Hongkong Directory 1911





OP 2573. ba

DIRECTORY

AND CHRONICLE

FOR

CHINA, JAPAN, STRAITS SETTLEMENTS,

INDO-CHINA, PHILIPPINES, ETC.

WITH WHICH

"

"

ARE INCORPORATED "THE CHINA DIRECTORY AND 'THE HONGKONG DIRECTORY AND HONG LIST FOR THE FAR EAST"

!

FOR THE YEAR

1911

FORTY-NINTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION

BRITISHL

MUSEUM.

THE HONGKONG DAILY PRESS OFFICE

DES VEUX ROAD, HONGKONG, AND 131, FLEET STREET, LONDON, E.C.

MDCCCCXI

(Price Thirty Shillings Net)

AGENTS

LONDON

Do.

Do.

PARIS

GERMANY

 

SAN FRANCISCO

SOUTH AFRICA

SYDNEY

MELBOURNE

BRISBANE

CALCUTTA

BOMBAY

COLOMBO.......

BATAVIA

SINGAPORE

.Office of "Hongkong Daily Press," 131, Fleet Street, E.C. ..Mr. F. Algar, 11, Clement's Lane, Lombard Street, E.C.

.Messrs. G. Street & Cc., Ld., 30, Cornhill, E.C.

Messrs. G. E. Puel de Lobel & Cie., 53. Rue Lafayette ...Messrs. Mahlau & Waldschmidt, Frankfort a/M. Johs. Wilh. Meier, 77 Steindamm, Hamburg 5 ......L. P. Fisher Advertising Agency, 836, North Point

Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, Long Street, Cape Town Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, 123, Pitt Street

Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, 124 and 126, Queen Street Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, Queen Street

.Messrs. Thacker, Spink & Co., 5 & 6, Government Place

Times of India" Office

..Messrs. A. M. & J. Ferguson, "Ceylon Observer" Office ...Messrs. H. M. Van Dorp & Co.

Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, 32, Raffles Place

FEDERATED MALAY STATES... Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Singapore

BORNEO

SAIGON.....

TONKIN

MANILA

YOKOHAMA.

KOBE & OSAKA

NAGASAKI

FORMOSA...

VLADIVOSTOCK

SHANGHAI, &c.

TIENTSIN

Mr. J. Nimmo Wardrop, Sandakan

Mr. A. Pfeifer

.Messrs. Speidel & Co., Hanoi

.E. C. McCullough & Co., McCullough Bdgs.

.Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, 60, Main Street

"Japan Chronicle" Office, Kobe

'Nagasaki Press " Office

..Mr. G. Miedbrodt, Taipeh

'Nagasaki Press " Office, Nagasaki

.........Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, The Bund

.Messrs. H. Blow & Co.

YANGTSZE PORTS ......Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, Shanghai PortArthur &TAIREN... Messrs. Sietas, Plambeck & Co. CHEFOOL& WEIHAIWEI...Messrs. H. Sietas & Co.

TSINGTAU (KIAOCHAU)...Messrs. Sietas, Plambeck & Co.

FOOCHOW

ΑΝΟΥ

SWATOW

CANTON

MACAO.....

Messrs. T. Brockett & Co.

.Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co., Limited, Kulangsu ...Yuen Cheong Book Store

.Messrs A. S. Watson & Co., Limited, Shameen .Mr. A. A. de Mello

Cebu, Directory

Canton Directory

Canton Ladies' Directory

Cebu, Descriptive

Batavia, Descriptive and Statistical

Batavia Directory

Borneo, Descriptive and Statistical

Borneo, British North, Directory

Buitenzorg, Descriptive

Cambodge, Descriptive and Statistical

Cambodge Directory

Canton, Descriptive and Statistical

House Flags, Plate of

Amoy, Descriptive and Statistical

Amoy Directory

Amoy Ladies' Directory

Annam, Provinces Directory

Annam, Descriptive

Antung, Descriptive

Antung Directory

INDEX, DIRECTORY

Bangkok, Descriptive and Statistical

Bangkok, Directory

Frontispiece 1025

Kowloon (Chinese), Descriptive

1053

Kowloon (Chinese) Directory

.1053

1026

Kowloon Streets Directory

1182

1032

Kyoto Descriptive and Directory

..691

.1220

Labuan, Descriptive and Directory

.1493

.1221

Lappa, Descriptive

..1054

.822

Lungchow, Descriptive and Statistical

1065

.823

Lungchow Directory

.1065

1251

Macao, Descriptive and Statistical

.1183

1253

Macao Directory

1185

1410

Macao Ladies' Directory.

.1195

1411

Macassar, Descriptive

1429

.1482

Macassar Direccory

.1429

Borneo, British North, Descriptive and Statistical

..1487

Malacca, Descriptive and Statistical

.1330

14-8

Malacca Directory

.1331

1411

Malay States (Federated), Descriptive.

1358

1246

Malay States (Federated) Directory

1359

.1247

Manchurian Trade Centres

820

1037

Manila, Descriptive and Statistical

..1437

.1040

Manila Directory

.1439

1050

Manila, Insurance Offices

..1471

.1476

Mengtsz, Descriptive and Statistical

.1066

1477

Méngtsz Directory

.1067

Changsha, Descriptive

.1004

Moji, Descriptive....

712

Changsha, Directory

.1005

Moji Directory

.713

Chefoo, Descriptive and Statistical

.830

Mukden, Descriptive

.820

Chefoo, Directory

..831

Mukden Directory

.821

China, Descriptive and Statistical

755

Nagasaki, Descriptive and Statistical

715

Cholon, Descriptive and Directory

Dairen, Directory

Dairen, Descriptive

Foochow, Descriptive and Statistical..

Foreign Residents, Alphabetical list of

Chingwantao, Descriptive

Chinkiang, Descriptive and Statistical

Chinkiang Directory

Chungking, Descriptive and Statistical

Chungking Directory

Cochin China, Descriptive

Chosen Descriptive and Statistical

Chosen Ports, Descriptive and Directories

Daitotoi, Directory

Far East, Map of

Foochow, Directory

.814

Nagasaki Directory

.716

.9 3

Nanking, Descriptive

.976

.974

Nanking Directory

.977

.1245

Nanning, Descriptive and Directory

.1059

.1008

Naval Squadron, Austro-Hungarian

..1504

1009

Naval Squadron, British

.1495

1225

Naval Squadron, Italian

.1507

.741

Naval Squadron, French

.1507

743 to 755

Naval Squadron, German

1503

735

Naval Squadron, Japanese.

1503

.826

Naval Squadron, Siamese

1506

827

Naval Squadron, United States..

..1499

Facing Directory

Negri Sembilan, Descriptive and Statistical

1363

1018

Negri Sembilan Directory

.1364

.1020

Netherlands India, Descriptive and Statistical

.1394

1523

Netherlands India Directory

.1400

Formosa, Descriptive

732

Newchwang, Descriptive and Statistical

815

Formosa, Directory

733

Newchwang Directory

..816

Haiphong, Descriptive and Statistical.

.1210

Ningpo, Descriptive and Statistical

.1014

Haiphong, Directory

.1210

Ningpo Directory

..1014

Hakodate, Directory.

Hakodate, Descriptive and Statistical

..683

Osaka, Descriptive and Statistical..

680

.684

Osaka Directory

.680

Hangchow, Descriptive and Statisticai.

.1011

Padang, Descriptive and Directory

.1427

Hangchow, Directory

1013

Pahang, Descriptive and Statistical

.1360

Hankow, Directory

Hankow, Descriptive and Statistical

..985

Pahang Directory

.1361

..986

Pakhoi, Descriptive

.1061

Hanoi, Directory.

Hanoi, Descriptive and Statistical

.1199

Pakhoi Directory

.1062

..1200

Peitaiho, Descriptive

.814

Harbin, Descriptive and Directory

823-324

Peking, Descriptive and Statistical

770

Hoihow Directory

Hoihow, Descriptive and Statistical

1063

Peking Directory

775

1064

Hokow, Descriptive and Directory

Penang, Descriptive and Statistical

.1336

1068 Penang Directory

.1336

Hongkong Directory

Hongkong, Descriptive and Statistical

Hongkong, Classified List of Trades, &c.

1159

1071

Perak, Descriptive and Statistical Perak Directory..

1382

.1383

1088

Ilongkong Ladies' Directory

Hongkong, Insurance Offices

Philippines, Descriptive and Statistical

..1434

1167

Port Arthur, Descriptive and Directory

.8.4-825

1170

Hongkong, Peak Roads Directory

Quinuon, desciptive and Directory

1222

1181

Iloilo Directory

Iloilo, Descriptive and Statistical

Hongkong Streets Directory

Hué, Descriptive and Directory

Ichang, Descriptive and Statistical

Ichang Directory

Indo-Chin, French, Descriptive

Saigon, Descriptive and Statistical

.1226

1176

Saigon Directory

.1227

1221

Samshui, Descriptive

.10:4

10 6

Sanishui Directory

..1055

1007

Santuao, Descriptive

..1017

1197

Santuao, Directory

.1017

1473

Sarawak, Descriptive and Statistical

.1482

Japan, Descriptive and Statistical

1473

Sarawak Directory

..1483

Johore Directory

Johore, Descriptive and Statistical

Japan, Classified list of Trades & Professions

.622

Selangor, Descriptive and Statistical

..1370

722

Selangor Directory

.1371

1354

Semarang, Descriptive and Directory

.14.4

Kelung Directory

Kelung, Descriptive and Statistical

1351

Seoul, Descriptive

743

.7.1

Seoul Directory

.744

Kewkiang Directory.

Kewkiang, Descriptive and Statistical

.737

Shanghai, Classified List of Trades, &c.

.955

.982

Shanghai, Descriptive and Statistical

.855

Kiaochau, Directory

Kiaochan, Descriptive and Statistical

.982

Shanghai Directory

.876

839

Shanghai, Insurance Offices

.965

Kobe-Hyogo Directory

Kobe-Hyogo, Descriptive and Statistical

.841

Shanghai, Roads in the Settlements

960

.691

Shasi, Descriptive and Directory

..10 3

Kongmoon, Directory

Kongmoon, Descriptive

Kobe-Hyogo, Insurances of.

.693

Shimonos, ki, Descriptive and Directory

.712

.710

Siam, Descriptive and.Statistical

..1250

.1056

Kouang-tcheou-wan, Directory

Kouang-tcheou-win, Descriptive

.1057

Singapore, Descriptive and Statistical Singapore Directory

.1277

12-1

.1060 Singapore, Classified List of Trades &c.

.1323

1060

Singapore, Insurance Offices

1329

INDEX

Soochow, Descriptive and Directory

.972

Tokyo Directory

628

Soerabaia, Descriptive

.1419

Tonkin, Descriptive

.1198

Soerabaia Directory

1420 Tonkin, Provinces Directory.

1216

Steamers, Coasting and River

1508

Tsintau (Kiaochau), Descriptive.

..839

Straits Settlements, Descriptive

1276

Tsintau (Kiaochau) Directory

.841

Sumatra (East Coast), Descriptive..

1430

Tsinanfu, Descriptive..

.851

Sumatra (East Coast) Directory

1431

Tsinanfu Directory

.852

Swatow, Descriptive and Statistica!

1032

Vladivostock, Descriptive

.613

Swatow Directory

1034

Vladivostock Directory

.614

Swatow Ladies' Directory

1037

Wei-hai-wei, Descriptive

836

Szemao, Descriptive

1069

Wei-hai-wei Directory

.837

Szemao Directory

1070

Wenchow, Descriptive and Statistical

.1016

Taipeh, Directory

.735

Wênchow Directory

.1017

Tainan, Takow and Anping Descriptive and Statistical ..738

Whampoa, Descriptive and Statistical

..1052

Tainan, Takow and Anping Directory

.739

Whampoa Directory

1032

Taku, Descriptive and Statistical

.812

Wuchow Descriptive and Statistical

.1057

Taku Directory

.813

Wuchow Directory

.1058

Dairen (Dalny) Descriptive and Directory

.826

Wuhu, Descriptive and Statistical

..979

Tamsui, Descriptive and Statistical

.734

Wuhu Directory

..980

Tamsui Directory

.735

Tengyneh, Descriptive

.1068

Yochow, Descriptive

.1001

Tientsin, Descriptive and Statistical.

782

Yochow Directory

.1002

Tientsin Directory

.786

Yokohama, Descriptive and Statistical

.657

Tientsin, Classified list of Trades & Professions

.807

Yokohama Directory

..859

Tientsin Insurance Offices..

.810

Yokohama, Insurance Offices

.630

Tokyo, Descriptive and Statistical

.627

TREATIES, CODES AND GENERAL

Admiralty, Rules of Procedure in Supreme Court

450

Great Britain, Tientsin, 1858

59

Advertisers, Index to

5

2

Agents

Great Britain, Chefoo Convention, 1876 Great Britain, Burma Convention,

67

75

Calendar and Chronology

21-22

Calendar, Anglo-Chinese

10

Chair and Boat Hire, Hongkong

.512

Chamber of Commerce, Scale of Commissions, &c....608

Chinese Festivals

23

Chinese Imperial Postal Rates..

..515

Chinese l'assenger Act.

.492

Consular Fees, Tables of

.383

Court of Consuls at Shanghai, Rules of Procedure

.478

Great Britain, Chefoo Convention, Additional.. Great Britain, Opium Convention, 1885 Great Britain, Chungking Agreement, 1890 Great Britain, Thibet-Sikkimi Convention, 1890 Great Britain, Kowloon Extension, 1898 Great Britain, Weihaiwei Convention, 1808 Great Britain, Commercial Treaty with China.. Great Britain, Emigration Convention, 1904 Great Britain, Tibet Convention..

.. 71

73

74

75

77

78

79

111

118

Customs Tariff, China.

91

Japan, Shimonoseki, 1895.

204

Customs Tariff, China, Rules

103

Japan, Commercial, Peking, 1896

203

Customs Tariff, China, Exports,

.106

Japan, Protocol, New Ports, Peking, 1896

212

Customs Tariff, China, Rules.

..108

Japan, Regarding Manchuria, 1905

.221

Customs Notification re Tariff of Import Duty, 1901

.104

Japan, Supplementary Treaty, 1903

.213

Customs Tariff, Japan. (proposed)

.243

Portugal, 1888

.101

Customs Tariff, Corea....

.233

Portugal 1904..

199

Foreign Jurisdiction Act, 1890..

.331

Russia, St. Petersburg, 1881

..162

Harbour Regulations, Japan

.506

Hongkong, Charter of the Colony

482

Hongkong, Constitution of Councils,

.484

Hongkong, Legislative Council, Rules of.

487

Hongkong Port Regulations

496

Hongkong Stamp Duties

Hongkong Signal Stations

..514

604

Russia, Regulations for Land Trade United States of America, Tientsin, 1858 United States of America, Additional, 1868 United States of America, Peking, 1880.... United States of America, Immigration, 1894 United States of America, Commercial, 1903.. With Corea:-

167

.171

.177

.179

..182

.184

Insurance, Japanese Ordinance

Hongkong Supreme Court Fees

466

Great Britain, Trade Regulations

230

:495

With Japan:-

Malay States Federation Agreement, 1896

.326

Corea, Treaty of Annexation, 1910

223

Manila Invoice Charges

.509

Orders in Council, H.B.M., China and Corea

337-381

China, Agreement China-Corean Boundary, 1903..297 China, Agreement Regarding Manchurian Quest.

Port Regulations for H.B.M. Consulates in China.

563

ions, 1909.

299

Postal Guide, Hongkong

.517

Great Britain, 1894

236

Shanghai Mixed Court, Rules of the

: 479

Great Britain, 1900

285

Siam, Foreign Jurisdiction, 1909

.313

Great Britain, Alliance, 1905.

287

Sicawei Observatory

.514

Great Britain, Indiau Convention, 1904

.286

Signals, Fire, Storm, &c., Hongkong.

.513

United States, 1886, Extradition Treaty

.289

Statutory Rules and Orders, 1909

3×2

United States, 1908, respecting the Pacific.

.300

Supreme and other Courts in China II.B.M., Rulesof....387

Russia, Treaty of Peace, 1905

291

Supreme Court in China H.B.M., Fees.

444-450

Russia, Railway Convention, 1907.

295

Treaty Ports, etc.,

.327

With Siam:-

Treaties :-

Great Britain, 1856

.301

Great Britain, Trade Regulations with.

.304

With China :-

Great Britain, Registration of Subjects

300

Final Protocol with Eleven Powers, 1901.

223

Great Britain, 1900

.307

France, Pekin, 1960..

132

France, 1994

..315

France, Convention of Peace, 1880

..123

France, 1907

317

France, Tientsin, 1885..

.134

Japan, 1898

321

France, Trade Regins, for Tonkin Frontier, 1886 ..137

Russia, 1899

325

France, Convention, 1887

.142

France, Convention, 1895

Germany, Tientsin, 1861

.144 .146

Germany, Peking, 1880

.153

Germany, Kiaochau Convention, 1898

.158

Great Britain and Germany, Relative to China, 19.0..100 Great Britain and France, Siamese Frontier, 1896 .325 Great Britain and Russia Railway Agreement, 1899....116 United States Consular Courts in China, Regulations475-480 United States Consular and Court Fees

fermany, Railway and Mining Concessi on, 1898..159 Weights and Measures, Money..

.480 .500

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

A.B.C. DIRECTORY OF BRitish Traders,

MERCHANTS AND MANUFACTURERS ...1791

AERATED WATERS MANUFacturers:-

Aquarius Co., Shanghai...

ANTI-FOULING COMPOSITION:-

Peacock & Buchan, Southampton.....1810

BANKS:

Bank of Taiwan (Formosa)

Chartered Bank of India, Aus, & China

PAGE

COAL MERCHANTS:-

Arai Shoten

...860D

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong

Chinese Engineering & Mining Co.,

Tientsin

F. Blackhead & Co. Hongkong

Hokkaido Colliery and Steamship Co. Mitsu Bishi Co.

31

Mitsui Bussan Kaisha

*

26

Schwarzkopf & Co., Tsingtau...

Dai-Ichi Ginko...

30

South Manchuria Ry. Co.

Deutsche Asiatische Bank

27

Yoshinotani Coal Mining Co....

PAGE

...1830

44

40

1180G

41

42

6

...840A

43

...636B

Gomei Kwaisha Murai Ginko...

