Sessional Papers - 1888

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG NOV1887 - DEC 1888

Table of Contents

1. Assessment

Assessor's Report on the assessment for 1888-9

2. Births and Deaths

Returns of Births and Deaths for the Year 1887

3. Blue Book

Report on the Blue Book and Departmental Reports for 1887

4. Botanical and afforestation

Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and afforestation Department for 1887

5. Coins

Papers Relating to the Importation of Subsidiary Coins. Presented to the Legislative Council, By Command of His Excellency the Governor

6. Colonial Surgeon

Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1887

7. Courts

Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1887

8. Education

Education Report for 1887

9. Estimates

Message of His Excellency the Governor (Sir G. William Des Voeux, K.C.M.G.) to the Legislative Council in Connection With Estimates for 1889

10. Fever Prevailing in the Western District

Report of the Commissioners appointed By His Excellency Sir G. William Des Voeux, K.C.M.G. to Enquire into the Cause of the Fever Prevailing in the Western District together With the Minutes of Evidence Taken Before the Commission (Blue Book)

11. Finance Committee

Report of Proceedings of the Finance Committee, at a Meeting Held in the Council Chamber, Hong Kong, on the 19th November 1887

12. Fire Bridage

Report of the Superintendent of Fire Brigade for 1887

13. Government Central School

Annual Report of the Head Master of the Government Central School for 1887 Presented to the Legislative Council, By Command of His Excellency the Governor

14. Harbour Master

Harbour Master's Report for 1887

15. Interpretation

Report on interpretation, Presented to the Legislative Council, By Command of His Excellency the Governor

16. Legislative Council

Proceedings

17. Lighthouse on Gap Rock

Correspondence Respecting a Proposed Lighthouse on Gap Rock (In Continuation of No.20 of 1887)

18. Lighthouse on Gap Rock

Proposed Lighthouse on Gap Rock (In Continuation of No.20 of 1887, and No.10 of 1888)

19. Main-Drainage

Report on the Separate System of Main-Drainage

20. Observatory

Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1887

21. Police

Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for 1887 Presented to the Legislative Council, By Command of His Excellency the Governor

22. Postmaster General

Postmaster General's Report for 1887 Present to the Legislative Council, By Command of His Excellency the Governor

23. Praya Reclamation Scheme

Correspondence Respecting the Praya Reclamation Scheme

24. Receipts and Payments, 1887

Statement Showing the total Receipts and Payments in the Year 1887

25. Tonnage

Return of tonnage, & C, Entered the Colony in 1887. Presented to the Legislative Council, By Command of His Excellency the Governor

26. Victoria Gaol

Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol for 1887

 

WITHDRAWN 28.MAY 1981

26557

July 3014+ 1930

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

WEDNESDAY, 2ND NOVEMBER, 1887.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL), vice His Honour SIR GEORGE

PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

*1

A

""

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD) vice the Honour-

able EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY, on leave.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE). HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, (vice the Honourable FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON,

on leave).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE, (by leave).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd September last, were read and confirmed. SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1886.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of

; Bill.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

The Colonial Secretary gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move the nd reading of the Bill.

✔APPROPRIATION BILL FOR 1888.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

The Colonial Secretary gave notice that, at the next meeting of the Council, he would move the cond reading of the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Tuesday, the 8th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of November, 1887.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

די

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

WEDNESDAY, 16TH NOVEMBEṚ, 1887.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL), vice His Honour SIR GEORGE

PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

""

27

1)

"

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD) vice the Honour-

able EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY, on leave.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE). HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, (vice the Honourable FREDERICK DAvid Sassoon,

on leave).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

""

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

""

ABSENT:

D

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE, (by leave).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd instant, were read and confirmed.

MESSAGE FROM HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.—Read the following message from His Excel- lency the Governor :-

16th November, 1887..

HONOURABLE MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,-I have had the honour to cause to be laid on the table of the Legislative Council the Estimates of revenue and expenditure for 1888, and I would request your special attention to them, inasmuch as after so short a residence in the Colony, my views as to the items appearing therein, and as to the omission of others, which have been proposed, may very possibly be modified under the light of your local experience.

The report of the Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General on these Estimates deals generally with their contents. More specific explanation will be given orally in Council to those Members who desire it.

I deem it well, however, to note here that there has, by an oversight, been omitted from the Estimates of expenditure an item for a lighthouse to be situated either at the Gap Rock or on some other spot, as may be settled with the Imperial Government of China; and I take the opportunity of saying that this important subject is engaging my earnest attention.

The amount of $30,000 set down for this item is as large a sum as can probably be expended on the object in question during the coming year.

I am glad to be able to congratulate you on the satisfactory financial position of the Colony. Though the balance to credit which is expected at the end of the year 1888 is not a large one, owing to the heavy demands for works involving extraordinary expenditure, the revenue is steadily increasing. with good promise of still further increase; while it will pro- bably receive a large accession in 1889 on the conclusion of the present opium contract. Several important works, such as a New Sheep Market, Slaughter Houses both in Victoria and Kowloon, and Public Laundries which are required to meet the increasing needs of the Colony, will have to be undertaken, as soon as these expectations approach somewhat neare to realisation.

CORRESPONDENCE FROM COAST PORTS.-DELAY IN DELIVERY OF-Mr. MACEWEN, in accordanc with notice. asked the Postmaster General, Whether it is correct that Correspondence from Coas Ports arriving unpaid is subjected to a delay of many hours before delivery ensues, in addition to bein charged with double postage rates.

The Honourable the Treasurer replied, That correspondence which, by some inadvertance of the sender is insufficiently prepaid, is delivered with as little delay as possible; but that which in contra- vention of postal regulations, is despatched by the sender without any attempt at prepayment, is allowed to stand over until it can be dealt with without unduly delaying the paid contents of the Mails. Insufficient postage is doubled under all circumstances. Instead of many hours it would be more correct to say some hours.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1886.--The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill, and laid on the table the Supplementary Estimates for 1886.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

APPROPRIATION BILL FOR 1888.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill, and laid upon the table the draft Estimates for 1888.

Captain THOMSETT, seconded.

Mr. MACEWEN addressed the Council.

The Treasurer addressed the Council.

The Governor addressed the Council. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee.

Captain THOMSETT seconded.

Question-put and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of November, 1887.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

WEDNESDAY, 30TH NOVEMBER, 1887.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD) vice the Honour-

able EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY, on leave.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

""

11

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE). HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

5

WONG SHING..

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

"J

"

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

13

ABSENT:

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL), vice His Honour SIR GEORGE

PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE, (on leave).

1)

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, (vice the Honourable FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON,

on leave).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the Minutes of His Excellency the Governor recommending the following Votes in excess of the Estimates for 1887:--

C.S.O. 1901 of 1887.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Surveyor General.

(1.) Salary and allowance to Land Surveyor in the Public Works Department,

viz.:

Salary from 1st July to 30th November, 1887, at $2,520 per annum, $1,050.00 Allowance for Chair hire from 1st July to 30th November, at $24

per month,

120.00

C. O. Desp. 117 of 1887.

C.5.0. 2008 of 1887.

Surveyor General.-Sanitary Sub-Department.

Inspector of Live Stock.

(2.) Salary from 8th September to 23rd October, 1887, (during voyage), at $900

per annum,

From 24th October to 30th November, at $2,400 per annum, Allowance for Chair hire from 24th October to 30th November, at $12 per

month,...

Harbour Master.

(3.) Pay of Crew and other contingent expenses of the Steam-launch Stanley,

(formerly Victoria), viz.:~

Engineer at $30 per month for 10 months,.

Fireman at $15

>>

>>

Coxswain at $10

""

**

3 Sailors at $ 7 each

>>

>>

""

.....

Coal, Oil, Water, &c. for 10 months,.

Moorings,

$1,170.00

$ 113.15 251.61

15.10

$ 379.86

..$ 300.00

150.00

100.00

210.00

$ 760.00 3.130.00

25.00

$ 3,915.00

Ь

C.S.O.

1526 of 1887.

C.S.O.

2658 of 1887.

C.S.O. 2530 of 1887.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Medical.

(4.) General overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and

hire of a Steam-launch while the repairs are being executed,

Works and Buildings.

(5.) Additional vote for repairs to buildings.

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

(6.) New posts and rails for the Garrison Parade Ground,

Miscellaneous Services.

.$ 325.00

.$2,200.00

...$ 500.00

C.S.0.

1499 of 1887.

C.S.O. 1404 of 1887,

(7.) Expenses connected with the celebration of H. M. Jubilee, viz.:-

Jubilee Service held in the Cathedral,

Illuminations of Government buildings, Employment of additional Police Constables,

Employment of Coolies at Fire Brigade Stations,

Colonial Exhibition.

8.) Re-vote of amounts voted in 1885 and 1886, as contributions towards the

expenses connected with the Indian and Colonial Exhibition, viz.:-

£500 voted in 1885 @ 3/5,

£275.11.0 out of £2,000 voted in 1886 @ 3/3,

$5,000.00

=$2,926.82

1,695.94

$4,622.76

C.S.O. 2623 of 1887.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURES.

Extraordinary Works.

(9.) Repairs to damages from land-slips, fall of walls, injuries to culverts, and other damages caused by the heavy rainstorms and freshets during the rainy season of the year,.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

$6,813.00

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee (No. 18) having reference to the Supplementary Estimates, 1886, and the Estimates 1887.

The Governor addressed the Council on the several suggestions made in the Report.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1886.-On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, seconded

by the Treasurer, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, seconded by the Treasurer, the Bill was then read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance No. 25 of 1887.

PROPOSED FURTHER LOAN-The Governor addressed the Council on the desirability of raising a further Loan to provide for remunerative Public Works.

7

Colon

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1888.-On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, seconded by the Treasurer, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, seconded by the Treasurer, the Bill was then read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance No. 26 of 1887..

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 13th day of January, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

FRIDAY, 13TH JANUARY, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD) vice the Honour-

able EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY, on leave.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

""

*)

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE). HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

WONG SHING.

""

""

A

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, (vice the Honourable FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON,

on leave).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th November last, were read and confirmed. VOTES OF MONEY PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 19), held on the 30th November last, and moved that the following items referred to therein be passed:-

C.S.0.

1901 of 1887.

C. O. Desp. 117 of 1887.

ESTABLISHMENTS. Surveyor General.

(1.) Salary and allowance to Land Surveyor in the Public Works Department,

viz.:

Salary from 1st July to 30th November, 1887, at $2,520 per annum, $1,050.00 Allowance for Chair hire from 1st July to 30th November, at $24

per month,

Surveyor General.-Sanitary Sub-Department. Inspector of Live Stock.

(2.) Salary from 8th September to 23rd October, 1887, (during voyage), at $900

per annum,

From 24th October to 30th November, at $2,400 per annum, Allowance for Chair hire from 24th October to 30th November, at $12 per

month,.....

120.00

$1,170.00

$ 113.15 251.61

15.10

$ 379.86

Harbour Master.

C.S.O.

2008 of 1887. (3.) Pay of Crew and other contingent expenses of the Steam-launch Stanley,

(formerly Victoria), viz.:--

Engineer at $30 per month for 10 months,

Fireman at $15

""

>>

""

Coxswain at $10

"}

""

3 Sailors at $ 7 each

""

""

Coal, Oil, Water, &c. for 10 months,.. Moorings,

.$ 300.00

150.00

100.00

210.00

$ 760.00

3,130.00 .25.00

$ 3,915.00

10

C.S.O.

1526 of 1887.

C.S.O. 2658 of 1887.

C.S.O. 2530 of 1887.

C.S.O.

1492 of 1887.

C.S.O.

1404 of 1887.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Medical.

(4.) General overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and

hire of a Steam-launch while the repairs are being executed,

Works and Buildings.

(5.) Additional vote for repairs to buildings,

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

6.) New posts and rails for the Garrison Parade Ground,

Miscellaneous Services.

(7.) Expenses connected with the celebration of H. M. Jubilee, viz.:—

Jubilee Service held in the Cathedral,. Illuminations of Government buildings, Employment of additional Police Constables, Employment of Coolies at Fire Brigade Stations...

Colonial Exhibition.

(S.) Re-vote of amounts voted in 1885 and 1886, as contributions towards the

expenses connected with the Indian and Colonial Exhibition, viz.:—

£500 voted in 1885 @ 3/5,

£275.11.0 out of £2,000 voted in 1886 @ 3/3,

.$ 325.00

$2,200.00

.$ 500.00

$5.000.00

$2,926.82

= 1,695.94

$4,622.76

C.8.0.

2623 of 1887,

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDItures.

Extraordinary Works.

(9.) Repairs to damages from land-slips, fall of walls, injuries to culverts, and other damages caused by the heavy rainstorms and freshets during the rainy season of the year,...

The Treasurer.seconded.

Question-put and passed.

$6,813.00

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Honourable the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a first time:-

(a.) The Cathedral Ordinance, 1888.

(b.) The Vagrancy Ordinance, 1888.

(c.) An Ordinance to provide for the preservation of copies of Books printed in Hongkong, and

for the registration of such Books.

(d.) An Ordinance to amend the Reformatory Schools Ordinance, 1886.

(e.) The Regulation of Chinese Ordinance, 1888.

(f.) An Ordinance prohibiting the Enclosure of Verandahs erected over Crown Lands.

(g.) An Ordinance for the Registration of Imports and Exports.

(h.) The Trees Preservation Ordinance, 1888.

(i.) The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1888.

(j) An Ordinance to amend the Crown Remedies Ordinance, 1875.

(k.) The Official Signatures Fees Ordinance, 1888.

(1.) An Ordinance for the naturalization of FRITZ ADOLPH FRICCIUS GROBIEN.

(m.) An Ordinance for the naturalization of HILLUNE LOO NGAWK alias Loo KIU FUNG. (n.) An Ordinance for the naturalization of LAI SHANG alias LAI CHEK KÜN. (0.) An Ordinance for the naturalization of LAI KIT, alias LAI CHEUK. (p.) An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No 15 of 1886.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 20th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of January, 1888.

ARATHOON Seth, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

1

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

WEDNESDAY, 25TH JANUARY, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

the Attorney General, EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.

""

27

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

17

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE). HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

""

""

}

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

""

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

"}

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

SWEARING IN OF MEMBERS.-Mr. H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., and Mr. A. P. MACEWEN, were, pursuant to Her Majesty's Warrants dated respectively the 11th October, 1887, and 8th December, 1887, duly sworn in and admitted as Members of the Council.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th instant, were read and confirmed.

QUESTIONS. Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice asked:---

in

What washing arrangement is made to keep the clothes of Small-pox Patients at the Government

Hospitals from contaminating the clothes of the general public?

Is there any system of disinfection of said clothes such as a disinfecting Chamber?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED THE DEFENCES SKETCHING PREVENTION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE PROHIBITING THE ENCLOSURE OF VERANDAHS ERECTED OVER CROWN LANDS.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

Mr. RYRIE then proposed that the going into Committee on this Bill be postponed.

Mr. BELL-IRVING seconded.

Question-put and passed.

12

BILL ENTITLED THE OFFICIAL SIGNATURES FEES ORDINANCE, 1888.--The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF FRITZ ADOLPH FRICCIUS GROBIEN.- The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretery seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF HILLUNE Loo NGAWK otherwise Loo KIU FUNG.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI SHANG otherwise LAI CHEK KÜN.-- The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill,

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI KIT otherwise LAI CHEUK.--The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 3rd proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of February, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

13

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

FRIDAY, 3RD FEBRUARY, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave!

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

""

HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

WONG SHING.

""

་་

""

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

FINANCE COMMITTEE MEETINGS.--Read the following Message from His Excellency the Governor:-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor has given his careful consideration, in Council, to the question recently raised by the Honourable Mr. MACEWEN with regard to the sittings of the Finance Committee. He is informed that for a long time past, nothing has occurred at any of the meetings of the Committee, which might have not been published without prejudice to the Public Service, and he moreover strongly sympathizes with the view that discussions on votes of public money should, as a rule, be held in public. On the other hand the practice of private sittings has the sanction of long usage, and though the advantages which it possesses, or the conditions that make it expedient, are not for the moment apparent, they must be presumed at one time to have existed and as therefore possible of recurrence. For this reason the Governor does not feel justified in sanctioning a complete alteration of the practice at once, but thinks that an experiment may safely be tried, which while making a sensible advance towards publicity, will permit of private sittings when they appear for any reason expedient.

It is proposed therefore that for the future the meetings of the Finance Committee shall, as a rule, be held with open doors, and that all votes be passed in public, it being however competent for any member, either by previous notice or otherwise, to secure a private discus- sion of such vote or votes as may appear to him to require it. As the principal reasons for or against every vote can under such a system always be elicited in the public hearing, either in the Finance Committee or in the Legislative Council, it is hoped that all reasonable de- mands for publicity will thus be satisfied.

On the other hand in the event, which the Governor does not deem probable, of the new practice proving by experience to have inconveniences which outweigh its obvious advan- tages, it will not be found difficult to return to that which has been hitherto followed.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd February, 1888.

SUBSIDIARY COINS.—Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice made the following motion and addressed the Council:-

That in consequence of the frequent inconvenience caused to the Public owing to the insuffi- ciency of the supply of Small Coins, the Council recommend increased quantities to be regularly

Mr. MacEwen will also move for previous correspondence on the subject. Mr. RYRIE seconded, and addressed the Council.

sent out.

The Treasurer addressed the Council.

The Governor addressed the Council.

14

At the suggestion of the Governor, the Colonial Secretary moved that the Council resolve itselt into Committee in order to give greater scope for discussion of the question.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Discussion ensued in Committee, and His Excellency stated that he would give the subject early consideration and lay it before the Secretary of State.

The Council then resumed and proceeded with the other business of the day.

BILL ENTITLED THE VACCINATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved, and the Colonial Secretary seconded, the first reading of this Bill.

Question--put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General then moved, and the Colonial Secretary seconded, that the Standing Orders be suspended and the Bill be read a second time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 1 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED THE DEFENCES SKETCHING PREVENTION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 2 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED THE UNCLAIMED BALANCES ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General informed the Council that owing to some additions which will have to be made in this Bill it will be necessary to substitute it by another Bill, and therefore asked permission to withdraw this one.

Bill withdrawn.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CROWN REMEDIES ORDINANCE, 1875.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 3 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE PROHIBITING THE ENCLOSURE OF VERANDAHS ERECTED OVER CROWN LANDS.-The Attorney General moved that the Bill be recommitted.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with the addition of a clause.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 4 of 1888.

}

}

>

[

15

BILL ENTITLED THE OFFICIAL SIGNATURES FEES ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 5 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF FRITZ ADOLPH FRICCIUS GROBIEN. The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 6 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF HILLUNE LOO NGAWK otherwise Loo KIU FUNG.The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 7 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI SHANG otherwise LAI CHEK KÜN.—— The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 8 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI KIT otherwise LAI CHEUK.--The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 9 of 1888.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 8th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of February, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

WEDNESDAY, 8TH FEBRUARY; 1888.

17

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.,

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

A

>>

""

""

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

WONG SHING.

71

""

.་

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE), by permission.

"}

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd instant, were read and confirmed. PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :--

Annual Report of the Head Master of the Government Central School for 1887.—(No. 3). BILL ENTITLED THE UNCLAIMED BALANCES ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General explained that this Bill was substituted for the one withdrawn at last meeting, and moved that it be read a first time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF COPIES OF BOOKS PRINTED IN HONGKONG, AND FOR THE REGISTRATION OF SUCH BOOKS.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 10 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED THE VAGRANCY ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second anding of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

18

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.-The Attorney General moved that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. RYRIE moved a postponement, and addressed the Council.

Mr. BELL-IRVING seconded, and addressed the Council.

At the suggestion of His Excellency the Governor, the Colonial Secretary moved that the Council go into Committee in order that the question may be more freely discussed.

Question-put and passed.

Discussion ensued in Committee.

Further consideration of the Bill postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 16th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of February, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

19

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

THURSDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

"

""

""

""

11

""

27

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Harbour Master, (HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL Chater.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

SWEARING IN OF MEMBER.-Mr. CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, having been elected by the Justices of the Peace to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. F. D. SASSOON, was duly sworn in

and admitted a Member of the Council.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th instant, were read and confirmed.

K

PAPER. The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper:-

Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for 1887. (No. 3).

BILL ENTITLED THE STAMP DUTIES AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Treasurer moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE UNCLAIMED BALANCES ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with some verbal amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 11 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED THE VAGRANCY ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resume consideration, in Committee, of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Council went into Committee.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 12 of 1888.

20

JURY LIST, 1888.-Strangers having retired by request, the Council proceeded to consider the Jury List for 1888.

The List was duly revised, corrected, and the Special Jurors designated in terms of Section 4 of Ordinance 24 of 1882.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Tuesday, the 28th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of February, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

:

21

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

TUESDAY, 28TH FEBRUARY, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), rice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

"" -

""

A

:

51

""

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JoHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Harbour Master, (HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

SWEARING IN OF MEMBER.Mr. JOHN BELL-IRVING, was, pursuant to Her Majesty's Warrant dated the 7th January, 1888, duly sworn in and adinitted a Member of the Council, in the room of Mr. WILLIAM KESWICK, resigned.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th instant, were read and confirmed.

C. O. Desp. No. 5 of 10th

PAPERS.-Read a Despatch from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Jan., 1888. Colonies respecting the recent Jubilee celebrations in the Colony, and expressing Her Majesty's deep regret at the unfortunate incidents that occurred at the time.

The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the follow- ing paper :--

Return of Tonnage, &c. entered the Colony in 1887. (No.).

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor:--

C.S.0.

2043 of 1887.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recomiends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred Dollars as a $300. Colonial contribution towards the maintenance of the Royal Naval Seamen's Club.

C.S.0.

2791 of 1887,

and

It is not unusual for Colonies, the water of which are frequented by Her Majesty's ships, to give assistance to similar institutions, which provide amusement, food, and lodging for the Seamen, and thus attract them from undesirable and injurious places of resort.

The Commodore has represented the difficulty of maintaning this Club on account of the heavy cost of rent and taxes, and has requested the remission of the latter. But while deeming it right to give some assistance in recognition of the usefulness of the institution, the Governor regards this particular form of concession as likely to become an inconvenient precedent, and he therefore recommends the above vote, the amount of which is the same as the contribution of the Admiralty.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, for the salaries of Collector, Assistant Collector and Coolie employed in the Treasury $58s. for collecting Village Taxes and Squatter's Licence Fees.

395 of 1988.

These items were inadvertently omitted in the Treasurer's Estimates for 1888.

Collector,

Assistant Collector,......

Coolie,

Government House, Hongkong, 27th February, 1888.

..$ 240.00

240.00 108.00

$ 588.00

22

(3.)

C.S.O.

2838 of 1887.

$210.

C.S.O.

2885 of 1887, and

36 of 1988.

$25.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and forty Dollars as an allowance for a Mandarin Teacher for Messrs. MAY and SERCOMBE SMITH, at the rate of $20 per month.

This was inadvertently omitted in the Registrar General's Estimates for 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th February, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-four Dollars, as additional pay to the Gate-keeper of the Government Civil Hospital.

The salary of the late Chinese Gate-keeper was $8 per month, the Superintendent recom- mended that an Indian should be employed at the salary of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th February, 1888.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE TREES PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Treasurer moved the first reading of this

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE REGULATION OF CHINESE ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Monday, the 5th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of March, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX,

Governor.

*

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10. COUNCIL, No. 10.

MONDAY, 5TH MARCH, 1888.

23

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VOUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

"}

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY). the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

1

>>

"}

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

>"

the Harbour Master, (HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, PHINEAS RYRIE.

R.N.).

"

>>

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 20), held on the 28th ultimo, and moved that the following items referred to therein be passed:—

C.S.O. 2791 of 1887,

and

395 of 1888.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Treasurer.

Salaries of Collector, Assistant Collector, and Coolie employed in the Treasury for collecting

Village Taxes and Squatter's Licence Fees:-

Collector,

for 12 months,

Assistant Collector, Coolie,

""

21

Registrar General.

..$ 240.00

240.00

108.00

$ 588.00

C.S.O. 2838 of 1887,

C.S.O.

2885 of 1887, and

56 of 1888.

Allowance for a Mandarin Teacher for Messrs. MAY and SERCOMBE SMITH, at $20

per month, for 12 months,.

Medical.

Additional salary to the Gate-keeper of the Civil Hospital, $2 per month, 12

months,

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Miscellaneous Services.

$ 240.00

$ 24.00

C.S. Contribution towards the maintenance of the Royal Naval Seamen's Club, ............$ 300 00

2043 of 1887.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

Papers relating to the Importation of Subsidiary Coins. (No.).

24

BILL ENTITLED THE STAMP DUTIES AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Treasurer moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded:

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with the addition of a clause.

BILL ENTITLED THE TREES PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Treasurer moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED THE REGULATION Of Chinese OrdinaNCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance No. 13 of 1888.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 23rd instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of March, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

{

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, NO. 11.

TUESDAY, 27TH MARCH, 1888.

55

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

>>

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

"}

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

1)

""

"}

""

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th instant, were read and confirmed.

SWEARING IN OF MEMBER.-Mr. WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, Captain Superintendent of Police, was sworn in to act, provisionally, as an Official Member of the Council.

BILL ENTITLED THE EUROPEAN DISTRICT RESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-Read the following Message from His Excellency the Governor :-

The Governor has directed to be introduced to the Legislative Council an Ordinance for the reservation of a European district in the town of Victoria. The object of this proposed law is fully stated in the preamble, which has been inserted in the Ordinance, as follows:- "Whereas the health and comfort of Europeans in a tropical climate demand conditions which are inconsistent with the neighbourhood of houses crowded with occupants and otherwise used after the manner customary with the Chinese inhabitants, and whereas the influx of Chinese into the Colony tends constantly to narrow the area of the City of Victoria where such conditions are attainable, and it is desirable to reserve by law a district wherein such conditions may be secured: Be it enacted by the Governor of Hongkong, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council thereof." The correctness of these statements is too well known to need further elucidation. The rapid influx of Chinese into this Colony, where they find facilities of acquiring, and especially of retaining property, which are, to say the least, not universally present in their own country, creates an increasing temptation to land-owners to pull down houses adapted for European habitation, and to erect Chinese houses in their place, which, as providing for a far larger number of people within the same area, offer the prospect of greater profits from rent. This substitution is now going on at such a rate that, in the absence of some effective check, the time is being brought within measurable distance when all but the richer European who can afford the occupation of land of exceptionally high value, will be driven altogether out of the town of Victoria, or compelled to live there under conditions far more prejudicial to their health than those already presented by the tropical climate. In view of the fact that a large leaven of Europeans is, and (in so far as can be foreseen) for a very long time will be, necessary to the well-being of the Chinese themselves, the practical exclusion from the principal town of Hongkong of those whose liberal institutions and whose indomitable energy and preseverance has transformed a bare uninhabited rock into a beautiful city and an emporium of trade second to very few others in the world, would be not merely a sentimental grievance, but a real calamity to all persons without exception who are concerned in the welfare of the Colony. With a view to prevent this undesirable result the Ordinance in question has been drafted for the reservation of a European district in Victoria. The district indicated (the actual limits of which will of course be subject to modification in Council, even if the general principle of the law be approved) is one which has always been occupied by European houses, almost without exception, so that there will be no disturbance of present conditions; and the only change proposed is the prohibition for the future of what has not actually taken place in the past, viz., the erection there of what are known as Chinese houses by large numbers of people after

26

A

the manner usual with Chinese. Under ordinary circumstances this limitation of the rights of ownership would probably be held to involve the obligation of granting compensation. There are, however, reasons which seem to remove this obligation in the present case. certain clause in the leases, under which property in this and other districts is held, has in the past been construed both by the leaseholders and by the Government as leaving to the Crown a discretion to grant, or refuse, permission for the building of houses of a different character from those previously erected; and as a matter of fact when the substitution of Chinese for European houses was in contemplation the permission of the Government has again and again been asked and has even occasionally been refused. As there has never been any legal decision on the point, this meaning of the clause may, or may not, be correct; but at all events it is one which has been generally accepted; and there is even an opening for doubt whether a single one of the leaseholders acquired his property in the belief that it had attached to it the right which, if it ever existed at all it is now proposed to withdraw. Another objection which may possibly be raised to the Ordinance is that it is what is commonly called "class-legislation." But apart from the improbability that the Governor would give his sanction to any measure involving this reproach, a very slight consideration will show that it is in no way open to it. A certain district is to be preserved in a condition such as to render it possible for Europeans to continue to live there in health; but there is nothing in the law to prevent Chinese from living there also so long as their habitation is of a character consistent with that condition. The rights of all races will thus be not less equal in this district than elsewhere, and this law so far from injuriously affecting Chinese, will as a matter of fact, be a benefit to them in common with the rest of the community, for the prevention within the prescribed district of the overcrowding which is prevalent else- where secures in permanence a comparatively open space, or what is commonly called a "lung," for the densely populated town of Victoria, and is thus more or less beneficial to the health of all the inhabitants.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a first time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

AUDITING OF DEFENCES ACCOUNTS.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked:--

Whether

any

local audit is made of the sums contributed to the Military Authorities for the defence works of the Colony?

The Colonial Secretary replied

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the following papers:---

Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol for 1887. (No. 3).

Statement showing the total Receipts and Payments in the Year 1887. (No. 5).

BILL ENTITLED THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Treasurer moved that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

BILL ENTITLED THE TREES PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed and numbered as Ordinance No 14 of 1888.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 4th proximo, at 4 P.M.

I

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of April, 1888.

ARATHOON SETHI, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

WEDNESDAY, 4TH APRIL, 1888.

27

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

"}

45

130

>>

"}

">

""

the Attorney General, (Edward LOUGHLIN O'Malley

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

24 of 1888.

CO Desp: QUEEN'S JUBILEE. CHINESE ADDRESS. Read a Despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies acknowledging the receipt of the Address from the Chinese Community together with the pieces of Embroidery presented by the Nampak-hong Merchants and the Lodging House Guild on the occasion of the Queen's Jubilee, and conveying Her Majesty's gracious acceptance of the same.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

691 of 1888. $25,000.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

C.S.0. The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-five thousand Dollars, to be paid to the Jubilee Committee as a contribution towards the celebration and commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of Her Majesty's reign,

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

$25,000.00

(2.)

..$

770.00

C.S.O. 2715 of 1887. $770.

.C.S.O.

2308 of 1887,

and

C. O. Desp. No. 6 of 13th Jan., 1888.

$300.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and seventy Dollars, for the conversion of Boatmen's quarters in the Harbour Office into Offices for the Imports and Exports Departinent,

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred Dollars, being a Building-grant to the Basel Mission Public School, to enable the Manager to enlarge and improve it,

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

300.00

1

28

(4.)

707 of

$270.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

CS.1888. The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and seventy Dollars, as an allowance for House-rent in lieu of quarters, to the Head Gardener in the Botanical and Afforestation Department, the quarters now occupied by him being required for Departmental purposes.

Allowance from 1st April to 31st December, 1888, nine months at $30 per month,.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Treasurer seconded,

Question-put and passed.

I

270.00

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE RESERVATION OF A EUROPEAN DISTRICT IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA. The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported with the addition of a clause.

BILL ENTITLED THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888.-On the motion of the Treasurer, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Progress reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 11th instant, at 4 P.M.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 18th day of April, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

=

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

WEDNESDAY, 18TH APRIL, 1888.

29

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

"GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED Lister).

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the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 21), held on the 4th instant, and moved that the following items referred to therein be passed:--

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

C.S.O.

707 of 1888.

Government Gardens and Plantations.

Rent:-Allowance in lieu of quarters to the Head Gardener, from 1st April to 31st

December, 1888, nine months, at $30 per month,

Education.

c. o. Desp. Grants-in-aid :-Building-grant to the Basil Mission Public School,

No. 6 of 13th

Jan., 1888.

C.S.O.

2715 of 1887.

Works and Buildings.

.$ 270.00

...$ 300.00

Conversion of Boatmen's quarters at the Harbour Office into Offices for the Imports

and Exports Department,..

$

770.00

Miscellaneous Services.

C.S.O.

691 of 1888.

Government contribution towards the celebration and commemoration of the 50th

Anniversary of Her Majesty's reign. (Re-vote of 1887),

$25,000.00

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the following paper:-

The Educational Report for 1887. (No. 8).

INTERPRETATION.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice asked:--

Whether it is the intention of the Government to act up to the recommendations contained in the Commissioners Report on the subject of Interpretation, forwarded in September last year, which condemned in general terms the system in force in the various Government Departments. e Colonial Secretary replied.

ť

30

:

FIRE BRIGADE.--Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice moved :-

That, in view of the rapid development and extension of the City of Victoria, and the neces- sity that exists for greater protection against fire, a Commission be appointed to test the advisability of a thorough re-organisation of the Brigade.

Mr. RYRIE seconded and addressed the Council.

The Surveyor General addressed the Council.

The Treasurer addressed the Council,

The Governor addressed the Council.

The motion was allowed to stand.

BILL ENTITLED THE CORONER'S ABOLITION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888.-On the motion of the Treasurer, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED THE EUROPEAN DISTRICT RESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 25th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of April, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM Des Vœux,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

FRIDAY, 27TH APRIL, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

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the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

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་་

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE), by permission.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th instant, were read and confirmed. VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

2530 of 1887.

C.S.O.

703 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and sixty-five Dollars to defray the cost of new Posts and Rails on the Garrison Parade Ground.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and twenty Dollars for the salaries of four additional Clerks in the General Post Office, at $30 per month each, from 1st June to the end of the year.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1888.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the following papers:-

C.S.O.

964 of 1883.

Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1887. (No. ).

Correspondence respecting a proposed Lighthouse on Gap Rock. (No. 10).

FIRE BRIGADE.-Read a letter from the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade on the subject of the resolution moved by Mr. MACEWEN at the last Meeting.

BILL ENTITLED THE CORONER'S ABOLITION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

32

BILL ENTITLED THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 15 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED THE EUROPEAN DISTRICT RESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-On the motion of the Attorney General, this Bill was re-committed.

Bill reported with the addition of a clause.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 16 of 1888.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Monday, the 7th proximo, at 4 P.M.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of May, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

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=

33

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

MONDAY, 7TH MAY, 1888.

PRESENT:

No. 15.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

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the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, were read and confirined. VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

1045 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Five hundred and $2,595.60. Ninety-five Dollars, and Sixty Cents for the Members of the Fire Brigade, in order to provide

for each Member an amount equal to 30 per cent. of his yearly salary.

Experience has shown that the salaries of the Fire Brigade have become insufficient, in view of the increased size of the Town, and the greater frequency of fires; and in the absence of some increase to the remuneration, it will probably be impossible to maintain an effective. force.

On the other hand, the supply of water under high pressure, which may shortly be expected from the Tytam Water-Works, will very possibly lessen greatly the labours of the Brigade; and this contingency renders it inexpedient at the present time to make any permanent addition to the salaries.

Until the new water-supply has been available for a sufficient time to enable the extent of Fire Brigade service required under the new conditions to be fully ascertained, the Governor proposes therefore that the question of extra-remuneration each year shall be considered with reference to the work actually done; and he recommends the above sum as a bonus for the past year in consideration of the exceptionally severe work which has been required in consequence of the unusually large number of fires.

The addition of a fixed proportion to the salary of each Member of the Brigade has, no doubt, the disadvantage that some Members will, relatively to the service rendered, be remu- nerated better than others. This plan has however been recommended, after much considera- tion, as on the whole less objectionable than any other which has been devised.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1888.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee, (No. 22), held on the 27th ultimo, and moved that the following vote referred to therein be passed:

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

C.S.07 New Posts and Rails to Garrison Parade Ground,

2530 of 1887, $665.

.$ 565.00

As regards the vote for additional Clerks for the Post Office, the Colonial Secretary explained that it required further consideration by the Finance Committee.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

I

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CHINESE EMIGRATION TO AUSTRALIA.-Mr. MACEWEN, by permission, addressed the Council on the subject of the policy adopted by the Australian Government in preventing the immigration of Chinese subjects into the Australian Colonies.

The Governor replied.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked :—

The reason for the delay in the completion of Victoria College: whether the Surveyor General can name a fixed date when the Building will be ready for occupation.

The Governor said that he was not prepared to answer this question to-day, but hoped to be able to do so at the next meeting.

TYTAM WATER SUPPLY.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:---

Presuming that water will be supplied to the Town by next November, is there to be a new distribution for Fire extinguishing purposes, and, if so, by what date will it be completed? Is such distribution included in the present estimated cost of the Tytam Water-Works? If not, what will the extra cost amount to?

The Surveyor General replied.

PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE

Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked :---

What instructions the Government have received from the Colonial Office regarding the Public Health Bill which was passed by an official majority lust session and suspended from operation pending the receipt of such instructions?

The Governor replied.

DESTITUTE WOMEN AND GIRLS.—Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked :---

For a return of the number of destitute Women and Girls at present in the Colony under the protection of the Government, the return to show the number in charge of the Tung Wa Hospital Committee;

The Honourable Member also called attention to the unsatisfactory nature of the arrangements at present in force for keeping and maintaining rescued Women and Girls; and moved the following resolution on the subject,-

That the Government immediately take steps to build a home or shelter of refuge for these destitute women and girls in the Colony.

Mr. WONG SHING seconded.

The Colonial Secretary replied to the question.

The Governor said he would give the subject of the resolution his best consideration.

BILL ENTITLED THE ORONER'S ABOLITION ORDINANCE, 1888.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the, Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE FUGITIVE CRIMINALS EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 17th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of June, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

MONDAY, 4TH JUNE, 1888.

3.5-

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCÝ THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VOUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), rice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

""

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the Surveyor General, (JoпN MACNEILE PRICE).

"

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23

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

SWEARING IN OF MEMBER.-Mr. BENDYSHE LAYTON, having been nominated by the Chamber of Commerce to fill the vacancy caused by the temporary absence of Mr. MACEWEN, was duly sworn in and admitted a Member of the Council.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.-His Excellency replied to the question put by Mr. MACEWEN at the last Meeting.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

932 of 1888.

C.S.0.

1810 of 1887.

C.S.O.

2610 of 1887.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred Dollars, for building a room over the two cells at the Magistracy to keep scales, balances, &c. for testing weights and measures.

The room used for this purpose at the Central Market will shortly be pulled down. Government House, Hongkong, 10th May, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred Dollars, for the erection of a Telegraphic line between the Gap and Mount Gough Police Stations.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight hundred and Forty Dollars and Forty-one Cents, being compensation to Mr. EDMUND SHARP, for deficiency in area of Inland Lot No. 670 at Belcher's Bay,

Overcharge of Crown Rent,

Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1888.

.$ 782.22 58.19

$840.41

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

:

36

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee, (No. 23), held on the 7th ultimo, and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed:- ESTABLISHMENTS.

C.S.O. 1046 of 1888.

C.S.O.

1045 of 1888.

Postmaster General.

Additional Clerks for 6 months from June 1st 1888,

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Fire Brigade.

...$ 720.00

Bonus to Members of the Fire Brigade, at the rate of 30% of their yearly salary,...$2,595.60

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

LUNATIC ASYLUM FOR CHINESE.-Referring to Mr. MACEWEN'S remarks at the last meeting, His Excellency addressed the Council in favour of the establishment of a Lunatic Asylum for Chinese.

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the following papers:-

(1.) Report of the Superintendent of Fire Brigade for 1887. (No. 1).

(2.) Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1887. (No. 1).

BILL ENTITLED THE FIRE ENQUIRY ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE CORONER'S ABOLITION ORDINANCE, 1888.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 17 of 1888.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Tuesday, the 12th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of August, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux,

Governor.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 17.

TUESDAY, 28TH AUGUST, 1888.

37

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

A

2:

་་

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th June last, were read and confirmed. GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE, GAP ROCK LIGHT-HOUSE.-Read the following Message from His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor has pleasure in directing to be laid on the table the further correspondence (other than confidential) which has taken place on the subject of the proposed Light-house at the Gap Rock.

Though none of the alternative proposals recently submitted by the Governor to the Chinese Government were considered altogether free from objection, an arrangement based on them has, nevertheless, been arrived at which practically secures the object in view, viz. : the improvement of the Southern approach to Hongkong by the erection of a Light-house and the maintenance of a Light at a point where this convenience to shipping has long been very urgently required, and on the site which all competent authority regards as the best for the purpose.

This arrangement is not in all respects such as might be desired; but there is excellent reason for believing that it is the most favourable that can be obtained, and that unless it were accepted, the attainment of the end desired would again be indefinitely postponed.

In this view of the arrangement, the Governor feels bound to make public acknowledg- ment of the service rendered, in devising and proposing it, by Sir ROBERT HART, the able Inspector-General of the Chinese Imperial Customs, who has thus found the means of further- ing the interest of British trade while at the same time loyally conforming to the very natural and intelligible prejudices of the Chinese Government.

And while recognizing the means by which this benefit has been obtained, the Governor desires also to express his regret that any words used, or reported to have been used, by him in Council in connection with this question should have been considered as reflecting upon His Excellency Sir JOHN WALSHAM, Her Majesty's Minister at Pekin.

Nothing in the knowledge of the Governor has furnished any ground for such reflection; on the contrary he considers that Sir JOHN WALSHAM deserves the thanks of the Colony for taking the only course which was at all likely to achieve success, and for thus bringing to a satisfactory termination, a question which has been the subject of much futile correspondence with his predecessors.

In connection with this Gap Rock arrangement, the Governor had hoped to be able to secure another improvement in the lighting of the approaches to Hongkong by the removal to Waglan Island of the Light-house now at Cape D'Aguilar. But, though his efforts in this direction have so far proved unsuccessful, he does not propose to relinquish then, if such course be approved by the Council.

38

The erection of a Light-house at Waglan would be far less difficult than at Gap Rock; and it is possible therefore that the Chinese Government might be more easily induced to undertake the work with its own staff, if a sufficient subsidy were promised by this Colony..

But pending any such negotiation, the issue of which would of course be uncertain, the Governor considers that there should be no delay of the work at the Gap Rock, if the arrange- ment respecting it should meet with the approval of the Council, and receive the sanction. of the Secretary of State.

For this reason the proposal recently made (with a view to save time in construction) for placing a flashing Light at Waglan and a fixed Light at the Gap, will require to be abandoned; and it is deemed to be on the whole expedient to revert to the original plan of a flashing Light at the Gap. Placed at the same height there seems to be no doubt that a flashing Light would be much more useful than a fixed Light; and apparently Sir ROBERT HART, whose experience on the subject is entitled to very great weight, is of opinion that the greater height required for the former is a disadvantage which would not be sufficient to out- weigh this superiority.

The two Light-houses, if we should succeed in obtaining both, would thus be more costly than would have been the case if the Governor's proposal to include them in the same arrangement had met with success; but considering that there now annually enter the Port of Victoria vessels with an aggregate measurement of nearly six millions and a half of tons (a tonnage it may be remarked which according to the published returns is larger than that of the Ports of all the British Possessions on the Continent of America and larger also than that of the total of the three leading Colonies of Australia) and considering that the Southern is, if anything, the more important of the two approaches to the Island, it may be taken as certain that no expense which is at all likely to be incurred can be otherwise than very in- considerable by comparison with the advantage gained in the saving of time alone, and without reference to the losses of vessels directly attributable to the absence of Lights.

The cost which would have been saved to the shipping trade, if a Light at the Gap Rock had been provided at the time when the subject was first mooted would now amount to a sum which could probably be only expressed in hundreds of thousands of Pounds; and the Governor trusts therefore he has reason in congratulating the Council and the Colony that a want of such very great importance is at length to be supplied.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

By Command,

FREDERICK STEWART, Colonial Secretary.

Hongkong, 27th August, 1888.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 815 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirteen thousand Dollars for $13,000. the drainage of the Wongnaichung Valley.

C.S.O. 730 of 1888.

$46.

'C.S.O.

1428 of 1885.

out.

The advantages to be found by this proposed work are too well known to require pointing

Government House, Hongkong, 18th June, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Forty-six Dollars, to be awarded to members of the Police Force as Prizes for shooting.

The above amount was realised from the sale of empty ammunition boxes which the Police Authorities recommended should be devoted to prizes.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Thirty-one $531. Dollars for general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steamn-launch Blanche, and hire

of a Steam-launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1888.

*

(4.)

39

C.S.O.

1476 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred and Twenty-five $25. Dollars, for supplying and fixing a new Flag Staff complete, in front of the Harbour Master's

Office.

C.S.O. 1133 of 1888. $280.

C.S.O.

Y

1878 of 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

(5.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Eighty Dollars for the salary of an Overseer at the Peak, to prevent Contractors from removing stones, cutting earth, or turf on Crown land without permits, and ensuring that all regulations and conditions on the permits are strictly observed. 7 months at $40 per month, ...$ 280.00

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd August, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(6.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Dollars as an $1,000. additional vote to the Contingent expenditure of the Sanitary Department.

The vote on the Estimates has proved insufficient owing to the purchase of an unusually large quantity of disinfectants and to other expenses incurred in connection with the epidemic of small-pox in the early portion of the year, and the more recent prevalence of cholera.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th August, 1888.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee, (No. 24), held on the 4th June last, and moved that the following votes referred to therein be passed

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES FOR 1888.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Works and Buildings.

282 of 1888. Building a room over the two cells at the Magistracy to keep scales, balances, &c.

for testing weights and measures,...

C.3.0. 1810 of 1887.

...$400.00

Erection of a Telegraphic line between the Gap and Mount Gough Police Stations, ...$200.00

Miscellaneous Services.

2610 of 1887. Compensation to Mr. EDMUND SHARP, for deficiency in area of Inland Lot 670 at

Belcher's Bay, (Kennedytown),

Overcharge of Crown Rent on above,

The Acting Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

...$782.22 58.19

$ 840.41

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the following papers:-

(1.) Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1887.

(No. 18).

(2.) The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1887. (No. 1).

(3.) Returns of Births and Deaths for the year 1887. (No. 1).

(4.) The Assessor's Report on the Assessment for 1888-9. (No. 1).

(5.) The Harbour Master's Report for 1887. (No. 1).

(6.) Report on the Blue Book and Departmental Reports for 1887. (No. 18). (7.) Proposed Light-house on Gap Rock. (No. 1).

(8.) The Blue Book for 1887.

40

QUESTION.Mr. LAYTON, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

Is there any truth in the rumours to the effect that an order has been given that Mendicants are not to be arrested in the Colony; and that the burning of paper clothes in the streets by the Chinese is to go on unchecked?

His Excellency replied.

BILLS ENTITLED THE FRENCH MAIL STEAMERS ORDINANCE CONTINUATION ORDINANCE, 1888, AND THE GERMAN MAIL STEAMERS ORDINANCE CONTINUATION ORDINANCE. 1888.--At the suggestion of His Excellency the Governor that both Ordinances should be taken together, the Attorney General moved the first reading of these Bills.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Bills read a first time.

On the motion of the Attorney General the Standing Orders were suspended.

His Excellency then addressed the Council.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bills be read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. RYRIE opposed the motion, and addressed the Council.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question put-that the Bills be read a second time.

The Council divided:-

For

The Honourable the Captain Superintendent of

Police.

the Surveyor General.

Against

Honourable B. LAYTON.

""

J. BELL-IRVING. WONG SHING.

""

>>

the Acting Colonial Treasurer.

the Attorney General.

>>

the Colonial Secretary.

the Acting Chief Justice.

>>

P. RYRIE.

Motion carried by a majority of two.

Bills read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bills.

Bills reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bills be read a third time. Question-put and passed.

Bills read a third time.

Question put-that these Bills do pass.

Bills passed, and numbered respectively as Ordinances 18 and 19 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE IN CERTAIN CASES JUDICIAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO CAUSES OF FIRE.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and explained that it was in substitution of the Bill entitled The Fire Enquiry Ordinance, 1888, which was read a first time at the last Meeting.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.---The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 13th instant, at PM.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of October, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

41

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 18.

WEDNESDAY, 17TH OCTOBER, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

**

""

""

""

""

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th August last, were read and confirmed. GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. ESTIMATES, 1889.-Read the following Message from His Excellency the Governor:-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor has directed to be laid on the table for the consideration of the Legislative Council the Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure for 1889.

REVENUE.

With the taxation remaining as at present the Estimate of Ordinary Revenue would have been $1,740,818, or an increase of $303,148 as compared with the estimated, and of some $253,000 as compared with what will probably be the actual, Revenue of 1888, provision requiring to be made for the largely enhanced price obtained for the new Opium Farm Contract, which will affect nine months of the coming year, and also for substantial improvement in various other items, due principally to the rapidly growing population and increasing prosperity of the Colony, and also in part, as regards Assessed taxes, to more careful rating and better collection.

It will however be observed that the actual amount appearing as the estimate of Revenue is $1,737,718, the difference being produced as follows:-Deduction has been made, for reasons given below (i) of $1,100, the amount of tax now received annually from the crews (other than the headmen) of cargo-boats; and (ii) of $47,000 for re- ductions in the assessed rates; while addition has been required of a sum of $45,000, the estimated product of the additional shipping-rate to be levied for the cost of the Gap Rock Light-house.

As regards Extraordinary Receipts-chiefly derived from premiums on the sales of land-which as representing capital are rightly excluded from the accounts of Ordinary Revenue, the amount to be expected will largely depend on (i) the result of the strong representations which have been made by the Governor with the view to the removal of the Military restrictions on the sale of the sites above the Kennedy Road, and (ii) on the approval by Her Majesty's Government of the project, about to be submitted, for the Extension of the Praya in front of the Admiralty and War Office Reserves. Allow- ing however for this item $150,000 a sum likely to be realised under any circumstances, the total receipts of the year would amount to $1,887,718.

EXPENDITURE.

The Ordinary Expenditure is estimated at $1,394,665 or an increase of $62,472 as compared with that for 1888. The apparent increase in Departmental expenses of $91,808 is due, as regards $35,474, to votes for Scavenging and for the Lock Hospital, which have hitherto appeared under the head of Miscellaneous services, and are now transferred to the Sanitary and Medical Department respectively. The real increase under this head, $56,334 (principally due to the needs of the increasing population,) will be as usual explained in detail before the Finance Committee. Some of the principal items however deserve special notice.

42

Surveyor General.

The net increase of the votes for the establishment of this Department amounts in the aggregate to $16,708. The recommendations which involve this increase have been made only after careful consideration and consultation with Mr. PRICE, the Surveyor General, who, it may be remarked, will himself probably derive no benefit from them, as to the Governor's deep regret, the Colony is about to suffer the loss of his most valuable services, he having applied to retire on the ground of ill health.

The duties connected with the Public Works of Hongkong appear to be especially prejudicial to the health of the Officers. The occasions are rare during the hot season when several of the staff are not incapacitated by illness. During the last month no less than nine Officers at one time were unfit for duty, and many works are thereby unduly retarded. As one instance out of many, the Estimates for the Extension of the Praya in front of the Admiralty and War Office property have, owing to this cause, been delayed for several months; and it has therefore been impossible to submit to Her Majesty's Government the scheme for this long-delayed and supremely important improvement, which, the Governor is most glad to announce, received early in the year the concurrence of the local authorities, Civil, Naval and Military, (the question however of the proportion of the cost to be paid respectively by the Local and Imperial Governments remaining yet to be settled).

The staff as increased by these recommendations will, in the opinion of the Governor, be not more than sufficient for the work which will, under any circumstances, be required in the coming years. A still further, though temporary, addition to the strength of the Department will be required, if there should be an immediate commencement of all the Public Works to which reference is made below.

Police.

The increase of $10,684 in the votes for this Department is principally to supply an addition to the numbers of the Force, required to meet the growth of the population.

Gaols.

The additions to salaries in this Department are chiefly for the purpose of bringing about a very necessary improvement in the staff, the remuneration hitherto given having rarely proved sufficient to be a permanent attraction to good Officers. The increase to the salary of the Superintendent, the Governor has felt compelled to recommend for reasons which will be explained in Finance Committee.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE.

With Ordinary Revenue estimated at $1,737,718, and Ordinary Expenditure at $1,394,665, there is thus a balance of $343,053. Certain recommendations which the Governor intends to make to the Secretary of State, but which cannot be introduced into the Estimates without previous sanction, may possibly reduce this balance by a sum certainly not exceeding $60,000 leaving $283,053. Adding to this $150,000 which has been stated as likely under any circumstances to be realised from land-premiums, and $445,000 the probable balance in the Treasury at the end of the present year, there results a total of $878,053 available for the cost of Public Works and to meet unforeseen contingencies.

The Extraordinary Public Works specified in the List accompanying the Estimates are all of them urgently needed. The necessity for their being immediately undertaken no doubt differs in degree; but with the funds available, none of them, in the opinion of the Governor, can be commenced too soon. It will be seen that the utmost sum which is estimated as likely to be capable of being profitably expended on them during the coming year is $637,626. This amount can be readily afforded. For apart from the steady advance which is being shown in all the important items of Revenue, there will almost certainly be in 1890 a still larger surplus of Ordinary Revenue than in 1889, owing to the fact that the New Opium contract will be in force during the whole twelve, instead of only nine, months; while if, as there is reason to hope, the proposed works in connexion with the junction of the East and West Prayas should be, before that time, in progress, there would probably be largely increased receipts from Land-premiums, owing to the impetus which would thereby be given to building in the Eastern district of Victoria.

As regards most of these works, the mere mention of them by name is sufficient to suggest their necessity to residents of Hongkong. One of them, however, the Separate System of Drainage which happens to be the most costly, may possibly require further explanation.

The report of Mr. COOPER, the Sanitary Surveyor, on this subject fully supported as it is by the valuable opinion and judgment of the Surveyor General, has however

:

43

produced in the Governor as complete a conviction of the necessity of the work as can be justly entertained by one who is not an expert; and he is of opinion that if the view of our local Engineers should be approved by the eminent professional authorities in England, to whom the question will be referred, this Government would assume a very grave responsibility if it failed to make the earliest practicable commencement of the works proposed.

Besides the Public Works appearing on the List there are (i) some equally required which cannot be commenced at once, such as a New Harbour Office, which requires to be placed on the proposed Reclamation, and New Supreme Court Buildings, Post Office, and Registrar General's Office, all of which it is proposed to include with the other Government Offices in one large building to be erected on the site of the present North Barracks, and on the reclamation in front of it (the whole cost of these however being likely to be recouped by the sale of the sites of the present buildings); and (ii) others which, it may be hoped, will be commenced in the coming year; viz.:-

Extension of the Praya in front of the Admiralty and War Office

Reserves roughly estimated to cost, Government portion of Reclamation in front of the Town of Victoria, Reclamations in Kowloon, (first instalment),

Total,

...

$ 400,000

363,000

30,000

$793,000

Y

These however being all works, not merely remunerative as are some of the others, but such as will very quickly repay the whole of their cost with, in the case of the Re- clamations, a large profit in addition, the Governor is of opinion that there can be no reasonable objection to the provision of the required funds by loan, unless, as is by no means impossible, that course should prove unnecessary.

As regards borrowing funds for works which will benefit future generations as well as the present, especially such works as are of a remunerative character, the Governor believes that if the true position of this Colony were more fully known all reasonable objections against such a policy would be removed, and the interest required would moreover be reduced below the 4 per cent. which is the rate paid in respect of the last Loan. Considering the extremely small indebtedness of Hongkong with reference even to its immediately realisable assets, the Governor is decidedly of opinion that if there were necessity for borrowing a sum many times larger than is at all to be required, there could scarcely be offered more complete security for it.

For though the area of the Colony is small, its Crown lands are of an exceptional value, and a value which is morally certain to increase pari passu with the rapid growth of the population.

Without attaching undue weight to the many recent sales of land at distances of 14 to 2 miles from the town of Victoria at prices varying from 20 cents to 40 cents a square foot, or to the recent valuation (believed to be more than justified by existing market prices) of the reclamation about to be undertaken in front of the Praya at ($7,910,821, or including that in front of the Government property at) $9,714,777 it may in any case be fairly considered that these figures throw a useful light on the prospect of the future, if the Colony, as there is every reason to suppose it will, should continue to prove an attraction to the people of the neighbouring Empire.

In the absence of calamity impossible to foresee and on the presumption that the Government is wise enough to maintain the present freedom of trade, there can be no moral doubt that the 20,000 acres of unsold land in the Colony (most of which is as suitable, or not more unsuitable for building than was originally that which is now covered with houses) will eventually realise an enormous sum. Indeed at this moment, if the necessity were to arise for changing the present policy of selling without the condition of immediate building, and of thus abandoning to speculators the profit that will otherwise be reaped by the community, there would be little difficulty of obtaining from sales within a few weeks an aggregate sum equal to several times the amount of the annual Revenue of the Colony.

But besides the land, the Colony has a most valuable asset in its two magnificent systems of water works, which unlike similar works elsewhere have been entirely paid for out of income. These could readily be sold for more than their cost viz.: a quarter of a million Sterling, while the rent-charges on land already sold, would, if capitalised, produce about half a million more. When it is further considered that there is an entire absence of import-duty in connection with the trade of a port, which in respect of the tonnage of its shipping is certainly the 4th, if not the 3rd, in the world, there seems no reason why the credit of the Colony should not be at least as high as that of the Corpo- rations and Companies which borrow at 3; and it is with a view to assist towards that end that the Governor has made this special reference to the subject.

4

There would, however, be a difficulty about obtaining on the most favourable terms a loan which would be repaid in four or five years, short periods not being at all in favour with investors. Some of the funds might indeed be re-invested, as they were recouped in a road and tramway round the island at the edge of the water-a work which ought in any case to be commenced at no distant date-but even in that case, the expenditure would with equal quickness be returned from the development which would thereby be hastened of the resources of the island.

For this reason it would probably be advantageous that an arrangement should be made by which the bonds for any Loan that may prove to be required should not be issued to the public, unless the necessity for doing so actually arose, but should be deposited as security for temporary advances. By such a plan, if permitted by Her Majesty's Government, it appears to the Governor that the funds might be obtained at the Bank rate of interest; and it would have this further advantage to set against the possibility of a temporary rise of the Bank rate that it would obviate the necessity of borrowing more than was actually required at the moment. There may, as stated above, be no necessity to borrow at all, as the effective expenditure of the large surplus depends on uncertain conditions, and may not for various reasons prove practicable. In any case, the amount required on Loan cannot be estimated at the present moment. On the supposition that the highly remunerative works referred to above will be carried out by means of a Loan, it would have been quite possible to provide from the balance of ordinary Revenue and Land-premiums for the commencement, and for a con- siderable part of the construction, of another important work which must probably be very soon undertaken, viz., a New Gaol of sufficient size for the confinement of all the convicts on the separate system. This work will be a very costly one, the estimate for it being $420,000, or deducting $50,000, the sum likely to be realised from such portion of the present site as can be sold, $370,000. It is, however, one which is absolutely required if the present system is to be maintained under which there are always in con- finement and supported at the cost of the Colony, some three or four hundred aliens who have come here to practice their misdeeds from the neighbouring Empire. The Governor, indeed, believes that under the very exceptional conditions which present themselves here, there would be very fully justified a change substituting short and sharp punishments, followed by banishment, for long periods of imprisonment; in which case the number of prisoners would be so much reduced as to admit of the exclusive use of the Separate System in the present Gaol. But if, as is probable in the existing state of public opinion in England, Her Majesty's Government should be unable to sanction such a change, the provision of a new and much larger Gaol, would probably be an inevitable necessity. During the coming year the Governor intends to make strong representations on this subject; and meanwhile more time will be given to watch the effect of the severer discipline recently enforced, which has already much reduced the number of prisoners. And under any circumstances the building could not be under- taken at once without postponing a considerable number of the other proposed Works. For the Governor is advised that there will be much difficulty in obtaining the requisite number of sufficiently skilled native artisans even for the works on the list, and that it would on this account be impossible to provide for them and the new Gaol in addition.

It has been mentioned above that the balance of Ordinary Revenue cannot be es- timated with exactness owing to uncertainty as to the issue of certain recommendations which the Governor is about to make to the Secretary of State. The great rise which has taken place in recent years in the cost of living, especially in the matter of rent, demands in the Governor's opinion some consideration for the Government Officers. Those who have been appointed recently, even though as compared with their prede- cessors they may be required to do more work for emolument which is practically less, have comparatively little cause for complaint. There is however real hardship in the case of those appointed before the rise in question took place, especially those with small salaries. Some special relief also seems to be required in the case of officers appointed from England in consequence of the great fall in exchange. For their ability to make provision for the future of themselves and their families has been thereby largely decreased; and it seems right that as regards some proportion of their salaries, the difference between the rate of exchange at the time of the receipt of salary and that which prevailed at the date of their appointment should be made up to them. If this subject should be discussed in Finance Committee the Governor does not doubt that the Secretary of State would give due weight to the views expressed.

Another of the recommendations referred to is, with respect to the cost of the Gap Rock Light-house. It had been originally intended that this charge should be met by a special tax on the shipping of 1 cent per ton; and as the decision of the Government on this point was with the unanimous support of the un-official members of Council, communicated to the Secretary of State and approved by him, the probable return of

45

such a tax, viz., $45,000 appears in the estimates of Revenue. But since the above decision was arrived at early in the year, the financial prospect has much improved; and as it is a fact clearly recognised by competent opinion, that taxes on trade affect it injuriously to an extent which is by no means measured by the amount of Revenue produced, it appears to the Governor specially desirable to render such an impost as light as practicable in a Colony to which its Commerce is of such paramount importance. For this reason the Governor will recommend to the Secretary of State that the special vote for this Light-house shall be a cent instead of 1 cent per ton. By this means the burthen will be distributed over a longer period; and it is probable that in the course of a year or two the condition of the Revenue may warrant the complete relief from it which at the present moment would be imprudent. Should this proposal be approved by the Council and receive the sanction of the Secretary of State, a sum of $30,000 will require to be deducted from the total estimate of Revenue; the balance of Revenue over expenditure being also reduced by a like amount.

As regards other remissions of taxation, the abolition of the licence for cargo- boatmen scarcely needs explanation. As the number of licences was unlimited, no advantage was obtained from the tax, and such an impost on mere unskilled labourers could therefore receive a slight justification only from the fact that the licence was useful for Police purposes.

But as identification was impossible without photographs, to obtain which in the cases of some 4,000 people has been found impracticable, all reason for the tax completely fails.

The other and more important remission, for which allowance is made in the Estimates, consists of a reduction of one-and-a-half per cent. in the assessed rates-a remission which is over eleven-and-a-half per cent. of the whole of the rates paid in the town of Victoria and of course forms a much larger proportion of the lower rates paid in the country districts. The Governor had hoped to be able to propose a still larger reduction of this tax; but owing to an uncertainty which will probably come to an end in the course of a few months, and which he will then be able to explain, he is unable to do so at present lest he should thereby repeat the mistake of some years ago by taking a step which may shortly have to be retraced. The reduction actually proposed however is a substantial relief, and it is hoped that it may prove practicable to make a further reduction at no very distant date.

Another point requires notice. The present favourable condition of the finances appears to afford a fitting opportunity for drawing attention to the Imperial Institute— an object which in the Governor's opinion is well deserving of a contribution from this Colony. As Hongkong is almost entirely dependent on Commerce, and has little or no manufacturing or agricultural industry which would derive benefit from a more ex- tended knowledge of its products in England, the objection to taking part in a mere Exhibition is intelligible, and not without force. But the addition to the original project of a plan for a Commercial Museum seems in itself not only to justify, but to render most desirable, some substantial support to the Institution on the part of this Colony. The Governor understands that the excellent Museums of this kind which have been established in Germany have been a very appreciable factor in the remarkable commer- cial progress which has been made by that country in recent years; and it seems evident that a collection which is kept continually supplied with samples of the goods actually required by, or likely to prove attractive to, the peoples of all countries, cannot but be of great advantage to a community which, relatively to its numbers, possesses a commerce not only not equalled but probably not approached in magnitude by any other in the world. The Governor is therefore of opinion that without appealing to British senti- ment or to Imperial sentiment or indeed to any sentiment at all, the taking of some share in the Institute by this Colony may be advocated on purely "business" grounds; and apart from this consideration he believes that it would hereafter become for various reasons a subject of regret if Hongkong should persist in standing aloof from a Great Institution which has been deemed worthy of the support of all the rest of the Empire.

Though holding these views, the Governor does not feel that he would be justified in giving to them practical effect by placing a vote for the purpose on the Estimates without the unanimous, or almost unanimous, approval of the Legislative Council; and he refers to the subject here in order that it may receive consideration in Finance Committee.

In conclusion the Governor indulges the hope that whether his opinions as above expressed meet with the concurrence of the Council or not, the Members will at least agree with him that the financial condition and prospects of the Colony, as revealed by the above survey, may be regarded as a subject of very justifiable congratulation.

Li

b

The Governor has in this message confined himself entirely to questions of finance. He proposes, in another to pass briefly in review the principal events of the year about to close, and also as regards the coming year to mention the various subjects which demand attention, giving at the same time some general indications of the measures which he hopes to be able to submit to the consideration of the Council.

By Command,

Government House, Hongkong, 17th October, 1888.

FREDERICK Stewart, Colonial Secretary.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.8.0.

1988 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred Dollars as $400. honorarium to the Secretary for his services in connection with the Fever Commission,

also

C.S.0.

1211 of 1888.

$7,000.

C.S.O.

1946 of 1888.

the sum of One hundred and Seventy-nine Dollars and Twenty-five Cents to Mr. Cox for his services as shorthand writer.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st August, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven thousand Dollars, being a portion of the amount ($20,000) required for the building of a Lunatic Asylum for Chinese.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st August, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Five hundred 82,561.92. and Fifty-one Dollars, and Ninety-two Cents, being the cost of a new Submarine telegraph

cable, and expenses incurred in laying it between Hongkong and Kaulung.

C.S.O. 2227 of 1888.

The old cable, after examination, having been found unrepairable, a new one, of a type approximately double the weight of the old cable, has been laid by the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company. A heavy kind of shore-end cable is found necessary to withstand injuries from junk anchors, and the wear from chafing against the rocks in the harbour.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th September, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒÙX.

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Nine thousand Eight hundred $9,850. and Fifty Dollars to defray the cost of the extension westward of Lower Richmond Road.

This road, when finished, will enable the adjoining ground on each side to be parcelled out into building allotments for sale.

C.S.O. 2269 of 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th September, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(5.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirteen thousand, Five hun- $13,523.29. dred and Twenty-three Dollars, and Twenty-nine Cents for repairs to damages from land-slips, fall of walls, injuries to culverts, roads, and other damages caused by the rainstorms during the rainy season of the year.

No. 126 of

Government House, Hongkong, 28th September, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(6.)

Desp. The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred and Fifty 2nd Aug, Dollars as a gratuity to the son of the late Mr. D. A. DA COSTA, Senior Marine Officer in the and C.S.O. General Post Office, to enable him to complete his education.

1888,

1306 of 1888.

$330.

Mr. COSTA died in May last after 25 years' faithful service, leaving his son, a lad of 14 years, totally unprovided for.

It is proposed to lodge the money in the hands of Trustees, who would see to its proper application.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th September, 1888.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

47

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. --The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee, (No. 25), held on the 28th August last, and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed:-

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES FOR 1888.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Surveyor General.

Y

C.S.0.

1153f1888. Salary of Overseer of Works in Hill Districts, at $40 per month,-7 months,..

of

C.S.O.

1 678 of

Sanitary.

C.81888. Contingencies:-Additional vote for the purchase of Disinfectants, and other expenses

connected with Small-pox, and Cholera epidemics,.

1476 of 1888.

Harbour Master.

C.5.0 Contingencies:-For supplying and fixing a new flag-staff complete, in front of the

Harbour Office,

Medical.

1428 of 1888. Contingencies:-For general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and hire of a launch while the repairs are being executed,

C.S.O.

730 of 1888.

C.S.O.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Police.

Prizes to be awarded to Members of the Police Force, for shooting,

Works and Buildings.

8161888. For the drainage of the Wongnaichung Valley,

The Acting Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

280.00

.$ 1,000.00

325.00

531.00

46.00

$13,000.00

DEFENCES. Read a Despatch (C. O. Desp. 14) from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, giving the reasons for the delay in the delivery of the guns for Hongkong.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1887.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first read- ing of this Bill, and laid on the table the Supplementary Estimates for 1887.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1889.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill, and laid on the table the Estimates for 1889.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF JOHN WONG CHUN otherwise WONG YIU SHANG.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF TAM IU-TS'ÜN otherwise T'AM FUK- SIU.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED ÂN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LI Ó MI otherwise LI TAI FUNG.- The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

48

a

BILL ENTITLED THE EUROPEAN DISTRICT RESERVATION ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888. The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 9 OF 1876 (GAMBLING).---The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE IN CERTAIN CASES JUDICIAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE CAUSES OF FIRE.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Monday, the 22nd instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of October, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils

K

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

Y

49

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 19.

MONDAY, 22ND OCTOBER, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

*

19

*

>>

22

23

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency. the Governor :-

C.S.O.

· 2430 & 2485

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight thousand Five hundred of 1888. Dollars, for building a Home for girls rescued under the Ordinance for the protection of women

and children.

$8,500.

The house will provide for a certain return in rent from the ground floor, and give sufficient accommodation above for the Home.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th October, 1888.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee, (No. 26), held on the 17th instant, and moved that the following votes referred to therein be passed :-

C.S.O.

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES FOR 1888.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Works and Buildings.

-

C.5.0, Building a Lunatic Asylum for Chinese-Estimated cost $20,000—Required for 1888, .$7,000.00

C.S.O.

2227 of 1888.

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

Lower Richmond Road, cost of the extension westward,

$ 9,850.00

2269 of 188s. Repairs to damages caused by the rainstorms during the rainy season of the year,... 13,523.29

Miscellaneous Services.

1938 of 1888.

Honorarium to the Secretary of the Fever Commission,

Payment to shorthand writer in connection with the Fever Commission,

$23,373.29

Do.

C.S.O.

1946 of 1888. Cost of a new Submarine telegraph cable, and expenses incurred in laying it between

Hongkong and Kaulung,

Desp.

No of Gratuity to the son of the late Mr. D. A. DA COSTA, Senior Marine Officer in the

2nd Aug,

1888.

and C.S.O.

1366 of 188S.

General Post Office, ......

The Acting Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

400.00 179.25

2,551.92

350.00

$3,481.17

30

PAPER. FEVER COMMISSION.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the Fever Commission.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1887.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1889.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill. The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF JOHN WONG CHUN otherwise WONG YIU SHANG.The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 20 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF T'ÁM IU-TS'ÜN otherwise T'AM FUK- · SIU.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 21 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LI Ó MI otherwise LI TAI FUNG.- The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question--put and passed.

Bill read a third time,

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 22 of 1888.

BILL ENTITLED THE EUROPEAN DISTRICT RESERVATION ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE,

1888. The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

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BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 9 OF 1876 (GAMBLING).-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE IN CERTAIN CASES JUDICIAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO CAUSES OF FIRE.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resume consideration, in Committee, of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed. Council went into Committee.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, and the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 23 of 1888.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of November, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils,

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

Y

573

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 20.

MONDAY, 12TH NOVEMBER, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

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17

21

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN)

on leave.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd ultimo, were read and confirmed. CHIEF JUSTICE'S SEAT IN COUNCIL.-His Excellency referred to the vacancy caused by the retirement of Sir GEORGE PHILLIPPO, and stated that according to recent instructions his successors would not be ex-officio Members of Council. After referring to the valuable assistance rendered to the Council by Mr. Justice RUSSELL, Sir GEORGE PHILIPPO's successor, while Acting Chief Justice, His Excellency stated that the question of filling the vacancy was under consideration.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor:-

C. O. Desp.

136 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand and Two $1,200. hundred Dollars, being a gratuity to the widow of Mr. ALEXANDER FALCONER, late Second

Master of the Government Central School.

C.S.O.

2831 of 1888.

$28.

C.S.O.

2244 of 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th November, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-eight Dollars for the salaries of two extra Postmen for the Peak Service, at $7 each per month, for the two remaining months of this year.

These appointments are required in consequence of the rapid growth of population of the Hill District.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th November, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, $250. being compensation to the Scavenging Contractor in respect of extra work now required of him

in the Hill District, at the rate of $50 per month from 1st August last.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th November, 1888.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

:

:

54

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

(a.) Reports of the proceedings of the Finance Committee dated the 24th and 27th ultimo

(Nos. 28 and 29.)

(b.) Report on the Separate System of Main-drainage (No. g).

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF ELIAS ISAAC ELIAS otherwise ELIAS ISAAC ELIAS ZACHARIAH.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1887.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed. Council went into Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 24 of 1888.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1889.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Council went into Committee.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Colonial Secretary then moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, and the Bill be read a third, time.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 25 of 1888.

VOTES FOR EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council go into Committee on the Schedule of Extraordinary Public Works as set forth at page 36 of the Estimates for 1889.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Council went into Committee.

Schedule reported with amendments.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Schedule, as amended, be passed.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE EUROPEAN DISTRICT RESERVATION ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888. The Attorney General moved that the Council resume consideration, in Committee, of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Council went into Committee.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, and the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 26 of 1888.

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3-5-

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 9 OF 1876 (Gambling).--The Attorney General moved that the Council resume consideration, in Committee, of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Council went into Committee.

Bill reported without any

further amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 27 of 1888.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

G. WILLIAM DES VOEUX,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 19th day of November, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

57

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 21.

MONDAY, 19TH NOVEMBER, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS. EXCELLENCY. THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

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27

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREdith Deane). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

"}

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed.

* VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Reports of the proceedings of the Finance Committee, (Nos. 27 and 30), dated respectively the 22nd and 27th ultimo, and moved that the following votes referred to therein be passed :-

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES FOR 1888.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Postmaster General.

2331 of

CS.1888. Salaries of two extra postmen for the Peak Service, at $7 each per month, for 2

months,

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Works and Buildings.

..$

28.00

2430248 Building a Home for girls rescued under the Ordinance for the protection of women

and children,

of 1888.

Miscellaneous Services.

$ 8,500.00

C.O.D.

136 of 1988. Gratuity to the Widow of Mr. ALEXANDER FALCONER, late Second Master of the

Government Central School,

C.8.0.

.....

..$ 1,200.00

2244 of 1888. Compensation to the Scavenging Contractor in respect of extra work now required

of him in the Hill District, at the rate of $50 per month, from 1st August last, 250.00

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

$ 1,450.00

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1888. --The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

158

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 15 OF 1886.--The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE EVIDENCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE COMPENSATION TO FAMILIES ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 6 OF 1887.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FACILITATE THE INCORPORATION OF RELIGIOUS, EDUCATIONAL, AND CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF ELIAS ISAAC ELIAS otherwise ELIAS ISAAC ELIAS ZACHARIAH.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 28 of 1888.

BYE-LAWS UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction. of the Governor, laid upon the table for the approval of the Council, certain Bye-Laws made by the Sanitary Board, on the 17th instant, under Ordinance 24 of 1887.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bye-Laws reported without amendment.

Question put--that these Bye-Laws be approved. Bye-Laws approved.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of November, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART, Administering the Government.

:

Y

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

COUNCIL, No. 22.

WEDNESDAY, 28TH NOVEMBER, 1888.

5-9

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FREDERICK STEWART.)

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY Ernest WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH Deane). WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

"

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th instant, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF T'sÜ TAK-PIU otherwise CHING Ú.— The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Mr. LAYTON addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be referred to a Select Committee consisting of the following Members:

The Honourable THE ATTORNEY GENERAL, (Chairman).

THE ACTING TREASURER.

""

J. BELL-IRVing.

>>

"

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

B. LAYTON.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 15 OF 1886.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

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Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 29 of 1888.

L

60

BILL ENTITLED THE EVIDENCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Attorney General then moved that this Bill also be referred to the Select Committee named above.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE COMPENSATION TO FAMILIES ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Attorney General then moved that this Bill also be referred to the Select Committec named above.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 6 OF 1887.—The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question---put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FACILITATE THE INCORPORATION OF RELIGIOUS, EDUCATIONAL, AND CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the order for the second reading of this Bill was discharged.

BILL ENTITLED THE STATUTE LAW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888.- The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time:

BILL ENTITLED THE CORONER'S ABOLITION ORDINANCE SUPPLEMENTAL ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 5th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of December, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 23.

WEDNESDAY, 5TH DECEMBER, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FREDERICK STEWART).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

""

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the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER Meredith Deane).

>>

""

33

>>

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER Palmer MACEWEN).

ABSENT :

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th ultimo, were read and confirmed. REPORTS OF SELECT COMMITTEE.-The Attorney General read the following Reports of the Select Committee dated the 30th ultimo:-

Bill entitled The Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance, 1888.-The Select Committee on this Bill report the same without amendment, with the exception of striking out the preamble.

Bill entitled The Evidence Consolidation Ordinance, 1888.—The Select Committee on this Bill report the same with the following amendments, adopted upon the suggestion of the Law Revision Commission:

In clause 39, by substituting the words at such trial for the words in such prosecution. In clause 40, by inserting after the word Crown the words the prisoner or accused

or his Counsel.

The Bill is printed as thus amended.

Bill entitled The Compensation to Families Ordinance, 1888.-The Select Committee upon

this Bill report the same without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Attorney General then moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, and the numbers of the sections of the Bill only be read instead of reading each section.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED THE EVIDENCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Attorney General then moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, and the numbers of the sections of the Bill only be read instead of reading each section.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

62

BILL ENTITLED THE COMPENSATION TO FAMILIES ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Attorney General then moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, and the numbers of the sections of the Bill only be read instead of reading each section.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF T'SÜ TAK-PIU otherwise CHING Ú.— The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED THE CORONER'S ABOLITION ORDINANCE SUPPLEMENTAL ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

BILL ENTITLED THE STATUTE LAW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888.- The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POWERS OF POLICE MAGISTRATES.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

The Acting Treasurer seconded, and addressed the Council. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 12th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of December, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 24.

WEDNESDAY, 12TH DECEMBER, 1888.

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PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FREDERICK STEWART.)

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY Ernest WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHater.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency. the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O.

FREDERICK STEWART,

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of 2912 of 1888. $1,500 to meet the cost of works designed for supplying, with water, houses at the Albany,

situated above the level of the Pokfulam Conduit.

C.S.O.

2920 of 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th December, 1888.

FREDERICK STEWART.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $5,300 as an additional vote for Repairs to Buildings.

The greater portion of this sum is to meet the cost of unforeseen works and services of the year, in connection with the extension of Mountain Lodge and additional work at Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th December, 1888.

On the motion of the Acting Treasurer these Minutes were referred to the Finance Committee. BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE REFORMATORY SCHOOLS ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

The Attorney General then moved that the Committee do adjourn.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

64

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POWERS OF POLICE MAGISTRATES.- The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 6 OF 1887.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee.

Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Monday, the 17th instant, at 4 P.M.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of December, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

Administering the Government.

کی گی

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 25.

MONDAY, 17TH DECEMBER, 1888.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FREDERICK STEWART.)

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley).

""

7:

"7

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O.

-3015 of 1888.

FREDERICK STEWART.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $1,600, being the balance of the vote passed in May, 1887, for $9,600, for the extension of the Cattle Market, of which only $8,000 were expended in 1887.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th December, 1888.

The Acting Treasurer moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Surveyor General seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Treasurer, by direction of His Excel- lency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 31) dated the 12th instant, and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed :-

C.S.O.

2912 of 1888.

C.S.O. 2920 of 1888.

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES FOR 1888. SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Works and Buildings.

Cost of works designed for supplying, with water, houses at the Albany, situated

above the level of the Pokfulam Conduit,

Additional for Repairs to Buildings,

$1,500.00 5,300.00

$ 6,800.00

The Surveyor General seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE REFORMATORY SCHOOLS ORDINANCE, 1886.—The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 2nd day of January, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

No. 18.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 19th November, 1887.

67

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman, The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD). the Colonial Treasurer. (ALFRED LISTER).

::

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE). HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.

WONG SHING..

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, (vice the Honourable FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON,

on leave).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

>>

;)

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL), vice His Honour SIR GEORGE

PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable PINEAS RYRIE, on leave.

The Committee meet this day at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 19th September last, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

(1.)

Supplementary Estimates, 1886.

The Committee consider the Bill to authorize the appropriation of a supplementary sum of $392,162.30 to defray the charges for the year 1886.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the various items stated in detail in the Supplementary Estimates for 1886, the Committee recommend that the amount mentioned in the Bill be approved.

The Committee desire, however, to call attention to the advisability of obtaining from the Military Authorities a detailed statement of the amounts expended for fortifications. (See item Extraordinary Military Defence at page 6 of the Supplementary Estimates for 1886).

(2.) Estimates for 1888.

The Committee then proceed to consider the Bill to apply a sum not exceeding $1,162,801 to the public service of the

year 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the various increases and decreases as compared with the Estimates of the previous year and given in detail in the statement atcom- panying these Estimates, prepared by the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General. the Com- mittee make the following recommendations:---

(3.)

Surveyor General's Establishment, (page 16).

The Committee are informed that provision has inadvertently been omitted to be made. for the salary and allowances of a Land Bailiff. The Committee are informed that the services of a Land Bailiff are absolutely necessary to prevent unlicensed squatting in the Rural Districts, and are assured by the Treasurer that the expenses incurred in this respect will be more than covered by a proper and systematic collection of the Rates, &c., which, under the present system, many occupiers of land escape undetected. Under these circumstances, the Coinmittee recom- mend the insertion of the following items:--

Salary for a Land Bailiff, $1,440 per annum.

Allowance for conveyance, $288 per annum.

There is also added, salary of 6 Foremen of Street Cleaners at $300 cach, $1,800, rising to $360 each after two years.

68

C.S.O. 2212 of 1887.

(4.)

Harbour Master's Establishment, (page 21).

On considering the vote for the Office of the Superintendency of Imports and Exports. Mr MacEwEN informs the Committee that he has been requested by several of the leading merchants to bring to the notice of the Government the desirability of connecting the Harbour Offie and the Treasury with the Telephone Exchange. as the communications of several of the leading firms with these Departments are frequent. and often of an urgent nature.

The Committee consider the request a reasonable one, and recommend it to the favourable consideration of the Government

(5.)

Educational Department, (page 26).

Melical College Scholarship.

The Colonial Secretary reads a Minute by Major General CAMERON, recommending au annual Scholarship of $150 per annum, for four years, in connection with the Medical College recently established in the Colony.

After discussion, the question is put to the vote and carried by 5 to 3 that the amount should be fixed at $120 per annum.

The Committee therefore recommend that this item be provided for under this Establisment.

(6.)

Medical Establishment, (page 27).

Civil Hospital.

Some of the Members of the Committee remark that it has come to their knowledge, that for some time past, the general working of this Hospital has been very unsatisfactory, great neglect having been shown, in one case in particular, in the treatment of patients.

The Committee therefore recommend that a Commission be appointed to enquire into the treatment of patients in and the general working of the Government Civil Hospital.

(7.)

· Miscellaneous Services, (page 35).

The Surveyor General calls attention to the necessity for new furniture for Government House, most of the present furniture being quite unfit for use. Morcover, certain furniture that had been purchased some years back had greatly deteriorated owing to its removal to and from Mountain Lodge, at the Peak. The Committee recommend that a sum of $10,000 be set apart under this heading for the purchase of furniture which they understand to be absolutely necessary for Government House.

With the foregoing additions and suggestions, the Committee recommend the Bill to the favourable consideration of the Council.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 30th November, 1887.

Read and confirmed this 30th day of November, 1887.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

J

No. 19.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 30th November, 1887.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

""

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

WONG SHING.

""

69

C.S.O.

1901 of 1887.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL), vice His Honour SIR GEORGE

PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N., (on leave).

91

})

PHINEAS RYRIE, (on leave).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, (vice the Honourable FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON,

on leave).

The Committee meet this day at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 19th instant, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1887.

Read the Minutes of His Excellency the Governor, recommending the following Votes:-

ESTABLISHMENTS. Surveyor General.

(1.) Salary and allowance to Land Surveyor in the Public Works Department,

viz.:-

Salary from 1st July to 30th November, 1887, at $2,520 per annum, $1,050.00 Allowance for Chair hire from 1st July to 30th November, at $24

per month,

120.00

C. O. Desp.

117 of 1887.

C.S.O. 2008 of 1887.

$1,170.00

Surveyor General.-Sanitary Sub-Department. Inspector of Live Stock.

(2.) Salary from 8th September to 23rd October, 1887, (during voyage), at $900

per annum,

From 24th October to 30th November, at $2,400 per annum, Allowance for Chair hire from 24th October to 30th November, at $12 per

month,....

$ 113.15 251.61

15.10

Harbour Master.

(3.) Pay of Crew and other contingent expenses of the Steam-launch Stanley,

(formerly Victoria), viz.:-

Engineer at $30 per month for 10 months,.

Fireman at $15

Coxswain at $10

3 Sailors at $ 7 each

""

""

""

""

""

Coal, Oil, Water, &c. for 10 months,. Moorings,

$ 379.86

$ 300.00

150.00

100.00

210.00

$ 760.00

3,130.00

25.00

$ 3,915.00

C.S.O.

1526 of 1887.

C.S.O. 2658 of 1887.

C.S.O.

2530 of 1887.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Medical.

(4.) General overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and

hire of a Steam-launch while the repairs are being executed,

Works and Buildings.

(5.) Additional vote for repairs to buildings,

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

(6.) New posts and rails for the Garrison Parade Ground,

Miscellaneous Services.

$ 325.00

$2,200.00

....$ 500.00

C.S.O.

1492 of 1887.

C.S.O. 1404 of 1887.

(7.) Expenses connected with the celebration of H. M. Jubilee, viz.:—

Jubilee Service held in the Cathedral, Illuminations of Government buildings,.. Employment of additional Police Constables, Employment of Coolies at Fire Brigade Stations,.

Colonial Exhibition.

(8.) Re-vote of amounts voted in 1885 and 1886, as contributions towards the

expenses connected with the Indian and Colonial Exhibition, viz.:—

£500 voted in 1885 @ 3/5,

....

£275.11.0 out of £2,000 voted in 1886 @ 3/3,

C.9.0. 2623 of 1887.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURES.

Extraordinary Works.

$5,000.00

=$2,926.82

1,695.94

$4,622.76

(9.) Repairs to damages from land-slips, fall of walls, injuries to culverts, and other damages caused by the heavy rainstorms and freshets during the rainy season of the year,....

..$6,813.00

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the various items, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 13th January, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 20.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th February, 1888.

رد

C.S.O.

2043 of 1887.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

""

**

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

,:

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

**

::

>>

>>

"

the Harbour Master, (HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N.). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOIN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Committee meet this day at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 30th November last, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor:---

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred Dollars as a $300. Colonial contribution towards the maintenance of the Royal Naval Seamen's Club.

C.S.0.

2791 of 1887, and

It is not unusual for Colonies, the water of which are frequented by Her Majesty's ships, to give assistance to similar institutions, which provide amusement, food, and lodging for the Seamen, and thus attract them from undesirable and injurious places of resort.

The Commodore has represented the difficulty of maintaning this Club on account of the heavy cost of rent and taxes, and has requested the remission of the latter. But while deeming it right to give some assistance in recognition of the usefulness of the institution, the Governor regards this particular form of concession as likely to become an inconvenient precedent, and he therefore recommends the above vote, the amount of which is the same as the contribution of the Admiralty.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, for the salaries of Collector, Assistant Collector and Coolie employed in the Treasury $588. for collecting Village Taxes and Squatter's Licence Fees.

395 of ISSS.

These items were inadvertently omitted in the Treasurer's Estimates for 1888.

रे

Collector,

Assistant Collector,..........

Coolie,

Government House, Hongkong, 27th February, 1888.

.$ 240.00

240.00 108.00

$ 588.00

72

(3.)

€.5.0.

2538 of 188i.

$210.

C.S.O. 2885 of 1887, and

56 of 1888.

$24.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and forty Dollars as an allowance for a Mandarin Teacher for Messrs. MAY and SERCOMBE SMITH, at the rate of $20 per month.

This was inadvertently omitted in the Registrar General's Estimates for 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th February, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-four Dollars, as additional pay to the Gate-keeper of the Government Civil Hospital.

The salary of the late Chinese Gate-keeper was $8 per month, the Superintendent recom- mended that an Indian should be employed at the salary of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th February, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the several items, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 5th March, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

No. 21.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

་ ་་ ་

On the 4th April, 1888.

تی د

691 of 1888. $25,000.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

>>

""

"}

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

13

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

The Committee meet this day at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 28th February last, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor:-

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

(1.)

C.S.08. The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-five thousand Dollars, to be paid to the Jubilee Committee as a contribution towards the celebration and commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of Her Majesty's reign,..

2715 of 1887. $770.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

(2.)

C.S.O The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and seventy Dollars, for the conversion of Boatmen's quarters in the Harbour Office into Offices for the Imports and Exports Department,

$25,000.00

.$

770.00

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

(3.)

C.S.O.

2308 of 1887,

and

C. O. Desp. No. 6 of 13th Jan., 1888.

$300.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred Dollars, being a Building-grant to the Basel Mission Public School, to enable the Manager to enlarge and improve it,

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

$

300.00

+

74

(4.)

C.8.0. 707 of 1888. $270.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

C. The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and seventy Dollars, as an allowance for House-rent in lieu of quarters, to the Head Gardener in the Botanical and Afforestation Department, the quarters now occupied by him being required for Departmental purposes.

Allowance from 1st April to 31st December, 1888, nine months at $30 per month,

Government House, Hongkong, 4th April, 1888.

$ 270.00

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the several items, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 18th April, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

:

1

No. 22.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 27th April, 1888.

C.S.O.

2530 of 1887.

C.S.O.

703 of 1888.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

37

""

>>

>1

,,

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFREd Lister).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREdith Deane). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE), by permission.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and sixty-five Dollars to defray the cost of new Posts and Rails on the Garrison Parade Ground.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and twenty Dollars for the salaries of four additional Clerks in the General Post Office, at $30 per month each, from 1st June to the end of the year.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1888.

After explanation by the Treasurer, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted. The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 7th May, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

1

:

No. 23.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 7th May, 1888.

77

C.S.O.

1045 of 1888.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

.:

19

=

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

""

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

""

>>

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Five hundred and $2,595.60. Ninety-five Dollars, and Sixty Cents for the Members of the Fire Brigade, in order to provide

for each Member an amount equal to 30 per cent. of his yearly salary.

Experience has shown that the salaries of the Fire Brigade have become insufficient, in view of the increased size of the Town, and the greater frequency of fires; and in the absence of some increase to the remuneration, it will probably be impossible to maintain an effective force.

On the other hand, the supply of water under high pressure, which may shortly be expected from the Tytam Water-Works, will very possibly lessen greatly the labours of the Brigade; and this contingency renders it inexpedient at the present time to make any permanent addition to the salaries.

Until the new water-supply has been available for a sufficient time to enable the extent of Fire Brigade service required under the new conditions to be fully ascertained, the Governor proposes therefore that the question of extra-remuneration each year shall be considered with reference to the work actually done; and he recommends the above sum as a bonus for the past year in consideration of the exceptionally severe work which has been required in consequence of the unusually large number of fires.

The addition of a fixed proportion to the salary of each Member of the Brigade has, no doubt, the disadvantage that some Members will, relatively to the service rendered, be remu- nerated better than others. This plan has however been recommended, after much considera- tion, as on the whole less objectionable than any other which has been devised.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

78

C.S.0.

1046 of 1888.

Read the following proposed Scheme by the Postmaster General in connection with His Excellency the Governor's Minute in U.S.O. 703, which was considered at the last meeting:-

Proposed scheme for re-adjustment of salaries amongst the junior Officers

·

F. Franco,

F. Remedios,

R. Costa,

Probationer,

Probationer,

Probationer,

of the Post Office.

Name.

Service.

Present salary.

Proposed

salary.

4 years.

$20.00

$40.00

2 years.

1 year.

20.00

(a) 30.00

(a) 30.00

(b) 20.00

(b) 20.00

(b) 20.00

(a) Increasing to $40 from January 1st, 1890.

(b) Increasing to $30 after January 1st, 1891, and to $40 after January 1st, 1892. *

The Treasurer explains fully the object of the re-adjustment.

The Committee find that this scheme leaves the total amount to be voted, viz., $720 for the half year, the same as that recommended in their Report of No. 22 of the 27th ultimo, and see no objection to the adoption of the proposed scheme.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 4th June, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 4th June, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

No. 24.

ود

C.S.O.

932 of 1888.

C.5.0.

1810 of 1887.

C.S.0.

.2610 of 1887.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 4th June, 1888.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

"

>>

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 7th ultimo, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred Dollars, for building a room over the two cells at the Magistracy to keep scales; balances, &c. for testing weights and measures.

The room used for this purpose at the Central Market will shortly be pulled down. Government House, Hongkong, 10th May, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred Dollars, for the erection of a Telegraphic line between the Gap and Mount Gough Police Stations.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight hundred and Forty Dollars and Forty-one Cents, being compensation to Mr. EDMUND SHARP, for deficiency in area of Inland Lot No. 670 at Belcher's Bay,

Overcharge of Crown Rent...

Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1888.

$ 782.22 58.19

$ 840.41

After explanation by the Treasurer, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted, The Committee, then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 28th August, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 28th August, 1888.

ARATHOON SETIL Clerk of Councils.

No. 25.

C.S.O. 815 of 1888.

REPORT OF

OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th August, 1888.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

20

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the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, on leave.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 4th June last, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirteen thousand Dollars for $13,000. the drainage of the Wongnaichung Valley.

C.S.0. 730 of 1888.

$46.

C.S.O.

1428 of 1888.

out.

The advantages to be found by this proposed work are too well known to require pointing

Government House, Hongkong, 18th June, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Forty-six Dollars, to be awarded to members of the Police Force as Prizes for shooting.

The above amount was realised from the sale of empty ammunition boxes which the Police Authorities recommended should be devoted to prizes.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Thirty-one $531. Dollars for general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and hire

of a Steam-launch while the repairs are being executed.

C.S.0.

1476 of 1888.

Government House. Hongkong, 27th July, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred and Twenty-five $25. Dollars, for supplying and fixing a new Flag Staff complete, in front of the Harbour Master's

Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1888.

82

C.S.O. 1133 of 1888. $280.

C.8.0.

1678 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM Des Vœux.

(5.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Eighty Dollars for the salary of an Overseer at the Peak, to prevent Contractors from removing stones, cutting earth, or turf on Crown land without permits, and ensuring that all regulations and conditions on the permits are strictly observed. 7 months at $40 per month. ...$ 280.00

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd August, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(6.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Dollars as an $1,000, additional vote to the Contingent expenditure of the Sanitary Department.

The vote on the Estimates has proved insufficient owing to the purchase of an unusually large quantity of disinfectants and to other expenses incurred in connection with the epidemic of small-pox in the early portion of the year, and the more recent prevalence of cholera.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th August, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, of the various items. the Committce recom- mend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 17th October, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 17th October, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 26.

8 3

C.S.O.

1938 of 1888.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 17th October, 1888.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

""

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**

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LATTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 28th August last, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :---

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred Dollars as $400. honorarium. to the Secretary for his services in connection with the Fever Commission,

also

C.S.0.

1211 of 1888.

$7,000.

C.S.O.

1946 of 1888.

the sum of One hundred and Seventy-nine Dollars and Twenty-five Cents to Mr. Cox for his services as shorthand writer.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st August, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven thousand Dollars. being portion of the amount ($20,000) required for the building of a Lunatic Asylum for Chinese.

Government House. Hongkong, 31st August, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Five hundred $2.551.92. and Fifty-one Dollars, and Ninety-two Cents, being the cost of a new Submarine telegraph

cable, and expenses incurred in laying it between Hongkong and Kaulung.

C.NO. 2227 of 1888.

The old cable, after examination, having been found unrepairable, a new one, of a type approximately double the weight of the old cable, has been laid by the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company. A heavy kind of shore-end cable is found necessary to withstand injuries from junk anchors, and the wear from chafing against the rocks in the harbour.

Government House. Hongkong, 28th September, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Nine thousand Eight hundred 89850. and Fifty Dollars to defray the cost of the extension westward of Lower Richmond Road.

This road, when finished, will enable the adjoining ground on each side to be parcelled out into building allotments for sale.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th September, 1888.

84

C.~.0.

2269 of 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(5.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirteen thousand, Five hun- $13,523 20. dred and Twenty-three Dollars, and Twenty-nine Cents for repairs to damages from land-slips, fall of walls, injuries to culverts, roads, and other damages caused by the rainstorms during the rainy season of the year.

Desp.

No. 126 of

2nd

1888.

and C.

1806 of 1888. $350.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th September, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(6.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred and Fifty Dollars as a gratuity to the son of the late Mr. D. A. DA COSTA, Senior Marine Officer in the General Post Office, to enable him to complete his education.

Mr. COSTA died in May last after 25 years' faithful service, leaving his son, a lad of 14 years, totally unprovided for.

It is proposed to lodge the money in the hands of Trustees, who would see to its proper application.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th September, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, of the various items. the Committee recom- mend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd October, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 22nd October, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH.

Clerk of Councils.

Chairman.

No. 27.

REPORT OF

OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 22nd October, 1888.

85-

C.S.O.

2430 & 2485

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

"

""

* * * *

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),.

on leave.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 17th instant, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :--

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight thousand Five hundred of 1888 Dollars, for building a Home for girls rescued under the Ordinance for the protection of women

and children.

$8,500.

The house will provide for a certain return in rent from the ground floor, and give sufficient accommodation above for the Home.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th October, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn to Wednesday, the 24th instant, at 3 P.M., for the purpose of considering the Supplementary Estimates for 1887, and the Estimates for 1889.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th November, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 24th October, 1888.

Chairman.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 28.

87

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 24th October, 1888.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

""

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2:

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

The Committee meet pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd instant, are read and confirmed.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES, 1887.

The Committee consider the Bill to authorise the appropriation of a supplementary sum of $194,468.63 to defray the charges for the year 1887.

Respecting the items under the heading of Extraordinary Expenditure, Mr. LAYTON suggests that an account of the amount expended on the Tytam Water-Works should be made up to date for the information of the public.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the various items stated in detail in the Supple- mentary Estimates for 1887, the Committee recommend that the Bill be reported without amendment. ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

The Committee then proceed to consider the Bill to apply a sum not exceeding $1,234,921 to the public service for the year 1889.

Revenue, (page 6).

Mr. RYRIE expresses a wish to see an account of the premiums on land sales.

The Colonial Secretary states that the account will be submitted for the Honourable Member's inspection, as desired.

Governor's Establishment, (page 14).

Mr. BELL-IRVING invites attention to the small amount of salary set down for the Private Secretary, $1,440, and suggests that it should be increased.

Police Magistrates Establishment, (page 28):

The Attorney General suggests that under the item "Administration of Justice" the word "Costs" should be substituted for the words "Compensation to.'

Amended accordingly.

Police, (page 29).

""

The Captain Superintendent of Police suggests that the salary of the Captain Superintendent and others, except that of the Adjutant, be placed under "Fixed Establishments."

Amended accordingly.

Sanitary Department, (page 33).

Mr. LAYTON suggests that more watchmen for the Hill District should be employed; and that it is not possible for two men to look after the whole District.

After deliberation, the Committee agree that it is a question for the Sanitary Board to raise. After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the various items of Revenue, and of the amounts mentioned in the Departmental Schedules I to V, VII to XX, of the Estimates, the Committee recommend that the sums referred to in each be voted.

Consideration of Schedule VI, Surveyor General's Establishment, and Schedule XXI, Fire Brigade Establishment is postponed.

The Committee then adjourned until Saturday, the 27th instant, at 3 P.M.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th November, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 27th October, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils..

Chairman.

No. 29.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 27th October, 1888.

89

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice (JAMES RUSSELL, C.M.G.), vice His Honour SIR

GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt., on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

The Committee meet pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 24th instant, are read and confirmed.

ESTIMATES, 1889.

The Committee resume consideration of the Estimates for 1889.

DEFENCES. Mr. BELL-IRVING draws attention to a statement made by him at the last Meeting, and reported in the local papers, and explains that he had no intention whatever of reflecting in any way on the construction of the forts.

TYTAM WATER-WORKS.-With reference to Mr. LAYTON's request at the last Meeting, the Chairman lays upon the table the following Statement of Account, up to date, connected with the Tytam Water-Works, viz.:-

Cost of Reservoir and Byewash,.

Cost of Tunnel,

£ 84,565.16.0 46,158. 0.5

Cost of Conduit and Tank,

39,272. 5.0

£169,996. 1.5

The Chairman also reads an extract of a letter from Sir ROBERT RAWLINSON to the Crown Agents, dated 20th August, 1888, to the effect that these Water-Works have not only cost less than the average of English Water-Works, but they are much more permanent, being of masonry in place of earthwork.

The Surveyor General states that a detailed Statement of the expenditure in connection with these works will be laid before the Committee in due course.

LAND SALES.-In compliance with Mr. RYRIE's request at the last Meeting, the Chairman lays on the table a Statement of Account of the amount of premiums realized from land sales from 1882 to date, shewing a total of $425,788, and intimates that the Statement will be made up to the end of the year and published.

Surveyor General's Establishment, (page 16).

After some explanations by the Chairman and the Surveyor General, the Committee recommend that the votes for this Establishment be approved.

هو

Fire Brigade Establishment, (page 32).

After some discussion as to the adequacy of the water supply, on the completion of the Tytam Water-Works, for Fire Brigade purposes, the Committee recommend that the votes for this Establish- ment be approved.

Charitable Allowances, Transport, Works and Buildings, Roads, Streets

and Bridges, (page 34).

After explanations by the Chairman and the Surveyor General, the Committee recommend that the votes for these services be approved.

Miscellaneous Services, (page 35).

Referring to the item for "Commission to Crown Agents," Mr. BELL-IRVING enquires whether there is any chance of the contracts for the supply of articles for the use of the Colony being thrown open to tender in the Colony.

After some discussion, in the course of which Mr. BELL-IRVING asks that a list of what is gene- rally wanted in the Colony be made out and laid before the Committee; the Committee recommend that the amount be approved.

Mr. RYRIE refers to the item "Loss in Exchange on Family Remittances," and suggests that the privilege of remitting at 4/2 should be extended to all members of the service.

Mr. BELL-IRVING is of opinion that all Officers who have come out to Hongkong on a Sterling agreement, and all Officers whose salaries are fixed by the Civil List Ordinance in Sterling, should be paid monthly in Dollars at the demand rate of the day.

Mr. LAYTON is of opinion that as we live in a Dollar using country, and as the Revenue is col- lected in Dollars, all Disbursements should be in that currency; but as the salaries of several Officers of the Government are fixed on a Sterling basis and at a fixed. Exchange of 4/2, it is only right that a revision of such salaries should be made to meet the fall that has taken place in the value of silver; at the same time, seeing that exchange is continually fluctuating, it is, in his opinion, very desirable that a plan should be adopted which would put the salaries on a satisfactory basis and do away with the necessity of the subject being brought up and reconsidered year after year; and probably Mr. BELL-IRVING'S Suggestion that the "demand rate" should be the basis of calculation, is the best plan, for then in case of exchange advancing, as many think quite possible in the near future, the salaries would still be paid at the current value of the Dollar.

The Chief Justice remarks that by the Civil List Ordinance, 13 of 1860, the salaries of the Officers mentioned therein are given in Sterling which is reckoned at 4/2. On the other hand the Military Contribution, which is also given in Sterling, is reckoned at 3/0, and both these items appear in the present Estimates.. The Sterling is paid to Public Officers at 4/2, but to the War Department at 3/0, an anomaly to say the least of it.

After explanation by the Chairman of the several items under this head, the Committee recommend that the amount for this service be voted, but express an opinion in accordance with the Governor's message that some special relief is required in the case of Officers appointed from England in conse- quence of the great fall in exchange.

Military Expenditure, (page 35).

After explanation by the Chairman, the Committee recommend that the ainount for this service be voted.

Interest on Loan and Sinking Fund, (page 35).

After explanation by the Chairman, the Committee recommend that the amount for this service be voted.

Extraordinary Expenditure, (page 36).

Mr. LAYTON remarks in reference to the item for " Drainage on Separate System." that some infor- mation regarding the scheme should be furnished to the public.

The Chairman says that His Excellency the Governor will probably cause Mr. COOPER's exhaustive Report on the subject to be laid before the Legislative Council.

The Committee recommend that the unexpended balance in the Estimates for 1888 of the item Continuation of Police Buildings Extensions," which appears to have been inadvertently omitted, should be inserted in these Estimates.

After explanations by the Chairman and the Surveyor General, the Committee discuss the various items under this heading, and finally recommend that the several amounts referred to be voted.

All the several items mentioned in the Estimates for 1889, having been thus fully considered, the Committee desire to report, with the foregoing amendments, the Appropriation Bill for 1889.

Imperial Institute.

The Chairman, then asks the Committee to consider the question of a contribution towards the Imperial Institute.

The Committee, Mr. RYRIE dissenting, are in favour of a contribution, and, after deliberation, recommend that consideration of the matter be postponed until it is known what sums other Colonies have contributed.

Town Band.

The Chairman next asks the Committee to consider the question of a Town Band.

The Captain Superintendent of Police estimates the total cost to be about $1,800 per annum, exclusive of instruments which will require an outlay of about $400 in the first instance. The $1,800 is to make up the difference between pay as Policemen and Bandsmen, as the men will be enrolled as Police Constables, and draw pay as such.

Mr. RYRIE is opposed to having a Town Band, on the ground that it will be a slur on the Military who have always been ready to assist with their Band when necessary.

After some further discussion, Mr. RYRIE dissenting, the Committee are generally of opinion that if a good band could be had the Colony should have one.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th November, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 12th November, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

Chairman.

No. 30.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 12th November, 1888.

93

C. O. Desp. 136 of 1888.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairinan.

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

་་

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE. C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN),

on leave.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand and Two $1,200. hundred Dollars, being a gratuity to the widow of Mr. ALEXANDER FALCONER, late Second

Master of the Government Central School.

C.S.O.

2531 of 1888.

$28.

C.S.0.

"244 of 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th November, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-eight Dollars for the salaries of two extra Postmen for the Peak Service, at $7 each per month, for the two remaining months of this year.

These appointments are required in consequence of the rapid growth of population of the Hill District.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th November, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, $250. being compensation to the Scavenging Contractor in respect of extra work now required of him

in the Hill District, at the rate of $50 per month from 1st August last.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th November, 1888.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary of the several items, the Committee recom- mend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 19th November, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 12th December, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH.

Clerk of Councils.

H. E. WODEHOUSE.

Chairman.

No. 31.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 12th December, 1888.

95-

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

};

};

>"

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the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXander Palmer MACEWEN).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 12th ultimo, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :—

FREDERICK STEWART.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of 2912 of 1888. $1,500 to meet the cost of works designed for supplying, with water, houses at the Albany,

situated above the level of the Pokfulam Conduit.

C.S.0.

2920 of 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th December, 1888.

FREDERICK STEWART.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $5,300 as an additional vote for Repairs to Buildings.

The greater portion of this sum is to meet the cost of unforeseen works and services of the year, in connection with the extension of Mountain Lodge and additional work at Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th December, 1888.

After explanation by the Surveyor General, the Committee recommend that these amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 17th December, 1888.

Read and confirmed on the 17th December, 1888.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

H. E. WODEHOUSE.

Chairman.

No. 32.

Princes

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THIE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 17th December, 1888.

7

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

3015 of 1888.

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

>>

*

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

33

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Report of the proceedings of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, having been taken as read, is confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

FREDERICK STEWART.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $1,600, being the balance of the vote passed in May, 1887, for $9,600, for the extension of the Cattle Market, of which only $8,000 were expended in 1887.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th December, 1888.

After explanation by the Surveyor General, the Committee recommend that this amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Greckrick Stewart,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 2nd January, 1889.

28th

Read and confirmed on the 2nd January, 1889.

Proben Beth

Clerk of Councils.

Chairman.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON INTERPRETATION.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

97

No. 36

87.

1. On the general question we recommend that greater inducements and facilities be held out to those civil servants who wish to study Chinese. This has been often proposed, but nothing practical has been done. Little progress can be expected without

it.

2. The allowance for a Chinese teacher, instead of being stopped, as it is at present, should, when an officer has passed all his examinations creditably, be continued so long as the Officer is studying and making good use of the teacher. A bonus or an addition to the salary should be given for proficiency in each dialect.

3. Officers such as Inspectors of Nuisances and others who require an interpreter for the performance of their duties should receive additional pay when they are able to dispense with the interpreter.

4. We do not recommend any special school or institution for training interpreters, nor do we recommend any separate department of interpreters.

5. We think that if inducements to study Chinese are held out to the children born here of European parents, who are able to pick up and learn the language much quicker and better than young men from England, all the wants of the service as regards interpretation or translation will be amply met without any special training school.

6. We agree with the Captain Superintendent of Police that a clever interpreter would soon be dissatisfied with that position if he is to receive no promotion, and we recommend that those officers who are selected to act as interpreters should be as eligible for promotion as any other civil servants, and should not be debarred advancement only because they are interpreters. It was to avoid this feeling of discontent and to procure efficient interpreters that we have recorded our opinion above that there should not be a separate department of interpreters.

7. With respect to the Supreme Court, we beg to report that as far as it goes the interpretation there is satisfactory, Mr. BALL and Mr. Li HONG Mr being good inter- preters in the languages and dialects which they profess to speak, but there are the following dialects, viz.: Hakka, Swatow, and Amoy, with which they are imperfectly acquainted, and we recommend that steps be taken to remove this deficiency. Residence in the places where the dialects are spoken would be the best means of securing inter- preters for those dialects.

8. There is no one to replace one of these interpreters in case of absence or sickness. and we beg to suggest that inducements be offered to Messrs. HAZELAND and HOLWORTHY to qualify themselves as interpreters. When they have sufficiently mastered the lan- guage they will have many opportunities of practising, as they could attend Court at any time, and with the assistance of Mr. BALL or Mr. LI HONG MI could act as inter- preters and so obtain practice and facility.

9. With respect to the Police Court we are of opinion that the interpretation is not satisfactory, and we strongly recommend that as soon as the services of a competent European can be obtained, one should be appointed as head interpreter for that Court.

10. We are of opinion that it is very desirable that the Magistrates should be acquainted with Chinese, and that should a Magistrate not speaking Chinese be appointed on account of his legal qualifications, inducement should be offered to him to acquire at least some knowledge of colloquial.

100

11. We are of opinion that all Inspectors of Police should be, acquainted with at least one dialect of Chinese, and that in the Charge Room there should be always one European Inspector or Sergeant competent to receive a complaint without the assistance of an interpreter.

The Committee consider this a point of great importance, as a competent Police Officer who would be able to converse with the complainant would soon, we feel, be able to elicit much information, which at present we think is not forthcoming or obtained.

All necessary inducements and facilities should therefore be offered to Constables to learn Chinese.

12. A competent staff of translators with a European at its head should be obtained as soon as possible. With respect to the other Government Offices we are of opinion that if our suggestions are followed, and the class of persons we have indicated are attracted to the service, all difficulties respecting interpretation will disappear.

13. In view of the statement made by Mr. CALDWELL respecting the objections there are to allowing the person who is to act as interpreter to receive complaints, a statement which, though difficult of proof, we believe to be well founded, we would recommend that, until a European Clerk is available for the purpose of receiving complaints, Mr. BALL should as much as possible attend to this duty, and if our recommendation respecting Messrs. HAZELAND and HOLWORTHY be approved of by Government and accepted by these gentlemen, one of them should attend when Mr. BALL is engaged in Court.

7th September, 1887.

EDw. J. ACKROYD.

Chairman.

A. LISTER.

A. P. MACEWEN.

J. CHALMERS.

E. J. EITEL.

HONGKONG.

THE POSTMASTER GENERAL'S REPORT FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No.

!

1

88.

1887.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, January 3rd, 1888.

SIR,-I have the honour to report on the British Postal Service in Hongkong and China during

.

2. There is not much to record, nor indeed, as far as Hongkong is concerned, can there be much in the of progress to record until the Department ceases to be cramped by a wholly inadequate

way building. The limits of development of the service in the existing structure have been fully reached, nor can any marked improvement of organisation be expected until room is provided for a larger staff and more extended operations. Economy of space has been carried so far in the Hongkong Post Office that any modification of detail which necessitates a shelf, a small table, or indeed any place to put anything, has become all but impossible. If the space required is more than a few feet, such a modification is quite impossible.

3. How little the staff of the Post Office has grown with the growing necessities of the service may be seen from the following statement of the Hongkong portion of the staff of this Department, in 1875 when the present writer took charge of it, and in 1887, respectively;—

1875.

Hongkong Staff only.

1 Postmaster General.

1 Assistant

1 Accountant.

do.

1 Money Order Clerk.

2 Marine Officers.

2 Chinese Assistants for Marine Officers.

6 Clerks.

3 Senior Chinese.

6 Postmen.

8 Coolies.

4 Boatmen.

1887. Hongkong Staff only.

1 Postmaster General.

1 Assistant do.

1 Accountant.

2 Money Order Clerks.

3 Marine Officers.

2 Chinese Assistants for Marine Officers.

7 Clerks.

3 Senior Chinese.

7 Postmen.

6 Coolies.

4 Boatmen.

35.

Total salaries $20,400.

37.

Total salaries $22,740.

4. It appears from the above that during twelve years there has been an increase in the Staff of two persons, and in the annual expenditure of $2,340, or not quite $200 a month. This increase is more than accounted for by the extra money order clerk, by a clerk for parcels, and by the additional Marine Officer. This latter appointment was necessitated, not by an increase in the work, but because it was found to be, in conjunction with the travelling and constant change of climate, too severe for only two officers. Two Marine Officers died at their posts. Even with three, one of whom is always doing three months shore duty, the strain on health is very perceptible.

5. This slight increase in the personnel of the Department, obtained, as is always the case, with the greatest difficulty, has been nothing like sufficient to keep pace with the growing wants of the community. Nearly stagnant from 1865 to 1875, this Colony in the latter year took a fresh departure, and has been increasing steadily ever since. Steamer traffic grows every year, new Ports have been opened in our neighbourhood, new mail lines have been established. The French Packets, which in 1875 brought ten or twelve half-empty bags of correspondence, now bring from ninety to a hundred full ones, our largest inward mail in fact, which, unfortunately, necessarily arrives unsorted.

In 1875 we had Money Order relations only with the United Kingdom, and the duties were attended to by a clerk who was expected to perform his full share of ordinary Postal work as well. Now we exchange Money Orders with nearly all the world, and the duties are discharged, with daily increasing difficulty, only by the continuous attention of two clerks, who have to be detached from all other duties. Parcel Post has been introduced within the last two years, and, whilst it is most useful and successful, it forms a serious addition to the general work of the Office, and to the daily demand for more space. The total number of letters, papers, &c. passing through the Hongkong Post Office in 1875 probably fell short of 900,000. The total for 1887 is estimated at 2,200,000. The work of the Department is

102

only got through, and that with extreme pressure and difficulty, by long and severe hours of duty, by excessively hard work, and by the superior officers joining in manual labour which, in most other places, would be performed by men at twenty-five shillings a week.

6 But it is when the Chinese Staff of the Office is considered that it is seen how completely inadequate is the provision of hands, in comparison with the work to be done. In the Local or Municipal Post Office of Shanghai, which undertakes nothing but the reception and distribution of local correspondence, and of that exchanged by steamer with certain Ports immediately corresponding with Shanghai, the work is carried on by the following Chinese staff under the superintendence of two Europeans:-

Cz

3 Senior Chinese.

17 Postmen and Coolies.

2 Rickshaw Coolies. 4 Boatmen

26

The Municipal Post Office at Shanghai is one of seven Post Offices by which the correspondence of that Settlement is dealt with, and it is furnished with twenty-six Chinese. The Hongkong Post Office does the whole of the Postal work of Hongkong, inward, outward, and local; prepares and passes on the mails for all China and Japan; acts as a centre between those countries and the Straits, India, America and Australia; sorts both the English and French mails for Shanghai; and is furnished with twenty Chinese. The amount of correspondence passing through Shanghai may be taken, with fair accuracy, to be about half of that passing through Hongkong. The whole Postal work of Shanghai is performed by 13 Europeans and 48 Chinese, that of Hongkong by 17 Europeans and 20 Chinese. Moreover the only two really heavy mails for Shanghai are sorted in Hongkong.

7. The Municipal Post Office at Shanghai can, naturally, establish hourly deliveries, and effect them with great regularity and satisfaction to the public. The Hongkong Post Office effects with difficulty three deliveries a day, with an extra delivery after dark when necessary; and, when there is a rush of either inward or outward mail work, delivery has to be suspended altogether, the services of the postmen who should go out with correspondence being indispensable indoors.

8. The directions in which the organisation of the Hongkong Office should now be developed are these:-

(a.) The improvement of local delivery.

(b.) The collection of correspondence from steamers, and a quicker landing of contract

mails, by means of a steam-launch belonging to the Department.

(c.) An enforcement of the monopoly of the Post Office with regard to outward corres-

pondence, more particularly Chinese.

The third of these has been waiting for time and opportunity, but the other two are absolutely de- pendent on the provision of a larger building. Local delivery cannot be improved without a Chinese staff at least double of what we have at present. There is not room in this building for a single additional Chinese. Instead of adding to the existing overcrowding, it should be abated. And it is worse than useless to collect correspondence from steamers unless there are the means of delivering it at least as quickly as the steamer agents can deliver it themselves. Similarly, this Department could not work a steam-launch to advantage without two Europeans to relieve each other in the duty of boarding vessels on arrival. They would have to live on the premises, for which no ingenuity could arrange in the present building. In fact almost every attempt to improve the service in any way is blocked by the same condition, more room.

9. To fully develope the internal Postal service of this Colony there will be needed ere long four small sub-offices, viz., one at the east and one at the west end of the town, one at Kowloon and one at the Peak. Pillar boxes will also have to be established at convenient spots on the routes leading to these suburbs. All this would pay its own expenses and more, but it is useless to attempt it without · a sufficient central staff to receive and distribute the correspondence.

10. International Statistics, to regulate the payments for sea and territorial conveyance of mails during three years were taken during the first twenty-eight days of November, and, so far as is known up to this date, with regularity and success.

11. The date at which this Report has to be sent in makes it impossible to detail the Revenue of the Department for 1887, which will not be definitely ascertained for some months to come. Probably, however, there will be some improvement on the Revenue for 1886, which was as follows:-

Gross Revenue, 1886,

$134,734.72

Share of United Kingdom,

Share of other countries,

Conveyance of Mails,. Working expenses, Balance,.....

·

$78,379.82

7,865.91

6,973.12

33,136.49

8,379.38

$134,734.72

$134,734.72

12. We have ceased to expect a profit on the working of the Post Office. That there is still a balance to the good is mainly due to the Parcel Post. During the year the following parcels have been dealt with (not including local parcels, of which no separate account is kept.)

Total.

By P. & O. Packet,

By German Packet,

Inward.

5,195 215

5,410

Outward. 3,831 166

3,997

9,026

381

9,407

13. The largest Parcel Mail was that despatched on November 8th, the Christmas Mail, by which 329 parcels, weighing 631 lb. net were forwarded. The next largest was that despatched on November 22nd, the New Year Mail, by which 265 parcels, weighing 487 lb. net were forwarded. The largest inward Parcel Mail consisted of 408 parcels, weighing 892 lb.

14. Two parcels were confiscated in London, one for containing reprints of books copyright in the United Kingdom, the other for containing cigars which it was attempted to smuggle under a false declaration. The cigars were addressed to a lady, probably to divert suspicion of the real nature of the contents of the parcel.

15. The exchange of Parcels with the Continent by German Packet is steadily though slowly increasing. At first only four or five parcels were sent or received by each mail, now the average is about twenty. A box containing eight parcels was lost in the Oder.

16. The reduction of postage on coast and local parcels effected some time since has been the means of attracting a considerable business in the transmission of such parcels, which are now carried at five cents a pound including Registration.

17. It is hoped ere long to have Parcel Post arrangements in force with the principal Australian Colonies. The Victorian Government, which, as controlling the P. & O. line from Melbourne to Colombo, is the first to be consulted, has accepted the proposals of this Office, and it is hoped that the system may be at work within two or three months. An exchange of parcels by the direct Torres Straits steamers was proposed to Queensland, but the internal legislation of that Colony does not permit of its adoption.

t

18. A direct exchange of Parcels with Canada viâ Vancouver has also been proposed. The Canadian Post Office replied that when the mail service between Vancouver and Hongkong has been put on a permanent footing the question will be considered.

19. It has been shown in paragraph 12 that, exclusive of local exchanges, 9,407 parcels passed through this Office in the course of the year. Although the contents of many of these were of con- siderable intrinsic value, no parcel has been lost, nor has any local parcel been lost.* The reason is not far to seek. Although parcels are not technically considered as Registered Articles, yet practically and to all intents and purposes, they are Registered. Persons who talk "the stuff that makes one sad and almost sick," as to how they never register their letters, "it only serves to call attention to them," would do well to consider the fact that upwards of nine thousand parcels, often containing such objects as watches, rings, bracelets, &c., with the contents and value` marked on them, have been transmitted safely under Registration during the year, whilst it is believed that nearly every letter containing such objects and posted without Registration has been stolen, not necessarily here, nor even necessarily in the Postal service, but still stolen, somewhere.

20. If it were as possible to prevent the sending of unregistered money letters through the Post as it is to prevent the sending of unregistered parcels, letter-stealing would disappear. It is kept up and perpetuated by the persons referred to in the last paragraph, who not only do wrong them- selves, but also persuade others to do so. If only money letters were stolen, the senders might well be left to reap the consequences of their own carelessness, but unfortunately the letters of innocent people are stolen on the chance or on the supposition that they contain money.

21. It may be questioned whether the detective measures taken by many Postal Administrations in the way of sending test letters and laying other traps for Post Office thieves do not do more harm than good. Every time a letter-carrier is convicted, the public begin to think that now, at last, they may send money letters with safety. They are soon undeceived.

They are soon undeceived. So far at least as Post Offices where the subordinates are Chinese are concerned, it will NEVER be safe to send money or valuables through the Post unregistered, and it is believed to be at once the kindest and the justest course to avoid any useless show of an attempt to make it so. Such attempts only foster a disas- trous illusion, and intensify the evil they are intended to cure. To countenance the promiscuous sending of money letters, and yet attempt to put down thefts by detective measures, is like planting a noxious weed, and then snipping at it with scissors. The public have it in their power to cut the weed at the root by ceasing to send unregistered money letters. It is believed that the refusal of this Department to make any enquiry into alleged cases of theft of unregistered money letters has reduced that class of correspondence very considerably. If these remarks should deter one additional person from sending money in unregistered covers they will not have failed of their object. And, if they do not deter him, the loss of his money very speedily will.

*Eleven Registered Letters are believed to have been destroyed by an explosion on board the Formosa on December 26th.

کی دے

104

:

22. As it appeared doubtful whether the direct route viâ Aden for correspondence for the South African Colonies was working as satisfactorily as formerly, experiments were made by the despatch of test covers, as to the real time occupied in transit. The result was as follows:

To Cape Colony, To Natal,

Viâ London. 50 days. 57 days.

Viâ Aden. 76 days.

69 days.

Correspondence for these Colonies is therefore now forwarded exclusively by way of London. 23. In view of the inconvenience caused by the departures of the steamers of the Pacific Mail Company and Occidental and Oriental Steam-ship Company on the same days as the Mails for Europe, the two Companies promised that they would, in arranging their Schedule for the present year, do all in their power consistently with the rules they have found it necessary to observe, to avoid a repetition of this conflict of dates. The good offices of the Companies have been so far successful that, in their Time Table for the first half of this year, there are only two coincidences.

24. It would be very desirable if the occasional despatch of the German Packet on the same day as the French Packet could also be avoided. It deprives the public of much of the advantage of a supplemental opportunity to be obliged to make use of it within a few hours or not at all.

*

25. The outward French packets now remain here only twenty-four hours, an arrangement causing a severe strain on the strength of this office, which has only a few hours of daylight to get the whole mail for Shanghai sorted and packed, amidst the numerous distractions always arising from the recent arrival of a contract mail. On one occasion the newspaper portion of the Shanghai mail was unavoidably sent up unsorted. That was on August 4th, a day on which three Contract Mail Packets left this Colony, and two were expected to arrive. Fortunately one arrival did not take place till the following morning.

26. It is feared that, under the new P. and O. contract, the stay of the outward Packet here will also be only twenty-four hours.

27. If the sorting of mails for Shanghai is to be continued under these circumstances, some re- inforcement of the staff will be inevitable, but this is a subject which can be well considered when the question of the surrender or otherwise of our Post Offices in China to the Chinese Government is settled. No decision on this point has yet been arrived at by the Imperial Government.

28. It will be necessary to make provision for a re-organisation of the Amoy Post Office in case we retain the control of it. It is impossible to continue working it much longer in its present under- manned condition. The duties of the Postal Agent at Amoy depend upon the incessant and constantly increasing steamer traffic of that Port, and have been much added to by the establishment of direct steam communication between Amoy and Manila, and between Amoy and Batavia. For Manila alone steamers leave Amoy on the average every three days. The Postal Agent has, during the past year, collected and accounted for Revenue to the amount of $9,403,60. He has sold $7,837 worth of stamps. He has despatched 5,353 Registered Letters and received 4,831, making a total of 10,184 Registered articles, every one of which needed individual attention and necessitated several entries in books, &c. This gives an average of 28 Registries each day, including Sundays, but sometimes as many as 125 Registered Articles will be despatched to Manila by one steamer. The Agent has dealt with 325 parcels, and has sold Postal Notes to the amount of $1,312. He has dealt, without any assistance except that of two Chinese who cannot read English, with over 200,000 articles of ordinary correspondence, say 550 per day, Sundays included. His Office is the point of distribution for Tamsui, Kelung, Taiwanfoo, and Takao, the service of which places involves much correspondence and attention to detail. It can scarcely be thought that $40 a month is a sufficient salary to pay a gentleman, who has other duties to attend to, for the amount of work, responsibility, watchfulness, and care, involved in keeping up such an Office as is described above All through the year, we have been continually on the verge of a deadlock at Amoy caused by the not unnatural reluctance of officers of the Consular service to undertake a post the work of which is out of proportion to the pay. Only by the good offices of H. M. Consul in prevailing on members of his staff to take the duties as a personal favour to himself has such a deadlock been prevented. If the Amoy Office continues to be worked from Hongkong it is hoped that its complete reorganisation will be allowed.

29. Arrangements were made, during the year under report, to induce a more general prepayment of the correspondence which it is the custom to send here by steamers outside the mails. The measures taken were necessarily of a stringent kind, but it was intended to relax them as soon as the end in view was attained. This was accomplished before the setting in of the inevitable outcry, which had been all along foreseen by this Department; and the sending of unpaid letters on board steamers was practically put a stop to, and less stringent rules introduced, before any complaint was made. This Office, at any rate, is no longer periodically/flooded with unpaid correspondence, nor will the wholesale transmission of such unpaid correspondence through the Post be allowed to be resumed.

I have the honour to be,

Sir, Your obedient Servant,

The Hon. FREDERICK STEWART,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

A. LISTER, Postmaster General.

* On Christmas day the clerks in charge of the Shanghai mail were at work from 2 P.M. till midnight, and were required at 7 the next morning for the ordinary work of the Office.

APPENDIX.

1037

APPROXIMATE STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1887.

COMPARISON WITH 1886.

INTERNATIONAL.

LOCAL.

DESCRIPTION OF CORRESPONDENCE.

TOTAL.

De- spatched.

Received.

De- spatched.

Received.

Total in 1886.

Increase. Decrease.

Ordinary paid letters,

Unpaid and short paid Articles,

571,000 428,000

65,000

56,000

1,120,000

1,095,000

25,000

·

10,000 23,000

2,000

5,000

44,000

46,000

6,000

Letters on Postal Business,.

1,200

7,000

1,300

1,200

4,400

4,000

400

Post Cards,...

5,000

3,000

3,000

1,500

12,500

9.900

Do. with prepaid reply,

2,600

Newspapers and Periodicals,

126,000

258,000

37,000

16,000

437,000

412,000

25,000

Books, Circulars, Prices Current, &c.,

210,000

87,000

15,000

11,500

323,500

304,100

19,400

Patterns,

5,000-

2,000

1,000

500

9,500

8,000

1,500

Commercial Papers,

Registered Articles,

23,000

32,000

3,700

3,800

62,500

58,900

3,600

Letters with value declared.

Registered Articles with Return Receipt,

300

5,000

100

100

5,500

4,500

1,000

Parcels,

1,000

1,200

8,506

:

No.

2

88.

HONGKONG.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL,

HONGKONG, 16th January, 1888.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on this School for 1887.

1. The total number of boys on the Roll for the past year was 601. The school days numbered 234, the difference from last year being accounted for, by the four days special holiday, given by His Excellency the Governor, in November in connexion with the celebration of Her Majesty's Jubilee.

2. To illustrate the condition of the School during the last five years the following table is annexed :-

Average

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887.

YEAR.

Total Number of Scholars.

Number of School Days.

Monthly Enrolment.

Daily

Maximum.

Minimun.

Attendance.

556

236

460

378

394

558

236

462

362

411

596

238

499

382

437

610

238

507

419

446

601

234

525

417

449

Number of

Percentage.

YEAR.

School

School Boys

of

Actual Nett

Fees.

Examined.

Passes.

Expenditure.

Average

Expense of each Scholar per Average Daily Attendance.

365

96.98

4,121

13,109.51

33.22

379

95.58

4,981

13,378.62

32.48

412

95.88

5,273

12,885.00

29.45

405

94.81

5,422

11,680.41

26.17

384

97.65

5,547

11,872.70

26.40

ANNUAL EXAMINATION.

3. The result of the Annual Prize Examination in English subjects, just held, is eminently satis- factory. Only 9 boys failed out of 384 examined, in other words 97 per cent passed. As this is the last Annual Examination which will be held in this school building, the history of which extends over a quarter of a century, I may be pardoned for dwelling on this signal success, which forms a fitting crown to the labours of so many years. It will be remembered that on my arrival, six years ago, after examining the school I expressed my astonishment and gratification at the attainments in English of the Chinese, who form the vast majority of Central School boys. Since then, no stone has been left unturned, steadily and get without undue haste, to raise the standard. English Composition was introduced into the 4th class; translation from and into Chinese was made obligatory in every class; English Grammar and Geography were extended three classes lower. The result of this exten- sion is shown in the present examination; of the 314 boys examined in English Grammar 90 per cent. passed, while 94 per cent. passed of the 110 examined in English Composition; and I may say that for idiom of expression and thoughtfulness in ideas the essays presented by these Chinese boys-who, it must be remembered, do not associate with English, out of school hours,-cannot fail to be considered admirable. Making comparison with the percentage table of last year, I observe a higher percentage obtained by the school this year in every subject, except Map-Drawing which is about the same figure. Special improvement is noticeable in Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, Euclid, Algebra, General Intel- ligence Papers and Mensuration.

4. The severity of the test applied to the classes in this school precludes all possibility of any comparison being instituted with work done in any other school in the Colony. Not only are there no Special Optional subjects-every subject, Euclid, Algebra, Latin, Physical and Commercial Geography,

108

taught in any class being compulsory to every boy in that class,-but the examination in Grammar is not, as in the Grant-in-Aid System, confined to Analysis Parsing and Definitions, nor in Geography to Map drawing and Definitions; on the contrary searching general questions are set, more after the type of the Oxford and Cambridge Local Examinations; nor must I forget to mention the two papers, translation from and into Chinese, in each class, which prove such a stumbling-block to non- Chinese boys and so ruthlessly handicap them in the race for prizes. The system I adopted on my arrival, and which I have since maintained, is that to pass in each subject a boy must obtain at least half-marks, and failure in more than half the subjects of his class makes a boy a complete failure. This year there were 15 subjects in the First Class, as opposed to 8 subjects in 1882; therefore this year, a boy required for a bare pass, as much as would have gained him excellent distinction six years ago. If this School had been examined on Grant-in-Aid principles, we could have presented 69 boys in the highest Standard, Standard VI; 41 in Standard V; 102 in Standard IV; 100 in Standard III; 52 in Standard II; and 20 in Standard I; moreover Copy-writing would have been taken into account for 274 boys, instead of merely for the 70 boys at the bottom of the school.

5. The Upper School was examined in a first year's work in Latin, the same paper was set to all three classes, and though the questions were stiff, very creditable answers were obtained. Class I was examined in three books of Euclid; and in Algebra offered Surds, Scales of Notation, &c. up to Har- monical Progression. Class IV passed excellently in Algebra and Euclid.

·

STAFF.

6. Mr. ARTHUR, Third Master, was transferred to the Magistracy, early in the year. He was a tho- roughly efficient, successful, and popular teacher, able to maintain excellent discipline without any ostentation, and having no need to resort to severity. In the important subject of English Reading and Pronunciation, which, to those not practically engaged in teaching English to foreigners, might appear easy, he was unrivalled. The school was fortunate in obtaining the services of Mr. JAMESON, a graduate of Peterhouse Cambridge, whose engagement at another school happily terminated at the time of Mr. ARTHUR'S transfer. Mr. JAMESON laboured strenuously throughout the year, with what success may be estimated from the fact that only one boy failed, out of the three classes in his charge, which comprised 126 boys. On April 1st Mr. Mox, 3rd Chinese Assistant was transferred to the Registrar General's Office, Mr. Cнü took his place, and Mr. Lo KIT was promoted from Senior Pupil Teacher to be 4th Chinese Assistant. In my report on the requirements of the New School forwarded twelve months ago, I drew special attention to the injury done to the school, by Masters, English and Chinese, leaving on account of dissatisfaction with salaries, and I trust that my suggestions on this head will meet with the approval of the authorities.

7. That the whole Staff deserves credit for the past year's work is evident from the results of Examination given above; but I wish to bear my testimony to the important fact, of which I alone can be cognisant, that in this school, there is no spasmodic cramming at the end of the year, with a view to dazzling effect; but steady uniform work, willingly and cheerfully performed consistently throughout the year. As in the New School a larger amount of responsibility in teaching will fall into the hands of the Chinese Assistants, I desire to draw particular attention to the good results obtained by the four classes V-VIII, which were entrusted to the care of the four Chinese Assistants. The excellent papers, in most instances, done by these boys, in English Grammar, Geography, Dicta- tion and Arithmetic show that there is no ground for apprehension, that English subjects cannot be adequately taught by Chinese.

8. I have received from Mr. JAMESON, Master in charge of the Preparatory School, a very favour- able report of the work done by the six Articled Pupil Teachers. This is very satisfactory, and marred alone by the fact, that one of the Pupil Teachers gave evidence of persistent neglect of his First Class studies, which culminated, as might naturally be expected in a pass, which can only be viewed as discreditable.

CAMBRIDGE LOCAL EXAMINATION.

9. The six candidates who entered for the Cambridge Local Examination in 1886 acquitted them- selves well. The Senior candidate passed in Arithmetic, English Grammar, Composition, and History, Geography, Euclid, and Algebra, but failed in Scripture. As a Chinese, he had natural difficulty with this subject, but his experience has led him to devote more attention to it for the late examination. Of the five Juniors, HOWARD and MADAR obtained certificates and have therefore the distinction of being the first Hongkong boys to obtain that honour; two others WONG FAN and WONG PING failed only in History and Geography, or it may be in only one of these as particulars were not given. The remain- ing boy was incapacitated by fever. That the boys themselves considered this result encouraging is evident from the fact, that they all entered for the late examination; MADAR abandoned the project only on leaving school, and five new boys swelled the number. In October last the Colonial Secretary, Hon. F. STEWART, LL.D., presented the parchments to the two successful candidates, for it seemed specially appropriate that the late Headmaster should perform in his old school a ceremony, that occurred for the first and last time, and which will prove a prominent link between this school and the new college.

109

10. I cannot refrain from here taking the opportunity to defend the Local Examinations against two serious imputations, cramming and competition, that have been laid to their charge. Cramming is the process by which a man of experience reduces, for the sake of his pupils, the wide area of any given subject, by judiciously selecting those portions, on which questions are likely to be set. This method is open to the obvious objection that first principles and sound basis are sacrificed to show results in answer to Catch Questions. Now when year after year, bodies of examiners, like the Oxford Delegates and Cambridge Syndicate set forth varied questions, testing the knowledge of rudiments in each subject, as well as embracing the highest achievements, and at the same time distinctly state that each candidate must satisfy the examiners in Rudimentary knowledge in each subject—to talk of cram- ming in connexion with these examinations merely argues want of information in those who hazard the statement. As regards the Central School, this charge is simply ludicrous; the local candidates study their subjects in a class of 60 boys; only one hour a week, in the afternoon, is allowed for in- structions in each of the special subjects (as Shakespeare and the Epoch of History) and for instruction in Higher Euclid and Algebra.

11. The idea of Competition is foreign to the purpose of local examinations, which is to provide one standard for boys educated in different schools on widely varying principles. Each boy does his best to pass well, and if possible to obtain distinction; but there is no personal emulation to urge him to outstrip any particular boy, which is the necessary element of competition as applied to school-boy life. Unfortunately, however, the attempt has been made, to raise the spirit of competition, not among scholars but schools. Such a feeling should not be admitted for a moment; not only is there no con- test, but there is actually no uniformity of conditions. One school may send in all the boys in certain classes, another may offer only selected candidates. One school may have a large staff of masters, another may be without this advantage. It is not the custom in England, as far as my personal know- ledge reaches, for comparison to be made between the results in different schools in the same town. Whatever wholesome emulation may be personally stirred among the masters, no comparisons are drawn between the results (say) of a Grammar School and of a Board School, nor between the latter and those of a Denominational School; nor in fact would it be possible as the basis of comparison is wanting.

OLD SCHOLARS.

12. In the past year we were gratified by the news of Mr. WALTER BOSMAN'S (Government Scholar) final success at the Engineering College at the Chrystal Palace. He was presented with the Society's Bronze Medal for sustained distinction, in no less than 9 terminal examinations. His future successes will not come within the scope of School Reports, but he will continue to carry with him the good wishes of his old school-fellows and schoolmasters.

13. It is also worthy of note that Mr. TAI TIN-PUI, who left the Second Class of this school at midsummer after showing marked aptitude for English Studies, graduated last November as Sau Tsoi at Canton. I am informed that this is the first time this success has been achieved by a Central School boy. It must, however, be clearly understood that the credit of this success does not belong to this school, for as a rule we can do but little more than preserve the knowledge of Chinese a boy brings with him; still Mr. TAI has shown conclusively that application to English studies need not cause a boy to abandon the pursuit of native literature.

HEALTH.

14. The health of the school suffered from the fever and small-pox prevalent in the town, at the close of the year. The Sick List in December is the largest I remember.

CONCLUSION.

15. I will conclude with a few general remarks. The new school is hasting to its completion, and I sincerely trust, that we are not doomed to pass another summer in these overcrowded class- rooms, from which air is effectually blocked out by the houses that hem us in, on every side.

side. It

It may be that in another year Chinese dwellings may stand on the site of this old School, but its memory will endure; a dozen Morrison scholars, and one Government scholar, hundreds of clerks in English and Chinese Government Service, and a countless number of mercantile clerks scattered over the Far East will have these old walls photographed on their memory of happy youthful days, as long as life shall last. The standard of education at the Central School may be said this year to have attained its High Water mark, it only remains for the Victoria College to take this tide at the flood and so be led on to Fame and Fortune.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A.,

Head Master.

The Hon. FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary,

&C..

&c

&C.

110

1887.

CENTRAL SCHOOL.

Number

Month.

of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

January,

417

5,700

14

407.14

February,

March,

April,..

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,..

October,

November,

December,

Total,.

519

4,587

9

509.66

525

13,386

27

495.78

518

8,314

17

489.06

509

11,493

24

478.87

498

11,017

24

459.04

471

11,609

26

446.50

449

1,767

4

441.75

470

9,864

22

448.36

467

10,059

23

437.35

455

9,143

22

115.59

433

8,287

22

376.68

105,226

234

105,226

234

449.684

601

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1887,

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1887,.....

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1887,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1887,

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the Central School during 1887.

Expenditure,

Deduct School Fees,....

Rent of Quarters,.......

""

Sale of Ink to Police Department,

Total Expenses of the School,...

Average Expenses of each Scholar per number on Roll,.........

*

"

55

29

多多

Average Daily Attendance,......

.......$17,803.40

.$5,547.00

382.50

1.20

5,930.70

$11,872.70

.$19.75

26.40

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A., Head Muster.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No.

3

88.

No. 14.

POLICE OFFICE, HONGKONG, 20th January, 1888.

SIR, I have the honour to forward, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, details of the Police Establishment, the list of Pensioners and the Criminal Statistics for the year 1887.

2. The Criminal Statistics show that 8,481 cases were reported to the Police during 1887, being a decrease of 355 cases or 4.01 per cent on the return for 1886. In the subdivision of these cases into Serious Crimes (so called) and Minor Offences an increase of 77 cases or 3.08 per cent is found in Serious Crimes and a decrease of 432 cases or 6.81 per cent in Minor Offences.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. M. DEANE, Captain Superintendent of Police.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c

7

Sc.

1887.

TABLE A.

RETURN of SERIOUS and MINOR OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1887, with the Results of such Reports.

Robberies with Violence)

froin

the Person.

Burglaries.

Larcenies in

Dwelling

Houses.

Assaults

with Intent

to Rob.

Larcenies.

Felonies

not

already

Assaults

and

Disorderly

Gambling.

given.

Conduct.

Kidnapping.

Unlawful

Possession.

Piracy.

Miscellaneous

Offences.

Euro-

peans

and

Ameri-

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

cans.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported. No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

No Pass or Light.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

:

:

:

:

:

:

January,

February,

co

:

C:

168

157

75 20 13 12 5

*

22

10

8

CJ

108

82

82

111

191 4 29

24

co

9

:

+

4

3

35

41

9

33 29 6

1

6

20 16

4

March,

*

N

1

3

CA

176

88

19

4

B

5 97 143

25

5 60 15 9 5

10 29

281

-1

7

April,

2

3

9

2

4

177

78

18

3

نه

3

82 114

25 13147

3

CU

Co

3

NO

2 15 13

9

May,.

8

2

186

78

26

3

4

1107

143

:

25

26

8

661 66 1.18

15 | 15

17

91 12

June,

2

3

1

2

178

77

23

:

July,

1

1

5

5

2

184

59

20

**

August,

6

1

3

151

61

22

7

6

31

86

September,

October,

2

November,

2

3

4

5

69

88

:

88

December;.

3

2

6

1

..

1

92

:

:

24

12

4

4

85

103

24

2

20

9 77 33

127

201

19128 65

&

3 4 28

221 16

145

44 29

8

3

81100

104

43 11 103

123

45

20

5

3

4102

115

36

6

51

180

79 28

5

1

1

15

1

13

153

82

102

27

15 39

2

7

2

8

3 [125

41

164

CO

es

9

co

2

5

ها

8

201

25

17 14

20 8

ลง

2

خير

4

1

1

14

السلام

6

6

4

2 6

දප

181

15

E

1

:

-}

8

co

20

3

GOL

43 22

14

8

6

401

36 12

1

TOTAL

31

23 3

38

{k

ΟΙ

8 22

I

23

41

13

305

40

17

TOTAL

or

ALL

CASES.

2

2

579

91

568

36

703

i

8

2

513

125

549

128

629

22

28

23

272 BOL

37

22

ይዩ።

315

31

80 4

ہو

5

101 27:

16

115

20

30

39

460

497

169

31

2

643

112

674

116

715

832

221

863

223

867

:

:

:

:

23

50

27

463 552

48

891

3

cra

1

835 190

874 191

919

24

35

11

298

200

34

38

5

473

98

512

103

674

14 38 12

321

311

52

16

7

00

Æ

5

10

613

161

637 173

750

9

28

17

275

281

53

13

1

8

4

614

216

635

221

646

23

17 10

295

290

45

161

3

1 2

540

132

560 137

630

:

:

15

12 11

314

828

ལུ

60

201

6

$

1

562

123

590 130

613

CO

3

2

27

17

0

297

290

51

15

8

*

AS

I 509

111

527 120

686

ہے

11

14

16

19

4

290

281

45

11

2

1

3 513

133

525

138

649

1,985

815

280

76

50

08 1,101,425 335

v

C

?

α

$ སུ

99 760 221

90

54

72

327 263 120

8

18

a 1 Prisoner absconded from bail.

b Case undecided and 1 Prisoner escaped from Custody.

c 2 Cases undecided.

d1 Prisoner died in Hospital.

Police Department, Hongkong, 20th January, 1888.

14 [231310|192|3,941 | 4,119

899

e 4 Cases undecided.

274 42

41

21 7,2201,7167,544 1,779

8,481

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

11/2

2 4

21

22 3 | 105 | 109 |

21

22

2106 106

3

ون

17

22

19

ww

8

61

02

3

9. 11

છે

70 75

5

-

I

53 69

CC

3

G

58 64

¿

48 49..)

86

6 11

872 1 6 S.. 63

11 13 1 #2 854 7

44 04 3

3

ここ

NO

53

10 16.

19

5 .. 16 56

..

3

ST

1 4 4

78 08

1

+-

་ ་

120 107 17:

8 123 128

171

16 11

Ca

18

1

27 26 2

ここ

162

13

N

شاشه

1

21

January,

29 32

505 8 3

10

نا

1 08

79

15

5

CU

3

..

10 34 2

66

1 149

12

57 10

to

r

OD

Co

N

B

62

LO

N

2

*

N

TH

10

V

6

19

ين

05

$2

51

16

h

:

20 21

29 28 2

9

:

2

10

28

Cases reported.

1S37.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases

reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported. No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

2

No. of Persons convicted.

N

to

NO

N

เง

G

Q

Breach of Spirits

Ordinances. and Opium

TABLE B.

RETURN of MISCELLANEOUS OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1887, with the Results of such Reports.

Desertion,

Unlicensed

Street

Mendicants.

Hawking.

Cries.

Refusal and Neglect of

Rogues,

Vagabonds

and

Suspicious

Breach of

Public

Vehicles

Ordinance.

Duty.

Characters.

Breach of

Harbour

and

Coast

Ordinances.

Breach of

Police,

Gaol

and

Deportation

Ordinances.

Breach of

Pawnbrokers,

Markets and Weights and Measures

Ordinances.

Intimidation,! Extortion, Bribery and

Culting

Trees

or

Conspiracy. Earth.

Obtaining Goods and

Money

by False

Pretences.

Cruelty to

Animals and

Furious Driving.

False Charge

and Contempt

of Court.

Breach of Triad Society

Registration and

Ordinances.

Spurious Coin.

13

14

69 69

31 32 1

..

17 19 1 129 124

5

21 21

10.

2 23 21 7

13 15

3 07

GR 1 18

171

6

2

34 39

5 51

5

23

23

1 83 83

19

October,....

30

30 6 63! 57 6

221

4102 07

(

11:

10

to

64 67

November, 23

December,.. 12)

6

to

| ទ

3

ون

11

..

5

!

I

12

TOTAL,..239 250 30991 973 41202 200 6 38 114 19559 | 673 76

**

Police Department, Hongkong, 20th January, 1888.

6

*

0.3

N

S

C

44 50 8 13 10

1:0

30

16

21

43

70

19

20 19 59 |

20 3

52 11

Co

04 17 18 18 2

S

9| 14: 5 70 61

13

11.

6

!!!

86 6

4

3

27 AS 18 73

6

00

36 37

7

ro

1

1

17 22 10

49}

45

£3

52 10 3

CU

3

13

26

هستیم

71

61

13

N

N

to

45

18

6

ลง

N

H

H

16 16

13 12

12

11

15

H

:

وزم

:

4

Cu

O

9

3

4...

N

H

3

ہے

Co

-

H

C

N

H

->

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted." No. of persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

ì roperty.

Damage to

Attempted Suicide.

Breach of

Dangerous Goods and Arms Ords.

Totals.

N

19

Co

AA

308 335

40

972 B01 37

345 34

469

197 169

463

3

208

582 48

269

3.1

324 214 52

5

5

22 21

21212 450 72 808756|149|16 29] 8 40 32

..

27

23

..

H

*

..

81

9

10

11

1 J.

T

..

..

211

33

21 2

1} 1!

3

6

گرم

1 173

297

200 51

11.65

21 290

281

15

8314 309 13 12 9 7 10 11 | 8 108 107 11 25 18 836 37 221 15 11 37 47 10 27 20 6 8 4 45031 1578,911 4,119 | 668

* 1 Prisoner committed Suicide, and 1 died In IIospital.

W. M. DEANE, Captain Superintendent of Police.

155

1

0 275 281 53

1 205

314

09

15

TABLE C.

COMPARATIVE Return of OFFENCES coming under the Notice of the POLICE, during the Years 1885, 1886, and 1887.

SERIOUS.

MINOR.

NUMBER OF PERSONS

NUMBER OF CASES.

DESCRIPTION.

Convicted.

Discharged.

1885. 1886. | 1887.

1885. 1886. 1887. 1885. 1886. 1887.

7531,0311,101

253 248 99 736 762 766 1,901 3,735 3,9411,998 4,209 | 4,119 323 373 231 690 470 340 387 479 192

973 1,486|1,425

225 335

31 211

416 668 No analysis of Convictions & Discharges.

273

58

426

NUMBER OF PERSONS

NUMBER OF CASES.

Convicted.

Discharged.

DESCRIPTION,

1885. 1886. 1887.

1885. | 1886. 1887. 1885. | 1886. 1887.

100 888 co

Murder,

3

Robbery with Violence from the Person, Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,. Assault with Intent to Rob,

96 64

31

70

33

23

15

93 68 60 36

32

11

3

4

1

5

Drunkenness,

Kidnapping,

53

78 90

25

63

54

55

72

Nuisance,....

Piracy,

17

10

8

13

1

18

10

14

No Pass or Light,

Unlawful Possession,

229

291

327 165

287

263

65

120

Larcenies,..

1,9271,898 | 1,985

952

898 815

300 278

280

Felonies not already given,

45

81

75

36

70 50

40

40

67

Total,..

2,466 2,500 2,577 1,298 1,389 1,234

561

472

565

===

10002889

13∞

Assault,

Gambling,

8 Miscellaneous,

Total,.

4,307|6,336|5,904 | 3,707 | 6,457 | 6,310

757

672 1,211

1887-Total Number of Cases 8,481, being a Decrease of 355 Cases or 4.01 per cent. on 1886.

Increase of Serious Crimes 77 Cases or 3.08 per cent.

Decrease of Minor Offences 432 Cases or 6.81 per cent.

Police Department, Hongkong, 20th January, 1888.

T

W. M. DEANE, Cuptain Superintendent of Police.

TABLE D.

1.-RETURN of SERIOUS OFFENCES reported to the POLICE, during the 10 Years ending 1887, showing the Number of Prisoners Arrested, Convicted and Discharged. Robbery with Violence

Murder.

from

the Person.

Burglary

and

Larceny in

Dwelling House.

Assault with

Intent to Rob.

Kidnapping.

Piracy.

Unlawful Possession.

Felonies

Larceny.

not already given.

YEAR.

t

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported:

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

1878,

7 4

1879,

4

1880,

1

1881,

2

1882,

2

1

1883,

1884,

1885.

1886,

1887,

:

:

10

20

35 12

2 14 13149

5 51

10

:

:

39 10

20

301101

44

9 53 1

ཡ་མ

53

31

69 100

00

8

1

6

470

410

166

576

1,888 1,037

304 1,341 19 10

18

28

:

...

51 38 40

:

25 16

3

CO

53 19 58 31 10

41 2

1

1

65

999

888888

78 7 6 I 7

333

302

105

407 | 1,850

972

302 1,274

11

5

7

12

43111

68

11 12

50 62 226

181

70

251

1,662

898

239 1,137

знай

1

15

16

1

19 15

8

1

30 21

6

27

23 60 31 8

91

42

50 35

...

:

49 | 27

76

1

2

2

55

29

2288

63

98

$8

59

888

7

12

9 21

303

307

53

360 1,879

979

260 1,239 9

7

t-

20

12

5

10

3 11 11

275

239

76

315 | 2,104 | 1,053

344 1,397 33

10

36

46

Total,..

16 10

2 12 148 71

39 113436 | 207 | 59 | 266

1

2

3274 201274 475 38 31

77 1111,607|1,439

470|1,909 | 9,383 4,939 1,449 | 6,388

78. 83

81 114

*2

2

50 17 15

32 81 21 4 25

1

1

1 30 7 42 49 13

4

8 12

254

217

81

26

26

52 18 8

26 47

15 9 24 2

1

1 32 4 39 43 9 16

28 44

298

262

23

៨.

2

96 70

35 105

67

00

2

61 33

15

48

68-32

82 283

7

55

no

1

I

53

2

6

38

1 6

1

1

31

23

رنت

26

60

11

00

8

19

:

:

90

388

78 63

859

25 CO 85 17

13

20 33

229

165

55 113 10

1

54

72126 8 18

14

10 11 291 287

32 327 263

109 371 2,153

96 261

65

120

298 1,980 887

949

312 1,199

82 25

22

47

322 1,271

55 32

19

51

952

1,927 352 1,898 898 278 1,176 84 70 383 1,985 815 280 1,095 76 50

300 1,252 45 36

40

998

76

40 | 110

68118

Total,..

13

31 BB

273161 76 237 323 107 | 34 |111| 10

7 2 9 283 153 268 421 | 57 52

801321,399 | 1,194

471 |1,665 | 9,913 4,501 1,492 5,993 342 213 189 402

Average of 1st period.......... Average of 2nd period,.. Police Department, Hongkong, 20th January, 1888.

3.2 2.0 0.4 2.4 29.6 14.8 7.8 22.6 87.2 41.4 11.8 53.2 0.8 0.2 0.4 0.6 54.8 40.2 54.8 95.0 7.6 | 6.8 15.4 22.2 321.4 287.8

2.6

...

6.2 16.6 54.6 32.2 15.2 47.4 64.6 21.4 [6.8 28.2 2.0 1.4 0.4 1.8 56.6 30.6 53.6 81.2 11.4 10.4 16.0 26,4||279.8 | 238.8

* In one case the Murderer committed Suicide.

94.0 381.8 1876.6 987.8 289.8 1277.6 15.6 6.6 16.2 22.8 94.2333.0 (1988.6| 900.2 | 298,41198.668.4 42.6 39.8 80.4

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Polier.

-511

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

Total,.....

1878,

1879,

1880,

1881,

1882,

YEAR.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons

convicted.

No. of Persons

discharged.

Total No.

arrested.

Cases

reported.

No. of Persons

convicted.

D.

2.-RETURN of Minor OFFENCES reported to the POLICE, during the 10 Years ending 1887, showing Number of Prisoners Arrested, Convicted and Discharged.

ASSAULT.

GAMBLING.

MISCELLANEous.

DRUNKEN-

NO LIGHT

NUISANCES.

OR PASS.

NESS.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No.

arrested.

Cases

reported.

Total,..

4,117

5,907

1,548

7,455

1,426

3,637

756

4,393

8,680

9,254

1,792 11,046

1,702

1,463

2,927

No. of Persons. convicted.

875

1,289

318 1,607

253

585

125

710

1,794

1,965

332

2,297

512

355

335

838

1,134

376 1,510

157

499

185

684

1,442

1,717

337

2,054

301

232

762

746

965

310

1,275

358

814

191

1,005 1,815 1,769

374

2,143

276

329

840

904

1,430

227

1,657

397

1,046

108

1,154

1,879 1,983

367 2,350

337

284

566

754

1,089

317

1,406

261

693

147

840

1,750

1,820

382

2,202

276

263

424

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No.

arrested.

730

852

299

1,151

86

358

166

524

2,629

2,804

559 3,363

158

527

1,135

1,118

1,513

397

1,910

104

594

124

718

2,441

2,636

581 3,217

202

790

2,896

753

973

273

1,246

255

736

58

794

1,901

1,998

426

2,424

323

690

387

1,031

1,486

225

1,711

248

762

31

793

3,735

4,209

416 4,626

373

470

479

1,101

1,425

335

1,760

99

766

211

977

3,941

4,119

668 4,787

231

340

192

Average of 1st period,..... Average of 2nd period,..

823.4 1181.4 309.6 1491.0 946.6 1049.8 305.8 1555.6

285.2 727.4

158.4 643.2

151.2 878.6

118.0 761.2

1736.0 1850.8 358.4 2209.2

340.4

292.6

585.4

2929.4 3153.2 530.0 3683.2

257.4

563.4

1,017.8

4,733 6,249 1,529

7,778

792

' 3,216

590

3,806

14,647

15,766

2,650❘ 18,416

1,287

2,817

5,089

Cases reported.

Cases

reported.

Cases

reported.

911

In 1878,

D.

3.-CASES REPORTED TO POLICE.

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

.2,611 cases.

In 1883,

1879,

.2,397

1884,

""

"

"

1880,

.2,051

1885,

29

25

1881, 1882,

..2,329

""

22

1886,

""

1887,

..2,596

11,984 cases.

.2,423 cases. .2,652 ...2,466 ..2,500 ......................2,577

29

""

"J

12,618 cases.

In 1878,

MINOR OFFENCES.

.4,224 cases.

"

""

In 1883,

1884,

1885.

"

1886, 1887.

1879,

.3,732

""

1880,

.4,364

""

1881, 1882,

.4,367

.3,728

20,415 cases.

Increase of 5.29 per cent. in second period.

.5,265 cases.

.7,551

"

.4,309

...6,336

"2

.5,904 ""

29,365 cases.

Increase of 43.84 per cent. in second period.

Altogether.

39

In 1878, 1879,

..6,835 cases.

In 1883,

..6,129

1884,

""

""

1880,

.6,415

27

1885,

15

1881,

.6,696

1886,

22

1882,

..6,324

""

1887,

"

32,399 cases.

.7,688 cases.

10,203

,.

..6,775

"

.8,836 ..8,481

41,983 cases.

Increase of 29.58 per cent. in second period.

4-DETAIL OF CASES REPORTED TO POLICE.

SERIOUS Offences.

1. Murder,

2. Robbery with Violence,

3. Burglaries & Larcenies in Dwellings,

4. Assault with Intent to Rob,

5. Kidnapping,

6. Piracy,

7. Unlawful Possession,

8. Larcenies,

9. Felonies not already given,

10. Assault,

11. Gambling,

12. Miscellaneous,

13. Drunkenness,

14. Nuisances,

15. No Pass or Light,

In 1878,

1879,

"J

1880,

95

1881,

22

1882,

117

1878 to 1882.

16

Yearly Average.

3.2

1883 to 1887.

Yearly Average.

13

2.6

148

29.6

273

54.6

436

87.2

323

64.6

1

0.8

10

2.0

274

54.8

283

56.6

38

7.6

57

11.4

..1,607

321.4

1,399

279.8

.9,383

1876.6

9,943

1988.6

78

15.6

342

68.4

MINOR OFFENCES.

1878 to 1882.

Yearly Average.

1883 to 1887.

Yearly Average.

.4,117

823.4

4,733

946.6

.1,426

285.2

792

158.4

..8,680

1736.0

14,647

2929.4

.1,702

340.4

1,287

257.1

..1,463

292.6

2,817

563.4

..2,927.

585.4

5,089

1017.8

5-NUMBER OF PRISONERS ARRESTED BY POLICE.

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

.2,125 cases.

.1,866 1,638 ..1,796 ..1,966

""

دو

وو

27

In 1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

"

1887,

In 1878, 1879,

"" 1880,

""

"J

1881.

1882,

9,391 cases.

FOR MINOR OFFENCES.

Excepting Nos. 13, 14 and 15 (See Table 2) of which no details are given.

In 1883,

4,614 cases.

.4,248

1884,

12

4,423

1885,

"

...5,161

1886,

"

.4,448

13

1887,

22,894 cases.

..1,663 cases. ..1,857 .1,859 .1,861 .1,799

"

""

32

22

9,039 cases.

...5,038 cases. ...5,845 ..4,464 .7,129 ..7,524

""

19

وو

"

30,000 cases.

118

Altogether excepting Nos. 13, 14 and 15.

.6,789 cases.

In 1878,

""

"

1879, 1880,

...6,114

9

..6,061

27

1881,

"

1882,

.6,957 ..6,414

وو

29

In 1883,

""

1884,

1885,

""

25

1886,

1887,

وو

32,285 cases.

6.-DETAILS OF NUMBER OF PRISONERS ARRESTED.

1. Murder,

2. Robbery with Violence from Person,

3. Burglaries and Larcenies from Dwellings,

4. Assault with Intent to Rob,

5. Kidnapping,

6. Piracy,....

7. Unlawful Possession,.

8. Larcenies,

9. Felonies not given,..

10. Assault,.

11. Gambling,

12. Miscellaneous,..

13. Drunkenness,

14. Nuisances,

15. No Pass or Light,

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

6,701 cases.

..7,702 ..6,323 ..8,990 ..9,323

""

12

"

39,039 cases.

1878 to 1882.

12

1883 to 1887.

33

113

237

266

141

3

9

475

421

111

132

1,909

1,665

6,388

5,993

114

402

9,391

9,033

FOR MINOR OFFENCES.

1878 to 1882.

1883 to 1887.

7.455

7,778

4,393

3,806

11,046

18,416

1,702

1,287

1,463

2,817

2,927

5,089

28,986

39,193

7-NUMBER OF PERSONS CONVICTED AND DISCHARGED.

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

Convicted. Discharged.

Convicted.

Discharged.

In 1878,

..1,554

571

In 1883,

.1,178

485

""

1879,

.1,381

485

دو

1884,

1,297

560

1880,

..1,208

430

1885,

.1,298

561

99

""

1881, 1882,

1,390

406

1886,

.1,389

472

....1,405

561

1887,

.1,234

565

39

6,938

2,453

6,396

2,643

FOR MINOR OFFENCES.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Convicted.

Discharged.

In 1878,

..3,839

775

In 1883,

.4,014

1,024

,, 1879,

,3,350

898

1884,

22

4,743

1,102

1880,

.3,548

875

وو

">

1885,

.3,707

757

""

1881,

.4,459

702

1886,

"J

..6,457

672

1882,

..3,602

846

,, 1887,

6,310

1,214

18,798

4,096

25,231

4,769

Altogether excepting Nos. 13, 14 and 15.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Convicted.

Discharged.

In 1878,

.5,393

1,346

In 1883,

.5,192

1,509

1879,

4,731

1,383

1884,

..6,040

"

29

1,662

1880,

..4,756

1,305

"

1885,

.5,005

1,318

1881,

5,849

1,108

>>

1886,

7,846

1,144

1882,

...5,007

1,407

1887,

..7,544

1,779

25,736

6,549

31,627

7,412

.

119

TABLE E.

RETURN shewing the STRENGTH, ENLISTMENTS and CASUALTIES in the Police Force during 1887.

Strength of the Force. *

Enlistments. Deaths.

Resignations through Sickness.

Resignations through expiry of term of service

Dismissals

or

Desertions.

or otherwise.

Total number of Casualties.

Europeans,

114

12

خير

4

6

10

5

15

Indians,

220

15

1

10

5

14

5

25

Chinese,.

347

66

4

4

26

27

61

TOTAL,......

681

38383

93

9

9

46

37

101

* Exclusive of-1 Captain Superintendent.

1 Adjutant.

4 Clerks.

55 Coolies.

Police Department, Hongkong, 20th January, 1888.

Grand Total, 742.

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

RETURN of Number, Tonnag

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

IN STEAMERS.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tous. Cre

Australia and New Zealand,

54

71,103 2,554

British Columbia,

6

12,446

394

British North America,

1

884

16

British North Borneo,

7

4,088

96

:

:

:

:

:

45

66,832 2,

:

:

:

6

12,446

Coast of China and Formosa,

699

729,705 29,334|

30

33,085

1,041

712

Canton River Trade,

889 1,055,939 35,054

Cochin-China,

145

183,703 5,166|

Continent of Europe,

37

68,700 4,012

Great Britain,....

165

252,524 6,904|

:

:

:..

India and Singapore,

83

110,308 6,224

:

:.

:

:

:

:

752,937 30,1

889 1,055,939 35,0

145

183,703 5,1

37

68,700 4,0

155 239,360 6,1

81

109,113 6,1

Japan,

147

192,443 7,186

3

3,804

72

147

191,288 7,1

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archipelago,.......

17

27,097 649

17 27,097

:

Macao,.....

3

981

81

Macao River Trade,

333

450,992 17,328|

Mauritius,

1

973

36

:

:

North Pacific,

:

:

:

:

:

3

981

333

450,992 17,8

1

973

:

Philippine Islands, .............

80

46,157 3,247

1 1,380

34

76

44,965 3,2

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,

99

35,943 2,658 1

647

27

100

36,590 2,€

Russia in Asia,

1 1,329 27

1

:

:

1,329

Sandwich Islands,

3

1,501

42

Siam,

United States of America,........

110

104,915 3,757

19

43,041 1,614

108

:

:

:

:

:

104,232 3,7

17

40,646 1,5

TOTAL,....

2,896 3,393,271 126,337 38 40,417 1,216 2,873 3,388,123 126,

RETURN OF TONNAGE, &c. ENTERED TH

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command

Tonnage and Crews of STEAMERS, SAILING VESSELS and J

BRITISH.

FORE

IN STEAMERS.

IN SAILING VESSELS.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

IN STEAMERS.

ls.

Tous. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

5

66,832 2,431 9

4,271

123

54

71,103 2,554

61

4,007

74

2

2,718

42

:

:

6

12,446 394

:

6 12,446 394

:

:

1

884

16

1

884

16

:

:

7 4,088 96

7 4,088 96

2 1,064

27

:

:

:

.:.

:

:

2 752,937 30,141 17

9,853

234

39 1,055,939 35,054

tō 183,703 5,166

:

:

:

729 762,790 30,375 14,054 1,415,856 191,443 9,203 674,234 110,052

889 1,055,939 35,054

290

360,654 15,126

:

145

17

68,700 4,012

55 239,360 6,688| 10

31

109,113 6,198 2

13,164 216

1,195 26

17

191,288 7,182) 3 4,959

76

150

.7

27,097 649

3

981

81

33

450,992 17,328

1

973

36

:

:

:

:..

:.

:

:

:

:

:

17 27,097

77 183,703 5,166|

37 68,700 4,012

165 252,524 6,904

83 110,308 6,224

57,652 1,952

196,247 7,258 112 156,373 6,493

649

37,799 1,566|

57,858 2,013

81 157,753 7,537

11 12,672 251

1

181

11

78

58,039 2,021

1

293

15

79

155,322 7,504

4

4,334 118

58

2

2,851 971

50

51,147 1,841

5

6,318 215

112

156,468 6,602

31

27

:.

36,124 1,514

3

981

81 379

58,490 9,239||

221

29,517 4,065

13

5,046 242

333

450,992 17,328

24

9,600

456

24

:

1

973

36

1

754

22

:

...

1

:

:

276) 10

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

456 9,600

1

754 22

6

44,965 3,217

00 36,590 2,685

10

5

2,572

64

81 47,537 3,281

56!

29,995 1,756

645

43

45

24,808 1,610

1

1,329 271

:

:

:

100

36,590 2,685

199

89,756 4,152

5

4,275 101

1

:

1,329

27

11

:

3

1,501

42

3

1,501 42

61

19,726 1,082

3,395

11

203 92,811 4,237

19,726 1,082

83

2,532

50

:

18

104,232 3,731

2

683

26

110

104,915 3,757 751

65,286 1,877

:

:

€0. 57,720 1,619

.7

140,646 1,576

2 2,395

38

19

43,041 1,614) 35

66,269 2,401|

:

20

47,626 2,214

33,888,123 126,596

61 45,565

957 · 2,934 3,433,688 127,553 15,219 2,244,582 232,437 9,446 723,567 | 114.691 1,017 1,080,179| 46,214

TOTAL OF

and JUNKS entered in the Colony of Hongkong, during t.

ENTERED THE COLONY IN 1887.

Command of His Excellency the Governor,

STEAMERS.