.1816

Mercantile Bank of India, Ld.

28

COTTON MANUFACTURERS :-

Mitsui Ginko

.1817

Spinner & Co., Manchester and Bombay 1814

Hongkong Savings Bank

1828

DIVING APPARATUS:-

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank...

25

Heinke's

...Back of Cover

Nippon K gyo Ginko

...1815

One Hundredth Bank

33

DOCKS :-

Sumitomo Ginko, Osaka...

32

Thirty-fourth Bank (Japan)

Yokohama Specie Bank (Tokyo)

..1818

Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co.

1180c

29

Kawasaki Dockyard, Co., Kobe,

...636c

Mitsu Bishi Dock, Nagasaki

..636G

BOOKSELLERS, & PUBLISHERS:-

Mitsu Bishi Dockyard, Kobe..

...636F

Z. P. Maruya & Co.

38

Shanghai Dock & Engineering Co.

...860c

Yokohama Dock Co., Ld....

...636A

BREWERS:-

Dai Nippon Brewery Co....

46

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS:-

BRICK MANUFACTURERS:-

Brighten, Malcolm & King

..860a

Chinese Engineering & Mining Co.,

Chinese Engineering & Mining Co.

...782p

Douglas & Grant, Kirkaldy

..1813

'Tientsin ...

10

Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co., Lư.

1180c

BULLION REFINERS, ASSAYERS, &c.:-

Mitsu Bishi D'yard & Engine Works

...636F

Johnson, Matthey & Co., London

...1811

Shanghai Dock & Engineering Co. ... Yonei Shoten

...860c

...1819

CAMPHOR MERCHANTS:-

Suzuki & Co., Kobo...

17

EUROPEAN AGENCY :--

William Wilson & Sons, London

...1812

CEMENT MANUFACTURERS:-

Ciments Portland Artificiels de l'Indo-

FANCY GOODS :-

Chine, Haiphong

45

Kruse & Co, Hongkong

1180D

CHEMISTS AND DRUGGISTS:-

Chobei Takeda, Osaka (Wholesale)

CHEMISTS, MANUFACTURING :--

Green Island Cement Co.,H'ong & Macao1180F

Fukien Drug Store, Amoy

Chee-Hsin Cement Co., Ld., Tientsin ...782B

FRENCH TRADERS,

Scheuer & Co.

MANUFACTURERS

...1821

MERCHANTS

AND

...1805

..1821

CA: FILLER":-~

...1823

Tai Kweng

...1825

May & Baker, London

HOTELS:-

...1790

Pearson's Antiseptic Co., Ld.

...1808

London: Thackeray Hotel, Inside front cover

CIGAR MERCHANTS:

London: Kingsley Hotel

"

Kruse &o., Hongkong

Shanghai: Astor House...

...860B

1180D

CLOTH MANUFACTURERS:-

Shanghai: Palace Hotel...

...860F

-

E. Spinner & Co., Manchester... N. Waites, Sons & Atkinson David Corsar & Sons

1814

Swa'ow, Astor House Tientsio: Astor House

1180E

...782A

...1813

...

..1824

Tientsin: Hotel de la Paix Yokohama: Hotel de Paris

...782c

.1923

COAL MERCHANTS

MITSUI BUSSAN KAISHA, LIMITED.

TOKIO

(MITSUI & CO., LTD. IN EUROPE AND AMERICA.)

HONGKONG OFFICE :--Princes' Building, Ice House Street.

IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

     COAL CONTRACTORS to Home and Foreign Mail and Freight Steamers, Railways, Army and Navy and Principal Industrial Works.

MIIKE HARBOUR AND DOCKS built by the Company to facilitate Loading and Shipment of Miike Coals.

SOLE AGENTS for sale of Miike, Tagawa, Ida, Yamano, Hondo, Ohnoura, Ohtsuji, Shiraiwa, Sasabara, Takae, Tsubakuro, Yoshio and other Coals.

Agents for:

TOKYO MARINE INSURANCE CO., LTD.

Tokio.

MEIJI FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD.

Tokio.

DAI NIPPON BREWERY CO., LTD.

.Tokio.

NIPPON FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD.

.Tokio.

THE KYODO FIRE, MARINE & TRANSIT INSCE. CO., LD... Tokio. NITTA LEATHER BELT Co..

Osaka,

ONODA CEMENT CO., LTD.,...

SHINAGAWA FIRE BRICK MANUFACTURING CO., LD....Tokio.

SHANGHAI COTTON SPINNING CO., LTD........................

..Onoda.

Shanghai.

etc.,

etc.,

etc.

Telegraphic

Address: "Mitsui."

COMMISSION MERCHANTS

MITSUI BUSSAN KAISHA, LTD.

ΤΟΚΥΟ

(Mitsui & Co., Ltd., in Europe & America) IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS AND

GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS

SOLE AGENTS IN JAPAN FOR:

AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVE Co.

GEBRUDER SULZER. GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. LIBBY, MCNEIL & LIBBY. MASCHINENFABRIK

NURNBERG.

AUGSBURG,

PACIFIC PHOSPHATE Co., LTD. PLATT BROTHERS & Co. SWIFT & Co.

VICKERS, SONS & MAXIM, LTD.

AND OTHER LEADING EUROPEAN

AND AMERICAN FIRMS.

HE'D OFFICE:

1, Surugacho, Nihonbashiku, TOKYO

- me a me ANGKA

BRANCHES AND REPRESENTATIVES:

JAPAN:-

AOMORI

KUCHINOTZU

KARATSU KURE

MOJI MURORAN

NIIGATA OSAKA

TAINAN TAIPEH

KISHIMA

KOBE

MAIZURU MIIKE

NAGASAKI

OTARU

WAKAMATSU

NAGOYA

SASEBO

YOKOHAMA

YOKOSUKA, &c., &c., &c.

Foreign :-

AMOY

FOOCHOW

NEWCHWANG

SOURABAYA

ANTUNGHSIEN

HAMBURG

NEW YORK

SYDNEY

BANGKOK

HANKOW

OKLAHOMA

TAIREN

BOMBAY

HARBIN

PORTLAND

TIENTSIN

CANTON

HONGKONG

RANGOON

TIEHLING

CALCUTTA

LONDON

SAN FRANCISCO

TSINGTAU

CHANGCHUN

LYONS

SEOUL

VLADIVOSTOCK

CHEFOO

MANILA

SHANGHAI

CHEMULPO

MUKDEN

SINGAPORE

C

Telegraphic Address: MITSUI."

8

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS- Continued

PAGE

PAGE

INSURANCES, FIRE :-

Nippon, Marine & Fire

Phoenix Assurance Co.

...1818 ...1826

NAVY CONTRACTORS :-

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong

44

David Corsar & Sons

Do.

On front cloth cover Western Assurance Co. of Toronto ...1832

...1824

F. Blackhead & Co., Hongkong

11800

I

NSURANCES, LIFE:-

OIL MERCHANTS:-

Standard Life

...1827

W. R. Loxley & Co., Hongkong

39

Do.

INSURANCES, Marine:-

...

On front cloth cover

Nippon Marine & Transport Insce., Co., 1818 Weste.n Assurance Co. of Toront

...1832

PAINTS:-

Peacock & Buchan, Southampton......1810

Chas. H, Blume...

...1810

PAPER MAKERS:-

IRON & STEEL MANUFACTURERS:-

John Dickinson & Co., London

...1807

W. Gilbertson & Co,, England Sugari & Co.

..1812

Edward Lloyd, London

...1806

...

47

Spalding & Hodge (Typewriting) ...1811

JEWELLERS, &c.-

PHOTOGRAPHIC GOODS DEALERS:-

K. Tuck Chang & Co.

...1829

A Ling & Co.

...1828

LAMP MANUfacturing Co. :-

A Tack Co.... M. Mumeya

...

...1822

Front end paper

A. C. Wells & Co.

Inside back end paper

LEAD & Articles of LEAD :-

PRINTERS' FURNISHERS:

John Dickinson & Co., London

...1807

Gen. Farmiloe & Sons, Ld. Grey & Marten, Ld.,

Locks AND SAFES:-

...8542

PROVISION MERCHANTS:-

...1809

See Storekeepers.

PUBLISHERS:-

Chubb & Sons, Inside front end paper

Maruya & Co. ...

MACHINERY :-

The London Directory Co., Ld.

38. ..1812

Arnhold, Karberg & Co....

...860E

RAILWAY CONPANIES:-

Brighten, Malcolm & King

Douglas & Grant, Kirkcaldy

...860a ...1813

South Manchuria Railway Co....

43.

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

...1180A & 860A

Hadfield's Foundry Co., Ld.........

ROPE MANUFACTURERS:-

...1814

Lose, Downs & Thompson, Hull,

50

MANUFACTURERS AND WAREHOUSEMEN :-

H'kong. Rope Manufacturing Co.... 1180B Geo. C.adock & Co., Ld..

...1522

Faudels, Limited

...1810

SHIPBUILDERS :-

MERCHANTS, COMMISSION AGENTS, &C:-

H'hong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld.... Kawasaki Dock Co., Kobe

1180c

...

...6360

Arai Shoten

...

Fung Tang, Hongkong

Haines & Co.

P. K. Kwok & Co., Hongkong,

Ng, Lim Quee & Co....

Suzuki & Co., Kobe

Yonei shuten

METAL MERCHANTS:-

...1830

...

...1825 ...1813

***

..1825

Mitsui Bussan Kaisha, China and Japan,

.1825

...1819

W. Gilbertson & Co., Pontardawe, Eng. 1812 Sing On, Hongkong

Mitsu Bishi Docks, Nagasaki

S'hai, Dock & Engineering Co. Yokohama Dock Co.

SHIPCHANDLERS:-

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong

F. Blackhead & (o., Hongkong

Schwarzkopf & Co., Tsingtau...

...

Mitsu Bishi Docks, Kobe

...636F

...6360

...8600

...636A

6

47

Kwong Sang

Sing On & Co

44

11800

...1822

..840A

...1822

..1822

SILK FABRICS :-

MINING :-

Yoshinotani Coal Mining Co.

...636B

MILK:-

Bear Brand (Blackhead)

Back end paper

K. Tuck Chang & Co.

SOAP MANUFACTURERS :-

Pears, London Pearson's Antiseptic Co., Ld....

...1829

On back cloth cover ...1808

F. Blackhead & Co., Hongkong

STEAMSHIP LINES:-

Chinese Engineering & Mining Co. Eastern & Aus. S.S. Co. Hamburg-Amerika Linie ... Messageries Maritimes Nippon Yusen Kaisha Norddeutscher Lloyd

Osaka Shosen Kaisha

South Manchuria Railway Co.

Tokyo Soko Kaisha...

Toyo Kisen Kaisha

STEEL MANUFACTURERS:--

Geo, Cradock & Co., Ld.

STOREKEEPERS:-

A Kow, Amoy

...

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong

:.

··

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS-

-Continued

9

PAGE

PAGE

TIMBER (BENT) 'MERCHANTS :-

Hopton & Sons, London

40

...1810

...

1824

TINNING & PRESERVING:-

35

Amoy Tinning Co.

...1823

36

***

...636D

TOBACCONISTS:→→→

34

...

Kruse & Co., Hongkong...

1180D

37

38

TOOLMAKERS AGENTS:-

...

*

...636€

Arnhold, Karberg & Co. ...

...860E

49

TRADE MARKS OF BRITISH MANU, 1803 & 1805

TYPE FOUNDERS':

...1522

Tokyo Tsukiji Type Foundry...

...1820

WHARVES AND GODOWNS:-

..1823

44

Tokyo Soko Kaisha, Kobe...

...636E

...

1180G

WINES AND SPIRITS:-

F. Schwarzkopf & Co., Tsingtau Meida-Ya

...840A

48

Caldbeck, Macgregor & Co., China, Inside end

cover

Nihon Shoyu Manuf. Co....

50

Scheuer & Co.

...1821

Cockburn & Campbell

Sing On, Hongkong.

...1822

Meida-Ya

...1832

48

...1824

SUGAR MERCHANTS:-

47

Yee Gwan & Co....

Suzuki & Co., Kobe...

TAILORS:-

Ah-Men & Hing Cheong Co., Hongkong 1822

WOOL AND COTTON MANUFACTURERS:-

E. Spinner & Co., Manchester and

Bombay

i ..

...1814

WIRE ROPE ManufactURERS:

Geo. Cradock & Co., Limited...

...1522

...

Anglo-Chinese Calendar for 1911

|| &

OF KING GEORGE

V

II. of Hsuan-T'ung, being King-Sut, or the 47th Year of the Cycle, and III. of Hsuan-Tung, being Sen-Hoi, or the 48th Year of the Cycle

亥辛次歲年三至戍庚次歲年

統宣

JANUARY

(31 Days)

FEBRUARY

(28 Days)

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

(31 Days)

(30 Days)

(31 Days)

(30 Days)

(31 Days)

(31 Days)

(30 Days)

(31 Days)

(30 Days)

(31 Days)

DAYS

of the

WEEK

12 & 1

MOONS

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DATE

1

NOOI

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DATK

? & 3

SNOOK

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DAYS

of thei

WEEK

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DATE

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DAYS

of the

WEEK

DAYS

[of the

WEEK!

10 & 11

SNOOK

S

X11

1[Wed.

3 Wed.

II

Mon.

Tues.

3

Thur.

3Fri.

4 Thur.

1Sat.

S.

Mon.

4Tues.

TV

Thur.

5 Sat.

VI 6Tues.

VI

7Fri.

VJI

S.

1v

10 Wed,

IX 11Fri.

x 11

Fri.

S.

2

Wed.

S&t.

10 Mon.

21

11 Ibur.

12/Sat.

12

3

Fri.

wed.

4 Sat.

+4

6 Sat.

3Mcn.

Tues.

5 Wed.

Eat.

¡Mou.

3

Thur.

S.

5

S.

Wed.

Fri.

Mon.

Mon.

6Thor.

67) ur.

7 Fri.

Sat.

S.

4

¿|Tueɛ.

4

*Thur.

Fii.

9 S.

3

11 Tues.

3!

12 Fri.

18

S.

13

10 Mon.

4

12 Wed.

4

13 Sat.

14Men.

14

7Mon.

5

Wed. 5

16£at.

11 Tues.

5.

13 Thur.

51

14) S.

1 Tues.

15

Tues.

10 Thur.

6

11

S.

12 Wed.

6

14Fri.

15 Mon.

10 Wed.

16

Sat.

7 Tues.

Tues.

7 Fri.

!

S.

9[Wed.

11 Fii.

7

5.

s[Wed.

10, Wed.

8

8. Sat.

S

10 Men.

10 Thur. &

1: Sat.

1cn.

Tues.

13 Thur.

7

15 Sat.

10 Tues.

173 Eur.

17

14 Fri.

&

16

S.

17 Wed,

18

Mon.

9 Thur. 9

11/Thur.

91

9] S.

19

11 Tues.

9

11 Fi.

19

B

S.

9

14 Wed.

vi

1 Sat.

9

17 Mon.

181hur.

9

19 Sat.

19

Tues. 10

10 Fri.

10

12, Fri.

10

10 Mon. 10.

T: Wed, 1G

Wed.

11 Sat.

11

13, Sat.

11

11 Tues. 11;

197) ur. 11

12/Sat. j10. 13 S.

14 Mcn.

10

Tur.

10

10 S.

10

11

15 Tues. 11

16 Fri.

'11

Thur. 12

12

S.

12

14 S.

12

12 Wed. :12:

14 Fri.

*12:

14Men. [12:

10[Wed, 12

17 Sat.

12

Fri. 13

Sat. 14

S. 15

Mon. 16

Tues. 17

Wed. 18

13 Mon.

13

14 Tues. 14) 15 Wed. 15 16 Thur. 16

17 Fri.

15 Mon. 13| 16 Tues. 14 17 Wed. 15

13 Trur. 13 11 Fri.

If Sat.

13

1 Tues. 13

1bu. 1

18

$.

11

14

16 S.

14

16 Wed, 14;

14

19 Mon. 14

17. 11 Tues. 12 18|Wed, 113 203) ur. 14

18/7ues. 10 18 Wed. 11: 201Eur. 12

19 Fil.

20

S.

10

201

2cl Sat.

11

21Mon. 11.

21

21

S.

12

Tues. 12

22

21 Fri.

13

Mon. 13

Wed. [13]

22 Sat.

14

2)Tues. 14:

1.r. 14

24

15 Sat.

151

17 Mon. 15

171Eur. 15

19 Sat.

15

20Tues, 15

15.

S.

.151

Wed. 1

2i. 1/

25

18, Thur. [16]

16 S.

¡16

IS Tues. 16

18/Fi.

16

20

S.

16.

21 Wed. I

2:18a1.

16

24 Mcn.

27 Thur. 1

20£at. 16

[17]

19 Fri.

[17]

17 Mon. 17

18|Wed. [17.

19 Sat.

171

21 Mcn.

17

22 Thur. 17

2: S.

17

2{|Tues.

17

27

18 Sat.

181

20 Sat.

18

18 Tues. 18.

201hur. 18

20 S.

1

2:Tres. 18

Thur. 19

19

S.

19

21

S.

19

19 Wed. 19;

23 Fri.

19

21Men.

19

Wed. 19

28 Fri,

24 Sat.

18

24 Mon. 18

20jWed.

27 Sat.

11

Fri. 201

20 Mon. 201

22 Mcn. 20|

kat.

21 Tues. 21}

S.

Mon. 23

22

22 Wed. 22|

Tues. 24

23 Thur.231

24 Fri.

24

Wed. 25

25 Sat.

Thur. [26]

261

S.

Fri.

27

27 Mon. 27,

Sat.

28

28, Tues. [28]

S.

291

291

Mon. 30 N.Y.

1

Tues.

31

2

23] Tues. (21) 24 Wed. [22] 251 Eur. 123

26 Fri.

Sat. |25|

S.

29} Ncn. [27] 30, Tues. [28] Wed. 129 11 r.80 111

31

Fri.

20, Thur. 120! 21. Fri.

24 Sat.

20,

22 Tues. 120)

24/Thur. £

25

S. 20

121

S.

[211

23 Wed, 21

25 Fri.

21.

2(Mon. 21

22 Sat.

23 $.