IN SAILING VESSELS.

IN JUNKS.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Yes.

8 6,725 116

:

:

8

6,725

116

60

75,110 2,628

2

2,718

42

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

6

12,416

394

222222

:

:

:

1

:

:

884

16

:

2 1,064 27

9

5,152

123

:

:

FOREIGN.

2 1,064

27

360,654| 15,126| 33 18,474 433 22,934 1,710,962 285,936 23,257 2,090,090 301,495 14,753 2,145,561 220,777 9,233 707,319 111,093 1,C

:

:

:

8

889 1,055,939 85,054

11

12,672

78 58,039 2,024

82 158,046 7,552

251

222 241,561 7,179

1

181

11 2

118 226,453 11,549

176 265,196 7,155

1

293

15 1

:

1

60

60,506 2,049

117 162,691 6,708

31

600

241 9,600

37,799 1,566

88,007 13,304|

456

141 167,960 8,176

259 348,816, 13,679

48

3821

2

8

2,854

10,122

97 1

287

2.

64,896 2,215

59,471 9,320

2211 29,517 4,065

I

357 460,592, 17,784

35

]

754

22

2

1,727

58

1

276

10

1

276

10

:

:

:

:.

:

:

58

30,640 1,799

136 76,152 5,003

2,025

77

12

204

94,031 4,253|

298 125,699 6,810

6

4,922

128

333

30

11

10

75

19,726 1,082

5,928 1381

65,286 1,877)

12

21,055 1,109

1

61 3,396 831

185 170,201 5,634

7

4,033

92

16

35 66,269 2,404

54 109,310, 4,018

:

30

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

58,039|||| 2,02-||

55,322 7,504 3

2,724

48

4,334 118 7 8,338 133

51,147 1,844| 10 9,359

205

56,468 6,602 5 6,223 106

587

82,961 13,062

36,124 1,514

4 1,675

52

5,046 242

:

9,600

456

:

:

754

22

:

:

:

:

:

1

276

10

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

F:

:

:

1,916|23,521|1,793,923 298,998 24,6652,968,149| 347,128| 18,1155,637,853 358,774|| 9,484| 763,984|115,907 3,89€

F:

:

:

:.

F.

24,808 1,610 13 5,832 139

2,811 4,287 1 1,220

19,726 1,082

16

10 5,928 133

$7,720 1,619 15 7,866 258

7,626 2,214 15 18,643 190

0,179 46,214 127 94,047

:

during the Year 1887.

TOTAL OF EACH CLASS OF VESSEL.

GRAND TOTAL

OF ALL.

IN BALLAST.

IN STEAMERS.

IN SAILING VESSELS.

IN JUNKS.

Is.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

2

2,718

42

45

66,832 2,431) 17 10,996

239

62

6

12,446 394

:

...

1

884

16

9 5,152 123

:.

:

:

:

:..

77,828 2,670

:

6 12,446 394

1

884

16

3 707,319 111,093 1,002 1,113,591 45,267) 50

28,327

889 1,055,939 35,054

181

11

223 241,742 7,190

:

:

293

15

116 224,022 11,516

3

2,724

48

99999

:

:

:

139

243,694 6,806, 17

21,502 349

:

:

:.

F.

2,854

97

131

160,260 8,042, 12

10,554 231

10,122 287

259 347,756 13,784 8

11,182 182

44

63,221 2,163) 4

1,675

52

:

:

:

:.

:

:

9 5,152 123

667 22,934 1,710,962 285,936| 23,9862,852,880 331,870

8891,055,939| 35,051

223 241,742 7,190

119 226,746 11,564

176 265,195 7,155

143 170,814 8,273

29,517 4,065

16

6,027 323

357

460,592 17,784

:

:

2

1,727

.:.

F:

:

1

276

10

2,025

ང་

77

121

69,773 4,827, 18 8,404 253

4,922 128 303

129,401 6,922

1

1,220 16

12

21,055 1,109

4,033

92

13

7,429 175

:

168

37

161,952 5,350 - 17 8,249

88,272 3,790 17

284

21,038 228

58

...

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

..

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

587

82,961 13,062

357 460,592 17,784

267 358,938 13,966

48

64,896 2,215

603

88,988 13,385

1,727 58

1

276

10

139 78,177 5,080

304 130,621 6,938

12

21,055 1,109

13 7,429 175

185 170,201 5,634

54 109,310 4,018

763,984 115,907 3,890 4,468,302 172,810, 188

139,612 2,873 23,521 1,793,923 298,998 27,599 6,401,837 474,681

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

No.

5

88.

HONGKONG.

PAPERS RELATING TO THE IMPORTATION OF SUBSIDIARY COINS.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1)

RETURN OF THE AMOUNT OF SMALL COIN IMPORTED INTO HONGKONG

DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS.

Copper.

Silver.

1878,

1879,

$10,000

$ 48,000

1880,

10,000

50,000

1881,

10,000

50,000

1882,

100,000

1883,

100,000

1884,

220,000

1885,

370,000 -

1886,

500,000

1887,

400,000

MARKET VALUES OF HONGKONG SUBSIDIARY COINS DURING THE LAST

FIVE YEARS.

Cash.

Cents.

Silver.

1883, May 1,

Discount.

12 per cent.

Discount.

10 per cent.

Premium.

.9 per cent.

""

November 6,

10

1.

19

1884, May 2,

November 3,

1885, May

">

6/1/

1.4

33

""

6/1/1

LO

5

.85

""

""

"

;

2,

6

5

1.

"

59

95

November 6,

4

3

.3

པོ

""

A

""

1886, May 3,

5

4/

.33

"

November 2,

4

.35

""

1887, May

2,

Cr

5

.35

""

November 3,

3

1.35

">

"

TREASURY,

Hongkong, January 30th, 1888.

* Jubilee, 1.8 p.c. premium.

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

(2)

No. 19.

SIR,

TREASURY,

HONGKONG, 8th May, 1883.

I have the honour to suggest that the Crown Agents be instructed to send out to this Colony $50,000 worth of subsidiary silver coinage every half-year, without special instructions for each shipment. The proportion of 20, 10, and 5-cent pieces should be the same as in recent shipments, and no copper should be sent on any account. This plan of a half-yearly supply is the same as that adopted with regard to Postage Stamps, and if vigilance be used against over-stocking it works well.

.

But there is not the slightest risk of any over-stock of these silver coins, even if we got double the amount suggested. They disappear into the interior of China, and I am informed that they may be seen in the most remote parts of the Kwang- tung province, converted into buttons and all kinds of similar small articles. If this coinage were a source of loss to the Government, it would become a very serious question how the absolutely indispensable supply could be kept up, but as we make it at least five per cent. on it we can afford its steady absorption into China. Still, in view of the possibility that this correspondence may be submitted to the Imperial Treasury, I should like to say plainly that these coins are not asked for because, incidentally, they yield a profit. We desire to keep the Public Offices reasonably supplied with change, which is still difficult, and to have suffi- cient small coin left for the wants of the Public, the Army, and the Navy. I pledge myself to stop the supply on the very first symptom of the coins falling to a discount, but there is not at present the least reason to anticipate anything of the kind.

I am happy to say that the good effects of stopping the supply of copper are already perceptible. Copper cents used to be at a discount of thirty per cent., the discount now is only ten per cent. Still we ought not to think of having any out till they are at a premium.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

· A. LISTER, Treasurer.

Governor's Order in reply to the above.

I doubt very much whether the Secretary of State would sanction a general instruction of this nature. The introduction into any Colony of large quantities of Tokens is looked on with suspicion. It is easy to make requisitions from time to time as these tokens are wanted. $50,000 worth were sent for quite recently.

(3)

No. 27.

SIR,

TREASURY, HONGKONG, 2nd July, 1883.

I have the honour to request that the Crown Agents be directed to order and forward to this Colony as soon as possible $60,000 worth of Subsidiary Silver Coin.

My reason for making this requisition at this time is that unless it be forwarded at once the coins will not arrive before the Chinese New Year, at which time there is always a run upon them.

I would call your attention to the following facts with reference to the last shipment, which speak for themselves.

$50,000 worth of small coin was ready for issue at this Department on April 17th last. No notice was issued to the public.

The military and naval authorities at once requisitioned for $22,000.

2

The subsequent issues were as follows:--

Week ending April 21,.

"

.$12,600

28,

4,500

May 5,..

12,

2,100

2,100

""

$21,300

The issue was stopped on May 16th, as the balance on hand (after 4 weeks only) was reduced to $6,800, which it was absolutely necessary to keep for Gov- ernment use. Since suspending the issue of these coins, the following applications have been refused, within little more than a month.

Messageries Maritimes Company,... Chartered Mercantile Bank,

Oriental Bank,

Messrs. Turner & Co.,

Mr. A. M. Baptista,

M. Marmande,

Chartered Bank of India,

The Basel Mission,

Pacific Mail Company,

Eastern Extension Telegraph Company,

$ 100

3,000

2,000

30

100

50

10,000

30

200

50

$15,560

Had any notice been issued to the public when the coins first arrived, there would have been many more than the above applications.

I would add that persons so applying are of course requested to wait for the next shipment; but when that arrives, the coins are expended so quickly, that unless they are very prompt indeed (and on the last occasion we could not venture to notify the arrival of a consignment) they find they have again missed an oppor- tunity of getting some small change.

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

No. 41.

:

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

A. LISTER, Colonial Treasurer.

(4)

TREASURY,

SIR,

HONGKONG, 29th October, 1883.

I have the honour to suggest that the Crown Agents be requested to order and forward to this Colony $60,000 worth of Subsidiary Silver Coin in the following proportions:-

Twenty cent pieces,.

Ten cent pieces,

Five cent ""

No copper should be sent upon any account.

.10 per cent.

..60

""

>>

.30

39

,,

In making this Requisition I am not unaware that one shipment of $50,000 is already in the Colony, whilst another of $60,000 will shortly be on the way.

The former, however, will probably be all absorbed before the end of this year, the latter will arrive in time for the Chinese New Year, and will all be taken up within a few weeks, if even the Military and Naval Authorities do not requisition for a large portion of either shipment or of both.

3

A trifling incident tends to shew what the scarcity of these coins is.

A lady presented herself the other day at the Post Office window and begged to be allowed two dollars worth of small change. She was a stranger, and was unable to get change anywhere in the Town. Had the applicant been a man, I should unhesi- tatingly have refused, for I had with difficulty spared $80 from the scanty reserve in the Treasury for the wants of the Post Office and Stamp Office.

Had the shipment which is now to hand arrived but a week or two later, we should have had to purchase small coins at a premium of about one per cent. for the use of the various Departments.

A profit of about 5 per cent. accrues on these coins.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Hon. W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

No. 43.

(5)

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

TREASURY,

HONGKONG, 3rd November, 1883.

SIR,

With reference to my letter No. 41 of October 29th, on the subject of a further supply of Subsidiary Silver Coin, I beg to call your attention to the following facts.

A consignment of $50,000 worth of these coins has just come to hand. They were counted into the Bank on the 31st. No notice whatever has been issued to the public, indeed I am at a loss to know where the applicants for the coins got their information.

Nevertheless in two days issues have been made to the amount of $16,390, mostly in small sums. Had I not cut down some of the Requisitions, which were for immoderate amounts, the issue would have been over $26,000, or more than half the shipment.

A set of rules has been framed for the regulation of the issue of these coins, I would suggest that a few printed copies be forwarded to the Secretary of State.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Hon. W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

(6)

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

TREASURY,

No. 26.

SIR,

HONGKONG, 4th September, 1884.

I have the honour to call your attention to a point of considerable practical interest in connection with our subsidiary coinage.

It appears to me that if this coinage, instead of consisting of 5, 10, and 20 cent pieces consisted of 5 and 10 cent pieces, quarter dollars, and half dollars, it would be in every way more useful even than it is. There is moreover, I think, ample power to introduce quarter and half dollars under the Queen's proclamation of January 9th, 1863 (see Gazette of May 2nd, 1863) and Ordinance No. 1 of

1864.

4

The quarter and half dollars so introduced would of course be tokens contain- ing 20 per cent. of alloy, but so far from this being a disadvantage, it might very possibly suffice to prevent the export of these coins to China, which, in the case of the present subsidiary coinage, drains the Colony of it as fast as it is imported. I am told that these coins are now in common use in Canton, throughout the Kwang- tung province, and are even beginning to be seen in the North. There is perhaps no great objection to China's being supplied with coin through this Colony, except that we cannot keep sufficient here. The following figures will shew that the large importations of silver coin we have lately made have not in the least tended to overstock the Colony, for the premium in the ordinary market on ten cent pieces

was :-

On May 1, 1883,.

"

""

November 6, 1883... May 2, 1884, September 4, 1884,

.9 per cent.

1

**

"}

1.4

23

1

"1

"

The Chinese are well aware that these coins are alloyed, but their extreme convenience over-balances the popular prejudice against alloyed silver. A half- dollar, however, is a more serious matter to a native than 10 cents, and I think it quite possible that a token half-dollar, whilst passing here freely enough, might command no great circulation on the mainland. If this turned out to be the case, it would be a great boon to this Colony, for we could then keep here a respectable and fairly portable coinage for our own local use.

The experiment would have to be made with caution, for it would not do to encumber the Government with a large shipment of an unpopular coin. But even if the new half-dollar were a little unpopular at first, the eagerness of the Chinese to get five and ten cent pieces would float off any moderate quantity, if (as at pre- sent) the rule were enforced of issuing all denominations of coins together.

No attempt to provide a half-dollar of par value could be made without serious loss.

I make no proposals at present about any definite supply, as it will probably be thought advisable to refer the general question home first.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

The Hon. W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

The Government would be much obliged to the Manager of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, if he would state his views in this recommendation.

4th September, 1884.

To the Honourable T. JACKSON.

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

Memo. for the Colonial Secretary.

I do not agree with the Treasurer that token coins of the value of twenty- five cents, and fifty cents each should be introduced into Hongkong.

I am of opinion that the present subsidiary issue of five, ten, and twenty cent pieces meets the requirements of the Colony.

The export of subsidiary coins from Hongkong ought not to be looked upon as a grievance, considering that there is a large profit upon them; I think the profit upon said coins might be increased by judicious purchases of Silver in London from time to time when favorable opportunities occur. An ample supply of subsidiary coins ought always to be kept in Hongkong.

The proposed method of forcing the half dollar token coins into circulation I consider most arbitrary, and unworthy of the Government of this Colony.

T. JACKSON. Chief Manager,

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank.

Hongkong, 6th September, 1884.

5

Mr. SILVA, (1st Audit Clerk),

Can you state the profit during last 12 months, reckoning loss on Exchange on remittances to pay for the coin.

8th September, 1884.

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

Statement annexed.

J. M. SILVA.

PROFIT ON SUBSIDIARY SILVER COINS.

WHEN RECEIVED.

WHERE COined.

RATE

OF REMITTANCES.

PROFIT.

s. d.

1879,

Royal Mint,

3/103

12

%

1880,

R. Heaton & Sons,

3/9

5룸 %

1881,

Royal Mint,

3/91

6.04%

1882,

R. Heaton & Sons,

3/91

4.43%

1883,

Royal Mint,

3/83

12.09%

R. Heaton & Sons,

5.05%

Average Profit, 7.46 %.

I annex a report on this proposal from the Honourable T. JACKSON, Chief Manager of the Bank (Hongkong and Shanghai) I agree with him that the proposal of the Treasury cannot be recommended. Moreover it would be contrary to express instructions of the Lords of the Treasury to issue Token half dollars. See Government Gazette No. 2 of 1867. We have made an average profit of 71 per cent. during the last five years on the imports of Subsidiary coins. Therefore it does not matter how large the drain of these coins may be.

Submitted.

8th September, 1884.

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

I agree. But for Executive Council.

9th September, 1884.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

Considered in Executive Council this day. The Council advise that no change should be made in the coinage of the Colony.

10th September, 1884.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

6

No. 32.

(7)

TREASURY,

SIR,

HONGKONG, 22nd May, 1885.

With reference to the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 81 of April 1st on the subject of One Dollar Notes, which His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to refer to me for report, I have the honour to submit the following observations:-

2. Lord DERBY sums up the matter as follows:-"If inconvenience is still felt in the Colony owing to the deficiency of $1 notes, the only course to adopt will be that which has already been put before you with the sanction of the Trea- sury, whereby the Colonial Government itself should undertake the circulation of these notes against a bullion reserve.” It now becomes my duty to point out that, in the present state of the Colonial Revenue, the demands upon it being so nu- merous and pressing, so conflicting, I may almost say so bewildering, the heavy expense of issuing and maintaining notes is out of the question. The incon- veniences of course will remain, but it is the unanimous opinion of those best able to judge that they may be much diminished by a liberal and constant supply of subsidiary silver coin.

3. I trust therefore that the Requisitions I shall have to make for this des- cription of coin will not alarm either the Colonial Office or the Treasury. It must be clearly borne in mind that it is impossible to flood Hongkong with these coins, as a colony like Mauritius or Ceylon might be flooded with them. As fast as they arrive they are bought up and sent into China, where they seem rapidly to be becoming a popular and useful coinage, the only one, except in copper, that there is. There is not the least symptom of a cessation of the demand, nor of any limit to the amount of coin that could be disposed of. The only way to avoid the inconveniences consequent on a scarcity of small coin here at such times as Chinese New Year, &c., is always to have a reserve to fall back upon.

4. Two shipments of these coins, amounting in all to $270,000, have been ordered from England.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Hon. W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

HONGKONG.

No. 34.

Governor

SIR,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

(8)

DOWNING STREET,

17th August, 1885.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 244 of the 26th of May last, reporting that your Government has decided against undertaking an issue of One Dollar Notes, and proposes to meet the difficulty arising from a scarcity of subsidiary currency by an increased issue of token coins.

Although there does not seem to be any present danger of these coins being forced, perhaps at a discount, I think it right to remind you that, in view of such a possibility in future, they should only be issued in response to a legitimate demand, keeping the supply short rather than full.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient humble Servant,

Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

FRED. STANLEY.

7

(9)

No. 58.

SIR,

TREASURY, HONGKONG, 24th September, 1885.

With reference to your letter No. 1316 of yesterday's date, in which you refer to me for consideration and report a Despatch from the Secretary of State, No. 34 of August 17th, on the subject of the issue of subsidiary coins here, I have the honour to report as follows:-

There is not at present any prospect of subsidiary silver coin being at a dis- count, or of any difficulty being experienced in issuing it. There is to-day a balance of $54,000 worth of these coins in the Treasury, all of which, and far more, could be got rid of in a few days by simply letting it be understood that Chinese might have as much as they liked to ask for. I hope to keep a special reserve of at least $50,000 against the Chinese New Year, but whether this will be sufficient to abate the run on small coin which always exists at that time only experience can shew.

The market prices of these coins have been as follows:-

November 6th,

1883, May 1st,

1884, May 2nd,

1885, May 2nd,

September 24th,

November 3rd,

.9

per cent premium.

1

""

""

1.4

""

**

""

.85

""

""

>>

1

""

";

""

.5 ""

"9

""

It will be seen that there is no tendency towards a reduction in the market- able value of the coins, in spite of the larger quantities which have been imported. It must be clearly borne in mind that we are only pouring water into a sieve, and that on the other side of the sieve is China, an enormous country with no coinage, but quite alive to the advantages of one.

Should the value of these coins at any time sink to par, shipments will be suspended.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

P.S.-To-day's low rate of premium on these coins is probably caused by the fact that they are obtainable free at the Treasury, which is the exception and not the rule. Directly our balance is exhausted the rate will rise till the next shipment arrives.

The Hon. F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

(Copy.)

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

(10)

The Treasury to the Colonial Office.

TREASURY CHAMBER,

14th January, 1887.

SIR,

In reply to Mr. MEADE's letter of the 31st ultimo, I am directed by the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury to aquaint you, for the information of the Secretary for the Colonies, that the necessary directions have this day been given to the Deputy Master of the Mint to supply (should he see no objection) the undermentioned subsidiary coins for the use of the Government of Hongkong, to the total nominal value of $150,000, as requested in the letter under reply, viz.:

20 cent pieces

10

5

"}

27

.....10 per cent. ......60

""

.30

""

8

I am, however, to add that My Lords hope that the large profit male by the Colonial Government upon the issue of these silver Tokens for circulation not within the limits of the Colony, but on the mainland of China, is not leading them to lose sight of the serious risk, that is continually augmenting, of future embar- rassment to the Colonial Treasury through the return of worn tokens for exchange, at their full nominal value, in possibly very large quantities at once.

The Colonial Government is of course under no obligation to furnish a medium of exchange to the Chinese Empire, and if Chinese subjects choose to buy Hongkong tokens for their own convenience, they could not complain if the Hongkong Government were to refuse to repurchase them, from holders resident in China, at the price of issue. But the question is whether it will be possible, when the coins circulating in China are defaced (by unfair means perhaps) to prevent Hongkong dealers from collecting them at a discount, and then presenting them to the Treasury for redemption at par.

My Lords hope that this subject may be carefully considered before the next demand for Hongkong Token coins is made.

The Under-Secretary of State,

Colonial Office.

HONGKONG. No. 17.

SIR,

I am, &c.,

(Signed),

R. E. WELBY,

(11)

DOWNING STREET,

4th February, 1887.

I have the honour to transmit to you a copy of a letter from the Treasury stating that the mint has been directed to supply the subsidiary coins asked for in your despatch No. 362 of the 15th of November last, and drawing attention to the danger of the issue of these coins in large quantities for use outside the Colony.

I see that my predecessor drew Sir GEORGE BOWEN's attention to this question in a despatch dated the 17th of August, 1885, No. 34.

I have the honour to be,

The Officer Administering the Government of

Sir,

Your most obedient humble Servant,

H. T. HOLLAND.

No. 10.

HONGKONG.

(12)

TREASURY,

HONGKONG, 6th April, 1887.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter No. 367 of the 16th instant, transmitting for my consideration and report a despatch from the Secretary of State, No. 17 of February 4th, on the supply of subsidiary coin to this Colony, and its use in China.

2. In an enclosure to that Despatch the Lords of the Treasury express, through their Secretary, a hope "that the large profit made by the Colonial Govern- ment upon the issue of these silver Tokens for circulation, not within the limits of the Colony, but on the mainland of China, is not leading them to lose sight of the serious risk, that is continually augmenting, of future embarrassment to the Colo- nial Treasury through the return of coins for exchange at their full nominal value, in possibly very large quantities at once."

9

3. I have given this subject my best consideration. I would remark, in the first place, that the profit on the coins, which is little more than what this Colony would obtain, without any expenditure of labour or trouble, by simply placing money in the Banks here on fixed deposit, has not suggested the obtaining of a single coin more than would have been asked for under any circumstances short of a prohibitive loss. If the coins were obtainable only at par I should have recom- mended every requisition I have recommended. If they were obtainable at a slight loss, I should have asked for as many as we could afford. I cannot see that the Government is less bound to provide coin than it is bound to provide roads, water, or police; and I consider it as much my duty to see that the supply of coin does not run out as I do to take the same precaution with regard to the stock of Postage Stamps.

4. I would further say that this Government does not encourage the exporta- tion of coin to China, but it is powerless to prevent it. We used to issue subsi- diary coins only on a written uudertaking that they would not be exported. The promise was not worth the paper it was written on, and its exaction was such a transparent farce that I substituted for it a system of granting any reasonable ap- plication for coin according to the eircumstances of the applicant. A shopkeeper in a large way of business, for instance, is allowed more than a petty trader, an employer of labour more still, and so on. This system works smoothly, but of course the export of the coin goes on as it always has done.

5. It would in many ways be more convenient to this Colony to keep the coin here, but no means of doing so could be devised.

6. It must not be forgotten that Hongkong is very badly provided with cur- rency, and for this reason the Managers of the Banks have repeatedly begged me not to allow the Colony to be left, as it used to be, for months at a time, with small coin unobtainable except at 10 per cent. premium. A shipment of $50,000 worth would arrive perhaps once in two years, and, however charily distributed, it was absorbed in a fortnight. Change was given only as a favour, a request for it was often regarded as positively unreasonable.

7. When I took charge of the Post Office, twelve years ago, it was regarded as the normal and almost legitimate state of affairs for the Shroffs employed to sell stamps never to have any change. Of course the real reason was that, with small coin at a high premium, they put aside all they got from the public for sale to money changers and others, and no consideration of the inconvenience they were inflicting on the public or on their employers deterred them from doing this. It is only of late years that I have been able to insist upon change being kept both in the Post Office and in the Stamp Office. As the premium on small silver coin, under ordinary circumstances, is now only about 3 per mille, the temptation to make away with it surreptitiously does not exist to any great extent.

8. The trying time is of course Chinese New Year, at which period it is the custom amongst Chinese to pay all debts and close all accounts. Only two years ago, during the three or four days before the Chinese old year's eve, small coin was at 200 per cent. premium. The Treasury had none to issue, the Banks had none, and Bank Notes were not to be had for love or money. The inconvenience to those who had many small payments to make, to the Commissariat, the Dockyard, to employers of labour, and public companies, was so great that I resolved on no account to allow such a state of things to recur if any vigilance of this Department could prevent it.

9. On the approach of the last Chinese New Year (January 24th, 1887) there was $180,000 worth of small coin in the Treasury, and this supply, amounting to no less than two and a quarter millions of coins, I considered to be ample. Never- theless, two months before the new year, such a steady demand set in that, though the requisitions were cut down as much as they reasonably could be, in four weeks the whole was exhausted, and the issue had to be suspended, if only to keep a few coins for the use of the Police, &c. It was at this juncture that an urgent request was received from the Army Payinaster for $10,000 worth of coin. I was enabled to make the issue, because I knew that after the New Year I could, if necessary, purchase small coin for Government use at a merely nominal premium. It has not been necessary to do so, but until the next shipment arrived we were on famine allowance, and the issue to the public was suspended. I should say, however, that no inconvenience appeared to arise from the exhaustion of the supply of coin at that time, as the Chinese community, in exhausting the Treasury stock, had suffi- ciently supplied itself. The new shipment arrived on March 22nd, and $48,000 of it, or nearly one-third, was issued in a week, to the Banks, the Commissariat, and the public.

10

10. It must not be forgotten that we have the wants of the Army and Navy to provide for. Every ship, before going North, obtains a supply of coin, because these coins pass anywhere in China or Japan, and, except broken silver or Ja- panese money, nothing else is to be had.

11. The total amount of subsidiary coin supplied to Hongkong to date has been $2,133,881, including some copper, which has not been exported. Of the silver, probably not ten per cent. is in the Colony.

12. I trust I have shown the necessity for keeping this Colony supplied with small coin, and the impossibility of the Government's exercising any check on its exportation except by declining to issue it at all. I now pass on to consider the risk of these coins being hereafter thrown upon the Colony for redemption in a worn or mutilated condition. I venture to think that this risk is very small, and that, even if it exists, which is doubtful, it would be easily averted. It should be borne in mind that these coins are not a legal tender for sums of more than $2.

13. The subsidiary coinage of Hongkong has been in circulation nearly a quarter of a century. During all that time no worn or mutilated coin has ever been seen in the Treasury. I am inclined to think silver coin would never become worn in China as it does in England, for the people do not carry it loose in their pockets, but always most carefully in a pouch or purse, or wrapped in paper; nor is it passed about to anything like the extent that silver coin is in Europe. Be this as it may, the fact remains that our silver coins are as yet practically unworn.

14. Chinese are great hoarders of coin. The popularity of our five cent pieces very greatly arises from their common use as little presents to children and servants. Thousands of them are made into buttons. It would probably be difficult for a speculator on the mainland to buy any quantity of these coins at profitable rates.

15. Let it be supposed, however, that in the course of another 25 years there will be, on the mainland of China, thousands of five and ten cent pieces in the same condition as old sixpences and shillings in England, namely, mere discs of silver, with perhaps slight vestiges of the original design of the coins. Let it be further supposed that a speculator has brought up $10,000 worth of these, and proposes to flood this Colony with them, forcing them on the Treasury as coin at a discount is always forced upon it.

16. It appears to me that the only course open to the Government would be to decline to recognise any coin which could not be shewn to have been issued from the Treasury here. This would practically amount to refusing to redeem all worn coins except in very rare cases.

17. If it once were known that the Hongkong Government was receiving at par

value coins which purported to be tokens worn out on the mainland, we should be at once inundated with coins by the thousand which had never been in or near Hongkong at all. There has already been some trouble with spurious ten cent pieces, so well made as almost to defy detection by ordinary observation. What then might be expected if forgers could imitate pieces worn out beyond recognition?

18. How easily the remedy would be applied may be seen from what happened some years ago in the case of Japanese 20, 10, and 5 cent pieces. These coins had for years circulated side by side with our own, and were received here, as Singapore ten cent pieces now are, at their par value. The Japanese Government suddenly lowered the intrinsic value of its subsidiary coinage, and, at the same time, the coast of China was flooded with it. The Banks here then refused to receive Japa- nese small coin, the Treasury did the same. The Government departments of course followed, and within a few weeks tradesmen begin to print on their accounts, Japanese small coin not taken. The coin sank to something like 16 per cent. discount, at which it remains, and even a chair-coolie in the street will not take a Japanese ten cent piece as his fare if he can help it.

19. It only remains to enquire whether such a course as is suggested would give rise to any hardship. I venture to say that it would not.

20. It must be borne in mind that this Government never sanctioned the export of subsidiary coin, and never undertook to redeem it on its return from the mainland in a bad condition.

21. Quite apart from that, however, every person who, on the mainland of China, takes these coins, does so becanse they are worth to him the value for which he receives them. Nobody ever accepts a coin in China on any other conditions; and these conditions are, as I shall show, absolutely independent of any idea of a central authority which will eventually redeem the coin at its par value if nobody else will take it.

11

22. It follows that, before subsidiary coin can become worn, it must have passed from hand to hand at a constantly decreasing value. The last holder would lose nothing by the refusal of the Government to redeem a doubtful coin at par; even a speculator would lose nothing, for he would have bought up the coin at its current value.

23. Money, as money, has no existence in China. At home a baker sells a sixpenny loaf for sixpence, and only asks that the coin, however old, shall be genuine. In China, however, there are two elements to every bargain, (i) the price of the goods, (ii) the price of the currency.

24. Bronze cash are the only coined money of China. They all

appear to date from the reigns of the earlier Emperors of the present dynasty, and they are naturally much worn and broken, as they get much knocked about. Nominally 1,000 go to the Tael, but nobody ever thinks of accepting them at anything but the market price, which varies from day to day, and according to the condition of the coin. That there should be a government department anywhere which would give a tael of pure silver for any thousand cash tendered to it would strike a Chinese trader as an altogether amazing state of things. The Chinese Government would certainly not redeem these coins, nor accept them in payment of dues.

25. It will be seen therefore that Chinese on the mainland of China do not

expect or count upon the redemption of subsidiary coins at their par value. They take them, as they do other coins, for what they will fetch in the open market. Japanese coins, inferior in intrinsic value to our own, circulate freely in the north of China, where the people who take them cannot be supposed to rely on any means of getting them redeemed in Japan.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable F, STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&C.,

&C.,

&c.

(13)

ALFRED LISTER,

Treasurer.

No. 17.

SIR,

TREASURY,

HONGKONG, 17th May, 1887.

I have the honour to request that the Crown Agents may be directed to obtain and forward to this Colony $150,000 worth of Subsidiary Silver Coin in the following proportions:-

20 Cent pieces,.........

10 per cent.

10

""

""

""

";

5

Copper,.

60

""

30

>>

Nil.

These coins are needed in addition to the supply of $150,000 worth indented for on February 17th, and, as they will be due here about the time of the Chinese New Year, I trust nothing will be allowed to stand in the way of their being

I have the honour to be,

sent out.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

A. LISTER, Treasurer.

Acting Coloniai Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

**It is right to state that the Coins referred to above arrived in November last, and, the Treasury having been entirely depleted by the Jubilee demand, they were very quickly absorbed. The Invoice of $150,000 now expected was ordered on August 17th, 1887.

12

1

No. 8.

TREASURY, February 17th, 1888.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter No. 211 of the 14th instant, referring to me for report the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 239 of December 27th, 1887, on the subject of the balances to be kept in this Colony.

2. The balances on fixed deposit are at present as follows:-

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, Chartered Bank of India,.... New Oriental Bank,.

$150,000

50,000

100,000

$300,000

3. All but the first of these will shortly be drawn to pay the Crown Agents' drafts, so that in that respect the directions of the Secretary of State will be carried out within a few weeks.

4. I beg to point out, with great deference, that the limit fixed in the Despatch under report is so low as to entail the most serious and inevitable embarrassment on this Department in its practical working. During the month of January the Treasury paid away no less than $172,000. During the first fortnight in February we paid $165,000. And a draft from the Crown Agents for $225,000 is shortly due. That amounts to $562,000 required within two months. Now, even allowing for the steady incoming of Revenue during the whole period, a floating balance of $200,000 is not enough, when payments have to be made on this scale. I would respectfully ask permission to keep on fixed deposit a sum not exceeding $200,000, and on current account a sum not exceeding $150,000, making a total margin of $350,000, which is the very least on which I can undertake to carry on the financial business of the Colony without undesirable interruptions.

5. I venture to observe that, if it is desired to keep the balance in this Colony as low as possible, there is an easy, and at the same time in every way advantageous way of accomplishing this. All that is necessary is a liberal supply of subsidiary silver coin. If the Crown Agents are instructel to send out $250,000 worth every quarter, until further notice, there will be no reason to complain of any accumula- tion of balances in this Colony, nor will there, I hope, be a recurrence of the discreditable and distressing scarcity of coin which has been prevailing for the last month. On Saturday last five cent pieces sold in the town for seven times their par value ($700 for a hundred dollars worth) and ten cent picces at four times their par value.

6. The Government was twitted, at a recent meeting of the Legislative Council, with indifference in not providing sufficient coin for the commonest daily wants of the Colony, and Lord DERBY'S Despatch No. 72 of March 20th, 1884, was quoted as a proof of this. In that Despatch His Lordship said, "As to the deficiency of subsidiary coins I need say nothing, as your Government has the remedy in its own hands." I trust I do not presume too far in saying that we have not had the remedy in our own hands. It is true that no requisition for coin has been actually refused, but the coins have been supplied with such obvious un- willingness and evident distrust that I have never sent in a Requisition without feeling that it probably would be refused. Had I really had the matter in my own hands, I should have requisitioned for at least double the amount of coin I have actually asked for.

7. In conclusion I would point out that, whilst the best interest we ever get on funds deposited at home is 44%, subject (as are also our remittances home) to charges for brokerage, we obtain 5% in this Colony, and never pay anything for brokerage under any circumstances. The plan I have suggested as to coins would

with any

loss to the Colony thus arising.

do

away

I have the honour to be.

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&C.

&c.

A. LISTER, Treasurer.

13

Colonial Secretary's Minute.

Report from Treasurer submitted for His Excellency's consideration. I presume a copy of it will be submitted to the Secretary of State..

17th February, 1888.

Governor's Minute.

FREDERICK STEWART.

Yes: saying that I concur with his recommendations. The only doubt I have on the subject of small coins is whether the amount obtained should be equal each quarter.

I understood from Mr. JACKSON the other day that the demand is far greater at the Chinese New Year, and the question therefore suggests itself whether the amounts obtained should not be, say, $400,000 to arrive about 1st January, and the balance of $1,000,000 in equal amounts at the other three quarters. It would be well for Mr. LISTER to give me his views, after talking the matter over with Mr. JACKSON.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

21st February, 1888.

HONOURABLE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

With reference to His Excellency the Governor's minute on C. S. O. 423 (Treasury Balances), I have seen Mr. JACKSON on the subject of the regular supply of subsidiary coins.

I find the same consideration had occurred to Mr. JACKSON as has been pre- sent to my own mind, viz., that an over-supply, or even a considerable reserve of these coins involves a serious loss of interest.

It seems more prudent to increase the supply by degrees till the limit of de- mand is reached, than to risk having a large dead balance Ïying idle here. I agree with Mr. JACKSON that the following shipments would in all probability meet the necessities of the case;--

To arrive about January 1st in each year,

$250,000

""

""

April 1st July 1st October 1st

**

150,000

>>

150,000

""

"J

""

200,000

$750,000

The extra quantities for October 1st and January 1st are in view of the de- mand which sets in from about October for the Chinese New Year.

If the Crown Agents were instructed to take such measures as might ensure the regular arrival of coins in the above quantities, I think it is probable there will be no further trouble about the subject for some years to come. The percentages of each denomination of coin should be as at present.

If the above quantities are insufficient they might be increased. With proper watchfulness it ought to be possible to regulate the supply so as to keep pace with the demand, the balance left over from one shipment when the next arrives never greatly exceeding $5,000. But this of course presupposes that the coins will arrive regularly, and that, if an increased supply be asked for, it will be sent as a matter of course.

A. LISTER, Treasurer.

Submitted for His Excellency's consideration.

28th February, 1888.

FREDERICK STEWART.

Let all the minutes on the subject be sent to the Secretary of State, with my recommendation of the last proposal of Mr. LISTER in his minute dated February 28th, commencing "with reference," and ending "of course."

29th February, 1888.

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

14.

PRÉCIS OF ACTUAL COST AND PROFITS ON SUBSIDIARY SILVER COINS RECEIVED FROM ENGLAND.

Amount

Ship- When ment. Arrived.

(Current

Value).

Actual

Cost in

Sterling.

Rate of

Average

Remit-

tances

Actual Cost

in Dollars.

Profit.

Equiva-

lent to

REMARKS.

per $.

$

£ s. d.

1 August,

14,000

2,874.19. 3

4,42

13,049.48

C.

950.52

1872.

2

February,

14,400

2,969. 1. 1

4/43

13,476.56

1873.

June,

1873.

38,400

7,901.18. 2

4/47/

35,866.81

2,533.19 659%

4

""

September,

24,000

1873.

6

November,

19,200

11,715.15. 3

4:47

1-400

53,177.93

4,422.07

767%

1873.

7

14,400

728%

923.44 641%

£87.10.0.

Coins manufactured by Messrs. R. HEATON & SONS of Birmingham. bars, purchased at 452 per oz. Scissel returned at 4/5 per Coins manufactured by Messrs. R. HEATON & SONS of Birmingham. bars, purchased at 4/5 per oz. Scissel returned at 453 per oz. Coins manufactured by Messrs. R. HEATON & SONS of Birmingham. bars, purchased at 4/5 per oz. Scissel returned at 4/5 per oz.

Silver 800 fine, cast into oz. Expenses for coining

Silver 800 fine, cast into Expenses for coining £90. Silver 800 fine, cast into Expenses for coining £240.

Coined in the Royal Mint. No particulars given as to price of Silver. Mint expenses, including. dies, assays, bags, boxes, &c. £300.

8 July,

24,000

1874.

9,925.13. 1

4/3/1/00

46,255.47

1,744.53

375%

9

24,000

""

10

May,

48,000

9,913.18. 3

4,21

47,115.62

884.38

187%

1875.

11 May &June,

48,000

9,022.11. 0 4/0

1876.

4/0

12

February,

48,000

8,796.17. 5

1877.

1 4/07/3

45,112.75

43,945.18

13

August,

48,000

9,016. 1. 6

4/03/

44,273.31

1877.

14

August,

1879.

48,000

8,289.19. 3 3/102

42,558.10

2,887.25 640% 10

4,054.82 923%

3,726.69 841%

5,441.90 | 1275%

Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS. Expenses £300.

Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS. Silver purchased at 4.4 per oz. Scissel sold for 4/3 per oz. Expenses for coining £300. A larger quantity of Silver than usual having been pur- chased for coining, and the amount of Scissel consequently larger, the loss sustained was about £118. On the representation of the Government, they refunded £71.13.6. Silver purchased at 4/1 per oz. Scissel sold for 3/10% per

Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS. oz. Expenses for coining £300. Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS. £300.

Silver purchased at 3/113 per oz.

Silver purchased at 4/52 per oz. Scissel returned at 4,54

Expenses for coining

Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS. £300. Coined at the Royal Mint. Mint expenses, boxes, &c. £250.

Silver purchased at 4/1 per oz.

Expenses of coining

412,400

384,831.21

27,568.79

15

PRÉCIS OF ACTUAL COST AND PROFITS ON SUBSIDIARY SILVER COINS RECEIVED FROM ENGLAND,-Continued.

Rate of

Amount

Ship- When

ment.

Arrived.

(Current

Value).

Actual

Cost in

Average

Remit-

Actual Cost

in Dollars.

Profit.

Sterling.

Equiva-

lent to

REMARKS.

tances

per $.

$

£ s. d.

$

C.

$

C.

412,400

384,831.21

27,568.79

15

June,

50,000

9,088. 1.10

3/91/1

47,545.33

1880.

16

October,

50,000

8,865. 1. 2

3,9

47,149.33

1881.

17

Apr.& May, 100,000

18,054. 7. 9

3,91

95,758.08

1882.

18

April, 50,000

8,874.15. 5

3,82

47,596.53

1883.

19

October,

50,000

8,317. 0. 7

3,81

44,605.30

1884.

2228

20

January,

60,000

10,064. 8. 9

J 3/82

1884.

} 53,978.90

21

May,

60,000

10,077. 4. 6

3/83/

1884.

22

October, 100,000

16,756.15. 9

3/83

54,502.17

90,628.26

1884.

23

April, 100,000

16,436.11. 2

1885.

{

3/83

89,045.59

3/63

21

August,

120,000

19,776. 0. 5

3/62

111,023.27

1885.

25

November, 150,000

24,308. 1. 1

3/62/

136,466.27

1885.

26

March, 150,000

23,502.14. 3

3/63

132,071.47

1886.

3/3

27

May, 100,000

15,511.17. 5

3/3

95,457.66

1886.

28

August, 100,000 1886.

15,260.15. 0

3/3

93,912.31

6,087.69

29

December, 150,000 1886.

22,290.15. 9

3/3

137,174.08

12,825.92

2,454.67 516%

2,850.67 60%

4,241.92 443%

2,403.47 505%

5,394.70 | 12 °9%

6,021.10 11 15 0/

5,497.83 10 08 %

9,371.74 | 10 34%

10,954.41′ | 12 30.%

8,976.73 808%

13,533.73 9 91%

17,928.53 | 13 57 %

4,542.34 475%

6 37%

9 35%

09

10

Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS, per contract. Coined at the Royal Mint. Silver purchased at 3/104 per oz. Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS, per contract. Coined by Messrs. HEATON & SONS, per contract. Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint.

Scissel sold at 3/93 per oz.

Silver purchased at 4/2 per oz. Silver purchased at 4/211 per oz. Silver purchased at 4/23 per oz. Silver purchased at 4/23 per oz. Silver purchased at 4/17 per oz.

Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint. Coined at the Royal Mint.

per oz.

Coined at the Royal Mint. per oz.

Bar Silver purchased at 4/2 per oz., and Mexican Dollars at 4/04 Bar Silver purchased at 4/113 per oz. Mexican Dollars at 3/11 No particulars as to price of Silver given.

No particulars as to price of Silver. Silver purchased at 3/10 per oz. Silver purchased at 3/9 per oz.

1,802,400

1,661,745.76

140,654.24

Average Profit 8 +0

per cent.

16

Hongkong, 16th February, 1888.

FREDERICK STEWART, Auditor General.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 6

88.

No. 22.

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

GAOL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 24th January, 1888.

I beg to forward herewith Annual Statistical Return of Victoria Gaol for the year 1887. 2. As I was absent from the Colony for nine months of the year, it seems to me proper to limit as much as possible any observations on last year's work, and it will be inore satisfactory to annex. hereto, copy of an interim report submitted by Mr. MITCHELL-INNES, who acted for me during my absence and to attach hereto the same Returns A., B., C., D., and E. for 1887 as were submitted by me in the previous year; to the first four of which are annexed for the sake of comparison similar Returns of the three previous years.

3. There is only one change to report during the past year. A reduction in the Prison diet, re- commended by the Gaol Commission Report of 1st June, 1886, was introduced in the beginning of the year with the sanction of the Home Government. This change was followed as had been anti- cipated by an attempt at mutiny on the part of the prisoners which was promptly suppressed by the energetic action of Mr. JONES, Chief Warden, and of Mr. MITCHELL-INNES to whom as superintendent summary powers of Corporal punishment had been restored with a special view to this contingency.

4. Although the average number of prisoners during the year has been less than in the previous year, it will be observed that the number of offences has largely increased. This is chiefly owing to increased stringency in the reporting and punishing the offence of talking, an offence which will be greatly diminished as soon as the separate system is introduced.

5. In the matter of industrial work there is a considerable diminution of profits as compared with the previous year. This is chiefly owing to want of storage room which necessitated in January last the sale by auction of all the oakum and rattan manufactures at a heavy loss.

6. As regards Prison Buildings I think I need hardly add a word to my previous report. I despair of establishing a really satisfactory deterrent and reformatory prison discipline until the sepa- rate system is introduced.

7. There is however one grain of comfort. There seems some evidence that increased prison dis- cipline and reductions in diet have caused habitual criminals to make the discovery that Victoria Gaol is no longer quite such a comfortable residence of ease and repose which it was supposed to be, and that prisoners who have had later experience of Gaol seem more disposed to avoid it. If we examine Return D. we find that on the 31st December, 1885, 35 per cent. of the prisoners in Gaol were old offenders, on 31st December, 1886, this number was reduced to 32 per cent., while on the same date in 1887 the percentage of old offenders was only 24.

8. There is one point already referred to by Mr. MITCHELL-INNES in his report which I would urgently press on the consideration of Government. The subordinate officers of the Gaol are very hard worked (12 hours duty in the 24) and very poorly paid, the lowest rank only getting $25 per month which compares very poorly with European Police or Dock Yard Police the lowest rank of which receive $40 a month. This presses very hardly especially on the married man who cannot get a room near the Gaol under $8 or $9 a month. The result is that subordinate officers of the Gaol are constantly on the look-out for other employment. There is a continual change of subordinate officials and consequently there is always a large number of officials imperfectly instructed in and still learning their duties to the detriment of discipline and order. I consider a revision of the scale of remuneration of subordinate officers is very urgent.

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

HONGKONG, 11th October, 1887.

SIR,-In accordance with the direction of His Excellency the late Acting Governor General CAMERON, I have the honour to transmit a report on the Gaol from 19th January, 1887, to 11th August, 1887, the period during which it was under my control. The report would have been sent in earlier had it not been for the time taken in preparing the return which accompanies it.

2. During my tenure of office I followed in general the lines laid down by General GORDON, any divergence therefrom being, as a rule, in the direction of increased stringency. That this course was the correct one will, I think, be admitted when the difficulty of rendering imprisonment deterrent to the Chinese, for whom it means, good rations, sufficient clothing and two holidays a week instead of miserable food, scanty rags and unremitting labour is considered. Thus following the system in force in naval prisons, all offences, however slight, have been reported and punished. This has naturally caused a large increase in the number of petty offences recorded, but I do not consider the reports to be a satisfactory criterion of the state of the Gaol, which I believe to have continued steadily to im-

prove.

3. When I took command of the Gaol I found that an outbreak was expected on account of the reduction in rations recently effected. That that expectation was well founded, was proved by the occurrence of a strike and among the chain gang and some of the other prisoners on the morning of the 31st of January. Fortunately by the prompt action taken by the Warden and Chief Warders and with the assistance of the European Prisoners who volunteered to assist, the mutineers were locked up in their cells before the disturbance had led to bloodshed, but the outbreak seemed to me to prove that a sharp lesson was required in order to maintain discipline in the Gaol and to shew the prisoners that combined action would not be met by the punishment of a few only but of all, I therefore caused 69 of the mutineers to be whipped. The punishment proved most successful in the Gaol, and I may mention incidentally that the number of prisoners fell from 658 to 585 and that the Captain Superin- tendent of Police remarked, as I am informed of the quiet state of the town after its infliction.

4. I note with satisfaction that acting on my recommendation; the Government has ordered fifty more cranks for the use of the Gaol. This form of punishment is much disliked by the Chinese to whom it is much more distasteful than shot drill or oakum picking.

5. The chain gang has been increased from 47 to nearly 100, it being found that the cost to the Surveyor General of a gang of the latter strength was very little in excess of that of one half its size. The gang has been usefully employed of late in cutting down the hill at the new Police Barracks opposite Green Island.

6. The want of accommodation still makes itself severely felt in the Gaol. Isolation is very dis- tasteful to the Chinese, but it can only be practised at present to a very limited extent, there being only 198 cells for an average of 607. The sleeping in association is, I consider; specially objectionable. The female prison is most unsatisfactory there being only two rooms for at times, twenty prisoners, thus entailing the association of petty offenders with hardened criminals.

7. The Gaol Staff is in a fairly satisfactory condition, the substitution of European for coloured warders being productive of good results; it is however difficult to induce steady reliable men to undertake or if undertaken to continue the hard and monotonous work of warders (the hours being from 6 to 6) for the very poor pay at present offered ($25 a month, without food, rising to $60). The constant changes which result interfere seriously with the effectiveness of the staff, as new men, in addition to learning their duties as warders, have to pick up a modicum of Chinese in order to be of much use.

To assist them in doing this, I have made for their use a small book containing the more ordinary expressions in use in the Gaol in low class Cantonese, which I trust may be found of

use.

8. Taking into consideration the central position of the Gaol, the continual changes in the staff, the fact of the prisoners being constantly in association, and the mild nature of their punishment as compared with those to which they are accustomed in their own country, I consider that their conduct has been on the whole satisfactory, and this I attribute in a great measure to the knowledge by them that no infraction of the Gaol rules, however slight would be excused. The health of the prisoners has, in view of the miserable condition of many of them on admittance been good.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

The Hon. FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary.

Your most obedient Servant,

N. G. MITCHEll-Innes,

Late Acting Superintendent.

MONTH.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, &c., in the years 1884, 1885, 1886, and 1887.

1

1884.

1885.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 552.

in Prison, 530.

1886. Daily average number in Prison, 674.

1887.

Daily average number in Prison, 584.

January, February, March,. April,. May,

14

55

119

146

17

25

135

75

32

44

248

97

24

JO..

23

330

408

31

252

197

963

June,

70

362

298

918

July,

77

289

297

500

August,

72

344

232

530

September,

50

254

318

558

October,.....

64

174

209

429

November,

35

148

183

184

December,.

43

162

93

113

Total,

529

2,132

2,659

4,921

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, for the years 1884, 1885, 1886 and 1887.

1884.

1885.

MONTII.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 552.

in Prison, 530.

1886.

1887.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 674.

in Prison, 584.

January,

22

28

14

21

February.

16

18

15

20

March,

23

18

17

11

April,.

26

29

32

29

May,

29

6

31

41

June,

24

22

19

33

July,

19

27

13

31

August,

24

13

13

39

September,

30

12

8

26

October,

14

13

17

27

November,..

21

8

December,

22

10

96

18

7

10

Total,

270

204

195

306

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(C.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1884, 1885, 1886 and 1887.

MONTH.

1884.

1885. Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 552..

in Prison, 530.

1886.

1887.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 674.

in Prison, 584.

January,

February,

65

74

28

14

76

78

16

10

March,.

April,.

47

82

14

20

52

133

11

27

May,.

66

106

7

39

June,

60

61

15

34

July,

72

52

9

57

August, ......

69

47

11

40

September,

October,....

November,

December,

8+88

82

17

31

58

50

23

17

71

41

15

30

32

39

21

23

33

Total,

719

709

212

435

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December, 1886, and 31st December, 1887, from 1st to 12th Convictions.

CONVICTION.

1886.

1887.

1st,

2nd,

3rd,

4th,

5th,

6th,

7th,

8th,

D

9th,

414

436

62

30

35

34

27

15

24

20

18

15

15

10

10

10

1

3

10th,

132

11th,

12th,

:

TOTAL,...

612

576

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(E.)

ABSTRACT OF ACCOUNT OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR 1887.

Dr.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1887.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,. $ 454.10 1887.

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

By Oakum sold during the year,

$ 933.58

Oakum issued for Gaol Hospital

25

927.50

10.00

during the year,

use,

>

Profit..

557.88

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,-

Paper Stuff,

Total,............$

1,939.48

SALAM BALONE DINE MODE

VAŠE KNITS VANDATRELAZAT E VENENOVARAJEVOMATSUTNAJSETSENCIAL,

Oakum,

995.90

Total,............$

1,939.48

L

.

Dr.

COIR YARN.

1887.

51

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,. $ 831.07 1887.

289.16

""

""

Profit,......

353.31

1887.

By Matting sold during the year,

Issue for Prison use during theĮ

year,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,-

Cr.

$ 769.45

84.09

Manufactured,

14.00

Material,.....

606.00

Total,...$

1,473.54

Total,............$

1,473.54

RATTAN WORK.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,.

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,

$178.48

48.79

1887.

By Chairs, &c., sold during the year,..

Articles made for Gaol use,

$ 83.88 10.44

29

29

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,-

Manufactured Articles, $26.80 Material,.........

12.24

Loss,...

39.04. 93.90

Total,.......

227.26

Total,.......

227.26

NET MAKING.

1887.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,

Cost of Material purchased during

$ 7.42 1887.

187.47

Nets made for Gaol use,

""

the year,

Profit,..

106.61

Total,

.$

301.50

By Nets sold during the year,

Stock on hand, 31st December,}

Total,......

1887.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,

Cost of Material purchased during Į

>>

the year,

Profit,..........

$213.10

88.40

301.50

$ 43.66

91.99

1887.

GRASS MATTING.

By Issue for Prison use during the

year,

>>

""

5.91

Matting sold during the year, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,-

$ 28.03

101.44

Manufactured, 50 yds.,....... Material,.....

7.00

5.00

Total,.........

141.47

Total,......

141.47

WASHING.

1887. To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,. $

"

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,

28.05 1887.

374.57

>>

792.59

Profit....

Total.............$

1,195.21

SHOE-MAKING.

1887.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,.

Cost of Material purchased during

$ 65.17

713.31

1887.

the year,

Profit,.......

23.41

Total,.....

801.89

By Value of Washing done during the year, Prison Clothing, at 1 cent a piece,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,....

$1,195.21

Total,.....$

1,195.21

By Estimated value of Shoes supplied to Prisoners, and Repairs,

$ 72.41

22

Two Issues-Summer and Winter Uniform, Shoes to Prison Of- ficers,

285.00

Sale to Prison Officers, &c.,

241.60

"

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,-

Material and value of new

Shoes,......

202.88

Total,............$

801.89

Dr.

1887.

PRINTING AND BOOK-BINDING.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,.

7.30 1887.

""

47.53

Cost of Material for printing and bookbinding, purchased during

the year,

Profit,...

By Estimated value of Printing done for Public Offices during the year, (187,558 forms),....... Estimated value of Books bound

for Prison use,

Cr.

907.75

14.17

61.97

946.53

""

Cash received for Books bound,

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,-

Book-binding Material, &c.,

17.47

Total,.......

1,001.36

Total,.....

1,001.36

TAILORS' SHOP.

1887.

وو

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1887,. $ 400.73

Cost of Material purchased during

1887.

841.51

the year,

Profit,......

58.94

1887.

1887.

Total,..........$

1,301.18

By Value of Prisoners' Clothing made

807.82

during the year,

S

"

Work done for Officers, Police,

116.28

&c., and charged,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1887,-

Flannel, Canvas, &c., Made-up Canvas Suits,

168.25

208.83

Flannel Shirts, &c.,... f

Total...

1,301.18

CARPENTERS' SHOP.

By Value of Articles made for GaolĮ

To Value of Stock on hand, 1st Ja-Į

nuary, 1887,....

""

Cost of Material purchased during t

the year,

Profit,....

1887.

$ 47.50

use,

149.74

""

Work done for Officers and

charged for,

$151.78

58.75

"

Stock on hand, 31st December,

28.91

1887,-

Material, Wood, &e.,... Value of manufactured

2.14

13.48

Total,....... ....$

226.15

RECAPITULATION.

Articles,

Total,...$

226.15

PROFITS.

1887.

LOSS.

Oakum,

557.88

Rattan Work,

93.90

Coir Yarn,

353.31

Net-making,

106.61

Surplus,......

2,780.19

Grass Matting,.

5.91

Washing,

792.59

Shoe-making,

23.41

Printing and Book-binding,

946.53

Tailoring,

58.94

Carpentering,

28.91

To Profit,

Total,............$ 2,874.09

$2,780.19

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 24th January, 1888.

Total,.....

...$ 2,874.09

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

HONGKONG.

STATEMENT SHOWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS I

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His E

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

STATEMENT SHOWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS I

REVENUE.

Amount

Total Estimated. Receipts.

More than Less than Estimated. Estimated.

EXPENDIT

$

$ C.

$

$

..

LAND REVENUE:-

Leased Lands,

Lands not Leased, including Stone Quarries,

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS:-

150,000

163,995.01

13,995.01

19.000

20,058.32

1,058.32

Fecs on Grant of Leases,

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS:-

Markets,

Buildings,.

200

300.00

100.00

67,200

77,875.45

10,075.45

7,000

11,337.48

4,337.18

Piers,......

LICENCES:-

800

1,072.50

272.50

The Governor....

Colonial Secretary,

Auditor,

Treasurer,..

Spirit.

45,000

42,380.00

Pawnbrokers,

14,000

13,300.00

2,620.00 700.00

Clerk of Councils,

Auctioneers,..

2,100

1.800.00

300.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

10

13.50

3.50

Surveyor General,

Emigration Brokers.

1,200

Billiard Tables,

1.000

1,200.00 950.00

50.00

Postmaster General,.

Opium,

182,400

182,400.00

Boarding Houses,

200

150.00

50.00

Registrar General,

Marriage,

300

344.00

244.00

Chinese Undertakers,

Money Changers,

Marine Store Dealers,

Shooting Licence,

Arms Licence,

TAXES:-

100

100.00

Harbour Master...

750

715.00

35.00

1,000

1,080.00

80.00

Lighthouses,

10.00

10.00

200.00

200.00

Observatory,

Stamps,.

Municipal Rates,

POSTAGE,

FINES, FORFEITURES & FEES OF COURTS:-

140,000 170,233.33 316,402 332,863.79 16,461.79

122,000 137,436.08 15,436.08

30,233.33

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fees,

FEES OF OFFICE:-

13,000 1,000 10,000

25,901.53

1,004.40 8,314.99

12,901.53 4.40

Government Gardens & Plantati

Judicial Departments,..

1,685.01 Ecclesiastical Department,

Burials,

500

939.50

Licences for Junks, &c.,

19,000

19,997.75

429.50 997.75

Registry of Boats,

3,300

3,381.15

81.15

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crews,

4,500

4,642.96

Educational

do.,

Medical

do..

112.96

Do.

of Hawkers,.

3,800

3,980.50

180.50

Police Magistrates' do.,

Cargo Boat Certificates,

750

Registration of Householders,

1,200

Do. of Servants, &C.,

Official Signatures......

100

784.42 1,645.50 17.75 195.00

34.42

445.50

Police

do.,

17.75

95.00

Gaol

do..

Registration of Deeds,

2,500

4,046.00

Shipping Seamen,..

9,000

9,458.00

1,546.00 458.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

Examination of Masters, &c., ...

1,450

1,172.50

277.50

Survey of Steam Ships, &c.,

9,500

11,300.19

1,800.49

Pensions, Retired Allowances & Graty

Registry Fees, &c., (Mer. Shipping Act),.

500

373.85

126.15

Do., of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

8,900

7,970.95

4,070.95

Charitable Allowances,

Registration of Companies,

1,000

Examination of Emigrants,

16,000

720.00 23,706.00

280.00

7,706.00

Transport,

Registration of Births, &c.,.

10

Light Dues,

28,000

71.60 33,003.57

31.60 5,003.57

Licences for Steam Launches,

350

450.00

100.00

Surveyor's Certificate for Steam Launches,

800

1,190.00

390.00

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c.,......

2,000

2,175.49

175.49

Registration of Trade Marks,

100

709.50

609.50

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

500

535.00

35.00

Medical Registration Fees,

35,00

35.00

Bills of Health,

1,200

1,815.00

615.00

SALE OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY:-

Police Station No. 4, to Military Authorities, Sundry Condemned Stores, &c.,

1,000

6,111.00 994.83

6,111.00

Works and Buildings, .

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

Miscellaneous Services,

Military Expenditure..........

Interest on Loan and Sinking Fund

Land and Houses Purchased,......................

5.17

REIMBURSEMENTS:-

Sick Stoppages from Police Force..

600

970.75

370,75

Subsistence of Seamen, &c., in Gaol,

300

297.01

2.99

Treatment of Seamen, &c., in Hospital..

6,000

9.832.59

3,832.59

Extraordinary Public Works...................

Convict labour and other items,

3,500

2,586.66

913.34

Sale of Printed Forms,

1,200

1,360.50

Gaol Expenses recovered..........

800

1.294.99

160.50 494.99

Čokoladan fymo duovorial Past OM.......

2.222

2 888 00

HONGKONG.

OWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS IN THE YEAR 1887.

slative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

BOWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS IN THE YEAR 1887.

į

ed.

Total Receipts.

More than Less than

Estimated. Estimated.

EXPENDITURE.

No.

777 88.

Amount

Total More than Less than Estimated. Payments. Estimated. Estimated.

$ C.

163,995.01

$ 0.

13,995.01

C.

$ ..

00

C.

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS:--

20,058.32

1,058.32

300.00

100.00

77,875.45

10,675.45

11,337.48

4,337.48

1,072.50

272.50

The Governor...

Colonial Secretary,.

Auditor,

Treasurer,..

33,975

36,342.30 2,367.30

24,776

21,268.68

3.507.32

6,078

6,064.85

13.15

10,400

11,494.01 1,094.04

42,380.00

2,620.00

13,300.00

700.00

Clerk of Councils,

1,300

1,239.68

00.32

1.800.00

300.00

13.50

3.50

Surveyor General,

56,145

58,619.30 2,474.30

1,200.00

950.00

50.00

Postmaster General,..

103,052 100,380.19

2.671.81

182,400.00

150.00

50.00

Registrar General,

24,196 23,190.82

1,005.18

544.00

244.00

100.00

Harbour Master.......

46,540

48,074.41 1.534.41:

715.00

35.00

1,080.00

80.00

Lighthouses,

0,508

5,612.77

895.23

10.00

10.00

200.00

200.00

Observatory,

6,420

7,229.88

809.88

170,233.33 30,233.33

332.863.79 16,461.79

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

4,822

4,804.33

17.67

137,436.08

15,436.08

Government Gardens & Plantations,

21,474

20,854.90

619.10

25,901.53

12,901.53

:

Judicial Departments,..

61,713

66,615.30 1,902.30

1,004.40

4.40

8,314.99

1,685.01 Ecclesiastical Department,

6,218

6,638.48

420.48

939.50

19,997.75

429.50 997.75

Educational

do..

47,231

43,070.91

4,160.09

3,381.15

$1.15

Medical

do.,

38,661

41,785.22 3,124.22

4,612.96

142.96

3,980,50

180.50

Police Magistrates' do.,

20,076

19,919.40

156.60

784.42

34.42

1,645.50

445.50

Police

do.,

206,874

213,481,10 6,607.10

17.75 195.00

17.75

95.00

Gaol

do.,

49,892 £8,650.58

1,241.42

4.046.00

1,546.00

9,458.00

458.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

18,786 18,156.39

629.61

1,172.50

277.50

11,300.49

1,800.49

Pensions, Retired Allowances & Gratuities......

34,000

40,987.41 6,987.11

373.85

126.15

7,970.95

4,070.95

Charitable Allowances,

4,000

3,932.70

67.30

720.00 23,706.00

280.00

7,700.00

Transport,

4,500

2,235.44

2,264.56

71.60 33,003.57

31.60

5,003.57

Works and Buildings,

74,500

$3,113.68 8,613.68

450.00

100.00

1,190.00

390.00

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

44,500.

46,172.02 1,672.02

2,175.49

175.49

709.50

609.50

Miscellaneous Services,

93,562 116,380.22 22,818.22

535.00

35.00

35.00 1,815.00

35,00

Military Expenditure,..

137,235

128,815.63

8,419.37

615.00

Interest on Loan and Sinking Fund,

55,000

51,551.05

3.148.95

6,111.00 994.83

6,111.00

Land and Houses Purchased................

1,500.00 1,500.00

5.17

970.75

370.75

297.01

9.832.59

3,832.59

2.586.66

2.99

913.34

Extraordinary Public Works,.........

1,245,431 1,278,181.68 | 61,925.36

29,177.68

760,000 744,820.38

15,179,62

1,360.50 160.50

1.294.99

494.90

نگر

Buillings Piers, LICENCES:

A A

800

1,072.50

272.50

Treasurer,..

་་

Spirit.

45,000

42,380.00

2,620,00

Pawnbrokers,

14,000

13,300.00

700.00

Clerk of Councils.

Auctioneers,..

2,100

1.800.00

300.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

10

Emigration Brokers.

1,200

Billiard Tables,

1.000

13.50 1.200.00 950.00

3.50

Surveyor General.

50.00

Postmaster General,.

Opium,

182,400

182,400,00

Boarding Houses,

Marriage,

Chinese Undertakers, Money Changers,

Marine Store Dealers,

Shooting Licence,

200

150,00

50.00

Registrar General.

300

314.00

244.00

100

100.00

Harbour Master,.

750

715.00

35.00

1,000

1,080.00

80.00

Lighthouses,

10.00

10.00

Arms Licence,

200.00

200.00

TAXES:-

Stamps,

140,000

170,233,33

30,233.33

Observatory,

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

Municipal Rates,

316,402

332.863.79

16,461.79

POSTAGE,

122,000

137,436.08 15,436.08

Government Gardens & Plantations

FINES, FORFEITURES & FEES OF COURTS:—

Fines,

13,000

25,901.53

Forfeitures,

1,000

1,004.40

12,901.53 4.40

Judicial Departments,.......

Fees,

10,000

8,314.99

1,685.01 Ecclesiastical Department,

FEES OF OFFICE:-

Burials,

500

939.50

429.50

Educational

do.,

Licences for Junks, &c.,

19,000

19,997.75

997.75

Registry of Boats,

3,300

3,381.15

81.15

Medical

do.,

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crews,

4,500

4,612.96

142.96

Do.

of Hawkers.......

3,800

3,980.50

180.50

Police Magistrates' do.,

Cargo Boat Certificates,

750

781.12

34.42

Registration of Householders,

1,200

1,645.50

145.50

Police

Do. of Servants, &c.,

Official Signatures...

100

17.75 195.00

17.75

95.00

Gaol

Registration of Deeds,

2,500

4,046.00

1,546.00

Shipping Seamen,.

9,000

9,458.00

458.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

do.,

do.,

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,450

1,172.50

277.50

Survey of Steam Ships, &c.,

9,500

11.300.49

1,800.49

Registry Fees, &c., (Mer. Shipping Act),.

500

378.85

126.15

Do., of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

3,900

7,970.95

4,070.95

Pensions, Retired Allowances & Gratuiti

Charitable Allowances,

Registration of Companies,

1,000

720.00

280.00

Examination of Emigrants,

16,000

23,706.00

Registration of Births, &c.,.

10

71.60

7,706.00 31.60

Transport,

Licences for Steam Launches,

Light Dues,.

Surveyor's Certificate for Steam Launches,

28,000

33,003.57

5,003.57

Works and Buildings,

350

450.00

100.00

800

1,190.00

390.00

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c.,......

2,000

2,175.49

175.49

Registration of Trade Marks,

100

709.50

609.50

Miscellaneous Services,

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

500

535.00

35.00

Medical Registration Fees,

35.00

35.00

Military Expenditure..............

Bills of Health, .

1,200

1,815.00

615.00

Interest on Loan and Sinking Fund,

SALE OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY:-

Police Station No. 4, to Military Authorities, Sundry Condemned Stores, &c.,

1,000

6,111.00 6,111.00

994.83

Land and Houses Purchased,........

5.17

REIMBURSEMENTS:-

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

600

970.75

370.75

Subsistence of Seamen, &c., in Gaol,

300

297.01

Treatment of Seamen, &c., in Hospital.

6,000

9,832.59

3,832.59

Convict labour and other items,

3,500

2,586.66

2.99

913.34

Extraordinary Public Works,..............

Sale of Printed Forms,

1,200

1,360.50

160.50

Gaol Expenses recovered,.

800

1,294.99

494.99

Contribution from Imperial Post Office,

3,888

3,888.00

Sale of Chinese Gazette,

50

Interest on Furniture at Govt. House,.

250

57.00 171.00

7.00

79.00

Fees from Scholars at Central School, Sale of Tickets for Destitutes' Shelter, INTEREST,

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

Storage of Gunpowder,.

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

5,000

30

5,547.00 33.00 3,560.72

547.00 3.00 3,560.72

9,000 55,000

11,686.38 2,686.38 49,541,50

5,458.50

TOTAL REVENUE...

1,291,270 1,427,485.79 148,798.45 12,582,66

TOTAL EXPENDITURE,...

RECEIPTS.

Deposits Available,-Premia on Land Sales,

Deposits not available,

Other Deposits,

.$155,238.02 747,300.00

ΡΑΥΜ

902,538.02

Deposits Available,

Advance Account,

Family Remittances,

Subidiary Coins,

Money Order Account,

Exchange Account,

Crown Agents' Account,

Crown Agents' Advance Account,

Loan Account,

Purchase of Marine Lot No. 18, Cash in hand, 1st January, 1887,

1.882.21

26,786.90 36,783.90 400,000,00 68,724.29 10,072.34 2,141,031.10 429,478.69 1,268,157.90

168,724,51 104,772.92

Deposits not Available..

Advance Account,

Family Remittances.

Subsidiary Coins,

Money Order Account, Crown Agents' Account,.

Crown Agents' Advance Account, Purchase of Marine Lot No. 18,

Cash in hand, 31st December, 1887..

TOTAL....

$6,977,888,57

A. F. ALVES,

Accountant.

TREASURY, HONGKONG, 20TH MARCH, 1888.

Examined.

FREDERICK

Auditori

JU

1.072.00

2/2.50

Treasurer,

10.400

11.494.04 1,094.04

30

42,380.00

2,620.00

70

13,300.00

1.800.00

700.00 300.00

Clerk of Councils,

1,300

1,239.68

60.32

13.50

3.50

Surveyor General,

56,148

58,619.30 2.474.30

1.200.00

30

950.00

50.00

Postmaster General,.

103,032

100,380.19

2.671.81

182.400.00

150.00

50.00

Registrar General,

24,196

23,190.82

1,005.18

544.00

244.00

100.00

Harbour Master............

46,540

48,074.41

1,534.41 ·

10

715.00

35.00

1,080.00

80.00

Lighthouses,

6,508

5,612.77

895.23

10.00 200.00

10.00

200.00

Observatory,

6.420

7,229.88

S09.8$

020

170,283.33

30,233.33

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

4,822

4,804.33

17.67

332.863.79

16,461.79

137,436.08

15,436.08

Government Gardens & Plantations,

21,474

20,854.90

619.10

coo

25,901.53 1.004.40 8,314.99

12,901.53

Judicial Departments,..........

64,713

66,615.30 1,902.30

4.40

1,685.01 Ecclesiastical Department,

6,218

6,638.48

120.48

939.50

19,997,75

429.50 997.75

Educational

do.,

47,231 43,070.91

4,160.09

3,381.15

$1.15

Medical

do..

38,661 41,785.22 3,124.22

4,642.96

142,96

3,980,50

180.50

Police Magistrates' do.,

20,076 19,919.40

156.60

784.42

31.42

1,645.50

445.50

Police

do.,

17.75

17.75

195.00

95.00

Gaol

do..

206,874

49,892 18,650.58

213,481,10 6,607.10

1,241.42

4,046.00

1,516.00

9,458.00

458.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

18,786 18.155.39

629.61

1,172.50

277.50

11.300.49

1,800.49

Pensions, Retired Allowances & Gratuities.....

34,000

40,987.41 6,987.41

373.85

126.15

7,970.95

4,070.95

Charitable Allowances,

4,000 3,932.70

67.30

720.00

280.00

23,706.00

7,706.00

Transport,

4,500

2,235.44

2,264.56

71.60

31.60

33,003,57

5,003.57

Works and Buildings,

74,500

83,113.68 8,613.68

450.00

100.00

1,190.00

390.00

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

44,500.

46,172.02 1,672.02

2,175.19

175.49

709.50

609.50

Miscellaneous Services,

93,562

116,380.22 | 22,818.22

585.00

35.00

85.00

35.00

Military Expenditure,.......

137,235

128,815.63

8,419.37

1,815.00

615.00

Interest on Loan and Sinking Fund,

55,000

51,551.05

3,148.95

6,111.00 994.83

6,111.00

Land and Houses Purchased.........

1,500.00 1,500.00

5.17

970.75

370.75

1,245,134 1,278,181.68 61,925.36 29,177.68

297.01

9,832.59 3,832.59

2,586.66

2.99

913.34

Extraordinary Public Works,...

760,000 744,820.38

15,179.62

1,360.50

160.50

1,294.99

491.99

3,888.00

57.00 171.00

7.00

79.00

5,547.00 BB.00 3,560.72

547.00

3.00 3,560,72

11,686.38 2,686.38 49,541.50

5,458.50

1,427,483.79148,798.45| 12,582.66

TOTAL EXPENDITURE,.

PAYMENTS.

902,538.02

1.882.21 26.786.90 86,788.00 100,000.00 68,724,29 10,072.34 2,141,081,10 429.478.69 1,263,157.90

163,724.61 101.772.92

6,977,888.57

Deposits Available, ·

Deposits not Available,. Advance Account, Family Remittances, Subsidiary Coins,

Money Order Account, Crown Agents' Account,.

Crown Agents' Advance Account, Purchase of Marine Lot No. 18,

Cash in hand, 31st December, 1887.

'. ALVES,

Accountant.

2,005,434 2,023,002.06 61,925.36 44,357.30

650,000.00

569.99 28,726.61

42,855.46

531,676.98

71,975.62

2,122,683.71

1,111,578.96

221,055.14

173,209.04

ΤΟΤΑΙ..........

.$ | 6,977,333.57

Examined.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Auditor General.

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

14 5

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLO

REVENUE.

1886.

1887.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITUR]

$

C.

$

c.

$

C.

$ C.

LAND REVENUE :—

Leased Lands,

149,288.84

163,995.01

Lands not leased, including Stone Quarries,. Fees on Grant of Leases, .

19,465.42

20,058.32

14,706.17 592.90

320.00

300.00

20.00

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS :--

Markets,

65,863.65

77,875.45

12,011.80

Buildings, Piers,

LICENCES:

Spirit,....

7,293.00

11,337.48

4,011.18

881.20

1,072.50

191.30

41,480.00

42,380.00

900.00

Pawnbrokers,

13,650.00

13,300.00

350.00

Auctioneers,

2,400.00

1,800,00

600.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

28.50

13.50

15.00

Emigration Brokers,

1,200.00

1,200.00

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS :-

The Governor,

Colonial Secretary,

Auditor,.

Treasurer.

Clerk of Councils, Surveyor General,. Postmaster General, Registrar General,. Harbour Master,..

Lighthouses..

Observatory,

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

Government Gardens and Plant

Billiard Tables,

970.00

950,00

20.00

Judicial

Department,

Opíum,

178,500.00

182,400.00

3,900.00

Ecclesiastical

do..

Boarding Houses,

200.00

150.00

50.00

Educational

do.,

Marriage,

340.00

514.00

204.00

Medical

do.,

Stamps,

Chinese Undertakers,

Money Changers....

Marine Store Dealers,.

Shooting Licence,..

Arms Licence,

TAXES:-

Municipal Rates,

POSTAGE,

FINES, FORFEITURES AND FEES OF COURTS :

100.00

100.00

Police Magistrates do..

770.00

715,00

55.00

Police

do..

1,170.00

1,080.00

90.00

Gaol

do..

30.00

10.00 200.00

20.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

200.00

159,819.63 170,233.33

10,413.70

306,131.35 332,863.79

26,732.41

130,846.72

137,436.08

6,589.36

Fines,

Forfeitures,.

Fees,

26,049,51 25,901,53

148.01

Military Expenditure,

3,056.10

1,004.10

10,853.13

8,314.99

2,051.70 2,538,14

Interest,

Pensions. Retired Allowances and (

Charitable Allowances,

Transport,.

Works and Buildings.

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

Miscellaneous Services,

Land and Houses Purchased,

FEES OF OFFICE :—

Burials,

616.25

939.50

Licences for Junks, &c.,..........

18,574.25

19,997.75

Registry of Boats,

3,436.14

3,381.15

་་

54.99

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crews,

4,767,56

4,642.96

Do.

of Hawkers,

323.25 1,423.50

124.60 Extraordinary Public Works,.

3,986,00

3,980.50

5.50

Cargo Boat Certificates,.

798.00

Registration of Householders,

Do. of Servants, &c.,

Official Signatures.

1,484,75 31.25 224.00

784.42 1,645.50

13.58

160.75

17.75

13.50

195.00

29.00

Registration of Deeds,

3,615.00

4,0460.00

431.00

Shipping Seamen,..

8,589.00

9,458.00

$69.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,202.50

1,172,50

30.00

Survey of Steam-ships, &c.,.

10,393.04

11,300.49

907.45

Registry Fees, &c., (Merchant Shipping Act),

435.78

373.85

61.93

Registry of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

7,326.00

7,970.95

644.95

Registration of Companies,

1,982.40

Examination of Emigrants,

18,101.75

720.00 23,706.00

1,262.40

5,604.25

Registration of Births, &c.,

64.30

Light Dues,

32,953.16

71.60 33,003.57

7.30

50.41

Licences for Steam-launches,

372.50

450.00

77.50

Surveyor's Certificate for Steam-launches,

935.00

1,190.00

235.00

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c.,

4.231.92

2,175.49

2,059,43

Registration of Trade Marks,

549.91

709.50

159.59

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

495.00

$35.00

40.00

Medical Registration Fees,

85.00

85.00

Bills of Health,

1,446.00

1,815.00

369.00

Sale of Government I'roperty,

1,753.99

7,105.83

5,35184

Reimbursements,

26,836.99

26,038,50

798.49

Interest.

11,636.44

3,560.72

Miscellaneous Receipts,

80,408.78 61,227.88

$1,867,977.741,427,485,79 97.175.94

8,075.72 19,180.90

37.667.89

THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1886 & 1887.

1887.

INCREASE. DECREASE.

$

C.

$ C. $ C.

EXPENDITURE.

1886.

1887.

INCREASE,

DECREASE.

$

0.

$

C.

C.

$

C.

163,995.01

20,058.32

14,706.17 592.90

The Governor,

300.00

20.00

77,875.45

12,011.80

11,337.48

4,041.48

1,072.50

191.30

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS :-

Colonial Secretary,

Auditor,.

Treasurer,

Clerk of Councils, Surveyor General, Postmaster General,

Registrar General,

37,418.29

36,342.30

22,838.78

21,268.68

1,075.99 1,570.10

5,953.98

6,064.85

110.87

12,454.59

11,494.04

960.55

1,160.00

1,239.68

79.68

53,260.44

58,619.30

5,358.86

126,355.34

100,380.19

25,975.15

22.922.83

23,190.82

267.99

42,380.00

900.00

Harbour Master,..

45,058.34

48,074.41

3,016.07

13,300.00

350.00

Lighthouses,.

5,948.84

5,612.77

336.07

1,800.00

600.00

Observatory,

6,422.31

7,229.88

807.57

13.50

15.00

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

5,160,00

4,804.33

355.67

1,200.00

Government Gardens and Plantations,

21,508.28

20,854,90

653.38

950.00

20.00

Judicial

Department,

62,768,70

66,615.30

3,846.60

182,400.00

3,900.00

Ecclesiastical

do.,

6,820.68

6,638.48

182.20

150.00

50.00

Educational

do.,

43,085.50

43,070.91

14.59

511,00

204.00

Medical

do.,

39,761.20

41,785.22

2,021.02

100.00

Police Magistrates' do.,

20,968.75

19,919.40

1,049.35

715.00

55.00

Police

do.,

193,618,88

213,481.10 19,862.22

1,080.00

90.00

Gaol

do..

52,410,84

48,650.58

3,760.26

10.00

20.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

15,363,99

18,156.39

2,792.40

200.00

200.00

Pensions, Retired Allowances and Gratuities,

37,747.94

40,987.41

3,239.47

Charitable Allowances,

3,372.00

3,932.70

560.70

170,233.33

10,413.70

Transport,.

1,882,24

2,235.44

353.20

332,863.79

26,732.41

Works and Buildings,

73,916.96

$3,113.68

9,196.72

137,436.08

6,589.36

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

36,175.17

46,172.02

9,996.85

Miscellaneous Services,

111,904.98

116,380.22

1,475.24

25,901.53

148.01

Military Expenditure,

124,561.68

128,815.63

4,253,95

1,004.40

8,314.99

2,051,70 2,538.14

Interest.

4,412.28 51,551.05

47,138.77

Land and Houses Purchased,

1,500.00

1,500.00

939.50

19,997.75

323.25 1,423.50

1,195,236.811,278,181.68

118,878.18

35,933,31

3,381.15

54.99

4,642.96

3,980.50

124.60 Extraordinary Public Works,..

825,624.81 741,820.38

80,804.46

5.50

784.42

13.58

1,645.50

160.75

17.75

13.50

195.00

29.00

4,016,00

431.00

9,458.00

869.00

1,172.50

30.00

11,300,49

907.45

373.85

61.93

7,970.95

644.95

720.00

1,262.40

23,706.00

5,604,25

71.60 33,003.57

7.30

50.41

450.00

77.50

1,190.00

235.00

2,175.49

2,059.43

709.50

159.59

535.00

40.00

35.00

85.00

1,815.00

7,105.83

369.00 5,351.84

26,088.50

3,560.72

61,227.88

798.49 8,075.72 19.180.90

1,427,485,79 |

97,175,94

37,667.89

32,020,861,65 |2,023,002,06 118,878.18

116,737.77

Lands ne

leased, including Stone Quarries,.

19,465.42

20.058.32

592.90

Fees on Grant of Leases.

820.00

300.00

20.00

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS :—

Markets.

65,863.65

77,875.45

12,011.80

Buildings.

Piers.

LICENCES:--

Spirit..

7,293,00

11,387.48

4.014.48

881.20

1,072.50

191.30

41,480,00

42,380.00

900.00

Pawnbrokers,

13,650,00

13,300.00

350.00

Auctions,

2,400.00

1,800.00

600.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

28.50

13.50

15.00

Emigration Brokers,

1,200.00

1,200.00

Colonial Secretary, Auditor..

Treasurer,

Clerk of Councils, Surveyor General,. Postmaster General, Registrar General,. Harbour Master,..

Lighthouses..

Observatory,

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

Government Gardens and Planta

Billiard Tables,

970.00

950.00

20.00

Judicial

Department.

Opium.

178,500.00

182,400.00

3,900.00

Ecclesiastical

do..

Boarding Houses,

Marriage.

Chinese Undertakers,,

Money Changers.... Marine Store Dealers,. Shooting Licence,..

Arms Licence,

TAXES:-

200,00

150.00

50.00

Educational

do.,

340.00

514.00

204.00

Medical

do.,

100.00

100.00

Police Magistrates' do..

770,00

715.00

55.00

Police

1,170.00

1,080.00

90.00

Gaol

30.00

10.00

20.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

do..

do.,

200.00

200.00

Stamps,

Municipal Rates,

POSTAGE.

130,846.72

137,436.08

159,819.63 170,233.33 10,413.70 306,131,35 332,863.79 26,732.44 6,589.36

FINES, FORFEITURES AND FEES OF COURTS :-

Fines,.

26,049,54

25,901.53

148.01

Forfeitures,.

3,056.10

1,004.10

Fees.

10,853.13

8,314.99

2,051.70 2,538.14

Pensions. Retired Allowances and C

Charitable Allowances,

Transport,.

Works and Buildings,

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

Miscellaneous Services,

Military Expenditure,

Interest,

Land and Houses Purchased,

FEES OF OFFICE:-

Burials,

616.25

939.50

Licences for Junks, &C.........

18,574.25

19,997.75

323.25 1,423.50

...

Registry of Boats..

3,436.14

3,381.15

54.99

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crews,

4,767.56

4,042.96

124.60

Do.

of Hawkers,

3,986.00

Extraordinary I'ublic Works,............

3,980.50

5.50

Cargo Boat Certificates,

798.00

784.42

13.58

Registration of Householders,

1,484.75

1,645,50

160.75

Do. of Servants, &c.,

31.25

17.75

13.50

Official Signatures.

224.00

195.00

29.00

Registration of Deeds,

3,615.00

4,046.00

431.00

Shipping Seamen,..

8,589.00

9,458.00

$69.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,202.50

1,172.50

...

30.00

Survey of Steam-ships, &c.,.

10,393.01

11,300.49

907.45

Registry Fees, &c., (Merchant Shipping Act),

435.78

373.85

61.93

Registry of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

7,326.00

7,970.95

614.95

Registration of Companies,

1,982.40

720.00

1,262.40

Examination of Emigrants,

18,101.75

23,706.00

5,604.25

Registration of Births, &c.,

61.30

71.60

7.30

Light Dues,

32,953.16

33,003.57

50.41

Licences for Steam-launches,

372.50

450.00

77.50

Surveyor's Certificate for Steam-launches,

955.00

1,190.00

235.00

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c.,

4.234.92

2,175.49

2,059.43

Registration of Trade Marks,

519.91

709.50

159.59

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

495.00

535.00

40.00

Medical Registration Fees,

35.00

35.00

Bills of Health,

1,446.00

1,815.00

369.00

Sale of Government Property,

1,753.99

7,105.83

5,351.84

Reimbursements,

Interest,

Miscellaneous Receipts,

26,836.99

26,038.50

798.49

11,636.44

3,560.72

80,408.78 61,227.88

8,075.72 19,180.90

$ 1,367,977.74 1,427,485.79

97,175.94

37,667.89

Deduct Decrease,

37,667.89

Nett Increase,

.$

59,508.05

TREASURY. HONGKONG, 20TH MARCH, 1888.

A. F. ALVES,

Accountant.

Examined,

F

163,995.01

1-4, ryb, Fa

The trovertor,

20,058.32

592.90

Colonial Secretary,

22,838.78

21,268.68

1.570.10

300.00

20.00

77,875.45

12,011.80

11,337.48

4,044.48

1,072.50

191.39

Auditor,. Treasurer.

Clerk of Councils.

Surveyor General, Postmaster General, Registrar General,.

5,953.98

6,064.85

110.87

12,454.59

11.494.04

960.55

1,160.00

1,239.68

79.68

53,260.44

58,619.30

5,358.86

126,355.34

100,380.19

25.975.15

22,922.83

23,190.82

267.99

42.380.00 13,300.00

900.00

Harbour Master,.

45,058.34

48,074.41

3,016.07

350.00

Lighthouses,.

5,948.81

5,612.77

336.07

1,800.00

600.00

Observatory,

6,422.31

7,229.88

807.57

13.50

15.00

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

5,160.00

4,804.33

355.67

1,200.00

Government Gardens and Plantations,

21,508.28

20,854.90

653.38

950.00

20.00

Judicial

Department,

62,768.70

66,615.30

3,846.60

182,400.00

3,900.00

Ecclesiastical

do..

6,820.68

6,638.48

182.20

150.00

50.00

Educational

do.,

43,085.50

43,070.91

14.59

544.00

204.00

Medical

do.,

39,761.20

41,785.22

2,021.02

100.00

Police Magistrates' do..

20,968.75

19,919.40

1,049.35

715.00

55.00

Police

do.,

193,618.88

213,481.10 19,862.22

1,080.00

90.00

Gaol

do..

52,410,84

48,650,58

3,760.26

10.00

20.00

Fire Brigade

dlu.,

15,363.99

18,156.39

2,792.40

200.00

200.00

Pensions, Retired Allowances and Gratuitics,

37,747.94

10,987.41

3,239.47

Charitable Allowances,

3,372.00

3,932.70

560.70

170,233.33

10,413.70

Transport,.

1,882.24

2,235.44

353.20

332,863.79

26,732.41

Works and Buildings,

73,916.96

83,113.68

9,196.72

137,436.08 6,589.36

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

36,175.17

46,172.02

9,996.85

Miscellaneous Services,

111,904.98

116,380.22

1,475.24

25,901.53

148.01

Military Expenditure,

124,561.68

128,815.63

4,253.95

1,004.10

2,051.70

Interest,

4,412.28 51,551.05

47,138.77

8,314.99

2,538.11

Land and Houses Purchased,.

1,500.00

1,500.00

939.50

19,997.75

323.25 1,423.50

1,195,236.811,278,181.68

118,878.18

35,933.31

3,331.15

4,642.96

3,980,50

54.99 124.60 5.50

Extraordinary l'ublic Works,..

825,624.81

744,820.38

$0,804.46

781.42

13.58

1,615.50

160.75

17.75

13.50

195.00

29.00

4,046.00

431.00

9,458.00

$69.00

1,172.50

30.00

11,300.49

907.45

373.85

61.93

7,970.95

644.95

720.00

1,262.40

23,706.00

5,604.25

71.60

7.30

33,003.57

450.00

1,190.00 2,175.49

709.50 535.00

...

50.41

77.50

235.00

2,059.43

159.59

40.00

35.00

35.00

1,815.00

369.00

7,105.83

5,351.84

26,038.50

798.19

3,560.72

61,227.88

8,075.72 19,180.90

1,427,485.79

97,175.94

37,667.89

37,667.89

59,508.05

$2,020,861.65 |2,023,002.06

118,878.18

116,737.77

Deduct Decrease,.

Nett Increase................

116,737.77

2.140.41

A. F. ALVES,

Accountant.

Examined,

FREDERICK STEWART,

A. LISTER,

Auditor General.

Treasurer.

No.

8

88.

*

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1887,

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 23rd March, 1883.

SIR, I have the honour to forward herewith the Annual Report on Education for the year 1887.

2. The total number of Schools, subject to supervision and examination by the Government, amounted, in the year 1887, to 94, as compared with 45 Schools in 1877 and 13 Schools in 1867. The total number of scholars, enrolled in Schools subject to Government supervision and examination, amounted to 5,974 in the year 1887, as compared with 3,144 scholars in the year 1877, and 700 scholars in the year 1867. In other words, there has been an increase of 49 Schools and 2,830 scholars during the last ten years, whilst the increase during the previous decade (1867-1877) amounted to 32 Schools with 2,736 scholars.

3. It is evident from the foregoing figures that the number of Schools and scholars under Govern- ment supervision and examination exhibits a considerable increase from decade to decade. This in- crease has, however, been running in the wake of a comparatively greater increase of the population of the Colony. The rate of annual increase has been unsteady in the case of Schools and scholars. In last year's Report I shewed that up to the year 1884 there was, year by year, a continuous annual increase amounting, on an average, to 6 Schools and 472 scholars per annum, but that, owing to certain disturbing elements, the previous annual increase of Schools and scholars remained checked from autumn 1884 to the beginning of the year 1887. But in the latter year there has now again been an increase of 4 Schools and 130 scholars under Government supervision and examination. Although this increase is not yet equal to the former annual rate, it may be taken as an indication that the current of educational development will soon recover its former strength.

4. Of the above mentioned 5,974 scholars attending Schools under Government supervision in the year 1887, as many as 4,160 were placed by their parents in Missionary Grant-in-Aid Schools where they received a Christian education, whilst 1,814 children attended the Government Schools. Of the latter number 601 scholars attended the Government Central School, 868 scholars attended Schools established by the Government in town and villages, and 345 scholars were under instruction in the small Village Schools kept by the natives and aided by the Government (by a fixed monthly grant of $5 each). Comparing these figures with those of the preceding year, it appears that there has been but a slight increase, amounting to 209 scholars, in the attendance of the Missionary Grant-in-Aid Schools, and a slight decrease, amounting to 79 scholars, in the attendance of the Government Schools. For further details see Tables I and II appended to this Report.

5. The expenses incurred by the Government, during the year 1887, on account of education in general, amounted (including the expenses connected with the Government Scholarship) to a total of $43,070.91 (as compared with $43,085.50 in the year 1886), or $7.21 per scholar (as compared with $7.37 per scholar in 1886). These expenses were distributed as follows. The Government Central School, with 601 scholars, cost the Government, in the year 1887, $11,872.70 or $19.75 per head. The expenses of the other Government Schools (including the Government Aided Schools in the villages), attended by 1,814 scholars, amounted to $9,443.43 or $5.20 per head. On the Grant-in-Aid Schools, with 4,160 scholars, the Government has spent, for the year 1887, the sum of $16,674.72 or $4 per head. Further details concerning the cost, to the Government, of each School, will be found in Tables III, IV and XIII.

6. As to the nature of the education given in the above mentioned 94 Schools under Government supervision and examination, we may divide these Schools into 5 classes, viz. Chinese Schools, Roma- nized Chinese Schools, Portuguese Schools, Anglo-Chinese Schools, and English Schools. The first and by far the largest of these classes of Schools consisted in the year 1887 of 75 Schools (with 3,802 scholars) giving a purely Chinese education, exclusively in the Chinese language, that is to say either in the Punti or Hakka or Hoklò dialects. The second class consisted of 2 Schools (with 98 scholars) giving a European education in the Chinese language, using both the Chinese written character and teaching also to read and write Chinese according to the Romanized system. The third class consisted of 3: Portuguese Schools (with 224 scholars) giving a European education exclusively in the Portuguese

language and teaching neither English nor Chinese. The fourth class consisted of 8 Anglo-Chinese Schools (with 1,160 scholars) giving a European education in both the English and Chinese languages. The fifth class consisted of 6 Schools (with 688 scholars) giving a European education exclusively in the English language.

7. Ever since Schools were established in this Colony, a disproportionate amount of attention has been given to the education of boys as compared with girls. In the early times of the Colony there was good reason for that, for the Chinese community consisted during the first two decades of the Colony's existence almost exclusively of men. It is only since the last 20 or 25 years that the Chinese began on a gradually increasing scale to settle down here together with their families, and it is very probable that the census of 1881 will show that the Chinese population of the Colony will in the near future attain to an approximately normal proportion of males and females. I shewed in my Report for last year that, thanks to the successful working of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, there has been, ever since the year 1873, a steady increase from year to year, both in the number of Schools established in the Colony for the special purpose of promoting female education, and in the proportion of girls to boys under instruction in the various Schools of the Colony. Among 5,974 children attending Schools under the supervision and examination of the Government, there were 4,195 boys and 1,779 girls in the year 1887. This constitutes a slight increase as compared with the statistics of the preceding year. But the gradual progress made in this direction becomes more striking if we compare the proportion of girls to boys during the last twenty years. In 1867, among 700 children then attending Schools under Government, the girls counted only 6.86 per cent. In 1877, in the case of 3,144 children attending such Schools, the percentage of girls had risen to 19.84 per cent. and in the year 1887 we had, among 5,974 children in School, girls to the number of 29.77 per cent. It is evident that female education in this Colony, although in a backward condition and requiring to be fostered in every legitimate way, has in it the elements of healthy progress.

8. Apart from the 94 Schools under Government supervision and examination, with their 5,974 scholars, there were, in the year 1887, about 110 Private Schools (including Night Schools) at work in the Colony, attended by about 2,300 children, so that the total number of scholars under instruction in Schools of all classes amounted to 8,272 scholars, distributed over 204 Schools. As the population of the Colony, apart from the Army and Navy, amounted, in the year 1887, to about 181,900 souls, it appears therefore that about 4.54 per cent of the whole resident population were under instruction in Schools, public or private, within the Colony. In European countries, where education is compulsory, the number of children actually attending School forms generally about 10 per cent. (more or less) of the population. Under the exceptional circumstances of this Colony and in the absence of any law compelling attendance at School, it would be unreasonable to expect an equally high percentage here. European families still continue to send their children to Europe for reasons of health or to complete their education, and Chinese families, although they have now to some extent taken to bringing up their children in the Colony, send them away to their ancestral homes on the neighbouring mainland at the slightest provocation, such as the outbreak of epidemic disease or the spread of vague rumours concerning expected disturbances. We have no accurate data to ascertain the number of children of local school-age (6-16 years) residing in the Colony in the year 1887. When the last census was taken (in 1881), the number of children of local school-age approximated 9.26 per cent. of the popula- tion. Applying this proportion to the population of the year 1887, it would appear that the number of children of local school-age amounted in 1887 to 16,843. Deducting therefrom the number of children actually in School (8,274), it appears that the number of uneducated children in the Colony, in 1887, amounted to 8,569. In other words, a little under one half of the children of local school-age actually came under instruction in Hongkong during the year 1887. There is nothing abnormal in this discrepancy. Educational statistics of quite recent date show that in England and Wales some- what over one half, and in Ireland less than one half, of those children (5-13 years of age) who ought to attend School, actually come under instruction. There are in this Colony hardly any industries which employ great numbers of children. One Sugar-Refinery employs a small gang of children in packing cube sugar in tins, and public road-making gives here and there parents an opportunity to employ their children in breaking small stones (to be mixed with cement), but there is very little in- terference at present with school attendance arising from these sources. The employment of children by their parents in carrying loads of soil or bricks to or from building sites has very much decreased during the last 10 years. The principal causes that interfere with school attendance in the Colony are domestic employment within the family, bond-servitude in the case of purchased servant girls, and fishing in the case of a few villages. The Government Schools (outside the Central School) and the Chinese Grant-in-Aid Schools offer, in every part of the Colony both in town and villages, an ordinary Chinese education absolutely free of charge. In the Aided Village Schools (also giving an ordinary Chinese education in the vernacular) a small charge is made by the village communities amounting, on an average, to 30 cash and 3 catties of rice (total value about 12 cents) a month for each child in actual attendance. There are moreover 5 Government Schools in different parts of the Colony which give an elementary English education (up to Standard IV) absolutely free of charge. It is only in the middle-class Schools of the Colony which give an English education (with or without Chinese in addition) and in Private Schools that fees are charged such as are beyond the means of the poor. Thanks to the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, the lowest classes of the Chinese population have the most liberal

Y

T

provision made for them by Government to furnish their children with an ordinary Chinese education. The mass of the Chinese lower classes do not yet sufficiently appreciate an English education, because their necessities demand Chinese rather than English knowledge. But the well-to-do classes of the Chinese community are now from year to year becoming more alive to the advantages of an English education (based on 3 or 4 years previous study of the Chinese classics) and the existing educational machinery is quite capable of any modification that may be required in order to keep pace with the gradually increasing demand for a higher and broader standard of school teaching. One great charac- teristic of our educational system is that, being the outcome of a slow but natural process of evolution, it is not only in vital sympathy with all the constituent elements of our heterogeneous community, equitably representing the various factors of differentiation, but it represents also a mighty force of unification. In social life and even in commercial life we have in this Colony sundry unbridged chasms, widely separating the different strata of the community, and this exclusivism seeks ago to secure se- parate Schools for separate classes of society, but the main current of the educational movement in the Colony runs so strongly in the direction of unity that the Schools of the Colony are either forced to abandon their exclusivism or to eke out a scanty existence by constant appeals to the charity of a sinall section of the community. The Government Central School, the largest and most flourishing educational institution in the Colony, was originally established for Chinese only but was soon compelled by the sheer force of circumstances to admit all other nationalities, and here we see now all the strata of Colonial society brought together in a harmonious co-operation which has (to a certain extent) a unifying effect on society itself. St. Joseph's College, originally established exclusively for Portuguese boys, soon found itself compelled to admit also Chinese boys, who were at first taught in entire separation from the Portuguese, but this partition wall had also to be lowered after some years, and now we see in the upper classes of St. Joseph's College Portuguese and Chinese harmoniously intermixed. Even the Hongkong Public School, established on a strictly exclusivist principle, being intended for Euro- pean Protestants only, found itself compelled to open its doors also to Portuguese, Jews and Mahome- dans. The writer of the article on Hongkong, in the book published under the title "Her Majesty's Colonies," concludes a fair sketch of the educational system of Hongkong (reprinted in a recent work entitled "The Schools of Greater Britain"), by saying that this system is "very well adapted to the views of the Chinese inhabitants, as a great element in popularising British rule and inducing respect- able Chinese to settle in the Colony." "What our educational system has thus done for the Chinese, it is also doing for all the other nationalities represented in the Colony, by striving to remove all unnatural distinctions of race and creed and to bridge over every chasm and gulf that divides one class of society from the other, in order to unite all in mutual subservience to the interests of the common weal.

9. In one respect most of our educational agencies are labouring under a serious disadvantage. The question of accommodation seriously affects the results of school teaching in every country, and more particularly so in a tropical climate. Yet in this very matter of house accommodation most of the Schools in the Colony are in a very backward condition. Among our 204 Schools there are hardly ten or twelve which are located in suitable premises. The vast majority of our Schools are at present accommodated in ordinary semi-Chinese or Chinese dwelling houses, ill suited for the purpose of class rooms and are in most cases deficient as regards light and ventilation and especially in respect of lavatories. Even the Government Schools, with the exception of four, are all more or less badly housed, being located in narrow tenements of Chinese construction which were originally built for Chinese domestic purposes and for which the Government pays a heavy monthly rent. The Grant-in-Aid Schools are, with a few exceptions, in the same plight. The Aided Schools in the Villages are mostly accommodated in window-less cottages, generally of a worse type than the dwellings of the villagers themselves, many of these Schools receiving light and ventilation exclusively from the open door-way. There is therefore great need for improvement in the matter of school accommodation. But at present there is little prospect of an early change for the better. House rent has risen enormously in the main parts of the town. All new houses, that have been built of late, are of smaller dimensions than the old houses of the town. Houses containing rooms suitable for the purposes of a School have of late become very rare in the Colony. The Government and private Managers of Schools are thus being forced to face the problem of providing school accommoda- tion of a suitable and sanitary type. The Grant-in-Aid Scheme offers indeed Building Grants under certain conditions and one very fine College (St. Joseph's) has been built with such aid, but Managers of Grant-in-Aid Schools appear to consider the restrictions with which Building Grants are hedged in too irksome still, although these restrictions have lately been modified to meet some objections. The Government has also lately made several grants of building sites for Village Schools, but in the thickly populated parts of the town there is a lamentable dearth of available sites suitable for Schools. The sanitary supervision of Public Schools which, under the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, devolved hitherto upon the Inspector of Schools, has at my request been entrusted, since 1887, to the care of the Sanitary Board, a measure of some importance as, in the case of an outbreak of epidemic disease, Schools serve as powerful centres for the propagation of the infection.

10. The results of the annual examinations of the Schools under the supervision of the Govern- ment will be found detailed in Table X-XV appended to this Report, and as far as the Government Central School is concerned, in the Report of its Headmaster. A few supplementary statistical details

and general observations regarding the principal classes of Schools may however be of interest.

Class.

Class.

11. In the case of the Government Central School, the result of the year's work has been tested as usual by means of a joint examination conducted by the Head-Master and myself. The general value of the year's work, as ascertained by these examinations, will be found summarized in the Head- Master's Report, but I subjoin the usual statistical tables which indicate, in detail, the progress made in 1887 by the several divisions and by each of the eleven classes of the School.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL.-NUMBER of BOYS PASSED in EACH SUBJECT in 1887.

Total No.

Examined.

Passed.

Reading.

Dictation.

Arithmetic.

Chinese into

English.

English into Chinese.

Grammar.

Geography.

Map-drawing.

Composition.

Euclid.

Algebra.

History.

Latin.

Intelligence.

General

Mensuration.

I.,

28

II.,...... 23

III.,

IV.,

...

V.,...... 34

*

18

41

VI.,

27

VII., ... 44

* * * * * *

24

25

16

23

19

19

2290

20

21

19

20

18

18

40

40

34

33

19 20 2

15

11

14

23

26

38

26

17

31

25

26

24

19

20

43

44

44

35

40

* 29 * * *

2223

25

24

20

21

222 223

1

23

21

2235

26

16 16 19 22 16 18

22 19 17 17 15

16

17

16

17

17

39

39

36

38

38

22 333

17

12

14 12 17

12

35

41

33

31

33

30

23

19

24

23

42

41

41

38

:

:.

:

VIII.,

IX,

& H

43

43

43

42

31

40

41

33

39

37

56

55

55

49

50

51

52

56

:

:

Writing.

X,

47

47

46

44

42

45

39

:.

A:..

47

XI,

23

23

23

23

22

18

21

23

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

::

:

:

F:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Total, 384

375

372 325 292

338

351 281 233 230

103

82 88 48 54

45

18

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL-PERCENTAGE of PASSES in EACH SUBJECT in 1887.

I.,

II.,

888

28

III.,

85.71 89.2857.14 71.43 75.00 89.28 85.71 82.14 89.28 92.85 57.14 57.14 67.86 78.57 57.14 64.28

23 100.00 82.61 | 82.6182.61 86.95 | 86.95 91.30 91.30 95.65 95.65 82.61 73.91 73.91 65.22 73.91

18 100.00 100.00 | 83.33 61.11 77.77 88.88 | 94.44 88.88 94.44 94.44 66.66 77.77 66.66 94.44 66.66

IV.,

41 97.55 97.55 56.10 63.41 92.68| 95.12 95.12 87.80 92.68 92.68 85.36 100.00

V.,

34 100.00 97.05 76.47 50.00 91.17 97.05 91.17 97.05 88.23

:

VI.,

27

92.59 96.29 77.78 70.37 74.07 85.17 | 70.37 77.78 85.17

VII.,

VIII.,... 43

...

44

97.72 100.00 100.00 | 79.55 90.91 | 95.45 93.18 93.18 86.36

100.00 100.00| 97.67|72.09 93.02 | 95.34 76.79 90.69 86.04|

IX.,

56

98.3598.35 88.50 90.14 91.78 93.43 | 100.00

X.,

XI.,

47 100.00 97.87 93.61 89.36 95.74 82.98

:

:

23

Total, 384

...

100.00 100.00 100.00 95.65 78.26 91.30

Writing.

100.00

100,00

69.57

97.65 96.87 84.63 76.04 88.02 91.40 89.49 90.30 89.14 93.63 74.54′ 80.00 69.57 78.26 65.22 64.28

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL.-CHINESE EXAMINATIONS.

Anglo-Chinese Division.

No. of Boys Examined.

PERCENTAGE of PASSES in EACH SUBJECT, in 1887.

Anglo-Chinese Division.

Copy Writing.

Reading. Dictation.

Chinese Transla- Characters. tion.

Total Percentage Passed.

12

12

12

10

12

100

II.,

12

11

9

12

12

9

100

III.,

11

7

6

9

9

10

5

73

I.,

II.,

III.,

IV.,

V........

VI.,

Chinese Class.

Chinese Class.

No. of Boys Examined.

Essay

Letter.

Prosody.

Total Percentage Passed.

41

37

35

11

90

67

59

54

50

83

71

66

39

58

87

38

34

27

24

79

40

36

28

33

82

19

16

:

16

79

12. Comparing the results of the year 1887, as tabulated above, with the results exhibited by the previous year' S examinations, it is evident that the Government Central School not only maintains its high standard successfully, but continues making solid progress year by year. As to the comparative results achieved in the several sections of the School, Classes II, III, VII, X and XI distinguished them- selves particularly by a high average uniformly secured in almost every subject, excepting only Reading in Classes II and X and Arithmetic in Classes III and VII. Compared with last year, Class I did better in every subject with the exception of Euclid, History and Map-drawing, and the progress made. in Dictation was specially to be appreciated. Classes IV and V appeared to be rather weak in Dictation and Arithmetic, but exhibited in all the other subjects sensible improvement, which was specially noticeable in the case of Class IV in Composition and Euclid and in the case of Class V in Grammar. Classes VI and VIII shewed good progress in the subjects of Dictation and Arithmetic but slightly poorer results in Translation. Class VII did very well in Reading, Dictation and Translation, but there was some falling off in Arithmetic and Map-drawing. Class IX did in most subjects better than in the previous year, with the exception of Dictation and Translation. The Chinese Classes of the School shewed on the whole satisfactory results, but especially so the Anglo-Chinese division where very marked progress has been made. The addition of Latin to the list of higher subjects taught in the Government Central School is a noticeable innovation, characteristic of the year 1887, which has added new subjects to the program of a number of other Schools in the Colony. In the early years of the Government Central School, anything beyond a partial mastery of the English language was viewed by the Chinese boys of the School as an irksome burden and as a waste of time, but after a while, little by little, they came to appreciate Mathematics also and Chemistry, and at one time (1870) even the Theory of Music and Drawing were included among the subjects taught in the School. Chemistry, which for some years dropped out of the program, and Book-keeping, which has been taken up in several of the Grant-in-Aid Schools, are at the present day making their claims felt. But there is a danger of over- burdening youthful brains and teaching multa instead of the better multum. School-hours have already reached the limit of what is safe to health. Home-lessons, indispensable as they are, are already dangerously encroaching upon the time needed for exercise. The remedy appears to me to lie in forming a higher division over and above that which now includes the first class of the Government Central School. If scholars can be induced to stay in School a year or two longer, all the higher subjects like Chemistry, Book-keeping, Latin and Mathematical Drawing, and so forth, might be relegated to this senior division which eventually might be affiliated with some English University.

1

13. The Anglo-Chinese Schools of the Government, located at Saiyingp'ún, Wántsai, Wong- naichung, Stanley and Yatimáti do not call for special remarks this year. The examinations of these Schools shewed fair results, which is the more to be appreciated as in those Schools which are situated ➤ out of town there is, with the exception perhaps of Stanley, little support given to the efforts of the Master by the villagers, who care far more for good Chinese teaching than for English. The inhabit- ants of Shaukiwán have been petitioning during the year 1887 for re-introduction of English teaching in their Vernacular School, but although another attempt in that direction has to be made, it is always done in the villages at the imminent risk of spoiling a good Vernacular School by changing it into a badly attended Anglo-Chinese School, especially in places like Shaukiwán where several Chinese dialects. arc represented among the people.

14. Those Government Schools and Aided Schools which hitherto gave a Chinese education, pure and simple, exclusively in the Chinese language and according to Chinese national methods, entered with the year 1887 upon a new phase of their existence, through the introduction of Arithmetic teaching, which is not only a striking departure from the groove of Chinese tradition but will prove the thin end of the edge for the introduction of class teaching, time table. mental training, and in short an approach to the methods and organization of a European School. For the present, the step taken in this direction is seemingly insignificant, and with one solitary exception the teachers of all the Schools, including even the Aided Schools in the Villages, took this step cheerfully. At the beginning of the year I supplied each Master with simple Addition and Multiplication Tables (in Chinese characters) and brief directions to teach all children under 10 years simple Addition whilst the rest were to be taught both Addition and Multiplication. But I left it free to each Master to choose whatever method he might prefer, to use the Chinese abacus, to have sums done in writing, or to teach simply mental Arithmetic, in any way he pleased. The results obtained at the end of the year might be called satis- factory, had they not been gained, in almost all cases, at the expense of Geography teaching, which was generally neglected in proportion as Arithmetic teaching was cultivated. Not one Master taught the use of the Chinese abacus. This is very significant and points in the direction of introducing the European method of Arithmetic, if the Masters can be led into it without driving. One Master boldly took up the European system of notation and taught, beside Mental Arithmetic, also Addition, Subtraction and Multiplication with the use of the black board and little wooden tablets (in the place of slates), making his children work out every sum in writing according to the European method. Another Master, resolved to use no foreign method whatever, but determined to teach Arithmetic strictly according to ancient Chinese models. So he took an old Chinese book, published some four centuries ago under the Ming dynasty, and actually taught his boys the four rules, and, in the case of the eldest class, he taught even the extraction of square root and cube root, with Chinese figures indeed but with the minutest adherence. to the European method. In doing so, the Master gloried all the time in the notion that he was following exclusively Chinese principles, for he was blissfully unaware that his old Chinese book was the work of a Chinese pupil of MATTHEW RICCI. The next step that may be taken will be to supply each teacher with a simple manual for his guidance in teaching the four rules according to the European system of Arithmetic, and to do the same for the teaching of Chinese Geography.

15. As regards the Grant-in-Aid Schools in Class I, that is, Schools which give a Chinese educa- tion exclusively in the Chinese language, I subjoin a comparative Table exhibiting the results of the working of the Revised Scheme (of 1883) which came into operation in 1884. The aim of that revision was to increase the pensum of work to be done under the several Standards, to reduce the earning power of these comparatively in-expensive Schools and, finally, to encourage the teachers to bring more children under instruction in the higher Standards without skipping the lower ones.

TABLE shewing the EFFECTS of REVISION of SCHEME (1883) on SCHOOLS in CLass I.

Number of Scholars examined in Schools

in Class I.

Amount earned by Passes (apart from Capitation Grant and Needle-work).

Standards.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

$

I.,

76

128

271

372

146

160

462

654

II.,

557

739

652

639

3,124

3,052

2,196

2,464

III.,.

470

446

474

487

3,208

2,196

2,184

2,100 -

IV.,

120

128

138

153

840

62-1

640

856.

V.,

26

26

44

32

230

210

320

250

VI.,

N

9

11

13

24

108

120

108

1,251

1,476

1,590

1,696

$7,572

$6,350

$6,222

$6,432

16. It will be seen from the above Tables that the amounts earned by these Grant-in-Aid Schools in Class I has increased from year to year but the rate of increase has been far below the natural increase of the number of children in attendance. It will further be observed that there has been from year to year an increase in the number of children annually brought forward into the higher Standards. The increase has indeed been rather small. Yet it is evident that the aim which was kept in view in revising the Scheme in 1883 has been fairly attained. There is, however, another point in connection with the above Table that requires comment. It appears from the above figures, on taking an average of the last four years, that from 1884 to 1887 the average number of scholars annually examined in the successive Standards of the Schools in Class I was as follows:-Standard I, 211 scholars; Standard II, 617; Standard III, 469; Standard IV, 135; Standard V, 32; and Standard VI, 9. At first glance, these figures appear to indicate that the children attending these Schools generally remain under instruction only some 3 or 4 years, that few stay in school 5 years, and that a very small proportion of children complete their course of education by reaching Standard VI. Now it is true indeed that, as a general rule, very few children and especially very few girls are left long enough in these purely Chinese Schools to finish their education there. But that does not prove that none of them continue their education in a higher Class of Schools. Chinese girls indeed are not sent to English Schools, and so far as they are concerned the above figures undoubtedly prove that Chinese girls are, as a rule, removed from school before they reach the highest Standards. But the above figures must also be read in the light of the fact that the vast majority of boys attending these Chinese Schools in Class I, pass on, after reaching Standard III or IV, into the Government Central School or into other English or Anglo-Chinese Schools (in Class IV of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme) to learn English there, whilst continuing, privately or in those Anglo-Chinese Schools, to keep up that Chinese knowledge obtained by them in the lower Standards of those Primary Chinese Schools in Class I. In other words, the above figures, whilst in- dicating a defect in the education of Chinese girls, shew also, in the case of boys, that those Primary Chinese Schools in Class I act as the natural feeders of our Middle Class Schools, so far as the Chinese population is concerned, and that in their case a sound knowledge of the vernacular is now generally made the preliminary stepping stone for reaching a sound English education. The same important principle has been recognized also, as I have shewn in former Reports, by the Portuguese community in this Colony. It is a principle which is now in India persistently urged upon educationists, since it has been generally recognized that the preservation of the vernacular in all Classes of Schools is required in order that the mental progress of the scholar may be reflected in his increased power to make use of his own language.

17. The Grant-in-Aid Schools in Class III (Basel and Berlin Missions) continue to show good results. In these Schools, which give a European education (to Chinese Girls) in the Chinese language, a laudable tendency has of late set in, to confine the use of the Romanized system of writing Chinese within reasonable limits and to teach in the higher Standards as much as possible of the written Chinese character. Evidence of the beneficial effect of this movement presented itself in a marked manner at the examinations held at the end of the year 1887. Formerly showy results in Chinese composition and letter writing were obtained, in the Romanized character, in these Schools, but, through comparative neglect of the use of the written Chinese character, children who passed successfully Standard VI were generally left unable to read or write an ordinary Chinese letter or simple bill for goods bought or sold. At the last examinations I noticed in this respect a great change for the better. The Chinese girls in these Schools are, for instance, still taught to write in good colloquial prose (Romanized) answers to searching questions in the history of Babylonia, Egypt, Greece and Rome, but they are now also gaining profi- ciency in writing simple prose or ordinary letters in the common Chinese character. It is to be regretted that the history teaching of these Schools excludes at present, for want of a suitable manual, the history of China. But as besides History, also Arithmetic (as far as decimal fractions) and Geography are added in these Schools to the ordinary subjects of an elementary Chinese education, it must be admitted that the wide range of education given in these Schools is eminently satisfactory, and does credit to the Basel and Berlin Missions.

18. The Grant-in-Aid Schools in Class IV have made extraordinary progress in the year 1887. I referred in the previous year's Report to the stimulus which had been given to the educational move- ment in this Colony by the introduction (at the instance of Mr. C. J. BATEMAN, Headmaster of the Hongkong Public School) of the system of non-gremial examinations conducted by the Syndicate of the University of Cambridge. I expected this measure to exercise, in time, a great and healthful in- fluence towards raising the standard of English education in the Colony. I apprehended also certain draw-backs, temptations and dangers to attach themselves to this as to every other strong stimulative measure. Surveying now the educational work of the year 1887, I certainly see, even at present, some of the draw-backs I referred to, but the suddenness and the extent of the healthful impulse which the introduction of the Cambridge Local Examinations gave, in the year 1887, to the study of the higher branches of an English education, has surpassed all my expectations. There was hitherto only one School, the Diocesan Home and Orphanage, which, during the last 5 years, annually took up three of the special subjects of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, viz., Algebra, Euclid, and Physical Geography. But in 1887, suddenly 5 other Schools, St. Joseph's College, the two Victoria English Schools (including even a Girl's School), St. Paul's College (Anglo-Chinese School) and the Hongkong Public School,

י,

(recently placed under the Grant-in-Aid Scheme) took up those same special subjects. The Victoria English Schools came out strongest in this respect, gaining the proportionately largest number of passes, in Book-keeping (Turner's Commercial Guide and Hunter's Civil Service Examination Questions), Algebra, Euclid and Physical Geography. St. Joseph's College also distinguished itself both by the number of higher subjects taken up (adding Findlater's Astronomy to the other subjects), and by the thoroughness in which these subjects were taught. The increase in the expenditure, thus caused, made it necessary to subject all the various Classes of Schools to a uniform reduction of the grants nominally earned. There was no injustice in including under this reduction also the Schools in Class I and III, because both those Classes of Schools, but especially the Chinese Schools in Class I, being comparatively in-expensive Schools, had all along an undue advantage annually earning from three fourths to nine tenths of their actual expenditure, whilst Schools in Class IV generally earn a grant covering, at the best, one fourth or one third of their expenses.

19. The Needle work Examination was conducted on the plan adopted several years ago which now appears to work satisfactorily. Greater strictness has been exercised in 1887 in excluding from examination, after timely previous warning, any kind of needle work which did not come clearly under the denomination of plain sewing. The aim is to encourage domestic and practically useful needle- work rather than decorative and fancy work.

20. Arrangements have been made, during the year 1887, to award the Hongkong Government Scholarship henceforth on the basis of written examinations conducted by the Syndicate of the Univer- sity of Cambridge, the Inspector of Schools acting as Local Presiding Examiner. Opportunity was also taken of this measure, which is virtually another effect of the introduction in the Colony of the above-mentioned Cambridge Local Examinations, to remodel the conditions of the Hongkong Govern- ment Scholarship in other respects.

21. I enclose the usual Tables, I to XVI, containing the Educational Statistics for the year 1887.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Hon. FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary.

E. J. EITEL, M.A., PH. D.,

Inspector of Schools.

No.

TABLE I-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending School subject to Government Supervision during 1887.

Name of School.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

";

Aplichau,

11

"

1)

:)

11

**

Station Street (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys), Queen's Road West (Boys),.

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Shamshuipo (Boys),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

9

Central School,

10

11

12

""

13

14

15

""

16

"1

17

**

18

""

19

19

20

21

22

??

23

"

24

25

25

>>

26

27

""

28

Hoktsui,

29

Hokün,

30

31

32

33

34

35

"

Yaumáti (Boys),

36

"

37

19

38

"1

39

""

40

""

41

19

42

C. M. S., St. Stephen's 1. Division (Boys),

II.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys), Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Third Street (Girls),

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghom (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán,.

Hongkong Public School (Boys), Hunghom,

Little Hongkong.

.L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),.

Wantsai (Boys)...

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),

II.

""

Hunghòm (Boys), Shekt'ongtsui (Girls), Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls)..

(Boys).

(Boys),

43

19

Ship Street (Girls),.

44

??

East Street (Boys),

15

46

47

99

48

49

55

50

51

*

Stanley Street (Girls),

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

T'aipingshan Chapel (Girls),..

Saiyingp'ún First Street (Girls), Wantsai (Girls),

Staunton Street Upper School (Girls),

52

Lower

وو

"

"

(Girls),

53

Mát auch'ung.

54

55

Mongkok,..

56

Mát'auts'ün,

Nampakhong Tòkwáwán (Boys),

57

New Village (Little Hongkong),

58

Pokfúlam,

59

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

60

"

61

23

62

"

63

64

65

66

"

67

68

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls),

St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),.

22

""

Italian Convent (Girls),

(Boys),.

Bridges Street Portuguese School (Mixed),....

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

15

(Girls),

European

69

Saiyingp‘ún (English),

70

(Punti),

71

(Hakka),

72

Sháiwán,

73

Shaukiwán,

74

Sheko,..

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

19

Shéungwán (Boys),

(Girls),

St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys), Stanley,

Táit'ámtuk,

Táiwongkung..

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

83 Tòkwáwán (Eastern Village),.

(Punti),

84

11

(Western Village),

85

Ts'attszemúi,

86

Wantsai (English),

87

$$

89

"

(Chinese),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

90

""

;;

>>

(Girls),

91

Wongkoktsui,

92

Wongmákok,

93

Wongnaichung,

94

Yaumáti,

Central School.

Native Native Grant-in- School School Aid (Govt.) (Aided). School.

Total.

...

54

***

***

601

114

8582 IZEN 500)

83

83

61

61

99

99

72

72

54

71

71

34

34

27

27

601

97

97

76

76

114

59

59

89

89

46

46

52

52

53

53

86

86

16

16

100

100

33

33

51

51

48

48

31

34

47

47

47

47

46

46

10

10

18

18

66

66

18

18

32

32

123

123

***

90

90

62

62

75

75

96

96

108

108

73

73

21

21

65

65

93

93

70

70

***

***

31

31

43

43

...

48

48

40

...

40

65

...

65

70

70

76

76

36

36

47

47

20

20

24

24

28

28

18

18.

14

14

7

7

66

66

53

53

127

127

215

215

198

198

117

117

51

51

56

56

42

40

169

172

: SN: ¦ ¦ &82; 6: 28N2; 288:⠀⠀

68

91

63

15

51

8

63

60

53

29

23

14

172

32 105

105

29

23

46

42

829 8 BRD287****8*2*= 2 *******

14

32

23

8

46

42

601

868

345

4,160

5,974

TABLE II.-PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1887.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA.

Population as estimated in 1887, about 181,900 souls (exclusive of Army and Navy).

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION, IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat Population. as per Census of 188

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION, IN VILLAGES.

No. of Scholars.

No. of Scholars.

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys);

83

1. Aplichau,

54

"

>

">

3.

*

**

1.

*

Station Street (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys), Queen's Road West (Boys),

61

99

2. Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys)... 3. C. M. S., Hunghòm (Boys),.

84

16

72

4.

Yaumáti (Mixed),

86

7. Central School,

9.

10.

"

5. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

6. Berlin Mission (Girls).........

8. C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

>>

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

71

5. F. Ë. S., Shaukiwán (Girls),

46

27

6.

601

7. Hokisui,

Stanley (Girls).

47

10

97

8. Hokün.

18

II

(Boys),

76

9. Hunghom,

18

114

11.

Pottinger Street (Boys),

59

10. Little Hongkong,

11. L. M. S., Hunghom (Boys),

32

73

12.

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),................

89

12.

11

Shckt'ongtsui (Boys),

75

13.

14.

፡፡

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

46

13.

"

(Girls),

21

52

14.

15.

Third Street (Girls),

53

15.

"

Tanglungchau (Girls), Yaumáti (Boys),

40

62

18.

1:

19.

::

20.

"

21.

16. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

17. F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),.

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road (Girls),

22. L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

100

16. Mát auch'ung,

20

33

17. Mát auts'ün,

24

51

18. Mongkok....

28

48

19. Nampakhong, Tòkwáwán (Boys),

18

34

20. New Village (Little Hongkong),

14

Pottinger Street (Girls),

47

21. Pokfulam,..

123

22. Shaiwán,

15

23.

};

Wántsai (Boys),

90

23. Shankiwán,

51

24.

22

Suiyingp'ún I Division (Boys),

96

24. Sheko,

22

25.

II

26.

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

(Boys),

108

25. Stanley,

48

65

26. Tait'ámtuk,

27.

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

93

27. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

60

28.

Ship Street (Girls),

70

28.

(Punti), ......

53

29.

East Street (Boys),

31

30.

Stanley Street (Girls),.

43

30.

*

31.

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),.

48

29. T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

31. Ts'attszemúi.

29

(Western Village),

23

32.

Táip'ingshan Chapel (Girls)...

65

32. Wongkoktsui,

23

33.

Saiyingp'ún First Street (Girls),

70

33. Wongmákok,

31.

>>

Wantsai (Girls),

76

34. Wongnaich'ung,

35.

"J

Staunton Street Upper School (Girls),

36

35. Yaumáti,

42

TEHNO O*******

7

$

14

8

46

36.

Lower

(Girls),

47

37. Public School, Hongkung (Boys),

66

TOTAL,.......

.1,185

39.

>

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls),

10.

*

38. R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),... 127

66

53

41.

European

"

12.

"

Italian Convent (Girls)....

13.

"

44.

J

45.

46.

>

English

47.

Bridges Street, Portuguese School (Mixed),

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed), 51 Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),...

48. Saiyingpún (English),"".

(Boys),... 215

198

117

""

(Boys), (Girls),

49.

"

50.

"}

(Punti),

(Hakka),

(Girls),

51. Sheungwin (Boys),

52.

"

53. St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

54. Taiwongkung,

55. Wántsai (English),

50.

57. Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

58.

59.

68

91

62

63

172

(Chinese),

32

"

Wellington Street (Boys),

115

27

>>

*

(Girls),

29

TOTAL,.....

.4,789

89

63

1829 8 8878%

56

42

40

TABLE III.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS during 1887 and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL.

No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls.

Total. Expense. No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls,

Total.

Expense.

1 Aplichau,

51

2

Central School,

601

601

54 $

108.00 11,872.70

18 19

Brought forward,.. Shéungwán (Boys),

1,066

1,066

13,780.01

GS

68

306.00

(Girls),

91

91

636.00

3 Hoktsui,

10

10

60.00

20

Stanley,

48

325.95

4 Hokün,

18

18

60.00 21

Táit'ámtuk,

$

50.00

5 Hunghom,

18

18

60.00

22 Taiwongkung,

6

Little Hongkong,

32

32

60.00

7 Mát'auch'ung,

20

20

60.00 24

S Mát auts'ün,

24

24

5.00

9 Mongkok,

28

28

60.00

26

་་

23 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

25 Tokwáwán (Eastern Village)..

(Western Village),

(Punti),

23

10 New Village (Little Hongkong)

14

14

60.00

27 Ts'attszemúi,

14

11

Pokfulam,

72.00

28 Wantsai (English),

172

12 Saiyingp'ún (English),

89

528.40 29

(Chinese).

169

13

(Punti),

69

173.91

14

(Hakka).

63

264.00

15 Shaiwán,

15

60.00

30 Wongkoktsui.

31 Wongmákok,"

32 | Wongnaichrung,

23

16 Shaukiwán,

51

156.00

33 Yaumáti,

46 42

*OBARE N ****

63

325.50

60

120,00

53

180.00

29

60.00

23

60.00

14

60.00

544.79 172 {

300.00

23

72.00

8

72.00

46

12

341.98 373.90

17 Sheko,

22

22

120.00

Carried forward...

1,066

1,066 13,780.01

TOTAL,

1,723

91 1,814 $17,608.13

*

TABLE IV.—ÅVERAGE EXPENSES of each SCHOLAR or STUDENT at the Government Schools during the Year 1887.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL.

Expenditure,

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND AIDED SCHOOLS.

Expenditure,

Add Inspector's Salary,

Chinese Writer's Salary,

>"

Teacher's Salary,

J

Travelling Expenses,

Total Expenditure for the year :-

Government Central School,

Government Schools and Aided Schools,

A.

Average Expenses calculated by the Enrolment.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Central School,

2. 3.

>>

""

""

*

""

at other Government Schools,....

99

at Government Aided Schools,

B.

..$11,872.70

..$ 5,735.43

..$3,000

300

120

288

3,708.00

$21,316.13

.$11,872.70 .... 9,443.43

Average Expenses calculated by the average Daily Attendance.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Central School,

2.

""

33

3.

at other Government Schools, at Government Aided Schools,..........

$19.75 5.41 3.01

.$26.40

9.38

4.37

No.

TABLE V.—AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1887.

Name of School.

Average Monthly Average Daily

Attendance.

Enrolment.

124 LO CO - 00

Aplichau,

38.58

33.12

3

Central School, Hoktsui, Hokün,

Hunghòm,

Little Hongkong,..

Mát‘auch'ung,

477.56

449.68

10.00

9.40

10.58

9.27

13.16

12.86

30.16

28.41

13.66

11.00

8

Mat'ants'ün,

24.00

24.00

9

Mongkok,

18.08

17.12

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),

9.50

8.34

11

Pokfulam,..

5.66

4.27

12

Sayingp'ún, (English),

69.00

66.52

13

""

(Hakka),

24.00

20.63

14

>>

(Punti),

38.83

36.73

15

Sháiwấn,

10.75

6.87

16

Shaukiwán,

33.66

28.14

17

Shekò,

19.33

17.96

18

Shéungwán (Boys),.

35.41

31.32

19

(Girls),

45.83

41.29

20

Stanley,

38.75

34.28

21

Táit'ámtuk,

6.77

5.19

22

Táiwongkung,

37.16

33.01

23

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

35.83

30.94

24

"

(Punti),

32.58

28.12

25

Tòkwáwáu (Eastern Village),

23.66

20.06

26

""

(Western Village),

17.83

15.89

27

Ts'attszemúi,

9.75

8.47

28

Wántsai, (English),

120.25

111.79

29

>>

(Chinese),

118.16

109.42

30

31

32

Wongkoktsui,

Wongmákok,

Wongnaich'ung,

18.16

15.35

8.00

7.63

33.25

31.04

33

Yaumáti,

27.50

25.20

1,455.40

1,333.32

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1887.

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum

Monthly Enrolment.

Maximum Daily Minimum Daily

Attendance

Attendance

(monthly average). (monthly average).

1

Aplichau,

2

Central School,

525

3

Hoktsui,

225

52

18

51.20

14.78

417

509.60

376.68

10

10

10.00

8.86

4

Hokün,...........

12

10.17

7.00

567

Hunghòm,

16

5

15.40

4.42

Little Hongkong,

31

28

30.19

26.19

Mát'auch'ung,

15

10

13.45

8.44

8

Mát auts'ün,....

24

24

24.00

24.00

9

Mongkok,

22

13

21.31

8.61

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),

11

4

10.00

4.00

11

Pokfúlam,

7

3

6.78

4.33

12

Saiyingp'un (English),

72

57

69.88

48.68

13

>>

(Hakka),

40

15

32.67

13.45

14

29

(Punti),

45

31

44.17

30.04

15

Sháiwán,

13

8

9.78

5.42

16

Shaukiwán,

40

20

35.95

15.56

17

Shekò,

22

13

21.41

12.33

18

Shéungwán (Boys),

40

32

36.00

26.63

19

""

(Girls),

57

24

52.19

17.46

20

Stanley,

44

35

40.88

32.28

21

Táit'ámtuk,

7

6

6.79

3.80

22

Táiwongkung,.

43

33

.37.00

27.63

23

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

41

28

36.64

23.19

24

(Punti),

43

20

35.40

17.63

25

T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

28

16

22.73

14.19

26

""

(Western Village),

19

14

18.11

9.56

27

Ts'attszemúi,

12

6

10.38

4.00

28

Wántsai (English)

131

80

123.22

75.43

29

(Chinese)

130

81

122.22

74.06

30

Wongkoktsui,

20

14

20.00

12.12

31

Wongmákok,

8

8

8.00

6.75

32

Wongnaich‘ung,

39

25

36.61

24.33

33

Yaumáti,

32

21

30.24

18.66

No.

1,651

1,126

1,552.37

1,000.51

TABLE VII.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS were taught during 1887.

Name of School.

School Days. No.

Name of School.

School Days.

1

Aplichau,

243

18

Shéungwán (Boys),

246

2

Central School,

234

19

""

(Girls),

224

3

Hoktsui,

247

20

Stanley,

245

4

Hokün,

252

21

Táit'ámtuk,

217

Hunghom,....

258

22

Táiwongkung,

242

6

Little Hongkong,.

250

23

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

246

7.

Mat'auch'ung,

253

24

(Punti),

244

8

Mat'ants'ün,

9

25

T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

250

9

Mongkok,

254

26

(Western Village),

256

ΙΟ

New Village (Little Hongkong),

240

27

Ts'attszemui,

250

11

Pokfúlam...

232

28

Wántsai (English),

241

12

Saiyingp'ún (English),

241

29

(Chinese),

241

13

29

(Hakka),

242

30

Wongkoktsui,

251

14

""

(Punti),

241

31

Wongmakok,

252

15

Sháiwán,

250

32

Wongnaich'ung,

234

16

Sháukiwán,

252

33

Yaumáti,

235

17

Sheko;

254

Total Enrolment for the Year.

TABLE VIII.—SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last twenty-five Years.

Years.

Minimum Daily. Attendance.

Maximum Daily Attendance. (Monthly Average).

Minimum Monthly.

Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

1863,

535

469

414

301

1864,

502

417

634

324

1865,

597

535

418

330

1866,

623

572

435

337

1867,

700

610

533

408

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

741

571

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1.326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

· 1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886, 1887,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the CENTRAL SCHOOL during 1887.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Average Daily Attendance.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

January,

417

5,700

14

407.14

February,

519

4,587.

9

509.60

March,

525

13,386

27

495.78

April,... May, June, July,

518

8,314

17

489.06

509

11,493

24

478.87

498

11,017

24

459.04

471

11,609

26

446.50

August,

449

1,767

4

441.75

September,..

470

9,864

22

448.36

October,

467

10,059

23

437.35

November,

455

9,143

22

415.59

December,

433

8,287

22

376.68

Total,

105,226

234

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1887,

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1887,.

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1887,

105,226 234 449.684

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1887,....

601

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (CENTRAL SCHOOL excepted) arranged in the order of their efficiency.

Rank I.

Saiyingp'ún, English Division.

Táiwongkung, Punti School. Wántsai, Chinese (Punti) Division.

Rank II.

Wántsai, English Division. Stanley, Anglo-Chinese School.

Wongnaich'ung, Anglo-Chinese School. Yaumáti, Anglo-Chinese School. Tanglungchau, Hakka Division.

Tanglungchau, Punti Division.

Rank II,-Continued.

Shéungwán, Girls School (Punti). Sheungwán, Boys School (Punti). Little Hongkong, Punti School. Shekò, Punti School. Tòkwáwán, Punti School. Aplichau Punti School. Wongkoktsui, Hlakka School. Tòkwáwán, Hakka School. Shaukiwán, Punti School. Sháiwán, Hakka School. Ts'attszemúi, Hakka School. Hunghom, Hakka School.

Rank II,-Continued.

Mát'auch'ung, Hakka School Saiyingp'ún, Chinese (Punti) Division. Hoktsui, Hakka School.

Wongmákok, Hakka School. Mongkok, Hakka School. Saiyingpún, Hakka School.

New Village (Little Hongkong) Punti

School.

Táit'ámtuk, Hakka School. Pokfulam, Punti School.. Hckün, Hakka School.

TABLE XI.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the

Scheme of 1883), Expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each, in 1887.

Class of

School.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total.

Expenses incurred

in 1887.

Amount of Grant gained for 1887.

$ c.

$ c.

I. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.

83

83

204.00

99

>>

""

"

""

33

95

"

وو

""

Station Street (Boys),

61

61

194.00

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

99

99

324.00

Queen's Road West (Boys),

72

72

285.00

""

""

A

"

ཋཧྨ

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò School (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),..

34

34

92.64

97

97

404.69

II.

(Boys),

76

76

352.95

114

114

391.39

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),.

59

59

349.58

AA

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),...

89

89

285.90

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

46

""

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

11

وو

Third Street (Girls),

988

46

308.38

52

264.56

53

53

313.35

""

Yaumáti (Mixed),

80

""

:

"

""

27

99

""

وو

"

""

* A

""

ود

99

"

""

Wántsai (Boys),

>>

""

""

""

""

""

39

""

Hunghòm (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

""

High Street (Girls),... Queen's Road (Girls). Hollywood Road (Girls),. Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls),

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpún I. Division (Boys),

II.

16

88

86

16

33

33

460.70

51

51

201.10

48

48

204.15

34

34

201.20

...

47

47

234.10

47

47

138.60

46

46

189.20

· 123

123

717.01

90

90

811.85

Yaumáti (Boys),

62

62

479.99

75

75

502.65

96

96

678.40

(Boys),

108

108

658.11

""

""

Hunghom (Boys),..

73

73

716.90

""

A

""

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

.21

21

418.88

27

3

"2

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

65

65

537.23

""

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

93

93

667.47

29

Ship Street (Girls),

ΤΟ

70

336.80

وو

""

East Street (Boys),

31

31

338.19

""

""

Stanley Street (Girls),.

43

43

540.35

""

25

Lower Lascar Row, (Girls),

48

48

415.98

""

Tanglungchau (Girls),

40

40

284.05

""

93

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

65

65

469.44

"

""

Saiyingp'ún First Street (Girls),

70

ΤΟ

293.22

??

Wántsai (Girls),

76

76

643.48

"

""

A

>>

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

AA

>>

""

35

III.

""

35

99

IV.

23

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),

Nampakhong, Tòkwáwán (Boys),

99

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls),........... Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls),....................

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),"'

St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

Hongkong Public School (Boys),

R. C. M,, St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

36

36

331.22

Lower

"

(Girls),

17

360.36

18

18

66

::

257.00

53

32

218.50

115

115

451.00

(Girls),

29

29

254.00

71

71

736.12

27

27

1,090.22

91

9 100

7,794.93

62

62

66

66

127

127

***

""

,,

وو

European

(Boys),

215

215

6,013.41

Italian Convent (Girls),

198 198

2.726.42

""

Bridges Street, Portuguese School (Mixed), St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed),.

60

57 117

912.00

20

31

51

732.00

""

""

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

20

36

56

1,205.00

""

哆哆

English School (Boys),

42

42

""

>>

29

29

(Girls),

40

40

3,263.00

2,472 1,688 4,160 41,284.67

TABLE XII.—ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1887.

Maxi- Mini-

mum

mum

mum

mum

No.

Name of Selicol.

Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol- ment. ment.

Average Average

Maxi- Mini- Average Daily

Monthly Attend-

Average

Number

Daily Daily Attend- Attend-

Enrol- ment.

ance

for the

ance.

ance.

Year.

of School Days.

IA CON -

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

"}

19

Station Street (Boys),.

61

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

4

""

1

Queen's Road West

(Boys),

5678

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò School (Boys),.

6 C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

238 2 15

79

58

74.91

49.04.

68.25

61.41

255

51

57.74

46.53 54.45

50.59

250

90

31

76.57

25.66

72.58 62.57

279

72

58

70.63

40.29

69.45 64.16

243

34

16

30.57

6.61

27.45 21.49

262

97

49

82.03

48.56

70.90

61.04

251

II.

""

(Boys),

74

42

63.37

36.76

58.27

49.12

250

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

90

64

86.18

63.00

77.66 75.00

260

9

Pottinger Street (Boys), .

59

45

55.73

31.95

51.63

46.88

251

10

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),..

64

36

59.11

32.25

50.00

45.87

263

11

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

46

32

41.68

28.94

41.00

35.92

257

12

Lyndhurst Terraco (Girls),

40

26

37.58

22.30

32.00 28.90

270

13

Third Street (Girls),

47

20

43.18

15.60

36.41

33.06

261

14

13

Yaumáti (Mixed),

82

45

70.07

25.83

62.45

54.90

264

15

Hunghòm (Boys),

16

9

13.96

8.00

13.63

11.65

243

16 F. E. S., Bonham Road (Giris),

31

21

29.50

20.03

28.45

27.61

232

17

55

High Street (Girls),

36

23

34.18

17.04

29.75

26.10

268

18.

""

Queen's Road (Girls),

39

22

33.07 21.50

32.08

28.98

271

13

""

Hollywood Road (Girls),.

24

14

21.50

11.84

19.50

16.74

270

20

>>

Pottinger Street (Girls),

45

29

42.07

23.15 39.45

36.50

259

21

""

Stanley School (Girls),

45

22

37.38

19.00 37.91

29.38

284

22

Shankiwán (Girls),

37

24

36.19

15.56

31.91

28.44

262

23

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

122

80

117.48

70.50

102.27

94.11

250

24

""

Wántsai (Boys),

87

74

78.96

70.10

80.09

74.60

252

25

29

Yaumáti (Boys),

36

28

32.75

23.68

30.90

27.69

256

26

99

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

60

43

57.50

37.52

54.50

51.11

256

27

"

28

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),

II.

75

33

72.50 32.25 70.08

67.05

262

(Boys),

78

42

61.37

32.23

63.41 54.83

272

29

Hunghom (Boys),

70

28

62.54

20.57

51.66

47.00

269

30

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

21

15

20.80

13.60 20.25

18.25

262

31

Aberdeen Street (Girls),.

45

30

39.34

26.52 40.41

36.58

264

32

Kan-ü-fong (Girls),

68

51

61.04

41.79

62.91

54.02

276

33

34

:9

East Street (Boys),

35

99

Ship Street Girls),

Stanley Street (Girls),

46

31

41.46

21.57

42.16

37.04

281

29

19

26.42

13.42 25.91

23.82

253

43

28

33.55

18.35 40.09

30.12

267

36

""

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

48

33

45.64

30.26 39.81

38.01

257

37

:

Tanglungchau (Girls),..

40

26

38.07

23.18 34.54

28.50

272

38

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

63

38

59.84

34.93 54.81

51.19

260

39

"

Salyingp'ún, First Street (Girls),

67

47

55.18

38.07 56.90

48.48

273

40

""

Wántsai (Girls),

70

55

56.96

48.07 64.00

53.99

266

41

""

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),

31

28

30.44

24.00 30.27

28.46

266

42

Lower

39

""

99

(Girls),

46

26

34.77

21.84 34.72 28.98

268

43 Nampakhong Tòkwáwán (Boys), 44 | R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

18

16

17.68

14.17 16.30

15.64

225

44

29

39.78

27.77 36.00 32.18

262

45

99

47

"7

48

39

33 3 853 885

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls), 46 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

49 Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

50 Berlin Mission (Girls),......................

51

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

52 St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys), 53 Hongkong Public School,

52

37

48.29

32.25 45.75 43.44

258

31

21

29.51

Wellington Street (Boys),

101

53

83.21

19.88 27.60 25.41 48.07 69.27

223

60.00

260

(Girls),

26

18

20.73

11.10 21.81

18.65

266

69

46

66.51

39.11

62.66 59.59

259

27

27

26.83

24.66

27.00

26.40

260

74

56

67.50 51.33

69.83

63.34

250

50

36

44.57 31.56

40.72

37.56

246

60

41

58.38

36.36 48.72 45.32

236

54 | R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division

126

83 123.95

$1.62 114.41 113.79

221

(Boys),

55

St. Joseph's College, European Divi-

215

176

sion (Boys),

56

"}

Italian Convent (Girls),

176

57

Bridges St., Portuguese School (Mixed),

102

82

206.57 152.75 203.75

162 157.54 118.63 168.18 87.15 71.40 89.66

190.65

226

144.98

232

81.82

247

(Mixed),

59

23

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),.

40

48

41

60

>>

>>

English School (Boys),

31

61

">

(Girls),

32

24225

32.63 21.93. 34.27

28.50

240

44.13

33.08 44.66

39.00

264

29

25.60 20.46 26.09 23.43 31.24 27.28 31.00 28.61

255

256

T

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Exam-

ined.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

TABLE XIII.-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1887, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

Number of Scholars who No. of Scholars who Failed.]

Passed.

Sums to which the School is entitled.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

13

3.

""

4.—

}}

13

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges' Street (Boys),.

Station Street, (Boys),. Hinglung Lane, (Boys),. Queen's Road West, (Boys), . Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, School, (Boys), 6.-Q. M. S. St. Stephen's I Division, (Boys),

53

50

5

19 13

48

42

25

65

65

21

15

30.00 10

8

14

2

63

59

20

20

11

16

15

4 6

2

46

41

10

20

}}

12.-

9.-

10.-

>>

11.-

11

"

13.---

14.-

11

II Lyndhurst Terrace. (Boys),. Pottinger Street, (Boys),

(Boys),

I

41.

39

10

12

61 63

7 26

11

43 42 16 12

Yaumáti, (Mixed),

15.-

Saiyingp'in (Boys), .

St. Stephen's Baxter. Memorial, (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),

Third Street, (Girls),.

Hunghom, (Boys),

16.-F. E. S. Bonham Road, (Girls),

26

35

9 16

98

27

16

6

25

25 3 D

29

28

10

:

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Total Passed.

Total Failed.

Average Daily

Attend-

ance during School Year.

Standard I.

LOCENSAEAO2 Standard II.

Standard III.

$

40

10

61.41

10

72

41

1

50.59 10 100

48

4+

21

62.57

8 96

90

44

15

64.16

6

80

120

12

3

21.49

8

24

12

38

3

61.04

20

80

42

34

49 12

20

48

54

58

10

75.00

14

104

84

35

46.83 32

48

42

20

45.87 18

61

18

24

35.92 32

24

25

28.90

6

36

23

5

33.00 20

28

46

45

33.

33

12

54.90

132

J

y

11.65 16

4

22

21

27.61 16

12

20.-

35

21.-

22.-

15

23.-L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

33.-

31.-

35.-

17.-

High Street, (Girls),.

18.-

19.-

"}

Queen's Road, (Girls),

""

Hollywood Road, (Girls), .

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls),.. Shaukiwán, (Girls),.

24.-

Wántsai, (Boys),

25.-

26.

Yaumáti, (Boys),

""

21

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

27.

Safyingp'ún I Division, (Boys),. II

(Boys),

29.-

30.--

31.-

32.-

Hunghòm, (Boys),

35

""

"}

11

13

19

19 10

19

26.10 20

24

28

27

20

28.93 10

36

12

10

10

10

16.74 12

4

26

25 12

24

36.50

2+

20

25

10

2

20

29.33

8

40

1

20

7

4

18

28.14 14

• 28

-77

6

21 $1

74

94.11 12

8:4

74

73

10

28 27 4

69

74.60 20

112

25

25

15 5

22

27.69

2

60

45

42

11 3 10

16

25

17

51.10

44

68

67

49

12

1

63

4

67.05

196

:

60

30*

8

41

14

54.83

4

120

"

39

15

10

32

3

47.00

6

60

55

36.--

Shektongtsui, (Girls), Aberdeen Street, (Girls), Kau-i-fong, (Girls),.

Ship Street, (Girls),

East Street, (Boys),

Stanley Street, (Girls).

Lower Lascar Row, (Girls),

21

S 4

18

18.25 10 32

38

15

3 9

29

36.58 30

12

46

45

G 13

31

15

51.02 14

24

38

88

11

11

20

7 12

35

37.-

38.--

39.-

40.-

Tanglungchau, (Girls), .

12

11

Taipingshan Chapel, (Girls),

47

}"

Saiyingpun First Street, (Girls),

51

""

Wántsai, (Girls), .

50

Staunton Street, Upper School, (Girls),

I

27

42.-

Lower School, (Girls),

1

26

+1

""

"}

43. Nampak Hong Tokwáwán, (Boys), 41.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School (Boys), 45.-- Bridges Street Poor School, (Girls), 46.--Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys), 47.- Wellington Street (Boys),

48.-- 49.-Basel Mission, High Street (Girls), 50.-Berlin Mission (Girls),

I

16

1

25

31

I

20

1

(Girls),

I

51.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys),.

52.-St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

53.-- Hongkong Public School, (Boys), .

51.----R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

55.--

}

"

European

13

(Boys),

IV

56.-

572-

58.---

59.--

"

Italian Convent, (Girls),.. Bridges' Street, Portuguese School, (Mixed), St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School, (Mixed),. Victoria, Portuguese School, (Mixed),

IV

IV

GO.--

English

""

(Boys),

IV

61.-

""

31

"}

(Girls),

--EE 2 2 2 222 E 2

49

19

III 55

III 27

IV 43

IV 32

IV 33

85

121

121

79

GO

12

IV 36

⠀ 8 A 18CANUMIKROHAKONA

ENSE & ∞o

3

5

:::::

33

8

37.04 10

56

20

23.82

28

10

20.12

4

12

28

38.04 16

86

17

28.50 16 28

10

16

87

51.19 20

6t

13

21

47

48.48 26

81

10

12

45

53.99 20

48

12 2

2.1

28,46 144

48

17

28.98

8

28

13

15.64

36

9

h

?]

52.18 18

24

21

28

43.41 42

32

9

17

25.41

36

10

11 14

44

60.00 20

11

9 3 #

15

4

18.65 18

12

19

12

53

59.59 114

81

2 7

4

24

3

26.40

14

3 11

*

3 9

G

2

45

I

63.31 48

83

22

6

1

-

30

2 87.56 132

48

****SE :12 : :22228N

12903140528872832RAR :***** 2 2

32

24

12

8

24

12

8

8

12

32

24

58

32

8

SO

16

8

60

66

36

G

21

GG

66

64

16

108

: : : : :89 : : :3 :2 : : : :8 : :2 : : : :§9 : : :2 :8 :8£ : : : : : : :98*

AI purpuris ***::*#0:****: :****** :******** •*** :** :*::* : :2 :25

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Good.

Very

Good.

Fair.

Needle Work.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant carned in

1887.

Amount of Reduction.

Amount Payable.

Amount due to

Teacher.

Amount due to

Manager.

* : : :

* : : : :

30

*

$

$

61.41

253.41 50.59 232.59 2.23

2.53

250.88

62.72

188.16

280,26

57.56

172.70

02.57 261.57

2.05

261,92

65.48

196.44

64.16 282.16

2.52

279.31

69.83

209.51

21.49 65.49

0.85

61.84

16.21

48.68

61.04 211.04

2.11

208.93

52.23

156.70

49.12 195.12

1.95

193.17

48.29 144.88

12

75.00 329.00

3.29

825.71

81.42

214.29

46.98 188.88

1.69

167.193

41.79 125.40

20

56

24

::BA22 :*::::::

45.87 158.87

1.54

152,36

38.09 114.25

13.50

35,92 151.42

1.51

149.01

87.47 112.44

48 1.50

28.90 222.40

2.22

33.06

4.50

54.90

181.06

232.40

1.81

220.18 55.04 179.25 44.81

165.14

184.44

11.65

* 15.83

0.16

2.32 230,08 57.2 15.67

172,50

.3.91

11.76

38 4.50

27.61

170.11

1.70

168.41 42.10

126.31

20 10.50

26.10

122.00

1.28

121,37

30.34

91.0%

20 15.00

28.98

162 98

1.63

161.85

40.33

121.02

6.00

16.74

66.74

0.67

60.07

16.51

49.58

32

9.00

3

36.50

108.50

1.69

166.81

41.70

125.11

9.00

16

29.33

146.38

1.16

144.92

36.23

108.69

18

6.00 3

28.44

121.44

1.21

120,23

$0.05

90.18

91.11

74,60 400.60 27.09 127.69

510.11

5.10

505.01

126.25

378.76

4.01

*96.59 99.14

297.45

51.11 203.11 67.05 351.05 54.8% 234.83

2.85

12

10

::: 82876C: 5: _855:

16 12.00

5

47.00

18.25

12

22.50

9

30

22.50 8

4 34.50 10

205.60

125.23

36,58 196.08

54.02

37.01 241.54

2.፡፡

1.28 126,41 $1.60 2.03 201.08 50.27

3.51 347.51 86.58 260.66 232.48 58.12 174.36 202.95 50.73 152.22

91.81

150,81

1.2.5

124001 81.00

93.00

1.96

194 12

48.55

145.59

272.52

2.73

269.79

€7.49

202.30

2.42

239.12

29.78 179,34

28.82

131.82

1.32

130.50

32.62

97.88

18

22.50

3

30.12

119.62

1.20

118,42

29 60

88.82

32

13.50 16 13.50 8

10.50 18

18.00 11

38.01

181 51

1.82

179.721

44.93

184.79

28.50

118 00

1.18

116 82.

20.20

87.62

51.19

:93.09

2.94

200.75

72.68 218.07

48.48 331.48

3.31

$28.17

24 32 20.00 12

58.99 369.99

3.70

82.01 240.18 368.29 91.57 274.72

42 4.50

28.46

174.96

1,75

178.21

43.30 129.91

15.00

:8.98

149.98

1.50

148,48

$7.12 111.36

15.61

75.64

0.76

74.88

18.72 50.16

32.18 1/2.18

1.12

11.06

27.76

8830

58

1.75

40

48

60

GO

98 7.50

51

8-1

52

90

42+

2.1+

12

2+

72

8

8 4 6 6

32

38 23 16

26

27

ཡ ུསྶསྐྱུཞེ བའི

.

24

26

18

15 10

2

119

19 17 18 12 8

3

15 8 6

1 3

17

IV 24

24

6

co

12 6 7

11

2

3

10

3

4

1ස

2 2 2 2826 S

1 45.32 48

84

61

40

1.12

43.44 175.44 25.41 109.41 1.69 108.32! 2768 $1.24 60.00 280,00 2.80 277.20 69.30 207.90 18.65 104.65 1.05 108.601 25.00 77.70 59.59 571.09 5.71 565.38 141.34 4:401 26.40 806.10 3.06 #03.34 75.88 227.51 63.4 618,24 6.13 607.21 151.89 455.41 37.56 241.56 2.12 179,86

45.32 412.32

17.69

43.412

180.27

79

4 113.79 228 200 160

113.79 701.79

239.14 59.78

108.20 396.15 102.05 7.02 691.77 173.69 521.08

214

2

190.65 156 208

210

160

210

51+

172+

190,65 1,600.65 16.91 1,673,74 418,48 1,285,31

71

5 141.98 114 186

130

|44 112 80

56

4

81.82 162 120

80

72

1.14 10.30

90

12

28.50 12

214

10

86

16

1

$9.00 60

96

60

84

132

28

48

17

23.43

10

66† Izt 21+

36

64

1

23

1

28.61

26

:

100

26

3.00

G+

144.98 ,015.48 10.15 271.33 1,005.33| 75-1.00

M1.82 605.82 6.06 149.01 589.76 140,82 2>,50 156.70 1,57 154.93) 38.73 116.20 39.00 329.00 3.30 335.61 88.90 251.71 23.13 243.43 3.43 255.00

$10,00 85.00 28.61 31.61 3.32 $28.20 82.07 2:6.22

* Reduction of 50 per cent., see C.S.O. No. 2076 of 1S 7.

+ Special Subject, under Regulations No. 22 of Grant-in-Aid Code,

TOTAL,

.$16,842.16 168.44 16,674.72 4,1C8.51 12,506,18

TABLE XIV. PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLs during the last two Years.

No.

Name of School.

1887.

1886.

Increase.

Decrease.

1234WOND a

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

80.00

54.38

25.62

19

Station Street (Boys),...

97.61

95.23

2.38

"

39

"

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

67.69

90.90

23.21

Queen's Road West (Boys),

74.57

94.91

20.34

7

"

8

39

9

"

5 Basel Mission, Shamshuipò School (Boys),... 6 C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

"

Lyndhurst Terraco (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

80.00

100.00

20,00

92.68

97.57

***** s

4.89

II

(Boys)

87.17

80.00

7.17

98.43

80.30

18.13

ence+

83.33

92,59

10

">

Saiyinp'ún (Boys),

82.85

88.57

11

12

13

14

આપે ભગવાન

59

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

88.88

100.00

9.26

5.72

11.12

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

100.00

70.58

29.42

****

15

17

18

* * * * *

Third Street (Girls),..

82.14

79.31

2.81

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghòm (Boys),

16 | F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

73.33

******

4

100.00

95.23

45.45

49.78

High Street (Girls),

100.00

78.26

21.74

Queen's Road (Girls),

74.07

90.90

16.83

19.

Hollywood Road (Girls),

100.00

45.45

54.55

20

Pottinger Street (Girls)

96.00

92.85

3.15

21

22

Stanley School (Girls),... Shaukiwán (Girls),

86.95

95.00

8.05

90.00

90.00

23

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

97.36

92,13

5.23

24

Wántsai (Boys),

94.52

88.23

6.29

25

Yaumáti (Boys),

88.00

82.05

5.95

26

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

59.52

98.04

38.52

27

Saiyinp'ún I Division (Boys),

94.03

66.66

27.37

28

11

(Boys)

74.54

90.00

15.46

29

93

Hungbom (Boys),

91.42

86.66

4.76

30

"

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

85.71

100.00

14.29

31

34

??

35

91

32

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls)

33 | L. M. S., Ship Street (Girls),

East Street (Boys),

Stanley Street (Girls),

80.55

76.74

3.81

67.39

90.19

22.80

86.84

89.47

2.63

100.00

100.00

40.00

90.47

*****

36

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

86.66

100.00

*****

50.47 13.34

37

Tanglangchau (Girls),

77.27

61.29

15.98

*****

38

"

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

82.22

97.56

15.34.

39

Saiyingp'ún First Street (Girls),

92.15

87.50

4.65

40

99

Wantsai (Girls),

91.83

87.72

4.11

41

17

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),

92.30

75.00

17.30

42

"

22

Lower School (Girls),

70.83

77.42

6.59

CSESE

43 Nampakhong Tòkwáwán (Boys),

92.85

a

44

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

84.00

82.14

1.86

45

"

46

47

""

48

Bridges Street Poor School (Girls), Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

55

100.00

****

85.00

58.62

26.38

91.66

85.33

6.33

13

(Girls),

78.94

77.77

1.17

****

49

Basol Mission, High Street (Girls),.

100,00

100.00

......

51

50 Berlin Mission (Girls),

52 St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

88.88

97.05

La

8.17

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

97.82

94.11

3.71

90.62

53 Hongkong Public School (Boys),...

96.96

54

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),.

95.18

95.00

0.18

******

55

"

European

"9

(Boys),..

98.34

98.18

0.16

56

**

Italian Convent (Girls),

93.67

90.00

3.67

*****

57

58

"

59

Bridges Street Portuguese School, (Mixed), St. Francis Chapel Portuguese School (Mixed),... Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

93.33

100.00

6.67

100.00

74.07

25.93

97.22

86.12

11.10

60

61

**

وو

English School (Boys),...

(Girls),.

100.00

90.00

10.00

95.83

89.47

6.36

TABLE XV-PErcentage of Passes in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1887.

Class of

Schoool.

Name of School.

Writing, Reading, or Com- position.

Arith-

Gram- Geogra- metic. mar. phy.

History.

Repeti- Expla- | Compo- tion. nation, sition.

I.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),..............

98.00 74.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

19

"

"

??

"1

Station Street (Boys), Hing-lung Lane (Boys),

100,00

88.09

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

95.38

58.46

100.00

100.00

Queen's Road West (Boys),

92.59

62.96

100.00

""

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò School (Boys),.

80.00

73.33

""

97

"J

,,

32

21

""

>>

">

""

""

""

13

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

II.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),..

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

100,00

95.12

50.00

(Boys),

92.30

84.61

...

96.87 33.33

100.00 100.00

97.56 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

...

100.00

79.36

100.00

98.41 100.00

66.66

88.09

92,85

97.61 100.00

100.00

48.57

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

100.00 81.48

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 96.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"?

11

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

67.85

100.00

100.00

100,00

"}

Yaumáti (Mixed),

86.66

28.83

Failed

100.00

62.49

59

29

"

Hunghom (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

100,00 100.00

100.00

100.00

95.45

100.00

100.00

100.00

*>

High Street (Girls),

100.00

94.73

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

Queen's Road (Girls).

96.42

60.71

100.00

100.00 100.00

Hollywood Road (Girls),

100.00

90.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

Pottinger Street (Girls),.

100.00

96.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

፡፡

"

>>

1)

>>

* * * * * ::

Stanley School (Girls),

100.00

76.00

100,00

100.00

88.88

Shaukiwán (Girls),

90.00

95.00

100.00 100.00

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

98.68 97.36

100.00

Wántsai (Boys), .

97.26 75.34

100.00

98.68 100.00 100.00 100.00

100,00

92.85

Yaumáti (Boys),..

100.00

88.00

100.00

100.00

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

97.42

43.87

91,66

97.61

100.00 100.00 100.00

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),

98.50

52.23

100.00

II.

>>

13

;"

(Boys),

94.64

53.57

100.00

96.42

"

,,

Hunghòm (Boys),

100.00

91.43

100.00

100.00

97.01 100.00 100.00 100.00 $0.00

100.00

100.00

13

**

;;

27

";

وو

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

100.00

85.71

100,00

100.00 100.00

100.00

77.77

100.00

100.00

100.00

93.47

73.91

100.00

100.00

100,00

"

39

Ship Street (Girls),

100.00

81.81

100.00 92.-5

17

21

East Street (Boys),

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

??

Stanley Street (Girls),

$4.00

36.00

100.00

100.00

86.66

21

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

100.00

70.00

100,00

100.00

100.00

100.00

*

19

Tanglungchau (Girls),

95.45

72.72

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

17

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

97.77

71.11

109.00

97.77

100.00

29

Saiyingp'ún, First Street (Girls),

98.04

82.35

100.00

100.00

100.00

警务

Wántsai (Girls),

100.00

85.71

100,00

j 100.00

96.29

13

19

19

"+

>>

3,

"

"1

III.

29

99

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),.

Nampakhong Tòkwáwán (Boys).

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),.

Bridges Street Poor School (Girls), Wesleyan Mission, Spring, Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

21

100.00

88.45

100.00

100.00

100.00

Lower

**

(Girls),

91.66 70.83

66.66

100.00

91.66

100.00

100.00

92.86

100.00

76.00

100.00

100 00

100.00

100.00

100.00

65.00

100.00

93.75

93.75

100.00

99

(Girls),

89.42 84.21

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00-

100.00 100.00 Failed

· 100.00 100.00 100.60 100.00

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),.

100.00 98.11 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

Iv.

Berlin Mission (Girls),

>

>>

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

Jongkong Public School (Boys),

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

100.00 92.59 66.66 100.00 89.13 100,00 100.00 100.00 96.00 100.00 66.66 100.00 100.00 84.84 90.90 81.25 100.00

97.59 96.38 97.59 100.00

100.00 100.00

83.33

94.12 100,00

100.00

...

100.00

">

27

""

European

כי

100.00

100.00 (Boys).

96.69

98.50

160.00

100.00

96.30

"

Italian Convent (Girls),

100.00

92.18

92.18

100.00

100.00 100.00

85.71

27

"

"

"

Bridges Street, Portuguese School (Mixed), St. Francis' Chapel, Poor School (Mixed), Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

100.00

93.00

95.00

94.44

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

94.44

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

"

English School (Boys),

100.00 91.66

100.00

""

**

(Girls),

100.00 94.73

95.83

100.00 100.00

88.88 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1887.

Number of Children (to local school-age) in the Colony in 1887 (about 9.26 per cent. of the

population),

Number of Children attending Schools under Government in 1887,. Number of Children attending Private Schools, in 1887,...

Number of Uneducated Children in the Colony in 1887,

....16,843

5,974

2,300

8,274

8,569

E J. EITEL, M.A., Phi D..

Insertim at Schools.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

165-

9

No. 88.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY, 28th January, 1888.

SIR,-For the information of His Excellency the Governor I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for 1887.

2. The distribution of the work among the different officials connected with the Observatory has been the same as explained in last year's report. The amount of information collected here concerning typhoons during the past year has been much greater than during previous years, and this work has pressed heavily on the clerks, who are, however, at the same time learning to do their work more quickly.

3. The Eastern Extension and the Great Northern Telegraph Companies, who so courteously transmit the extensive system of meteorological messages free of charge through their cables, rendered the greatest assistance during the stormy weather in September last by giving me information about the changes in the weather setting in at those stations, which were nearest the centres of the typhoons. The China Coast Meteorological Register, in which the daily information about the weather is published, being printed in several local newspapers the Government has not hitherto found it necessary to print a daily weather-report, so that the expenses, which are elsewhere by far the heaviest item in the cost of meteorological offices, are at the present time altogether saved in this Colony.

4. The salaries of several members of the staff being considered small in proportion to the practical importance of their duties, His Excellency has been pleased to allow me to submit applications for increases of salary when the estimates for next year are under consideration.

5. One year's trace made by the self-recording tide-gauge is now ready and no funds for hourly readings being available, I have had the honour to suggest that the monthly magnetic observations might be discontinued for some years, in order to allow the tabulation of tides to be proceeded with in the meantime, this subject, although not hitherto included in the work of the Observatory, being of very great importance.

6.

*

7. Lunar distances are now less often than formerly observed on board ship to determine the longitude. There is no doubt that the too accurate and in consequence too complicated methods of reduction generally followed have been partly the cause of this. Occultations of stars claim still more complicated calculations to determine the longitude and are scarcely more accurate, being moreover phenomena of comparatively rare occurrence. The eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites promise to furnish a means of obtaining the longitude on board ship with more ease and accuracy than can be obtained from Lunars. It has therefore been my wish to pay attention to those observations as of importance to the shipping, and I expect to be able to do so in the course of the year.

S. As stated in the "Instructions for making Meteorological Observations, &c.," meteorological instruments forwarded by observers, who regularly send their registers to the Observatory, are verified here free of cost. During the past two years the following number of instruments has been verified and certificates issued:-

Barometers: 8; Thermometers: 12; Anemometer: 1.

The index-errors of barometers read off on board ship in typhoons are generally determined by aid of readings made near to or in this port, which are compared with the hourly readings in the Observatory.

9. The number of transits observed during the past year was 313, and the inclination of the axis was determined 132 times. All the chronometers were cleaned and oiled and their rates satisfactorily ad- justed in the course of the year by a local firm of jewellers. The sidereal standard clock was stopped on the 7th October, 1887, and its rate corrected. The mean daily rates during ten-day periods are exhibited in the following table, where — means gaining, and + losing rate :-

2

TABLE I.

Rate of Sidereal Standard Clock in 1887.

Period.

Rate.

Temp.

Bar.

Period.

Rate.

Temp.

Bar.

December 31-10,......

-2.$12

62.03.

30.in802

June

29- 9,.......

-3.$73

82.°1

29.ins 70

January 10-20,...

-2.23

63. 3

29. 98

July

9-19,.

-3.84

82.8

29. 62

20-30,

-2.20

61.6

29. 92

19-29,.

-3.97

81. 4

29. 47-

30- 9,.

-2.18

59.4

29. 95

29- 8,.

-3.96

83.3

29. 63

"

February

9-19,.

~2.05

60. 4

30. 15

August

8-18,

- 3.91

81. 8

29. 73

19- 1,.

-2.28

62. 3

29. 94

18-28,.

- 3.92

79.9

29. 70

March

1-11,

-2.32

61. 3

29. 97

28- 7,

- 4.01

81.8

29. 74

""

""

11–21,...

-2.36

61.3

29. 95

21-31,

-2. 34

62. 7

29. 94

""

September 7-17,..

17-27,....

<

- 4.23

83. I

29. 54

-4.25

82.3

29. 69

31-10...

-2. 48

67.0

29. 94

>

27-7,

-4. 12

79.8

29. 76

""

April

10-20.