22:

24 Mon. 22:

24 Thur 22

26 Sat.

22

271ues. 2:

123.

2 Turs. 23

25 Fri.

23

27

5.

28

28 Wed. [22

Tues. 19 20Wcd. 20 27Tur. 21.

28] Fii.

28 Sat.

27 Thur.

28 Fri.

28)

S.

19

29 Mcn.

201

S. 17

28 Mon 18

291ues. [18

Wed. 20 XI

Eat.

3(Tres, 21

X

111, 21

22 vm

23

S.

3 cn.

JX

Wed. 22:

Fii.

22

28)

Thur. 23

kat.

23

124

26

24′Mcn. '24' 25 Ties. '251 26 Wed, 26 27 Thur. (27)

2€}Wed. [24

SC/Sat.

28 Mon. 24

27 11 ur. 25

27

28 Fri.

26

20 Sat.

27

S. 25

28 Men. 261 VI 29 Tues. 127:

20Tues. 25

Thur. |24| vn

Fri.

1|

S. 24.

Tres, 241

3 Fri.

S. 24

25

2Mcn. 25

4 Wed. 25

4 Sat.

F]Mcn. [25]

Wed. 26

1Sat.

£68.26

1 m. 26!

E

S.

(201

Tucs, 26]

2Thur. 27.

2

5.

27.

4Wcd. 127

Fri.

27

6Men. 27

Wed. 27

28 Fri.

SC

S. 126

v 1Wed.

Fri.

3)Men. [28j

Eur. 28

7&st.

Tues. 28

7hur. 28

29 Sat.

129

v 1 Mcn.

Thur.

4 Sat.

291

47 ues. [29]

Hi.

20:

S.

29

ε Wed. 20

Fri. 29

S.

30

2)Tues. 20

3 Fri.

S.

30

g/Wed. 20

7 Sat.

30.

Ncn.

301

Thur. (20

10/Sat. 130

11

2 Wed. 31

Mon. 31:

[Thur. ¡31]

Tues. 31

10

S.

31

12

Chinese New Year's Day in 1912 falls on February 18th.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

JANUARY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st

.7h. 05m.

5h. 49m.

1909

1910

15th

..7h. 07m

5h. 58m.

Maximum

.64.1

66.5

Minimum

.57.6 57.8

MOON'S PHASES

Mean

..60.6 61.8

૧.

h.

m.

New Moon

1

0

21

A.M.

First Quarter

8

2

20

P.M.

Full Moon

15

6

26

A.M.

Last Quarter

22

21

P.M.

New Moon

30

45

P.M.

BAROMETER, 1910.

Mean....

..30.11

1909 1.460 inches

RAINFALL

1910

0.885 inches

11

WEEK

MONTI

MOONS

Sun.

1

Mon.

2

2

Tues.

3

Wed. Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

7

Sun.

8

DAYS OF DAYS OF 11 & 12

co

445

61-∞

5

6-8

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

1ST AFTER CHRISTMAS. Kobe and Osaka opened, 1868. Overland Telegraph through Russia opened, 1872. Russians surrender Port Arthur to the Japanese, with 878 officers, 23,491 men, 546 guns and vast stores of ainmunition, also 4 battleships, 2 cruisers, 14 gunboats and destroyers, 10 steamers and 35 small vessels, 1905.

First election by the Hongkong Chamber of Commerce of a member of the Legislative

Council, 1884. Evacuation of Shanghai completed, 1903.

First election by the Hongkong Justices of the Peace of a member of the Legislative

Council, 1884.

Decree of Emperor Tao-kwang prohibiting trade with England, 1840.

Commissioner

Yeh captured, 1858. Chinese Government definitely refused to submit the Macao boundary question to arbitration, 1910.

EPIPHANY. Fearful fire at Tientsin, 1,400 famine refugees burnt to death, 1878. Forts at Chuenpi taken with great slaughter, 1841.

Mon.

9

Tues.

10

Wed. 11

11

===

9

10

Thur. Frid.

12

13

Sat.

14

Sun. 15

Mon. 16

Tues. Wed.

17

18

Thur. 19

Frid.

20

23 HR CERRO

23 HORTBRO

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Sat.

21

Sun.

22

21

22

Mon.

23

Tues. 24

7237

22

23

Accession, 1902.

24

Wed.

25

Thur. 26

Frid.

27

Sat.

28

2928

《དྷ《ལླཱ ཙྩེ ཙ

25

26

27

28

Sun. 29 Mon. 30

Tues.

31

29

N. Y.

Murder of Mr. Holworthy at the Peak, Hongkong, 1860. Marriage of the Mikado of

Japan, 1869.

Murder of a Chinese Reformer in Gage Street, Hongkong, 1901.

Seamen's Church, West Point, opened, 1872. New Union Church, Hongkong, opened 1891. Two Americans and one Finu hanged in Hongkong gaol, 1905. II.E. The Governor of Hongkong issued an appeal for endowment fund of $1,250,000 for proposed Hongkong University, 1909.

Tung-chi, Emperor of China died, in the nineteenth year of his age, 1875.

Ki-ying, Viceroy of Two Kwang, issues a proclamation intimating the intention to

open up Canton according to the Treaties, 1846.

Secretary of United States Legation murdered at Tokyo, 1871.

2ND AFTER EPIPHANY. Bread poisoning in Hongkong by Chinese baker, 1857. Indo-China

str. "Yik Sing" lost at The Brothers, 1908.

Severe frost in Hongkong, 1893. Chinese Imperial Court returned to Peking, 1902. The Tai-wo gate at the Palace, Peking, destroyed, 1889.

Great Gunpowder explosion in Hongkong harbour, 1867.

Elliot and Kishen treaty, ceding Hongkong, 1841. Sailors' Home at Hongkong formally

opened, 1883.

Attempt to set fire to the C. N. Co.'s steamer "Pekin" at Shanghai, 1891. Collision near Woosung between P. & O. steamer "Nepaul" and Chinese transport Wan-nien-ching " latter sunk and eighty lives lost, 1887. Hongkong ceded to Great Britain 1841. Celebration of Hongkong's Jubilee, 1891.

*

Death of Queen Victoria, 1901. The first Chinese Ambassadors arrived in London,

1877. Police Sergt. Mills shot dead by armed robbers at Yaumati, 1909. 3RD AFTER EPIPHANY.

P. & O. steamer "Niphon" lost off Amoy, 1865. King Edward's

Matheus Ricci, the Jesuit Missionary, enters Peking, 1601. U.S. corvette "Oneida" lost through collision with P. & O. steamer "Boinbay," near Yokohama, 1870. Decree announcing resignation of Emperor Kwang Hsu, 1900

Hongkong taken possession of, 1841.

         S. Paul's Church at Macao burnt, 1835. Terrific fire at Tokyo; 10,000 houses destroyed and many lives lost, 1881.

Decree from Yung-ching forbidding, under pain of death, the propagation of the

Christian faith in China, 1733.

4TH AFTER EPIPHANT. Lord Saltoun left China with $3,000,000 ransom money, 1846. British gunboat patrol with drawn from West River, 1908. Big fire among flowerboats in Canton: 100 lives lost, 1909

Outer forts of Weihaiwei captured by Japanese, 1894.

1ST AFTER EPIPHANY, Ice one-fourth inch thick at Canton, 1852. British str. "Namchow

sank off Cup Chi, near Swatow; about 350 lives lost, 1892. The French evacuated Chantaboon, 1905.

DS

12

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

FEBRUARY-28 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st

.7h. 04m.

6h. 10m.

1909

1910

15th

..6h. 56m

6h. 19m.

Maximum

.64.3

64.7

Minimum

.57.0 55.9

Mean

.60.4

60.0

MOON'S PHASES

Barometer, 1910

Mean......

..30.09

1909 1.660 inches

RAINFALL

1910 0.405 inches

Chronology OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

The Additional Article to

First

Inhabitants of Hongkong declared British subjects, 1841.

Chefoo Convention came into force, 1887. Mrs. Carew sentenced to death at Yokohama for the murder of her husband; sentence commuted to penal servitude, 1897. meeting of International Commission on Opium at Shanghai, 1909. The German Club at Hongkong opened, 1872. Weihaiwei citadel captured by Japanese,

1895.

Great robbery in the Central Bank, Hongkong, discovered, 1865. Agreement opening

West River signed, 1897.

5TH AFTER EPIPHANY. Anti-foreign riot at Chinkiang, foreign houses burned and looted, 1889. The Spanish Envoy Halcon arrived at Macao to demand satisfaction from the Chinese for the burning of the Spanish brig "Bilbaino," 1840. Japan broke off diplomatic relations with Russia, 1904. Japanese str. "Tatsu Maru" seized by Chinese gunboats near Macao for alleged smuggling arms, 1908

d. h.

m.

First Quarter 6 11

28

P.M.

Full Moon

13

6

37

P.M.

Last Quarter 21

11

44

A.M.

DAYS OF DAYS OF

1

WEEK

MONTH

MOON

Wed.

1

3

Thur.

N

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

Mon.

6

456 18

Tues.

Wed.

8

10

36

9

Thur. 9

Frid.

10

12

Sat.

11

Sun. 12

Mon. 13

2*

14

15

2349

Tues. 14

16

Wed. 15

17

Thur. 16

18

Frid. 17

19

Suez Canal adopted as the regular route for the Eastern Mails, 1888.

The Spanish fleet leaves the port of Cavite, by order of the Governor of Manila, for the purpose of taking Formosa, 1626. Hostilities between Russia and Japan begun by Russian gunboat off Chemulpo, 1904. Japanese made a successful torpedo attack at midnight on Russia's Port Arthur squadron, 1904.

The "Henrietta Maria" was found drifting about in the Palawan Passage, captain, crew, and 250 coolies missing, 1857. Murder of Messrs. Kiddle and Sutherland at Mengka on Yunnan border, 1900. Naval fight at Port Arthur between Japanese and Russian fleets with disastrous consequences to the latter, 1904. 13 The Japanese constitution granting representative

the Emperor in person at Tokyo, 1889.

Sat.

18

Sun.

19

21

20

22

21

23

Mon.

Tues.

1- 222 2 2 * * &

Wed. 22

Thur. 23

Frid. 24

Sat

Sun.

24

=∞ 02 72* * * * N * 22

25

26

25

27

28

26

Mon. 27

29

Tues.

28

30

SEPTUAGESIMA.

government proclaimed by

Accession of the Emperor of Japan, 1867. Outbreak of convicts in Singapore Gaol, 1875. Surrender of Liukungtao Island forts and remainder of the Chinese fleet to the Japanese, 1895.

S. Valentine's Day. Tung Wa Hospital, Hongkong, opened by Sir R. G. MacDonnell,

1872. Ports of Hongkong and Tinghai declared free, 1841. The Chinese frigate "Yu-yuen

and corvette Chin-cheng" sunk by the French in Sheipoo harbour, 1885. Insurgents evacuated Shanghai, 1855. Stewart scholarship at Central School, Hongkong,

founded, 1884. Alice Memorial Hospital, Hongkong, opened, 1887.

The

Lammock

C.S. paddle man-of-war **Ashuelot" wrecked 011 the East Rock, near Swatow, 1983. SEXAGESIMA. Lord Amherst's Embassy, returning from China, shipwrecked in the

Java Sea 1817.

Mr. A. R. Margary, of H. B.M.'s Consular Service, was murdered at Manwyne, Yunnan, by Chinese, 1875. Statue of Li Hung Chang unveiled at Shanghai, 1906, The Emperor Tao-kwang died, 1850 (reigned 30 years). Massacre of missionaries at

Nanchang, 1906

"Queen'

Hostilities between England and China recommenced, 1841. Steamer

captured and burnt by pirates, 1857. First stone of the Hongkong City Hall laid, 1867. Chusan evacuated by the British troops, 1841. Explosion of boiler of the str., "Yotsai" between Hongkong and Macao; six Europeans and thirteen Chinese killed and vessel destroyed, 1884. Captain Da Costa and Lieut. Dwyer murdered at Wong-ma-kok, in Hongkong, 1849.

Chinese Imperial Euict issued dismissing the Dalai Llama of Tibet, 1910.

QUINQUAGESIMA. Bogue Forts, Canton, destroyed by Sit Gordon Bremer, 1841. Hongkong

police chop burnt, 1884. Marriage of the Emperor Kwang Hsu, 1889.

Treaty of peace between Japan and Corea signed at Kokwa, 1876. Evacuation of

Port Hamilton by the British forces, 1887.

Capture of the Sulu capital by the Spaniards, 1876.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

MARCH-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st 15th....

........6h. 46m.

6h. 25m.

1909

1910

....Ch. 33m.

Ch. 31m.

Maximum

......67.6

67.0

Minimum

...60.8

60.1

MOON'S PHASES

Mean

.64.1

63.3

d.

h.

New Moon

1

8

SE

31

A.M.

BAROMETER, 1910.

First Quarter

8

7

01

A.M.

Mean.....

.30.04

Full Moon

15

7

58

A M.

Last Quarter

23

8

26

A.M.

1909

RAINFALL

1910

New Moon

30

8

38

P.M.

2.345 inches

0.580 inches

13

DAYS OF DAYS OF 2 and 3

WEEK

Wed.

Thur.

Frid.

1

Sat.

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thur.

MONTH

12340∞ C

91

Frid. 10

MOONS

1

3

9

10

1211

1234

Sat. 11

11

Sun.

12

12

Mon.

13

13

Tues.

14

14

Wed.

15

15

Thur. 16

16

Frid.

17

17

Sat

18

aa

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EventS

ASHI WEDNESDAY, S. David's Day. Bombardment of the Chinhai forts by French

men-of-war, 1885. Twenty-six opium divans closed in Hougkong, 1909. First Dutch Embassy left China, 1657.

Foreign Ministers received in audience by the Emperor at the Tsz Kuang Po, 1891. Emperor Kwang Hsu assumes the government, 1889,

1ST IN LENT. Expulsion of Chinese Custom House from Macao by Governor Amaral, 1849 Hostilities at Canton recommenced. Fort Napier taken by the English, 1841. Departure of Governor Sir J. P. Hennessy from Hongkong, 1882. Kongmoon opened to

Foreign trade.

Arrival in Hongkong of Prince Henry of Prussia, 1898. Russo-Chinese Manchurian

Convention signed, 1902.

Attack on Messrs. Farnham and Rohl at Shanghai, 1872.

Lin arrived in Canton, 1839. 12,000 Chinese troops attacked the English in Ningpo and Chinhai and were repulsed with great slaughter, 1842. The Japanese army after a sanguinary battle lasting several days occupied Moukden, and pursued the retreating Russians, whose losses in the battle were estimated at 10,000, 1905.

Governor Sir R. G. MacDonnell arrived in Hongkong, 1866.

2ND IN LENT. Imperial Commissioner Ki-chen, degraded by the Emperor, left Canton

as a prisoner, 1841 Capture of Bacninh, by the French, 1881.

8,000 Chinese troops routed by the English at Tze-hi with great slaughter, 1842. New Law Courts at Yokohama opened, 1890. Hongkong and Shanghai Bank at Peking burnt down, 1900.

Governor Sir H. Robinson left Hongkong for Ceylon, 1865.

Chinese Envoy Ping and suite left Shanghai for Europe, 1866. Japanese Diet resolved to nationalise the railway. China released the Japanese str. "Tatsu Maru" at Canton, 1908. Sir F. D. Lugard laid foundation stone of Hongkong University, 1910.

8. Patrick's Day, Lord Macartney's Embassy left China, 1794. Severe earthquake in

Formosa, 1906.

Chungking declared

Sun. 19 Mon. 20

Tues. 21

Wel.

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

Mon

22

23

23

24

24

25

25

* * * * *R*

26

26

27

27

28

29

29

Tues. 28 Wed. Thur 30

Frid.

31

* 227 2

21

22

1 * 287 2 ** ** **-

18

Edict of Commissioner Lin to surrender all opium in Canton, 1839.

open to foreign trade, 1891.

19

3RD IN LENT, Governor Sir G. Bonham landed at Hongkong, 1848.

20

Wreck of the steamer "Nanzing," near Hongkong, 1891.

British ship Sarah,' first free-trader, sailed from Whampoa, 1834. Mr. F. A. Aglen

appointed Deputy Inspector Chinese Maritime Customs, 1910.

Death, at Peking, of Sir Harry Parkes, H.B.M. Minister to China, 1885. Sir Robert Hart

left Peking for Home, 1908

Captain Elliot forced his way to Canton, 1839.

in the Philippines, 1901

Aguinaldo captured by the Americans

GOOD FRIDAY. First Section of Manila-Dagupan railway opened, 1891, Attempted

assassination of Li Hung-chang at Shimonoseki, 1895

Captain Elliot demands passports for himself and all the British subjects imprisoned in

Canton, 1839.

4TU IN LEST. Great flood at Foochow, 1974. Newchwang placed under Russian martial law, Death of the widow of the Emperor Tung-chi, 1873. Protocol of Convention

between China and Portugal signed at Lisbon, 1887.

20,289 chests of opium burned by Lin at Canton, 1839.

Seizure and occupation of the Pescadores by the French fleet, 1885.

Arrival of Governor Sir George Bowen, G.C.M.G., 1883. Chinese Regiment at Weihaiwei disbanded. Cantonese resolved on a boycott of Japanese products which lasted through- out the year, 1908

Abolition of the coolie trade at Macao, 1874. Arrival of the Duke and Duchess of Con-

naught in Hongkong, 1800,

14

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

APRIL-30 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st............6h. 18m.

6h. 37m.

1909 1910

15th...

..6h. 04m.

6h. 32m.

Maximum

.75.8

73.9

Minimum

Mean

..67.4 66.1

.71.1 69.6

MOON'S PHASES

1. h.

111.

BAROMETER, 1910

First Quarter 6

1

55 I'.M.

Mean..

.29.95

Full Noon

13

10

37

P.M.

Last Quarter 22

2

36

A.M.

1909

RAINFALL

1910

New Moon

29

6

25

A.M.

2.455 inches

3.725 inches

DAYS OF DAYS OF 3 and 4

WEEK

Sat.

MONTII

MOONS

3

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

21 20 4

1

3

5

6

Wed.

5

Thur. 6

8

Frid.

7

9

Sat.

8

10

Sun.