-2.91

73. 1

29. 77

October

7-17,

+0.51

78. 5

29. 91

20-30,

-2.78

69.7

29. 89

19

17-27,

+0.60

75.9

29. 93

30-10,

-2.93

72. 1

29. 79

27-6,.

+0.81

73. 1

29. 99

May

10-20,

-3. 11

74.6

29. 79

November 6-16,

+0.79

71. 7

29. 97

20-30,

- 3. 33

78.0

29. 75

16-26,

+1.00

69: 3

30. 06

>>

June

30- 9,... 9-19, 19-29,

- 3. 49

79.8

29. 69

26-6,.

+1.01

68. 1

30. 01

""

-

www.

-3. 72 3.78

82.7

29. 63

December 6-16,.

+1.14

67.3

30. 04

83. 2

29. 68

19

16-26,..

+1.17

65. 1

30. 05

10. As stated in the time-ball notice published in the Government Gazette on the 10th January, 1885, the ball is not dropped on Sundays or Government Holidays. The ball was dropped every working day in the past year, but failed to drop at 1 p. on May 27th, June 25th and October 27th, the failure being caused the first time by a broken covered wire in the polarized relay, the second time by the switch not having been properly turned, and the third time by the battery having become weak in comparison to the elasticity of the spring on the lock. On every occasion the defect was remedied and the ball dropped allright at 2 p.

TABLE II.

Errors of Time-Ball in 1887.

means too late.

+ means too early.

Date:

Jan. Feb.

March. April. May.

June.

July.

Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

1,

2,

+0.83

0.$1 +0.96 +0.3 0.1

0.$1

0.$1

0,$1

0.51

0.$1 +0.82

0.1

0.$1

0.1

0. 1

0.'1

0.1

3,

0.$1 +0.4 0.2

-0.2 +0.3

--

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5

+0.3

4,

0.1

+0.4

0.3

0. 1

+0.2

0.1

0. 1

0. 1

0.1

0. 1

5,

0.1 +0.4

0.3

0. 1

0.1

0.1

0. 1

0.1

0.1

0. 1

0.1

6,

0. 1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

--

0.2

0.1

7,

0.1

+0.7

-0.4

0.1

0.1

+0.3

-0.2

0.1

-0.3

0.1

-0.3

8,

-0.2 +0.9

0.4

0.1

-0.2

...

0. 1

+0.3

0. 1

+0.2

-0.4

9,

0.1

0.1 +0.2

+0.5

+0.3

0.1

0.1

+0.5

0.1

10,

-0.4

-0.3

0.1

0.1

+0.5

0. 1

+0.2

0.1

+0.3

11,

+0.3

-0.5

0. 1

+0.2

+0.7

+0.3

0.1

0.1

-0.3

12,

+0.6

-0.8

0.1

+0.7

+0.3

0.1

-0.2

+0.6

0.1

-0.3

0.1

13,

+0.9

+0.9 +0.5

+0.5

0.1

0. 1

+0.7

0. 1

-0.2

14,

0. 1

0.1

0.1

+1.2 -0.2

0.1

0. 1

0.1

+0.2

0. 1

-0.2

15,

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.7

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.3

18,

19,

20,

16,

17,

...

0.1

0. 1

0. 1 0. 1

-0.2

0.1

0. 1

-0.3

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0. 1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1 +0.2

-0.2

0. 1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

+0.5

0.1 +0.3

+0.3

-0.2

...

0.1

0. 1

+0.2

+0.2

0. 1

0. 1

+0.4.

-0.3

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0. 1

0.1 +0.5

0. 1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

21,

22,

0.1 0. 1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.6

0.1

0.1

0. 1

0.1

+0.7

0.1 -0.4

0.1

+0.2

0. 1

0. 1

0.1

0.1

0.1

23,

24,

+1.0 0.1

-0.2 -0.5

0.1

0. 1

0.1

0.1

0. 1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0. 1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

25,

+0.2 +0.3

0.1 -0.7

-0.2

0. 1

+0.2

0. 1

0.1

0.1

26,

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1 -0.3

...

0.1

+0.2

+0.4

0.1

0.1

27,

+0.2

...

0.1

0.1

0.1

0. 1

+0.2

+0.5

0. 1

28,

+0.2

0.1

+0.3

-0.2 +0.2

0.1

0.1

0. 1

-0.2

+0.4

-0.2

29,

+0.3

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0. J

0.1

-0.3

-0.3

0.1

-0.3

30,

...

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0. 1

-0.4

+0.2

-0.4

31,

+0.3

+0.4

+0 8

0.1

0.1

-0.5

11. The probable errors of the signal in the different months of 1887 (with the average percentage. of clouded sky added in parenthesis) were as follows:-January 0.18 (90), February 0.31 (64), March 0.15 (75), April 0.28 (72), May 0.17 (81), June 0.16 (71), July 0.15 (73), August 0.11 (59), September 0.20 (64), October 0.11 (27), November 0.14 (41), December 0.18 (43).--The mean of the probable errors was 0.18.

12. The absolute values of the magnetic elements were observed by Mr. F. G. FIGG and Mr. MAHOMET ALARAKIA every month as usual, and the report is ready.

13. The monthly weather reports have all been published as soon as ready. They are arranged exactly as explained in last year's report. The clouds are classified as follows:-

Cirrus (c) is the finest and most lofty of all the clouds. It looks like hair, thread or feathers.

Cirro-cumulus (c-cum) is also a high cloud, but is more rounded in shape than the former and looks like small woolly tufts.

Cirro-stratus (c-str) form a sheet of uniform thickness high up in the atmosphere. They are often seen in long straight streaks, that appear to radiate from a point of the horizon. When covering the whole sky they form a sort of vaporous transparent veil.

Stratus (str) is also a layer of cloud of generally uniform thickness but belongs to the lower regions of the atmosphere. It presents no variety of shade.

Cumulus (cum) consists of rounded heaps like enormous balls of wool.

Cumulo-stratus (cun-str) is a cumulus dark and flat at its base traversed by horizontal streaks of dark cloud. It has often a coppery hue.

Strato-cumulus (str-cum) is intermediate between cumulus and stratus. When the number of entries are counted, half is added to cumulus and the other half to stratus.

Roll-cumulus (R-cum) is formed by cumulus clouds lying apparently in long horizontal rolls.

Small-cumulus (sm-cum) are small white cumulus. They belong to a level between cirro-cumulus and cumulus.

Nimbus (nim) is a cloud from which rain is seen falling.

Cumulo-nimbus (cum-nim) has a uniform dark appearance like the true nimbus, but no rain is actually seen falling from it at the time of observation.*

14. The weather in January 1887 was quite abnormal. The rainfall was about six times larger than the average. The amount of clouds and the dampness were also excessive particularly the former, so that the rainy season appeared to have set in in the midst of the dry season and that was the case at every station in China from which reports are received. On the contrary the weather was remarkably dry and clear in March, gradients for NE winds continuing till the 29th of that month. On the 8th of April the damp weather set in, but the rainfall was very deficient in that month and also in May. The 1st of June was extremely dry and the barometric tide and daily variation of temperature excessive for the season as might be expected. The middle of that month was very squally with strong SW monsoon. Showers in the carly morning hours were distinctly marked but electric phenomena were unusually rare. The thunderstorms during July came from unusual directions. In August the SW monsoon was strong, and the clouds unusually low, as was in fact the case all through the summer but still the rainfall was below the average. September was characterised by an unusual number of typhoons in this neighbourhood as remarked at the end of the report for that month. The weather in October was very dry, clear and fine. On the 21st during N wind it was hotter in the puffs, reminding one of the Föhn in Switzerland. December was very dry and warm. At night time there occurred frequently a sudden change in the direction of the wind from about E to about N with considerable rise of temperature and great decrease of humidity.

15. Tables III-X inclusive exhibit the annual means and totals of meteorological phenomena and their frequency. The arrangement of the tables is explained in previous annual weather-reports. Tables XI and XII exhibit the five-day means arranged as in previous years. The total amount of rain measured daily at 10 a. and entered to preceding day was 66.29 at the Observatory, 61.73 at Stone Cutters' Island and 78.34 at the Peak. The total duration registered at the Observatory was 863 hours. The rainfall was at least 0.01 inch on 153 days at the Observatory, on 112 days at Stone Cutters' Island and on 84 days at the Peak. The accuracy of these observations is in a great measure due to the painstaking care of Mr. F. G. FIGG.

TABLE III.

Mean Values and Hourly Excess above the Mean of Meteorological Elements in 1887.

Mean or Total.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 2.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon.

1 p. 2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p. 10 p.

11p. Midt.

Observ.

Peak.

atory.

Temperature...

1.4 1.5

Humidity,

Vapour Tension,

Pressure,

Diurnal Range,.

+.005.007-015-018

+ 5 + 5 + 4+ 4 + 4 + 3 +.013 +.008 +.001.003

013 +.001

1.6 1.8

2.0 2.0

+.017 +.032

· 1.4 0.4

+.043 +.044 +.035 +.017 0.7 +1.5 + 2.1 + 5.2

-.007 -.028 +2.8 +2.7

040 045 + 2.4 + 1.8

041 -.032 + 1.0 + 0.1

-.018

.000

+.013 +.022

0.4

0.6

0.8 0.9

+.022 +.015 | 1.2 1.3

29.846

28.107

71.1

65.6

7.2

6,5

...

...

-.008 ..009

+ 2

-,007

Sunshine (Total),

10.3

Rainfall,

0.108 0.152

0.130 0.313

0.358

0.251

102.9 171.5 196.3 0.304 0.322

Hours of Rain (Total),..

Intensity of Rain,.

35

0.037

· 39

0.047

39

52

52

53

53 46

0.040

0.072

0.083

0.057

Wind-Velocity,

1.0 0.8

0.7

0.7

0.9 1.1

Wind-Direction,

Cloudiness,

+ 1

+1

70

go

1

90

5

0.453

40 43 0.069 0.084 0.136 0.084 1.1 0.8 +0.5+1.5 70

1 6

-.010-013 -.015 203.2

0.302

4

7

7

8

8

-.011 -012

212.3 210.1

..006 -.007

216.5 218.6

..003

6

...

-.003

5

211.8 197.6

3 0 -.001 +.003 132.3 21.1

+ 2 + 3

+

+.008 +.013

4 +

+.015 +.017

+ 5 + 5

75

86

+.017 +.015|

0.605

0.579

2104.5

...

0.266

0.222

26

0.123

38

0.070

0.136

31

0.204

0.199

0.285

0,239

0.196

0.166

0.100

0.199 0.185

0.289

0.146

5.524

6.528

0.053

27

0.091

36 39

32

24

0.066 0.088

0.090

0.098

20

1.6 1.9 0° +30 + 9°

2.3 + 2.5

+ 2.3 + 1.6

+ 0.9

0.3

30 19 0.066 0.063 1.4 1.6

25

30

42 39

890

0.095

1.4

0.074

0.083

0.045

0.074

1.2

1.3

1.1

13.9

25

+ 8° +10°

+ 80 + 90

+ 70 + 4o + 3o + 10 + 10

20

40

40

E 50 SE 20° S

2

3

6

Sea-Disturbance,

1.8

2.0

1.8

1.9

...

...

Solar Radiation,

...

Excess of do. do.,

...

Terr. Radiation,

63

1.9

128.9

122.3

53.8

53.1

+2.8

+2.1

...

...

TABLE IV.

Number of Hours, during portion of which it rained, for each Month in the Year 1887.

Month.

1. .

2 a.

.3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon. 1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5

5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p.

10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Total.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

July,

June,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

10 00 40 40 00 - 00:00 40

1

1

7

4

4

4

1

7

1

6

5

6

∞ ∞ ∞ + 2 1 O O O N

5

1

6

8

4

6 11

10

10

7

6

5

4

2

-wacop A 013101

6

4.

10 6 00

4

4

2

2

4

4

3

4

1

1

1

6

1

2

2

9

7

5

6

4

6

2

1

5

2

1

1

1

2

2

2

1

1

2

:

1

2

2

1

1

1.

1

1

1

1

1

30+ E CO IN OHN HN H

3

2

2

1

3

4

1

2

2

1

TO DI CO GINN 10 DAM prać

24∞∞ Q = Ỡ 10 1-

CO 1 CO ON

4.

2

1OÁ TONN472:

5

2

1

3

2

3

3

4

1

HOWAN: A co co A

4

3

1

1

2

4

2

5

5

1

1

1

1

3

3

2

6

7266 -0027

7

107

4

60

94

89

2

48

79

147

101

107

18

1

1

1

24

1

...

::

1

16

:

:

Total,..............

33

39 39

52

52

3323

53

53

46

40

43

26

38

31

27

36

39

3323

24

30

19

25

25

30

42 39

890

169

TOTAL DISTANCE.

DURATION.

VELOCITY.

Miles.

Hours.

Miles per Hour.

TABLE V.

Total Distance traversed by, as well as Total Duration and Average Velocity of Winds from eight different Points of the Compass during the year 1887.

WIND.

N,

9622

874

11.0

NE.

12070

905

13.3

E,

73095

4168

17.5

SE,

8314

583

14.3

S,

5738

566

10.1

Y

SW,.

6911

506

13.7

W,

3838

475

8.1

NW,

1813

279

6.5

Calm,

251

404

0.6

Sums and Mean,....

121652

8760

13.9

TABLE VI.

Total Number of Days on which different Meteorological Phenomena were noted and Total Number of

Thunderstorms during each month of the year 1887.

Month.

Electric

Phenomena.

Lightning.

Fog.

:

:

Thunder.

:

:

Co

3

t-

2

CO

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,.

June,

July,

2

3

7

ลง

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

:

10

:

:.

2

Co

6

:

:

1

1

30

7

5

18

16

12

12

13

13

:

:

1

1

:

1

1

1

00

00

:

:

:

:

2

1

2

10

5

2

13

11

2

6

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

5

2

6

2

6

1

:

:

ลง

8

6

Co

2

1

16

8

Co

:

O

WO

11

1

10

:

1

2

:

:

:

:

Sums,.....

16

67 60

36

12

19

77

14

30

14

37

1

-6--

TABLE VII.

Total Number of Times that Clouds of different Forms were observed in each month of the year 1887.

Month.

C.

c-str.

c-cum. sm-cum. cum. cum-str.

str.

R-cum. cum-nim.

nim.

January,

2

33

100

19

12

82

58

February,

2

ลง

11

March,

31

88

888

92

2

22

10

31

18

29

1

39

27

42

42

April,..

1

25

15

97

18

33

May,

17

9

39

160

13

27

25

26

41

40

24

June,

108

14

205

N.

2

1

9

1

17.

July,

6

114

25

17

153

20

15

13

33

August,

12

78

9

34

146

11

12

16

29

September,

1

66

24

21.

122.

11

12

36

10

32

October,.......

34

21

108

:

5

6

4

5

November,..

December,..

57

O

28

59

14

7

4

10

:

:

55

77.

1

19

190

10

1

9

Sums,....

28

516

103

314

1407

46

189

189

276

329

TABLE VIII.

Mean diurnal

RAIN FALL.

Tem-

Baro-

variabi-

perature

Month.

metric

Tide.

lity of

decrease. Mean

Height

1878-

Hourly Intensity of Rain.

MEAN DIRECTION OF CLOUDS WHENCE

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH

COMING.

CLOUDS BELOW.

Tempera-

1887.

for 1°

1887

ture.

Lower.

inclus.

Upper. Cirrus. 2000 ft. 1000 ft.

ins.

feet.

ins.

ins.

ins.

January,

0.106

1.83

348

1.47

8.430 0.058

E

W by S

:

2153

14.

February,

0.112 1.78

387

1.66

1.895

0.022

E by N

W

12

:

March,

0.106 1.63

370

3.53

2.950

0.026

E by S W

April,

0.097 2

.44

370

6.55

5.640

0.052

S by EW by S

WSW

22

May,

0.085 1.39

328

9.82

2.045

0.036

SE by E NW

26

Junc,..

0.077

0.80

230

12.67

5.475

0.096

July,..

0.062

1.15

284

16.41

12.075

S by W NE

0.124 SE by SNE by N

NE

25

NNE

August,..

0.067

1.06

294

16.93

13.155

0.152

S by E

NE by N ENE

22

2 2 2 2 1 1 2

6

19

10

13

11

25

7

2

September,

0.082 1.15

279

9.89

10.955

0.146

E

E by S

E

6

0

October,

November,

0.090 1.02

294

5.06

2.030 0.104

ENE

WSW

N

0.101 1.51

279

1.04

0.790

0.036

ENE

WSW

2

December,.

Year,....

0.102 2..32

310

0.19

0.850

0.061

E by S

WSW

3

0.091

1.51

314

85.52

66.290

0.076

:

:

:.

189

69

-7-

TABLE IX.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered at the Observatory during the year, 1887.

BAROMETER.

TEMPERA-

TURE.

HUM. VAPOUR Tension.

RAIN.

WIND VELOCITY.

RADIATION.

MONTH.

Max.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Min. Max. Min.

Daily Hourly Max. Max.

Sun

Terr.

Max.

Max.

Min.

January, 30.184 29.759

69.7 48.9 53

0.585

0.227

3.920 0.470

February,... .307

.815

70.0

42.8

53

.495

.201

0.895

0.135

85

42

140.4

44.0

38

137.7

39.7

March,

.135

.702

78.4

53.8 24

.631

.173

1.090 0.235

45

142.7

51.1

April,

.158

.615

82.2

56.5

32

.787

.174

3.205

0.875

42

145.9

54.0

May,

29.908

.597

88.4

67.2

36

.867

.314

1.110

0.330

35

156.1

65.8

June,

.821

.506

89.0

73.3

34

.960

.372

0.905.

0.500

31

150.1

69.5

July,

.824

.270

89.8

73.8

61

1.008

.768

2.240

1.320

50

153.6

73.6

August,

.836

.526

88.6

72.9

53

0.951

.692

3.215

0.920

51

149.7

71.5

September,.. .904

.070

90.7 73.5

55

.991

.659

5.855

1.390

69

158.6

**70.6

October, 30.085

.631

84.8 64.6

32

.818

.318

1.660

0.930

35

149.3

61.7

November,.. .168

.830

77.9

56.0

16

.644

.136

0.560

0.100

36

142.5

54.0

December,... .305

.891

73.5 44.8 12

.550

.044

0.830

0.140

36

138.8

42.8

Year,...... 30.307 29.070

90.7

42.8

12

1.008 0.044

5.855

1.390

69

158.6 ..39.7

TABLE X.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered at Victoria Peak during the year, 1887.

BAROMETER.

TEMPERATURE. HUM. VAPOUR TENSION. RAIN.

WIND.

RADIATION.

MONTH.

Max. Min.

Max. Min.

Min.

Max. Min.

Daily

Force Sun

Terr.

Max.

Max.

Max.

Min.

January,

28.360 28.031

65.3

45.7

February,

.467

.039

66.9

39.2

March,

.321

.016

72.3

47.2

April,.....

.330 27.926

76.5

50.3

May,

.146

.903

78.3

60.5

Junc,

.093

.861

79.5

67.3

N & & & R

65

0.563

0.244

5.01

7

135.9

41.2

67

.543

.203

0.79

132.3

37.6

38

.637

.216

1.39

7

137.1

42.8

34

.745.

.158

2.04

137.1

46.3

63

.845

.412

1.02

6

143.6

60.4

72

.864

.619

2.50

140.5

65.6

July,

.111

.594

81.3

72.0

84

.894

.733

2.79

7

149.7

70.4

August,

.111

.853

81.3

69.7

80

.900

.699

4.26

9

143.8

67.0

September,

.186

.509

91.6

71.3

73

.962

.717

1.72

10

148.1

69.4

October,........ .318 27.950

78.3

61.4

52

.795

.370

0.73

10

140.7

57.4

November,...... .378 28.097

72.2

52.7

30

.601

.211

0.52

131.2

49.3

December,

.388

.128

68.2

44.2

38

.529

.136

0.82

6

134.3

41.3

Year,

28.467 27.509

81.6

39.2

30

0.962

0.136

5.01

10

149.7

37.6

:

Barometer.

Tempera- ture.

TABLE XI.

Five-Day Means of the principal Meteorological Elements observed in Hongkong in 1887.

Five-Day Period.

Humidity.

Vapour

Tension.

Wind Velocity.

Nebulosity. Sunshine.

Rain.

January

1- 5

29.962

60.9

83

0.444

17.8

7.9

5.0

0.000

6-10

30.075

99

58.3

72

.358

20.8

7.4

4.6

0.000

.11-15

29.974

62.6

87

.498

19.0

9.5

2.9

0.004

""

.16-20

.987

59.6

79

.406

14.6

9.5

1.9

""

0.003

.21-25

.930

58.6

86

.430

13.2

9.4

1.2

0.425

.26-30

.912

53.1

87

.353

7.3

10.0

0.2

1.195

دو

February

.31- 4

.957

51.0

83

.310

7.9

10.0

0.3

0.308

5- 9

.938

51.2

84

.318

10.8

9.0

1.3

0.122

""

.10-14

30.126

54.6

72

.315

12.8

4.7

5.5

0.001

"9

.15-19

.181

57.9

70

.337

17.1

1.4

9.9

0.000

"

.20-24

29.964

61.1

74

.402

23.0

6.3

6.7

0.002

"

..25- 1

.928

59.7

83

.424

13.8

8.2

2.2

""

0.223

March

2- 6

.943

59.4

89

.452

21.4

10.0

0.6

0.086

7-11

.990

60.6

78

.412

18.1

8.3

2.0

0.008

""

...12-16

.911

61.5

84

.463

24.2

9.5

1.5

0.035

.17-21

.982

58.7

72

.356

13.2

6.1

4.2

0.229

.22-26

30.043

61.0

58

.310

18.2

5.3

7.5

0.010

.27-31

29.831

67.2

73

.493

11.4

5.5

6.0

0.004

"

April

1- 5

.990

64.3

61

.377

15.5

3.1

9.6

0.000

6-10

.885

69.6

80

.579

8.5

5.5

6.8

0.001

.11-15

**

.....

.823

71.5

89

.690

13.9

9.3

2.2

0,655

.16-20

.711

73.8

88

.733

6.8

7.3

4.5

0.047

"

.21-25

.914

64.7

87

.541

16.0

9.7

0.1

0.388

""

26-30

.866

70.2

83

.619

14.5

8.4

3.0

0.037

May

1- 5

.811

70.1

85

.630

19.5

9.1

1.5

0.033

6-10

.772

74.2

87

.737

9.2

6.5

4.7

0.013

99

...11-15

.794

73.0

72

.586

15.7

9.5

2.6

0.025

""

..16-20

""

.789

75.9

83

.739

14.2

7.4

4.8

0.014

.21-25

.810

75.8

86

.767

20.3

8.3

4.2

0.001

39

.26-30

.693

79.2

83

.824

11.5

8.0

5.2

0.323

June

31- 4

.746

77.5

76

.718

12.7

7.1

4.0

0.212

5- 9

.640

80.6

83

.864

11.0

7.3

8.1

0.184

"

95

...10-14

.641

82.0

80

.871

16.6

8.6

6.0

0.325

""

....15-19

.623

82.8

80

.894

12.5

8.2

4.7

0.153

92

...20-24

.681

83.0

77

.873

10.4

5.9

8.8

0.174

35

...25-29

.672

83.0

76

.855

9.6

5.9

10.6

0.047

July

.30- 4

.714

81.3

84

.891

8.0

7.6

5.1

0.116

5- 9

.687

80.8

85

.893

10.1

9.1

4.4

0.658

"

.10-14

.705

82.6

79

.880

14.8

4.9

10.1

0.269

93

15-19

.532

81.7

81

.875

14.7

7.4

5.5

0.437

""

.20-24

.440

80.4

84

.870

15.1

8.4

2.4

0.462

.25-29

.499

81.4

84

.895

9.0

7.2

5.0

0.415

August ......

.30- 3.

.572

83.2

80

.911

17.8

6.2

9.2

0.058

4- 8

.693.

82.4

77

.849

11.3

5.5

10.1

0.007

"

9-13

.738

81.9

79

.861

7.4

3.0

11.2

0.018

..14–18

.700

78.7

85

.827

19.0

7.4

4.4

1.009

"9

....19-23

.710

78.5

86

.842

8.3

6.9

5,0

0.779

..............24-28

.698

79.0

85

.838

6.3

7.5

4.2

0.797

September

...29- 2

.765

81.5

77

.829

4.4

3.0

10.7

0.028

3- 7

.725

81.6

76

.824

20.9

7.1

7.0

0.197

""

8-12

.446

82.6

77

.853

16.2

7.1

4.5

0.383

99

13-17

.642

81.7

80

.874

20.2

7.9

6.5

1.347

*9

.18-22

.671

.81.7

81

.873

25.7

6.4

6.6

0.159

""

October

.........23-27

.709

82.2

79

.871

22.0

6.1

7.9

0.073

........28- 2

.784

79.7

73

.747

8.8

5.0

8.4

0.058

3- 7

.741

78.9

50

.501

13.0

2.4

10.8

0.006

"

8-12

.908

76.7

65

.593

8.5

1.4

9.9

0.000

99

.13-17

.915

77.5

70

.661

13.2

1.8

9.6

""

0.000

29

....18-22

.870

75.8

68

..598

13.0

5.3

4.4

0.367

.23-27

29.983

73.4

56

.461

14.9

0.9

10.5

0.000

29

November

..28- 1

30.003

71.2

60

.463

14.6

2.8

9.6

0.000

2- 6

29.977

71.6.

69

.535

12.5

3.2

8.9

0.000

وو

7-11

.934

71.6

66

.513

17.2

5.4

6.4

0.000

12-16

30.004

68.8

56

.396

10.7

5.9

5.7

0.010

.17-21

.091

68.2

53

.361

17.1

2.3

9.5

0.000

""

22-26

.038

68.8

52

.365

10.7

0.5

9.9

0.000

"

December

.27- 1

29.977

65.7

60

.379

11.6

8.9

2.5

0.148

2- 6

30.038

64.2

59

.361

10.6

3.7

6.2

0.167

7-11

.006

66.7

65

.427

12.7

1.9

8.7

0.000

12-16.

.082

64.2

17-21

.039

62.7

.22-26

.068

62.3

..27-31

.087

59.8

8889

63

.385

13.4

9.1

1.9

0.002

66

.375

14.9

3.1

8.3

0.000

60

.341

8.3

5.1

6.4

0.001

42

.228

14.3

2.0

8:5

0.000

-9-

TABLE XII.

Five-Day Means of the principal Meteorological Elements observed at Victoria Peak in 1887:

Five-Day Period.

Barometer.

Temperature. Humidity.

Vapour Tension.

Wind Force.

Rain.

January

1- 5

28.182

56.8

86

0.410.

4.5

0.00

6-10

.281

51.4

83

""

.335

5.5

0.00

.11-15

.214

""

58.3

95

.476

4.5

0.00

.16-20

.210

25

53.6

90

.380

4.3

0.00

.21-25

.157

""

54.2

93

.399

4.6

1.43

..26-30

.106

48.5

94

.324

5.1

""

February

1.19

..31- 4

.144

45.6

94

.293

5.0

0.58

5- 9

""

.140

46.0

94

.298

4.4

0.11

10--14

""

.321

49.6

84

.319

4.1

0.00

15-19.

*

.383

53.4

79

.344

4.2

0.00

""

.20-24

.183

56.3

83

.394

5.0

0.00

..25- 1

.149

55.4

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--10-

16. Investigations concerning typhoons were continued during the past year. The results are partly contained in the already published Results of Further Researches concerning Typhoons, partly in a report containing exhaustive investigations of all the typhoons in 1886 and their paths, which is ready as well as the two maps exhibiting the paths, and partly in two minor papers about to be published one of which draws attention to an additional means of forecasting typhoons while the other explains the cause why typhoons are so frequent in the China Sea in September. It is hoped that these investigations will by degrees lessen the terrors of the Eastern Seas and that masters of vessels trading out here will in the future be enabled not only to escape damage from typhoons but to benefit by the favourable winds so as to make quicker voyages. The typhoons of 1887 have been provisionally investigated by aid of daily weather-maps drawn from the 1st July till the 1st November and by other means. In addition to the observations furnished by stations on shore, the log-books of 143 different vessels containing entries on 1561 days (counting those made on board different ships separately). are available. A great number of log-books have of course been looked through without entries bearing on typhoons having been found. The final investigation of the typhoons of 1887 will occupy my time during the next half year.

17. The remarks concerning typhoons, meteorological signals, and storm-warnings published in the China Coast Meteorological Register issued in the forenoon from here are reprinted below. The remarks, if not otherwise stated, refer to the state of the weather at 9 a. or 10 a. The position of the centre of the typhoon, as determined from a provisional discussion of observations subsequently received, is added in small print. The basis on which the information was founded is explained in a pamphlet: "The Law of Storms in the Eastern Seas," published in September, 1886:—

1887, April 16th. for SW winds are very prevails.'

1887, April 17th.

The barometer is falling over Luzon but steady along the coast. Gradients gentle. The temperature and the humidity are high and cloudy weather

The barometer is falling at all stations except Wladivostock and the fall is greatest in Manila. There appears to be a typhoon in the neighbourhood of Luzon. The temperature is high, the humidity moderate and cloudy weather prevails.'

The typhoon appears to have been at some distance E of the Philippines.

1887, April 18th.-' The barometer continues to fall in the South but has risen in the North. The temperature and the humidity are rather high and cloudy weather prevails.'

1887, April 19th. The typhoon has probably passed northwards in the Pacific. The barometer has risen except in Bolinao. Gradients for NE winds are moderate. The temperature and the humidity are high and cloudy weather prevails.'

This typhoon probably recurved in the Pacific.

1887. April 20th.

The barometer is rising except in Nagasaki where it has fallen and gradients are very slight in southern China. The temperature and the humidity are high and the weather is overcast.'

6

1887, May 11th. The barometer is still falling over Luzon but has risen along the coast. Gradients for NE winds continue steep in southern and moderate in northern China. The tempera- ture is moderate, the humidity rather high and the weather overcast.'

coast.

Typhoon in 151° N, 1261° E, (according to Faura).

1887, May 12th.-The barometer is very low but steady over Luzon and has fallen along the Gradients for NE winds remain steep. The temperature and the humidity are moderate and the weather is cloudy in the South and fine in the North.'

Typhoon in 183° N, 1261° E (according to Faura).

1887, May 13th.-The barometer is nearly steady but gradients for NE winds continue steep. The temperature is high, the humidity very low and the weather cloudy. At 10 a. the following telegram was sent to the Treaty Ports:-"There appears to be a typhoon at some distance to the East of Luzon.

Typhoon in about 25° N, 119° E.

C

1887, May 14th. The barometer has risen and gradients for NE winds are moderate. The temperature is moderate, the humidity low and cloudy weather prevails.'

This Typhoon recurved south of Japan.

(

1887, May 26th. The barometer has fallen. There is a depression SE of Shanghai. The temper- ature is moderate, the humidity high and the weather overcast and wet.'

The typhoon appears to have been situated in the Pacific East of Luzon moving NNWestward.

>

-11-

1887, May 27th.-' There is a decided fall in the barometer at all stations owing to the approach of the typhoon indicated yesterday. The temperature and the humidity are high and cloudy weather prevails.'

The typhoon appears to have been E of the Balintang Channel.

6

1887, May 28th. The barometer has risen except in the North. The typhoon is situated south of Japan and is moving northwards. The temperature and the humidity are high and cloudy weather prevails.'

The centre appears to have been in about 30° N, 129° E.

-

1887, July 11th. The barometer has risen in the south and fallen in the North. Gradients are moderate for SE winds. The temperature and the humidity are high and the weather is cloudy. A small typhoon has passed Westward across the China Sea.'

Typhoon in northern Annam.

1887, July 15th. The barometer has fallen along the SE coast of China and has risen elsewhere. The temperature is rather high, the humidity moderate and cloudy weather prevails.'

1887, July 16th.-'The barometer has risen over Luzon and fallen along the coast. There is a depression in the China Sea with steep gradients for SW winds south of the centre and for NE winds north of the centre. The temperature and the humidity are rather high and cloudy weather prevails.'

Fresh wind and high sea were reported by ships in the China Sea. Lowest pressure appears to have been situated near the Paracels.

1887, July 18th.

The barometer is falling particularly in the SE.

Gradients are moderate for S winds over the China Sea and for SE winds along the E coast of China. The temperature is high, the humidity moderate and the weather cloudy.'

There is a large typhoon

There appears to have been a typhoon in the neighbourhood of the Pratas Shoal. 1887, July 19th. The barometer is falling particularly in Hongkong. in the China Sea SE of Hongkong probably travelling towards the SEastern coast of China. temperature and the humidity are moderate and overcast weather prevails.'

Typhoon in about 21° N, 115° E.

The

At 5 a.

1887, July 20th.-' Directions to hoist the Red Drum were issued at 1.45 a. on the 19th. the following notice was issued: "There is a large typhoon approaching from the SE. Telegraphic communication is interrupted." At 4.30 a. on the 20th directions to fire typhoon-gun one round were issued, at 7.30 a. to hoist South Cone ond at noon to hoist Red Ball.-At 10 a. an attempt was made to issue the following notice: "Typhoon S of and close to Hongkong moving Westward," but this failed for want of direct telegraphic communication with the offices of the E. E. A. & C. Tel. Co., in Queen's Road.'

Typhoon in about 21° N, 114° E.

1887, July 21st.-'The barometer has risen except about the gulf of Tonquin. The following notice was issued at 4 p. yesterday: "The typhoon appears to be crossing Hainan." Gradients are moderate for E winds in China. The temperature is low and the humidity great.'

Typhoon in about 20° N, 109° E.

1887, July 22nd.The barometer has fallen in Haiphong owing to the approach of the past typhoon. It is possible that another typhoon has approached Northern Formosa from the East. The Red Ball was removed yesterday about 1.15 p.'

The past typhoon appears to have entered southern Tonquin. Another typhoon in about 27° N, 124° E..

1887, July 23rd.-The typhoon that crossed the China Sea passed south of Haiphong during the night. The typhoon that approached Northern Formosa has entered the mainland south of Shanghai. The North-Cone was hoisted yesterday at 4 p. The barometer has fallen slightly in the S.E.'

This typhoon entered the mainland during the previous night in the neighbourhood of Wenchow.

1887, July 24th.--Directions to take down the North Cone were issued at 1.10 p. yesterday.

This typhoon appears to have moved NWestward in the interior of China.

1887, July 27th.-The barometer has fallen between Shanghai and Amoy (owing to the approach of a typhoon travelling apparently NWestward) and has risen elsewhere. The temperature and humi- dity are rather high and cloudy weather prevails.'

This typhoon entered the mainland S of Ningpo during the previous night.

T

-12-

1887, July 28th. The barometer has fallen at all stations except Shanghai, where it has risen. The lowest reading of the barometer is reported from Amoy. The temperature and humidity are high and the weather is cloudy.'

4

1887, July 30th. The barometer has fallen in the north. There is a storm in the Sea of Japan, probably one of the typhoons that lately were indicated by observations in northern China. The temperature and the humidity are rather high and cloudy weather prevails.'

This depression had possibly a different origin.

1887, August 2nd.-'The barometer has risen in the South and is very low in Japan and gradients are steep for SW winds. The temperature is high, the humidity moderate and the weather cloudy but fine.'

Typhoon in about 30° N, 129° E. '.

1887, August 3rd. 'The barometer has fallen and gradients remain steep for SW winds owing to a typhoon in Corea, which is moving northwards. The temperature is high, the humidity high in the North and low in the South and the weather is cloudy and squally.'

Centre between Nagasaki and Fusan.

1887, August 4th.-The barometer has risen except in Wladivostock. Gradients continue steep for SW winds owing to the typhoon now disappearing in the North. The temperature is high, the humidity moderate and overcast and squally weather prevails.'

Centre near Eastern Corea.

1887, August 15th. The barometer has fallen in Hongkong owing to a typhoon, which appears to be travelling Westward in the China Sea.'

Typhoon in about 21° N, 114° E.

1887, August 16th.— Directions to hoist the South Cone were issued yesterday at 1.17 p. and to remove this and hoist the Ball at 4.30 p. The Ball was directed to be taken down at 10.25 a. to-day. At 4 p. yesterday the following notice was issued:-"Typhoon SW of Hongkong moving Westward," Fresh SE winds prevail over the northern part of the China Sea and the weather is overcast and wet.'

Centre in about 21° N, 109° E. The typhoon was dying out at this time.

1887, August 17th.

The barometer has fallen in Tonquin and risen in Hongkong. Gradients are moderate for SE winds over the China Sea and for SW winds in Northern China. The temper- ature is low, the humidity high and the weather cloudy.'

1887, August 24th. The barometer has fallen in the neighbourhood of Amoy and risen else- where. Gradients are moderate for SW winds over the China Sea and moderate for NE winds to the North of Amoy. The temperature is high and the weather fine and dry.'

Centre of small typhoon in 23° N, 120° E.

1887, August 25th.- At 6.10 p. yesterday the following notice was issued :-" Small typhoon in southern part of Formosa Channel." At 7 a. this day directions were issued to hoist the Drum and at 10.20 a. to hoist the North Cone. The wind increased last evening in Amoy and heavy squalls with violent gusts and a heavy swell in the sea were reported during the night. The typhoon appears to have entered the mainland and to be moving northwards. The barometer has risen and gradients are gentle over the China Sea.'

Typhoon entered the mainland close to and north of Amoy and it then ceased to blow.

C

1887, August 26th. The barometer is steady in Tonquin and has fallen elsewhere. Gradients are slight. The temperature and humidity are rather high and cloudy weather prevails with thunder- storms in Southern China. Directions to take down the North Cone were issued at 1.10 p. yesterday.

The barometer has fallen especially in Tonquin. Gradients are slight for

and humidity are high and cloudy weather prevails."

1887, August 27th. S winds. The temperature

1887, September 5th.

{

The barometer has fallen in the south and gradients are moderate for N winds. The temperature is high and the weather cloudy but dry.'

6

1887, September 6th. The fall in the barometer has continued along the SE coast of China and in Luzon and gradients continue moderate for N winds. There appears to be a typhoon SW of For-

The temperature is high and the weather fine and dry.'

mosa.

Typhoon in about 18° N, 119° E.

1887, September 7th. The barometer has fallen along the southern coast of China owing to the typhoon, referred to yesterday, passing westward in the China Sea. Directions to hoist the Drum were

-13-

""

issued at 4.15 p. yesterday, and to hoist the South Cone at 11.15 a. this morning. The following tele- gram was issued at 9.30 a.:-" Typhoon SE of Hongkong moving westward.' The temperature is high and the weather cloudy but rather dry.'

Typhoon in about 18° N, 116° E.

1887, September 8th. The barometer has fallen in Tonquin. The typhoon appears to have entered Annain. The temperature is high, the weather cloudy but fine and dry and moderate SE winds prevail. At 4 p. yesterday the following telegram was issued:-" Typhoon SW of Hongkong moving westward," and also directions to hoist the Ball."'

Typhoon is about 17° N, 110° E about to enter Annam.

1887, September 9th. The barometer has fallen in the E, particularly in the SE, and risen in the W. There is a typhoon north of Luzon. The temperature is high and the weather is cloudy but dry except in Luzon, where it is squally and wet.'

Typhoon in about 17° N, 126° E.

1887, September 10th.-The barometer has fallen everywhere. The temperature is high and the weather cloudy but dry. The typhoon raged along the NW coast of Luzon during the night accompanied by heavy rain and a tremendous sea. Directions to take down the Ball were issued at 12.30 p. on the 8th and to hoist the Drum at 12.15 p. on the 9th. The following telegrams were ad- dressed to the treaty ports: at 4 p. yesterday:-"Typhoon NW of Luzon," and at 11.45 a. this day: "Violent typhoon approaching Formosa Channel.'

Typhoon in about 19° N, 121o° E.

1887, September 11th.-The barometer has fallen along the China Coast particularly in Hong- kong. The centre of the typhoon is situated between Hongkong and South Cape and appears to be moving very slowly NWestward. It is blowing very hard in the northern semi-circle but the wind is more moderate S of the centre. At 7 p. the following telegram was issued :-"It is blowing hard in the Formosa Channel," and at 10.25 a. the following was sent to the Treaty Ports: The typhoon in southern part of Formosa Channel is moving NWestward. At 10.05 p. directions were given to replace the Drum by the North Cone.'

Typhoon in 22° N, 117° E.

1887, September 12th.-The barometer has fallen slightly in Tonquin and risen elsewhere. The temperature and humidity are rather high and the weather is overcast, wet and squally round the China Sea. Directions to fire the gun one round were given at 7.05 p. [on the 11th] and at 10.35 a. to take down the North Cone. At 10.35 a. the following telegram was addressed to the Treaty Ports (and the other stations):-" At midnight the typhoon entered China a little to the East of Hongkong." It blew hard in Amoy last evening during the first part of the night, and there was a high sea and wet weather. This morning the weather is squally with fresh SE wind, which indicates that the remainder of the typhoon is still moving NWestward on the mainland.'

Typhoon in 24° N, 112° E.

1887, September 13th.

The barometer has risen and gradients are moderate for S winds. The temperature and humidity are rather high and cloudy weather prevails.'

1887, September 14th. The barometer has risen and gradients are slight for E winds. The

• late typhoon appears to have passed northwards through China, and then NEastward to the north of Japan. The weather is hot, damp and cloudy.'

The depression north of Japan was probably of a distinct origin,

1887, September 15th. The barometer is beginning to fall in Luzon and has risen along the Southern coast of China and also in Japan. Gradients are moderate for N winds. The temperature and humidity are moderate and the weather cloudy.'

Typhoon apparently NE of Luzon not far from the coast.

1887, September 16th. The barometer has fallen along the SE coast of China and still more in Luzon. It has risen in Tonquin and in Japan. There is a typhoon North of Luzon. The weather is hot and cloudy but dry along the SE coast of China. Telegraphic communication is interrupted. Directions to hoist the Red Drum were issued at 11.20 a.

Typhoon in about 19° N, 119° E.

;

1887, September 18th. The existence of the typhoon was first indicated in the China Coast Meteorological Register

Register on the morning of the 15th according to the last paragraph of Chapter II of the "Law of Storms" (page 9). On the morning of the 16th it was stated that it was N of Luzon. Directions to hoist the Drum were issued at 11.20 a. At 7 p. the following notice was issued :-" Ty-

:

-14-

phoon approaching Formosa Channel. Strong NE winds reported from stations there." At 8.50 a. on the 17th directions to fire the gun one round were given. The following notices were issued on the 17th: (at 10.20 a.) "Typhoon SSE of Hongkong apparently moving NWestward," (at 11.05 a.) "Only a strong gale is expected or a storm at any rate it is not likely to blow so hard as in 1884,' (at 4 p.) "Typhoon SW of Hongkong apparently moving NWestward." At 12.20 p. directions were given to hoist the South Cone and at 1.03 p. to hoist the Ball. Owing to the absence of direct telegraphic connection with Hongkong and the other stations earlier or more complete information was not available.'

Typhoon at 9 a. on the 17th in about 20° N, 1154° E and at 9 a. on the 18th in about 22° N, 111o E.

1887, September 19th.-The barometer has risen along the coast and fallen in Luzon. The temperature is high and the weather cloudy but calm. At 4 p. yesterday the following notice was issued:-"There appears to be another typhoon in the Pacific. Telegraphic communication is inter- rupted." At 10 p. directions were issued to hoist the Drum. The typhoon was approaching Bolinao from the East this morning. An increasing NW gale is felt in Luzon.'

Typhoon in 15° N, 122° E.

1887, September 20th. The typhoon passed across Bolinao in the evening and is now moving Westward in the China Sea. Its full force was felt in Manila in the afternoon. The following notices were issued: (at 1 p. on the 19th) "Typhoon approaching Bolinao from the E this morning." (At 4 p. on the 19th) "Violent typhoon appears to have crossed northern Luzon and entered the China Sea." (At 10 a. on the 20th), "The typhoon appears to be moving NWestward in the China Sea between Bolinao and Hongkong.""

Typhoon in about 17° N, 116° E.

1887, September 21st. At 12.20 p. [on the 20th] orders were issued to hoist the South Cone, at 12.27 p. notice to Cape St. James that typhoon was approaching Annam, at 12.45 p. to Harbour Office that ships bound for northern or eastern ports might expect fine weather, at 8.25 p notice for distribution: A fresh East gale is expected here but no typhoon," at 10.05 p. orders to fire gun one round, at 10.22 a. to the stations: "The typhoon appears to move towards northern Hainan " and at 11.24 a. direc- tions to hoist the ball.'

66

Typhoon in about 18° N, 113° E.

{

1887, September 22nd. The typhoon appears to have passed over southern Hainan and to the south of Haiphong. It has probably entered northern Annam by this time.'

Typhoon in about 20° N, 107° E.

1887, September 23rd. The barometer has risen along the coast and gradients are gentle for NE winds. The weather is hot but rather dry and cloudy. At 12.35 p. [on the 22nd] directions were issued to take down the Ball.'

1887, September 24th.-At 4 p. yesterday the following notice was issued: There appears to be another typhoon in the Pacific." This typhoon is now raging in northern Luzon. It appears to be moving Westward.'

Typhoon entering northern Luzon.

1887, September 25th. At 12.15 p. yesterday (six hours late in the absence of direct telegraphic connection) the following notice was issued:-"The typhoon was approaching Bolinao from the E this morning," and also directions to hoist the Drum, at 2.30 p.: "The typhoon is raging furiously at Bolinao. The wind and rain are much worse than during the last typhoon," at 6.30 a. direction to fire the gun one round, at 10.20 a.: "The typhoon is moving Westward in the China Sea," and at 10.35 a. directions to hoist the South Cone.

Typhoon in about 18° N, 116° E.

1887, September 26th. At 10.35 a. to-day directions to hoist the Ball were issued. The typhoon appears to be approaching Hainan.'

Typhoon in about 19° N, 111° E.

1887, September 27th. The barometer has risen and gradients are gentle for NE winds. The weather is fine and dry and the temperature high. At 4 p. [on the 26th] the following notice was issued: "The typhoon has entered the mainland to the West of Hongkong," and at 10.05 p. directions to take down the Red Ball."

Typhoon appears to have entered southern Tonquin in the afternoon of the 26th and disappeared.

C

1887, September 28th. The barometer has fallen in the E and risen in the W. Gradients are gentle for N winds. The weather is cloudy but fine and rather dry. It is hot along the SE coast of China. There is probably another typhoon in the Pacific.'

Typhoon in the Pacific to the E of Luzon.

-15-

ŕ

1887, September 29th. The barometer has fallen in Luzon and along the SE Coast of China. The weather is fine, hot and dry in SEastern China but overcast and wet in Luzon. The typhoon appears to be approaching northern Luzon from the East.'

Typhoon in the Pacific E of the Balintang Channel.

1887, September 30th.The barometer has fallen in Luzon but is steady along the southern coast of China. The typhoon appears to have crossed southern Luzon and to be moving Westward in the southern part of the China Sea.'

One typhoon SE of S. Cape (Formosa), another [probably at this time] about crossing the southern Philippines.

1887, October 1st.—* At 10.40 a. yesterday directions were issued to hoist the South Cone and at 10 a. to-day to remove it The barometer has risen and the weather is fine and dry with moderate temper-

ature.'

The new typhoon appears to have been raging near northern Palawan.

1887, October 4th. The barometer is rising slowly in Luzon and falling slowly along the Coasts of China and Japan. Gradients are moderate for N winds. The weather is fine, dry and hot.'

1887, October 5th-At 4.45 p. [on the 4th] the following notice was issued:" Typhoon approaching Formosa.' The typhoon has since approached the Channel. It is probably blowing hard

in southern Formosa.

Typhoon in about 20° N, 132° E.

1887, October 6th.—' At 3 p. directions were issued to hoist the Red Drum. The typhoon appears to have recurved.'

Typhoon E of Formosa recurving towards the North.

1887, October 7th.-The barometer has risen and gradients are gentle. The temperature is moderate and the weather fine and very dry. At 4.15 p. directions to take down the Drum were issued.'

The storm was moving NEastward to the S of Japan.

1887, November 26th.-There is not much change in the barometer and gradients continue steep for NE winds in the China Sea. The weather is fine and cool and the humidity moderate.'

1887, November 28th.The barometer has fallen along the Coast of China but is beginning to rise in Luzon. At 10h. 5m p. yesterday the following notice was sent to Singapore.-"There is a typhoon in the southern part of the China Sea moving Westward."'

Typhoon in about 15° N, 115° E.

18. I cannot conclude this report without expressing my thanks to the heads of the Harbour, Police and Post Office Departments for their great courtesy and kind co-operation. The buildings have been kept in a good state by the Public Works Department. All the necessary repairs are being effected. The leaks in the roofs have been attended to and additional venetians put up to obviate the draughts in the main building. Benchmarks have been put on different public buildings in Kowloon, and their heights above the benchmark in the police boat-basin have been measured with the level.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. DOBERCK,

Director.

No. 10

88.

HONGKONG.

CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING A PROPOSED LIGHTHOUSE ON GAP ROCK.

(In continuation of No. 20 of 1887.)

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

No. 2/G.

His Excelleney

SIR,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 16th January, 1888.

With reference to previous correspondence on the subject of the proposal to erect a Lighthouse as a guide to vessels approaching Hongkong and the Canton River from the South, I have the honour to inform Your Excellency that the Government of this Colony, in accordance with the unanimous opinion of the maritime experts who have been consulted on the point, has decided that the only proper position for the Lighthouse is on the Gap Rock, and that the display of a light at any other of the sites suggested would be worse than useless as likely to create danger to vessels rather than avert it.

2. Under these circumstances as the provision of the light in question is of great and growing importance to the trade of this Colony, and indeed to the trade of China, I should be much obliged if Your Excellency would, on behalf of this Colony, lay before the Imperial Government of China the three following alter- native proposals for the erection of a Lighthouse at the Gap Rock as described in the annexed paper.

I.

The Government of Hongkong to erect the Lighthouse and to maintain the light entirely at its own cost and by means of its own employés, being permitted to occupy the Rock in consideration of the maintenance of such light, and of the annual payment of a nominal rent as acknowledgment that the dominion remains with China.

II.

The Government of Hongkong to erect the Lighthouse by means of its own employés, and, on its completion, to give possession of it to the Imperial Govern- ment of China on an undertaking of the latter to maintain the light, or to permit the Government of Hongkong to do so.

III.

The Government of Hongkong to pay to the Imperial Government of China the sum of $80,000 in consideration of the erection of the Lighthouse and mainte- nance of the light by the latter, it being at the same time agreed that if there should at any time be failure on the part of the Imperial Government of China to maintain the light, the Government of Hongkong would be permitted to do so. Though the above sum is believed to be a very full estimate of the cost of the work, if executed by the Colony, the Government of Hongkong, with a view to facilitate negociation and to assist towards rapid execution, is willing to increase the payment to $90,000 on condition that the Lighthouse is completed and in use within a period of two years from the 1st of May next.

Sir JOHN WALSHAM, Bart.,

H.B.M. Minister,

&C..

&c.,

&C.. PEKING.

""

3. The occupancy of the Rock temporary or otherwise for any of the purposes mentioned in the above alternative proposals would not involve "the dominion," so that in no case would the Imperial Government require to part with territory.

4. Though the first proposal would involve the heaviest cost to the Colony, and no cost at all to the Government of China beyond the permission to occupy a barren uninhabited rock of only a few square feet in extent, this Government would, on the whole, prefer it, as affording the best prospect of permanently securing an object of so much importance to our commercial interests.

5. In view of the willingness of the Colony to bear the whole cost and res- ponsibility of a work which will largely benefit the Imperial Government, I earn- estly hope that Your Excellency may be able, without further delay, to induce the acceptance of one or other of the above proposals, and thus enable the successful accomplishment of a project which has been the subject of such prolonged, and hitherto, profitless, discussion.

6. Moreover, to save the loss of another year in the commencement of the work it is important that the matter should be settled by the second or third week in March so as to permit of the occupation of the Rock at the season during which access to it is comparatively easy. For this reason I have deemed it well to avoid the delay which would be involved in communicating with Your Excel- lency only after receiving the consent of Her Majesty's Government to the above proposals, and have forwarded a copy of this letter to the Secretary of State for the Colonies with the request that Your Excellency may be informed by telegraph of the approval of its contents by Her Majesty's Government.

7. I need hardly say that this Colony would be under great obligation to Your Excellency if you were able to obtain the early erection of the Lighthouse on terms less onerous to it than those proposed, and I trust that you will agree with me in considering that the Imperial Government of China might fairly make some concession on the point, in view of the large recent increase to its fleet, and the importance to the latter as well as to our mercantile marine of a provision for saving of time and increased security in the approach to this Port and the Canton River.

F

I have, &c.,

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

Enclosure in Letter No. 2/G of 16th January, 1888.

A flashing first-order great sea-light to be erected on the Gap Rock, South of Hongkong. Estimated height of rock 90 feet. Height of tower 30 feet. Height of light above sea-level 120 feet.

Derrick and apparatus for hoisting and landing persons and stores. Keepers' quarters, water-tanks, and typhoon-proof out-buildings complete.

SIR,

(2.)

PERING, 9th March, 1888,

I had the honour to receive on the 11th of February your Excellency's Despatch of the 16th of January last bearing upon the long pending question of the erection of a Lighthouse in the neighbourhood of Hongkong to serve as a guide to vessels approaching from the South.

You inform me that the Government of the Colony, in accordance with the unanimous opinion of the Maritime Experts who have been consulted on the point, has come to the conclusion that the only proper position for the Light is the Gap Rock, and that the display of a Light on any other of the sites which have been suggested would be worse than useless as calculated to create rather than avert danger.

Under these circumstances Your Excellency has requested me to lay before the Chinese Government three alternative proposals for the erection and maintenance of a Lighthouse on the "Gap" Rock, and you state that in order to facilitate the commencement of the work at an early date, you had submitted the decision of the Colonial Government to Her Majesty's Government and asked that, should it be approved, I might be informed by telegraph and so enabled to lay the matter before the Chinese Authorities without delay.

Your Despatch reached me at the commencement of the Chinese New Year, when little or no official business is transacted; but with a view to expedite as far as possible a settlement of the question, I placed myself in communication with

·

Sir ROBERT HART, the Inspector-General of Maritime Customs who is charged with the Superintendence of the Chinese Lighthouse Departmeent, and with his usual courtesy he at once promised to give your proposals his best attention, so that at the expiration of the New Year's holidays he might be in a position to discuss the proposals of the Hongkong Government with the Ministers of the Tsungli Yamên, but he did not disguise from me his fears that it would be almost useless to expect a reply from the Chinese Government in time to permit of the work being commenced by the second or third week in March, the date mentioned by Your Excellency, as in all probability it would be necessary to consult the Viceroy of Canton, within whose jurisdiction the Gap Rock lies.

On the 3rd instant I received a Telegram from the Secretary of State telling me that Your Excellency's proposals had been approved, and Sir ROBERT HART lost no time in placing them before the Government.

He himself appears to be in favour of the first suggestion, which I gather from your despatch is the one which on the whole the Colonial Government would also prefer, namely, the erection and maintenance of the Lighthouse by the Government of Hongkong, on the condition of the occupation of the Rock being sanctioned in return for a nominal "Royalty" as an acknowledgement of China's Sovereignty over the soil.

Directly I am made acquainted with the views of the Chinese Government I shall have the honour of bringing them to Your Excellency's knowledge.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant,

His Excellency

THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

(3.)

No. 30/G.

His Excellency

No. 12.

JOHN WALSHAM.

SIR,

.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 22nd March, 1888.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellency's letter of the 9th instant, bearing upon the question of the erection of a Lighthouse on Gap Rock, and I desire at the same time to convey to you the thanks of this Govern- ment for the trouble you are taking in the matter.

SIR JOHN WALSHAM, Bart.,

Enclosure.

(See No. 1.)

H.B.M. Minister,

&c.,

&c.,

&c., PEKING.

I have &c.,

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

Governor.

(4.)

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 16th January, 1888.

SIR,

Referring to previous correspondence on the subject of a proposed Lighthouse for the guidance of vessels approaching Hongkong from the Southward, I have the honour to forward to you copy of a letter which I have addressed to Sir JOHN WALSHAM, Her Majesty's Minister at Peking; and, with a view to save if possible the delay of another year in the commencement of a work of pressing importance to the Colony and in favour of which there is a very strong and unanimous public opinion, I would earnestly request that if you see no objection to the alternative proposals contained in the letter, you will be good enough to cause the approval of Her Majesty's Government to be communicated to Sir JOHN WALSHAM by telegraph.

2. After much correspondence and discussion on the subject of this Light- house, and in view of the fact that the proposals of Sir ROBERT HART referred to in

the previous correspondence have recently appeared to have reference to erection on one or other of the sites which, though more easy of access are, I believe unani- mously, condemned by experienced sailors, I have come to the conclusion, in which the Executive Council unanimously concur, that the only chance of attaining the end desired without further indefinite prolongation of vexatious delay is to offer to the Chinese Government the choice of an exhaustive list of practicable proposals, such as are contained in the letter in question; and though I have not laid the matter formally before the Legislative Council, I have satisfied myself that the members, un-official as well as official, will give a cordial support to the action taken and, rather than there should be further delay in the matter, would gladly support an increase of the previously suggested tax on the shipping of the port, and vote such addition to the existing dues as will cover the whole expense involved in the acceptance of any one of the alternative proposals.

3. It is estimated that an addition to the tonnage dues of 1 cent per ton for 2 years, or 1 cent per ton for 3 years, will more than realize the whole of the $90,000 required.

4. The mercantile community believe, if I may gather their opinion from that of the leading merchants in the Legislative Council, that the saving of time to shipping would be well worth the outlay involved even in the provision of the whole cost both erection and maintenance.

5. An outside estimate for maintenance would, I am informed, be $8,000 per annum ; but in view of the reluctance of the Chinese Government to part with territory, even under lease, it is probable that the proposal would be preferred, under which this cost will not fall on the Colony.

6. Independently of the suggested communication with Sir JOHN WALSHAM, I should be much obliged if you would inform me by cable whether the proposals above referred to have not met your approval or disapproval.

The Right Honourable

I have, &c.,

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

SIR HENRY T. HOLLAND, BART, M.P., G.C.M.G.,

Governor.

HONGKONG,

No. 23.

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

(5.)

DOWNING STREET,

25th February, 1888.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch No. 12 of the 16th of January last, regarding the erection of a Lighthouse on the Gap Rock.

2. You will have already received my telegram of the 23rd instant assenting to this proposal, and the Foreign Office authorities have been requested to send a similar telegram to Sir JOHN WALSHAM.

3. With regard to the suggested tax on the shipping of the port to cover the expense connected with the erection of this light, I observe from your Despatch under acknowledgment, that it is estimated that an addition to the tonnage dues of 1 cent per ton for two years, or 1 cent per ton for three years will more than realize the whole of the $90,000 required, whereas in Mr. MARSH'S Despatch No. 369 of the 25th of November, 1886, it is estimated that a tax of 1 cent per ton would only realize $15,000 per annum or $45,000 in three years and I should be glad if you could inform me on what grounds this estimate has now been doubled.

4. I should also be glad to be informed whether the sum of $30,000 entered in the Estimates for 1888, under extraordinary Public Works, for "Lighthouse for Southern approach to the harbour" refers to the present scheme, and whether it is intended that this sum should be recouped from the new tax.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient humble Servant,

Governor

SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

KNUTSFORD.

[Subsequent correspondence with His Excellency Sir J. WALSHAM “Confidential.*]

No. 8.

No.

11

88.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 20th February, 1888.

the

SIR,-I have the honour to present the following report in connection with the Fire Brigade for year 1887.

The year has been characterized by an unusual number of fires, some of which have attained serious proportions, but the greater part of which have been soon extinguished. There were nearly three times as many fires as the maximum number recorded in any previous year and the resources of the Brigade have been very fully taxed. To those who know how easy the spread of a fire is in the crowded Chinese town with its back to back houses, and narrow lanes, I think the Brigades may be congratulated on the success that has attended their efforts.

In one of these fires only has a charge of incendiarism been made. It was made at the instance of an Agent for a German Insurance Office, and was committed for trial at the Supreme Court, where the defendant was acquitted without being called upon to make his defence.

I understand that a civil suit is pending in connection with this trial and I forbear therefore from dwelling upon this particular case. Generally speaking, however, I may say that the practice of in- suring contents of Chinese houses without any check beyond what is caused by the self-interests of the parties concerned is a grave source of temptation, and is fostered by the interests both of those who insure and of those who accept the risks.

Even supposing abuses not to arise it is inexpedient to give opportunity for them and the danger created by the facilities for bad practices is aggravated by the difficulty of detecting and exposing such as take place, and by the natural reluctance which a Company concerned only with its own interests feels to take the initiative by refusing a claim.

In the interests of the Brigade I think it would be well if it were made obligatory upon Insurance Companies and Agencies to furnish the Superintendent or the Government with full particulars as to date, amount and nature of policies effected in houses in which fires occur, and thus possibly to afford some idea as to how far Insurance and fires stand to each other in the relation of cause and effect. I do not think there would be any reluctance to give the information, and it might in time form a valuable record.

It is possible however that when systematic enquiries on oath are made, other causes such as the indiscriminate and careless use of Kerosine oil, or the increase of accidents arising with the growth of the population may be found to be the prime promoters of conflagrations, but the tendency of insuring is undoubtedly to give rise to incendiarism, and even apparent carelessness may be the result of careful forethought.

Two or three cases of undoubted incendiarism have come under my own notice, occurring not necessarily in the house in which the fire originated, but in the house adjoining it, and I am credibly informed that on the occasion of the large fire in Queen's Road West some weeks ago, the fire broke out simultaneously in three different houses separated from each other and with no possibility of inter- communication of the flames.

The fires of the past year have been marked by some painful incidents. Towards the close of the extensive conflagration in Queen's Road West to which I have just referred a member of the Government Fire Brigade named Fox lost his life in venturing into a house, the upper portion of which was in a dangerous state. The house collapsed and fell down upon him while he was inside.

In another case, six Chinese lives were lost. The fire broke out in a room on the first floor and communicated itself to the stair-case before the inmates above were made alive to their danger. There were no means of escape either by the roof or by windows and all six lost their lives.

The last incident that occurred was at an extensive fire in Bonham Strand, where, without a minute's warning, five houses fell outwards across the street resulting in the most serious injuries to Mr. Ross the foreman of the Volunteer Fire Brigade. A member of the Government Fire Brigade was also slightly injured, but to those who witnessed what took place, it was a mercy that no more harm was done than was actually occasioned, as there were at least six firemen whose position at the time seriously jeopardized their lives.

It may not be out of place at the commencement of another year to take stock of the existing con- dition of the Fire Brigade and of its adequacy to meet the requirements of the Colony.

At the present moment the Fire Brigade consists of thirty three Europeans of whom seventeen are firemen, six engine drivers, and the rest, superintendents, foremen, and assistant foremen, and of ninety-one Chinese firemen besides stokers and interpreters. The pay of the European firemen is four dollars and fifty cents a month and that of a Chinese fireman from one dollar and fifty cents to one dollar. The foremen, stokers, and interpreters are of course paid at a higher rate. The Brigade is further strengthened by the services of the Hongkong Fire Insurance Volunteers, the Pawnbrokers, and other bodies all of whom have been present on every occasion of a fire and have rendered most valuable services.

The head quarters of the Fire Brigade are at No. 5 Police Station in Queen's Road. Watchmen are stationed at the Clock Tower and at the Tower of the Fire Brigade Station, and upon an alarm of fire the bells are rung at the Central Police Station, at the Fire Brigade Station and at the Clock Tower. Three separate strokes indicate a fire west of the Harbour Office, two separate strokes a fire between the Harbour Office and the Murray Barracks, and one stroke a fire east of the Murray Barracks.

The Engines are located at the Fire Brigade Station. They are four in number, not including the floating engine which is known as the No. 1 Engine. The latter is located in the harbour near Yau- mati. It is an invaluable engine and can throw four jets of some sixty feet high. It has recently been modified with a view to increasing its speed and it is now capable of steaming at a rate of about eight knots an hour.

In addition to the steam engines I have mentioned, there are also a certain number of manual engines stationed in different parts of the island. So far as the City of Victoria is concerned, there is one at Government House, one at the Central Police Station, one in Hollywood Road, one at the Harbour Office and one at Saiyingpún. There are also boxes with fire appliances in various parts of the Town.

Practically speaking however the main strength of the Brigade is at the Fire Brigade Station. At an alarm of fire in the City of Victoria, a telephonic signal is immediately sent to what is known as the No. 2 Tank. This tank is situated in Caine Road, and supplies the City of Victoria with water from the Pokfulam Reservoir. The water is distributed by two main pipes from which branch out smaller pipes throughout the Town. Its limits are broadly speaking Queen's Road at the foot of Gough Street to the west, Queen's Road to the north and the City Hall to the east. At frequent intervals are what are known as street fire plugs. They are distinguishable by iron plates level with the street, and on removing this iron plate, hose can be attached. Many of these plates have a raised knob on the top of them. The knob is to distinguish them from the other plates that are without them, and indicates that they are stop plugs, that is to say that they are merely for the purpose of shutting off water. Before this distinguishing mark was put, the greatest confusion often resulted, and much time was lost in waiting for water at one of these stop plugs, when there was none to come.

The No. 2 Tank is in its turn supplied from another tank at the western end of Robinson Road. This tank also supplies Caine Road and some other streets. These are the two chief distributions of water from the Pokfulam Reservoir. There are other subsidiary supplies which are strictly local. One is in Glenealy Ravine and supplies the Gaol and Police Barracks. Another is above the Government Civil Hospital and another near the Albany. Wanchai, as far as the City Hall, is supplied from the tank that is to be seen in the Wong-nei-chung Gap.

Generally speaking the fresh water supply is very unsatisfactory. It is uncertain inasmuch as it is not always running, it is inadequate and its pressure is not uniform. Much of its possible pressure is also diminished by leakage throughout the houses in which it is distributed along its route to the fire and by other causes such as the friction of the pipes, and sudden changes in their diameter. In reducing therefore the working of the Brigade to a system, it is impossible to regard the fresh water supply as other than a very poor adjunct, and in almost every instance recourse is had to the harbour.

In starting the engines in connection with the harbour, consideration has to be given to the locality of the fire. Experience has shown that it is impossible to safely work pressure to a higher point than is able to afford a sufficient jet for houses placed between Queen's Road and the harbour. The rule therefore is to work direct from the harbour with all houses comprised within those bounds, but in the case of fires at a higher level than Queen's Road, the engines are distributed at intervals up the hill as far as may be required; they are connected the one with the other with hose and each engine pumps into the other until the level of the fire is reached. All this occasions great wear and tear of engines and hose and fire materials, and leaves only a very limited supply of water when the fire is reached, but it is inevitable so long as the fresh water supply is arranged as at present. Nor do I see that the increased supply of water from Tytam will much improve matters unless with it there is an increase of pressure, a uniformity of distribution and a certainty of water at all times.

It is impossible to insist too much upon the element of certainty. It is not as if fires could be met by arrangements devised for them at the moment. They must be treated in accordance with general arrangements applicable to all cases, and of these the first desideratum is water, and until one can base one's arrangements upon the certainty of a sufficient fresh water supply at any given point, the harbour must be regarded as the single basis of one's calculations.

The hilly nature of the site of the City of Victoria would seem to point to a system of high level tanks as being that best adopted for the requirements of the Town. In the case of a fire spreading up the hill it would be of immense advantage to be able to meet it from above and the constant growth of the Town up

the hill points still further in this direction. Nor am I at all sure that with such a system, if properly devised and carried out, the necessity for land steam engines will not almost entirely cease to exist. The cost would of course be considerable and it may not be thought to be worth while to incur it. The proposed Praya reclamation scheme, however, if carried out, will necessarily bring this matter to the front, and in the meantime I would merely ask His Excellency's attention to the question and also to the consideration as to the extent to which the working of the reclamation scheme will interfere with the water supply from the harbour.

The following is the arrangement at present in force with regard to the steam engines. Three of the engines proceed to the Praya. Two of them run out hose to the fire. The other stands by with fires lighted, but does not run out hose until the order is given. The fourth engine remains in the station in reserve. Each engine has its own hose reel, and the branch pipes have special marks to indicate to which engine they belong. In order that in the confusion the branch pipes may not be attached to the wrong hose, a slight delay takes place between the removal of each engine from the station, and the driver is under orders to see that his engine never starts without the proper hose reel accompanying it. With a view further to obviate any miscarriage from hurry or ignorance or neglect, duplicate branch pipes are supplied, two being attached to each engine and two to each hose reel. The branch pipe is frequently termed the nozzle, but strictly speaking the term "nozzle" is applicable only to the end of the branch pipes from which the water issues.

Generally speaking the efforts of the Brigade have been directed rather to the simplification of duties and to the instruction of the men in a few broad elementary rules with regard to the running out of hose, the protection of the adjoining property, and such like matters, together with the provision before hand of all such arrangements as are likely to be of service on the occasion of a fire.

Owing to the constitution of the Fire Brigade, which consists of Policemen who have in the first place to consider their Police duties, it is not possible to assign particular duties to individual firemen and it has been sought rather to familiarize each one with the elementary rudiments of Fire Brigade drill, and by a careful prearrangement and simplification of appliances and by general rules as to dealing with fires, to minimize the drawbacks occasioned by the impossibility of assigning special duties

to selected individuals.

very

Among some of the principal changes that have been made in this direction, I may mention the substitution of a broad thread screw for the narrow thread that it was customary to use in the hose couplings. A great saving of time and labour has been effected by this change, and it has been found to be of the greatest possible advantage to the Brigade. Another change that has been found valuable has been the institution of a light service in the form of what is termed a "Supply Cart." This Cart can be drawn by two men, and contains all the necessary appliances for dealing with a fire at the outset. Inasmuch also as it has been found that very frequently a fire without actually spread- ing to an adjoinning house, will ignite it inside to the extent of making it necessary to play water upon the incipient flames, the Supply Cart carries with it two hand pumps and two extincteurs, which have been constantly found sufficient to extinguish the flames, when without these appliances resort must have been had to a hose, with the consequent delay of stopping the engine, attaching a new length, and a great destruction of property by a deluge of salt water, even supposing the flames to have not made uncontrollable way in the interval.

Other changes of a similar kind have been made, of which I have already mentioned the duplicate branch pipes, and in which I may include the institution of reserve hose reels to be taken to the fire

and used exclusively for adding new lengths when required, instead of as formerly having recourse to the engines when additional lengths were wanted, and lastly the practice of indiscriminately cutting down wood work has been entirely abandoned. No wood work can now be cut down without the order of an officer, and such an order is seldom required. In the opinion of many the spread of the great fire in 1878 was largely due to the immense destruction of wood work on that occasion, the streets in some places being blocked with shutters and broken timbers which at one and the same time impeded the movements of the Brigade, and served as a bridge for the flames.

With regard to the spread of fires they are occasioned by the beams and rafters of the roof of the house on fire being in contact with those of the adjoining houses, and in many cases protected from access by the ceiling below; also by the falling of lighted matter through the smoke holes of neighbouring houses, and again by projecting verandahs which probably contain inflammable articles. Heat alone is often sufficient to ignite either the opposite houses, or anything near that is capable of catching fire. A double brick-wall is however absolute protection to the extent of the space covered by it.

The clothes stands on roofs though invariably igniting have not so far as my experience goes been a principal cause of fires spreading. They consist only of upright and horizontal bars, with hollow spaces between them, and do not readily burn.

The accompanying report from Mr. BREWER will show the state of the engines at the present time. They have worked well throughout the year, and have been carefully tended by Mr. BREWER, the Engineer, and Mr. WAGNER, the Assistant Engineer.

There is great need of another floating engine. The present floating engine lies at Yaumáti, and is not immediately available for service on this side. Also when a fire occurs anywhere on the other side or in the harbour, there is no launch at the disposal of the Brigade for taking the men to these places. What is required is a floating engine similar to that now in use, and capable of trans- porting men to different parts of the Island. At present if the existing floating engine breaks down, there is nothing able to take its place, and considering the vast shipping interests in the harbour, and the valuable property located at Yaumáti, the Naval Yard, Kowloon, and Hunghom, one floating engine is not enough. The nature of the country on the other side does not admit of the transport of land engines, and the only practicable method of dealing with fires there is by floating engines. I trust therefore that His Excellency will give this matter his favourable consideration and will sanction the purchase or construction of another floating engine.

Also I think the European element of the Brigade should be further increased. Men who before were available for fire duties have now to attend to engines, and considering the growth of the town I do not think an increase of ten men would be by any means out of place. We are always hampered by want of men, some being in Hospital and some on Police duty, and at the initiatory stages of a fire the want of a sufficient European complement is much felt, as it is on them that the Superintendent has mainly to rely to see that his general system of organisation is properly carried out. Police firemen are not allowed to leave their beat to go to a fire, so that the nominal strength of the European element is reduced by one half at the outset, and to this must be added absence from sickness and other causes.

On the other hand I think the Chinese element might be largely reduced. With an increased European element, I think we might easily dispense with a sufficient number of Chinese to balance the additional expense in the increased European element, so that the change could be accomplished without further cost to the Brigade.

I will conclude this report with a return of fires and alarms of fires during the past year. The origins assigned to the different fires given in the schedule must be accepted with reservation, and are not to be taken as authoritative.

I have only to add that the Brigade has enjoyed the hearty co-operation of the officers and men, throughout the year, who have all worked well under the exceptional strain that has from time to time been put upon them.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODEHOuse, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

&c.

(Copy.)

FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 5th January, 1888.

Annual Report on Fire Engines.

SIR, I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1887.

No. 1 Floating Fire Engine by Merry Weather.

This engine is 19 years old, and was formerly a land engine on wheels, but was found too heavy for the roads and cumbersome of transportation; it was therefore put into a launch in March, 1883, and has since done good service. The Boiler is now 10 years old, and requires a new fire box. It was intended to execute this repair some months ago, but it was postponed pending the arrival of the new engine from England. The fresh water tanks are rusting internally, and require to be removed for scraping and painting and generally overhauling, I would recommend this be done immediately after the Chinese New Year.

The machinery and hull of the launch are in good order and with a view to increasing the speed of the launch, a new propeller of more suitable design is now fitted.

No. 2 Steamer by Merry Weather.

This Engine is 19 years old. It was fitted with a new boiler in 1878 and new steam cylinders by Messrs. FENWICK & Co. in 1886. The Engine is of obsolete type and too heavy for our roads, proof of which, it has on two occasions broken through the roads and sunk up to its axles. The engine has however done good service feeding the small engines on high levels with salt water. engine should be supplemented by one of modern type lighter more powerful and a quick generating boiler (as the present one takes 25 minutes against the modern one of 7 minutes to raise steam.)

No. 3 Steamer by Shand and Mason.

This

This Engine is 8 years old and was formerly of the auxiliary cylinder type. It was altered last year upon my recommendation, the auxiliary cylinder removed and a balance wheel substituted, which has rendered the engine more efficient and has given every satisfaction. In consequence of the age of the boiler, I have reduced the working pressure of steam to 75 lbs. which has necessarily somewhat handicapped the engine in its work. In my last year's report I recommended a new fire box which I find it is impracticable to attach, and would suggest that Messrs. SHAND & MASON receive instructions to send out a new boiler complete, which we can fix here.

No. 4 Steamer by Shand and Mason.

This Engine is 5 years old and is in excellent condition. New valves have been fitted and the working parts adjusted.

No. 5 Steamer by Shand and Mason

Was supplied upon my recommendation last year. This engine is of the most modern type, and has proved a valuable auxiliary to our fire extinguishing apparatus.

66

Stanley" Floating fire pump has only been used once during the past year, and is not available on emergency, as the launch is kept at Stone Cutters' Island.

The manual engines 9 in number, are all in good working order.

Generally.-Though the calls on the Fire Brigade have been heavy this year, I am happy to state that no Engine has been totally disabled during a fire, and no serious breakdown has occurred at any time, yet I am still of opinion, we have not sufficient engines for the increasing size of the Colony, as two fires at the same moment would drain our resources, and an engine laid up for repairs renders our appliances insufficient.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

(Signed)

JOHN S. BREWER, Assist. Supt. and Engineer.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Esq., C.M.G.,

Superintendent, Fire Brigade,

&C.,

&c.,

1

&c.

.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1887.

No. of

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

2

OTIA CO 10-

Jan.

3,

Grass on the hill-side at Mount Davis,

4,

Grass on the hill-side above Kennedy Road,

>>

A stack of grass at No. 207, Shaukiwán,

BUILDING

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

...

Trifling

Unknown.

Do.

Do.

$10

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

""

8, 12 Midnight.

A wooden hut in Garden Lane,

1

$100

9 a.m.

""

A partition on the ground floor of house No. 199, Holly- wood Road.

...

...

Trifling

6

CO

12,

1 a.m.

House No. 16, Sai Woo Lane, top floor,..........

1

2

$1,400

"

10

11

78961

12,

12.15 a.m.

Some clothing in No. 39, Tank Lane,

...

Trifling

Incendiary.

Ignited by the burning husks. Accidental while cooking.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp on a quantity of hemp bags. Unknown.

""

13,

4.30 a.m.

>>

13,

9.30 p.m.

A straw shed at the back of No. 146, Third Street,. No. 142, Second Street, ground floor,.

1

Do.

Do.

2

3

$14,000

Do.

14,

9.30 a.m.

""

14,

4 p.m.

The verandah of No. 115, Queen's Road West,. Gallery of the Ko Shing Theatre, ....

...

Trifling

Accidental.

12

15,

5 a.m.

No. 48, Queen's Road West, cock-loft, ground floor,..

2

""

13

14

15,

""

9 p.m.

15

16

17

4567

16,

""

16,

""

16,

""

""

6666

9 a.m.

18,

18

39

20,

19

20

2222

20,

""

""

21

""

>>

21,

22,

22,

4 p.m.

11.30 p.m.

4.30 p.m.

6.30 p.m.

8.15 p.m.

11 a.m.

5.8 a.m.

11.20 p.m.

A quantity of mattings at the back entrance of No. 215, Queen's Road East.

A mosquito curtain at No. 172, Wellington Street, Some and old baskets at No. 230, Queen's Rd. Central,] papers A kerosine lamp at No. 117, Queen's Road Central,... Grass on the hill-side at Deep Water's Bay, .....

A number of mat bags saturated with kerosine on the roof of No. 5, Bonham Strand.

A stack of grass on the hill above Man Ming Lane,.

The chimney of No. 31, Lyndhurst Terrace,

Some

papers and a wooden box at Man Mo Temple, House. No. 103, First Street,

None.

$23,000 Capsizing of a kerosine lamp on a quantity of paper, straw and shavings.

This was a false alarm and greatly excited the audience for a short time.

Was insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co.'s Office for $3,000.

None

:

:

$2

DA

Incendiary.

Accidental.

...

Trifling

Unknown.

...

...

:

:

...

...

...

Do.,

...

...

$5

Unknown.

None

Trifling

None

Do.

Do.

Incendiary,

None Accidental. Unknown Incendiary,

$30

A large number of young trees were des- troyed.

The man who sat fire to the bags on the roof was seen running away by a boy.

23

25,

2.45 a.m.

Some

""

24

26,

:

,,

1 p.m.

stored on the second floor of house No. 63, papers Wellington Street. A Printing Office.

Ground floor of house No. 59, Queen's Road West,

$25

Unknown,

:

...

1

1

$3,000

Do.,

25 Feb.

3,

8 p.m.

Ground floor of house No. 3, Bonham Strand, ......

1

$12,000

Dropping of a kerosine lamp,

...

28

8885

26

13,

""

27

17,

5.40 a.m.

22,

The grass on the hill-side at Kai Lung Wan, Ground floor of No. 129, Queen's Road West, Grass on the hill-side near Stanley,

...

1

Trifling

Unknown.

1 $2,900 Accidental,

Trifling

Unknown.

A small quantity of paper and shavings saturated with kerosine with a cracker and a lighted incense stick attached were found at the foot of the staircase. Was insured in Messrs. Adamson, Bell & Co.'s Office for $5,000.

Was insured in Messrs. Schellhass & Co.'s Office for $3,200.

The contents were insured in Messrs. Meyer & Co.'s Office for $12,000.

The buildings were not insured.

No. DATE.

TIME.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1887,-Continued.

No. of

SITUATION OF FIRE.

BUILDING

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

...

Trifling

Do.

Unknown.

Do.

None Incendiary.

Do.

Unknown.

Do.

Do.

29 Feb. 22,

7.20 p.m.

3.45 p.m.

8.20 p.m.

12.30 a.m.

5 a.m.

Some clothing on the ground floor of No. 81, Hollywood Rd., A shed on the roof of No. 17, Salt Fish Street,

The shrubbery under one of the matsheds at the Race Course, Chimney of No. 63, Bonham Strand East,....

A wooden partition in house No. 22, Queen's Road West,. No. 15, Sz Mi Lane, ground floor,

30

""

24,

31

27,

"

32

March 4,

""

7,

9,

""

12,

15,

""

8.50 p.m.

A cooking stall in Chinese Recreation Ground,. No. 76, Jervois Street, ground floor,

33

34

35

36

""

6

::

::

$19,000

Carelessness with joss papers,... Insured for $2,000 at Messrs. Schellhass

None

Unknown.

Trifling

Incendiary,

Upsetting a kerosine lamp, Unknown.

Falling of a kerosine lamp,

& Co.

A large quantity of paper, a number of books saturated with kerosine were found, and also a chatty and a tin containing some kerosine.

Property of Government.

Three small pigs roasted alive. Insured for $2,000.

Insured for $20,000 in Messrs. Meyer & Co., and $20,000 in Messrs. Pustau & Co.

37

16,

5.50 p.m.

38

22,

10 a.m.

Chimney of No. 276, Queen's Road Central,.. Matsheds at Taitám Water-Works,

None

Unknown.

14

$550

Unknown,

39

22,

4.25 p.m.

Two matsheds at Tsimshatsui,

2

$10

Careless use of fire,

40

23,

3.50 a.m.

No. 17, Wing Kut Street,

1

$2,500

....

41

23,

""

5.20 p.m.

42

24,

9 p.m.

No. 34, Bonham Strand West,

43

26,

""

44

27,

""

45

27,

10 a.m.

12 a.m.

Grass on the hills between Stanley and Táit'ámtuk, No. 143, Queen's Road Central,

Chimney of No. 135, Queen's Road West,

Wood-work in the cook house of No. 36, Bonham Strand West.

...

1

None

$1,800

Slight

Accidental while cooking.

Do.

...

::

...

Incendiary.

None

Attempted arson,

...

"

46

47

29,

1 a.m.

A kerosine lamp at No. 111, West Street,..

Do.

Accidental.

29,

""

6 p.m.

The chimney of No. 4, Wellington Street,...

Do.

Unknown.

48

29,

9 p.m.

No. 13, Tank Lane, ground floor,

49

31,

>>

4.30 p.m.

No. 8, Táit'ámtuk,

1

$70

50 April April 3,

11.15 a.m.

51

""

52

""

Grass on the hill-side at No. 2 Bridge, Pokfulam Road, Grass on the hill-side at Mount Davis,

Grass on the hill-side near Whitfield,

Do.

$7

Do.,

Accidental,

53

""

54

,,

55

"}

56

99

57

5,

ເລ ົາ

A quantity of kerosine was found poured over the staircase.

Slight Upsetting a kerosine lamp.

Accidental.

Unknown Unknown,

Combustion of accumulated coal Burning of joss paper.

[gas.

A number of young trees were destroyed. Some young trees were destroyed. Caught fire while some Chinese were wor- shipping at the graves. Three men

were arrested and ordered by the Magis- trate to pay the damage.

Caught fire while worshipping at graves. Caught fire while worshipping at tombs. A number of trees and shrubs were burned.

Grass on the hill-side near Shaukiwán Village,. Grass on the hill-side at Stanley,

...

Unknown

Do.

Do.,

Do.,

...

...

2 p.m.

5.30 p.m.

4.30 a.m.

Messrs. Blackhead & Co.'s coal shed at Tsimshatsui,

No. 37, Market Street,..........

A quantity of firewood on the ground floor of No. 19,

Sheung Fung Lane.

...

$125,000

Trifling

None

...

Do.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1887,- Continued.

No. OF

BUILDING

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

None

Incendiary,

58 April 27,

No. 17, Graham Street,

59

30,

7.10 p.m.

60 May

1,

9 a.m.

No. 273, Queen's Road Central, No. 4, Wai Tak Lane,

2

$8,000 Unknown, Trifling Incendiary,

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Chan A-woo who formerly lived in the same house as the woman Ching Hi, and had been charged at the Police Court for assaulting her, poured kerosine oil on the stairs and attempted to set it on fire, when observed by inmates he ran away. Insured for $10,000 at Messrs. Pustau & Co. Kau Hung placed a basket of shavings satu- rated with kerosine and set fire to it. He was arrested by P.C. 236 and charged with arson.

Some oakum caught fire.

The house was not insured.

61

""

62

>>

63

64

>>

4,

4,

6 p.m.

6.45 p.m.

7.25 p.m.

65

7,

""

66

13,

11 a.m.

Cock-loft of No. 51, Market Street, Hunghòm,.

15

67

16,

>>

7.30 p.m.

Tsimshatsui,

Chimney of No. 107, Wellington Street, Matshed at Sandy Bay, Pokfúlam,

None Unknown.

1

Accidental.

First floor of No. 7, Station Street,..

Trifling

Unknown,

No. 35, Battery Road,

Chimney of No. 28, Wing Lok Street,

Trifling

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp, . Unknown.

$3

None

$120

$60

:.

8889

وو

68

69

""

31,

30,

5.45 p.m.

Grass on the hill-side near Aberdeen,....

Chimney of No. 47, Lower Lascar Row,

Do.

Accidental while burning incense

paper.

Messrs. Blackhead & Co. were trying a new patent lamp at Tsimshatsui, and an alarm of fire was raised.

Unknown.

Do.

Do.

$9

Accidental,

70

71

31,

5.30 p.m.

No. 142, Queen's Road West,

31,

6.40 p.m.

Chimney of No. 2, Hollywood Road,

None

Unknown.

Insured for $3,000 at Messrs. Siemssen & Co.

""

72

73

74

75

><

une

>>

3,

13,

19,

76 July 2,

31,

Grass on the hill-side above Aberdeen Docks,

Do.

Do.

2.30 p.m.

8 p.m.

7

p.m.

The chimney of house No. 99, Wántsai Road,

Chimney of No. 180, Hollywood Road,

A mosquito curtain in house No. 362, Queen's Road West,

Do.

Do.

...

Trifling

Accidental.

None

Do.

6.45 p.m.

A mosquito curtain in house No. 56, Caine Road,

Do.

Do.

...

77

3,

9.5 p.m.

House No. 28, Tank Lane,

1

1

$300

78

25,

8.30 p.m.

House No. 185, Queen's Road West,

15

4

79

27,

2.20 a.m.

In the ruins of house No. 187, Queen's Road West,.

None

>>

80 Aug.

3,

10.55 p.m.

Room No. 14, College Chamber,.......

Very little

81

Grass on the hills near Stanley,

Slight

وو

82

23,

>>

9 p.m.

House No. 311, Queen's Road Central,

2

$2,000

Dropping of a light on some

shavings.

$26,000 | Breaking of a kerosine lamp,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp. Unknown.

Dropping of a kerosine lamp,

Insured for $1,500 at Messrs. Melchers & Co.

Insured for $1,350 at Messrs. Carlowitz & Co.

83

84

29,

A thatched hut at Aplichau,

...

>>

30,

Chimney of house No. 135, Wellington Street,..

Trifling

None

Unknown.

Do.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1887,—Continued.

No. of

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

89

90

"}

91

92

93 Oct.

94

21,

25,

2.30 p.m.

وو

4,

4.45 a.m.

حرية

85 Sept.

86

""

87

88

508

12,

""

""

TIME.

7 p.m.

8 a.m.

3 a.m.

15, 5.5 a.m.

"

15,

""

18,

10 p.m.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

Chimney of house No. 137, Queen's Road Central, Messrs. Russell & Co.'s coal godown, Praya East, A basket of charcoal at No. 2, Tak Hing Lane, No. 39, Wing Lok Street,

No. 37, Wing Lok Street,

Some papers in cook house on first floor of No. 15, Mor- rison Street.

No. 76, Queen's Road West,

A small quantity of hay at No. 52, Hing Lung Street, The chimney of house No. 254, Queen's Road West,

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

...

1

:

:

:

:

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Unknown Unknown.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

$1,200

Unknown,

None

Incendiary,

*

Trifling

Unknown.

2

1

$4,000

Do.,

None

Do.

Do.

Do.

5,

5 a.m.

House No. 9, In Ku Lane,

1

...

$1,500

Do.,

95

7,

5.25 p.m.

House No. 5, Gage Street,

1

1

$3,000

Dropping of a lighted kerosine

lamp.

Both houses were insured for $1,600 at Messrs. Schellhass & Co.

* A paper torch was found in a clothes press and partly burnt along with some papers and a Chinese jacket.

Insured for $1,500 at Messrs. Carlowitz & Co.

The contents were insured for $25,000 at Messrs. Meyer & Co.

8588

11.40 a.m.

Some clothing on second floor of house No. 7, Station St.,

Very little

Unknown.

""

2 p.m.

""

98

10,

""

8 p.m.

A wooden hut at Mongkoktsui,

Some clothing on first floor of No. 2, Wing Fung Lane, ...

{

13

Huts

$250

$1

Accidental.

99

26,

Grass on hills at Stanley,

""

100

31,

4.45 a.m.

A matshed at Kennedy Town,

العربية

...

{

2

Sheds

""

101 Nov.

8.45 p.m.

The cook house chimney of Star Hotel,

102

Cook house No. 7, Pokfúlam Road,

103

**

11.42 a.m.

House No. 9, Sheung Fung Lane,

...

1

104

7,

>>

5 p.m.

First floor of house No. 12, Gilman Street,

...

...

105

Some grass on Victoria Peak,

""

106

10,

107

14,

6.30 p.m.

108

16,

7.20 p.m.

109

16,

7.30 p.m.

:.

::

110

111

112

""

""

18,

18,

19,

10 p.m.

""

11 p.m.

Some grass near Magazine Gap,.......

Some empty packing cases on first floor of house No. 5,

Cochrane Street.

House No. 253, Queen's Road Central,

Staircase of house No. 55, Square Street,

A quantity of mat bags on hill-side at Shekt'ongtsui, Ko Shing Theatre,

House No: 115, Wellington Street,...

24 10

::

...

Slight Accidental.

$90,000 Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

Slight

$3

None

Incendiary,.....

Unknown.

Slight

Incendiary,

Firema: Fox was killed at this fire while engaged in its suppression.

A rag soaked with kerosine and a lighted joss stick were found at the foot of the staircase.

This was a false alarm and greatly excited the audience who made general rush for the doors.

A quantity of joss paper saturated with nut oil was found burning just inside the street door.

Slight

Unknown

Burning of joss paper.

None

Unknown.

Do.

Accidental.

1

Do.

Slight

None

Shavings caught fire, Unknown.

Do.

Unknown.

Carelessness with matches.

Unknown.

The house was not insured.

Discharging of rockets.

:

No. DATE.

TIME.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1887,—Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of

BUILDING

Destroyed.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

CAUSE.

...

Slight

Do. .

None

Carelessness with a lamp.

Unknown.

Do.

...

Very little

Do.

None

Do.

Do.

Incendiary.

REMARKS.

$150 Unknown,

Very little Spontaneous combustion.

Some old rags saturated with kerosine were found in the staircase.

The house was not insured.

12

None

Unknown

None

Unknown.

Do.

...

:

:

:

Not much Incendiary.

Unknown Unknown,

Do.,

Do.

None

Do..

Accidental.

......

This was a false alarm and a general rush was made for the doors.

A considerabe amount of damage was done to growing trees.

A few acres of grass burnt and part of the wood and young plants slightly damaged. This was a false alarm. A general rush was made for the doors. Two men were arrested for raising false alarm.

$190 Accidental, upsetting of an oil The house was not insured.

1

Slight

Unknown.

1

$1,000

Accidental,

$150

[lamp.

The house was not insured. The house was not insured.

Accidental, bed curtain caught fire while worshipping.

113 Nov. 20,

10 p.m.

114

21,

115

21,

5.30 p.m.

116

22,

8.15 a.m.

Rutter's Lane.

117

22,

11 p.m.

118

23,

""

9.15 p.m.

Partition of house No. 21, Stanley Street,...

Grass on the hill-side near Hoktsui,

A quantity of firewood in the cook house No. 341, Queen's Road West.

Some clothing and matting on ground floor of No. 2,

A mosquito curtain in house No. 32, Third Street, House No. 42, Queen's Road West,

:

119

24,

3.10 a.m.

House No. 13, Triangle Street,

1

**

120

24,

""

3.30 p.m.

Coals in one of the Kowloon Godown Company's sheds at Tsimshatsui.

121

24,

""

9.30 p.m.

Some dried grass at No. 16, Wing Fung Street,

122

25,

""

123

25,

""

8.20 p.m.

Ko Shing Theatre,

124

25,

"

9 p.m.

125

26,

""

126

26,

""

3.30 p.m.

Matsheds at Taitám Water-Works,

Beams of verandah of No. 348, Queen's Road West, Grass on the north-side of the hill below Mount Kellet,

Grass on the hill-side near Kai Lung Wan,

...

127

26,

Ko Shing Theatre,

""

128

15

27,

129

27,

130

27,

""

7.5 p.m.

131

28,

House No. 107, Wellington Street,..

""

132

29,

6.40 a.m.

House No. 163, Queen's Road East,

8.15 p.m.

6.30 p.m.

8.45 p.m.

A kerosine lamp on the ground floor of house No. 20, Graham Street.

First floor of house No. 1, Nullah Lane,

A basket of old clothing at No. 348, Queen's Road West,

:

:

:

:21

>>

133

29,

""

134

29,

""

135

29,

"

ឥតគ

7.30 p.m.

House No. 165, Queen's Road East,

7.40 p.m.

8.30 p.m.

|House No. 4, Staunton Street, House No. 107, Wellington Street,.

136

30,

"

137

30,

""

""

138❘ Dec.

5 p.m.

1,

7 p.m.

House No. 40, Wing On Street,

Messageries Maritimes Coal Godown, Praya East,

House No. 55, Square Street,

I-

:

1

$150

Unknown.

Very little

Do.

3

...

:

None.

$16,000 Accidental, upsetting of an oil

None

lamp.

Do. Incendiary,

The smouldering ruins of old fire broke out afresh.

No fire, but the coal was smoking and it was removed.

A piece of rag saturated with kerosine, some matches and joss sticks were found burn- ing at the foot of the staircase.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1887,—Continued.

No. of

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

139 Dec. 1,

ல்

10101066

9.20 p.m.

House No. 21, Pound Lane,...

140

1,

""

9.30 p.m.

Ko Shing Theatre,

141

>>

3 p.m.

House No. 55, Square Street,

142

2,

""

4 p.m.

143

144

""

145

146

""

147

""

1

$200

Unknown,

None

Do.

Incendiary,

148

149

100

7,

150

151

152

""

200908

20, 5 a.m.

20,

6.50 p.m.

7 p.m.

wood Road.

28,

1.30 a.m.

153

154

155

156

""

"

""

4.15 p.m.

8 p.m.

6

p.m.

1.40 p.m.

11, 6.50 p.m.

20,

24,

26,

5.50 p.m.

7.20 p.m.

House No. 55, Square Street,

Chimney of No. 3, New West Street,....

A bed quilt at house No. 336, Queen's Road West, Servant's quarters at Staunton Street, Grass on the hill near Táit'ámtuk, House No. 116, Wellington Street,.

Cook house chimney of house No. 31, Elgin Street,.

A grass water-proof coat on the hill-side at Yaumáti caught fire while Wong Tai, a mendicant was wearing, House No. 15, Morrison Street,

A mosquito curtain at No. 88, Station Street, Yaumáti, House No. 5, Kau-ü-fong,

House No. 34, Cochrane Street,

Chimney of No. 22, Hing Lung Street,

Some wood on the back premises of house No. 112, Holly-

:

:

Do.

Do.,

:.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Incendiary.

Slight

Unknown.

None

Incendiary,

Do.

Unknown.

Do.

Accidental while cooking,

2

:

$1,800

Unknown,

A:

Slight

4

$1,500

Accidental while smoking opium. Accidental, falling of a kerosine lamp.

Slight

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

None

Unknown.

...

Slight

House No. 56, Bonham Strand,

16

$30,000

157

158

159

"}

""

28,

28,

7.30 p.m.

10.45 p.m.

28,

""

160

28,

7.50 p.m.

A stack of grass near the Burning ground at Yaumáti, The temporary Market at Hunghom, Matsheds and grass at Wántsai Gap, House No. 223, Queen's Road West,

Unknown

...

34

Do.

Do.,

Sheds

2

Do.

Do.

......

Sheds

None

Incendiary, ....

161

31,

1 p.m.

Some books in a drawer at house No. 1, Square Street,

Do.

Accidental.

Carelessness with joss paper.

Carelessness with some lighted joss sticks.

Unknown, but very currently reported to have been the act of incendiarism. Unknown.

Carelessness with matches.

Seven people were perished.

False alarm. Great confusion was caused amongst the audience.

Two men were arrested for raising false alarm.

Some shavings soaked with kerosine oil were found on the staircase.

A few rags and shavings were discovered alight on the staircase.

A lighted joss stick and a handful of white cotton saturated with kerosine oil were found on the staircase.

Wong Tai died subsequently.

The contents of house No. 15 were insured for $6,000 with Messrs. Schellhass & Co.

The contents of the house were insured for $5,000 in Messrs. Schellhass & Co.'s Office.

Mr. Ross, the foreman of the Volunteer Brigade, sustained severe injuries.

A woman was slightly burnt.

A lighted bundle of paper was thrown into the window.

:

:

Fire Brigade Office, Hongkong, 13th January, 1888.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

195

No. 92.

No. 12

88.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 20th April, 1888.

SIR,--I have the honour to forward herewith the following Returns :--

1. Criminal Cases, &c.

a. Appeals, Criminal Cases.

2. Civil cases commenced and tried in 1887.

a. In Original Jurisdiction.

b. In Summary Jurisdiction.

3. Bankruptcy.

4. Admiralty.

5. Probate and Administration.

6. Revenue (Fees, &c.)

7. Proceeds paid into Treasury.

It will be seen that while there is an increase under the head of Criminal cases both in the number of cases and in the number of persons tried there is a considerable falling off under the head of Civil

cases.

The number of adjudications in Bankruptcy have also decreased.

The other Returns call for no remarks.

To The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

:

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

I have the honour to be.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

I

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME Court, during the last Ten Years.

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

Number Number

YEAR.

of

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Cases. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1878, (b.) 1879,. 1880,.

157

216

163

15

6

8

148

202

135

54

11

13

91

160

120

34

6

6

1881,

105

154

111

39

Ι

4

(c.) 1882,

124

187

124

38

15

21

Total....

625

919

653

210

39

52

I

(d.) 1883,.

91

126

70

1884,.

68

101

65

1885,

91

147

103

(e.) 1886,.

75

107

59

(f.) 1887,.

94

155

82

22228

26

14

28d

2

2

20

8

16

16

22

20

16

27e

1

36

17

26

Total,.....

419

636

379

124

71

119

11

Average of 1stĮ

125

1833

1303

42

73

103

13

Period,

Average of 2nd}

834

127/

75%

244

143

233

21

Period,.

J

(b.) 1. Under offence of Breaking into a Dwelling House out of 9 prisoners, 6 only are accounted for, the remaining 3 must have been

acquitted, and have been posted accordingly.

2. Under Murder out of 3 prisoners, 2 only have been accounted for, the 3rd was probably acquitted.

3. Under Unlawfully giving false statement to Registrar General the prisoner, although convicted, does not appear under the head-

ing, but the facts appear in a foot note on the Return.

(c.) In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings

(d.) In one case the recognizance estreated, and one prisoner committed suicide in the Gaol.

(.) In one case the recognizance estreated.

(f) In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, for the Year 1887.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

:

Showing how the cases tried in the

Superior Courts ended.

(Each prisoner tried, counted as a separate case ; where a large

number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Other offences against the Person.

Malicious Injuries to Property. Robbery with violence.

Prædial Larceny.

Other offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

Murder, other than wife or child murder.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at murder.

Murder of wife, Reputed wife,

or Concubine.

Child murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Total.

:

:

10

5

:

Judgment for the Crown,

Judgment for the Prisoner,..

Prisoner found Insane,...

Cases which fell through for want

36

29

of prosecution or absence of (a) accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),

Cases postponed,

SH

Abortion.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

155

11

16

1

:

:

13

1

:

:

37 11

=

14 14

:

5 18

8

30

:

21

14

64

43

Note.-29a Including three who did not appear and whose recognizances were estreated.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

Number of Cases.

Number of Persons.

1

1

11

al

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, during the Yeur 1887.

SENTENCE.

199

CHARGES CASES

ABAN-

POST-

DONED.

PONED.

CRIMES.

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

1

Administering stupefying drug..

Arson,

Assault and unlawfully imprisoning,

7 Burglary and receiving stolen goods,

Conspiracy...

Demanding money with menaces,. Embezzlement by a Police Officer,

2 Embezzlement by a Public Servant,.

Embezzlement by a Clerk,

Escape,

1 Feloniously wounding with intent to do grievous

bodily harm.

5 Feloniously forging a certaiu receipt for money with

intent to defraud,

1

Feloniously setting fire to a dwelling house,

Larceny on board ship in the Harbour,

4 Larceny in a dwelling house,..

1 Larceny from the person,

4

Larceny and receiving stolen goods,.

3 Larceny and feloniously wounding,

1 Larceny by a servant.

Larceny by a Police Constable,

12 Larceny and previous conviction,

7 Manslaughter,

Murder,

Obtaining money under false pretences, Perjury,

Piracy,

Piracy and receiving stolen goods,

Receiving goods feloniously taken by pirates,

2 Receiving stolen goods,

13 Robbery from the person with violence,

Robbery and Larceny from the person,

3 Unlawfully attempting to bribe an Inspector of Police. 1 Unlawfully being a member of the Triad Society,...... Unlawfully detaining for the purpose of prostitution,

8 Unlawfully bringing into this Colony for the purpose

of prostitution,

1

5

3

1

1

4

1

1

3

1932

12

1

3

4

3

4

Unlawfully bringing into this Colony for the purpose

of emigration,

b1

3

Unlawfully printing and publishing obscene libel,

-~

2 Unlawfully falsely and deceitfully uttering certain

counterfeit coin,.

Unlawfully shooting with intent to do grievous and

bodily harm,

76 123

Of 123 Persons only

2 were not indicted, which are included under the

heading of charges abandoned,

and

3 Recognizance estreated,

3

1 1

7

:

82 36

:

Death Recorded.

:

:

Penal Servitude.

over one Year.

Hard Labour

Hard Labour one

Year and under.

Number of Persons. Solitary Confinement,

Number of Persons. Privately Flogged.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

:

:

:

2

:

:

تان

:

O

1

2

:

::

15

17

17

17 17

26

.118 were tried.

Convicted,. Acquitted,

3

Charges abandoned, Recognizance estreated. Cases postponed,

123 Persons.

Total,

a. In this case the Jury found the Prisoners guilty of manslaughter.

b. In this case the 1st Prisoner was fined $250, the 2nd and 3rd Prisoners were find $100 each.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

:

::

:

:

.82

36

118 Persons.

26

3

155 Persons.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

!

APPEALS COMMENCED.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

1887.

2

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

1887.

2

JUDGMENT.

Respondent.

APPEALS TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

1

Respondent.

Pending.

case remitted back to Magistrate.

Pending.

1

1 case remitted back to Magistrate.

CASES COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

No.

Jurisdiction.

of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

withdrawn

before

Trial. Plaintiff.

Defend-

ant.

Non- Suit.

Struck out, Dismissed

and Lapsed Writs.

In Dependency.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

TOTAL CASES TRIED.

Cases.

Debt and Damages recovered.

1887.

Original,

40 $283,189.33

2

2

Summary,

1,296 $149,077.42

502

445

57

15

200

223

29

77

4 | $ 4,461.04

517 $53,640.97

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Plaintiff. Defendant. Non-Suit.

1887.

Original,

10a

$232,722.22

6

2

Summary,

7336

$ 86,928.21

455

60

16

Struck out, Dismissed & Lapsed Writs.

Debt and Damages.

2

$199,222.22

202

$ 59,094.56

a. 6 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1886.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

b. 23 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1886.

ALFRED G. WISE,

RETURN of ADMIRALTY CASES for 1887.

Acting Registrar.

1887,

Year.

Entered.

Amount claimed.

Tried.

Judgment for Plaintiff.

Amount recovered.

Judgment for Defendant. Discontinued.

Pending

or

Settled out of Court.

$76,000

3

2

(Not yet settled.

1

3

1

Vice Admiralty Registry, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

56/

RETURN of all BANKRUPTCIES filed in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the Year 1887.

Name.

Date of Adjudication.

Official or Petitioner. Creditor's Assignee.

Debts in Schedule.

Assets.

Amount Total received by amount of

Official Assignee.

debts

proved.

$

$

$

Antonio Augusto da Cruz,

18 Jan., 1887 Bankrupt

Official

3,064.00

320.00

399.99

2,507.04

John Juster,

19,182.47 7,158.86

2,501.40

""

""

""

Lok Choi,

Jacob Sayed,

Ho Yuk Tong,

Hu Tak Pui alias Hu Yan Shan, 19 April, 1887

Creditors

1887 Bankrupt

2 May, 1887

3 Mar., 1887

15,950.00 46,035.00

649.05

3,793.50

"

22

No Schedule filed.

1,072.00

16

4,139.19

3,520.09

33.10 2,672,82

1,183.00

97

Yan Chung, *

10 June, 1887

4,567.37

15.00

22

Paul Bohn, †

Wong Cheuk,

4 Aug., 1887

In forma Pauperis Creditors

9,408.50 8,612.81

No Schedule filed.

22,257.98

"

Tsoi Shing Ying alias Tsoi |

9

Tsik Ting,

1887 Bankrupt

Creditor

21,600.28 13,674.72

2,353.11 12,229.34

Lo Hoi,

12

1887

Official

>>

Rasmus Adolf Apenes,

13 Oct. 1887

""

6,349.59 2.217.77

16,636.68

851.35 6,523.76

748.54 3,738.13

Leong Sing Yee, ‡

Total,..

9,080.05 5,540.00

$111,161.13

87,094.25

5,035.14 57.295.97

* Bankrupt discharged 6th December, 1887.

† Adjudication refused. Petitioner not a pauper.

Bankruptcy not proceeded with.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

ALFRED G. WISE. Acting Registrar.

RETURN of BANKRUPT and INTESTATE ESTATES and of all JUDICIAL DEPOSITS, paid into the Treasury, by the Registrar

of the Supreme Court during the Year ended 31st December, 1887.

DATE.

ESTATE, CAUSE OR ACCOUnt.

JUDICIAL INTESTATE BANKRUPT DEPOSITS. ESTATES. ESTATES.

TOTAL.

1887.

April

28

Barnett Samuel Barnett, Unclaimed balance,.

22.54

22.54

28

Lau Tin Ho,

35.70

35.70

"

28

""

Carl Wassenins,

129.15

129.15

28

""

Captain Jarvis,

14.05

14.05

"

29

June

10

Cheung A Ho,

1,655.44

1,655.44

""

Total,...

1,856.88

1,856.88

I hereby certify that the above is a true and correct account, to the best of my knowledge and belief.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS granted by the Court of Probate, Hongkong during the Year 1887.

Value of the

Date

of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Place and Time of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Effects as

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

sworn to, set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

Jan. 13 Tercio da Silva,

13 Cheung Li Kwai,.

Macao, H'kong,

3rd Oct., 1886, | Administration, 3rd Nov., 1886,

Do.,

Anna Maria Barros d Silva, the widow,... Lam A-tso, the lawful wife by second

marriage.

$11,000.00

300.00

-13 | Ah Min alias Chan A-min,

21 How Sow Choong,

33

21 Ng Yuk,

H'kong,

27 Theresa Annunciação Danenberg, Macao,

Feb.

Adolf Schumacher,

H'kong,

4 Lim Leack,

Amoy.

At Sea, 1st Nov., 1886, Hang Tin Village, Canton,

26th Oct., 1886. 9th Jan., 1887,

1st Sept., 1886;

15th Jan., 1887,

22nd Aug., 1887,

Do..

Tse A-nü, the widow,

1,000.00

Do..

How Siu Tong, nephew of the deceased,

1,000.00

Probate.

Administration,

Ng Kang Tong, the executor according

to the tenor of the Will.

2,000.00

Carlos Diocleciano Danenberg, the ad-

8,800.00

ministrator,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

500.00

):

14 Wong Mui Hin alias Wong Sang, Canton,

16th Nov., 1886,

Adm. with Expn. of the Will and Codicil annexed, Probate,

William Henry Gaskell, as attorney of

Lim Teck Gee,

Pow Chow otherwise Pow Ping Kwan,

the exccutor according to the tenor

6,700.00

9,700.00

of the Will.

14 Helena Maria Goularte d'Aquino, H'kong,

1:

15 Wat Wai,

19 James White,

29th Oct., 1886,

H'kong, 30th Aug., 1887,

England, 9th Jan., 1883,

Administration,

Eusebio Ischirião d'Aquino, husband of (

the deceased,

7,500.00

"?

19 Mary White...

England, 13th July, 1884,

Probate,

Adm. with Expn.

of the Will annexed, Do..

Ü Shing and Wat Kai Hi, the executors according to the tenor of the Will, Bendyshe Layton, as attorney for Henry Osborne White and Alfred Cromwell White....

1,500.00

50,750.00

Bendyshe Layton, as attorney for Henry

Osborne White and Alfred Cromwell White,.

50,750.00

**

21 John Lindsay,

H'kong,

Mar. 3 Francisco Manoel da Cunha...

Macao,

6th Feb., 1887, 22nd Oct., 1885,

Administration,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise. Official Admi-

4,000.00

nistrator,

Adm. with Will | Carolina Antonia da Cunha, the widow,

+,775.00

3 Sorabjee Merwanjce Oomrigur,

H'kong,

3rd Feb., 1887,

aunexed, Probate,

13

11 Wong Leung Shi,

Canton,

16th Feb., 1887,

Do.,

Nowrojee Pestonjce Dhalla and Hor- musjec Merwanjec Mehta, the exe-

cutors..

Wong Yat Sun, the sole executor,

900.00

2,300.00

18 Li Leung Nam,

Canton,

18 Ng Kwang alias Ng Luk Chiu,. H'kong,

18 Max. Behr,

18 Herajee B. Atia,

29

21 Susan Mary Wood,

H'kong,

Macao,

4th Jan., 1887,

21st Jan., 1887,

Frankfort-on-Main,

Germany, 7th April, 1886,

8th Dec., 1886,

13th May, 1884,

Do.,

Administration,

Li Kwok Lam, the executor according

to the tenor of the Will.

23,000.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

3,800.00

nistrator,

Adm. with Expn.

of the Will annexed, Administration,

Friederich Gustav Gerhard Seip, as

attorney of Meyer Behr,

1,400.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

50.00

Do.,

Apr.

1|Li Ng.

H'kong, 11th Mar., 1887,

Do..

1 Chun Moon,

"

9

Pang Yuk Man,

9 Hu Fung Ting,

12

Lillie Happer Cunningham,

"" 12

Chan Hoi Shan,

"

12 Fok Li Tai alias Fok Fuk Shan, H'kong,

3

12 Chun Hcong Po,

""

13 Thomas Edward Blair,

Macao, 3rd Jan., 1887, H'kong,

26th Feb., 1887,

Heung Shan, 31st Dec., 1886, Canton, 9th Dec., 1886, H'kong, 9th Jan., 1887,

6th Mar., 1887,

Canton, 12th Sept., 1886,

England, 5th April, 1886,

Do..

Adm. with Will

17

Do.. Adm. with Will annexed, Do.,

Administration,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

annexed.

Administration,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-i

nistrator,

Li Chun Fui, first son of the deceased, Ng Fan, the administrator, Pang Yuk Tseung, the sole executor during the minority of Ying Un. Hu Ching, the eldest son of the deceased, Theodore Bliss Cunningham, the husband, Chan Kam and Chan Pin, sons of the

said deccased and executors,

3,000.00

300.00

8,000.00

500.00

5,000.00

4,000.00

1,800.00

Fok Tim Ying, the eldest son of the

deceased,

1,500.00

13 Frederick Jerdein,

Hankow,

4th Nov., 1886,

Do.,

Chun Kai Shui, the younger son of the

deceased, Bendyshe Layton, as attorney for

George Alexander Blair. Power being reserved to Florence Ellen Blair and Francis Hamilton Grove, the other executors, Bendyshe Layton, as attorney for Alex- ander George Wood and Alexander McLeod,

200.00

400.00

3,600.00

52

19 Leung San,

11

25 Alexander Brand Inglis,

;;

22

May 11 Harrison Tate Bewley,

18 Thomas Oxley,.....

18 Miguel Ayres da Silva,

20 Pang Heung,

20 Lo Fuk,.

20 Thomas Theodore Benning,

June 2Albino Mencarini,...

2 Wong Sik,.

13 Sam Tsuk Pui,

19 Chun Shui,

19 Romão Lourenço do Rozario,

21 Matthew Young,

Macao, 23rd July, 1870, Shek Tz Tan Village,

Pun-u District, China,

23rd May, 1884, H'kong, 25th Feb., 1887, Shek Kang Village,

2nd Dec., 1886, England, 11th Oct., 1886,

England, 13th Sept., 1886,

S.S. Taiwan, 9th Oct., 1886,

Adm. with Will annexed, Adm. and Codicils annexed, Adm. with Expn. of the Will annexed, Do..

Administration, Adm. with Will annexed,

Administration, Do.,

Yü Shee, the widow,

3,500.00

Chun Shat Shang and Chun Yik Wan,

500.00

Agostinho Guilherme Romano,. Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,..

5,000.00

60.00

Charles David Bottomley, as attorney)

16,000.00

for Annie Young,......

Alfred Buimer Johnson, as attorney for

Jesse Anne Inglis,

1,100.00

Alexander Wright, as attorney for Eliza

Bewley,

3,800.00

H'kong,

13 José Maria Jesus da Silva,..

Macao,

England, 6th Mar., 1886,

Macao, 17th Sept., 1886, H'kong, 9th Aug., 1885, H'kong, 29th April, 1887, H'kong, 12th May, 1887,

At Sea, on board S.S. Oxus,

4th Dec., 1886, 2nd April, 1887,

28th Mar., 1886,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, as attorney for

14,800.00

Harriet Oxley.

Administration,

Do., Do.. Probate,

Administration,

Josephina Ferreira da Silva, the widow, Pang Ping Sai, the only son of the deceasd. Yong A-tsing, the first lawful wife, Augustus Harrison Benning, one of the

∙1,000.00

1,500.00

113,000.00

executors,

Domenico Musso, as attorney of Idaļ

10,000.00

Mencarini,

Do.,

Wong Hang, the eldest son of the said

600.00

deceased,

Do.,

Capitulina Maria da Silva, the widow,

1,800.00*

1

L

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,—Continued.

Probate, Administration

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Place and Time of Death.

with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of the Effects as

sworn to, set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

June 17 Elizabeth Berkeley,

India,

12th July, 1885, | Administration, Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

$ 600.00

nistrator,

17 William Wood,

H'kong,

18th May, 1887,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

255.00

nistrator,

17 Margaret Elizabeth Benning,..

Масао,

30th May, 1887,

Do.,

Augustus Harrison Benning, the eldest

son of the deceased..

33,000.00

20 Montague La Vigue Salamon,

H'kong,

4th June, 1887,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-)

800.00

nistrator,

July 1 Chan Shi Tai alias Chan Mi-ho,.

H'kong,

21st Oct., 1886,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Offic! ! Admi-¡

200.00

nistrator,

,,

4 Henry Osborn Jeyes,

Switzerland,

Adm. with Will

Victor Hobart Deacon, as attorney of

18.100.00

*

4 Ludwig Wiese.

8

Juan Antonio Barretto,

Luzon,

12

8 Alexander Milne Humphreys,

H'kong,

14 Tso Wing,

H'kong,

26 Richard Smith,

**

27 Vicente José Gracias,

H'kong,

Macao,

**

23rd Sept., 1886, London, 22nd Mar., 1887,

21st Nov., 1881,

27th June, 1887, Administration,

24th June, 1887, Probate,

12th July, 1887, | Administration,

20th April, 1887, Adm. with Expn.

of the Will annexed,

annexed, Do.,

Frank Leyburn,

Heinrich Hoppius, as attorney of Jo-1

15,300.00

hanna Wiese,.

Do.,

Andronico Francisco Alves, attorney of

2.000.00

J. A. Barretto,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

600.00

Aug.

2 Leung Chim alias Sz Shun,

2 William Forrest,

2 Robert Boyd.

H'kong,

11

Au Yeong Shing alias Ow Yeong

Shing,

Foochow,

"

12 Augustus Charles Gardner,

H'kong.

15 J. V. Rodrigues,

H'kong,

3rd July, 1887,¦

6th Dec., 1886,

29th July, 1887, 1st Aug., 1887,

Sun Ming, 29th Feb., 1884, Adm. with Will

annexed, Do.,

Administration,

Probate,

Administration,

Tso Tsu Shi, the exccutrix according to

the tenor of the Will, Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

José Antonio dos Remedios, as attorney

of Eufrozina Esmeralda dos Reyes Gracias,

Mui Shi, mother of the said deceaseà,

Thomas Henderson Whitehead, as attor-

ney of Thomas Forrest. Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator.

18.000.00

100.00

24,400.00

$,000.00

150.00

500.00

Au Ycong Kü, the executor according

to the tenor of the Will, William Frederick Garone,

29,000.00

1,400.00

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise. Official Admi-

nistrator,

100.00

#

15

Fung Yau Ngan,

H'kong,

13th July, 1887,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

350.00

nistrator,

15 Lee Tak,

H'kong,

10th July, 1887,

16 George Augustus Kinloch Honey, England,

11th April, 1887, |

Do., De bonis non, Adm. with Will annexed,

Low Fun, (the widow of Lee Choong),

Thomas Henderson Whitehead. Frede-

25 Yeung Fu Wing,

H'kong,

19th July, 1887,

Probate,

rick William Marshall, and John Fowler, as attornies of Robert Phil- lip Wood, George Rainy Young and Duncau Adam Smith. Pang Shi, Yeung Kwai Kit, and Yeung

4.800.00

25 Cornelio José Gracias,

""

31 Henri Fournier,

"

Sept. 2 Anthony Eugene Berg,

8 Lam Man Ho,

13 | Henry Daniel Jamieson,

Macao, 24th Dec., 1886,

Marseilles, 31st May, 1887, | Administration, H'kong, 12th May, 1887, H'kong, 28th Aug., 1887,

Adm. with Will annexed,

Kwai, the executrix and executors, according to the tenor of the Will.. Caetano João Gracias, the eldest son of j

the deceased,.

3,000.00

8,000.00

Do.,

Marie Fournier, sister of the deceased, Emma Andreza Maria da Silva,

30,600.00

3,150.00

Do..

Lam A-tan, younger brother of the de-

ccased,

40.00

13 Cheung Shc,

24 Lai Kung Shan,

""

24 Chung A-koi,

Oct.

4 Dora Fry,

""

5 Peter Danova,

24th Sept., 1887,

H'kong, H'kong,

H'kong, 15th Aug., 1887, Adm. with Will

annexed, H'kong, 16th Sept., 1887, | Administration,

H'kong,

England, 23rd Feb., 1887, | Adm. with Trust Disp. and Settle- ment annexed, 11th July, 1887, Probate, 26th July, 1887, | Administration,

|

William Gibson Brodie, as attorney for George Auldjo Jamieson and James Auldjo Jamieson,

11,800.00

Tsang Tsun Fat, the sole executor,

11.000.00

Tang Lai Pan, Fung Lo Chun, Kwok

Tun, and Leong Liu Kai,

30.000.00

Kwok A-ying, the executor,

2,500.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

3,800.00

+9

5 Leung Tai Ku alias Leung Ku........ H'kong,

5 Arnold Christoph Steinmetz,

5 Galstaun Edgar,

19th Sept., 1887,

Shanghai, 25th July, 1883,

H'kong, 30th Jan., 1887,

31 J. R. Burns,

At Sea,

"1

Nov.

1 William Henry Brereton,

H'kong,

14th Oct., 1887,

24th Oct., 1887,

Probate,

Adm. with Will annexed, Administration, |

Adm. with Expn. of the Will annexed, Administration,

Probate,

Very Revd. Giuseppe Burghignoli, sole

500.00

executor:

Tsang Ping, a legatee under the Will,

9.300.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

250.00

nistrator,

Mary Galstaun Edgar, the Widow,

8,000.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi- Į

nistrator.

150.00

Anna Maria Brereton, one of the exe-

cutrixes.

Power being reserved to

72,900.00

Georgina Brereton,

"

4 Phoorja Mahomed Arab,

H'kong,

16 Hermann Busch..

**

H'kong

16 Aganoor Peter Aganoor.

London,

16th Oct., 1887, 2nd Nov., 1887,

25th Jan., 1886,

Do.. Administration,

Idroos Moosdeen, the sole executor. Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-{

nistrator,

36,000.00

1,500.00

24 Richard Gibbon,

Southampton.

16th Oct.. 1885,

Do..

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed.

Dec.

1 George Theodor Siemssen,.....

Alfred Gascoyne Wise. as attorney of

Gregory Eleazer Gasper,. Victor Hobart Deacon, the attorney of Emma Jane Gibbon and Rowland Escanbe. Power being reserved to Charles Deighton Braysher, the other executor,

Hamburg, 24th Nov., 1886, Administration, Heinrich Hoppius, as attorney of Maria

Amalia Siemssen, Carl August Schröder, Magdalena Cornelia Schröder, Cornelia Maria Siemssen, Louise Marianne Emilio Siemssen, and Carl August Schröder,.......

SC0.00

61,550.00

123,500.00

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,—Continued.

Date of Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Place and Time of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of the Effects as sworn to, or set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

Dec.

3 Louisa Hams,

3 Lee Yau Tsoi,

2:

3 William Dickinson,

Amoy,

H'kong,

H'kong.

15th July, 1887, Adm. with Will

and Codicils annexed, 5th Aug., 1887, | Administration, 14th Aug., 1887,

Do..

Thomasine Charlotte Nicholls. attorney

of Susan Filewood,

$ 2,000.00

Lee A-luk, sister of the deceased, Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

3,000.00

400.00.

"9

3 Sophy Goldenburg..................

H'kong,

5th Oct., 1887,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

250.00

nistrator,

14

30

Andrew Gillon Walker,,

London,

30th Oct., 1885,

Do.

John Duflon Hutchison, as attorney of

2.775.00

14

30

Tam Kung Ping alias Tam Ping

Jessic Duncan Walker,

Kai,..

Canton,

25th Nov., 1887,

Adm. with Will

30

Lee Tuk Cheong,.

San Ui,

5th May, 1887,

...

30 Wong Ping,

30 Hormusjce Dorabjee Camajee,

Canton, 15th Nov., 1887, Shanghai, 3rd Sept., 1886,

of Probate annexed,

"

30 Charles Dewhirst Weeks,

Foochow, 2nd Oct., 1885, Adm. with Will

annexed,

annexed, Do..

Probate, Adm. with Expl.

Wong Ching Ki, one of the executors. Dadabhoy Muncherjee, as attorney for Manakbai. Power being reserved to grant like Probate to Jamsetjee and Minocher when they or either of them shall attain majority. Alfred Parker Stokes, as attorney of

Emily Dewhirst Weeks,

Tam Kwan Shi alias Kwan Shuet, the

lawful widow of the deceased, Lee Sow Kin, the eldest son of the

deceased.

J

20,300.00

140,000.00

40,000.00

2,000.00

2,100.00

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

RETURN of all sums received as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1887.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,.

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,

Appraiser's Fees,.

Sheriff's Fees,

Bailiff's Fees,

Interest on Deposit of surplus cash,.

Fees on Distraints,................

Registrar of Companies,

Fine and Forfeitures,.

Land Office Fees,.

.$ 1,791.65

3,197.18

302.05

822.90

751.64

1,170.16

166.07 87.62

101.00

1,042.50

3,903.54

1,043.75

720.00

995.00

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

$16,095.06

4,366.00

$20,461.06

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

RETURN of all sums collected in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1887, and paid into the Treasury.

1887.

1886.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps,.

$ 9,499.64

$ 7,157.53

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5 per cent. on amounts encashed paid into the

Treasury,

2,517.88

OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,.

938.68

1,170.16 751.64

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2 per cent. on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000; above $10,000 commission, 1 per cent. on further amount, 1 per cent. commission on income,

247.35

166.07

APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 per cent. on Houses, Land, Goods, Furniture, &c., 1 per cent. on cash, Banking Account or Shares,

531.01

BAILIFF,

1,078.00

87.62 1,042.50

SHERIFF,

173.50

101.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,.

1,982.40

720.00

INTEREST on Registrar's balance at the Bank,

4,013.29

3,903.54

FINE AND FORFEITURES,.

2,000.00

995.00

$16,095.06

LAND OFFICE FEES,...

4.366.00

DEPOSITS UNAVAILABLE. -Intestate Estates not claimed,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 21st January, 1888.

$22.981.75 3,985.00

$26,966.75

$ 2,290.35

$20,461.06

2 1,856.88

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

TOTAL

NUMBER

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF

ԴՐ PRISON-

CASES.

ERS.

ABSTRACT of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT, during the Year 1887.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.*

*

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1887.

Warrants.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

12,015

14,182

10,354| 325 | 2,620

F.

159 158

M.

F. M. F.

9 28

M. F. M.

183 16 228

F. M.

36

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

1

14

47

...

..

13,633 549

3,777

190

86

153

13

977

203

5,349

14,182

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,.

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

OFFENCE.

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:-

NO. OF

No. OF CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCE.

NO. OF

No. of

PRI-

CASES.

SONERS.

Animals---Cruelty to..

Arms---Chinese not Holders of Night Passes found car-

Arson.

rying.

--Carrying without reasonable excuse,

Assault --Causing grievous bodily harm..

-Common..

-Indecent,

-On Females, and Boys under 14 years of age, -On Police in the Execution of their Duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

-With wounding,

Attempting to commit other Offences (indictable),

Bail-Personating,

Bailiff-Unauthorized..

Banishment-Returning after (see also Conditional

42

42

Brought forward,.

4,589 6,449

-}

8

8

Larceny-by a Public Servant,

1

1

195

195

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,

-from the Person,

8

12

101

112

3

3

-from the Person with Violence.

2

2

9

-in a Dwelling House,

24

30

502

664

-of Beasts or Birds, not the subject of Larceny

5

6

9

10

at Common Law,

1

1

139

155

-of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and

enclosed places,

2

2

Letters--Sending threatening,

1

16

Malicious Injury to Property.

36

36

1

Manslaughter,

1

1

Marine Store Dealers-Breach of Ordinance for,.

1

Markets' Ordinance-Breach of...

427

427

15

ότι

15

Menaces-Demanding Money by,

17

27

Pardon),

Mendicancy,

280

280

Birds-Breach of Ordinance for Preservation of,

1

1

Misdemeanor-Aiding and Abetting in,

1

1

Births & Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration

2

N

of,

Murder,

Boats-Leaving Harbour without a Clearance,

2

2

-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,

2

2

Bonfires-Firing Crackers or making,

360

360

-Noises by Watchmen. &c..

Bribery,

Burglary,

"

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in, Coin-Offences relating to,

Chairs and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for Street,.. Child Stealing,

Breach of the Peace,

Buildings-Breach of Ordinance for,

Burial of Chinese Corpse elsewhere than in a Cemetery,

Cattle

Diseases Ordinance-Breach of,.

--Slaughtering in a place other than one set apart į

for the purpose,

-Turned loose on Public Ways...

41

41

-Attempting to commit,

Night-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent to

commit Felony therein,

Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

1

3

5

16

19

1

1

57

57

4

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof,

3

>>

48

-Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

and Property, ·

10

10

:1

-Blowing Whistles..

7

7

6

">

-Exploding Dynamite to the danger of Per-

10

10

N

sons and Property.

-Exposing Night Soil in the Streets in

1

uncovered Buckets, and in open Boats

36

36

135

173

along the Praya.

-Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

Public Ways..

41

41

17

17

*

-Keeping Pigs, &c., without a Licence,.

16

46

Contagious Diseases' Ordinance-Offences against

11

11

-Latrine,

2

2

""

Contempt of Court,

12

12

-Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

Cutting and Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily

18

19

throwing Rubbish, &c.. into the Streets,

838

838

harm.

*

-Neglecting to provide Dust Boxes.

10

>

with intent to murder,

1

3

-Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets,

50

Dangerous and Offensive Trades-Carrying on,

!!

-Raking Dust Bins,

Dangerous Goods-Carrying on board Ships under false

1

2:

-Regulations-Breach of,

21

description,

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of,

19

Decoying Persons into or away from the Colony,

22

95

H. M.'s Army and Navy,

Property,..

--Drunkenness, Fighting, &c.,

Disorderly House-Keeping a,

Desertion from Foreign Ships,

British Merchant Ships,

Desertion of Soldiers and Seamen-Assisting in the,

Disorderly Behaviour-Accompanied with damage to

Dogs Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c., Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,..

14

60

DAHON N

19

14

6

1

2

220 07

-Rough Dressing, &c. of Granite in or near

a Public place,

28-23

10

50

1

21

3

وو

6

2

849

1,446

3

3

15

15

Passage--Obtaining surepticiously a..

28

28

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

the Beach,

60 Obstruction of Navigation,.

of Wharves by Boat People.

Offensive Weapons-Having Possession of,.

Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation and Sale

of prepared.

Passengers-Carrying in Excess of that allowed by

151

151

235 235

of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers,

Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers,.

1,302 1,421

178 178

13

13

907

939

3

3

Drugs-Administering,

1

4

3

Licence.

Embezzlement,,

Passes-Chinese out at Night without.

192

192

by a Public Servant,

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for..

4

Emigration Officer-Neglecting to report within 24

hours the Arrival of Ships to,... f

1

I

Fawning-Illegally.

Escape of Prisoners from Gaol,

1

Perjury, (see also Preferring false Charge and giving

wilful false Testimony).

"

from Custody of Police,

4

Piracy,

1

5

**

Negligently allowing,

with Violence,

2

10

Excise Officer-Personating,

Police-Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of,

2

";

Extortion or Attempt to extort,

False Charge-Preferring or giving wilful false evidence,

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by,

Police Constables-Misconduct as,..

2

17

17

-Personating as,

1

23

27

Police Officers on Duty-Licensed Grocers harbouring,...

Felony-Accessory after the Fact to,

3

Rape,...

1

1

"3

-Attempting to commit,

28

28

Rates, Municipal Ordinance-Breach of,

3

3

Forgery,

$

8

Receiving Stolen Goods,

23

31

Fugitive Offenders' Act- Offences against,.

8

8

Recognisances-Breach of..

15

15

Furious Driving,

16

20

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,.

3551,226

Religious Ceremonies & Festivals Ordinance-Breach of, Roads and Streets-Injury to..

22

22

6

6

-in the Streets, treated as Obstruction of

Public Ways, .

547

547

Robbery From the Person,.

3

3

-Registered Householder permitting in a House,

2

2

-From the Person with Wounding or with)

Violence,

2

3

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for,

8

8

"

Harbour Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the,

20

20

Regulations-Breach of....

19

19

-On the Highways with Arms or with Violence, Rogues & Vagabonds-As Street Gamblers and Watch-

men to Gamblers,.

2

3

34

34

House Breaking,.

5

9

As suspicious Characters,

118

118

House-Neglecting to have a legible Number affixed to,...

3

3

-As Vagrants.

3

3

-Overcrowded.

--Wandering abroad and lodging Į

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance, for

12

12

in the open air.

Registration of,.

Sanitary Regulations-Breach of,

1

Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

and Lewdness...

44

44

Indecent Prints.

3

3

Jurors-Neglecting to answer Coroner's Summonses to Į

attend Inquests.

Larceny. -as a Bailee,

1

1

*

-Common,

866

969

Scavenging Contract-Breach of. Shooting with intent to do Grievous Bodily Harm,

to prevent lawful Apprehension. Spirituous and fermented Liquors-Breach of Ordinance

for retail of.

Stones and other Missiles-Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property,

12

12

15

15

5

5

Carried forward,

4,589 6,449

Carried forward...

9,956 12,029

.

No. of

OFFENCE.

CASES.

No. OF

PRI-

SONERS,

OFFENCE.

Brought forward...

9,956 12,029

Brought forward........

Streams-Defiling,

49

49 Unlicensed-Money Changer,

Streets-Noises by Hawkers..

129

129

#!

Threats with intent to murder,

I

""

Trees, &c.-Cutting and destroying,

77

77

Trespass on Crown Land.

146

Triad and Unlawful Societies-Breach of Ordinance for

25

25

Suppression of,

Unlawful Possession of Property,

281

of Trees. Shrubs. &c..

23

-Plying, of Boats or Vessels for Hire,

-Seamen's Boarding Houses, -Undertaker,

146 Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring-

ing into the Colony,.... Watchmen-Misconduct as Private,

342 Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for,

23 Women and Female Children-Breach of Ordinance for

Unlicensed-Coffee Shop,

1

1

-Hawkers, ---Latrine,

992

protection of...... 992 Workmen-Intimidating.............

1

Carried forward.......

11,631 13,815

TOTAL,.

No. of

NO. OF

CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

11.681 13,815

2

12

12

1

1

I

1

30

30

1

1

207

207

78

111

2

12,015 14,182

Total Number

Years.

of Cases.

Committed

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

for Trial at Supreme Court.

Magistracy, Hongkong, 9th January, 1888.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate, for the Police Magistrates.

ABSTRACT of CAases brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January, 1878, to 31st December, 1887, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Committed to Prison

or detained pending Orders of His Excellency

To keep the Peace, and to be of Good

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

False Charge Undecided.

or giving

Number

False

of Defendants.

the Governor.

Behaviour.

Testimony.

2

B

4

6

8

9

10

#

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F

M.

F.

M.

F.

1878,

9,100

7,166

628

2,126 251

200

18

1879,

7.009 5,758

861

1,900 .189

145

B

50 M

11

98

22

18

230

32

1880,

7,998

5.892

252

1,775

187

170

27

15

204

1881,

1882,

1883,

10,658

8,203 7.049 BBB 7.567 6.049 394

8,127

1,678 178

192

48

369

2236

10

19

9,630

922

18

34

8,103

602

48

87

33

8,126

531

53

9,379

630

1,922 255

209

263

13

80

8,622

780

670

2,398 349

121

154

62

160

11,008 1,101

1884,

14,065 11.748

1,088

2,294

268

101

228

105

14,517 1.418

1885,

10.281

7,951

849

2.188 258

159

357

99

18

10,690 1,211

1886,

1887,

14,611 12.015

12.081

842

2.98 190

157

869

100

168

15,510 1,137

10,854 826 2,620 159

158

28

411

52

14

*48

13,633 549

Grand Total for

the 10 Years,

100,602

82,175 5,742 | 21,099 2,279

1,662 146

200

14

8,183

633 176

36

718 31

109,213

8,881

Average per 40,000.2-8,217.5 5742 2,100.9 227.9

Year,

166.2 14.6 20.0

1.4

318,3

63.3

176

71.8

8.1

10.9215 | 888.1

One male committed suicide in Gaol while under remand.

Magistracy, Hongkong, 9th January, 1888.

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

TABLE A-RETURN OF ALL CORONER'S CASES, 1887.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate, for the Police Magistrates.

Inquest Held.

Buried without Inquest.

NATIONALITY.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Very much decomposed:

sex not

ascertainable.

Total.

Europeans and Americans,...

Portuguese,

9

1

9

7

1

2

Japanese,

1

Jews,

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

Chinese,

72

10

13

7

102

60

11.

73

73

18

235

Total,.......

84

10

14

- 3

115

68

75

73

18

245

Total for 1886, .

69

16

7

100

55

34

41

10

144

Japanese.

Jew.

TABLE B.-RETURN OF INQUESTS, 1887.

European and American.

::

:::

Portuguese.

VERDICTS.

Wo-

Men.

Men. Boys.

men.

4

1

...

:

Chinese.

Total.

Wo-

Men.

Boys. Girls.

men.

42

1

22-

5

10

::

8

∞ : :

10

5

:

65

2

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

1

1

42

72

1257

11

:

:

:

::

:

:

2

~:

1

5

2

2

1

3

1

7.

Accidental death,·

Death by misadventure,

Death by hanging,

Deceased met with his death in knock- ing against something in the confu-

sion caused by the dispersal of the crowd by the two Constables, P.C. 211 and P.C. 283,

Deceased came to his death from the effect of a blow received from the shaft of a jinricksha running against his right side and being drawn at the time by the witness described as the prisoner, but that there is no sufficient evidence to show whether or not the prisoner was to blame in regard to the collision between the deceased and the jinricksha, Deceased met with his death owing to

the fall on him of certain cargo, but that there is not sufficient evidence to show whether any person was guilty of culpable negligence or not, Deceased met their deaths by reason of the explosion of a cartridge in course of firing a salute on board H. M. S. Mutine and the explosion was occa- sioned by the concussion in closing the breech and the ignition of the tube owing to its non-removal. The jury declined to attach any particu- lar blame to any individual for its non-extraction,

Felo de Se,

Do. in Gaol,.

Found dead from injuries received from

a fall from the window of his room, Found drowned,

Murder,.......

Manslaughter,

Natural causes in Gaol,

Opium poisoning, but that how the

Opium was administered there is not sufficient evidence to show,................... Suicide while in an unsound state of

mind,...

::

***

:

2

1

1

Suicide under the effect of an attack of

1

fever,........

:

...

:

:

:

1

1

1

2

:

:

:..

1

1

1

1

72

10

13

:

:.

:

:.

:

9

1

-J

7

115

H. E. WODEHouse,

Coroner.

TABLE C-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT INQUEST, 1887.

European and American.

Chinese.

Reason why no Inquest

was held.

Men. Boys..

Men. Women. Boys. | Girls.

Portuguese.

No jurisdiction,

1

1

No suspicious circumstances,

3

1

45

9

24 39

1

No evidence and/or decomposedĮ

state of Body,.......

48

34

Post Mortem Satisfactory,

3

1

10

1

Very much

Found on Land. Found in Harbour.

de-

composed; Total.

sex not ascertain-

Known.

Un- known.

Known.

able.

Un- known.

2

2

122

31

:

53

29

18

111

11

68

10.

3

1

Total,....

7

2

60

11

73

73

1

18

245

38

97

12

98

Total,.....

Coroner's Office, Hongkong 13th January, 1888.

HONGKONG.

209

13

No. 18

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

88.

BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 13th April, 1888.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on this Department for the year 1887.

ESTABLISHMENT.

There has only been one change amongst the officers and foremen. That change was the loss of the foreman in charge of the plant houses; he, unfortunately, died from the effects of a wound received while arresting a youth who was pilfering flowers. There were, however, as usual, a large number- 16-of changes amongst the lower ranks. These frequent changes are a great inconvenience and drawback, but there will be no help for it while recruits have to be obtained from the only source which is now available.

A carpenter was added to the staff during the year, and the result has been very beneficial to the department.

BOTANIC GARDENS.

The general condition of the Gardens is kept up to as high a standard as possible with the means at my disposal, but, although the Colony is proud of its Gardens, there yet remains very much to be done in order to bring them up to a standard which would not be too much to expect being realised. When the estimates were submitted last year I had the honour to advert to this subject and to point out how improvements might be effected, but as the additional means could not be furnished I can only do the best with what is at my disposal and hope for better things in the future. As it is I regret that any attempt at improving Glenealy Ravine in the New Garden will again have to be postponed.

I fear too that some curtailments will have to be made in the arrangements for the propagation and growth of plants for sale to the public. The glass plant-house will also, I fear, scarcely stand through another year.

Fountain Terrace.

The re-arrangement of this terrace has been completed, and the beds have been planted with roses, so that now the whole of the terrace is a rose-garden. In addition to the improvements of new beds and relaying of the turf, an examination of the underground drainage showed it to be wholly defective, consequently a large quantity of the drains were removed and re-laid, and the curb stones and levels of walks were also taken up and re-arranged.

Thinning and removal of Trees.

This work has been continued whenever opportunities offered for effecting improvements.

Plant Houses.

An addition to these has been made by the erection of a Propagation House 50 feet long by 12 feet wide. Our own carpenter has been employed on this work whenever he could be spared. A portion of this house was obtained from Messrs. FOSTER and PEARSON, of Notts, England.

Fern Houses and Plant House.

The bamboo screens, of which the roofs and sides of these houses are composed, were all in a con- dition not calculated to carry them through another year, therefore a large quantity of new material has been manufactured in the Gaol for re-roofing the houses.

The space between the above two houses has been enclosed and furnished with specimens of ferns of species of large stature.

The three houses now form a continuous range 123 feet long.

Glass House.

This is in a very rotten state and will not, I fear, be able to stand a gale this be blown down we may have to regret the loss of the plants it contains.

year.

If it should

+

Donors.

Adams, Rev. J. S., Ningpo. Armstrong, J. M.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide, South Australia.

Brisbane.

}}

""

Jamaica.

11

""

29

""

19

"5

""

""

""

""

Cook, Mrs.

Mauritius. Melbourne.

Natal.

Penang. Port Darwin. Saharanpur. Singapore. Townsville.

Trinidad.

Cooper, W. M., Ningpo.

Cox, J. H. Cundall, C. H., Manila. Diercks, F., Hankow. Henry, Rev. B. C., Canton. Johnstone, D. A., Hoihow. Kneebone, Miss.

Koch & Brunner, Messrs., Cebu. Livesey, J., Stone-Cutters' Island. MacGowan, Dr. D. J. Roebelen, C.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta.

""

>>

""

Ceylon.

"}

""

""

Kew, London.

""

Palm Nurseries, U.S.A.

Schultz, Mrs., Perak.

Thurston, K.C.M.G., Sir J. B., Fiji. Veitch & Sons, Messrs. J., London.

HERBARIUM.

The facilities and accommodation not only for extending, but even for maintaining the collections of scientific dried plants are still lamentably deficient. We have now about reached the limit of possibility of progress unless the suggestions which I have made on several occasions be responded to. There are now large collections of plants put away which have been made, dried, and poisoned, and which cannot be mounted, labelled and incorporated with the general collections in cabinets until the additional accommodation for working at and storing the specimens is available.*

As much attention as possible has been given to the herbarium demands whenever a little time could be obtained between other work. A considerable number of plants have been poisoned, and mounted by the clerk and office boy, and labelled and incorporated by myself, but there are large numbers which it has been impossible to overtake.

A collection of nearly 2,000 named specimens of chiefly Asiatic plants have been procured by purchase. Since they came into our possession they have all been poisoned to preserve them from damage or destruction by insects, and many of them have been mounted. Another large collection was obtained during a journey made by myself, with Chinese assistants, up the North and Lienchau Rivers in the Kwangtung Province. Duplicates of all these have been sent to Kew Gardens. They have not yet been examined and determined, so that I am not yet able to make a report on the species which were obtained.

Donations of dried plants have been received from the Rev. E. FABER, of Shanghai, amongst which were many species of Chinese plants which were not before in our herbarium.

BOTANICAL LECTURES.

When the Chinese Medical College was inaugurated last year I was invited to give the Botanical Lectures to the students. With the approval of the Government I consented to do this, and have continued since last October to deliver two lectures a week. The lectures have all been given after office hours. For the sake of the demonstrations it would have been more convenient to give the lectures during daylight, but this was found impracticable to work into the time table of the College. Botanical specimens to illustrate the lectures, have been supplied to the students from the Botanic Gardens.

Since the Herbarium has been provided with more suitable accommodation, the students have received their lectures twice a week in the Herbarium room instead of at the Medical College. By this arrangement the resources of the Herbarium have been readily available and of great assistance to the students. The students take great interest in the botanical lectures, and many of them give promise of capacities for making considerable acquirements in botanical science.

LIBRARY.

A copy of the Chi Wu Ming, a valuable work on Chinese Botany which is difficult to procure, was obtained from Peking, through the kind aid of the Registrar General's Department of this Colony, and of Dr. DUDGEON at Peking,

I have to thank the Indian Forest Department for sending regularly copies of its various Reports which have been received throughout the year, and also the Directors of the many Botanic Gardens in various colonies for Annual Reports.

To Mr. THISELTON DYER, Director of Kew Gardens, we are specially indebted for numerous copies of the "Index Flore Sinensis" of the various parts as they were published, and also for copies of "Icones Plantarum" and the "Kew Bulletin," the latter complete for the year 1887, the first year of its publication.

* Since the above was written I am very pleased to say that by some alterations in the departmental buildings very greatly improved accommodation has been provided by the Government, and work long delayed is now progressing satisfactorily.

:

473

The following is a list of receipts for the year :-

Botanical Magazine, 1887. Journal of Botany, 1887. Gardeners' Chronicle, 1887.

Report, Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta, 1886.

""

Botanic Gardens, Jamaica, 1886.

""

21

Ceylon, 1886.

""

55

"

""

})

"1

*1

Mauritius, 1885. Natal, 1886.

>>

11

""

">

>>

39

Indian Forest Reports.

Forest Administration in Assam, 1886-87.

Central Provinces, 1886-87. Bengal, 1886-87.

,, Ajmere Merivara, 1885-86. British Burma, 1885-86. Coorg, 1885-86.

""

22

""

"}

>>

11

""

>>

>>

27

""

""

>>

32

>>

>>

Madras, 1886-87.

""

>>

>>

North-West Provinces,

1885-86.

Andamans 1885-86.

""

""

2.9

Hyderabad, 1886-87.

Saharanpur, 1886. Singapore, 1886. Agri-Horticultural So- ciety, Madras, 1886.

Report, Queensland Acclimatisation Society, 1886.

Forests, Straits Settlements, 1886.

21

Survey Branch, 1885-86.

Review of Forest Administration in British India,

GOVERNMENT-HOUSE GARDENS.

1885-86.

The ordinary yearly routine work has been performed at the gardens appertaining to Government House, but besides the thinning of over-grown trees, of which a good deal has been done, no special works have been undertaken.

INVESTIGATION AND PLANT COLLECTING.

A journey was undertaken by myself in August along the North and Lienchau Rivers in the Kwangtung Province. Besides an extensive collection of dried plants for the herbarium about 800 living plants were brought back. These are chiefly plants of an ornamental character which are most desirable additions to cultivation. When these living plants have become established and grown they will, in many cases, be new objects of great beauty and interest in the gardens of this Colony. When the collections have been thoroughly examined, a work which will yet take some time, the scientific results of the tour will, I feel sure, be of considerable value and interest.

Besides the introduction of new living plants, and the acquisition of a large quantity of material for the herbarium and for the enrichment of science, I may mention another result which is important and of direct and immediate practical utility to the Forest Department. For several years I have endeavoured, in vain, to procure through Chinese and other sources seeds in quantity of the tree (Cunninghamia sinensis) which yields the timber, so called China fir, that is universally used here and in South China for all kinds of building, and many other purposes. While I was absent I found the tree growing abundantly about 100 miles North of Canton, and under circumstances which ren- dered it possible to procure seeds in quantities as were desirable. I made arrangements for seeds to be collected there when they were ripe and delivered in Hongkong. We have now a large quantity on hand, and experiments on a large scale will be made with the cultivation here of the tree during this year. The timber from this tree, if it be found to succeed here, will be of much more value than that of Pinus sinensis, the tree which hitherto we have planted very extensively.

FORESTRY.

After the reduction of planting works which took place in 1886, the number of trees dealt with in artificial reproduction during 1887 was again brought up to something nearer former work, but until the Forestry vote is again placed at the figure which was provided before its reduction last year, we cannot accomplish annual afforestation works to the same extent as formerly.

Roughly estimating the area of ground operated on by the number of trees planted at fairly regular distances apart we have about 312 acres as the area for 1887. 157,144 trees were reared in nurseries and planted on the hills. Planting as usual was commenced in December, and finished in April, which was somewhat earlier than in former years. Planting in the dry season can only be done in places where water is available for artificial irrigation. In other places we are entirely depen- dent on favourable weather. In all places the planting was very successful.

Nurseries.

Nine nurseries have been maintained. These were situated at Kowloon (two) Saiwan, North Point, Sokoupo, Deep Water Bay, Little Hongkong, Aberdeen and Pokfulam. From them the trees were carried to the various planting grounds ranging from Saiwan in the East, North Point in the North, Pokfulam in the West, and Deep Water Bay in the South of Hongkong, and north eastwards of Yaumati at Kowloon.

The trees reared in nurseries under contract have this year, as a rule, been very successfully managed by the contractor, they show a great improvement on the previous year's work in this respect.

Rearing Trees in Situ.

Trees reared in situ have been successful. The number thus treated was 217,738. They are situated on Mount Parker, and near Deep Water Bay.

The total number of trees planted and reared in situ was 374,882.

The following is a list of the trees planted and reared in situ :---

Pinus sinensis,

""

وو

Eucalypti.

Bamboos,

Acacias,.

Cocoa-nuts,

Miscellaneous,

in situ.

.151,081

.217,738

3,621

1,864

197

128

253

374,882

Broad-cast Sowing.

In addition to planting and rearing in situ some pieces of land were operated on by sowing seeds broad-cast without any preparation of the ground. În certain places the method promises to give good results at a very small cost, as already stated in my report for last year.

There is, however, a serious difficulty to contend with where this work has been done, it is, the operation of grass-cutters, who cut grass, and the young seedling trees in it not caring, or at the least not knowing about the existence of the young trees. Until we have more control over grass-cutters this method of rearing trees cannot be extensively carried out. Some experiments made four years ago of sowing seeds broad-cast have given very good results, there being now abundance of healthy trees about two feet high.

Cunninghamia sinensis.

As mentioned elsewhere a considerable quantity of seeds of this valuable Chinese tree have at last been obtained from a distant part of the Kwangtung province. The seeds are the first instalment for what I hope will be the establishment of successful plantations to supercede the common Pinus.

sinensis.

Camphor Trees.

In 1886 about 4,500 camphor trees were planted as an experiment. The success of the camphor in the Botanic and private gardens of the Colony gave promise of its succeeding on the hills when placed within plantations of the China pine which were sufficiently large to afford shelter from winds. In such plantations where the soil is somewhat better than the average soil the trees have succeeded beyond my expectations, but where the shelter and soil is inferior the trees have made but little pro- gress. The general results, however, were such as to lead me to continue the experiment, therefore about 12,000 trees were reared in the nurseries for planting during the present season.

Pinus Massoniana.

A few pounds of seeds of this tree were procured from Japan, and sown in situ by the side of our native pine, but the seeds, unfortunately, germinated very badly, probably owing to their not having been sufficiently ripened or harvested in Japan. The germination of our own seeds on the ground was perfect. A fresh lot of seeds have been obtained for further experiment this year.

Tristanea conferta.

In my report for last year I drew attention to this rapid growing tree of which 800 were planted four years ago. These trees are now about 20 feet high (some have reached 30 feet). They flowered and produced seeds in abundance during the year under report. Seeds were collected and sown, and an abundance of young trees have been obtained for planting this season. I have great hopes of this tree. From its rapid growth and large amount of leafage it should be a much better tree than most species of Eucalypti for this Colony.

Persea nanmu.

The specimen in the Botanic Gardens of this Chinese tree which was introduced from the Sze Chuen province has now reached 24 feet high and it is thoroughly established in its new home. As previously reported on, the wood which it yields is extremely valuable in China. A number of young plants

were propagated from the tree and planted for experiment on a piece of land which was subsequently utilised for a portion of the new Tytam Water-Works before I had any opportunity of dealing with the trees. The result of the experiment was therefore lost in consequence of the destruction of the little trees. Last year another experiment was tried which it is to be hoped this time will have a chance of being undisturbed.

Thinning Plantations.

This work has been continued throughout the year in plantations which were sufficiently advanced. The thinnings have been disposed of by sale without difficulty. However extensively surplus wood

be produced there is no prospect of there ever being any difficulty in its disposal in this Colony.

may

Fire Barriers.

Grass fires during the dry season have always been numerous and extensive and besides burning the grass, which was of minor importance, the fires have in their progress naturally destroyed or damaged the small trees and shrubs which were on the ground, thus effectually preventing natural reproduction. The increase of fires and the rapid extension of plantations which required greater protection led me to devise a system of barriers to check the progress of fires. With the consent of the Government about 40 miles of these barriers were made before the dry season set in. The result

.

has been even better than I anticipated. Besides a fire which occured from a bonfire at the Jubilee celebrations, there were only two fires which spread beyond a very small extent, and these two did not extend over more than five acres of planted land. In the vicinity of roads, paths, and cemeteries a great number of burnt patches of grass have been seen where the fires had been arrested by the fire barriers. There is no doubt but that for the existence of the fire barriers the fires which were arrested would have spread to a very great extent and have destroyed immense quantities of trees. If these barriers are maintained, and other suitable precautions carefully observed, there is now hope of

grass

fires being reduced very much in area.

Protective Service.

An additional Forest Guard was placed on the staff in January. Forest offences do not seem to have increased during the year. The number of cases brought before the Magistrates by the Forest Guards was 27, that is 11 less than during the previous year. There is a great deal of trouble in keeping the guards up to their duty, in fact there is rarely any case instituted which is not done by pressure brought to bear on the guards by the Superintendent. This is not satisfactory, as the Forest Guards should be of a sufficiently high character to move themselves in matters instead of continually shirking their plain duty. This duty of continual surveillance of the guards is becoming more difficult and troublesome to perform as other duties increase and demand attention and time in so many other ways. There will, perceptibly, have to be some improvement in the protective service before long. I fear that we shall never get really effective Chinese guards, but the employment of efficient men would involve a greatly increased cost, however, the time may arrive when it will in the long run be real economy to incur this cost.

Ferneries.

The rockery in Glenealy Road near St. Paul's College, which I referred to in last year's report, has been constructed and is now partially planted. The older rockeries have been maintained in as good condition as circumstances would permit.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

\

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1887..

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 14

88.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 31st May, 1888.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit my Annual Report for the year 1887 together with the Tables showing the work done in the Medical Department under my supervision, and the Reports of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, and the Government Analyst.

POLICE.

The admissions to Hospital from the Police Force show a slight increase as compared with 1886, a year during which the number of admissions was larger than the previous decade. In 1886 the increase was principally among the Chinese portion of the Force, while in 1887 the Indians were the greatest sufferers as the following table shows:-

Admissions to Hospital, 1881,

Europeans,

Indians.

Chinese.

88....

212...

..198

Do.,

1882.

92..

.230..

.227

Do.,

1883,

..113..

.246.

.239

Do.,

1884,

87..

....

...224.....

...175

Do.,

1885,.

124..

208.....

....163

Do.,

1886,.

..138..

Do.,

1887,

..139..

.243. .293.

221

..187

This table records an increase of sickness among the Europeans, 1; Indians, 50; and a decrease among the Chinese of 34 as compared with 1886.

Table I shows the admissions to Hospital of the different sections of the Force during each month of the year. The summer months as usual exhibit the largest number of admissions, September the largest of all.

Table II gives the average strength of the different sections of the Force, rates of sickness and mortality relative to strength.

Table III shows the admissions to Hospital from the different Stations and Districts during each month of the year.

The Central Station sends in a larger number than in 1886, the increase being greatest amongst the European and Indian portions of the Force. In this Station the increase of sickness has been uniform from year to year. The dormitories are much overcrowded.

Whitfield Station and the Water Police Station have decidedly improved this year sending in only 108 sick compared with 158 in 1886. Shaukiwán shows a slight increase. Pokfúlam, Aberdeen and Stanley a slight decrease. No 7 Station is worse than ever, sending in 51 cases compared with 41 in 1886.

Four of the European Police and two of the Chinese were admitted to the Small-pox Hospital; one of the Europeans died.

There were 9 deaths in the Force this year, 4 Europeans, 1 Indian, and 4 Chinese; 5 died in the Government Civil Hospital, and 1 in the Small-pox Hospital. Inspector Lindsay died of aneurism at No. 7 Station, a Chinese Interpreter died at his own house and one European Constable was killed at a fire.

3

1880, 1881 1882.

J

The following table gives the Police admissions to Hospital and deaths for the last 10 years :-

1878,. 1879,

>

Admissions.

566...

Deaths. 6

566....

8

588.....

...13

....498....

.....10

549.

8

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887.

599..

..10

..486..

7

..495.

9

.602..

..14

619..

9

TROOPS.

There was a still further increase in the amount of sickness among the Troops last year as compared with 1886, but the death rate was as usual small compared with the amount of sickness. 1,749 men were admitted to the Military Hospital as compared with 1,607 in 1886, an increase of 142.

There were 14 deaths, of these two were cases of suicide, and two were from an explosion of fire- works.

Table IV gives the average strength of the Garrison and shows an increase of 88 compared with 1886. The admissions to Hospital with the percentage of sickness and mortality are also given.

The following were the admissions to the Military Hospital and deaths for the past 10 years :--

1878,. 1879,

1880,

".

1881.

1882.

1883,..

1884,

1885,

1886,.....

1887,.....

Admissions.

Deaths.

944....

.10

1,035

8

1,075

...13

..1.116.

4

}

1,019....

9

·

1,105....

.10 .

1,097....

.12

1,190....

.24

1,607.... .1,749.

9

.14

The sickness as will be seen exceeds that of any of the previous years. There were no cases of Cholera among the Troops last year.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

There has been much trouble connected with the Staff of this Establishment during the past year. The Superintendent resigned in the beginning of the year.

Surgeon YARR, A.M.D. acted as Superintendent for six months during the summer, but as he had his own Military duties to attend to, he could not reside at the Hospital. He was however most energetic and efficient in the performance of his duties notwithstanding that he was hampered by his Military work which lay at one end of the City while his Civil work was at the other. He had eventually however to resign the Acting Appointment, his whole services being required by his own Department. and Surgeon THOMPSON, A.M.D. took charge for a few weeks till the arrival of the new Superintendent. Surgeon THOMPSON in addition to the trouble of double duty as had been the case with Surgeon YARR underwent the unpleasant experience of having to put the Senior and Assistant Wardmasters under arrest. Fortunately he discovered we could obtain the assistance of two non-commissioned Officers of the Medical Staff Corps to act in their place, and these two officers were accordingly engaged. I am greatly indebted to the Army Medical Department for the valuable and prompt assistance they have rendered the Hospital in its difficulties and I have much satisfaction in recording my appreciation of these services.

Dr. ATKINSON, the new Superintendent, arrived out in the Colony and took charge in November finding the unpleasant state of affairs to which I have alluded, to greet him on his arrival.

The Senior Wardmaster has since been sentenced to seven years hard labour in Gaol for embezzling the property of patients in the Hospital two of whom were in a dying condition.

The Wardmasters have been a continual source of trouble during the fourteen years I have been in charge of this Department. I have seen over twenty appointed besides a number acting for a time. At present we have two Acting Wardmasters neither of whom is satisfied with his post. The Acting Senior Wardmaster, a Police Constable, prefers to return to the Police Force as he finds the hours at the Hospital twice as long, and the ward duties themselves far more arduous and harassing and entailing a greater amount of anxiety and responsibility than his former Police duties while the pay and advantages are inferior. Moreover at the Hospital he has no prospect of promotion in the service. The Acting Assistant Wardmaster a young Portuguese formerly employed in the Sanitary Department thinks the work, too much for his strength and prefers less pay with lighter work and less responsibility

elsewhere.

In my first Annual Report for 1873, I had to comment on the trouble which appeared to beset the filling of these posts and for fourteen years my reports in the same connection have been incessant but though the Wardmasters' pay has been slightly increased it is not sufficient to secure trained men or in view of the duties performed, or compared with the pay of officers of the same rank in other Departments. The Wardmasters have twelve hours of continuous duty to do. They have to attend the Superintendent in his rounds, to see the Chinese nurses do their duty, to administer medicines, to change dressings, to see diets given out and temperatures taken, to receive and admit patients, to attend to their wants pending the Superintendent's arrival, and many other things which keep them incessantly engaged during the whole twelve hours.

It would be difficult to appreciate adequately the discomfort of the Superintendent, with untrained men attending to the ward duties and the uncertainty he must be in as to whether his directions will be attended to properly and correctly if at all, or yet the bewilderment of a new and untrained Ward- master with the multifarious directions written and unwritten for about from 60 to 100 different patients, or the unpleasantness to the patient himself at having to put up with the nervous, awkward handling, of the untrained nurse, however willing and kindly the intention.

I think I have said enough to show that it is very detrimental to the proper administration of the Hospital that continual changes should recur in these posts by reason of the employment of inferior men at low salaries. Such changes add very greatly to the troubles of the Superintendent, and detract very much from the comfort of the patients. It is true that for the most part the latter are only seaman, Government servants, Police Cases, or destitutes, but there should be no distinction of class in the treatment of the sick in Hospitals. All are entitled to the same efficiency of nursing as if they belonged to the influential section of the Community.

Dr. ATKINSON has had the trouble of training the two present Wardmasters for three months at a time of great emergency while an epidemic of small-pox was raging in the Colony. The duties of training and instruction doubled his work, and naturally caused him not only a great amount of care and anxiety but necessitated much extra and harassing watchfulness. This burthen Dr. ATKINSON has borne with great cheerfulness, not sparing himself in any way if he could lighten the labour and increase the comfort of those under his charge, and I cannot speak too highly of the skill, care, and attention he has shown in the performance of his duties, but I submit that he should be relieved from a recurrence of such anxieties in the future by the proper organization of his staff.

Fortunately in Mr. WATSON, the Assistant Apothecary, lately arrived and whose appointment is a new one, in Mr. ROGERS the Steward, Mr. U. I. KAI the Student Apothecary, Mr. CARNEIRO the Wardmaster of the small-pox Hospital, Mr. Lo CHEUNG IP the Clerk, and A Lok the Chinese Ward- master, he has found energetic and willing assistants these officers being thoroughly conversant with their duties.

The office of Clerk at the Hospital is another post which gives considerable trouble and which is subject to frequent changes owing to insufficiency of pay. Mr. Lo CHEUNG IP the present holder of this post is one of the most efficient Clerks we have ever had. His office hours are from nine A.M. till five P.M. and more often seven P.M., and even then were it not for the assistance rendered him by Mr. ROGERS the Steward he would very often not be able to get through his days work at all. Clerks in other Government Departments and Offices, some of whom have been in the post he now occupies, work as a rule from 10 A.M. till 4 P.M., and while having lighter duties are better paid, consequently Mr. Lo CHEUNG IP is naturally in search of other employment and I shall be forced to recommend a good officer for promotion though it will be much against the interests of the Hospital that it should lose his services. The Hospital has in consequence of this combination of overwork and insufficient pay hitherto found it impossible to retain a Clerk long after he had learnt his duties, and if he has not found promotion in the public service he generally has sought private employment.

It must always be a matter of regret that discontent should prevail among the subordinate staff of a Hospital for the constant changing of officers in an Institution filled with people distressed in mind or body is not at all conducive to the comfort or alleviation of the latter.

A scheme for the employment of European Female professional nurses in the Hospital has been drawn up by Dr. ATKINSON at the request of the Government and is now under consideration. If on enquiry in England it is found feasible the scheme will undoubtedly be a very great benefit to the Hospital. It is not however entirely without some drawbacks for the nurses will have to reside on the premises and this will require a considerable increase of accommodation in the shape of an additional block of buildings which means considerable expense. As usual it is a question of initial outlay.

Last September Mr. W. E. CROW the Government Analyst was transferred for temporary duty to the Sanitary Department. This transfer has, I am glad to say not deprived the Hospital of Mr. Crow's valuable services. He continues to attend as heretofore to his analytical duties and researches and the supervision of the Dispensing Department of the Hospital.

The admissions to the Hospital this year show a slight increase of 33.

There were 432 cases of Fever of various types, of these 11 died; 40 cases of Dysentery were admitted of whom 6 died; 53 cases of Diarrhoea of whom 3 died.

The following table shows the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the last seven years

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

Police,

........549

599

486

495

602

619

Board of Trade,..........116

110

60

100

132

103

Private paying Patients, 268

260

259

283

381

324

Government Servants,... 88

105

96

124

144

147

Police Cases, .............207

227

231

238

142

208

Destitutes,

.230

201

222

270

222

255

1,458

1,502

1,354 1,510

1,623 1,656

The increase in the number of admissions is principally among two classes. Police cases, an in- crease of 66 as compared with 1886. Destitutes, an increase of 27.

The admissions and deaths in Hospital for the last ten years are as follows:-

1878,

1879,

1880,

1881.

1882

1883,....

1884,

1885,

1886,..

• 1887

Admissions.

.1,289..... ...1,071

1,055.

Deaths.

...50

.55

44

1,236..... 1,458......

....

.49

.68

.1,502..

..70

1,354.....

50

1,510.....

76

.1,623.

79

.1,656....

...89

years.

The percentage of deaths relative to admissions was 5.37, the highest percentage in the last 10 Eighteen deaths were from injuries received, six of them were fractured skulls, and three from burns.

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.

Small-pox became epidemic in the Colony towards the latter end of November, and between the 22nd of that month and the end of the year 40 cases had already been admitted to Hospital. The accommodation not being sufficient for the demand, three large matsheds were improvised and enclosed in the Hospital grounds and a Police Guard had to be put over them. Dr. ATKINSON had charge of these inflammable temporary buildings and they caused him no small anxiety in consequence of the dangers of fire to which they were several times exposed from the flying sparks of houses burning below the Hospital. In three months, ie: December 1887, January and February 1888, there were over 100 small-pox cases admitted to Hospital. For the use of European females I utilized the female ward of the Lunatic Asylum which happened to be vacant at the time. I had personal charge of these cases, of which three were only varioloid, and none very severe.

Table VIIa shows the number of small-pox cases, the nationality of the patients admitted in 1887, and the dates of their admission. There were 65 cases in all, of these 11 died.

The Medical Members and Secretary of the Sanitary Board together with the Registrar General met and made arrangements for daily vaccinations in different parts of the Colony and at all the Hospitals. All the prisoners in the Gaol were vaccinated and every one admitted to Gaol now is vaccinated.

Government orders have been given that all new members joining the Police Force shall be vacci- nated. There was an extraordinary demand for vaccine lymph, and as it soon got very scarce it had to be husbanded with great care. The best vaccine that was procured was calf lymph from Japan which was excellently put up for travelling and arrived in very good condition, it was used with excellent results. There are very few Europeans now in the Colony that have not been vaccinated or revaccinated and if there are it is not from any want of facilities.

Another result of the recent experience was a recommendation from the Sanitary Board that the small-pox Hospitals both for Europeans and Chinese be removed to the outskirts of the City of Victoria. Small-pox is endemic among the Chinese in the winter months and notwithstanding all safeguards and precautions must inevitably be imported into the Colony by them. The recommendation therefore is one deserving of earnest attention. The Sanitary Board also drew up a set of rules and precautions to be followed on the appearance of small-pox in private tenements, this list was printed in English and Chinese and freely circulated and the Sanitary Inspectors visited all houses where cases occurred and saw the instructions of the Board carried out.

The Chinese Washermen were also instructed in the disinfecting of wash-clothes in boiling water and Jeyes' Disenfecting Fluid and the latter was supplied to them the Sanitary Inspectors seeing that the instructions for its use were carried out.

2 21

The vaccination of infants within six months after their birth is now compulsory by law but there will, I apprehend, be some difficulty in carrying out the provisions of the new Ordinance among a travelling population like the Chinese who are here many of them for a short time only. This difficulty will be due to the number of infants of whom nothing is known constantly arriving from without, and to the many taken away soon after birth.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII shews the number of bodies brought to the Mortuary for examination i. e.; 183, of these 11 were Europeans, 1 coloured, and 171 Chinese. Of the latter 36 were children.

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following figures give the number of admissions into Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years.

Total No. admitted

to Gaol.