9

Mon. 10

12

Tues. 11

13

Wed. 12

14

Thur. 13

       Frid. Sat.

14

15

Sun. 16

Mon.

17

B4D OF

15

16

17

18

19

Tues. 18

20

Wed.

Thur. 20

       Frid. Sat.

21

2222

19

21

22

23

F

24

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thur. 27

Frid.

Sat.

Sun. 30

*** *** 88

23

24

26

25

27

26

29

997 22

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

The port of Hoihow, Hainan, opened, 1876. The ports of Pakhoi, Wenchow, Wuhu and Ichang opened, 1877. B. N. Borneo adopted the Straits Settlements currency, 1905. 5TH IN LENT. French Flag hoisted at Kwang-chau-wan, 1898. Belilios Reformatory

opened at Hongkong, 1900.

Protocol arranging the preliminaries of peace between France and China signed at Paris, 1885. The Tsarevitch and Prince George of Greece arrive in Hongkong, 1891. Bogue Forts destroyed by General D'Aguilar, 1847. Wheelbarrow Riot at Shanghai, 1897. Attempt to destroy with dynamite the Prince Regent's Palac: at Peking, 1910 Convention between Sir John Francis Davis and the Viceroy Ki-ying for the admission

of Europeans into the city of Canton within two months, 1842.

Hongkong Mint opened, 1836. Indignation Meeting at Shanghai respecting Wheel

barrow Riot, 1897. Great powder explosion at Canton, 1903. Arrival of M. Paul Bert at Hanoi, 1886.

11 PALM SUNDAY. Terrific tornado in Canton; 2,000 houses destroyed and 10,000 lives lost,

RI 234

SE

5837

1878.

37,000 Christians butchered in Japan, 1738. Death at Peking of Marquis Tseng, 1890.

Presentation of colours to Hongkong Regiment, 1895. Russian flagship Petropavlovsk sunk by a mine off Port Arthur, nearly every man drowned including Adiniral Makaroff, 1904

Soldiers' Club opened at Honghong, 1900. Imperial Palace, Seoul, destroyed by fire, 1904

Aliens given tae right to own land in Japan, 1910.

GOOD FRIDAY. S. Francis Xavier left Goa for China, 1552. Riots at Changsha, 1910 British Flag hoisted at Taipohu, Kowloon New Territory, 1899. Governor Sir Arthur Kennedy arrived in Hongkong, 1872. Junk Bay Flour mills, Hongkong, suspended operations, 1908. EASTER SUNDAY,

Telegraph to Shanghai opened, 1871. (including "Namoa" pirates), 1891. at Shimonoseki, 1895.

Execution at Kowloon city of nineteen pirates Treaty of Peace between China and Japan signed

Convention between China and Japan settling Corean differences signed at Tientsin, 1885. The O. & 0. steamer "San Pablo wrecked near Turnabout, 1888. One-fourthi of the opium divans at Shanghai closed, 1908. Town of Wagima, Japan, destroyed by

fire, 140,

The "Sir Charles Forbes," the first steamer in China waters, arrived, 1830. The

Tsarevitch arrived at Hankow, 1891,

Resignation of Shanghai Municipal Council, 1897.

East India Company ceased trade with China, 1834. Arrival of Governor J. Pope Hennessy in Hongkong, 1877. Opening of new commercial port of Hengchow near Macao, 1909.

25 1ST AFTER EASTER. S. George's Day.

Chinese Imperial Edict issued disranking Roman Catholic missionaries, 1908.

ture of the citadel at Hanoi, Tonkin, by the French forces, 1882. Departure of Sir William Marsh, acting Governor of Hongkong, 1887. Firstsod of the Shanghai- Nanking railway cut at Shanghai, 1905

Cap.

28

30

29

12

28 Foundation stone of Queen's College, Hongkong, laid, 1884

2

Ratifications of Corean Treaty with England exchanged, 1884.

Japan constituted by Imperial decree, 1888, Sir F. D. Lugard lays foundation store of Hongkong Seaman's Institute, 1909.

Battle of the Yalu (Russo-Japan War), Russians defeated with great slaughter, 1901 2ND AFTER EASTER. Arrival of General Grant in Hongkong 1879.

Privy Council for

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

MAY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st.....

..5h. 52m.

Ch. 48m.

1909 1910

15th........ .5h. 4im.

Ch. 54m.

Maximum

.78.6 84.1

Minimum

.71.5 75.1

Mean

.74.8

78.9

MOON'S PHASES

15.

d.

h.

m.

BAROMETER, 1910

First Quarter

5 9

14

P.M.

Mean.......

.29.85

Full Moon

13

2

10

P.M.

Last Quarter

21

5 23

P.M.

New Moon

28

2

21

P.M.

1909 6.700 inches

RAINFALL

1910

1.955 inches

DAYS OF DAYS OF

4 & 5

WEEK ΜΟΝΤΗ

MOONS

Mon.

1

3

Tues. Wed.

Thur.

W N

4

5

Suspension of Oriental Bank, 1884.

Roman Catholic Cathedral at Peking

1∞ DOLG

Frid. Sat.

7

8

Sun.

9

Mon.

10

Tues. Wed.

11

10

12

667809

13

14

Thur.

     Frid. Sat.

12

13

Sun. 14

16

Mon. 15

16

15

Tues.

18

Wed. 17

19

Thur. 18

20

Frid. 19

21

Sat.

*E*28* * * *** **

=2* 19 SECO & 2 2** * &N

20

Sun. 21

Mon.

22

Tues. 23

Wed. 24

Thur.

25

22

23

24

25

26

Frid. 26

28

27

29

Sat.

Sun.

28

Mon.

29

2227

30

Tues.

Wed.

31

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

First number of "Hongkong Gazette" published, 1841. Telegraphic communication established between Hongkong and the Philippines, 1880. Spanish fleet destroyed by U.S. fleet at Cavite, 1898. Empreor Kwang Îsu buried, 1909.

Ratification at Tientsin of the Treaty between Portugal & China, 1888.

Riot in French Concession at Shanghai, 1874.

inaugurated, 1884. Aomori uevastated by fire, 1910.

British troops evacuated Ningpo, 1812. Imperial Government ordered steps to be taken

at Hongkong to close opium divans, 1908.

King Edward VII died, 1910,

Attack on Mr. Wood at the British Legation at Tokyo, 1874.

3RD AFTER EASTER. Departure of Governor Sir William Des Voeux from Hongkong, 1891. HI.M.S. "Terrible" arrived at Hongkong from South Africa, 1900.

New Town Hall at Tientsin opened, 1890. Waglan Lighthouse opened, 1893 Hongkong declared infected with plague, 1894. Colonel Gordon with the Imperial troops captured Chang-chow, the rebel city, 1864. Occupation of Port Hamilton by the British Squadron, 1885. Meeting of Chinese merchants at Shanghai instituted a boycott of American products as a protest against the Chinese Immigration Act, the movement eventually spreading extensively in China, 1905.

Attempted assassination of the Tsarevitch by a Japanese at Otsu, Japan, 1891. Execution

of fifteen pirates (including leader of "Namoa" pirates) at Kowloon, 1891. East India Company's garden at Canton destroyed by the Mandarins, 1831.

A corporal of the British Legation murdered by Chinese soldiers at Peking, 1864. Anti-

foreign riot at Wuhu, 1891.

4TH AFTER EAST R. Arrival of Sir John Walsham, Bart., in Hongkong, on his way to

Peking to assume the functions of British Minister, 1886.

Ratification at Peking of the amended Treaty between Russia and China, 1881.

Anu-foreign riot in the lochow district, 1891.

Kowloon walled city occupied, 1899.

Loss off Amoy of the French war steamer "Izere," 1860.

Shanghai, 1879.

Arrival of General Grant in

The city of Chapu taken by the British troops, 1842. Anti-foreign riot at Nanking, 1891, Disastrous surprise of a French sortie in Tonkin led by Commandant Riviere and death

of the latter, 1883. "Hongkong Daily Press" enlarged, 1900.

ASCENSION DAY. Forts at mouth of Peiho captured by British and French forces, 1858.

The Canton Mint commenced striking silver coins, 1890.

ROGATION DAY. Loss of M.M. str. "Meuzaleh" while on her passage from Hongkong to Yokohama, 1887. Imperial Edict respecting anti-Christian literature, 1892. Ministers, Joint Note to Chinese Government on the Boxer agitation, 1900.

Foreign factories at Canton pillaged, 1841.

U.S. Legation at Tokyo burned down, 1863.

EMPIRE DAY. Captain Elliot and all the British subjects left Canton for Macao, 1839.

British flag hoisted at Weihaiwei, 1898.

ASCENSION DAY. The city of Canton invested by British troops, 1841. Anti-foreign riot

at Nanking, 189). Formosa Republic declared, 1895. Death of Grand Secretary Wen-siang, 1876.

Canton ransomed for $6,000,000,1841. Boxers burn station on Lu-Han line, 1900. Battle of Kinchau (Russo-Japan War); Japanese stormed Nanshan and captured 78 guns, 1904, Battle of the Japan Sea, Admiral Togo practically annihilates Admiral Roshdes- vensky's fleet, 1905.

1ST AFTER ASCENSION. Queen's Statue, Hongkong, unveiled, 1896. Great rain storm

in Hongkong, serious damage, 1889. Anti-foreign riots in Szechuen, 1895.

II. B. M. screw sloop "Reynard" lost on the Pratas shoal in trying to rescue re- mainder of crew of "Velocipede," 1851. Opening of the Peak Tramway, Hongkong, 1888.

Typhoon at Iongkong and Macao; loss of the "Poyang," with 100 lives near Macao 1874.

16

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

JUNE-30 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1909

1910

1st............5h. 39m.

6h. 51m.

15th...........5h. 39m. 6h. 07m.

Maximum

..86.3

86.9

Minimum

.78.6

78.8

Mean

..81.8 82.3

MOON'S PHASES

d.

h.

111.

BAROMETER, 1910

First Quarter

4

6

04

A.M.

Mean........

..29.81

Full Moon

12

5

51

A.M.

Last Quarter

20

51

A. M.

New Moon

26

9

20

P.M.

1909 7.385 inches

RAINFALL

1910

18.190 inches

DAYS OF DAYS OF 5 and 6

WEEK

MONTII

MOONS

Thur.

1

5

Frid.

2

6

Sat.

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thur.

Fri.

0 N

9

8

9

10

11

D123 4 DOL

67800 CER

Mon. 12

Tues. 13

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Attempt to blow up the Hongkong Hotel, 1978. New Opium Agreement between Hongkong and China came into force, 1887. Anti-foreign riot at Tanyang, 1891 Canton-Samshui Railway completed

Hongkong connected with London by wire, 1871. Formal transfer of Formosa from

China to Japan, 1895. Revs. Norman and Robinson murdered, 1900.

Earthquake at Manila, killing more than 2,00 persons, 1863. Death of Sir Arthur Kennedy, 1883. Russell & Co. suspend payment, 1891. Kelung taken possession of by Japanese, 1895.

WHIT SUNDAY. Treaty between France and Corea signed at Seoul, 1880. West River

opened, 1897

Departure of the first O. & 0. steamer from Hongkong to San Francisco, 1875. Messrs. Argent and Green murdered in an anti-foreign riot at Wuhsueh, 1891. Communication with Peking cut off, 1900.

Heavy rains in Hongkong, property to the value of $500,000 destroyed, and many

lives lost, 1861.

Attempted anti-foreign riot at Kiukiang, 1891, Hongkong-Canton steamer "Powan"

wrecked, 190S.

Destruction of Mission premises at Wusieh by anti-foreign mob, 1891.

Suspension of New Oriental Bank, 1892. The P. & O. steamer "Aden" wrecked off

Socotra, 78 lives lost, 1897

Typhoon at Formosa; loss of several vessels, 1876. Admiral Seymour starts for

Peking, 1900.

TRINITY.

SUNDAY, Portuguese prohibited trading at Canton, 1640.

Opening of the first railway in Japan, 1872.

British steamer "Carisbrooke" fired into and captured by Chinese Customs cruiser, 1875. Imperial Edict condemning attacks on Foreigners, 1891. Baronvon Ketteler, German Minister, murdered in Peking, 1900.

Russo-Chinese Treaty, 1728 Battle of Telissu (Russo-Japan War) Russians defeated

with a loss of 7,000 men and 16 guns, 1904.

Tidal Wave, Japan, 28,000 lives lost, 1896. British barque "Cæsar" and Danish schooner "Carl" taken by pirates off Pedro Blanco, 1866. Hope Dock opened at Aberdeen 1867. Russian squadron sank Japanese transport "Hitachi," badly injured "Sado," 1904. Woosung taken, 1842.

Sat.

10

14

Sun.

11

15

16

17

Wed. 14 Thur. 15

18

19

Frid.

16

20

Sat. 17

21

Sun. 18

22

23

24

25

22

26

Canton blockaded by English forces, 1840.

Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee celebra-

tion, 1897.

27

Mon. 19

Tues. 20

Wed. Thur.

21

Frid. 23

Sat.

Sun.

CERA** ***N*28

AEG ZAG ! **

First foreign-owned junk leaves Chungking, 1891. Capture of Taku Forts by Allies, 1900. 1ST AFTER TRINITY. Explosion of the "Union Star" at Shanghai, 17 persons killed and

10 wounded, 1862. Disastrous inundation at Foochow, 2,000 lives lost, 1877. Shanghai occupied by British forces, 1842.

Macartney's embassy arrived in China, 1793. Attack on mission premises at Haiman

city, 1891. Unprecedented floods in the West River, 1908. Massacre at Tientsin, 1870.

24

28

25

29

2ND AFTER TRINITY.

!

Mon

26

Tues.

27

2

Wed.

Thur.

Frid.

29

30

5

Ki-ying visits Hongkong, 1843 Shock of Earthquake in Hongkong, 1874. French troops surprised by Chinese near Langson, 1884. Russian Baltic Fleet, after remaining six weeks in Tonkin waters, sailed from Kamranh Bay northward, 1995.

Assassination of M. Carnot, President of the French Republic, 1894. Treaty of Nanking. exchanged, 1843. Attack on British Legation at Tokyo, 1862. Treaty between England and China signed at Tientsin, 1858. Additional Convention

between France and China signed at Peking, 1887.

Treaty between France and China signed, 1858. Confiscation of the str. "Prince Albert "

by the British Consul and Customs at Canton, 1863.

Agreement effected between Great Britain and the United States for reciprocal protection

of British and American Trade Marks in China, 1995.

The Foreign Ministers admitted to an audience of the Emperor of China at Peking, 1873.

Indian Mints closed to silver, 1893.

British expedition to China arrived, 184). Opening of a section of the Shanghai and

Woosung Railway, 1876. Flooding of the Takasimă coal mines, 1891.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

17

JULY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st

......................5h. 43m.

7h. 00m.

1909

1910

15th............5h. 48m.

7h. 08m.

Maximum

...86.5

87.0

Minimum

78.2

78.8

Mean

.81.9

82.3

MOON'S PHASES

d. h.

m.

BAROMETER, 1910

First Quarter

3

5

20

P.M.

Mean...

.29.75

Full Moon

11

8

53

P.M.

Last Quarter

19

1

31

P.M.

1909

RAINFALL

1910

New Moon

26

4

12

A.M.

12.825 inches

13.905 inches

DAY OF

DAY OF 6 and 6

WEEK

MONTH

MOONS

Sat.

1

6

Sun.

Mon.

تت

8

Tues.

Wed.

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

44878→

9

5

10

6

11

12

13

9

Mon.

10

Tues.

=

11

Wed.

12

CHERIE DE

14

15

16

17

Thur.

13 18

Frid.

14

19

Sat.

15

Sun. Mon.

Tues.

16

17

18

Wed. 19

Thur. Frid.

20

21

Sat.

Sun. 23

Mon.

Tues.

21

22982 KANAR A

2 OF * 27282 *

25

20

21

23

Terrible earthquake at Manila, 1880.

24

25

26

27

28

29

Wed. Thur.

26

27

Frid. 28

Sat.

29

Sun. Mon.

30

31

30

i

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Hakodate, Kanagawa, and Nagasaki (Japan) opened to trade, 1857. Two Swedish mis.

sionaries murdered at Sungpu, 1893.

3RD AFTER TRINITY. Amoy forts and many junks destroyed by H.M.S. "Blode," 1840.

French Expedition from the Hoongkiang arrived in Hongkong, 1873.

>>

Steamer "Don Juan burnt at sea near Philippines; 145 persons perished, 1893

Hongkong low level electric tram service opened, 1904.

Declaration American Independence, 1776. Telegraph cable laid between Hongkong

and Macao, 1884. U. S. Pacific Cable opened to Manila.

Tinghai first taken, 1840. Attack on British Embassy at Tokyo, 1886. Duke of Con-

naught's Statue unveiled in Hongkong, 1902. Order of nobility instituted in Japan, 1884.

| Canton factories attacked by Chinese, 1846.

7TH AFTER TRINITY. First Datch embassy arrived at Tientsin, 1656. Portuguese fleet left Malacca for China, 1522. The Yangtsze blockaded by British fleet, 1840. First Bazaar by Chinese held at Hongkong in aid of relief of distress caused by West River floods, 1908

Engagement between the U. S. Naval Forces and the Coreans; the Expedition leaves to

await instructions, 1871. Amherst's embassy arrived in China, 1816.

Foreign Inspectorate of Customs established in Shanghai, 1854. Suspension of Hongkong Police Officers for accepting bribes, 1897. Macau troops commenced operations to exterminate pirates at Colowau Island, 1910.

First English ship reached China, 1835. French gunboats fired on by Siamese at Paknami, 18 B. Pirates attacked S. S. "Sainam" on West River, killing Rev. Dr. Mac- Donald and injuring several of the crew, 1906.

Statue of Paul Beau unveiled at Hanoi, 1890. Tientsin native city captured by Allies

1900, Chines: Imperial Edict declared bow & arrow obsolete arms, 1905.

Shimonoseki forts bombarded by the English, French, and American squadrons, 1874;

Eruption of Bandai-san volcano, Japan: 500 persons killed, 1888.

ST. SWITHEN'S DAY. British trade with China re-opened, 1842, The King of Cambodia

arrived on a visit toHongkong, 1872.

5TH AFTER TRINITY,

Ningpo Joss-house Riots, Shanghai; 15 killed and many wounded, between Russia and

China on Amur River, 1900.

London, 1885. Li Hung-chaug passed through Hongkong on his way North, 1900. Nanking captured by the Imperialists, 1864. Indo-China S.S. "Hopsang" sunk by

Russians, Pechili Gulf, 1904.

Wreck of the C. M. S. N. Co.'s str. "Pautah" on Shantang Promontory 1857. Yellow River burst its banks at Chang-kiu, Shangtung; great inundation 1889.

in Hongkong, 1902.

8TH AFTER TRINITY. Armed attack on Japanese Legaton at Seoul, Cora, and eight

inmates killed 1882.

Bri ish trade prohibited at Canton, 1834. Anglo-Chinese Burmah Convention signed

tat Peking, 1886.

Kowshing," British steamer, carrying Chinese troops, sunk by Japanese, with loss of about 1,000 lives, 1894. Defeat of British forces at Taku, Admiral Hope wounded, 1850. First visit of Prince Chun, the Emperor's brother, to Hongkong, 1901. Japanese occupy Newchwang, 1904.

Great flood at Chefoo kills 1,000, 1903.

Canton opened to British trade, 1843. Terrific typhoon at Canton, Macao, Hongkong, and Whampoa ; loss of life estimated at 40,000 persons, 1862. Disastrous typhoon at Hongkong, 1908

Nanking re-taken by Imperialists, 1864. Sir Matthew Nathan arrived Hongkong, 1904. German gunboat "Iltis" wreeked off Shantung Promontory, all but eleven of the crew

perished, 1890. Outbreak of rebellion at Manila, 1896.

7TH AFTER TRINITY. Severe typhoon at Macao, 1836.

Hongkong low level electric tram service started, 1904

Japanese occupy Sakhalin, 1905.

Additional Article to Chefoo Convention signed in

Typhoon

18

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

AUGUST-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st

.5h. 56m.

7h. 02m.

1909

1910

15th

.6h. Olm.

6h, 53m.

Maximum

87.5

86.8

Minimum

.78.8

78.6

MOON'S PHASES

Mean

...82.8 82.2

d.

h.

m

BAROMETER, 1910

First Quarter

2

7

29

A.M.

Mean.....

...29.73

Full Moon

10

10

55

A.M.

Last Quarter

17

8

11

P.M.

1909

RAINFALL

New Moon

24

0

14

P.M.

8.340 inches

1910 11.155 inches

DAYS OF DAYS OF 6 and 7

WEEK

MONTH

MOONS

Tues.

1

7

Wed.

8

Thur.

3

Frid.

4

10

Sat.

11

Sun.

12

Mon.

13

Tues.

14

Wed. 9

15

Thur. 10

16

Frid. 11

17

Sat.

12

18

Sun.

13

Mon.

14

Tues.

34

19

20

15

21

Wed. 16

22

Thur. 17

23

Frid. 18

24

Sat.

19

25

Sun.

20

26

Mon. 21

27

Tues.

22

28

Wed.

23

Thur.

24

Frid.

25

Sat.

26

Sun.

27

Mon.

28

Tues. Wed.

Thur. 31

29

30

2RLD O7 12 22

*** **N

~ M

5

4 4 3 - ∞

8

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Both China and Japan declare war, 1894. Kucheng massacre, 1895. Victims of massacre at Tientsin buried, 1870. British fleet arrived before Nanking, 1842.

First Chinese Bazaar held at Canton, 1908 Bombardment of Kelung by French, 1884. Li Hung Chang visited Queen Victoria, 1898.

Macartney's Embassy entered Peiho, 1796,

        1900. Allied march on Peking starts,

STH AFTER TRINITY. Serious flood at Tientsin, 1871. British Squadron arrived off the Peiho, 1840.

Assassination of Mr. Haber, German Consul, at Hakodate, 1874.

British troops landed at Nanking, 1842, King Edward VII's Coronation celebrated

at Hongkong, 1902. Sir II. Pottinger arrived at Hongkong, 1841. Destructive typhoon at Foochow, 1888. First public meeting of British merchants in Canton, called by Lord Napier, who

suggested the establishment of a Chamber of Commerce, 1834.

174 British prisoners executed in Formosa, 1842.

1898.

Manila occupied by U.S. Troops

collapse, causing 43 deaths,

9TH AFTER TRINITY. Tong-ur-ku taken, 1860. House

in Cochrane Street, Hongkong, 11. Japanese squadron sinks Russian cruiser Kurik near Tsushima, 1904.

ASSUMPTION B.V.M. Great fire on French Concession, Shanghai; 991 houses destroyed; loss Tis. 1,500,000, 1879. Total loss of the E. & A. steamier "Gatterthun" near Syuney, 1595. Peking Legations rescued, 1500. Murder of Messrs. Bruce and Lewis at Chengehow, Hunan, 1902. Prince and frincess Arisugawa entertained at hongkong, I104. British trade of Canton stopped by hong merchants, 1854. French Treaty with Siam

Bigned, 1866.

"Empress of India" sinks Chinese cruiser "Wong Tai" in collision near Swatow, 1903.

Great fire in Hongkong Lord Napier ordered by the Viceroy to leave Canton, 1834.

1863. Indian troops lauded in Shanghai, 1900

10TH AFTER TRINITY. First conference between Sir Henry Pottinger and Ki-ying on board the "Cornwallis," at Nanking, 1842, Taku forts taken by the Allied forces, 1860. Emperor Hien Fung aied, 1861. Palace Kevolution at Peking, Em press Dowager again

assumes the Regency, 1898.

Governer Amarai (Macao) assassinated, 1849. Ma, Viceroy of Nanking, stabbed, 1870 Seizure of steamer "Spark" by pirates between Canton and M.cao, 1874. Telegraph line to Peking opened, 1884. Korea annexed by Japanese, 1910. 11.M.S. Bedford wrecked at nelpart, 1910.

Large meeting in Hongkong to protest against the military contribution, 1864.

Chinese fleet at Pagoda Anchorage destroyed by French, 1884.

ST. BARTHOLOMEW. Wreck of the C. N. Co.'s str. "Tientsin" near Swatow, 1887. Dis-

turbances at Amoy, Japanese landed marines, 1900.

British Chamber of Commerce established at Canton, 1834.

Britain and Japan signed, 1858.

Treaty between Great

British left Macao, 1839. British steamer "Dunearn" foundered in a typhoon off Goto

Islands, 190

11TH AFTER TRINITY. Amoy taken by the English, 290 guns captured, 1841.

Lord Amherst's Embassy left for Yuen-ming-yuen, 1816. Slavery abolished in British

possessions, 1833. Kimpai forts silenced by French, 1884.

Treaty of Nanking signed, 1842.

Wreck of "Futami Maru" off Cape Calavite, 1900,

Severe typhoon on coast of China, many lives lost, and much damage done to shipping

at Hongkong, Macao, and Whampoa, 1848.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

SEPTEMBER-30 DAYS

19

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st

...................................6h. 07m,

6h. 39m.

1909

1910

15th

.6h. 01m.

6h. 25m.

Maximum

.87.0

84.1

Minimum

.78.5

79.7

MOON'S PHASES

Mean

82.2

76 3

d.

h. ir.

First Quarter

1

0

21

A.M.

BAROMETER, 1910

Full Moon

8

11

57

P.M.

Mean......

.29.80

Last Quarter

16

1

51

A.M.

New Moon

22

10

37

P.M.

First Quarter 30

7

08

P.M.

1909 8.505 inches

RAINFALL

1910

15.950 inches

DAYS OF DAYS OF 7 and 8

WEEK

MONTH

MOONS

Frid.

1

9

Sat.

2

10

Sun.

3

11

Mon.

1

12

Tues. 5

13

Wed.

6

14

****

    Thur. Frid.

Sat.

Sun

10

1-∞¬9

15

8

16

17

18

Mon.

=

11

19

DOTR A

    Tues. Wed.

12

13

Thur. 14

234

Frid

15

Sat. 16

Sun.

17

Mon

18

Tues.

Wed.

19

20

Thur. 21 Frid. 22

Sat.

23

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed

25

26

27

Thur.

28

Fri.

27 28

29

24

277 ** *****

DO TR72* *

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

1

Count von Waldersec reached Shanghai, Typhoon at Swatow, 1891.

Bat.

30

9

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Ma, Viceroy of Nanking, died of the wounds inflicted by an assassin, 1870. Foundation stone of Gap Rock lighthouse, near Hongkong, laid, 1800. Chinese Imperial Decree published announcing a decision to grant Constitutional Government.

Arrival of the "Vega" at Yokohama after having discovered the North-East Passage, 1879. Kiaochau declared a free port, 1898. Japanese occupied Lioa-yang, capturing vast stores of ammunition and provisions, 1904,

12TH AFTER TRINITY. Hongkong Plague proclamation revoked, 1894. Disastrous floods at

Shanghai, 1904. Attack on the forts at Shimonoseki, Japan, by the allied fleets underA dmiral Kuper, 1464. Death of Tso Tsung-tang at Foochow, 1885. Anglo-Chinese Commercial Treaty signed,

1902.

H.R.II. Prince Alfred received by the Mikado of Japan, 1800. Chinese Court left Isianfu on the way to Peking, 1901. Assassination of Mr. McKinley, President of the U.S.A., 1901. Sir James Mackay's Treaty with China signed, 1902. Attack on Dr. Greig, near Kirin, by soldiers, 1891.

Great typhoon in Hongkong, 1867. H.1.1. Prince Tsai Hsun visits Hongkong, 1909. Sir Hercules Robinson assumed the government of Hongkong, 1859.

13TH AFTER TRINITY. Riot by Chinese mob at Canten; great destruction of houses and property in Shameen, 1883. British gunboat "Wasp" left Singapore for Hongkong

and seen no more, 1887.

Publicmeeting of foreign residents at Yokohama to protest against proposed new Treaty with Japan 1890. Japanese flagship "Mikasa" foundered as the result of an explosion in Sasebo harbour, with a loss 599 men, 1905.

Convention signed at Chefoo by Sir Thomas Wade and Li Hung-chang, 1876.

Public Meeting in Hongkong, with reference to the blockade of the port by the Chinese

Customs' cruisers, 1874. Severe typhoon in Southern Japan, 1891.

Chinese transport "Waylee" driven ashore on Pescadores; upwards of 370 lives lost, 1887.

Pingyang captured by the Japanese, '894

New Convention between Germany and China ratified at Peking, 1881.

The battle of the Yaln, in which the Chinese were defeated by the Japanese, losing Ave

vessels, 1894.

14ȚII AFTER TRINITY. Destruction by fire of the Temple of Heaven, Peking, 1889. Loss in Ki Channel, near Kobe, of the Turkish frigate "Ertogrul," with 567 lives, 1890. Allied Generalissimo, reached Hongkong, 1900. Typhoon at Hongkong the most disas-

trous in the Colony's history, 1908. Riots at Kumchuk, Kwang tung, 1800.

U. S. brig "Labra" taken by pirates, 1866. Terrific typhoon in Hongkong and Macao, many thousands of lives lost, 1874. Hongkong Volunteer Reserve Association inaugurated 1904.

15T AFTER TRINITY 11.M.S. "Rattler" lost off Japan, 1868. Piratical attack on the German barque "Apenrade," near Macao, 1869. The Satsuma rebels in Japan ronted with great slaughter, their leader, Saigo, killed, and the insurrection suppressed 1877. Bomb thrown at Chinese Commissioners when about to leave Peking for Europe, 1905. Arrival of Governor Sir Henry A. Blake in Hongkong, 1898. Jubilee of Dr. A. H. Graves'

missionary labours at Canton celebrated, 1906.

Lord Napier arrived at Macao dangerously ill, 1834.

Commissioner Lin degraded, 1840. Lord Kitchener in Hongkong, 1909.

Yellow River burst its banks in Honan; calamitous inundation, 1887. Death of Hon. Stewart, Colonial Secretary, at Hongkong, 1889. II. A. L. Lydia" wrecked near

Hainan Stra't, 1910.

[4

Michaelmas Day. Hurricane at Manila, causing immense damage to shipping, 1865, S. S. "Charterhonse foundered in a typhoon off Hainan Head, 70 persons drowned.

1906.

All the Bogue forts destroyed by the British fleet, 1841. S. 8. "Hsiesho' sank after striking

a mine in Pechili Gulf, 1905.

1900.

20

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

OCTOBER-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st.

.........6h. 16m.

6h. 10m.

1909 1910

15th............6h. 11m.

5h. 57m.

Maximum...

..81.5

79.7

Minimum

..74.0 72.0

Mean

.77.8 75.3

MOON'S PHASES

d.

h.

m.

Full Moon

8

0

11

P.M.

Last Quarter 15

7

46

A.M.

New Moon

22

09

P.M.

First Quarter 30

41

P.M.

BAROMETER, 1910

Mean.....

.30.02

1909

RAINFALL

1910

23.985 inches

0.045 inches

DAYS OF DAYS OF 8 & 9

019

Wed. 11

WEEK

MONTIL

MOONS

Sun.

1

10

Mon. Tues.

11

12

Wed. 4

13

Thur. 5

14

Fird.

6

15

Sat.

16

Sun.

8

17

Mon.

9

18

Tues. 10

19

20

Thur. 12 Frid. 13

21

22

Sat.

14

23

Sun. 15

24

!

Mon. 16

25

Tues. 17

26

Wed. 18

2*

Thur. 19

28

Frid.

20

29

Sat.

21

30

Sun. 22

Mon. 23

Tues,

24

Wed. 25

Thur. 26

Frid. 27

6

Sat.

28

7

Sun. 29 Mon. 30

9

Tues. 31

10

* & ** **** **

1

CHRONOLOGY of Remargable Events

16TH AFTER TRINITY. The "Hongkong Daily Press" started, 1857. Inauguration of Hongkong College of Medicine, 1887. Hyogo declared an open port, 1892. Gold Standard adopted in Japan, 1897. Eritish Section, Canton-Kowloow Railway opened, 1910. Confucius born, B.C. 562. Tamsui bombarded by French, 1884.

! Serious riot at Hongkong, 1884. Treaty between France and Siam signed at Bangkok, 1893. Withdrawal of British steamers from West River, 190. Chinese National Assembly Inaugurated, 1910.

Attack on foreigners at Wenchow, 1884.

Hongkong, 1894.

Terrible fire at Amoy, 1902. Typhoon at

French expedition left Chefoo for Corea, 1866. Arrival in Hongkong of Governor Sir William

Des Vœux, 1887. Lin Kung-yi, Viceroy of the Liang-kiaug, died at Nanking 1902. Hongkong Government agreed to lend the Viceroy of Wuchang £1,100,000 to repurchase from an American syndicate the Canton-Hankow railway concession, 1905. H.R. H. Prince Alfred visited Peking, but not received by the Emperor, 1869. Great public meeting at Hongkong to consider increase of crime in Colony, 1878. Chinese Court left Kaifengfu on its way to Peking, 1901.

17TH AFTER TRINITY, Supplementary Treaty signed at the Bogue, 1848. French landing party at Tamsui repulsed, 1884. Death of Lady Robinson, wife of the Governor of Hongkong, 1894. Battle of Shaho, Russo-Japanese War commenced, ended 25th in disastrous defeats of Russians; casualties 45,800 Russian ; 15,879 Japanese, 1904. Shanghai captured, 1841. Chinhai taken, 1841. Official inspection of Tientsin-Kaiping Rail- way, 1888. Wreck off the Pescadores of the Norwegian str, "Normand," with loss of all on board except two, 1892. Shanghai-Woosung Railway placed under Chinesecontrol, 1904. Lord Napier died at Macao, 1834. Wreck off the Pescadores of the P. & O. str. " Bokhara,"

with loss of 125 lives, 1892.

The first Chinese merchant steamer (the **Meifoo") left Hongkong for London with

passengers to establish a Chinese firm there, 1881.

Revolt in the Philippines, 1872. Eight Chinese banks in Peking suspended payment 1910. Ningpo occupied by British forces, 1841. First railway in Japan officially opened by the Mikado, 1872. Allies capture Paotingfu, 1900. **Flora Templet" lost in the China Sea, with upwards of 800 coolies on board, 1859.

            "Hankow" burut at her wharf, Hong- kong, 75 deck passengers perishing, 1906.

18TH AFTER TRINITY,

Explosion on the Chinese trooper "Kungpai," loss of 500 lives, 1895. Khanghoa, in Corea, taken by the French, 1866.

St. John's Cathedral, Hongkong, dedicated, 1842. Daring piracy on board the British

str. Greyhound," 1885. Tao Mu, Viceroy at Canton, died, 1902.

At a meeting of the Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London, and China, a scheme

of reconstruction was approved, 1892.

Great fire in Hongkong, 1859. Great typhoon at Formosa, 1861. Japanese (lovernment

welcomed American Battleship Fleet, 1908

Terrific typhoon at Manila; enormous damage to property, 1882.

The Shanghai and Woosung railway closed by the Chinese Government, 1877. H.R.H. Prince Alfred arrived at Shanghai, 1869. Cosmopolitan Dock opened, 1875.

Death at Saigon of M. Filippini, Governor of Cochin-China, 1887,

19TH AFTER TRINITY. 58 piratical vessels destroyed by Captains Hay and Wilcox, H.M.

ships Columbine and "Fury," 1849.

King Chulalongkorn of diam died, 1910.

Japanese cross the Yalu, 1894.

Treaty of Whampoa between France and China signed, 1844. Kahding recaptured by the

Allies, 1562. Sir Claude Macdonald leaves Peking, succeeded by Sir E. Satow, 1900. Chin-lien-cheng taken by the Japanese, 1894.

Serious earthquake in Central Japan, 7,500 persons killed, 1891. Attempted insurrection at Canton, 1895. Prince Adalbert of Prussia visited Hongkong, 1904. Mass .cre of four American Missionaries and a child at Lienchow, 1905. Prince Ito assasinated at Harbin, 1909.

20TH AFTER TRINITY. Portuguese frigate "D. Maria II." blown up at Macao, 1850. Great fire in Hongkong, 1866. Fenghuang taken by the Japanese, 1894. Chinese Govern-

ment welcomed American Battleship Fleet at Amoy, 1908.