Daily average No.

of Prisoners.

.395.22

1877,

.3,964.

1878,

.3,803.

519.22

1879,

.3,665....

......576.13

1880,

.3,530....

...575.25

1881,

4,150...........

...666.00

1882,

3,498....

.622.00

1883,

3,486....

..542.15

1884,

4,023.

.552.00

1885,

.3,610.

530.00

1886,

.4,600....

...674.00

1887,

.4,302....

.584.00

These figures show a decrease of nearly 300 in the admissions and a decrease of nearly 100 in the daily average number in the Gaol.

Table IX shows the number of prisoners admitted to the Gaol Hospital, the nature of their com- plaints and the number of deaths.

Table XI shews the rate of sickness and mortality of prisoners under treatment in Gaol. The record of prisoners in the prison Hospital last year shows an increase of 27 as compared with 1886, while the number of deaths shows a decrease of 3. In 1886 there were in that Hospital 239 cases and 9 deaths, in 1887, 266 cases and 6 deaths. In 1886 there were two suicides and two sudden deaths in the cells, in 1887 two suicides and one sudden death.

Table XIb. shows the number of opium smokers consuming one mace and upwards received into the Gaol, their age, consumption of opium, weight on admission and weight at the end of a month or on discharge.

Table XIc. shews the number of opium smokers admitted to the Gaol Hospital and the diseases they were suffering from; there were no deaths among these opium smokers.

As usual there were no evidences of suffering from the deprivation of the opium-pipe, though opium in any form was carefully excluded from their treatment. The exclusion of opium is rigidly adhered to unless the treatment of the disease imperatively demands it; this however did not happen to be the case with any of the opium smoking prisoners under treatment last

I

year.

I give the ages, consumption and weights of the largest consumers received into Gaol. They were six in number, all had habitually consumed 4 mace, i.e., half-an-ounce of opium daily, the time they have been addicted to the habit of opium smoking is also set forth :-

Number of years Opium

Weight at end

Age.

Consumption per diem. Weight on Admission.

* 56

smoker.

20 years.

of 4 weeks.

4 mace.

110

106

67

40

$

103

109

""

>>

52

30

4

120

114

""

78

35

4

96

96

""

""

70

36

4

106

98

""

""

36

4

75

80

""

""

* 72

Those marked with an asterisk were under treatment for general debility, the others were under no treatment for other ailments. It will be gathered from these figures that the habit of opium smoking does not interfere with the digestive powers. These men all consumed an amount of opium equivalent in value to 30 cents a day or $9 per month. Therefore they must have been of a comparatively well to do class and when at liberty could afford better food than the diet of the Gaol Hospital, for in order to live well, (for instance as well as the best class of Chinese servants,) it need not have cost them more than $3 per month for food.

Of the three not under treatment two decreased in weight, and the one who is 78 years old remained A man of 78 that can digest the ordinary Gaol diet and keep his weight must have his digestive powers in excellent order.

the same.

There were 78 opium smokers of over one mace a day received into Gaol of whom 17 were taken into Hospital, none of them having very serious complaints as Table XIc. shows.

Moreover it must be remembered that opium smoking prisoners not under treatment have the ordinary rice and water diet one day every week which would tend to decrease their weight, notwith- standing this however, most of those weighing under a hundred pounds remain of the average weight. The Chinese of the chain-gang are picked from the strongest of the prisoners and their average weight is 110 lbs. It is only reasonable to expect that those who are above the average weight on admission should not add to that weight on a Gaol diet which though sufficient and wholesome cannot be said to be fattening. These tables which have been given for the last six or seven years with my Annual Reports prove conclusively that the opium smoker can discontinue the habit at once without any treatment whatever and without any detriment to himself, and that it is idle to talk of the suffering which the deprivation of the opium entails. I do not think the suffering attendant on that deprivation is more than that of a tobacco smoker if so great.

Opium smoking held forth as the Chinaman's greatest vice is certainly not to be compared in its evil effects with the European vice of spirit drinking, a habit to which the Chinese as a nation are not given. Instead of making such an outcry and wasting large sums of money in trying to reclaim the Chinaman one cannot but reflect with how much greater advantage we might look nearer home and attend to our own need of reform, in respect of intemperance.

From the 1st September Dr. MARQUES took over the medical charge of the Gaol from me, and I again took medical charge of the Lock Hospital.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

Table XId. gives the number, nationality, disease and description of patients admitted to the Lunatic Asylum during the past year.

Nine were admitted during the year, of these three remain.

Fortunately there were no females in the Asylum at the end of the year and it was therefore possible to utilize the empty ward as a small-pox Hospital for European females.

TUNG-WA HOSPITAL.

The total number of patients treated in this Hospital was 2,231 of these 1,213 died, 376 having been admitted already in a moribund condition. The great majority admitted into this Institution are incurables in a destitute condition.

The number of out-patients treated was 130,910.

There remained in the Hospital at the end of the year, 158 cases.

There were no small-pox cases in the small-pox wards of this Hospital at the beginning of the year, but 310 were admitted during the last two months, of these 221 died. The majority of the admissions were children a large proportion of whom were under four years of age and nearly all unvaccinated. 2,138 vaccinations were successfully performed by the vaccinators attached to the Hospital, which is entirely under the management of the Chinese.

TEMPORARY LOCK HOSPITAL.

This year the new Lock Hospital will be given up to the special use for which it was designed. For the last two years it has been occupied as a portion of the Government Civil Hospital, but the new wing being nearly finished this accommodation will no longer be required.

On the 1st of September, 1887, by an order from Her Majesty' Government the compulsory medical examination of women was abolished. This decision having been announced to them the Europeans, Japanese, and Chinese went to the Registrar General and petitioned for a continuance of the exami- nations, the Chinese requesting that I should again take charge of this duty.

Every woman was interviewed separately by the Registrar General at his office with a view to ascertaining if this request was entirely voluntary and whether any pressure had been put upon the petitioners by the keepers of houses of ill-fame. But such was not found to be the case.

On their attending the Hospital when I took charge on the 1st of September, I made it perfectly clear to them that they were not compelled to continue their visits unless they wished to do so, and every woman admitted to Hospital has since been told that she is under no compulsion to remain, that she is free to go or to stay as she pleases and only in one or two trivial cases have I even had any occasion to advise them to remain. The attendance weekly has been very regular and orderly and I have had no trouble with them whatever. I have no hesitation in saying that had these examinations been discon- tinued it would have been nothing short of a disaster to the health of the Colony. It was scarcely to be expected that women of three different nationalities should have shown such unanimous good

:

יד

sense and appreciation of the benefit to themselves of these examinations. Their decision speaks well for the way the examinations have been conducted and the fact that the women treated should voluntarily have expressed a desire for a continuation of the practice and that no repugnance has been shown by them, proves that kind and civil treatment has not been misspent in their case.

These voluntary examinations have been now going on for over eight months and up to the date of my forwarding this Report I have had no complaint from any of the women of the treatment received by them from the nurses or attendants at the Hospital.

Table XVa. shows the number of admissions to the Lock Hospital and average number of days' stay in Hospital for the last thirty years. The admissions have varied between 411 and 44 in the last fourteen years as compared with 722 and 124 in the previous years. The average number of days treated has varied between 21 and 12 in the last fourteen years as compared with 13 and 18 in the previous years. This gives a good idea of the decrease in the extent and severity of the disease of late years.

The daily average number in Hospital for 1887 was 5, and the longest number of days detention for any one case was 90 days. The average detention for the year was 13.9 days.

The total number of examinations made was 12,223. Of these 144 cases were found diseased, or about 1 per cent. Only six of these suffered from constitutional disease. The number of women detained in Hospital last year was 144 as compared with 401 in 1886.

Table E shews the number of admissions to the Military, Naval, Police, and Civil Hospitals from the various types of venereal disease. The admissions to the Military and Naval Hospitals are about the same as in 1886. There is a very large increase among the Police for which I am unable to account, as neither the Military, Naval or Civil Hospitals show a similar increase of disease contracted in the Colony.

Table E 2 shows the number of cases of venereal disease affecting the constitution among the admissions to the Naval Hospital; 8 cases were contracted in the Colony as compared with 20 in 1886. Table E 3 shews the same for the Military Hospital 39 cases were contracted in the Colony as compared with 41 in 1885. There were 10 cases admitted to Hospital from among the Police and 11 to the Civil Hospital.

However, taking every thing into consideration the type of disease from this source is for the most part of the mildest, and both the Military and Naval Authorities bear witness that no other British station shows such freedom from venereal disease of a bad type as Hongkong.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

ERRATUM.

At page 716 of the Supplement to the Gazette of the 14th instant, for the two last lines of the first paragraph under the heading, Health of the Colony, read,—

"In 1887 the deaths were 108 as compared with 103 in 1886 and 99 in 1885. of deaths to the population is 3.55, an increase on the average of the past 10 years. has been steadily increasing for the last five years."

The percentage This percentage

Continueu.

1873,

6

2

17

25

1874,

4

17

26

1875,

18

24

1876,

14

24

1877,

8

4

10

27

1878,

15

9

29

1879,

21

14

38

1880,

12

10

24

1881,

2

17

10

29

1882,

10

13

1

13

37

1883,

1

9

9

19

...

1884,

4

12

23

1885,

11

9

19

...

46

1886,

.8

18

1887,

10

2

25

1873, 1874, 1875,

.......

1876,

1877,

1878,

1879,

1880,

1881,

1882, 1883,

1884, 1885,

1886,

1887,

:

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

FEVERS.

YEARS.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

VOMITING DIARRHEA. CHOLERA. AND

PURGING.

TOTAL.

Typhus.

12

96

16

195

125

46

231

31

291

2

288

94

343

259

145

370

8

311

89

481

33

701

116

733

21

608

309

373

348

...

438

168

38

435

679

71

465

262

571

3

660

132

600

301

105

755

561

9

772

10

326

441

25

276

...

319

402

612

696

834

1,304

1,478

1,030

1,079

1,215

1,496

1,035

176

1,604

19

1,136

13

764

In respect therefore of those diseases which may owe their origin to insanitary conditions we see that the European Table of deaths keeps about the same average, while the Chinese Table shows a very marked reduction, in fact the latter has never been so low for the previous ten years.

The improved methods of surface scavenging and the thorough cleansing of tenements at certain periods, insisted on by the Sanitary Board for the last three years, appear to be doing a great amount of practical good. In 1886 there was a decrease in this Table of nearly 400 deaths as compared with 1885, this year there is another decrease of nearly 400 deaths as compared with 1886. With these facts before us the Sanitary Board must have every reason to be satisfied with the result of their work in the practical sanitation of the town although their best efforts will be I fear but of little comparative avail until their hands are strengthe- ned by the new Public Health Ordinance which it is very deeply to be regretted should not have been confirmed and brought into operation last year.

During 1887-8 fever has prevailed extensively in the extreme Western District, along the upper levels of Victoria and a Medical Commission has been appointed by His Excellency the Governor to enquire into the nature and cause of the disease and to suggest preventive measures. This Commission has not yet submitted its Report.

In November, a very serious outbreak of small-pox occurred, there were 15 deaths among Europeans and 233 deaths among Chinese from this cause up to the end of the year. There was for a time a very large demand for vaccine and the latter was telegraphed for to Japan, Australia and England. The calf-lymph procured from Japan was found admirably put up for travelling, it arrived in excellent condition and was effective and satisfactory.

The small-pox epidemic was severe while it lasted, and necessitated the building, of a tempo- rary mat Hospital with 100 beds in the Government Civil Hospital grounds. So large was the number of admissions that it reached 50 cases in Hospital at one time. Thanks to the precautions and the energetic measures taken by the Sanitary Board this epidemic was not of long duration. An Ordinance for the compulsory vaccination of infants has since been passed and it will be interesting to see whether it can be successfully enforced among the Chinese population.

As the Government Medical Staff of the Colony at present stands, each member of it has his full complement of work, and there is no relief possible in case of emergency, except from outside sources which cannot always be depended upon. If any member of the Medical Staff falls sick there is no one to take his place. None of us can take vacation leave without great personal loss as according to the Rules of the Service every officer absent on furlough has to find a substitute. The finding of a substitute is feasible in almost every other Department without detriment to the individual who takes his leave for there is always some brother officer in the service who can take his place, or his limited hours of duty render it possible for him to find outside assistance. With the Medical Department however such is not the case. The duties require the incumbent of the office to be on duty at all times night and day, and there is no one in the Service that can relieve him. The Army Medical Department have hitherto come to our relief but this cooperation cannot always be depended on as from press of work, sickness, or other cause, the Army Medical Staff may be short of hands themselves. If therefore the recent recommendation of the Sanitary Board in favour of an Epidemic Hospital outside of the town be carried out, it would be absolutely necessary to obtain the permanent services of an additional Surgeon.

I have the honour to be,

Sir, Your obedient Servant,

The Hon. F. STEWART,

Colonial Secretary.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

POLICE.

I.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1887.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

6

11

11

7

12

11

19

July,

15

August,

6

September,

18

October,

6

November,

5

December,

12

MONTHS.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

1887,.

January, February, March, April, May, June,

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.] Deaths. Admissions.

CONNONOGAEREFR

CHINESE.

TOTAL. TOTAL. Admissions. Deaths.

Deaths.

12

6

11

14

13

6

1

20

7

29

10

31

26

*2828,32

24

29

26

1

50.

76

1

29

29

73

20

18

1

44

1

40

20

78

1

36

11

1

53

24

17

46

14

23

49

::

Total,......

139

1

293

1

187

3

619

5

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

II. TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1887.

AVERAGE STrength.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS.

RATE OF SICKNESS. RATE OF MORTALITY.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

Total. European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

116

201

319 636

139 293 187

4

1

4

119.82 145.77 58.62

3.45

0.49 1.25

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1887.

GOVERNMENT

STONE CUTTERS'

CENTRAL

No. 1

No. 5

HOUSE

8

"

No. 2

9

3

"

"

ISLAND,

No. 6

WATER POLICE STATIONS, TSIMSHATSUI,

WHITFIELD.

SHAUKIWAN,

POKFULAM. ABERDEEN.

STANLEY.

No. 7

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

February,

Remaining on 1st Jan., 1887,

January,

11

March,

4

10

2

April,

9 12

May,

7

20

June,

17

July,...

7 15

10

August,

9 4

September,

6

25

3

October,

3 24

3

November, 3 15

December,

6 10

3

1

2

Total,

76 182

48

10

27

10

3 1 2

4 2

:::

::::

:::::::*

:::::

Ni: Ni wwHi Hi Mi

14

THE ** :~*** : 2

3413 EN 16

:::::::

19

الله

1

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

3

13

1

10

2

14

4

7

2

12

13 3

92

to

Chinese.

European,

YAUMATI,

HUNG HOM.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

::::::::

:::

:::

:::

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

TOTAL,

1

2

2

3

:::::/:::~*

1

ZABRAOKC

24

29

32

26

39

50

76

73

44

78

53

.2

46

2

49

3

12

5

7

11

3

31

11

5 10

7619

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

IV. TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOP3 serving in HONGKONG during the Year 1887.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS.

White. Black. Total. White. Black. Total. White. Black.

1,217 177

1,394

1,423

326

1.749

10*

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

Total.

RATE OF MORTA- LITY PER 1,000 of THE STRENGTH.

White. Black. White. Black.

14

57.54

6.53 8.21*

22.59

* This includes 4 deaths out of Hospital, viz.: 2 Suicides and 2 from an explosion of fireworks, deducting these the deaths will be 6, and the rates per 1,000, 4.93.

RT. LEWER, Deputy Surgeon General,

́P.M.O. China Station.

V.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1887.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

Europeans,

Total.

DISEASES.

Brought forward..............

439 363 278 1080 21

18

22

61

Congestion of Liver,

11

2

13

Hepatitis,

3

::

Cirrhosis of Liver,

1

12

26

Abscess of Liver,

Jaundice,

Peritonitis,

9 of Spleen,

Congestion of Kidneys,

Acute Nephritis,

Bright's Disease,

Cystitis,

Vesical Calculus,

Extravasation of Urine and

Retention......

Stricture of Urethra..

Measles,...

Rötheln,

111

Variola,

Enteric Fever,.

Dysentery,

23

Febricula,

15

14

Remittent Fever,

43

40

134

Intermittent Fever,

68

80 242

Beri-Beri,

Syphilis, Primary,-

Hard Chancre,..

8

~ M

Soft Sores,

15

Secondary,-

Iritis,

Removal of Eye,

Tertiary,-

Rupia,

3

Ulcer of Leg,

1

Gumma of Brain,

Gonorrhoea,

27

19

Gleet,..

12

Privation,

3

Scurvy,

Alcoholism,

25

Delirium Tremens,

Debility,

15 13

Rheumatic Fever,

Rheumatism,

19

B: B-wi - 5~

~~ *-* :* :*

1

52

13

6

31

59

13

Leprosy,

Ancemia,

5

Diabetes Mellitus,

Tuberculosis,

Febroma of Foot,

Carcinoma of Stomach,

Do. of Upper Jaw,.

1

Cancer of Tongue,

Do. of Breast,.

Epithelioma of Penis,

Do. of Nose,

1

:-

N

1

Rupture of Urethra,

1

Paraphimosis,

Excoriations of Penis,

1

Warts,

Hydrocele Testis.

Scrofulous Dis. of Testis,

Orchitis,

11

31

2

2 Metritis,

Prolapsus Uteri,..

3

Menorrhagia,

2

Ovaritis.

2

Parturition,

Synovitis, Knce,..

1

Necrosis of Lower Jaw,

Do.. Wrist,

Do.. Abscess of Loin,

Edema of Leg,

Phthisis,

Homoptysis,

18

2

Anasarca,

Ascites,

Softening of the Brain,

1

Meningitis,

2

Alcoholic Paralysis,

2

Paralysis of Extremities,

1

Hemiplegia,

1

General Paralysis,

1

Apoplexy,

1

Sun Stroke,

2

Headache,

Nervous Debility,

3

Mania,

2

Dementia,

1

:

Hysteria,

1

Conjunctivitis,

Ulcer of Cornea,

3

2

13

Splinter of Iron in Cornea,

Rupture of Eye-ball,

Abscess of External Meatus of)

Ear,

Deafness,

Valve Disease of the Heart,

Popliteal Aneurism,

Bronchitis,

Bronchial Catarrh,

Asthma...

Pneumonia, Acute,

Pleurisy,

Edema of Face,

Caries of Teeth,

Ranula,

Tonsillitis,

3

~-wwwi ai

...

Abscess,

Scabies,

Eczema,

Acne,

Herpes,

Hypertrophy of Toe,. 12 Alopecia,

Tinea,

Urticaria,.

Keloid,

Erysipelas of Face,

Ulcer,

Bubo,

Boils,

Burns and Scalds,

Whitlow,

1

2

Sebaceous Cyst,

Tumour of Thorax,

Poisoning, Opium,

Do., Mercurial.

Do., Lead.

Immersion in Water,

Inebrietas,

Moribund,

Observation,

Dog-bite and by Tiger,. Contusions,

Sprain of Shoulder,

Do. of Ankle,

Do. of Knee,

Wounds, Contused,

10

21

6217 21

17 12:

6

1

2

3

14

14 18

46

6

IS

29

CANN: Ni

11

2

28 37,

2 21 27

Do., do.,

of Scalp,

Do..

Incised,

4

43

Do.,

Lacerated,

10 43

1

Do.,

Gun-shot of Face,

3

Do.,

do. of Scalp......

Do..

do. of Upper Arm,

Do..

do.

of Shoulder,

Do..

do.

of Abdomen,

Do.,

do.

of Thumb,

Do..

do.

of Thigh,...

Do.,

do.

of Leg,

2

1

Laryngitis,

Gastric Catarrh,

Do., Punctured of Neck,

Dyspepsia,

3

2 12

Do.,

do.

Obstruction of the Bowels,

2

Do.,

do.

over Ribs, of Forearm,

-:

Hernia, Inquinal,

Do., do.

of Thigh,

Tape-worm,

2

2

Do..

do.

Diarrhoea,

27 21

53

2

Do., do.

Do., Chronic,

1

1

Do.,

Constipation,

1

2 1

Colic,

9 18

Fistula in Ano,

1

2

of Abdomen,

of Scrotum, do. of Back,

Concussion of Brain,....

Fracture Simple of Radius,

Do. do. of Ulna,.

124

Hæmorrhoids,

6

2

8

Do.

do.

of Humerus.

1

1

Lacerated Wound of Sphincter

Do.

do.

of Patella,

1

Do.

do.

of Fibula,

Ani-rectum,

Hypertrophy of Liver,

Do.

do.

of Tibia....

Carried forward..

439 363 378 1080 21 18

22 61

Carried forward,

615 458 550 1623 27

21 32

80

DISEASES.

TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY, &c.,—(Continued).

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

ADMISSIONS.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

DISEASES.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

HA: A

: 10

do. of Lower

Jaw,

مر

Brought forward......

Fracture Simple of Femur and ]

Ulna,

Do.

do.

of Femur,

Do.

of Spine,

Do.

of Skull,

Do.

Compound of Skull,

Do.

615 458 550

...

t-

27 21

32

80

Brought forward,......

Fracture Compound of Finger

& Toes,

619 460 565 1644 28 21 39

A

:

:

888

Do.

do.

of Tibia

1

1

& Fibula, Do.

do. of Tibia, Dislocation of Humerus, Amputation of Toe,

Carried forward....

619 460 565 1644 28 21 39

88

TOTAL,.

622 460 574 1656 28 21 40

89

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

VI. TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of

Admissions.

Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

1878,. 1879.

Per cent.

3.88 5.13 1879,

1878,

Per cent.

3.46

Per cent.

Per cent.

1878,

3.08

1878,

5.76

3.12

1879,

8.39

1879,

4.72

1880,

4.17

1880,

3.73 1880,

2.66

1880,

5.80

1881,

3.96

1881,

3.87 1881,

3.09 1881,

4.80

1882,

4.66

1882,

4.35

1882,

4.38

1882,

5.24

1883,

4.66

1883,

4.37

1883.

3.01 1883.

6.08

1884.

3.69

1884,

3.15

1884,

1.24

1884,

6.08

• •

1885,

5.03

1885,

4.65 1885,

3.06

1885,

7.01

1886. 1887,

4.86

1886,

4.25 1886,

4.66

1886,

5.73

5.37

1887,

4.50

1887,

4.56

1887.

6.96

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

VII.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1887.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

Remaining on the 1st

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

January, 1887,

January,

February,

March,

April,.

34

23

37

21

32

20

28

22

46

30

May, June,.

40

41

65

47

July,

58

43

August,

58

19 00 00 × 10 12 m -*

20

37

31

35

27

39

77

57

55

66

September,

64

56

56

October,

49

54

46

November,

57

37

50

December,.

54

29

3

55

HION 00 00 01 00¤¤#0 : A

95

83

85

103

120

4

169

8

156

15

161

14

176

8

149

144

138

:

Total,

622

28

460

21

574

40

1,656

89

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

No.

SEX.

NATIONALITY. AGE.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

VIIa.-TABLE of ADMISSIONS INTO and DEATHS in SMALL-POX Hospital, 1887.

DESCRIPTION OF PATIENT.

NO. OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL.

RESULT.

-22 10 20 100 ✪

Male

English

23

1st January

American

22

Chinese

"

4

German

":

#

Spanish

28

27th

11th January 31st

10 4

Private Paying

99

*1

"

28

3rd February

8th February

5

4th

28th

24

">

27

Recovered Died Recovered

$5

23

6th

22nd

16

""

**

Swede

26

6th

3rd

25

་་

7

American

22

7th

5th

26

*!

8

""

English

23

15th

28th

13

""

"

19

19

""

"

"}

9

French

25

22nd

14th March

20

>>

=>

10

American

22

12th

14th

30

"

gg

>>

19

*

11

Manila

24

5th March

14th

9

19

**

12

Scotch

27 26th

29th

""

13

Aden

35 31st

5th

"3

14

15

"

Chilian English

30

14th

14th

"

1

29 21st

16

::

Jappe

22 24th

22nd 25th

62

"T

1

99

""

17

Chinese

25

25th

26th

1

"J

""

18

French

30

25th

":

9th May

14

19

Scotch

26

9th May

27th June

49

""

20

Scotch

40

14th

""

18th May

?

21

Swede

28

18th

29th June

42

""

22

Scotch

27

7th June

1st August

55

P.C. 98

23

Female

Chinese

12

11th

"

2nd July

21

24

Scotch

26

26th

24th

28

17

"

Destitute

Private Paying

The Board of Trade P.C. 57

Private Paying

Government Servant

Private Paying

Government Servant

Police Interpreter's Daughter Private Paying

Died

??

29

Recovered Died Recovered

"?

33

Died Recovered

>>

91

25

Male

West Indian

28

29th

11th

12

Destitute

95

26

English

29

27th October

16th November

20

Private Paying

27

Indian

24

22nd November

25th

3

The Board of Trade

28

Chinese

16

23rd

31st December

39

Private Paying

Died Recovered

29

English

34 25th

31st

37

23

*

"1

:་

30

Irelish

21 25th

31st

37

"

11

31

Swede

33 25th

16th

21

">

"

"

32

English

36 26th

31st

36

"

33

Chinese

30

26th

31st

36

*

>>

34

Chinese

17

26th

16th

20

11

Destitute

Government Servant Private Paying

35

Chinese

21

29th

31st

33

P.C. 189

**

"

36

Female

Chinese

13

30th

17th

17

Destitute

**

37

Male

American

43

5th December

31st

27

"

38

Chinese

19

5th

6th

1

>:

77

""

39

Scotch

27 11th

31st

21

P.C. 49

"

>>

40

Chinese

20

12th

26th

14

"

"

"

41

Chinese

37 12th

27th

15

";

12

Chinese

30

13th

14th

1

2.

Private Paying

43

"

English

13th

31st

19

**

Assistant Turnkey

44

Scotch

23 13th

21st

8

P.C. 106

""

"

,,

45

"

Portuguese

6 14th

31st

18

21

Private Paying

16

Portuguese

19 14th

23rd

9

""

"?

47

Manila

16 14th

21st

7

>

""

57

48

English

30 14th

16th

2

"

""

Destitute

*

Private Paying

Destitute

Government Servant

11

Died" Recovered Died Recovered

Died"

}}

""

19

33

.་

"

95

"

39"

"

"

19

"?

49

Italian

19 15th

22nd

7

"1

1:

""

50

English

15 17th

31st

14

*

Son of Sergeant Interpreter

Recovered

51

Female

Portuguese

28 19th

31st

13

Destitute

"

29

52

Male

Scotch

26 20th

30th

10

33

53

Female

Chinese

17 22nd

31st

10

Private Paying

Wife of P.C. 230

54

Male

Colonian

39

55

"

English

23rd 23 23rd

31st

9

The Board of Trade

31st

9

Destitute

">

::

**

56

་་

English

40 24th

31st

"

Private Paying

57

.་

Indian

18 26th

31st

Destitute

12

58

Malay

20 28th

31st

"

59

Canacian

""

32 29th

31st

>>

60

Female

Japanese

18 29th

31st

The Board of Trade Destitute

"

19

11

Male

Chinese Chinese

28 29th

31st

Private Paying

26 30th

31st

"

Female Japanese Male Chinese

23 30th

31st

29

5 31st

65

19

English

26 31st

31st 31st

P.C. 208

Son of Inspector Quincey Destitute

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

VIII.-LIST of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the PUBLIC MORTUARY during each Month of the Year 1887.

>

Destitute

11

33

MONTHS.

January,

February,

March,

April,.

May, June,.

July,

August,

+

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,

EUROPEANS.

Adults.

Children.

COLOURED.

Adults.

Children.

CHINESE.

Adults.

Children.

Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female.

ကာ

11

* 1 of them was Japanese:

† 1 of them was European,

:

1

:

TOTAL.

9

2

4

:

2698

17.

15

12

8

8

11

12

18

10

::

17

24

13

16

11

21

4t

31

115

20

15

21

183

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer in charge

of Post Mortem Examinations.

IX.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1887.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1887,

I.-Febricula,

Intermittent Fever,..

Remittent Fever,

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

peans.

Euro- Coloured

Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL.

Euro-

peans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL.

15

15

3

2

1000 2

2

Nii

2

Small Pox (Removed to Tung-

Wah Hospital),

1

Hordeolum,

IV.—Anæmia,

V & VI-Bubo Sympathetic,.

VII.-Chronic Bronchitis,

Asthma,

Bronchitis,

Phthisis Pulmonalis,

Homoptysis,

Inflammation of Lung,

VIII.—Aphtho,

Ascites,

II.-Rheumatism,

Secondary Syphilis,

philitic cachexia,

III.-Cephalalgia,

Conjunctivitis,

Granular Conjunctivitis,

Paralysis,

Debility Paralysis,

Morbus Cordis,

2

:

1

:

::

:

::

Ulceration of pharynx, and sy-

1

:

:

]

1

1

2

3

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

4

5

1

6

6

1

2

1

1

3

1

2

1

1

Ascites,

1

Hæmaturia,.

Orchitis,

Boils,

Carbuncle,

Erysipelas,

Diarrhoea,

Dysentery,

Dysentery ulcers of rectum,

Hemorrhoids,

Jaundice,...

Prolapsus Ani,

IX & X.--Soft Chancre,

Soft Chancre, and Gonorrhoea,

Necrosis of Lumbar Vertebra,

Stricture,..

Sores on Penis, Not Syphilitie,...

XII-Abscess,

...

1 1

co co

3

1

5

12

1

1

...

1

...

3

1

1

...

2

2

1

1

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

52

...

CO ON:

2

53

3

234

5

10

...

Herpes Zoster,

Ulcer,

Cystic tumour in the left thigh I

-extracted,

Deep ulcers of perineum, and

ulceration of tongue,

Deep gluteal abscess after flog-

1

1

1

1

:

1

1

1

1

ging,

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

:

Deep abscess of right pophiteal

1

1

space,

Urticaria,.

1

1

Scabies,

:::

:

:

:

::

:

:

Unclassed.

Alcoholia,

4

1

:::

36

37

1

1

...

Debility,

Edema feet,

Wounds and Injuries.

Contusions,

Contused Wounds,

Contused Wounds from Flogging,

Incised Wound,

Bullet Wound,..

Incised Wound for extracting

a bullet in the back,

Sprain,....

Simple fracture of lower jaw,

Unknown or Unrecognized.

Observation,

TOTAL,...

5

10 10

5

17

17

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

3

11

::

:.

1

1

13

24

42

1

223

266

::

:

:

:

...

6

6

OTHER DEATHS-1 Chinese, Rupture of Blood-vessel near the heart.-Found dead in Ward B III, No. 5 cell. 1 Remand, Rendition Case- Suicide by strangulation in Sleeping-cell, Remand Ward. I Remand, Rendition Casc.-Suicide by Opium poisoning.

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer,

I

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

X.—TABLE shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1887.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1887,

3

I.

Febricula,

II.

Scrofula,

Secondary Syphilis,

VII.

Bronchitis,

VIII.

Diarrhoea,

Dyspepsia,

Hemorrhoids,....

XII.

Abscess,

Carbuncle,

Herpes Zoster,

Whitlow,

Unclassed.

!

Debility,

Old Age,

Wounds and Injuries.

Contused Wounds from Flogging,

Unknown or Unrecognized.

Observation,

:

2

:

1

:

1

:

:

:

2

:

10

5

1

3

:

:

1

1

1

I

1

1

2

~

1

1

1

1

1

9

15

1

1

1

:

24

24

وت

3

4

TOTAL,

14

1

50

65

XI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1887.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Daily Average No. of Prisoners. Hospital.

Total Sick in

Total

Serious Sick, Total Sickness Trifling Deaths.

Cases.

Rate of Sickness.

Rate of Mortality.

to Total.

To Total. To Average. To Total. To Average.

4,308

584

266

68

6

0.617

0.775

0.381

0.0139

0.1027

TABLE XI,-CASES ADMITTED to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, at the first Medical Examination by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1887.

SENTENCE.

No.

DISEASES.

DATE

DATE

OF

ADMISSION.

OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

Years. Mos.

Days.

1

Bullet Wound,

6

Intermittent,

4 January. 7

11 January. On Remand.

13

92

"

Contusion,

10

18

On Remand.

**

""

42

Bubo,

13

28

>

"

Debility,

15

21

Bubo,

15

""

21

Debility,

29

29

3 February.

16 February. 19

42

Debility,

2 March.

4 March.

Contused Wound,.

10

19

On Remand.

""

10

Contusion,.

11

25

On Remand.

""

11

Debility,

16

"

13 April.

12

Observation,

25

33

2

On Remand.

"

13

21

14

15

16

17

18

coco:

Debility,

1 April.

16

35

Contusion,

2

9

25

Observation,

12

19

On Remand.

""

Observation,

14

16

On Remand.

""

3

Debility,

18

17 May.

3

Sprain,

30

4

"3

وو

19

Observation,

20

42

Debility,

19 May. 14 June.

27

On Remand.

"

28 June.

21

14

Abscess,

23

25

""

99

22

14

Alcoholia,

24

28

"}

""

23

14

Alcoholia,

24

6 July.

24

6

Sprain,

29

"

4

33

25

2

Debility,

1 July.

8

26

Boil,

18

On Remand.

"

A

27

42

Observation,

9

">

28

42

Observation,

9

"

29

I

Observation,

11

30

Fever,

13

"

31

42

Observation,

14

22

,,

3

35

32

Alcoholia,

20

21

39

33

2

Abscess,

23

30

""

34

1

Alcoholia,

3 August.

10 August.

35

42

Debility,

11

30

"

55

36

42

Observation,

11

13

"

37

14

Debility,

11

25

38

42

Observation,

11

17

>>

39

3

General Debility,

19

1 October.

40

1

Debility,

31

>>

24 Sept.

41

12

Secondary Syphilis,

31

23

42

...

Intermittent Fever,

2 Sept.

43

Dysentery,....

5

""

44

Contused Wound,

14

15

22

22

15 October.

9 Sept:

7

Remand. Sent Civil Hospt. On Remand.

45

21

Intermittent Fever,

19

""

46

6

Sprain of elbow joint,

19

30

24

""

99

47

2

Soft Chancre and Gonorrhoea,.

24

26

39

48

14

General Debility,

27

22

49

12

Incised Wound for extracting

11 October.

""

8 October.

24 ""

Paid his fine.

a bullet in the Back,

50

51

53

OHNGH 3958

2

General Debility,

14

24

27

1

Sore of Penis,

18

52

42

General Debility,

25

"

3

Dysentery,

1 Nov.

54

1

Soft Chanere,

14

31

21 Nov.

14

1 Dec.

55

42

f Deep ulcers of perineum,

30

:

56

57

N

:

42

ulceration of tongue,

Ulceration of pharynx, syphi-

""

30

litic cachexia,

42

General Debility,

General Debility,

22 Dec. 22

COLO

13

27

Paid his fine.

"

30

>>

1

1

XI6.-TABLE showing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS) for the First Four Weeks' Confinement in VICTORIA GAOL), during the Year 1887.

NUMBER OF

No.

AGE. YEARS OPIUM

SMOKER.

CONSUMPTION

PER DIEM,

WEIGHT WHEN ADMITTED.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR

WEEKS.

REMARKS.

42

45

$

50

9

56

10

40

11

35

12

46

13

53

14

15

48

16

62

17

61

18

64

53 13

20

19 38 10 20 50 20

21

22

30

6

19

58 16

23

55

24 67

25

48

26

52

27

56

28

50

29

59

20

30

32

31

52

32

32

33

30

34

43

35

33

36

36

37

38

38

50

39

31

40

40

41

38

42

.53

43

29

44

29

45

44

46

26

47

55

48

47

49

78

50

36

51

45

52

54

53

52

54

58

55

38

56

44

57

55

58

40

59

45

60

49

61

48

62

70

63

39

64

45

65

42

66

44

67

30

68

72

69

34

70

25

71

28

72

48

73

50

74

48

75

30

5888-5*5...KUMU-UUN~-~~~-„NENHU„WMNA,N,ENZUMEZH,NUN,NNEWORN ANNEES

38

10

Years.

48

""

10

43

10

19

20

20

"

"

Q CO TH 22-24D TH

2 Mace.

119

Ibs.

115

115

114

114

3

106

108

105

107

105

፡፡

""

106

Paid his fine.

83

83

85

84

84

22

27

117

118

117

119

116

"3

108

102

106

105

1

*

"3

104

99 100

97

97

*

22

101

96

97

96

96

""

110

105

107

107

106

"

99

100

105

102

100

>

109

106

106

106

105

""

90

88

89

89

11

"

102

94

95

96

117

Paid his fine.

1

*

107

107

104

2

106

"

77

78

80

80

80

2

84

2

"

87

88

88

87

110

99

2

100

19

101

103

105

110

19

108

"

108

110

110

100

""

99

"

99

100

104

133

"

128

"

130

131

132

135

..

129

129

127

10

106

106

5:

108

107

109

103

21

**

102

10

104

=;

120

99 103

104

108

109

103

102

4

"

113

116

"

113

114

112

""

109

19

113

118

118

98

"

97

98

101

102

"

113

"

111

111

33

111

110

109

""

"

107

06

108

107

20

96

""

""

95

"

100

101

100

6

90

"

"2

91

92

93

93

"

116

""

>>

114

116

115

111

20

"

104

"

>>

101

06

108

118

13

114

108

107

111

108

99

27

>>

92

92

96

98

103

""

32

101

97 102

101

30

109

"

101

105 106

105

16

89

19

>

85

88

88

93

111

"

105

103

100

96

10

89

"

85

87

86

84

110

"

108

108

106

106

95

"

95

95 100

99

"

91

??

1

*

88

87

89

92

"

20

115

""

2

3:

116

113

116

117

*

99

19

1

"

100

95

98

97

"

30

141

29

3

>>

140

140

138

138

"

105

17

1

100

102

100

99

96

19

""

93

94

96

96

19

98

"

97

102

101

102

99

96

"

19

95

95

94

94

25

89

90

92

99

94

"

20

95

29

94

95

95

101

>>

105

102

100

100

100

39

1

96

94

94

92

89

"

2

112

106

109 107

106

118

111

19

113

113

114

110

19

100 102 104

106

12

2

110

108

108 109

"

1

116

"

114

114 115

116

109

"

106

108

"

108

107

106

22

100

101

98

"

91

2

100

101 102

100

102

12

110

105 104 102

**

11

115

110

111 110

"

20

99

29

93

94

96

**

10

109

27

103

102

106

3:

36

75

??

74

77

78

80

"

19

115

113

*

110

112

112

"

102

*

91

88

91

"2

1

110

"

119

106 106

"

20

2

116

115

114

113

111

"

19

20

2

120

115

""

117 116

117

19

28

113

"

>>

103

105

104 102

10

1

98

88

88

88

88

XIC.-TABLE shewing OPIUM SMOKERS ADMITTED to HOSPITAL and treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER,

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1887.

during the Year 1887.

Coloured

Europeans. Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

Intermittent Fever, No. 4,

General Debility, Nos. 9, 12, 14, 16, 24, 34, 38, 49, 53, 63, 68,. Ulceration of pharynx, and syphilitic cachexia, No. 74,

Soft Chancre, No. 71,

Observation, Nos. 39, 41, 50,

TOTAL,........

........

:

...

1

1

11

11

1

1

1

1

3

3

17

17

XId.-TABLE shewing the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of PATIENTS treated in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUM during the Year 1887.

No.

Native of

Sex.

Age.

Diseases.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No. of Days in Asylum.

Description of Patients,

1

- G3 C3 = 10 6 1-∞∞

Germany,

F.

2

Austria,

F.

43

Jamaica,

M.

+

Barbadoes,

M. 30

RO

25

Dementia, Dementia,

1st Jan.

26th Dec. 15th Mar.

360

74

"

""

31

Dementia, Mania,

22nd Oct.

294

19

"

21st Dec.

365

11

5

Macao,

F.

27

Dementia,

7th Feb.

37

"

27

Ireland,

M. 34

20th Feb.

31st Dec.

314

7

England,

M. 46

8

England,

M. 46

India,

M. 50

Melancholia, Melancholia, Dementia,

30th July 24th August

8th Aug.

9

25th Dec.

16th Sept. 31st Dec.

23

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec.,

1886.

Males.

Private Paying.

The Board of Trade.

19

Private Paying.

"

Government Servant, Destitute.

XII. TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1887.

Admitted during the year 1887.

No. of Cases Treated in the Hospital, 1887.

No. of Patients Discharged during the year 1887.

Died during 1887.

No. of Out-Patients Treated during 1887.

Moribund Cases,

1887.

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec., 1887.

86

97

1,837

394 2,231 1,837 394 2,231 839 118 957 955 258 1,213

99,716 31,194 130,910 240 136

376129 29 158

XIII.-CASES of SMALL-POX treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1887.

Remaining in Hospital Admitted during 1887.

31st December, 1886.

Discharged.

Died.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1887.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

...

181

129 310 39

16

55 119

102

221 23

11

34

XIV.-VACCINATION performed during the year 1887 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

2,913

In Out District.

Shaukiwán,

Aberdeen, Yaumáti,

..97

.45

.83

Total.

3,138

JAMES J. CLERIHEW, Inspector of Nuisances,

Western Health District.

XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 30 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued and the AVERAGE LENGTH of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858,

124

1858,.

4,797

1859,

162

1859,.

1858, 5,389 1859,

43.8

30.8

1860,

36.1

1860,.

9,107

1860,

23.7

1861,

442

1861,

10,778

1861.

23.4

1862,

485

1862.

12,193 1862.

22.0

1863,

420

1863,

11,707

1863.

23.7

1864,

442

1864,

11,940

1864.

27.0

1865,

890

1865.

11,303

1865.

28.0

1866,

406

1866.

13,060

1866.

28.6

1867,

434

1867.

18,120

1867,

25.5

1868,

579

1868,

16,462

1868,.

23.6

1869,

546

1869,

16,779

1869,

24.8

1870,

722

1870,

18,382

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871.

12,308

1871.

18.5

1872,

656

1872,

15,103

1872,.

20.9

1873,

500

1873,

11,219

1858,

19.5

1874,

345

1874,.

6,814

1874.

18.6

1875,

134

1875,

2,916

1875,

187

1876,

168

1876,.

2,730

1870,

14.3

1877,

177

1877,

3,069

1877,

16.6

1878,

105

1878,

2,242

1878,

19.0

1879,

129

1879,

2,199

1879,

13.6

1880,

57

1880,

1,300 1880,

14.7

1881,

44

1881.

1,330

1881.

21.7

1882,

99

1882.

1,831

1882.

15.5

1883,

273

1883.

3,451

1883,.

12.0

1884,

325

1884.

5,174

1884,.

13.1

1885,

411

1885,

6,161

1885,

15.6

1886,

401

1886.

4,837

1886,

12.2

1887,

144

1887,

2,014

1887.

13.9

Daily Average, 5. Longest stay, 90 days.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE B.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 10, during the Year 1887.

Number admitted

Number of Beds in

to Hospital

on Certificates of

Lock Hospital.

Visiting Surgeon.

32

144

Number

who submitted voluntarily.

269

Number against whom

it was necessary to proceed

by Information before the Registrar General,

30

Total Number brought under the Provisions of the Ordinance.

269

Total Number of Examinations

made during the Year.

12,223

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

12,079

Total Number Discharged from Hospital.

143

*

Including the examinations which were made outside the Lock Hospital.

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1887.

Pн. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No. of Females admitted

ADMITTED INTO

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per month).

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

Average No. of Men in Mer- Garrison chant and Port Seamen. (per month).j

Average Percentage

of Men Diseased (per month).Į

REMARKS.

144

222

268

70

54

614

1,401

1,132 636

15,648

18,837

0.270

Every day, Sundays and Government holidays

excepted.

TABLE D.

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT Lock HOSPITAL during the Year 1887.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

12,223

144

12,079

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do..

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined, Secondary Syphilis,

P. and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea,

TOTAL.........

No. remaining in.

Hospital, 31st

December, 1886.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

80

25

*****

33

33

80

*

144

:

Cured.

144

143

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

1

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1887.

TABLE D. 2.

Shewing the Number of UNLICENSED PROSTITUTES apprehended under Ordinance No. 10 of 1867, during the Year 1887.

In Houses,

NO. OF WOMEN.

CONVICTED.

DISCHARGED.

FOUND DISEASED.

30

30

15

15

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1887.

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicate !,

Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

Do.,

and Primary Syphilis, combined,

do.,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Gonorrhoea and Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea, Gleet,

do.,

January, February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

Military

Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil

Hospital.

69

95

23

15

113

144

33

19

9

40

15

10

11

*

9

TOTAL,

..1887,..

* 222

+268

70

54

TOTAL,

..1886,..

216

235

25

65

TOTAL,..

..1885,....

145

200

27

130

TOTAL,

.1884,.

159

149

41

.94

*Military Hospital, of these cases 12 were contracted out of the Colony. † Naval Hospital, of these cases 106 were contracted out of the Colony.

TABLE E 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of NAVAL MEN admitted into NAVAL HOSPITAL during the Year 1887.

Months.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Contracted in Hongkong.

September,

October,

November,

December,

Contracted elsewhere.

Total.

3

4

7

1

1

2

2

1

3

I

1

1

Total Number,......

TABLE E 3.

3

4

17

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL during the Year 1887.

January, February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September, October, November, December,

Months.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Contracted in Hongkong.

10

6

2NDON HQ — — 05 05 Co

2

1

1

3

3

Contracted elsewhere.

Total.

2

2

10

6

3

2421 21 10 00 so

Total Number,......

40

23

Years.

XVI. TABLE shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years.

Number of European and

American Residents.

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents.

Deaths.

1878,

2,767

67

2.42

1879,

2,767

55

1.98

1880,

2,767

69

2.49

1881,

3,040

64

2.10

1882,

3,040

55

1.80

1883,

3,040

81

2.06

1884,

3,040

94

3.09

1885,

3,040

99

3.25

1886,

3,040

103

3.38

1887,

3,040

108

3.55

Average of 10 Years,.........

2,958.1

79.5

2.612

Enclosure 1.

Report from the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 6th March, 1888.

SIR,-I beg to forward report of the work done at the Civil Hospital during the year 1887 with the usual statistics.

I arrived at the Colony in November 17th, and took over charge from Dr. THOMPSON on the following day.

I was very much surprised and perplexed at the state of affairs then existing at the Hospital. The two European Wardmasters were on their trial for robbing patients under their care.

To undertake the nursing of the patients in addition to the Chinese attendants who have practi- cally no knowledge of nursing, I had the services of two of the Army Medical Staff Corps to the end of December, who were of great assistance, and of CHAN A LOK the Chinese Wardmaster. The latter during his long period of service at the Hospital has acquired some practical knowledge in regard to nursing and is very useful as an Interpreter. Unfortunately he is leaving soon, wishing to retire, as he does not feel strong enough to continue his work.

As the services of the Army Medical Staff Corps men were not available two Wardmasters Mr. CUBIT a Policeman and Mr. CARNEIRO son of the Wardmaster of the Small-pox Hospital were appointed on probation for three months.

Meanwhile as the Nursing Staff of the Hospital generally seemed so inefficient, I had drawn up a scheme for the re-arrangement of the Nursing Staff, which was submitted to His Excellency The Governor. In this scheme I recommended that in addition to the two European Wardmasters who should be preferably retired Army Medical Staff Corps men, the obtaining of five European trained female Nurses, one to act as Head Nurse; this scheme is still under consideration.

Since my arrival there has been an epidemic of Small-pox. I have had under my care 111 cases of that disease, many of a very severe type. The present building which is used as a Small-pox Hospital only contains 10 beds. This had to be augmented, first by the erection of one and afterwards as this soon was filled, by the erection of two bamboo sheds. This has entailed a great deal of extra work upon the Hospital Staff. Fortunately the epidemic seems to be subsiding thanks in a great measure to the energetic measures taken by the Sanitary Department. I would strongly urge the necessity of the erection of an Infectious Hospital either on one of the Islands of the Harbour, or as far away as possible from any habitation, as the present building is quite inadequate for the treatment of such cases; also that such Hospital have a separate Medical Officer and Staff of its own. The sooner this is done the better, as the Colony is always liable to an outbreak such as this.

On refering to the Statistics it will be found that the Hospital Register contains 1,656 cases, 43 more than in 1886, of this number 619 were Police, seventeen more than in the previous year.

Table III shows the number from each station, Table V shows the varieties of disease a mongst the patients generally, with the mortality from each.

There were forty cases of Dysentery of which six proved fatal.

Nine cases of Typhoid were treated of which one died.

ī

Remittent Fever seems to have been very fatal as out of 134 cases there were nine deaths. Altogether out of 420 cases which Dr. WHARRY classes as Hongkong Fever, there were ten deaths, as against one death out of 406 cases in 1886; out of these ten, one was a European, two were Coloured, and seven Chinese.

Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatism sent 38 cases, of which one died.

There were seven cases of opium poisoning, of which two died.

The total number of deaths were eighty-nine, the death rate compared to the total number of admissions being 5.37, the highest yet recorded.

The total amount of fees received from patients during the year was $10,275.68 of this the Board of Trade paid $2,181.75 and the Police $970,75 this is exclusive of $1,788.18 fees from patients in Lunatic Asylum which amount in previous years has been included in the Civil Hospital accounts.

Mr. WATSON the Assistant Apothecary arrived in the Colony on September 25th and forthwith commenced his duties.

Mr. Crow the Senior Apothecary and Analyst is temporarily performing the duties of Sanitary Superintendent.

I have to thank these officers and particularly Mr. ROGERS, the Steward, for the assistance they have rendered me in becoming acquainted with the working of the Establishment.

In conjunction with the Colonial Surgeon I have made certain alterations in the existing rules in order to keep the Chinese attendants more under control.

In conclusion I wish to point out the necessity there is for an assistant Resident Medical Officer. In a Hospital like this in which so many of the cases are acute and so many accidents are admitted, and in which, as I gather from the previous reports, the greatest stress of work falls in the Summer months, the work is too great for one Medical Officer; one cannot always be on duty; under the existing arrangements it is impossible to leave the Hospital for even a couple of hours without a feeling of anxiety that something may happen during one's absence; if there was another Resident Medical Officer, there would always be one on duty.

My report is necessarily incomplete from the late period of the year in which I took over the charge of the Hospital.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

JOHN MITFORD ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent, Government Civil Hospital.

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

Enclosure 2.

Lock Hospital's Returns.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Year.

Number of examinations.

And Cutane-

Hard Chancre

ous

Erup-

tion,

1885.

12,454

67168 38

1886.

12,407

111 155 51

1887.

11,496

28 4233*

1

N

:

::.

3

1

93

40 367 12,087

1

4

N

333

1

378 12,029)

21

129 11,367

REMARKS.

* 1 Woman was found with soft sore, but was not detained.

D.

RETURN showing the NUMBER of TIMES in which WOMEN were EXAMINED and TREATED in the LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1887.

1887.

Number

of

Women

Examined.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

FOUND DISEASED.

SYPHILIS.

Pri- Secon-

mary. dary.

Hard

Chancre.

January,

1,058

1

so

4

I

February,

981

4

2

:

March..

1,066

4

ལྟ་

4

10

1

April,

985

14

1

May,

967

12

June,

1,008

10

1

July,

914

10

August,

988

6

10

00

:

:

:

September,

931

October,....

885

November,

874

December,

869

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

1*

:

:

1

:

Total,......

11,526

28

53

333

35

2

4.

Labial Abscess.

Abrasion of os

Ul. of os Uteri.

Uteri.

Abscess.

Free from Disease.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

2

4

1

1

:

:

:

:

1

:

N

:

:

:

:

2 18

2

Remained.

Admitted.

Total Treated,

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

:

DISCHARGED CURED.

SYPHILIS.

Pri-Sccon-

mary. dary.

Hard

Chancre.

Soft Sore.

...

1,047

11

11

1

971 1

1,046 3

10

11

4

20

963

14

946 10

994 15

895

9

966 11

931

881

21

222

23

N

36

31

10

:

5

14

19

22

CO NO NO

9

:

Co

4

Co

2

3

10

10

13

1

29

4

8

4

28

4.

4

33

7

4

N

9

1

5

1

4

4

N

874 1

1

867

1

1

...

:

F:..

:

:

:.

111,381

:

:

* Was not detained in Hospital but treated outside.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

1

:

:

I

Labial Abscess.

Abrasion of os

Uteri.

Ul. of os Uteri.

Abscess.

Total Discharged.

Remaining in Hospital.

2

:

1

1

:

:

10

1

8

3

9

14

...

:

26

10

16

15

2220

9

17

11

24

9

9

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

2

:

M

:

:.

1

4

2

6

2

:

1

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

144

144

28

53

34

2

3 2

18

2 1

143

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

1

TABLE 1.

RETURN of the NUMBER of COMPLAINTS against the REGISTERED WOMEN during the Year 1887.

1887.

COMPLAINTS FROM

Gonorrhoea.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

SYPHILIS.

Soft Sore.

Primary.

Hard

Cut.

Chancre. Erupt.

No. OF WOMEN

POINTED OUT.

RESULT OF EXAMINATION.

Free from Disease.

Found diseased Detained.

January,

Different Quarters,.

12

7

February,

13

8

>>

March,

+

1

>>

1

April,

12

9

1

>>

""

May,

""

"

June,

8

10

9

:

"

July,

August,

A

"

Total,.....

A

9

10

5

71

49

2

1

2225

20

20

21

20

1

8

:

:

:

:

3

22

15

7

17

17

11

13

11

A

4a

4

122

90

32

23 2

a. One of the women was pointed out by two men.

TABLE II.

RETURN showing the RESULT of the EXAMINATIONS of the REGISTERED WOMEN stated to have infected men from

H. M.'s Army, Navy, and others with Venereal Sores during the

1887.

COMPLAINTS FROM

Soft Sore.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard Chancre.

and Cut. Erupt.

Secondary.

Year 1887.

NO. OF WOMEN

POINTED OUT.

RESULT OF EXAMINATION.

Free from Disease.

Found diseased

Detained.

January, February,

Her Majesty's Army,

5

"}

April,

>>

>>

>>

May,

""

""

June,

33

"

>>

July,

"

""

August,

"

38

January, February,

Her Majesty's Navy,

2

42

4

""

>>

""

6

2

5

8

6

3

2 106 MM N

5

3

3

5

1:263110

5

38

21

17

1

10 21

5

10 2

t

5

:

1

7

April,

June,

July,

Government Civil Hospital, 1

1

2

2

1

1

12

"

1

1

">

""

3

4

4

January, February, March,... July,

Miscellaneous,

""

""

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

3

1

:

H

2

2

Total,

50

2

1

:.

53

34

19

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE III.—Showing the RESULT of the EXAMINATIONS of the REGISTERED WOMEN stated to have conveyed Gonorrhea infection during the Year 1887.

RESULT OF EXAMINATIONS.

NATURE OF COM- PLAINTS.

1887.

COMPLAINTS FROM

No. of WOMEN POINTED

REMARKS.

GONOR-

Free from

OUT.

RHEA.

Disease.

Found diseased Detained.

January,

Her Majesty's Army,

February,

Do.,

March,

Do.,

April,.

Do.,

May,

Do.,

June,

Do.,

July,

Do.,

5 7 7

5

6 6 10 10 257

7 7

6678 10 11

60 61 ∞ ONE

2

3

46

46

36

10

January,

Her Majesty's Navy,

February,

Do.,

May,

Do.,

2

November,

Do.,

6623

6629

6699

3

3

17

17

17

April,

Government Civil Hospital,...

1

1

1

May,

Do.,

1

1

...

June,

Do.,

3

2

1

July,

Do.,

1

1

7

4

7

10

5

2

1

1

1

February,

Miscellaneous,

Total,

71

71

59

12

Pí. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon,

Abrasion.

Ulceration of os

Uteri.

Warts.

F.

RETURN of WOMEN examined in WANTSAI during the Year 1887.

Number

of

Free from

1887.

Women Examined.

Disease.

Found diseased and sent to the Lock Hospital.

Gonorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

Leucorrhoea.

NATURE OF DISEASE.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

and

Hard cutaneous Chanere.

eruption.

Secondary.

January, February,.

March....

:

...

26

26

April,

39

37

2

May,

28

28

June,

28

28

July,

42

42

August,

26

25

I

1

September,

October,

26

26

November,

..

27

27

December,

32

32

3

:

O

:

:

:

...

...

During the months of January, February, and September, the Wantsai women were all examined at the Lock Hospital their expenses

being paid by me.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon,

Total,.......

274

271

G.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

RETURN of the RESULT of EXAMINATIONS of WOMEN from UN-REGISTERED BROTHELS during the Year 1887.

1887.

January,

March...... April,. June,

July, August,

Total......

30

No. of Women.

Place of Residence.

9

O7NQ ∞ N

Different Quarters,.

دو

""

""

19

"

""

"9

""

2

"

TABLE A.

NATURE OF Disease.

Free from Disease.

Found diseased and detained.

Leucorrhoea.

Ul. of os Uteri.

Gonorrhoea.

Warts.

Soft Sore.

SYPHILIS.

Primary. Secondary.

Hard Chan-

and cut.

cre.

erup- tion.

LO CO TH (pred pound proj

4

4

3

4 12-

15

15

11

3

1 1

1

1

1

1

:

:

÷

2

1

:

...

1

:

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 10, during the Year 1887.

Number

of Beds in Lock

Hospital.

Number admitted to Hospital

on Certificates

of Visiting Surgeon.

32

Number against whom it was necessary to proceed by Information before the

Number who submitted Voluntarily.

Registrar General.

Total Number brought under the Provisions

of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examina- tions made during the Year.

Total Number of Examina- tions made when no Disease was found.

Total Number Discharged from Hospital.

REMARKS.

144

269

30

269

12,223*

12,079

143

*In this table are included also the women examined at Wántsai and those examined outside.

TABLE C.

RETURN of WOMEN examined, and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the Year 1887.

EXAMINATION.

No. of days

in Month on which

Examinations

were held.

Total Number of

Examinations made during the

Year

Number admitted

to Hospital.

Total Number of

Examinations made when no

Disease was found.

Examina-

tions are

heid daily Sundays & Govern- ment holi- days ex- cepted.

12,223

144

DIBEABES.

12,079

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated

do.

Gonorrhoea

Do.

and P. Syphilis combined

P. & Secondary do.

P. & Secondary Syphilis & Gonorrhea

TOTAL.

Admitted.

HOSPITAL.

Total treated.

Cred

DISCHARGED.

TOTAL.

33

80

25

3842

33

25

87588

80

80

****

33

24

24

4

****

33

80

4

2

Number remain- ing in Hospital,

31st Dec., 1887.

144

144

143

143

1

REMARKS.

In this table are included also the women examined at Wantsai and those examined outside the Hospital.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

Enclosure 3.

ļ

Report of the Government Analyst.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 21ST APRIL, 1888.

SIR,I have the honour to forward a statement of the work done in the temporary laboratory of this Hospital during the

year 1887.

WATER.

During the months of February, March, and April analysis of 328 waters derived from wells or springs within the City of Victoria were made at the request of the Sanitary Board. My instructions were to simply "separate the wells into two classes viz. ; those which were evidently much polluted and those which were not." Many of these waters had been examined in former years and in previous special and annual reports I have expressed my views on the danger incurred by the public in having recourse to the shallow wells in this City for a supply of water for dietetic purposes.

In judging of the extent of the pollution of these well waters some considerable care was taken to ascertain the existence or absence of nitrites the detection of which in shallow well waters being, in the opinion of most chemists, held as conclusive evidence of the presence, in the water under examina- tion, of fresh decomposing sewage.

Of the 328 waters examined 223 or 68 per cent. showed unmistakable evidence of the presence of nitrites; and 199 or 60 per cent, contained considerable quantities of free ammonia. The specimens of good well water I have analyzed in this Colony have been found to contain practically no free ammonia and certainly not even the faintest trace of nitrites.

In all cases an accurate determination was made of the amount of Chlorine present in the water and after a careful consideration of the chemical data and an inspection in many instances of the localities whence the samples were drawn, I placed 233 of the samples or 71 per cent. in the category of waters that were evidently much polluted.

I may add that the greater part of the remaining 95 samples contained Chlorine considerably in excess of the quantity found in water derived from wells that are without doubt uncontaminated; and in the last report on water analysis I submitted to the Board, a recommendation was made that when an abundant water supply was available the Government would do well to order the closing of all wells in the City of Victoria.

MILK.

During the

year nine samples of milk which had been obtained by the Nuisance Inspectors were analyzed at the request of the Sanitary Board. Of these three were returned as being adulterated. One of the specimens was estimated to contain at least 50 per cent. of added water.

Sometime ago the necessity of checking the quality of the milk supplied to the Civil Hospital was very clearly demonstrated to the Civil Medical Staff, and it was decided that once a month samples from the morning and evening milk delivered by the contractor were to be analyzed.

To enable me to form a proper estimate of the quality of the milk an analysis is made, regularly once a month, of a sample selected at the Contractor's Farm from the mixed product of the whole Dairy.

Too much weight cannot be attached to the necessity of providing the sick with milk of the best quality seeing that in many cases it forms their sole article of diet. Mr. ROGERS the Hospital Steward has been, for some months, in the habit of noting the Specific Gravity and Temperature of every delivery so that all possible precautions are now taken to prevent an inferior article being sent up to the wards for the patients' consumption.

In all 36 samples of milk were analyzed during the year. The process adopted in every case is the one devised some years ago by Dr. JAMES BELL the Principal of the Somerset House Laboratory.

TOXICOLOGICAL.

Investigations were conducted in three cases where there was evidence pointing to the use of poisonous agents.

1. Calomel Poisoning.-On the 3rd of August Dr. J. A. LOCKHEAD brought me a small quantity of a decoction of coffee which he had received from one of his patients-an officer of the American

ship Alice D. Cooper then lying in the harbour of Hongkong. The officer, at the request of Dr. LOCKHEAD, presented himself at the Government Laboratory and furnished me with the following information :-

"About 5 o'clock one morning while I was on watch-the ship being then in the China Sea within a few days sail of this port I received at the hands of a negro cabin-boy a cup of Coffee which had been prepared by the ship's Cook. I drank about a mouthful and fancying from the taste that there was something wrong I carelessly threw overboard the greater part of the beverage. I soon felt very violent pains about the region of the stomach and about five minutes after drinking the Coffee I vomited. On hearing of the occurrence the Captain gave me an emetic and something to drink. None of the vomits were preserved, what remained of the Coffee was placed in a small bottle and handed over to the Doctor soon after our arrival in Hongkong. For several days I felt very weak and had a nasty taste in the mouth. I complained of a bad stomach. These symptoms continued until I placed myself under Dr. LOCKHEAD'S treatment after the ship came into port."

The bottle contained about half an ounce of Coffee. There was a considerable sediment of a greyish brown colour which at first could not be very easily diffused throughout the supernatant decoc- tion. A microscopical examination of the deposit revealed the presence of a number of fat globules (milk fat) and an amorphous body which was in due course identified with Calomel, the Sub-chloride or mild chloride of mercury of the British and United States Pharmacopoeias.

A special report on the result of this analysis was forwarded to the American Consulate at the request of Colonel WITHERS, the United States Consul.

Most persons will agree with me in condemning in the strongest terms the practice-revealed in the course of my enquiry into this case-of leaving a ship's medicine chest open to persons other than the senior officers of the vessel.

2. Fish Poisoning.-On the night of the 16th of September some men were observed to put into a live fish tank in one of the City markets a substance known as

Ch'á tsai ping. The fish were killed almost immediately. The water containing the poison was removed and a supply of fresh water put into the tank. The only material available for analysis was the dead fish.

The above data-derived from the depositions of the witnesses who gave evidence at the Magistracy -was obligingly placed at my disposal by Mr. H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., the senior Police Magis-

trate.

In this case two questions were referred to me by the Court for consideration and report :-

1. Can the active principle of Ch'á tsai ping be detected in the dead fish?

2. Are fish destroyed as above fit for human consumption ?

Before giving an opinion on these two points I wrote to Mr. CHAS. FORD, F.L.S., the Superin- tendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department enquiring if he could give me information con- cerning the preparation and uses of this poison, special reference being made to the possibility of more than one plant entering into its composition.

I append as an Appendix to this report, an extract from Mr. FORD's letter and also an extract from a memorandum sent to me by Mr. J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, the Registrar-General, of whom I requested assistance in obtaining the opinion of the Chinese fish merchants as to the suitability or otherwise as an article of diet, of fish destroyed by Ch'á tsai ping or Ch'á fu as it is sometimes

termed.

It will be seen from Mr. FORD's account (Appendix A) of its preparation that the seeds of Camellia oleifera, Abel, of the Natural Order Ternstroemiaceae, minus the oil, are the sole consti- tuent; and the practical observations he makes as to the uses of the substance for the destruction of low forms of animal life without doubt prove that it is a poison although only a mild one. Confirma- tory evidence on this latter point will be found in Mr. LOCKHART's memo. (Appendix B).

The only recorded description of this fish-poison accessible to me is that given by Mr. HUGH MCCALLUM in his annual report for 1882 and in a paper by the same author in the Pharmaceutical Journal (3) Vol. XIV, p. 21. Mr. MCCALLUM refers to its use as a fish-poison, and states that its activity is doubtless due to the glucoside saponin which exists in the seeds to the extent of about 10 per cent. The seeds also contain about 44 per cent of a fixed oil.

The action of saponin on man has been but little studied but Mr. WYNTER BLYTH' is of opinion that it is an undoubted poison and capable of endangering the life of man.

The attempt made by me to discover the glucoside in one of the fishes sent to the Laboratory by the Police proved a failure.

With regard to the question as to the use as human food, of fish destroyed by Ch'á tsai ping, I would invite attention to the following consideration :-

1. The absence of any record of such fish acting injuriously.

2. The opinion of the Chinese as to their harmless nature.

3. The fact that birds are not affected by worms similarly destroyed.

(1.) Camellia Sasanqua, Thunb. Index Floræ Sinensis p. 82.

(2.) Poisons (1884), p. 421.

2.

I can scarcely imagine, considering the rapidity of the action of the poison, that fish killed by saponin would have absorbed sufficient of the glucoside to render them objectionable as an article of diet: nevertheless the practice of destroying them by such means is one that the Government should, for several reasons, do all in its power to prevent.

of

3. Supposed Administration of a Stupefying drug.-This was the case of a Chinese youth, 19 years age, who on the 20th of May was admitted into the Civil Hospital under the influence of a narcotic poison.

The Magisterial enquiry elicited the following particulars :-Between 7 and 8 A.M., on the 17th of May, the boy-then residing in Canton with his parents--was sent by his father to pay a sum of money to a certain shopkeeper in that City. The lad did not return to breakfast and suspicion being aroused, his elder brother left for Hongkong the same evening and reported the occurrence at the Central Police Station. A reward was offered for the recovery of the boy and on the 20th of the same month a Detective found him in a state of insensibility on board a steamer that was about to leave Hongkong for Singapore.

When the boy was discharged from the Hospital and examined by the Magistrate he stated that as he was passing along one of the streets of Canton a man, whom be had never seen before, puffed some smoke into his eyes and rubbed his hand once down his face. He at once became insensible and remained oblivious of everything that took place from that day (the 17th) until the 20th when he regained his senses and found himself in the Hongkong Civil Hospital.

Dr. M. T. YARR, A.M.S., then the Acting Superintendent, was of opinion that when he examined the boy he was recovering from the effects of a narcotic poison; but I failed to detect any poisonous principle in the material extracted from the lad's stomach soon after his admission into the Hospital. In this instance a special search was made for Atropine the active principle of Datura alba, Nees, the

Nau Yeung fa of Chinese Materia Medica.

A number of men were charged with kidnapping this youth but the case fell to the ground through lack of evidence.

A perusal of the cases of poisoning by Datura cited in No. 8 of Notes on Chinese Materia Medica3 would lead one to imagine that this boy had been drugged with some agent allied in its physio- logical action to this easily accessible poison; and that the somewhat extraordinary symptoms recounted by the victim might be referred to the hallucinations to which persons are subject in the early stages of poisoning by drugs of the mydriatic class.*

The remainder of the analysis were of minor importance and call for no special remarks.

REMARKS.

The new Assistant Apothecary Mr. W. MALCOLM WATSON entered on his duties on the 25th of September.

The appointment, to the Civil Medical Staff, of this officer who holds the Major Diploma of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, places the Department-so far as the Analytical and Pharma- ceutical work is concerned-on a proper footing. To provide quarters for his accommodation I vacated my rooms at the West end of the large building and pending the appointment, and for some months after the arrival of Dr. ATKINSON, I resided in the quarters set apart for the Superintendent. After this I removed to quarters at the East end of the Civil Hospital and am at present lodged there pending the construction, in connection with the Hospital extension scheme, of the new Laboratory with quarters attached, which will, I understand, be completed during the course of the present year.

I avail myself of this opportunity for stating that the Student Apothecary, Mr. Ü I KAI, conti- nues to make satisfactory progress with his studies.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

WM. EDWARD CROW, Government Analyst and Apothecary, Civil Medical Department.

Dr. PH. В. С. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon and Inspector of Hospitals.

(3.) Notes on Chinese Materia Medica, by C. FORD F.L.S., HO KAI, M.B., and W. E. CROW 8. Datura alba, Nees, in China Review

vol. XVI, p. 2.

(4.) Toxicologists will be interested in the discovery, last year, on this island of Datura Stramonium, Liun, a species hitherto unrecorded

from South China.

2

Appendix A.

Extract from a letter received from Mr. CHAS. FORD, F.L.S. Director of the Hongkong Botanical Gardens.

"In reply to your enquiries concerning the preparation and uses of Ch'à tsai ping I have much pleasure in being able to furnish. you with some information."

"While on a Botanical tour in the Kwangtung province, from which I have just returned, I had an opportunity of inspecting plantations of the shrub from which the material is obtained, of seeing mills in which the article is prepared, and of receiving information on both the cultivation of the plant and the preparation of tea oil from an intelligent and courteous old Chinese gentleman."

“Camellia oleifera, Abel, is extensively grown in South China for the production of seeds which yield a valuable oil known as tea oil. Ch'à tsai ping is the refuse matter left after the oil has been ex- pressed. The preparation is very simple. The seeds are collected in October or November, dried and taken to a mill where they are crushed in a circular mortar or trough by a pestle drive through it by water power. The seeds after being crushed are steamed and then the mass is placed in a powerful press which expresses the oil. The refuse, after the extraction of the oil is the article known as Ch'á tsai ping. It is produced in cakes weighing, when dry, about 3 ozs. and 3 lbs. respectively. The quality of the two kinds of cake is the same. I am not aware that anything besides the seeds of Camellia oleifera enters into the composition of these cakes."

"Ch'á tsai ping is used by the Chinese as a hair-wash and as soap for cleansing both the person and clothes. It is also used for the eradication of earth worms from the soil in which plants in pots are grown.

In these gardens we also use it for eradicating earth worms from grass lawns. For this purpose the cake is crushed and boiled. The decoction is then diluted and poured on the grass when the worms come to the surface of the ground. As a rule the small worms die, but the larger ones after a time recover. After being picked up from the grass the worms are often given to fowls and ducks which devour them readily and apparently thrive on them, experiencing no inconvenience from the effects of the Ch'á tsai ping with which the worms were killed.”

BOTANICAL Gardens,

Hongkong, September 20th, 1887.

Appendix B.

Extract from a memorandum on fish-poisoning agents received from Mr. J. H. STEWart Lock- HART the Registrar-General.

"In ponds of great dimensions these drugs (more than one is mentioned) are often used for killing fish and shrimps and are so powerful that not a single fish can escape. The fish so caught are offered for sale and the writer has never heard of a single instance in which any one has suffered from eating fish obtained in this way. Ch'á fu is sometimes used for killing earth worms.'

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE;

"}

Hongkong, September 21st, 1887.

True extracts,

WM. EDWARD CROW.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1887.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

No.

15

88.

GRAND TOTAL,

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS. DEATHS,

Boys.

Girls. Total. Males. Females. Total. Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Males. Females.

Sex

Unknown.

Total.

Victoria,.....

100

90

190

176

67

243

725

583

1,308

2,444

1,802

4

4,250

1,498

4,493

Kaulung,

2

2

4

1

1

35

28

63

273

142

10

425

67

426

Shaukiwán,

Aberdeen,

1

49

37

86

133

90

223

86

224

:

***

2

1

19

17

36

84

59

1

144

36

145

:

:.

8

10

18

19

10

29

18

29

:

Stanley,

TOTAL,.

DEATHS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

:

...

102

92

194

179

67

246

836

675

1,511

2,953

2,103

15

5,071

1,705

DEATHS IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. .

ESTIMATED POPULATION.

5,317

Annual Birth-Rate Annual Death-Rate

per 1,000 for the Year.

per 1,000 for the Year.

Males. Females. Total.

Europeans, exclusive of Portuguese,... 76

Of the Deaths in Victoria, there were in the-

British and Foreign Community,

10,552

18.38

23.31

Portuguese,

62

Italian Convent,.

163

394

557

Indians, &c.,

59

Chinese,

.175,410

8.61

28.90

Asile de la Ste. Enfance,

168

291

459

Non-Residents,

49

Tung Wa Hospital,

944

248

1,192

Whole Population,..............

.*185,962

9.16

28.59

TOTAL,............ 246

TOTAL,

1,275

933

2,208

* This does not include the moving population.

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 8th March, 1888.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General.

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

1.-Zymotic Diseases.

Acute Throat Disease,..

Diphtheria, ...

Dysentery,

Diarrhoea, (Acute),

Cholera Nostras,

Do. Infantum,

Fever, Simple Continued,

Do., Intermittent,

Do., Remittent,

Do., Typhoid or Enteric,.

Do., Typhus,

Do., Scarlet,

Civil.

:27

6

Army.

.1

1

10

2 1

6

5

...

Navy.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

1

...

1

...

4

6

...

1

...

3

2

1

Do., Puerperal,

1

Sinall-pox,

14

1

Measles,

3

...

Whooping Cough,

...

Syphilis,

...

་..

Anthrax,

1

...

Septicæmia,

Hydrophobia,

Phthisis,

Acute Tuberculosis,

Chronic Tuberculosis,

Trismus Nascentium,.

Beri Beri,

Leprosy,

Pyæmia,

Cancer,

2.--Constitutional Diseases.

Catarrh,

20

1

3

1

2

1

...

...

...

...

...

::

Marasmus,

Inanition,...........................

Scurvy,

Rheumatism,

Dropsy,

Anæmia,

Alcoholism,

Debility,

Delirium Tremens,

1

...

1t

1239 1-

1

...

1

I

...

1*

....

Apoplexy,

3.-Local Diseases.

Nervous System,-

Hydrocephalus, Convulsions,

Paralysis,

Meningitis,

1

7

1

...

1

...

2

...

a

Mania or Insanity,

1

Tetanus,

2

Cephalitis,

1

...

Epilepsy,

...

Hemiplegia...

1

Cerebral effusion,

1

...

Sunstroke, .............

1

...

Respiratory System,-

Quinsy,

2

Hæmoptysis,

1

...

Croup,.....

1

...

Pleuro-pneumonia,

Bronchitis and Pneumonia, 11

Carried forward,...142

...

...

...

3

Hawan.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedy

Town.

Harbour.

1

2

8

79

6

1

1

5

33

2

10

94

20

1

1

1

68

35

15

3

23

340

35

10

14

20

30

18

5

2

1

3

3

1

1

3

4

5

1

1

1

1

2

5

3

17

178

2

23

1

4

2

...

1

...

...

...

1

...

...

...

1

1

1

...

**

...

...

...

I

242

...

1

3

...

1

1

...

216

7

5

1

1

1

...

226

...

...

1

...

1

...

-

4

...

1

...

12 102

16

6

...

...

:

...

:

:

...

3

...

.6

2

16

57

1

...

...

10

1

189

296

80

4

15

5

13

4

...

1

6

1

...

3

12

22

2

3

...

16

: : : : :

...

:

1

1

...

...

15

8 33

6

44

460

33 785 1,243

246

34

5

3

:: wo

...

6

...

15

10 N N

2

2

...

...

...

64

8

1

14

1

...

1

1

:

YEAR ENDING THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1887, AND THEIR CAUSES.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN STANLEY DISTRICT. DISTRICT. DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

3

27

3

1

108

1

49

ww::

NNNUNZI: Ow::

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

1

3

7

24

19

22

2

1

17

1

22

28

GES:

21:01

9

12

13.

23

14

11

11

17

1

2

4

1

...

1

3

3

10

:*

4

1

2

...

100

5

3

...

171

90

106

:::::

8 : : : : :

2

Boat

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45 Years.

Grand Total.

24

REMARKS.

1

4

1

2

2

2

11

Ι

1

2

4

co on :: wo

3

1

3

...

: 5:

11

8

74

43

137

40

36

19

96

2

9

88*

88

282

4

15

1

10

66

84

48

132

111

451

4

10

51

326

124

515

1

II

15

16

79

48

170

1

1

12

2

16

1

5

18

1

25

1

3

5

1

1

1

29

106

37

72

3

8

3

N

:

247

Age unknown I.

14

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

14

8

23

...

Age unknown 1.

1

...

4

4

1

1

458

20

1

480

1

1

1

4

3

8

...

...

1

54

131

39

2

1

...

1

93

52

:

22-

::

1 226

1

1

f* And Gastro-

Enteritis.

2 S† And Endocar-

151

r

ditis.

2321

6

22

1

1

2 208

347

103

660

14

10

24

1

21

12

34

1

2

6

4

10

1

47

6

3

56

1

1

1

3

1

1

1

1

6

10

1

1

1

9

17

2

:

N

3

2

::

1

2

12 2

73

30

52

-14

2 588 543

684 307 1,009 527 3,658

And Heart Di-

aease, 1.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui,

Kennedy

Town.

Harbour.

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

CAUSES.

Wantsai.

Army.

Navy.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Civil.

Brought forward,...142 15 8 33

F

Local Diseases,--Contd.

Respiratory System,--

:-

1

...

6

1

::

Lung disease, (Chronic),......

Emphysema,

Circulatory System,——

Heart disease,

Aneurism,

Endocarditis,

Digestive System,-

Liver complaint,

...

1

6

Hawan.

44 460

7

25

:

2253

I

1

Jaundice,.

Piles,

Hypertrophy of Liver,

1

Inflammation of Stomach,

1

Do. of Bowels,

1

Peritonitis,

Hepatitis,

Pyloric obstruction,

1

3t

...

7851,243

246

34

6

64

:

62

14

125

401

112

16

5

57

33333

:

:..

1

1

2

3

1

6

1

1

1

...

1

1

22:2

33333

...

::

7*

...

1

...

:

:

1 1

...

::

:

:::

3

∞ a w

3

6

...

1

1

1

::

:

4

...

:

:

...

...

::

3

1

1

1

:

1

...

::

:

21:

:::

:

Hernia,

Urinary System,-

Rupture of Urethra,

Stricture of

do..

Do. of do., and

Uræmia, .....

Nephritis,

Stone in bladder,

Kidney disease,

Reproductive System,-

Puerperal Peritonitis,.....

Integuments, Bones, and

Joints,-

Abscess,

Ulcer,

Disease of Bones & Joints,

4.-Developmental Diseases.

Child Birth,

Old Age,

Premature Birth,

5.-Parasitic Diseases.

Worms,...

6.-Violent Deaths.

Hanging,

Suicide,

Opium Smoking,

Accidental Injury,

Drowning,

Internal Injuries, Wounds,

Murder,

Manslaughter,

7.-Undiagnosed and Un-}

known, .......

1

2

...

:

:..

9

60

10

...

1

1

1

N:

2

10 2

5

2

3

2

1

...,

...

...

1

1

17

:

...

...

:

:

:

...

...

1

∞ 2

::

:~ :

:

:

::

:

:.

:

3

2

2

221

:

...

9

1

1

4

:

1

:

1

4

:

20

18

8

1

10

2190

1

1

2

8

I

པ་

+

TOTAL,.........214 20 12 62

15

83

539

57

3335

43

52

4

4

43

1,035 1,738 445

55

19

202

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

YEAR ENDING THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1887, AND THEIR CAUSES,—Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN DISTRICT. DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

STANLEY DISTRICT.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

171

06

REMARKS.

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15 Years.

Over 15 & un- der 45 Years.

Over 45 Years.

Grand Total.

Boat

106

73

30

52

14

2 588 543

2:

833:3

44

33888

39

18

13

*:

21

23

...

5

...

:::

::

:

⠀ ⠀

...

::

...

684 307

1,009

527 3,658

2

7

17

+

:

...

:

:::

:::

...

::

:

4

:

1

3

cod

...

:

***

222332

Age unknown 1.

36

477

449

1,018

1

1

2

10

18

30

...

3

...

...

1

2

co co 8

3

3

...

...

1

...

::

...

...

....

...

::

:

::

:

:

::

:

:

9

16:

...

:

...

:::

:

21:

1

2

1

:

1

4

:

1

1

1

1

...

1

...

1

...

...

::

:

:..

1

1

1

1

1

2

3

- - -

1

4 R

St And Cirrhosis

of Liver, 1.

1

1

1

3

— Q

1

2

12

1

2

1

1

7

2

(* And Cirrhosis

of Kidney, 1.

1

1

1

...

1

...

1

...

...

1

...

1

~

2

1

:

1

1

25

25

3

2

:

13

::

...

:::

:

~::

1

4

H

21:

7

16

1

5

16

3

crab

31

2

9

6

10

5

1

3

...

30

82

2

33

30

:

1:.

17

3

1

4

3

18

3

24

1

1

6

8

55

12

84

1

15

20

Age unknown i

1

1

1

...

2

...

125

1

:

95

45

29

13

73

37

292

Age unknown 10

5,303

14

Age unknown.

10

5

704

616

767

379

1,732 1,105

5,317

261

164 132

91

59

85

24

:

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 8th March, 1888.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Registrar General.

DEATHS RATES IN DIFFERENT GROUPS OF AGES FOR THE YEAR 1887.

AGES.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN.

CHINESE.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Under 1 month,.......

18

7.32

686

13.53

Over 1 and under 12 months,

24

9.75

592

11.67

Over 1 and under 5 years,

26

10.57

741

14.61

Over 5 and under 15 years,

3.25

371

7.32

Over 15 and under 45 years,

123

50.00

1,609

31.73

Over 45 years, •

Unknown,

44

17.89

1,061

20.92

3

1.22

11

0.22

Total,

246

100.00

5,071

100.00

Registrar General's Office, 8th March, 1888.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Registrar General.

To

.

No.

16

HONGKONG.

THE ASSESSOR'S REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1888-9,

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

SIR,

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 4th June, 1888.

I have now the honour to hand you the second Annual Report shewing the result of the work of the Assessment Department for the year ending 31st May, 1888.

1. During this period I have made an entirely New Assessment of Victoria, The Hill District, Pok-fu Lam, So-kon Po, and Kowloon Point; the assessment for the remaining portion of the Colony has been adopted for the ensuing year by order of the Governor in Council in accordance with the provisions of the Rating Ordi-

nance.

2. The result of the New Assessment is that the Rateable Value of the entire Colony has been raised from $2,902,933 to $3,050,790 on the Old Assessment, shewing an increase of 5 per cent on the Rateable Value, viz.: $147,857 and an increase in the Rates to be collected of $16,697 or about 4.6 per cent above this year's Rates.

3. A perfectly reliable comparison cannot, however, be made between the Assessments of this year and that for the ensuing year as the latter has been made in accordance with the New Rating Ordinance, which has reduced the percentages in some cases, in the amount of rates to be paid, viz.: at Quarry Bay and Pok-fu Lam, the rates were 8 30 on the Rateable Value, and the Piers in Victoria are now only to be charged with 7 per cent instead of 13 per cent on their Rateable Value.

4. I annex hereto a Tabular statement which will more clearly shew the relative values of the respective Assessments.

5. The Rateable Value of property generally in this Colony is still on the increase. District No. 1 at the West End of the City has considerably increased in value, not so much in the value of individual Tenements as in the number of New Tenements erected. The Rateable Value of this part of the Town has increased 17 per cent. The Hill District, (Victoria Peak) has also considerably increased in value since the last Assessment and likewise Kowloon Point, mostly on account of the extensive Godowns which are being erected on the Praya.