H.R.H. Prince Alfred arrived at Hongkong, 1869. Talienwan and Kinchow taken by

the Japanese, 1894.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

NOVEMBER-30 DAYS

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

SUNRISE

SUNSET

1st

.........6h. 29m.

5h. 45m.

Maximum

15th...6h. 37m.

5h. 39m.

Minimum

Mean

1909

1910

..75.5 73.3

.65.4 64.7

.70.4 68.7

MOON'S PHASES

d.

h.

Ill.

BAROMETER, 1910

Full Moon

6 11

48

P.M.

Mean.......

.30.06

Last Quarter

13

3

19

P.M.

New Moon

21

4

49

A.M.

First Quarter

29

9

42

A.M.

1909 0.065 inches

RAINFALL

1910 2.535 inches

I

21

DAYS OF DAYS OF 9 and 10!

WEEK MONTH MOONS

W 19

Wed.

1

11

Thur.

2

12

Frid.

Sat. Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed. Thur.

Fri.

Sat.

22 42 OTRO

3

13

14

15

16

7

17

18

6189

19

10

20

2=

*

21

22

23

Sun.

12

Mon.

13

Tues.

14

Wed.

15 :

25

26

Thur. 16

24

25 3 7 3278 2

Frid.

17

Sat.

18

Sun.

19

29

Mon.

20

30

Tues.

21

1

Wed.

22

       Thur. Frid. Sat.

23

24

25

Sun. 26

6

27

7

2323

*** 20

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thur.

28

29

R

30

10

Chronology of RemarkABLE EVENTS

The port of Quinhon, Annam, opened to foreign trade, 1876. Death of Alexander II Czar of Russia, 1894. Riotous disturbances at Hongkong connected with the boycott of Japanese goods, 190s. Wreck of the U.S. cruiser "Charleston" off North Luzon.

Great Britain commenced the first war with China by the Naval action of Chuen-per

1839.

Hongkong Jockey Club formed, 1884.

21ST AFTER TRINITY. Great fire at Macao, 500 houses burnt, 1834. Peking evacuated by

the Allies, 1860.

English and French Treaties promulgated in the "Peking Gazette," 1860.

1

Death of Li Hung-chang, 1901.

The French repulsed in Corea, 1866. Celebration of Queen Victoria's Jubilee in Hongkong, 1887. Typhoon at Hongkong, 1900, H.M.S. "Sandpiper" and "Canton City" sunk. Funeral of Empress-Dowager of China, 1909. Statue of Sir Arthur Kennedy unveiled in the Botanic Gardens, Hongkong, 1887. H.M.S. "Racehorse" wrecked off Chefoo in 1864. Denth of M. Paul Bert, Resident General of Annam and Tonkin, 1886. New Chinese Tariff came into force, 1901. Disturbances at Shanghai, following measures to prevent a plague epidemic, 1910. 22ND AFTER TRINITY. Hongkong first lighted by gas," 1864. The Foreign Ministers

had audience within the Palace, Peking, 1894.

Earthquake at Shanghai, 1847. Macao Boundary Delimitation Conference at Hongkong

interrupted, 1909.

Convention signed between Russia and China, 1860. Celebration of Shanghai Jubiles, 1893. Germans took possession of Kinochau Bay, 1897. Death of the Chinese Emperor Kwang Hsu, 1908. H. M. gunboat "Anat lost on the Palawan, 1868. Destruction of the str. "Wah Young" by fire in the Canton river; upwards of 400 lives lost, 1887. Opening of Canton-Fatshan Railway, 1:03. Death of the Chinese Empress Dowager Tze Au, 1908. Shanghai opened to foreign commerce, 1843. Celebration of Shanghai Jubilee, 1893. Great fire in Hongkong, 1867. First section Shanghai-Nanking railway to Naziang opened. 23RD AFTER TRINITY. Terrific gunpowder explosion at Amoy; upwards of 800 houses destroyed and several hundred lives lost, 1887. Jesuit fathers expelled from Macao, 1910. Portuguese Custom House at Macao closed, 1845. Lord Elgin died, 1863.

Major Baldwin and Lieut. Bird, of II.M.'s 20th Regt., murdered in Japan, 1864. Port Arthur taken by the Japanese, 1894. Departure of Governor Sir Henry Blake from Hongkong, 1903; acting appointment of Hon, F. H. May.

Terrible boiler explosion on board the steamer "Yesso" in Hongkong harbour,

86 lives lost, 1877.

Arrival of the Princes Albert Victor and George of Wales in the "Bacchante

Woosung, 1881.

"

at

Capture of Anping, Formosa, 1868. Treaty between Portugal and China signed, 1871,

Imperial Diet of Japan met for the first time, 1890.

21TH AFTER TRINITY. Edict issued by the Viceroy of Canton forbidding trade with British

ships, 1839.

M. Thiers accepts the apology of Ch'ung How, the Chinese Ambassador, for the murder of

the French at Tientsin (June 21st, 1870), 1871.

Foreign_factories burnt at Canton, 1856. Great fire in Hongkong, 1867. Blake Pier

Hongkong, opened 1900.

"

Murder of captain and four men of the British barque "Crofton, near Ku-lan, 1869. Opening of the Japanese Diet at Tokyo by the Emperor in person 1890. Revolt of troops at Macao, 1910,

S. Andrew's Day. S. Joseph's Church, Hongkong, consecrated 1872. The Japanes a cruiser "Chishima Kan" sunk in collision with the P. & O. steamer "Raavenna" in the Inland Sea, 61 lives lost, 1892

22

THE CALENDAR FOR 1911

DECEMBER-31 DAYS

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

SUNRISE

SUNSET

1st

..........................6h. 48m.

5h. 35m.

15th............6h. 57m.

5h. 40m.

Maximum.....

Minimum

Mean

MOON'S PHASES

1909

1910

...68.9 65.1

..58.9

54.9

..63.6 59.7

BAROMETER, 1910

Mean........

.30.18

1909

RAINFALL

0.00 inches

1910 0.790 inches

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

ADVENT. S. Francis Xavier died on Sanchoan, 1552.

d.

h.

1.

Full Moon

6 10

52

A.M.

Last Quarter

13

1

16

A.M.

New Moon

20

11

40

P.M.

First Quarter

29

2

47

A.M.

DAYS OF DAYS OF 10 and 11|

WEEK MONTH

MOONS

Frid.

1

11

Sat.

2

12

Sun.

3

13

Mon.

14

Tues.

15

Six

Wed.

6

16

Thur.

7

17

Frid.

8

18

Sat.

9

19

Sun. 10

20

Mon. 11

21

Tues. 12

22

Wed. 13

72 * **N

23

Thur. Frid. 15

14

24

25

Sat.

16

26

Sun. 17

27

First census of Hongkong taken, population 15,000, 1841.

foreigners killed at Wang-chuh-ki, 1847. Soochow re-taken by the Imperialiste under General Gordon, 1863. The Japanese warship "Unebi-kan" left Singapore and not heard of again, 1886.

Confucius died, B.C. 490.

European factories at Canton destroyed by a mob, 1842.

Ningpo captured by the Taipings, 1861. Consecration of new Pei-tang Cathedral

Peking, 1888.

1ST IN ADVENT. Piracy on board the Douglas str. 'Namoa," five hours after leaving Hongkong. Captain Pocock and three others murdered and several seriously wounded, 1890. Arrival in Hongkong of Governor Sir William Robinson, 1891. Indemnity paid by Prince of Satsuma, 1863. Admiral Bell, U.S.N., drowned at

Osaka, 1867.

Imperial Decree stating that the Foreign Ministers at Peking are to be received in

audience every New Year, 1890.

French flag hauled down from the Consulate at Canton by Chinese, 1832, Firet

Reception of foreign ladies by the Empress Dowager of China, 1898.

All Roman Catholic Priests (not Portuguese) expelled from Macao, 1838.

2ND IN ADVENT. The P. M. S. S. Co.'s steamer "Japan" burnt, 1 European passenger, the cook,and 389 Chinese drowned, 1874. United States District Court for China opened at Shanghai 1906. Sir W. Des Vœux, formerly Governor of Hongkong, died, 1909. Mon. 18 28 Sir Hugh Gough and the Eastern Expedition left China, 1842. Tues. 19 Wed. 20

Thur. 21 Frid. 22

Sat.

** N** &

23

Sun. 24 Mon. 25

Tues. 26

Wed.

Thur.

72287

Frid. 29

888-

29

1

2345 C

9

10

30! 11

Arrival of Princes Albert Victor and George of Wales at Hongkong in the "Bacchante, 1881. Two cotton mills destroyed by fire at Osaka, 120 persons burnt to death, 1898.

Steam navigation first attempted, 1736

Two Mandarins arrived at Macao with secret orders to watch the movements of

Plenipotentiary Elliot. 1836.

Sir Henry May, of Hongkong, appointed governor of Fiji, 1910.

British Consulate at Shanghai destroyed by fire, 1870.

CHRISTMAS DAY. Great fire in Hongkong; 368 houses destroyed, immense destruction

of property, 1878.

Great fire at Tokyo, 11,000 houses destroyed, 203 lives lost, 1897. The N. C. Company

steamer "Shanghai" destroyed by fire on the Yangtsze, over 300 lives lost.

Dedication of Hongkong Masonic Hall, 1865.

Canton bombarded by Allied forces of Great Britain and France,1857

Sat.

Sun.

31 12

1ST AFTER CHRESTMAS,

CHINESE FESTIVALS AND OBSERVANCES IN 1911

1911. King Sut Jan. XII. Moon.

20

20

23

23

24 26

21

26

Sin-Hai Yr.

I. Moon.

30

1

Feb.

5

7

8

10

13

14

Mar.

NEE BON -

15

16

II. Moon.

1

2

13

13

15

15

19

19

22

22

April III. Moon.

1

༤ ༣ ཛྙྰམཚོས

3

15

18

23

26

26

May IV. Moon.

8

10

11

12

14

15

17

18

20

28

**26*2

28

June

1

V. Moon.

10

5

H39

192

11

13

12

16

Festival of Lu Pàn, the patron saint of carpenters and masons.

225

23

He is said

to have been a contemporary of Confucius. Among the many stories related of his ingenuity, it is said that, on account of his father having been put to death by the men of Wu, he carved the effigy of one of the genii with one of its hands stretched towards Wu, when, in consequence, drought prevailed for three years. On being supplicated and presented with gifts from Wu, he cut off the hand, and rain immediately fell. On this day carpenters refuse to work.

Worship of the god of the hearth at nightfall.

The god of the hearth reports to heaven. Beginning of Spring

Chinese New Year's Day.

Beginning of Spring.

Fête day of the Spirits of the Ground.

Feast of Lanterns, Fête of Shang-yuen, ruler of heaven.

Fête of Shen and Ts'ai, the two guardians of the door. Auspicious day

praying for wealth and offspring, as well as for rain.

Fête day of the Supreme Judge in the Courts of Hades.

Mencius born, B.C. 371. Spring worship of the gods of the land and grain. Fête of the god of literature, worshipped by students.

Fête day of Hung-shing, god of the Canton river, powerful to preserve people

from drowning, and for sending rain in times of drought. Birthday of Lao Tsze, founder of Tauism, B.C. 604.

Fête of Kwanyin, goddess of mercy.

Vernal Equinox

Fête of Hiuen Tien Shang-ti, the supreme ruler of the sombre heavens

and of Peli-te, Tauist god of the North Pole.

Tsing-ming or Tomb Festival

Fête of 1-ling, a deified physician, and of the god of the Sombre Altar, wor-

shipped on behalf of sick children.

Fête of Hen Tu, the goddess worshipped behind graves; of the god of the

Central mountain, and of the three brothers.

Fête of Tien Heu, Queen of Heaven, Holy mother goddess of sailors. Fête of Tsz Sun, goddess of progeny.

National Festival of Ts'ang Kieh, inventor of writing.

Fête of the Bodhisattva Mandjushri; worshipped on behalf of the dead. Fête of San Kai, ruler of heaven, of Earth, and of hades; also a fête of Buddha.

Beginning of Spring.

Fête of the dragon spirits of the ground.

Anniversary of the death of Confucius

Fête of Li Sien, Tauist patriarch, worshipped by barbers.

Fête of Kin IIwa, the antonese goddess of parturition. Fête of the goddess of the blind.

Fête of Yoh Wong, the Tauist god of medicine.

Fête of the god of the South Pole.

National fête day. Dragon boat festival and boat races. On this day the Cantonese frantically paddle about in long narrow boats much ornamen- ted. The festival is called Pa Lung Shun er Tiu Wat Uen, and is held to commemorate the death of the Prince of Tsoo, who, neglecting the advice of his faithful Minister Wat Uen, drowned himself about B.C. 500. National fête of Sheng Wang, the tutelary god of walled towns. National fête of Kwân Ti, god of war, and of his son General Kwan. Anniversary of the Formation of Heaven and Earth. Fête of Chang Tao-ling (A.D. 34), ancient head of the Tauist sect. His descendants still continue to claim the headship. It is said "the succession is perpetuated by the transmigration of the soul of each successor for Chang Tao-ling, on his decease, to the body of some youthful member of the family, whose heirship is supernaturally revealed as soon as the miracle is effected." Fête of Shakyamuni Buddha, the founder of Buddhism.

24

CHINESE FESTIVALS AND OBSERVANCES IN 1911

26

VI. Moon.

22

July

8

13

24

29

14

19

19

24

Aug. VI. Int.

9

24

27

Moon,

15

VII. Moon

1

30

7

Sept.

7

15

9

17

10

18

12

བྲཱཀྐསྶ སྶ གྷསྶཉྩེ༠ག སྨཱ ཉྙཱ

20

22

24

29

VIII. Moon.'

1

233

Oct.

15

Nov.

37

Dec.

00

ཨཱུ མི॰ ིིསོ

18

25

27

IX. Moon.

^

9

11

15

16

17

18

28

X. Moon.

15

3

XI. Moon.

4

Summer Solstice.

Slight Heat. Fête of Lu Pan, the god of carpenters and masons. Great Heat.

Fête of the goddess of mercy.

Anniversary of Kwan Ti's ascent to heaven. Fête of Chuh Yung, the spirit

of fire; and of the god of thunder.

Beginning of Autumin

First day of the seventh moon. During this moon is held the festival of all souls, when Buddhist and Tauist priests read masses to release souls from purgatory, scatter rice to feed starving ghosts, recite magic incantations accompanied by finger play imitating mystic Sanskrit characters which are supposed to comfort souls in purgatory, burn paper clothes for the benefit of the souls of the drowned, and visit family shrines to pray on behalf of the deceased members of the family. Exhibitions of groups of statuettes, dwarf plants, silk festoons, and ancestral tablets are com- bined with these ceremonies, which are enlivened by music and fireworks. Fête day of Lao Tszu, the founder of Tauism.

Fête of the god of Ursa Major, worshipped by scholars, and of the seven

goddesses of the Pleiades, worshipped by women.

Fête of Chung Yuen, god of the element earth.

White Dew

Fête of the three gods of heaven, of earth, and of water, and of the five

attendant sacrificial spirits.

Fête of Chang Fi, A.D. 220. A leader of the wars during the Three Kingdoms. He is said to have been at first a butcher and wine seller. After many heroic exploits, he perished by the hand of an assassin. Fête of the god of wealth.

Fête of Hü Sün-ping, a Tauist eremite.

Fête of Ti Ts'ang-wang, the patron of departed spirits.

Fête of Hu Sun, a deified physician, worshipped by doctors, and of Kin

Kiah (god of the golden armour) worshipped by the literati. Fête of the gods of land and grain.

Descent of the star god of the northern measure, and fête of the god of the hearth. Autumnal Equinox.

National fête day. Worship of the moon, and Feast of Lanterns. Cold Dew.

Fête of the god of the Sun.

Fête of Confucius (born 551 B.C.), the founder of Chinese ethics and politics.

Descent of the Star gods of the northern and southern measures from

the 1st to the 9th day inclusive.

Frost's Descent

Fête of Kwan Ti, the god of war; kite-flying day. Fête of Tung, aruler in Hades

Fête of Yen Hwui, the favourite disciple of Confucius. National fête of Shu Hi (A.D. 1130-1200), the most eminent of the later Chinese philosophers whose commentaries on the Chinese classics have formed for centuries the recognized standard of orthodoxy.

Fête of the god of the loom.

Fêtes of the god of wealth; of Koh Hung, one of the most celebrated of Tauist

doctors and adepts in alchemy; and of the golden dragon king.

Fête of Tsü Shêng, one of the reputed inventors of writing. Beginning of

Winter.

Fête day of Hwa Kwang, the god of fire, and Ma, a deified physician.

Fête of the three brothers San Mao.

Fêtes of Ha Yuen, the god of water; of the god of small-pox; and of the

god and goddess of the bedstead.

National fête of Confucius (born 551 B.C.), founder of Chinese ethics and

politics. Winter Solstice.

Fête day of Yuh Hwang, the higher god of the Tauist pantheon.

BANKS

25

Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.

PAID-UP CAPITAL

STERLING RESERVE FUND SILVER RESERVE FUND

$15,000,00O

£1,500,000 at 2/- $15,000,000

10,000,000

RESERVE LIABILITY OF PROPRIETORS

31,000,000 15,000,000

COURT OF DIRECTORS: CHAIRMAN G. BALLOCH, Esq.

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN-ROBERT SHEWAN, Esq.

F. H. ARMSTRONG, Esq.

ANDREW FOR ES, Esq. G. FRIE LAND, Esq. HON. MR. H. KESWICK C. R. LENZMANN, Esq.

S. A. LEVY, Esq.

F. LIEB, Esq.

W. LOGAN, Esq.

G. H. MEDHURST, Esq.

H A. SIEBS, Esq.

BRANCHES, AGENCIES AND SUB-AGENCIES:

AMOY BANGKOK

BATAVIA

BOMBAY

CALCUTTA

COLOMBO

CANTON

FOOCHOW

HAMBURG

HANKOW

HONGKONG

ILOILO

IPOH

JOHORE

KOBE

KWALA LUMPUR LONDON LYONS

MALACCA MANILA

NAGASAKI

NEW YORK

CHIEF MANAGER :

Hongkong-N. J. STABB.

MANAGER :

Shanghai-H. E. R. HUNTER.

PEKING PENANG RANGOON

SAIGON

SAN FRANCISCO

SHANGHAI

DO. (HONGKEW)

SINGAPORE

SOUKABAYA

TIENTSIN YOKOHAMA

LONDON OFFICE-31, LOMBARD STREET.

LONDON BANKERS-LONDON COUNTY & WESTMINSTER BANK, LD.

Interest Allowed

HONGKONG.

On Current Deposit Accounts at the rate of 2 per cent. per annum on

the daily balance.

On Fixed Deposits:-

For 3 months, 21 per cent. per annum

6

12

""

29

""

LOCAL BILLS DISCOUNTED.

CREDITS granted on approved Securities, and every description of Banking and Exchange business transacted.

DRAFTS granted on London and the chief commercial places in Europe, India Australia, America, China, and Japan.

N. J.

HONGKONG, 1ST JANUARY, 1911.

STABB,

Chief Manager.

26

BANKS

Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China

HEAD OFFICE 32, BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHIN, LONDON Incorporated by Royal Charter.

PAID-UP CAPITAL, in 60,000 Shares of £20 each RESERVE FUND

          COURT OF DIRECTORS 1909-1910 THE RT. HON, LORD GEORGE FRANCIS HAMIL-

TON, G.C.S.I.

SIR H. S. CUNNINGHAM, K.C.I.E. THOMAS CUTHBERTSON, Esq.

£1,200,000 .£1,000,000

SIR ALFRED DENT, K.C.M.G. WILI IAM HENRY ŃEVILLE GOSCHEN, Esq. SIR MONTAGU C. TURNER LEWIS A. WALLACE, JUN., Esq.

JOINT MANAGERS-T. II. WHITEHEAD AND T. FRASER

MAGNUS MOWAT, Esq.

AUDITORS

WILLIAM ADOLPHUS BROWNE, Esq., F.C.A.

BANKERS

THE BANK OF ENGLAND: LONDON CITY & MIDLAND BANK | THE NATIONAL BANK OF SCOTLAND,

AMRITSAR.

MADRAS.

BOMBAY, | PENANG.

CALCUTTA, THAIPING.

RANGOON.

COLOMBO.

AGENCIES AND BRANCHES

SINGAPORE.

KWALA-LUMPUR.

BATAVIA,

BANGKOK.

TIENTSIN. HANKOW.

LD.

KLANG. MALACCA. SEREMBAN,

CEBU.

MANILA.

DELI (SUMATRA). IPOH (PERAK).

SOURABAYA.

HONGKONG. FOOCHOW. SHANGHAI.

ΥΟΚΟΗΑΜΑ.

KOBE.

KARACHI.

NEW YORK.

SAIGON. HAMBURG.

LIST

OF CORRESPONDENTS

Continent.

Portland, Oregon {

CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE. BANK OF CALIFORNIA.

Paris-Messieurs OFFROY GUIARD & CIE.

Amsterdam-Messrs. OPR & Co., Messrs. WERTHEIM & GOMPERTZ, BANK OF AMSTERDAM, NETHER- LANDS TRADING SOCIETY.

BANK OF ROTTERDAM.

Frankfort...DEUTSchr Bank

Rotterdam ....

Berlin

Bremen

Messrs. WIDOW J. LANGE, SON & C1. DIRECTION DES DISCONTO GESELLSCHAFT.

Australia and New Zealand,

BANK OF AUSTRALASIA.

BANK OF NEW SOUTH WALES.

BANK OF VICTORIA, LIMITED.

COLONIAL BANK OF AUSTRALASIA, LIMITED.

COMMERCIAL BANK OF AUSTRALIA, LIMITED.

COMMERCIAL BANKING COMPANY OF SYDNEY, LIMITED.

LONDON BANK OF AUSTRALIA, LIMITED.

ENGLISH, SCOTTISH, AND AUSTRALIAN BANK, LIMITED.

UNION BANK OF AUSTRALIA, LIMITED.

BANK OF NEW ZEALAND.

NATIONAL BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, LIMITED.

United States and Canada.

Boston-Bank of Nova Scotia.

NATIONAL BANK OF INDIA, LIMITED. BANK OF BENGAL.

ANGLO-EGYPTIAN BANK, LIMITED.

.Messrs. TAIT & C›.

CREDIT LYONNAIS.

..Credit LYONNAIS

ANGLO-EGYPTIAN BANK, LIMITED.

AUSTRIAN SOCIETY OF CREDIT (formerly

Gottlieb Lederer)

Aden

Agra

Alexandria...

Amoy

Barcelona

Bordeaux

Cudiz

Sres. ARAMBURU HERMS.

Cuiro

Curlsbad..

Chefoo

Chemulpo

Genoa...

Haiphong

Honolulu

Kiavchao

CORNABE, ECKFORD & Co.

CARL WOLTER & Co.

ConstantinopleCREDIT LYONNAIS.

Lahore..

Lyons

Macassar

Madrid

Malta

Marseilles

Mauritius

Milan.........

Messrs. GRANet, Brown & Co.

Messrs. SPEIDEL & CO.

Messrs. BI-HOP & Co.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HAWAII, LD. SIEMSSEN & Co

BANK OF BENGAL.

Messrs. AYNARD & FILS.

Nambooze VennootschAP.

HANDELSVEREENIGING VOORHEEN REIS&Co. Sres. HIJO DE A. G. MORENO Y SOBRINOS ...ANGLO-EGYPTIAN BANK, LIMITED.

Messrs. E-TRINK & Co.

BANK OF MAURITIUS, LIMITED.

ZACCARIA PISA&BancaCommerciaLEÏTALIANA

Negapatam..... BANK OF MADRAS.

QUEEN'S ROAD, Hongkong, 1st Jan., 1911.

Tacoma-Bank of CalIFORNIA.

Vancouver, Vi toria, Į CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE. Toronto & Montreal $ & LONDON PARIS NATIONAL BANK

BANK OF CALIFORNIA.

San Francisco

CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE,

THE SAN FRANCISCO NATIONAL BANK. Chicago-FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO.

Philadelphia {TRADESMAN'S NATIONAL BANK.

FOURTH STREET N TIONAL BANK

NATIONAL Bank of CommERCE

Seattle BANK OF CALIFORNIA.

South Africa.

STANDARD BANK OF SOUTH AFRICA, LIMITED. THE BANK OF AFRICA. LIMITED.

South America.

BRITISH BANK OF SOUTH AMERICA, LIMITED. LONDON AND RIVER PLATE BANK, LIMITED. BANCO DE CHILE.

ANGLO-SOUTH AMERICAN BANK, LTD,

Nagasaki... HOLME, RINGER & Co. Naples

CREDITO ITALIANO.

Newchwang.....ÁRNHOLD, KARBERG & Co.

Odessa

Padang

Port Said

Peking.. Réunion.

Rome

Samarang

BANQUE D'ESCOMPTE D'ODESSE.

PADANGSCHE HANDFL MAATSCHAPPIJ. IMPERIAL OTTOMAN BANK.

ARNHOLD, KARBERG

BANQUE DE L'ILE DE LA REUNION.

BANCA COMMERCIALE ITALIANA.

St. Petersburg..CREDIT LYONNAIS.

Sandakan

Suez...

Smyrna

Swatow

Talienwan

Trieste...

Valencia. Venice.

Vienna..

......INTERNATIONALE CREDIET EN HANDELS.

VREENIGING "ROTTERDAM.

Messг. BEHn, Meyer & Co., LTD. GEORG MEINECKE.

IMPERIA Ottoman BANK.

Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE

...CORNABE, ECKFORD

Co.

K. K. PaY ESTERREICHISCHEN CREDIT

ANSTALT FÜ∙ HANDEL & GLWERBE. Sres. SANCH · Y COMPANIA,

BANCA COMMERCIALE ITALIANA.

K. K. PRIV. OESTERREICHISCHEN CREDIT

ANSTAL· FÜR HANDEL & GEWKEBE.

Vladicostock, .O. W. LasDHOLM & Co.

Wei-hai-wei ...CORNABK, ECKFORD & Co. Iloilo

Messrs MITH, BELL & Co. Zanzibar Messrs HAnsing & Co.

Zamboanga........... Bens, Meyer & Co., LD.

Wm. DICKSON, Manager, Hongkong

BANKS

27

DEUTSCH ASIATISCHE BANK

CAPITAL FULLY PAID-UP

Shanghai Taels 7,500,000

Head Office:-SHANGHAI

Board of Directors:--BERLIN

BRANCHES :

BERLIN

CALCUTTA

HAMBURG

HONGKONG

KOBE

PEKING

SINGAPORE

HANKOW

TSINANFU

TSINGTAL

YOKOHAMA

TIENTSIN

CANTON

FOUNDED BY THE FOLLOWING BANKS & BANKERS:

Koenigliche Seehandlung (Preussische Staatsbank)... Berlin. Direction der Disconto-Gesellschaft ..

Deutsche Bank

S. Bleichroeder

Berliner Handels-Gesellschaft

Bank fuer Handel and Industrie

Robert Warschauer & Co.

Mendelssohn & Co.

...

M. A. von Rothschild and Soehne

Jacob S. H. Stern

...

Norddeutsche Bank in Hamburg

Sal. Oppenheim jr. & Co.

...

Bayerische Hypotheken and Wechsel Bank

LONDON BANKERS:

...

}}

}}

"}

"}

"}

Frankfort o/M

Hamburg ... Cologne ...Munich

Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons,

THE UNION OF LONDON & SMITH'S BANK, LIMITED. DEUTSCHE BANK (BERLIN), LONDON AGENCY. DIRECTION DER DISCONTÓ GESELLSCHAFT.

INTEREST allowed on Current Accounts.

   DEPOSITS received on terms which may by learned on application. Every description of Banking and Exchange business transacted.

28

BANKS

THE

MERCANTILE BANK

OF INDIA, LIMITED.

Authorised Capital

Subscribed

Paid-up

Reserve Fund..

£1,500,000

1,125,000

562,500

285,000

HEAD OFFICE: 40 THREADNEEDLE ST., LONDON, E.C.

BANKERS:-

Bank of England and the

London Joint Stock Bank, Limited.

BRANCHES :-

Calcutta, Howrah, Bombay, Karachi, Madras, Rangoon, Colombo, Kandy, Galle, Singapore, Penang and Kwala-Lumpur.

    INTEREST allowed on Current Accounts at the rate of two per cent. per annum on the daily balance.

The Bank receives Current and Fixed Deposits on terms which may be learned on application.

Telegraphic Address: "PARADISE"

HONGKONG, IST JANUARY, 1911.

EVAN ORMISTON,

Manager.

BANKS

The Yokohama Specie Bank, Ld.

29

ESTABLISHED 1880.

CAPITAL PAID UP RESERVE FUND

ESTABLISHED 1880.

Yen

24,000.000.00 16,600,000.00

President:-BARON KOREKIYO TAKAHASHI,

Directors:-

NAGATANE SOMA, Esq KOKICHI SONODÁ, Esq. RIYEMON KIMURA, Esq. ROKURO HARA, Esq.

YUKI YAMAKAWA, Esq. MAUNOUKE ODAGIRI, Esq. VISCOUNT YATARO MISHIMA. TCHUNOSUKE KAWASHIMA, Esq.

HYOKICHI BEKKEY, Esq.

HEAD OFFICE:

OFFICE: YOKOHAMA

Branches and Agencies at:-

ANTUNG-HSIEN

HONOLULU

NAGASAKI

BOMBAY

HONGKONG

NEWCHWANG

SAN FRANCISCO

SHANGHAI

CHANGCHUN

KOBE

NEW YORK

TIEHLING

DAIREN (Dalny)

LIAO YANG

OSAKA

TIENTSIN

FENGTIEN (Mukden)

LONDON

PEKING

ΤΟΚΥΟ

HANKOW

LYONS

RYOJUN (Port

Arthur)

Correspondents at all the Chief Cities in the World.

The Bank buys and receives for collection Bills of Exchange, issues Drafts and Telegraphic Transfers and Letters of Credit on above places and elsewhere, and transacts General Banking Business,

Deposits received for fixed periods at rates to be obtained on application.

YUKI

YAMAKAWA >

General Manager.

30

BANKS

Dai-chi Ginko, Limited

The

(FORMERLY

FIRST

NATIONAL BANK

ESTABLISHED 1873

Paid up Capital

Reserve Fund

Yen 10,000,000.00

5,550,000.00

BARON E. SHIBUSAWA, PRESIDENT.

H. MITSUI, Esq.

T.

KUMAGAI, Esq.

DIRECTORS:

Y. SASAKI, Esq. Y. KUSAKA, Esq.

Y. SACAKI, GENERAL MANAGER,

HEAD OFFICE:

No. 1, Kabutocho, Nihonbashiku, TOKYO

HOME BRANCHES:

     OSAKA KOBE

HYOGO

SHINOSAKACHO

YOKOHAMA

KYOTO

YOKKAICHI

NAGOYA

(IN TOKYO) NISHIKU (IN OSAKA)

SHIMONOSEKI

FUSHIMI

KOREAN BRANCHES:

SEOUL

FUSAN

CORRESPONDENTS:

Ti.e Bank, in addition to its own Branches, has Correspondents in the Principal Cities and Towns of the Empire, Formosa, Corea, and al-o several Correspondents abroad; and is able to give every facility for the transmission and collection of money.

Every description of Banking Business is cordially and promptly transacted in our Bank.

BANKS

行銀灣臺

31

BANK OF TAIWAN, LD.

(Incorporated by Special Imperial Charter)

CAPITAL

RESERVE FUND

Yen 10,000,000.

1)

2,450,000.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS:

K. YAGIU, Esq., President; T. SHIMOSAKA, Esq., Vice-President;

I. KAJIWARA, Esq.,

I. SADA, Esq.,

M. NINOMIYA, ESQ.

HEAD OFFICE:

TAIPEH, TAIWAN (FORMOSA).

ΑΜΟΥ

KEELUNG

SHANGHAI

CANTON

KOBE

ΤΑΙΝΑΝ

FOOCHOW

NAGASAKI

TOKYO

HONGKONG

OSAKA

YOKOHAMA

SWATOW

HONGKONG OFFICE:

Princes' Building, 3, Des Vœux Road,

INTEREST-On Current Accounts and Fixed Deposits. DRAFTS-On the Chief Commercial Places in CHINA,

JAPAN, COREA and FORMOSA.

32

BANKS

THE SUMITOMO BANK.

Capital Allotted Reserve Fund Deposits

Yen

1,000,000 4,550,000 46,900,000

L

  K. SUMITOMO, Esq., K. NAKADA, Esq.,

HEAD OFFICE:

CITY OFFICES:

-

::

::

PROPRIETOR. MANAGER.

KITAHAMA,

OSAKA.

KAWAGUCHI, DOTONBORI, NAKANOSHIMA, SENBA.

BRANCHES:

TOKYO KYOTO

YOKOHAMA

HAKATA

ONOMICHI

MOJI

HIROSHIMA

NIHAMA

KOBE

WAKAMATSU

KURE

HYOGO

AGENCIES AND CORRESPONDENTS:

London, Paris, Hamburg, New York, San Francisco, Shanghai, Peking, Tientsin, Hankow, Hongkong, Bombay, Calcutta, etc.

Letters of Credit issued available in all the chief centres of the world. Every description of Banking Business transacted.

BANKS

33

The One Hundredth Bank, Ltd.

(DAI HYAKU GINKO

ORIGINAL

CHARTER

DATED 1878

.2,000,000.00

1,650,000.00

.5,480,000.00

15,813,500.75

Subscribed Capital Paid up Capital... Reserve Fund Deposits

Head Office:-YORODZUCHO, TOKYO

PRESIDENT-K. TAKATA, Esq.

I

MAN. DIR.: KENZO IKEDA, Esq.

Branch

Offices :-

YOKOHAMA :

KYOTO :

Nos, 53, 54, & 55, Honcho Shichome. MANAGER:-S. OKUBO, Esq.

Karasumaru Rokaku MANAGER-N. OKAZAKI, Esq.

TRANSACTS GENERAL BANKING AND FOREIGN EXCHANGE BUSINESS. CONDUCTS TRUST COMPANY BUSINESS.

Issues Travellers' Letters of Credit Available in all parts of the World. Opens Commercial Credits and Sells Drafts and Cable Transfers.

OFFERS GREAT FACILITIES TO THE FOREIGN CAPITALISTS DESIROUS OF INVESTING IN JAPAN. ACCOUNTS OF MERCANTILE FIRMS, AS WELL AS THOSE OF BANKS AND BANKERS, ARE SOLICITED, AND WILL RECEIVE CAREFUL ATTENTION.

COLLECTIONS PROMPTLY MADE & REMITTED. CORRESPONDENCE INVITED.

SAFE DEPOSIT INSTITUTION IN THE YOKOHAMA OFFICE AFFORDS SAFE CUSTODY TO VALUABLES.

B

34

99

SHIPPING

Norddeutscher

- Lloyd -

IMPERIAL GERMAN MAIL LINE.

     The Steamers of the above Line convey Passengers and Cargo every fortnight to and from the following ports, viz.:-BREMEN, HAMBURG, ANTWERP, SOUTH- AMPTON, GIBRALTAR, ALGIERS, GENOA, NAPLES, PORT SAID, SUEZ, ADEN, COLOMBO, PENANG, SINGAPORE, HONGKONG, SHANGHAI, TSINGTAU, NAGASAKI, HIOGO and YOKOHAMA, having Regular Connections at PENANG for RANGOON and SUMATRA; at SINGAPORE for SUMATRA, BANGKOK, BORNEO, GERMAN NEW GUINEA, and PORTS in JAVA; at SHANGHAI for CHEFOO and TIENTSIN; at HONGKONG for BÖRNEO, BANGKOK, and the PHILIPPINE ISLANDS; and further Monthly to and from the following ports, viz.-BREMEN, ANTWERP, SOUTHAMPTON, GENOA, NAPLES, PORT SAID, SUEZ, ADEN, COLOMBO, FREMANTLE, ADELAIDE, MEL- BOURNE and SYDNEY, and a Regular Mail Line between JAPAN, CHINA and AUSTRALIA calling at YOKOHAMA, KOBE, NAGASAKI, HONGKONG, MANILA, YAP, FRIEDRICH - WILHELMSHAFEN, RABAUL, BRISBANE, SYDNEY and MELBOURNE.