6. The number of Rateable Tenements is 9,537 being an increase of 102, this is a small number, caused no doubt by the numerous Fires, 150 Tenements being thereby destroyed in twelve months and most of these Tenements although being rebuilt are not yet Rateable.

7. A very considerable portion of my time allotted for the General Assessment has been taken up in investigating the Returns made by the Chinese of the Rents they receive, on which I base my Assessment, and I regret to say that I believe a very large number of the returns made to me are false, in eight cases I conclusively proved to the Magistrates before whom I summoned the offenders, that false returns were knowingly made to me, in some cases by Chinese occupying a good position in the Mercantile World, and notwithstanding the widest publicity was given to the Magisterial proceedings, the offences were continued. In the above cases Fines to the amount of $2,875 were recovered.

The Honourable A. LISTER,

Colonial Treasurer.

88.

-

8. In the course of the investigations I discovered a fraud which no doubt has been going on for some years whereby the owner of a property not only made a return to me of the rent he said he received, which, however, proved to be about half of what he actually did collect, but he collected Taxes from his Tenants by producing to them an authority purporting to emanate from the Colonial Treasury demanding Taxes based on a Řental even greater than the amount received thereby making a very large profit out of the Rates for which he was arrested and the Magistrate admitting him to bail in the sum of $1,500 to come up on remand, the defendant did not appear and so the bail was forfeited, and I have reasons to believe that this is but one of many such cases, but the difficulty of obtaining evidence from the Chinese is so great that it is almost impossible to get a conviction.

9. The House numbering of the tenements having now been added to my duties by the Rating Ordinance, I purpose re-numbering the Old Tenements and numbering the New Ones, in the respective Villages as soon as possible as until that is done it is impossible to accurately assess them or describe them in the Rate Book.

10. In conclusion I beg to state that, I believe the recent prosecutions have had a wholesome effect on the Chinese in making them see, that they can no longer, with impunity and without great risk of being very heavily fined, make false returns of their Rents to the Assessment Department.

11. The amount of fines, &c. viz.: $4,375 will more than pay the entire cost of my Department this year, for which a sum of $3,598 was provided for in the Estimates.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. SHELTON HOOPER,

Assessor.

.

.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF THE ASSESSMENTS FOR THE YEARS 1887-88 AND 1888-89.

1887-8.

1888-9.

DISTRICT.

No. of

Assesst.

Rateable Value.

REMARKS.

Amount of Rates.

Rateable Value.

Amount of Rates.

No. of

Assesst.

VICTORIA.

6,876

15

2,588,072

336,439

2,719,555

17,200 (g)

2,236

3,050 (g)

353,542

213

6,962

4

2,605,272

338,675

2,722,605

353,755

HONGKONG VILLAGES.

Existing Assessment adopted,

1,296

55,104 (a)

3,857

7

32,646 (b)

2,856

87,750

6,713

87,750

6,142

1,303

28

1

400 (h)

Village transferred from Victoria,

37

34,490 (c)

3,017

43,710 (c

Villages re-assessed,

24

6,298 (d)

551

6,362 (d)

2)

3,824

44

445

25

40,788

3,568

50,072

4,269

KOWLOON VILLAGES.

Existing Assessment adopted,

1,128

120,928 (e)

8,464

120,928

8,464

1,128

Village re-assessed,...

52

48,195 (ƒ)

3,373

69,035

4,832

70

TOTALS,..

9,435

2,902,933

о

(a) All the Hongkong Villages except Quarry Bay, (b) Quarry Bay formerly paid 82% now reduced to 7 °/ (c) The Hill District formerly described as Victoria Peak. (d) Pok-fu Lam formerly paid 84 % on Rateable Value now reduced to 7 01 (e) All the Kowloon Villages except Kowloon Point.

%.

%.

360,793

3,050,790

377,490

9,537

(f) Kowloon Point.

(9) The Piers in Victoria formerly paid 13 % now reduced to 7 %. Many Piers this year are not separately assessed but rated with their adjoining Godowns.

(h) So-kon Po Village formerly paid 13 % now reduced to 7 %.

REFERENCE.

HONGKONG.

THE HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1887.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 17

88.

No. 64.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 10th February, 1888.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the following Annual Returns for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1887.

!

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Section 3 of Ordinance 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of China. XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyors.

2. This being the last Annual Return it will be my duty to make to the Government, I trust it will not be thought out of place to give a short account of the progress in Shipping, &c., the Colony has made since I have held the Offices of Harbour Master, Marine Magistrate, Emigration and Custom's Officer. I was in the first instance, while serving in the Royal Navy, temporarily employed by the Colony from the 17th March to 26th November, 1860; and in March, 1861, I was, on the resignation of my predecessor, permanently appointed to this Department.

3. The Department when I took charge consisted of the Harbour Master, three Clerks, and one Boarding Officer, the annual tonnage of the Port, exclusive of Junks, averaged about 878,135 tons, and the number of foreign built ships entering the Port daily was about 5.

4. The returns accompanying this report show the progress the Colony has made. Twenty-seven years ago steamers were the exception, and sailing ships the rule, and previous to 1866, Junks went in and out of harbour unnoticed. The average tonnage of a steamer then was very little over one thousand tons, whereas now it is no uncommon thing to see three or four steam-ships in Port at one time each measuring from 3 to 4000 tons and upwards.

5. The Regulations for the control of the Harbour had been in force since the Colony was created. My attention was soon drawn to this, and to the absence of, any means of providing for payment of fees for registering ships under the Merchant Shipping Acts, any Marine Court to enquire into casualties at sea, any regulations for cargo-boats, and any board to grant Certificates of Competency to Masters

and Mates in the Mercantile Marine. On these matters being brought to the notice of the Government, the following Ordinances, affecting these great interests, were framed and became law :-

No. 10 of 1860, regulating fees under Merchant Shipping Act 1854.

No. 11 of 1860, to constitute Marine Courts of Enquiry.

No. 15 of 1860, to regulate Cargo-boats.

No. 17 of 1860, to constitute a board of examination for Masters and Mates.

No. 1 of 1862, to regulate and control the Harbour.

6. Previous to 1866 Piracy in Colonial and neighbouring waters was of common occurrence, and Shau-ki-wan bore a very bad name as the centre where Junks fitted out for piratical purposes. Its close proximity to the Lyeemun Pass enabled Masters of heavily manned and armed Junks to follow vessels that had been ascertained to have opium, or other valuable cargo, on board. These were too frequently come up with and attacked at night, stink-pots and arms of all descriptions being freely used. Shortly after Governor Sir RICHARD MACDONNELL'S arrival his notice was attracted to the unenviable character Hongkong bore as a Pirate resort, and he introduced Ordinance 6 of 1866, which brought all Junks under the supervision of this Department, which was considerably increased to meet the requirements of the Ordinance. Harbour Master's Stations were created at Shau-ki-wan, Stanley, and Aberdeen (now supplemented by Stations at Yau-ma-ti and Hung-hom) so as to bring all Junks visiting these waters under close inspection, and no Junks have since been allowed to leave or enter the waters of the Colony without undergoing an examination by Inspectors appointed for the purpose. Ordinance 7 of 1866 compelled the registration of all Chinese householders, and the two Ordinances assisted by Gunboats which the Senior Naval Officer kept constantly cruizing had the desired effect, and Hongkong soon ceased to be a resort for Pirates, and that trade (if it may be so called) came to an end. Isolated acts of Piracy are still reported, but they are not attended with the slaughter and burning that existed in Hongkong's earlier days.

7. In 1867 Messrs. LANDSTEIN & Co., were permitted to keep a hulk off Yau-ma-ti, clear of all shipping, for the storage of Gunpowder. At 1.15 P.M. of the 17th January, 1867, a vessel was lying alongside the hulk discharging Gunpowder when an explosion took place and the two vessels and people on board were destroyed. A Gunpowder Ordinance (No. 4 of 1867) was at once passed bringing the storage of all private Gunpowder within the control of the Government, with a result that has proved satisfactory.

8. In 1867, the increasing shipping of the Colony brought the question of Lighthouses promi- nently before the Government. Reports were made and with the assistance of the late Staff Com- mander REED, a Naval Surveyor in command of H.M.S. Rifleman, the Islet of Waglan at the Eastern approach to the Harbour, Green Island at the Western entrance, and the Gap rock to mark the Southern approach to the Colony were recommended as the most favourable sites for Lighthouses. Difficulties were raised then, and they apparently continue, by the Chinese Government as to the Colony erecting such buildings on Chinese Territory, and it was not until after much loss of time and a great deal of correspondence that this Government was compelled to build Lighthouses within its own jurisdiction, and Cape d'Aguilar, Cape Collinson, and Green Island Lighthouses were erected under the provisions of Ordinance 17 of 1873, and lit for the first time on the 18th April, 1875. The concession, or letting of Waglan and Gap rock at a nominal rent to this Colony, together with Green Island, would have made the lighting of the approaches to Hongkong complete. At present such is not the case, and all apparently owing to a sentimental feeling on the part of the Chinese Government, for most certainly neither Waglan nor Gap rock are of any value except as sites for Lighthouses.

ment.

9. Ordinance 1 of 1874 brought the survey of unseaworthy ships under the control of the Govern-

10. In 1875, an explosion and loss of life on board a steam launch in the Harbour caused an Ordinance to be brought into force for the regulation of steam ferry boats, of which there are now 42 licensed. The Masters and Engineers of these boats undergo an examination at this Office, the boats are thoroughly examined every six months, and no further accident has occurred.

11. Till 1876, steamers plying between Hongkong, Canton and Macao were under no regulation whatever, and they at times carried as many passengers as could be crammed into them. These vessels are now, as indeed are all vessels carrying more than 12 passengers, under stringent regulations as to the number of passengers they can convey, the condition of boilers and engines is ascertained and it is stated on the ship's certificates in what parts of the ships and how many passengers can be carried.

12. The Shipping Ordinances passed previous to 1879 were consolidated by Ordinance 8 of 1879, and in framing this Ordinance advantage was taken to introduce regulations for the Survey of ships carrying more than 12 passengers, for the appointment of practical Marine Surveyors to conduct the surveys, for the examination of Engineers as to their qualifications, for the carriage of dangerous goods, for holding Courts of Survey, for regulating medicines and medical stores, and other smaller details were introduced to meet the requirements of the time.

13. The following table from 1861 to 1887 inclusive, will at once show the yearly increase of the arrivals of vessels at this Port. Where it has been possible to separate sailing ships from steamers and Junks I have done so, and the result will show a very satisfactory statement of the Colony's

progress:-

STEAMERS AND

STEAMERS.

SAILING SHIPS.

JUNKS.

TOTAL.

SAILING SHIPS.

YEARS.

Vessels.

Tons. Vessels. Tons.

Vessels.

Tons.

Vessels. Tons. Vessels.

Tons.

1861,

1,259

658,196

1,259

658,196

1862,

1,390

688,829

1,390

688,829

1863,

1,822

894,924

1,822

894,924

1864,

2,264 | 1,013,748

2,264

1,013,748

1865,

2,206

1,063,259

2,206

1,063,259

1866,

1,896

949,856

1,896

949,856

1867,

2,446

1,194,826

20,787

1,367,702

1,367,702

23,233

2,562,528

1868,

2,043

991,117

25,457 1,510,698 27,500

2,501,815

1869,

2,223 | 1,127,962

23,235 1,397,446 25,458

2,525,108

1870,

2,400 1,327,730

25,491

1,508,706 27,891

2,836.436

1871,

3,049 1,700,855

26,501 1,660,167

29,550

3,360,622

1872,

3,054 | 1,905,866

28,340 | 1,871,810

31,394

3,777,676

1873,

1,579

1,203,372

748

431,980

27,049 1,789,598

29,376

3,424,950

1874,

1,607 | 1,190,063

584

328,545

23,290

1,631,594 25,481

3,150,202

1875,

1,906 | 1,558,308

703

393,547

23,459 1,610,919 26,068

3,562,774

1876,

2,179 | 1,773,068

688

400,367

25,314 | 1,727,456 | 28,181

3,900,891

1877,

2,109 1,982,123

760

463,632

26,500 1,798,788 29,369

4,244,543

1878,

2,326 2,136,832

731

454,340

25,722 1,761,496 28,779

4,352,668

1879,

2,212 | 2,204,901

517

265,744

1880,

2,465 | 2,316,121

416

219,466

1881,

2,750 | 2,599,460

464

1882,

3,054 | 2,943,867

383

1883,

3,012 3,215,569

387

1884,

2,976 | 3,259,234

314

1885,

3,084 3,632,051

344

3,963 | 4,359,906

288

3,890 4,468,302

24,508 1,652,023 23,920 1,650,258 26,801 253,819 24,339 1,680,025 27,553 226,976 25,231 1,805,390 28,668 234,859 24,258 1,851,239 27,657 220,403 23,473 1,687,594 26,763 234,658 23,674 1,797,222 27,102 5,663,931 211,390 22,974 1,752,868 27,222 6,324,164 188 139,612 23,521 1,793,923 27,599 6,401,837

27,237

4,122,668

4,185,845

4,533,304

4,976,233

5,301,662

5,167,231

1886,

1887,

14. The Emigration laws of the Colony were not in a very satisfactory condition in 1861. Besides the Imperial Chinese Passenger's Act 1855. Ordinances 11 of 1857 and 6 of 1859 were in force and others were added, which for convenience were consolidated by Ordinance 5 of 1874, and since then additional Ordinances for the protection of Chinese Emigrants have been brought into force, but these call for no special remark.

15. I will now bring to the notice of the Government a statement of the Shipping, Emigration, &c.: in 1887 as compared with 1886.

SHIPPING.

16. The grand total of all vessels including Junks arriving here in 1887 is 27,559 vessels measuring 6,401,837 tons, or an increase of 377 vessels and 77,673 tons on the previous year, making a daily average arrival of 75.5 vessels measuring about 232 tons each; and of this very large trade 53.6 per cent is under the British flag.

17. The following paragraphs refer to the trade in vessels of foreign construction, the Junk trade being dealt with separately under its proper heading.

18. During the year under review 3,890 ships propelled by steam measuring 4,468,302 tons, and 188 sailing vessels measuring 139,612 tons arrived, being a decrease of 73 steam-ships, but an increase of 108,396 tons showing the additional capacity of steamers of the present day.

19. There is a decrease on the whole of 100 sailing ships measuring 71,778 tons, the decrease being principally in British bottoms. Sailing vessels under foreign flags are now 100 per cent in excess of the same class of vessels carrying the British flag.

Of the above mentioned 3,890 steam-ships entering the Port, 2,873 are British and the remaining 1,017 are foreign owned, or a difference of 182.5 per cent in favour of British ships.

20. The nationality of the various steam-vessels arriving at this Port come in the following order : ---

Number. Tons.

Average tonnage of each vessel.

British, German,

2,873 3,388,123

1,179

540

467,775

866

Chinese,

140

180,795

1,291

French,

100

160,765

1,607

Danish,

63

28,521

453

Dutch,.....

44

58,941

1,339

Norwegian,.

37

44,610

1,206

Spanish,

29

16,178

558

United States,

20

47,626

2,381

Italian,

14

21,520

1,323

Austrian,

13

27,421

2,109

Russian,

11

19,726

1,793

Japanese, Belgian,

5

5,743

1,149

558

558

you

!

21. The vessels under the French, Dutch, United States, Italian, and Austrian flags are few in number but of large capacity some are subsidized by their respective Governments. The Russian ships belong to the so-called Volunteer fleet and pass through with Troops, Prisoners, free Emigrants, and Stores. The British ships vary very much in size thereby reducing their average capacity, and the same may be said of German ships.

22. There is a decrease in tonnage under the following flags: American 51,783 tons, Austrian 17,093 tons, French 12,852 tons, and an increase under the British flag of 62,141 tons, Norwegian 28,984 tons. Under other flags the increase or decrease is too unimportant for special notice.

23. Of the Countries with which this trade is conducted: In British vessels there is an increase with British Columbia of 12,446 tons, Java and adjacent Islands 18,783 tons, Macao 38,710 tons, Hainan 9,532 tons and Siam 22,863 tons; there is a decrease of 26,068 tons with Coast of China and Formosa, and of 20,937 tons to Cochin-China.

24. In Foreign bottoms there is an increase with Coast of China and Formosa of 10,934 tons, India and Singapore, &c. 16,003 tons, Japan 75,851 tons, Hainan 10,058 tons, Russia in Asia 16,065 tons and Siam 35,254 tons; the decrease is with Australia 20,644 tons, Cochin-China 56,570 tons, Europe 19,728 tons, Great Britain 19,561 tons, Macao 24,988 tons and the United States of America 10,447 tons.

JUNKS.

25. The trade in Junks from the Coast of China and Formosa shows an increase of 691 vessels measuring 62,875 tons, but the trade from Macao in this class of vessel shows a decrease of 141 vessels and 21,820 tons. There is also a decrease of 620 vessels and 16,603 tons in the carrying trade between Victoria and the Villages in the Island and Yau-ma-ti.

STEAM-LAUNCHES.

26. Of these vessels there are 42 licensed to carry passengers, 43 private boats, 10 Local Govern- ment boats and 7 belonging to the War Department. These boats add much to the active appearance of the Harbour, and on one occasion, under the following circumstances, gave a practical illustration of their usefulness beyond their ordinary employment. The Pacific Mail Steam ship Company S.S. City of Peking (3,129 tons), while, passing through the shipping on her way to her buoy, collided with the Messageries Maritimes S.S. Saghalien (2,444 tons) striking her on her broadside damaging her below the water line. A large number of launches voluntarily seized hold of the latter ship and towed her until she grounded in shallow water off the Cosmopolitan Docks, probably saving the vessel from sinking in 8 or 9 fathoms of water.

- The licensed launches are gradually driving the small Junks out of the carrying trade with the Villages.

EMIGRATION.

27. Of the whole number of Emigrants leaving in 1887 (82,897) there is an increase on the previous year of 16,401 Male adults, 1,530 Female adults, 300 Male children and 144 Female children, this increase being divided as follows:--

INCREASE.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

DESTINATION.

Male. Female. Male. Female.

Straits Settlements,

7,431

1,276

206

129

San Francisco, ....

4,713

222

14

5

Australian Colonies,..

3,299

4

57

Honolulu,

921

31

31

13

British Columbia,

111

:

United States of America vial

British Columbia,..

168

Mauritius,

34

:

:

:

:

Increase, :

16,677 1,533

311

147

DESTINATION.

DECREASE.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

Male. Female. Male. Female.

Bangkok,

Dili, Timor,

Mauritius,

:

:

247

3

2

29

:

9

:

Australia,

:

1

Decrease,

276

3

11

3

Increase,

16,677

1,533

311

147

Increase,

16,401 1,530

300

144

Total Increase,18,375.

28. With so extensive an Emigration, it is scarcely possible to prevent abuses, but it is satisfac- tory to know that they are in a very small proportion.

29. Women and children under 12 years of age have to provide two photographs each, one is kept on record at this Office, and the other remains in the possession of the Emigrant, so that on arrival at their destination there can be no question as to their identity, should, after the vessel has sailed, any one appear at this Office and complain that a relative has been improperly taken away. With male adults it is more difficult to deal, and they are a good deal left to their own resources. They are all however questioned as to their desire to leave the Colony, and if their replies are in the affirmative there can be no reason why they should not exercise their rights and proceed on their voyage. If any emigrants leave here against their will it is entirely due to themselves for not stating the truth when questioned at the Harbour Office in the first place, and again when questioned and medically examined on board the ship by which they are to proceed.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

30. Four vessels were registered during the year, and nine Certificates of Registry were cancelled.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

31. Ninety cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court during the year.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS, UNDER

SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 of 1879.

32. The following Table will show the number of Candidates who passed, and who failed in obtaining Certificates of Competency:-

GRADE.

PASSED.

FAILED.

Masters,. First Mates,

Only Mates,

2223

5

10

3

1

Second Mates,

3

35

9

First Class Engineers, .

Second Class Engineers,

4312

14

13

10

S. &1

5

27

15

MARINE COURTS, UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

33. The following Courts have been held during the year :---

1. On the 30th June, 1887.-Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Benledi, Official No. 65,767 of Leith, on the "Boat Rocks" to the South West of the Lammocks Island Lighthouse, on the 18th June, 1887. The Master's (JAMES LAWSON RIDDOCH) Certificate of Competency was returned to him. In this case the Harbour Master (President of the Court) disagreed with the Finding, and under Sub-section 5, Section 13, Ordinance 8 of 1879, reported to the Governor his reason for dissent therefrom. 2. On the 22nd November, 1887.-Inquiry as to the burning and loss of the British Steam- ship Wah Yeung, Official No. 88,834 of Hongkong, near Chuen Pee Point, in the Canton River, on the 15th November, 1887, resulting in great loss of life. The Master's (JOHANNES H. A. WITT) Certificate of Competency was suspended for three months. 3. On the 28th November, 1887.-Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Killarney, Official No. 65,876 of Dublin, which was run down and sunk by the British Steam-ship Crusader, Official No. 63,856 of Glasgow, in Iloilo Bay, Philippine Islands, on the 14th November, 1887. The Master of the Killarney's (JAMES O'NEILL) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

4. On the 22nd December, 1887.-Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Lorne, Official No. 62,297 of Leith, on the East Coast of Hainan, on the 3rd December, 1887, resulting in loss of life. The only surviving Officers so far as can be ascertained being the Second Mate and the Third Engineer. No blame was attached to the Master (WILLIAM HUNTER) or any of the Officers.

SEAMEN.

34. 9,458 Seamen were shipped at the Shipping Office during the year, and 10,378 discharged. this discrepancy is owing to Consuls representing foreign flags not applying as hitherto for permits to ship Seamen on board their respective vessels, consequently no record of such shipping can now be kept.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

35. I append a return of the work performed by the Surveyors, since Mr. BREWER'S first appointment.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country, in the Year 1887.

FOREIGN.

ΤΟΤΑΙ..

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

British volumbia,.

British North America,

British North Borneo,...

6

Coast of China and Formosa..

Cochin-China,

16

4,088 96

1,588 1,785,644 64,388) 145 183,708 5,166

37.

71,108 2,554} 12.446 394

884

54

...

6:

12,446

}:

71.108) 2.5541.

334

884 161

6. 4,007 74

2,718 421

6,725 116]

60.

75,110 2,628)

2,718) 12 62 77,828 2,670

6

12,446

394

12,446 391

7

4,088 961

1,064

27

*30

33,085 1,041

884 16 5,152 123

1,6181,818,729 65,429 14,054 1,415,856 191,443 9,203 674,284 110,052 23,257 2,090,090 301.495 15,6423,201,500 255,831 9,233 707,319 111,093 24,875 3,908,819 366,924 145 183,703| 5,166|| 77 57,858 2,013]

78 58,039 2,024 222 241,561 7,179 82158,046 7,552|

}

884 161

1:

2: 1,064 27

9: 5,152 123

181

11

181

11}

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

68,700 4,012} 165: 252,524 6,904]

37

68,700 4,012] 81 157,753 7,537]

293

151

118 226,45311,549]

]

293

15

165 252,524 6,904

11

12,672 251

India and Singapore,

83 110,308 6,224)

83 110,308 6,224

58:

57,652 1,952

Japan,

147 192,443 7,186)

3,804

150 196,247 7,258

112

156,373 6,493)

2,854 97 6,318; 215

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

17. 27,097 649

17

pelago,

27,097 649 31:

37,799 1,566}

131 12,672 251 601 60,506 2,049 117 162,691 6,708 31 37,799 1,566|

176 265,196 7,155] 141; 167,960; 8,176) 259 348,816 18,679)

2,854; 971 10,122 287!

223 241,742 7,190 119 226,746 11,564 176 265,196 7,155 143 170,814 8,273 267 358,938 13,966-

Macao,

336

451,973 17,409)

336

451,973 17,409

403

€8,090 9,695)

221

29,517 4,065

6241

97,607 13,760

Mauritius,

973 361

1

973 361

754

22

754

22

North Pacific,

276 19]

1

276

10

48 64,896 2,215 741|| 520,741| 27,139) 1,727

276

:

48 64,890 2,215

219

28,839 4,030

960 549,580 31,169

58)

2

10

::

1,727 58

1

270

10

Philippine Islands,

801

46,157 3,247

1,380

81

47,537 3,281)

56

29,995 1,756,

645

43

58

30,640 1,799|

136)

76,152 5,003]

2,025

139

77

78,177 5,080

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

99

35,943 2,658]

647

100

36,590 2,685

199

89,756 4,152}

4,275 101

Russia in Asia,..

1,329 271

1,329 27

11

19,726 1,082)

Siam,

. Sandwich Islands,.

United States of America,

1,501 42

Bi

1,50|| 42

6

3,396 83

2,532

501

19

110 104,915 3.757 48,041; 1,614

110

101.915 3,757

751

65,286 1,877)

19

43,041 1,614

35) 66,269 2,404

TOTAL,

2,8963,393,271 126,337

38

125,699 6,810} 21,055 1,109)

6 3,390 83] 185 170,201

54 109,310 4,018)

185 170,201

54 109,310 4,018

40,417 1,216 2,934|3,433,688) 127,553| 15,219|2,244,582 232,137 9,446 723,567 114,691 24,665 2,968,149 347,128 18,1155,637,853 358,774 9,484 763,981 115,907 27,599 6,401,837 474,681

858,774

204

94,031] 4,253 298

4,922 128

304

130,621 6,938

11/

19,726 1,082} 12

12

21,055 1,109-

10!

5,928 1331

4,038) 921

131

7,429 175

75

65,286 1,877

5,634}

5,634

35

66,269 2,404

1.

1

3

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country, in the Year 1887.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOes.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Cochin-China,

Australia and New Zealand,.

British Columbia,.

British North Borneo,

Coast of China and Formosa,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

34

49,095 2,118]

227

1

729 16

4j 2,217 56

1,707 1,897,272į 70,171)

42 45,865 1,451

11 351 49,322 2,129 729

34

...

16

31 2,861

11 1,220 15

2,761 64

9 4,978 120

32

39,835 1,244 97 130,370 3,493||

1,739 1,937,107 71,415 16,987 1,773,998 234,176 5,963 139 176,235 4,944|| 79 68,748 2,558

23

4,081 64 328,916 64,822 22,950 2,102,914 298,998 18,694 3,671,270 304,347 5,995 19,500 643 102 88,248 3,201 121 114,613 4,009)

49,095 2,118 4f 3,590 65 4 2,217 561

227 11 351 49,322 2,129 1,220 15 2,761 64

5 4,810 80

9 4,978 120

120

368,751 66,066 24,689 4,040,021 370,413 149,870 4,136| 241 264,483 8,145

31 58,151 3,752|

31

58,151 3,752

45

99,851 5,862]

45

99,851 5,862

76

158,002 9,614

76 158,002 9,614

:

3 2,814

76

3

2,814 76

Japan,

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,

128

209 308,344| 11,819|| 181,660 7,768

8

5,523 152

217

313,867 11,971|

7 7,267 124 87 114,150 4,039|

...

7

7,267 124

10

10,081) 2001

10)

10,081) 200

5,667| 1011

93

119,817 4,140

296

422,494 15,858||

14

11,190 253

310

433,684 16,111

44,696 1,249

165

226,356 9,017

2

3,101¡

103

10

17,014 346

12

20,115 449

1

78 123,810 6,266. 370

63

77,041 2,008

141

200,851 8,274

206

305,470 14,034

100

121,737 3,257

306

427,207 17,291

12

1,747 40

4

2,117 52

31

Labuan,.

1

330 10

1

330 10

1

3,471 115

330

13

18,761 386

16

22,232 501

10

1

330 10

Macao,

339 455,408 17,555||

::

...

339 455,408 17,555

569

92,095|12,874 51

7,733

883

620

99,828 13,757

908 547,503 30,429|

ŏll

7,733

883

959 555,236 31,312

North Pacific,

2,669

100

2,669 100

2761 12

11

276

12

276

12

3

2,669

1001

4 2,945 112

...

Philippine Islands,

20 9,731 790

12

16,028

285

32

25,759 1,075|

201

12,203] 504

10

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,.

109

44,646 3,038

109

44,646 3,038

205

97,191 4,460)

5

9,587 179

660

30;

21,790 683

40

21,934 1,294)

22

25,615

464

62 47,549 1,758

79

210

97,851 4,539

314

141,837 7,498

660

79

319

142,497 7,577

Russia in Asia,..............

:

1,450] 41

21

1,450 41

21

1,450| 41

2

1,450

41

Sandwich Islands,

3

1,364 44

Siam,....

41.

38,592 1,384

8,181 210 47

South America,

United States of America,

848

20

18 16,219

323

::

37113

1,364 44

5

2,750 69

51

2,750 69.

4,114j 113

8

4,114 113

46,773 1,594

56

47,117 1,361

5,717

162]

63

848

16,219

20

1,409 29

82

52,834 1,523

97

85,709 2,745

13

13,898 372

110!

99,607 3,117

1,409 29

323

35

40,599

822

35 40,599 822

48

2,257

56,816 1,145

49

3

2,257 49

48

56,818 1,145

TOTAL,.....

2,687|3,116,056| 120,484||

211 267,804 7,154 2,898 3,383,360|127,688 | 18,188 2,486,475 273,268 6,132 457,788 68,932 24,315|2,944,263 342,200 20,870 5,602,581 393,752 6,343 725,092 76,086 27,2136,327,628 469,838

}

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1887.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

sVesels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

Austrian,

52

83,655

13

27,421

2,684 797

12

13,684

215

64

97,339

2,899

13

...

27,421

797

Belgian,

1

558

18

1

558

18

· British,

2,896

3,393,271 |126,337

38

40,417

1,216

2,934

3,433,688

127,553

Chinese,

137

179,525 6,568

5

2,363

121

142

181,888

6,689

Chinese Junks,

14,133

1,113,202

185,641

9,388

680,721 | 113,357

23,521

1,793,923

298,998

Danish,

58

25,048

1,284

3,473

116

63

28,521

1,400

Dutch,

44

58,692 2,515

908

41

46

59,600

2,556

French,

102

162,299

11,285

3

1,121

48

105

163,420

11,333

German,

554

474,729

16,765

25

25

15,671

522

579

490,400

17,287

Hawaiian,

3

1,059

40

3

1,059

40

Italian,

14

21,520

850

14

21,520

850

Japanese,

3

2,855

78

Norwegian,

44

48,274

1,204

co co

3

3,330

223

6

6,185

301

2,296

48

47

50,570

1,252

Russian,

11

19,726

1,082

11

19,726

1,082

Siamese,

15

7,147

258

15

7,147

258

Spanish,

34

18,400

Swedish,

1

472

1,356 - 12

34

18,400

1,356

1

472

12

TOTAL,....

18,115 5,637,853 | 358,774

9,484

763,984 115,907 27,599 6,401,837 | 474,681

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1887.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGoes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

Austrian,

383

63

15

94,307 30,701

3,039 996

11

11,802

187

74

106,109

3,226

15

30,701

996

Belgian,

1

558

18

1

558

18

British,

2,687 | 3,116,056 | 120,484

211

267,304

7,154

2,898

3,383,360 | 127,638

Chinese,

126

163,753 4,535

4

Chinese Junks,

17,153

1,442,767 | 229,974

5,986

1,771 323,236

71

130

165,524

4,606

65,259 | 23,139

1,766,003 | 295,233

Danish,

56

23,073

1,264

5

3,845

124

61

26,918

1,388

Dutch,

42

57,421

2,424

3

1,197

44

45

58,618

2,468

French,

98

158,836

11,082

12

German,

553

445,736

16,247

59

29

6,031

312

110

164,867

11,394

57,559 1,428

612

503,295

17,675

Hawaiian,

2

722

24

2

722

24

Italian,

14

20,563

812

14

20,563

812

Japanese,

6

Norwegian,

8

6,399

155

36

6,185 41.721

314

6

6,185

314

1,036

44

48,120

1,191

Russian,

10

18,622

1,043

10

18,622

1,043

Siamese,

11

5,507

194

1,640

63

15

7,147

257

Spanish,

32

18,068

1,479

4

1,771

64

36

19,839

1,543

Swedish,.

472

12

1

472

12

TOTAL,

20,870 5,602,531 393,752 6,343

725,092 76,086

27,213 6,327,623 469,838

V.—TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1887.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

OF PORTS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vls. Tons. Crews. VIS. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,

475

386

271

19,065 4,283 651 12,759 3,185 881 17,796 3,566 110

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.

Total,.

2,8963,393,271|126,337|| 38 40,417 1,216 2,934 3,433,688 127,553 13,489 2,105,081 212,611 5,511 598 89,881 8,792 2,293 2,896|3,393,271|126,337| 38 40,417 1,216 2,934 8,488,688|127,558 15,219 2,244,582 232,437 9,446

40,151 8,717 1,126 54,316 8,568 1,267 7,801 1,090 381 554,644 72,142 21,934 107,072 25,390 2,891

59,216 13,000 67,075 11,753 25,597 4,650 6,052,996 411,090 196,953 34,182

723,567 114,691 24,665 2,968,149| 9347,128 18,115 5,637,833 858,774 9,484 763,984 115,907 27,599 6,401,837 474,681

40,151 8,717 1,126

54,316 8,568 1,267

Tons. Crews. VIS.

59,261|13,000) 475| 67,075 11,753| 386 7,801 1,090 381 25,597 4,656 271 514,227 70,926 19,000 2,619,308 283,537 16,385 107,072 25,390 2,891 196,953 34,182 598

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews.

19,065 4,263Į 651 12,759 3,185 881 17,796 3,566| 110 5,498,352 338,9418 5,549 89,881 8,792 2,293

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1887.

RED

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

OF PORTS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews, Vls.

Tons. Crews. VIS.

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,

Victoria,

2,687| 8,116,056|120,484

211 207,304 7,154 2,8983,383,360|127,688|15,057

Yaumáti,

...

Total,.

2,687 8,116,056|120,484'

9,563 1,843 881 46,572 6,120| 477 14,674 1,901 196 2,851,411|252,938 2,865 1,039 64,255 10,376 1,713 211 267,304 7,154|| 2,898 3,383,300 127,638 18,183 2,486,475 273,268 6,132

245

757

185

Tons. Crews. Vls.

49,653 11,164 1,126 19,217 5,298 1,234 10,923| 2,667| 381 256,552 27,557 18,822 121,443 22,246 2,752

Tons. Crews. Vls.

59,216 13,007 65,789 11,418] 25,597 4,658)

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

245

757]

185

9,563 1,843 46,572 6,120| 14,674 1,991 2,607,963 280,495 18,644 5,467,467 373,422 3,076 185,698| 32,622|||1,039 64,255 10,376| 1,713

881

477

196

49,653|11,164 1,126 50,216| 13,007 19,217 5,298 1,234 65,789 11,418 10,023 2,667| 381 25,507 4,658 523,856 34,711 21,720 5,991,323 408,133 121,443 22,246 2,752 185,698 32,622

457,788 68,932 24,315 2,944,263|342,200 20,870 5,602,581|398,752||| 6,343

725,092|76,086 27,213 6,327,623 469,838

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1887.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passeu-

gers.

Victoria,

368 54,122

9,032

255

219

28,839 4,030

353

587

82,961 13,062

608

Total,... 368

54,122 9,032

255

219

28,839 4,030

353

587 82,961 13,062

608

VIII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1887.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,

527

75,315 12,077

593

49

7,055

844

620

576

82,370 12,921

1,213

Total....

527

75,315 12,077

593

49

7,055

844

620°

576

82,370 12,921 1,213

}

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1887.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

475

19,065 4,283

Shaukiwán,

386

12,759 3,185

64 51

651

40,151 8,717

43

1,126

881

54,316

8,568

82

1,267

39,216 13,000 67,075

107

11.753

133

Stanley,

271

17.796 3,566

110

7,801

1,090

16

381

25,597 4,656

127

Victoria,

12,035

Yaumáti,.

598

919,579 156,783 89,881 8,792

116,561

5,284

442,542

65,562

60

2,293

107,072 25,390

30,095 51

17.269 2,891

1,362,121 | 222,845, 146,656

196,953 34,182

111

Total,... 13,765 || 1,059,080176,609 |116,847

9,169

651,882 109,327 30,287

22.934

1,710,962 285,036147,134

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1887.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,

245

9,563 1,843

79

881

49,653 11,164

757

Stanley,....... 185

46,572 6,120 14,674

252

1,991

119

Victoria,

14,400

Yaumáti,.

1,039

1,232,388 197,567 133,895

64,255 10,376

47

Total,... 16,626 1,867,452 | 217,897 |134,392

5,937

477 19,217 5,298 196 10,923 2,667 2,670 114,945 23,040 1,713 121,443 22,246

316,181 64,415

56 1,126 59,216 13,007 20 1,234 23

381 13,078 17,070 430 2,752

135

65,789 11,418

272

25,597 4,658

142

1,347,333 | 220,607 146,973 185,698 32,622 477

13,607

22,563 1,683,633 282,312 | 147,999

XI.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1887.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

gers.

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,... 386

475

19,065 4,283

64

651

40,151

8,717

43

1,126

59,216 13,000

107

12,759 3,185

51

881

54,316

8,568

82

1,267

67,075

11,753

133

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.

271 12,403 598

17,796 3,566

111

110

7,801

1,090

16

381

25,597

4,656

127

973,701 165,815 116,816

89,881 8,792

5,453

471,381

69,592

30,448

60

2,293

107,072 25,390

51

17,856 2,891

1,445,082 235,407

147,264

Total.... 14,133 | 1,113,202 |185,641 |117,102

9,388

680,721 113,357

30,640

196,953 34,182

23,521 | 1,793,923 298,998

111

147,742

XII.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1887.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

245

Shaukiwán,...

757

9,563 46,572 6,120

1,843

79.

881

49,653 11,164

56

1,126

252

477

19,217 5,298

20

1,234

59,216 13,007 65,789 11,418

135

272

Stanley,

185

14,674 1,991

119

196

Victoria,

14,927 | 1,307,703 209,644|134,488

Yaumáti,.

1,039 64,255 10,376

47

10,923 2,667 2,719 122,000 23,884 1,713

23

381

121,443 22,246

13,698 430

17,646 2,752

25,597 1,429,703 | 233,528

4,658

142

148,186

K

185,698 32,622

Total,... 17,153 | 1,442,767 |229,974 | 134,985

5,986

323,236 65,259 14,227

23,139

1,766,003 29 5,233

477

149,212

XIII.-Return of Junks ( Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and

the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1887.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,....

3,094 98,083 31,402 3,059 1,215

43,223 11,649 4,277 4,309

141,306 43,051

7,336

Total,... 3,094 98,083 31,402 3,059 1,215 43,223 11,649 4,277 4,309

141,306 43,051

7,336

XIV.-Return of Junks ( Local Trade ) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and

the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1887.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria, ......

1,863 54,655 16,100 6,068 2,624

99,914 28,460

826 4,487

154,569 44,560

6,894

Total,...

1,863

54,655 | 16,100

6,068 2,624

99,914 28,460

826 4,487

154,569 | 44,560

6,894

XV.-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,..

2,896

3,393,271

126.337

Do.

do. in Ballast,

38

40,417

1,216

Total,.......

2,934

3,433,688

127,553

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

2,687

3,116,056

120,484

Do.

do. in Ballast,

211

267,304

7,154

Total,.......

2,898

3,383,360

127,638

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared;

5,832

6,817,048

255,191

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

15,219

2,244,582

323,437

Do.

do. in Ballast,

9,446

723,567

114,691

Total,.....

24,665

2,968,149

347,128

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

18,183

2,486,475

273,268

Do.

do. in Ballast,

6,132

457,788

68,932

Total,......

24,315

2,944,263

342,200

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,.

48,980

5,912,412

689,328

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

18,115

5,637,853

358,774

Do.

do.

in Ballast,.

9,484

763,984

115,907

Total of all Vessels entered,

27,599

6,401,837

474,681

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

20,870

5,602,531

393,752

Do.

Do.

do.

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,.

do.

in Ballast,....

Total of all Vessels cleared,

do. in Ballast,

6,343

725,092

76,086

27,213

6,327,623

469,838

38,985

11,240,384

752,526

15,827

1,489,076

191,993

54,812

12,729,460

944,519

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,

Do.

4,309

141,306

43,051

cleared,

4,487

154,569

44,560

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,

8,796

295,875

87,611

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

54,812

12,729,460

944,519

do.,

8,796

295,875

87,611

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,.

63,608

13,025,335

1,032,130

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,.

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,.

92,375

617,893

54,888

7,336

Total Arrivals,...

772,492

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

82,897

Do.

in China and Japan,..

629,532

Do.

in Macao,

57,675

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

6,894

Total Departures,

776,998

Excess of Departures over Arrivals,..

4,506

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,....

1,549,490

XVI.—RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1887.

Name of Vessel.

Number.

Official Regis- Horse

tered Tonnage.

Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when

Penshaw,......

68,930 729.33

Dafila, str.,

68,501 535.68 99

Barque

Schooner Iron

Wood Southwick, Durham, 1875.

Sunderland, Durham, 1873.

Fatshan, str.,

88,843 1,425.12 225

None

Steel Leith, 1887.

Haitan, str.,....................

88,844 1,182.60 350

Brigantine Steel Middlesborough, 1887.

Remarks, &c.

XVII.-RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1887.

Name of Vessel.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when

Reason of Cancellation.

Registered anew at Singapore in consc-

quence of change of ownership.

Transferred to Sydney, N.S.W.

Registered anew at Penang in consequence of change of ownership.

Willie,.

64,099 274.97 1872

Three Brothers, 40,739 366.97 1874

Presto,............ 64,122 384.33 1875

Mary Austin, str, 53,204

65,082

:

:

....

88,833

Hailoong, str.,..

Milton, str.,

Wah Yeung, str., 88,834 313.36 1885 55

Schr. Wood Vegesack, 1861.

Barq. Wood Bangkok, Siam, 1859.

Barq. Iron

Amsterdam, 1862.

140.22 1884 30 Schr. Iron Newcastle on Tyne, 1865.

277.12 1884 60 Schr. Iron Aberdeen, 1871.

149.61 1884 37 Schr. Wood Hongkong, 1884.

Sehr. Wood Hongkong, 1884.

Sold to Foreigners at Shanghai.

Victoria, str., 88,837 16.94 1885 16

Schr. Wood

Hongkong, 1885.

Glasgow, 1881.

Camorta, str., 84,285 1,355.27 1886 200 Schr. Iron

Sold to Foreigners at Hiogo,

Japan.

Registered anew at Penang in consequence of change of ownership.

Destroyed by fire.

Transferred to Port Darwin,

South Australia. Transferred to Glasgow.

XVIII-AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III of Ordinance No. 8' of 1879 in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1887.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fec taken.

Number.

Fee.

Amount.

Remarks, &c.

CA

Alteration in Agreement with Seamen,

Certifying Desertion, ....

2

2

133

1

133

Declaration of Ownership,...

10

2

20

Endorsement of change of Master,.

43

1

13

Endorsement of change of Ownership,.

5

10

Endorsement of change in Tonnage,

1

2

2

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,

15

60

Inspection of Registry,

1

i

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

5

10

Recording Transfer of Mortgage,

3

5

15

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,.

1

5

Recording Sale of Ship,..............

12

39.85

Regis eng Certificate of Sale,...............

3

6

Total,.......

373.85

XIX.-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1887.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

TOTAL..

WHITHER BOUND.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1 January 3

Japan, str..

2

3

งง

4

Surat, str..

"J

4

Pandora, str.

1,865 British 1,670 1,781 Austrian

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

355

57

12

7

431

167

167

N. J. Nantes

">

P. Mersa

572

70

13

662

Sydney

73

4

CT

5

6

19

A

5 Cairngorm, str.

1,166 British

W. H. Pearse

Melbourne

78

::

151

,,

8 Camelot, str.

1,049

وو

J. Daily

Straits Settlements

498

513

Port Darwin

23

10 Chingtu, str.

1.450

J. D. C. Arthur

Sydney

54

152

Melbourne

75

11 Oceanic, str..

2,440

H. Davison

San Francisco

94

101

11 Kashgar. str.

1,515

C. Gadd

Straits Settlements

453

""

22

14

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

153

2

19

10

15

""

11

""

Berenice, str.

18 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

1,707 Austrian

2,400 British

C. Bechtinger

139

aaa

25

487

20

184

20

178

120

120

E. G. Stead

""

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

45

12

""

19 Airlie, str................

1,492

W. Ellis

Brisbane

Sydney

23

Melbourne

13 14

21

Bormida, str.

""

31

Cyclops, str.

15 February 1

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,499 Italian 1,403 British 1,392

E. Pizzarello

Straits Settlements

124

12

117

H. Nish

""

A. B. Mactavish

26

دو

16

17

18

19

20

21

""

2

Poseidon, str.

99

2,510 Austrian

G. Doncich

29

"

7 Archimede, str..

"

""

8

Khiva, str.

7

8

Tai Sang, str.

97

11

Dardanus, str.

91

12

City of New York, str.

1,849 | Italian 1,419 British 1,505 1,536 1,964 American

O. Canepa

79

3

:

"

214

11

S. Bason

وو

T. L. Davies

2101

16

""

T. Purdy

104

12

وو

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

45

4

- 2010 20

136

117

30

37

83

228

232

122

51

Port Darwin

7

Sydney

261

22

""

14 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459❘ British

W. M. Dodd

Melbourne

41

111

Adelaide

Dunedin, N.Z.

36

23

គន

14

Devonhurst, str.

""

24

""

15 Nepaul, str.

25

16 Menelaus, str.

26

"

19 Compta, str.

1,164 Dutch 1,987 British 1,300 1,291 Dutch

P. Houthoff L. M. Wibmer R. Nelson

Straits Settlements

90!

197

"

510

W. L. Laimers

7291

90

197

514

16

753

Straits Settlements

7241

Port Darwin

30

Brisbane

7

Sydney

46

:

::

27

""

21 Deepdale, str.

1,715 British

J. G. Sharp

Melbourne

44

895

Port Chalmers

Launceston

Greymouth

27

Wellington

28

29

25 Glenfruin, str.

1,936

E Norman

Straits Settlements

709

13

2

727

"

26 Thisbe, str.

21

30

27

26 Achilles, str..

1,848 Austrian 1,529 British

L. Lemesich

677

47

11

746

259

2.9

C. Anderson

31

26 | Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

2901

14

1

305

34

32 March

Thames, str.

2,131

33

>>

2 Wing Sang, str.

1,617

W. A. Seaton d'A. de Ste. Croix)

Straits Settlemeuts

218

213

726

62

21

817

Port Darwin

21

42

101

31

2 Tsinan, str.

1,460

A. Hunt

Sydney

Melbourne

381

co co co co

8 *=***

35

36

37

53

38

39

5 Japan, str.

و,

A

*

40

19

15 Amphitrite, str.

41

15 Ganges, str.

5

42

""

43

44

45

"

46

25

8 | Haiphong, str.

9 City of Peking, str.

11 Glenartney, str.

11 Changsha, str. ..

17 Arratoon Apcar, str.

19 Bormida, str.

19 Hector,

str.

19 Guthrie, str..

22 Sikh, str.

1,865 1,122

3,129 American 1,400 British

1,463

2,486 Austrian 2,162 | British 1,392

1,499 Italian 1,590 British

T. S. Gardner S. Ashton

Straits Settlements

752

776

18

679

696

11

H. C. Dearborn D. O. Mackinlay

San Francisco Straits Settlements Port Darwin

1,022

7

1,034

853

47

17:

921

55

J. E. Williams

Sydney

32

200

27

Melbourne

111

,!

B. Gelcich E. Stewart J. G. Olifent E. Pizzarello H. Batt

Straits Settlements

829

45

922

216

216

700

""

610

""

685

ལཱལ ི

:

:

52

301

785

672

52

700

15

""

Port Darwin

47

>>

25 Claymore, str.

CAA

48

23

26 Tai Sang, str.

1,493

1,510

1.058 1,505

N. Shannon

Sydney

43

98

Melbourne

30

Port Darwin

68

A. Scotland

Sydney

134

333

Melbourne

125

W. A. Gulland

Straits Settlements

1,052

1 052

وو

742

49

""

26 City of Sydney, str....

50

29 Coromandel, str.

1,966 American 2,523 British

T. L. Davies D. E. Friele J. Reeves

50

19.

218

San Francisco

695:

695

Straits Settlements

250

250

i

Port Darwin

118

51

"T

29 Chingtu, str.

1,459

J. D. C. Arthur

Sydney

751

246

"

Melbourne

51

83835

52 April

4 Glenlyon, str.

03

5 Oceanic, str..

1,410 2,440

33

J. Sommers J. Metcalfe

54

5 Clara, str.

55

7 Palamed, str.

56

57

Archimede, str.

7 Kashgar, str.

Carried forward,.

675 German

! 1,536 British 1,849 Italian 1,515 British

C. Christensen C. Jackson O. Canepa C. Gadd

Straits Settlements San Francisco Straits Settlements

913

36

959

1,062

:

1,062

387

18

11

419

764

35

810

-

576

36

623

15

622

=

21

650

+7

96,823

Carried forward,..

23,622

871 287

112

24,892

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-(Continued).

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward,........

96,823

Brought forward, | 23,622

871

287 112 24,892

Singapore

46

:

Port Darwin

58 April

7 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

100

J. W. B. Darke

Sydney

263

44

Melbourne

71

8668838858 8 22 2 2

59

"3

12

Peshawur, str.

"

60

13

""

Medusa, str..

61

>>

13

Parthia, str.

62

15

64

14 Devonhurst, str.

Palinurus, str..

15 Jaan, str.

دو

*

16

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

دو

19

Khiva, str.

1,419 British

67

"5

19

China, str...

69

"

20

Wing Fang, str.

22

21

Fero, str.

70

22

""

Cathay, str.

71

JE

23 Stettin, str.

2,130 1,776 Austrian 2,035 British 1,164 Dutch 1,536 British 1,865 2,275 American

648 German 1,517 British

754 German 1,884 British 1,079 German

L. H. Moule E. Perini C. C. Brough P. Houthoff T. Jackson T. S. Gardner

W. B. Seabury S. Bason

J. A. Hansen

E. Ashdown

Straits Settlements

210

210

""

526

100

643

>>

1,068

14.

1,091

*

4431

443

22

153

153

457

39

on

508

San Francisco

775

Straits Settlements

539

J. P. Ulderup d'A. de Ste. Croix

12

352

:

:

:

775

17

31

560

16!

368

632

23

7

1

663

Singapore

137

Mauritius

165

CO

:

308

Straits Settlements

188

188

F. W. Warnkes

,,

439

19

460

Port Darwin

96

3

72

A

25 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459 British

W. M. Dodd

Sydney

61

Melbourne

173!

::

338

73

23

26 Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

1,138

26

""

1,169

Port Darwin

62

77

78

79

80

RRERS

74

75

29 Chelydra, str.

1,574

H. Peace

Sydney

116!

318

>>

Melbourne

136

3

30 Deuteros, str.

1,198 German

L. Iwersen

Straits Settlements

560

31

7

602

76 May

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392 British

J. G. Olifent

694

921

19

وو

814

39

5

Ajax, str.

1,525

J. Riley

3481

**

348

22

5

Bokhara, str.

5

City of New York, str.

1,711 1,964 American

C. R. Edwards

170

170

>>

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

691

693

Port Darwin

36

Brisbane

1

49

5 Tannadice, str..

81

6 Carisbrooke, str.

82

7 Celebes, str.

83

7 Sarpedon, str.

84

12 Bisagno, str.

1,408 British

973 1,423 Dutch 1,592 British 1,499 Italian

H. Craig

159

Sydney

40

Melbourne

79

R. Cass J. C. Joon H. Chrimes E. Pizzarello

Straits Settlements

592

559

""

167

""

597

دو

2888

30

14

640

21

11

679

25

203

75

12

10

694

Port Darwin

87

85

وو

13 Tsinan, str.

1,460 British

W. N. Allison

Sydney

99!

282

Melbourne

93

86

13

""

Zambesi, str.

1,565

C. F. Preston

Straits Settlements

737

42

794

87

""

14

Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

88

""

14

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

89

90

91

29

17

Orestes, str.

1,323

"

27

18

Abyssinia, str.

2,346

T. J. Davies

J. W. Hutchinson

A. Marshall

San Francisco

Victoria, B.C.

1,153

1,169

Straits Settlements

638

113

11

789

458

43

516

""

29

80

"

United States

50

""

19

Deccan, str.

92

""

20 Protos, str.

2,022 1,150 German

P. W. Case

Straits Settlements

201

201

""

C. J. Sorensen

532

53

>>

13

12

610

Singapore

320

3

1

Port Darwin

69

93

12

94

::

23 Port Victor, str.

24 City of Peking, str.

95

S

A

860

23

25 Pathan, str.

96

""

27 Lombardy, str..

97

27 Titania, str.

98

99

"

1,828 British

3,129 American

1,762 British

A. Williams

488

Sydney

56

Melbourne

35

H. C. Dearborn

San Francisco

998

Singapore

273

2=

21

11

Port Darwin

57

712

1,032

J. Rowley

484

Sydney

75

Melbourne

64

::

101

3 Kashgar, str.

100 June

28 Japan, str.

31 Whampoa, str....

2 San Pablo, str..

1,571

2,011 Austrian 1,865 British

1,109

>>

3,060 American 1,515 British

G. Fawcett

G. C. Brookes S. Mersa T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

615

152

347

938

30

79

15

51

13

Port Darwin

77

131

22

a 16

3

652

208

417

Sydney

49

151

:

Melbourne

102

J7

3 Telemachus, str.

1,421

E. C. Reed C. Gadd H. Jones

San Francisco

582

14

607

Straits Settlements

740

63

822

323

35

367

""

27.

103

7 Parthia, str.

2,035

""

C. C. Brough

Victoria, B.C.

32

United States

57

::

90

104

>>

9 Bormida, str.

105

25

10

Berenice, str.

106

2:

11

City of Sydney, str..

107

13

دو

Khiva, str.

108

14 Wing Sang, str.

1,499 Italian 1,707 Austrian 1,966 American 1,419 British 1,517

A. Guelfi C. S. Antega D. E. Friele S. Bason

Straits Settlements

356

30

392

358

120

San Francisco

271

4

Straits Settlements

387

32

d'A. de Ste. Croix

416

76

15

Port Darwin

118

65539

14

498

283

430

11

518

Thursday Island

Cooktown

49

109

""

18 Menmuir, str.

1,247

P. Helms

Townsville

14

214

Rockhampton

31

Brisbane

7

Sydney

19

110 111

""

18 Angers, str.

2,077

J. Pinkham

Straits Settlements

323

27

364

20 Oceanic, str..

2,440

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

427

18

7

454

112

""

20 Glenfinlas, str.

1,409

B. Quartly

Straits Settlements

182

34

10

235

113

""

25 Jason, str.

1,412

J. Miligan

139

10

5

155

2"

114

25 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

J. G. Olifent

347

71

13

437

""

115

31

28 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459

W. M. Dodd

Sydney Melbourne

15

30

15)

Curried forward,.

193,636

Carried forward,..

48,751 2,444 646 340 52,181

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—(Continued).

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

Brought forward,..............| 193,636

Brought forward, 48,751 2,444| 646 340 52,181

Port Darwin

16

Cooktown

116 June

28 Deepdale, str.

1,715 British

J. G. Sharp

Brisbane

56

Sydney

Melbourne

10

117

29

28

Port Augusta, str.

1,856

J. Hogg

Victoria, B.C.

13

23

""

United States

10

118

22

30

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

91

100

119

"}

30

Glenorchy, str....

1,822 British

F. Gedye

Straits Settlements

147

:

147

120

""

30

Venetia, str..

1,609

F. Cole

350

99

121

July

2

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

T. L. Davies

174

Port Darwin

39

122

+

6 Airlie, str.

1,492

W. Ellis

Sydney

50

:

323

3

391

11

256

194

""

Melbourne

961

123

8 Bisagno, str..

1,499 Italian

S. Anfosso

Straits Settlements

425

124

37

9 Zambesi, str..

1,565 | British

C. F. Preston

519

22

125

12 Gaelic, str.

126

"

14 Cyclops, str.

2,691 1,403

""

"

W. G. Pearne H. Nish

San Francisco

607

14

9884

460

552

627

Straits Settlements

140

140

127

14 Orion, str.

1,833 Austrian

G. Maltiazzi

359

96

19

494

Port Darwin

30

Cooktown

10

128

15 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

J. W. B. Darke

Townsville Brisbane Sydney

63

15

Melbourne

5

129

دو

15 Japan, str.

130

">

16

Menelaus, str.

1,865 1,300

وو

T. S. Gardner R. Nelson

Straits Settlements

493

67

15

18!

593

130

130

131

"

19

Glengyle, str...

2,244

K. J. Gasson

295

35

13

351

132

J

23

City of New York, str.

1,964 American

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

186

10

193

133

""

25

Achilles, str..

1,529 | British

C. Anderson

Straits Settlements

150

134

""

25

Glenfruin, str.

1,936

E. Norman

193

::

150

193

22

27

Port Darwin

343

135

26 Tsinan, str.

1,460

W. N. Allison

Sydney

57

:

452

>>

Melbourne

43

1

136

""

30

Celebes, str.

137

30 Lombardy, str...

1,423 Dutch 1,571 British

J. C. Joon

Straits Settlements

220

60

12

305

G. C. Brookes

426

49

13

15

503

Port Darwin

10

138

""

30

Afghan, str..

1,439

""

G. Roy

Sydney

36

73

Melbourne

27

139 August 2

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

358

39

16

472

""

140

""

2

Abyssinia, str.

2,346

141

4

Belgic, str.

2,695

A. Marshall

W. H. Walker

Victoria, B.C. United States San Francisco

10

:

30

40

262

43

312

"1

Thursday Island

1

Townsville

142

""

6 Tannadice, str...

1,408

H. Craig

Brisbane Sydney

31

16

Melbourne

11

143

"

6

Antenor, str.

1,376

J. Grier

Straits Settlements

137

137

144

"

10

Deccan, str.

2,022

P. W. Case

349

36

10

400

23

""

12

145

""

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

J. G. Olifent

107

44

5

163

32

""

63

Port Darwin

146

21

13 Soochow, str.

18

999

J. B. Harris

Sydney

2

Melbourne

:

:

88

147

"

13

Elektra, str.

2,095 Austrian

P. Mersa

71

65

Straits Settlements

148

""

15

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

G. B. Daquino

83

28

>>

149

">

16

Kashgar, str.

1,515 British

C. Gadd

204

27

25

150

19

Tai Sang, str.

221

56

1,505

T. Davies

""

22

Port Darwin

36

151

*

22

20 Guthrie, str..

1,493

S. G. Green

Sydney

10

""

Melbourne

152

20

San Pablo, str.

153

22

23

Khiva, str.

154

21

29

Venetia, str.

155

"

30

Changsha, str.

3,060 American 1,419 British 1,609 1,463

E. C. Reed

San Francisco

135

37

S. Bason

Straits Settlements

386

38

F. Cole

401

33

888

10

483

7837

2=0

151

119

241

12

296

54

198

442

443

""

J. E. Williams

Sydney

14

43

Melbourne

29

Honolulu

286

17

156

>"

31 City of Sydney,

str.

157 Sept.

1 Glenearn, str.

1,966 American 1,410 British

158

32

3 Japan, str.

1,865

D. E. Friele

P. Brass T. S. Gardner

San Francisco

191

43

3

19 19

551

Straits Settlements

299

70

19

11

399

218

44

8

10

280

>>

";

159

""

Pathan, str.

1,762

J. Rowley

""

Sydney Melbourne

42

57

13

160

"

8 Bellerophon, str.

1,397

W. E. Guthrie

Straits Settlements

142

19

3

164

""

161

10 Imperator, str..

2,441 Austrian

162

""

10 Bisagno, str.

163

""

10 Oceanic, str...

164

13 Zambesi, str..

1,499 Italian 2,440 British 1,565

C. Bechtinger S. Anfosso J. Metcalfe

212

90,

11

16

329

240

231

267

22

San Francisco

248

47

302

C. F. Preston

Straits Settlements

245

12

267

165

14 Crusader,

str.

647

166

""

14 Titan, str.......

1,554

J. Ogston

R. J. Brown

65

14

82

"

167

""

19

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

168

"}

19

Palamed, str.

1,536

d'A. de Ste. Croix] C. Jackson

"

"

39

39

97

:

97

367

461

13

པ་

431

80

80

169

"

19 Chingtu, str.

1,459

J. D. C. Arthur

Cooktown Thursday Island Townsville

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

40

1

15

11

170

21 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

171

24 Stura, str........................................

2,275 American 1,416 Italian

W. B. Seabury G. B. DeMarchi

San Francisco Straits Settlements

139

11

2

153

518

35

10

567

Carried forward,....

289,200

Carried forward,..

60,928 3,878

942

580 66,328

RETURN OF CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-( Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND,

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,....... 172 Sept. 28 Tai Yuan, str.

289,200

1,459 | British

Brought forward,......60,928 3,878; 942 580 66,828

W. M. Dodd

Sydney

41

61

Melbourne

20

Cooktown

15

173

28 New Guinea, str.

Townsville

11

1,700

J. W. Wale

J

58

Sydney

25

Melbourne

7

174

29

Angers, str.

2,077

J. Pinkham

22

Straits Settlements

245

240

175 Oct.

1

Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

"

308

12:

323

170

21

Parthia, str...

2,035

J. Arnold

Victoria, B.C.

13

25

United States

28

12

177

""

4

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

J. G. Olifent

Straits Settlements

520

61

11

10

"2

A

611

178

""

5 Diomed, str...

1,471

W. H. Bigley

84

84

179

>>

6 Celebes, str.

1,423 Dutch

J. C. Joon

16

>>

467

Port Darwin

180

"

7 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

181

27

11

182

183

"

184

185

""

186

""

15 | Sikh, str.

City of New York, str.

11 Amphitrite, str.

12 Lombardy, str.. 12 Tai Sang, str.. 15 Bormida, str.

1,964 | American 2,486 Austrian 1,071 British 1,505 1,499 Italian 1,510 British

J. W. B. Darke

R. R. Searle L. Lemesich G. C. Brookes T. L Davies G. B. Daquino

Sydney Melbourne San Francisco

Cooktown

34

261

21

141

23

170

Straits Settlements

377

49

442

232

13

31

250

311

40:

6!

72

367

362

32

27

406

A. Scotland

Sydney Melbourne

42

:

82

39

187

188

"

**

18 Deccan, str.

2,022

""

18 Vortigern, str.

876

P. W. Casc J. Brown

Straits Settlements

2931 241

3

323

141

7

:

149

189

25

20 | Belgic, str.

2,095

W. H. Walker

Honolulu

398

13

>>

San Francisco

297

37

768

190

191

""

21 Japan, str. 21 Deuteros, str.

1,865

192

22 | Sarpedon, str.

1,198 German 1,592 British

T. S. Gardner L. Iwersen

H. Chrimes

Straits Settlements

191

237

193

23

204

104

*

125

193

22 Tsinan, str.

1,460

F. T. Gladstone

Sydney Melbourne

26

41

15

194

25 Hydaspes, str.

1,891

E. Crew

Straits Settlements

187

187

195

29

Devonhurst, str.

1,164 | Dutch

196 Nov.

1

City of Peking, str.

197

>>

1 Ghazee, str.

པ་

198

199

"2

7 Tritos, str.

200

""

7 Kashgar, str.

201

7 Glenfiulas, str..

202

203

>>

204

"

}

205

206

>>

207

208

""

209

"

18 Arratoon Apcar,

str.

210

"

18 Changsha, str.

Tannadice, str.

3,129 American

1,764 British

1,408

J. Johnson

P. Houthoff H. C. Dearborn

494

553

";

San Francisco

153

30

188

Straits Settlements

251

Sydney

33

298

Melbourne

10

Port Darwin

19

H. Craig

Sydney

14

Melbourne

4

8 Telemachus, str.

12 Titania, str. 12 Wing Sang, str.

12 Bisagno, str................. 12 San Pablo, str..... 15 | Glucksburg, str. 16 Falkenburg, str.

2,011 Austrian 1,517 British 1,499 | Italian 3,060 American 916 German

988 1,892 British

H. Jones

M. Garofolich

S. Anfosso

E. C. Reed A. Schultz

W. Dreyer

1,341 German 1,615 British 1,400 1,421

A. L. Bleicken

Straits Settlements

149

13

C. Gadd

4331

67

2

>

B. Quartly

101

16

>>

32

>>

39

100!

56

59

d'A. de Ste. Croix

254

22

1

112

10

21

San Francisco

86

Straits Settlements

247

སྐཚལཚལ

:

:

Singapore

3:

Mauritius

11:

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

324

118

Port Darwin

79

1,463

J. E. Williams

Sydney

31

39

169

10

518

126

38

167

291

125

94

2€2

147

462

129

}}

Melbourne

14

Port Darwin

51

Cooktown

211

19 Guthrie, str..

1,493

S. G. Green

Townsville

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

18

Melbourne

11

212

22 City of Sydney, str.

1.966

213

22

Ancona, str..

""

214

#

25. Khiva, str.

American 1,888 British 1,419

D. E. Friele W. J. Webber C. F. Preston

San Francisco

98

Straits Settlements

187

556

58

17

27

Port Darwin

141

Thursday Island

Townsville

215

28. Airlic, str..

1,492

W. Ellis

Brisbane

Sydney

Rockhampton

:

100

100

187

630

163

101

Melbourne

4

216

29 Deuteros, str.

217

29 ¡ Cloncurry, str.

1,198 German 1,695 British

218

219

Dec.

}

29 Tai Sang, str.

Oceanic, str.

1.505 2,440

L. Iwersen

J. Deason

T. Davies

Straits Settlements

112

14,

127

Sydney

27

41

Melbourne

161

Straits Settlements

299

700

381

27

22}

2 Fidelio, str.

6 Japan, str.

222

6 Malwa, str.

223

6 Stura, str.

224

Chingtu, str.

225

9 Pemptos, str.

226

10 Poseidon, str.

227

10 City of Rio de Janeiro, str..

35

852 German 1,865 British 1,708 1,416 Italian

1,450 British

1,541 German 2,510 Austrian 2,275 | American

J. Metcalfe H. Brock T. S. Gardner

San Francisco

211

222

Straits Settlements

67

:

67

185

10

201

ولا

G. W. Atkinson G. B. de Marchi

J. D. C. Arthur

U. Johannsen S. Mersa W. B. Seabury

167

167

22

157

14

""

175

Port Darwin Sydney

72

41

122

Melbourne

7

Straits Settlements

216

249

41

503

San Francisco

871

91

Carried forward..... 383,707

Carried forward,.... 72,29

4,970 1,130

724 79,123

RETURN OF CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-( Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION

ALITY

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

OF SHIP.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...

383,707

Brought forward, .|72,290| 4,970 1,139

Straits Settlements

724

79,123

182

5

228 Dec. 14 Gulf of Aden, str.

1,572 British

G. J. Allan

Sydney

34

226

Melbourne

3

229

A

;"

14 Glenshiel, str.

2,240

>>

A

230

15

17 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459

R. A. Donaldson

W. M. Dodd

Straits Settlements

376

48

435

Port Darwin

91

""

Sydney

211

132

Melbourne

19

231

20

Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

276

287

J

232

20 Ravenna, str.

2,045

A. B. Daniell

Straits Settlements

204

204

:

:

233

"2

22

Glencagles, str.

1,838

E. F. Park

448

23

483

93

""

234

23 Parthia, str.

2,035

Victoria, B. C.

14

J. Arnold

United States

6

235

23

Nestor, str.

1,269

22

J. S. Thompson

Straits Settlements

100

236

23

Venetia, str..

1,609

F. Cole

243

21

وه

"

237

ܙܕ

23

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

120

9

19 19

23

238

""

28

Autenor, str...

1,370

J. Grier

130

21

100

273

133

136

Port Darwin

90

Cooktown

239

""

28 Catterthun, str.

1,406

J. W. B. Darke -

240

241

A

29 Glengyle, str.

242

30 Bormida, str.

"

243

30 Fero. str.

""

29 City of New York, str.

1,964 American 2,244 British 1,499 Italian

754 German

TOTAL TONS,.

411,225

SUMMARY.

To Adelaide, South Australia,

""

Brisbane, Queensland,

""

Cooktown, Do.,

Dunedin, New Zealand,

Greymouth,

Do.,

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

Launceston, New Zealand,

>>

Mauritius,

Melbourne,.

29

Port Chalmers, New Zealand,

Townsville Rockampton Brisbane Sydney Melbourne Honolulu

242

11

R. R. Scarle

K. J. Gasson G. B. Daquino J. N. Hansen

San Francisco

172

Straits Settlements

180

390

351

140

>>

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

10 05 10 10.09

140

434

186

435

149

75,827 5,138 1,184 748

82,897

'''

Ι

41

41

104

104

361

36

27

27

921

31

31

13

996.

4

277

285

1,515

27

1,572

1

1

2,138

30

2,178

10

10

12,946

460

91

55

13,552

55,441 4,636

978

678

61,733

1,996

16

1

2,015

5

48

48

168

168

111

114

7

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

75,827 5,138 1,184

748

82,897

""

Port Darwin, South Austra'ia,

Rockhampton, Queensland,.

San Francisco, U.S.A.,..

""

Straits Settlements,

,, Sydney,

""

دو

Thursday Island, Queensland,.

Townsville, Queenstand,,

United States of America, vià Vancouver, British Columbia,

Vancouver, British Columbia,

""

Wellington, New Zealand,

XX. RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1887.

No.

DATE ABRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F

2

1 January 3 Westmeath, str.

3 Neckar, str..

2,095 British

Stonehouse

Straits Settlements

240

co

3

247

1,870 German

>>

3 Carisbrooke, str..

973 British

Baur Cass

252

252

Mauritius

240

250

3 Amigo, str.

771 German

Samuelsen ·

Straits Settlements

190,

203

5

4 Kashgar, str.

5 Glenogles, str.

Bormida, str.

5 Bengloe, str.

6 Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,515 British

Gadd

69

71

2,000

";

1,499 Italian

1,19 British

Hogg Pizzarello Farquhar

3761

400

141

>>

:

141

30:

30

1,011

Watton

Bangkok

143

10

167

Port Darwin

17

Thursday Island

Cooktown

61

10

10 Airlie. str.

1,492

Ellis

Townsville

28.

"

Brisbane

31

242

Adelaide

21

Sydney Melbourne

82.

16

~

11

10 Jasou, str.

1,412

"

12

10

Berenice, str.

13

11

Wing Sang, str.

1,707 Austrian 1,517 British

Milligan Bechtinger

Straits Settlements

186

611 10

..

14

12

Mongkut, str.

859

Ste. Croix Loff

480. 20

""

Bangkok

94:

15

13

Deucalion, str.

16

13

Tai Yuan, str.

1,374 1,469

""

Asguith

Straits Settlements

180

Jones

"

198

2

17

13

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Cobb

San Francisco

3291

18

14

E. J. Spence

519 British

Gill

Honolulu

148

19

14

Suburg, str.

921 German

Bertelsen

Straits Settlements

340

20

15 Nepaul, str..

1,987 British

Alderton

297

21

19

17 Kong Beng, str.

862

Phillips

Bangkok"

12

22

18 Cardiganshire, str..

1,623

Wilkins

Straits Settlements

27

23

91

18 Dardanus, str...

1,536

Purdy

389

186

621.

500

108

180

200

329

150

342

297

43

29

390

24

25

26

17

20

Albany, str.....

1,488

Porter

23

180,

A

188

19

20

Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

3:

San Francisco

203.

**

21

Cyclops, str.

1,403

27

25 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Nish Webb

Straits Settlements

1501

28

>>

25 Poseidon, str.

2,510 Austrian

!!

185

Doncicb

200

206

153

189

200

Port Darwin

Cooktown

29

25 Whampoa. str.

1,109 British

Hunt

Townsville

133

Brisbane

16,

Sydney

47

Melbourne

39

30

31

32

""

33

19

31

34

35

36

>>

31 Archimede, str.

28 City of New York, str.

28 Arratoon Apcar, str.

31 Tai Sang, str.

Laertes, str..

31 Fidelio, str.

31 J. H. Bawers

1,964 American

Searle

San Francisco

123

1,392 British

Mactavish

Straits Settlements

126

to

1,505 1,391

Davies

"

36

Scale

>

381

9)

852 German

Brock

163

1.849 Italian

Canepa

741

697 American

Plum

Honolulu

166

312

123.

132

40

38

167

75

170

Port Darwin

4

:

Cooktown

12:

37

31 Tannadice, str.

2)

1,408 British

Craig

Townsville

6

59

Brisbane

12:

Sydney

25

38 Feb.

3 Achilles, str.

1,528

Anderson

27

Straits Settlements

54

.54

}

39

7 Polyhymnia, str..

40

8 Japan, str.

1,053 German 1,865 British

Schultz

113

113

Gardner

615

615

41

8 Belgic, str.

2.695

Walker

*

San Francisco

165

165

42

10

Ganges, str.

2.162

Stewart

::

Straits Settlements

72

72

43

10 Tsinan, str.

1.459

Allison

**

193

195

44

10

Sikh, str.

1.510

Scotland

**

2001

200

45

12 Glenroy, str.

46

12 Ingraban, str.

47

14 Amigo, str.

48

14 Nestor, str.

49

??

50

1"

51

15 Deuteros, str.

52

18 Prometheus, str.

53

19 Glenartney, str.

54

19 City of Peking, str.

55

21 Telamon, str.

15 General Werder, str.

15 Mongkut, str.

1.269 British

1,820 German

859 British 1,198 German 1,538 British

>>

1,400 3.129 American 1,555 British

Webster

Massmann

Hendervardt Thompson Schnokmann

Loff Luthjens Webster Mackinlay

Dearborn Jackson

1.411

490

10

500

"

894 German 771

"

255

2351

193

105:

Bangkok

38

2293N

259

239

198

110

40

105

110

Straits Settlements

217

220

246

250

San Francisco

50

52

Straits Settlements

235

10

240

Port Darwin

Cooktown

56

21 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

Newcastle

.

35

Sydney

Melbourne

Adelaide

23823833

57

23 Thisbe, str.

"

58

25 Hector, str.

1,848 Austrian 1,590 British

Lemesich Batt

Straits Settlements

45

20

10

80

112

59

60

#

25 Picciola, str.

61

62

"

63

39

28 Ningchow, str.

64

25 Wing Sang, str.

26 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

26 Braunschweig, str..

March 1 Taichiow, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

520

"

$75 German

Nissen

189

::

355 British

Webb

!!

400

ZANA!

116

:

23

543

196

16

423

2,150 German ·

Stouner

214

214

1,735 British

Castle

235

N

240

862

Newton

Bangkok

47

50

Port Darwin

Cooktown

65

22

1 Changsha, str.

1,463

Townsville

10

Williams

106

Brisbane

Sydney

18

28

Melbourne

40

Curried forward.....

96,217

Carried forward...

12,561 223 66

36

12,886

!

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-( Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

Brought forward..

96,217

2288 28

67

!!

66 March 4 | Glenlyon, str.

4 Antenor, str.

1,410 British

Somers

Brought forward..... 12,561 Straits Settlements

223

66

36 12,886

387

400

1,376

Grier

440

450

68

5 Benvenue, str..

1,497

Thompson

140

A

150

69

9 Palamed, str.

1,536

Jackson

336

357

་་

70

9 Peshawur, str..

2.130

Moule

37

37

:

9 Yorkshire, str.

1,426

Arnold

200

201

-+

72

10 Amphitrite, str.

2,486 Austrian

Gelcich

4001

20

429

Port Darwin

5

Cooktown

51

Townsville

Brisbane

24

73

11 Guthrie, str.

1,494 British

Shannon

Dunedin, N.Z.

4

Greymouth

98

11

Wellington

Sydney

27

Melbourne

4

Adelaide

4!

74

75

11 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

:>

14 Agamemnon, str.

1,523

Olifent Wilding

Straits Settlements

150 10

184

ON

2

2

164

2

4

190

76

2

14 Mercury

1,098 American

Panno

Honolulu

37

:

37

77

14 Mongkut, str.

859 British

Loff

Bangkok

57

78

79

15 Glenfalloch, str.

16 Titan, str.

1,419

Cormack

Straits Settlements

182

*

80

**

16

City of Sydney, str.

1,554

1,966 | American

Brown

126

#!

384

60

10

200

130

Friele

San Francisco

327

327

81

17

Chi Yuen, str..

1,211 Chinese

Lunt

Straits Settlements

575

22

600

82

18

Lennox, str.

1,327 British

Thearle

119

130

">

83

21 Benlawers, str.

1.513

Webster

110

122

:>

84

21

Ching Wo. str.

1,556

22

McHugh

244

:

244

85

22

Cathay, str.

1.884

Ashdown

72

72

::

86

22

Tai Sang, str.

1,516

Davies

520!

30

6

560

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Thursday Island

10

87

22 Ching Tu, str.

1,459

Arthur

Townsville

9

78

Brisbane

11

Sydney

22

Melbourne

201

888

88

24 Amigo, str.

771 German

89

25 Oceanic, str.

2,695 British

""

90

26 Hesperia, str.

1.136 German

Hundervadt Metcalfe Christiansen

Straits Settlements

378

San Francisco

140

8

Straits Settlements

192

91

92

28 Ingraban, str.

29 Diomed, str..

894 1,471 British

Massmann

214

19

""

"

Bigley

290! 10

93

22

29 Glenorchy, str.

1,822

Gedye

514

12

23

94

29 Palinurus, str...

1.536

Jackson

50

5

""

95

19

31 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Webb

226

..

13

17

96 April 1 Archimede, str.

1,849 Italian

97

98

99

"

100

101

*****

1 Bellerophon, str.

1,397 British

2 Glenartney, str.

1,400

"

2 Galley of Lorne, str.

1,380

Canepa Guthrie Mackinley Pomroy

265

15

13

78

??

200

12

38

61029 N

- ∞ ∞ → ON 10 00 10 10 OM

3

398

151

200

237

305

10

540

55

250

15

299

85

2

220.

43

**

6 Bokhara, str.

1,711

Edwards

55

55

**

17

6 Ajax, str.

1,524

Riley

191

200

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

14

102

"

6 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

Keppel Bay

11

131

Brisbane

27

Sydney

60

Melbourne

6

103

9 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Seabury

San Francisco

150

150

104

9 Gleneagles, str.

1,838 British

105

9 Medusa, str.

106

12 Oopack, str..

107

12 Bayley, str.

108

12 Japan, str.

1,696 1,865

>

109

22

12 Protos, str.

1,150 German

1,776 Austrian 1,730 British

Park Perini Jaques

Child Gardner Sorensen

Straits Settlements

115

316 60

21

283 13

10

>>

651

138!

20

Bangkok

44

27038+

120

13

416

306

70

170

49

110

12

Mongkut, str.

859 British

Loff

103'

105

>>

111

12 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

126

126

112

13

Khiva, str.

25

1,452

Bason

Straits Settlements

100

5

105

113

2

15

Sarpedon, str.

1,592

Chrimes

521

55

多事

114

92

15

Wing Sang, str.

1,513

Ste. Croix

330

20

357

Port Darwin

11

:

Thursday Island

Cooktown

3

115

#

15 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459

Dodd

67

>>

Townsville

Sydney

16

Melbourne

28

116

"

16 Picciola, str.

117

"

18 Electra, str.

118

119

";

120

""

21 Orestes, str..

121

""

21 Deccan, str..

122

22 Oder, str.

123

>>

124

>>

23 China, str.

125

;}

126

""

25 Moyune, str.

127

99

25 Atholl, str.

128

25 Amigo, str.

18 Glengarry, str.

19 Benarty, str.

875 German 1,146 1,956 British

Nissen

Straits Settlements

255

260

Madsen

90

3

"

"

Taylor

399 27

10

31

1,119

Le Boutellier

135

1,323

2,022

Hutchinson Case

941

16

41 2 2

3996

100

441

2

150

118

>>

66

66

*

1,892 German

Pfeiffer

308

308

22 City of New York, str.

25 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,964 American

1,091 German

Searle Haye

San Francisco

94

94

Bangkok

30

38

1,012 British

Lightwood

85

91

129

26 Tsinan, str.

Carried forward..

1,714

923

771 German 1,460 British

Hogg

Straits Settlements

2321

18

250

Coulter Hundervadt

168

~

175

";

369

21

3

401

"

Hunt

Sydney

401

40

***

193,047

Carried forward....

24,595 728 275 121

25,722

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward....

193,047

130 April 27

Glaucus, str.

1,382 British

131

27 Glenogle, str.

2,200

Hannah Duke

Brought forward... 24,595 728 275 124 Straits Settlements

25,722

190.

11

208

160

5

175

-

**

132

27 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent

365

13

382

་་

133

27 Anchises, str.

1,304

Lapage

25

30

""

134

29

Lorne, str.

1,035

Hunter.

113

122

"

135

>>

29 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

119

123

}

136

"?

30

Niobe, str.

1,672 German

Pfaff

Straits Settlements

50

52

137 May

1 Monmouthshire, str.

1,871 British

Cuming

$7

3

101

*

Port Darwin

Cooktown

138

2 Tannadice, str.

";

1,408

Craig

Townsville

Brisbane

61

Sydney

Adelaide

139

4 Afghan, str.

1,439

140

4 Rosetta, str.

2,155

19

Roy Brady

Straits Settlements

210

217

93

93

141

4 Velocity,

491

Martin

Honolulu

87

96

142

5

Kong Beng, str.

862

Phillips

Bangkok

71.

80

143

5 Ulysses, str....

1.301

Bremuer

Straits Settlements

147

-2

159

144

5

Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Webb

120

135

145

**

6 Camelot, str.

1,049

Daily

Straits Settlements.

47.

52

146

7

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

Davies

306

24

18

2

350

147

7

Alvah, str.

1,511

Young

901 1

97

148

7 Bisagno, str.

1,498 Italian

Pizzarelo

120

130

149

9 Mongkut, str.

859 British

Loff

Bangkok

98 12

110

150

"

10

Stentor, str.

1,307

Milligan

Straits Settlements

280

10

302

151

11

Zambesi, str.

1,565

Preston

121

121

19

152

"

12

Tritos, str.

1.142 German

Bleiken

Bangkok

68

70

153

12

Protos, str.

1,150

Sorensen

25

27

11

154

12

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Dearborn

San Francisco

116

120

155

14

19

Hydra,

785 German

Binge

Honolulu

25

31

156

17 Verona, str.

1,876 British

Speck

Straits Settlements

120

120

157

11

17 Telemachus, str.

1,421

Jones

293 16

**

315

158

"

17 Iphigenia,

1,059 German

Voltum

230 10

159

""

18

Benlarig, str.

1,482 British

Clark

176 12

160

18

China, str.

1,091 German

Haye

Bangkok

61

161

20

Glenfinlas, str.

"

162

20

Sachsen, str.

163

20 Glucksburg, str.

164

21 Patroclus, str..

165

21 Decima, str...

1,409 British 2,874 German

916 1,386 British

965 German

Quartley

Straits Settlements

170

10

22677

250

200

73

190

Zacger

153

>>>

Schultz

398 28

Thompson

80 10

மல

"

Oestmann

Bangkok

48.

Thursday Island

11

166

21 Guthrie, str.

1,494 British

Green

Sydney

47:

¡

Melbourne

37

167

23

San Pablo, str.

":

168

"

23

Duburg, str.

169

+1

25

Denbighshire, str.

170

25 Titania, str.

1

171

99.

25

Japan, str.

3,060 American 921 German 1,663 British 2,011 Austrian 1,865 British

Reed

San Francisco

99

Bertelsen

Straits Settlements

200

12

Dreyer Mersa

150

12

300 20

!

10

10 21 7-

Gardner

385

172

25

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,011

"

173

19

27 Kashgar, str.

1,515

Watton Gadd

Bangkok

40

Straits Settlements

140 10

174

19

28

Glengyle, str.

2,244

Gasson

300

10

NN

175

31 Ancona, str....

11

1,888

Hassall

45

176

21

31 Kong Beng, str.

862

Phillips

Bangkok

65

153

442

95

50

105

99

221

170

337

385

45

156

318

45

70