"

""

The above Company has a bi-weekly Twin Screw Express Service (s.s. "KRON- PRINZESSIN CECILIE,' KAISER WILHELM II.," "KRONPRINZ WILHELM,' "KAISER WILHELM DER Grosse"), and a Bi-Weekly Twin Screw Passenger Service (Steamers of the "BARBAROSSA Class) of fast boats plving between BREMEN, SOUTHAMP TON or PLYMOUTH, CHERBOURG and NEW YORK, and further regular Mail Services between BREMEN and BALTIMORE direct; BREMEN and CHARLESTON S.C. direct; BREMEN and GALVESTON via NEW YORK or BALTIMORE; BREMEN and HAVANA, CIENFUEGOS and MANZANIL- LO via ANTWERP; BREMEN and PHILADELPHIA and SAVANNAH (freight only); BREMEN and PERNAMBUCO, BAHIA, RIO DE JANEIRO and ŠANTOS via ANTWERP, OPORTO and LISBON; BREMEN and MONTEVIDEO and BUENOS AIRES via ANTWERP, CORUNA, VILLAGARCIA or VIGO; BREMEN and FREMANTLE, ADELAIDE, MELBOURNE, SYDNEY, BRISBANE, TOWNSVILLE (freight only).

     Regular Passenger Service between MARSEILLES, NAPLES and ALEXANDRIA; MARSEILLES, GENOA, NAPLES, PIRAEUS, SMYRNA, CONSTANTINOPLE, ODESSA, NICOLAJEFF and BATOUM, ALEXANDRIA, SMYRNA, CONSTAN- TINOPLE and CONSTANZA, and Special fast Steamer Cruises between ALEX- ANDRIA, NAPLES, GENOA and NEW YORK.

A regular Service of fast Mail Steamers has also been established between GENOA, via NAPLES, and GIBRALTAR to NEW YORK.

Particulars regarding dates of Sailing, Rates of Passage Money, Freight, etc., may be obtained on Application at the Office of :-

Telegraphic-Address

Messrs. MELCHERS & Co.,

"NORDLLOYD."

GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE COMPANY AT

HONGKONG AND CHINA..

SHIPPING

35

HAMBURG-AMERIKA LINIE.

HAMBURG

EAST ASIATIC SERVICE.

To and from Europe.

Regular Freight Service from HAMBURG, BREMEN, EMDEN, ROTTERDAM, ANTWERP to STRAITS SETTLEMENTS, HONGKONG, SHANGHAI, KOBE, YOKOHAMA, and back from YOKOHAMA and KOBE, via SHANGHAI, HONGKONG, STRAITS SETTLE- MENTS, COLOMBO, to HAVRE, ANTWERP, ROTTERDAM, BREMEN, and HAMBURG.

Also from HAMBURG, &c., to BANGKOK, MANILA, HAN- KOW, TSINGTAU, TIENTSIN, DALNY, VLADIVO- STOCK, &c., and vice versa.

Taking Cargo for all Continental and Baltic Ports.

To and from U.S.A.

Regular Freight Service between NEW YORK, BOSTON, BALTIMORE, &c., and EAST ASIATIC PORTS via SUEZ.

Coast Service.

Regular Sailings between SHANGHAI and TSINGTAU, CHEFOO or DALNY, TIENTSIN twice every week.

Imperial German Mail Service, OPERATING THE FINE NEW PASSENGER STEAMERS "ADMIRAL V. TIRPITZ", "STAATSSEKRETAER KRAETKE",

"GOUVERNEUR JAESCHKE", AND "SIKIANG."

Also Operating Coast Lines between :-

Yangtse-Ports and Hongkong-Canton, and on Yangtse River

SHANGHAI OFFICE:-2, Kiukiang Road. HONGKONG OFFICE:-3, Queen's Building, Chater Road.

36

SHIPPING

MESSAGERIES MARITIMES

DE FRANCE.

Telegraphic Address:

LICORNE..

MESSAGERIE

OFFICES:

LONDON.

PARIS.

Paris

Marseilles..

Direction:

LYONS.

MARSEILLES.

Head Office: 1, Rue Vignon.

Place Sadi-Carnot Passenger Office : No. 3.

Bordeaux.. 29, Allées d'Orléans.

BORDEAUX.

London

97, Cannon Street, E.C.

PORTS OF CALL.

Lyons

7. Place des Terreaux.

FRENCH MAIL STEAMERS.

UNDER CONTRACT WITH THE

FRENCH

REGULAR SERVICES

FROM

GOVERNMENT

MARSEILLES

MAIN LINE.

TO INDIA, CHINA, JAPAN

Port Said, Suez, Aden, (or Djibouti), Colombo,`

Singapore, Saigon, Hongkong, Shanghai,

Kobe, Yokohama.....

(Colombo to Pondichery, Calcutta

BRANCH LINES.

Singapore to Batavia

Saigon to Tonquin Ports

Saigon to Singapore

Dunkirk, Havre, Marseilles to Colombo,

Saigon and Haiphong

CARGO-BOATS) Antwerp, La Rochelle, and Marseilles to China`

LINES.

J and Japan

Every fortnight.

Every 28 days. Every fortnight, Weekly. Every fortnight.

} Every month.

Every 2 months.

TO BOMBAY, AUSTRALIA and NEW CALEDONIA

MAIN LINE.

(Port Said, Suez, Aden, Bombay, Colombo, Connecting at Colombo. Fremantle, Adelaide, Melbourne, Syd- Every 28 days.

ney, Noumea and New-Hebrides

with the China Main Line every 28 days.

To

ZANZIBAR, LOURENCO - MARQUES, DURBAN,

REUNION, MAURITIUS, SEYCHELLES.

MADAGASCAR,

To EGYPT, SYRIA, GREECE, TURKEY, BLACK SEA PORTS. TO HAVRE and LONDON, Cargo only (Weekly).

FROM

BORDEAUX

TO PORTUGAL, SENEGAL, BRESIL, LA PLATA

        Particulars regarding dates of sailing, rates of passage money, freight, etc., may be obtained on application at the Office.

HONGKONG AGENCY:

No. 3, QUEEN'S BUILDING, 2nd Floor.

CABLF ADDRESS:

"SHOSEN" OSAKA,

AND ALL BRANCHES.

ESTABLISHED 1884.

W

SHIPPING

A 1 & A. B. C.

5th Edition,

Codes Used.

OSAKA

SHOSEN

(OSAKA

MERCANTILE

KAISHA.

S. S. Co. Ltd.)

Capital, Yen 16,500,000

Debentures -

Fleet: 135 Steamers,

""

-

6,500,000 160,000 Tons.

HEAD OFFICE: OSAKA, JAPAN

Hongkong Office: No. 1, Queen's Buildings.

BRANCHES : -Osaka, Kohe, Moji, Shimonoseki, Nagasaki, Kochi, Takahama, Beppu, Tadotsu, Keelung, Tamsui, Anping, Takao, Pescadores, Fusan, Mokpo, Chemul- po, Chinnampo, Dairen, Foochow, Amoy, Hongkong, Tacoma, U. S. A. AGENCIES:-Tokyo, Yokohama, Shimizu, Nagoya, Yokkaichi, Hakodate, Otaru, Niigata, Tsuruga, Masampo, Wonsan. Seishin, Kunsampo, Vladivostock, Antung, Port Arthur, Newchwang, Tientsin, Chefoo, Tsingtau, Hankow, Shanghai, Swatow, Canton, Manila, Saigon, Bangkok, Singapore. Penang, Rangoon, Calcutta, Colombo. Victoria, Vancouver and all other important ports ard points in the Orient and merican Continent.

REGULAR SERVICES.

AMERICAN LINE-Fortnightly, in connection at Tacoma with the Chicago, Milwaukee and Puget

Sound Railway.

TSURUGA-VLADIVOSTOCK LINE-Weekly, in connection with I. J. Government Railways and

Trans-Siberian Railway.

VLADIVOSTOCK-JAPAN SEA LINES-About three times a month.

OSAKA-DAIREN (DALNY) LINE--Twice a Week, in connection with I. J. Government Railways and

South Manchurian Railway.

NAGASAKI-DAIREN LINES, via Korean Coast Ports-Weekly.

YOKOHAMA-DAIREN LINE-Twice a month.

KOBE-KEELUNG LINE-Four times a month, in connection with I. J. Government Railways and

Imperial Formosan Government Railways.

YOKOHAMA-TAKAO LINE-About Six times a month.

FORMOSA COASTING LINES--Six times a month.

HONGKONG-TAMSUI LINE-Weekly.

HONGKONG-ANPING TAKAO LINE-Fortnightly.

HONGKONG-SHANGHAI LINE. VIA PORTS-Three times a month.

OSAKA-TIENTSIN LINE-Four times a month, in connection with I. J. Government Railways.

OSAKA-KOREAN LINES, CALLING ALL PORTS-About Twenty times a month.

OTARU (HOKKAIDO)-KARAFUTO (SAGHALIEN IS.) LINE-Three times a month.

&..

&c.,

Ac.

JAPAN COASTING & INLAND SEA SERVICES-Steamers are despatched DAILY, as net-work and the O. S. K. Inland Sea Service is ideal

for sight-seeing on the littorals.

37

888

38

100

PUBLISHERS

THE

MARUZEN KABUSHIKI-KAISHA

OR

Z. P. MARUYA & Co., LTD.

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS & STATIONERS

TOKYO. 11-16, Nihonbashi Tori Sanchome, ΤΟ ΚΥΟ,

TELEPHONE: --Nos. 28 (Special), 17, 208, 876, and 1,033, HONKYOKU

THE LARGEST AND OLDEST PUBLISHERS AND IMPORTERS OF FOREIGN

BOOKS IN THE EAST.

THE LARGEST AND OLDEST IMPORTERS OF FOREIGN STATIONERIES (TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS ESPECIALLY), IN THE EAST

THE LARGEST INK MANUFACTURERS IN THE EAST.

AGENTS FOR THE FAR EAST OF LEADING PUBLISHERS AND STATIONERS

THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.

ALL BOOKS-SUPPLIED IN ANY LANGUAGE, NO MATTER ON WHAT SUBJECT. WRITE US-We Can Get YOU ANY BOOK PUBLISHED IN THE WORLD.

A FEW EXAMPLES FROM OUR PUBLICATION:

BOOKS FOR FOREIGN VISITORS AND OTHERS.

Yen.

16mo.

Mutsu, H.-A Japanese Conversation Course. Fifth Edition. Crown 8vo... Imbrei, William. -Handbook of English-Japanese Etymology. Fifth Edition. Crown 8vo. Perry, Anna M.-Five Thousand Phrases (English-Japanese) for Common Use. Seventh Edition 24mo.. Calthrop, Capt. E, F.-A Dictionary of Military Terms. English-Japanese and Japanese-English. Together with a

List of 1,200 Chinese Characters.

.30

1.50

1,00

1.25

Koto, B. K. Jimbo, and S. Matsumura.-A Vocabulary of Mineralogical Terms in the Three Languages, English,

German and Japanese. Second Edition. 16mo,

.75

Matsumura, A.-A Gazetteer of Ethnology, 1908, Crown 8vo..

2.25

Ichimura, T.-Vakabular der allgemein bekannten Tier und Pflanzen. Deutsch-englisch-latinisch-japanisch. 18mo. 1.50 Matsumura, Prof. Dr. J.-Shokubutsu-Mei-I. Enumeration of Selected Scientific Names of both Native and

Foreign Flants, with Romanized Japanese Names, and in Many Cases Chinese Characters. 8vo,

Index Plantrum Japonicarum sive Enumeratio Plantarum Omnium. 8vo.

2,00

2,25

Volumen J'rimum. Cryptogamae. Pars Prima. Gymnospermae et Monncotyledonear.

2.00

Each 1.00

Miyoshi, Prof. M.-Atlas of Japanese Vegetation. With Explanatory Text. (Sets I-X are published, and the

        following are in preparation.)............. Hepburn, J. C.-A Japanese-English and English-Japanese Dictionary. Seventh Edition. Super royal 8vo. 7,50

Ditto Abridged Edition Roy, 8vo.

2.00

BRANCHES:

OSAKA:-Shinsaibashi-suji, Bakuromachi, Shichome. KYOTO: Sanjodori, Fuyacho-Nishi-ye-iru.

PLEASE STATE WANTS.

When in TOKYO call and see our Large Collection on Exhibition in Show Rooms.

OIL MANUFACTURERS

39

PURE LINSEED OIL

AWARDS:

MEDALS AND DIPLOMAS

AT INDIAN INDUS-

TRIAL EXHIBITION,

CALCUTTA, 1898, 1900, 1901

PARIS EXHIBITION

· 1900

JAPAN EXHBN,

1903

INDUSTRIAL,, BOMBAY, 1904

INDUSTRIAL " BENARES, 1906

CHRIST CHURCH EX-

HIBITION, N.Z. - 1906, 1907

MANUFACTURED BY

THE GOUREPORE Co., Ld.

CALCUTTA

!

Contractors to the Admiralty, the Mili- tary and Public Works Departments, State Railways, and all Large Con- sumers Throughout India, the East, and the Colonies.

RAW,

BOILED, PALE BOILED, IN DRUMS

AND CASKS.

W. R. LOXLEY & Co.,

YORK BUILDING,

Sole Agents,

HONGKONG.

Cable Address: "LOXLEY," Hongkong.

40

COAL MECHANTS

KAIPING COALS

THE CHINESE ENGINEERING & MINING CO., LD.

Registered Office:-22, Austin Friars, London, E.C.

Head Office:-Tientsin, North China.

The Collieries situated in the Kaiping District of the Province of Chihli have an output of 1,500,000 tons per annum, which is classified to meet the local demands as under:

Navy Lump is a fuel specially suited to the Far Eastern Naval requirements; pos-

sessing all the characteristics of the best Cardiff coal.

Loco. Lump.-A first quality steam coal comparing favourably with the best Japanese, Australian or Scotch coals. As a special fuel for locomotives,

it is used on all the Chinese Railways North of the Yangtze. Locomotive Lump mixed with a proportion of slack from the same

seams is used as a bunker coal by all the large Eastern Shipping concerns. For steady steaming this mixture gives excellent results, being both cheap and economical in consumption. Linsi Lump is a good quality coal most suitable for household purposes. Slack in two grades is a good, cheap fuel largely in demand by the Chinese in the brick-burning and distilling industries, in bean cake factories, etc., and for general domestic use.

Coke of a SPECIAL quality, manufactured with great care from the best coal, is used with good results by the Government Arsenals, Mints and Dockyards and is considered equal in quality to the best Durham product. It is close-grained, hard, heavy and free from sulphur.

No. 2 Coke is used for household purposes.

Firebricks of the well-known C.E.M.C.L. brand are made in any size and shape at the Tongshan Brickworks. This brand of firebrick is practically alone in the Chinese market.

Sanitary Stoneware Pipes.

Heavy Paving Tiles.

For all information please apply to:-

Agent and General ManagER, TIENTSIN.

AGENT, I, JINKEE ROAD, SHANGHAI.

AGENT, ALEXANDRA BUILDINGS, HONGKONG,

or any of the Company's Agencies.

41

HOKKAIDO

KAISHA

TANKO

COAL MERCHANTS

BEST

COALS

IN

JAPAN

HOKKAIDO TANKO KISEN KABUSHIKI KAISHA

(The HOKKAIDO COLLIERY and STEAMSHIP Co., Ltd.)

CAPITAL

DEBENTURES

ANNUAL OUTPUT OF COAL

EXPORTING

PORTS:

-

Yen 27,000,000 6,000,000

Tons 1,500,000

OTARU AND MORORAN.

THE COALS CAN BE OBTAINED AT

TOKYO,

HONGKONG,

YOKOHAMA,

SINGAPORE,

MORORAN,

And other principal Ports.

OTARU,

All Business Communications should be addressed to

TOKYO OFFICE:

TSUKIJI, TOKYO, JAPAN.

Telegraphic Address:

"TANKO" TOKYO.

CODES USED:

A1., A.B.C., 4th & 5th Editions, Western Union Telegraphic Code.

42

COAL MERCHANTS

Cable Ad:- "IWASAKI"

Which also applies to all

Branch Offices.

Al, A.B.C. 5th Edition,

and

Western Union Codes used.

MITSUBISHI GOSHI KWAISHA

(MITSU BISHI CO.)

COAL DEPARTMENT

HEAD OFFICE:

MARUNO UCHI, ΤΟΚΙΟ.

BRANCH OFFICES:-NAGASAKI, MOJI, WAKAMATSU,

KOBE,

KARATSU,

AND HANKOW.

SHANGHAI,

HONGKONG

All Letters Addressed :-MANAGER, MITSU BISHI CO., with Name of Place above

YOKOHAMA:-M. Asada, Esq.

AGENCIES:

| CHINKIANG:-Messrs. Gearing & Co. MANILA :-Messrs. MACONDRAY & Co.

SOLE PROPRIETORS OF TAKASHIMA, OCHI, MUTABE, HOJO, KANADA, NAMAZUTA, SAYO, SHINNEW, and

KAMI-YAMADA

Sole Agents for:

COLLIERIES

KISHIDAKE and KIGIO-KOMATSU Coals.

The Head and Branch Offices and the Agencies of the Company will

receive any order for Coals produced from the above Collieries.

South

RAILWAY COMPANY

Manchuria

43

Railway

SHORTEST, QUICKEST AND CHEAPEST ROUTE BETWEEN THE FAR EAST AND EUROPE (VIA DAIREN).

FROM DAIREN TO CHANGCHUN

HARBIN

Do.

>>

Do.

"

ST. PETERSBURG (VIA VIATKA)

Do.

BERLIN

"J

Do.

19

Do.

PARIS.

LONDON..

11

.15) Hours.

.25 19

.10

Days-

.11

12

11

12}

FOUR

TIMES WEEKLY EXPRESS TRAINS. Composed of excellently equipped SLEEPING, DINING AND IST GLASS CARS. Operated between DAIREN AND CHANGCHUN in connection with the TRANS-SIBERIAN ROUTE AND SHANGHAI MAIL STEAMERS.

CONNECTIONS AT MUKDEN. These Express Trains connect at MUKDEN with the PEKING MUKDEN RAILWAY running via TIENTSIN, and connect also with the MUKDEN - ANTUNG LINE traversing a most picturesque country and connecting with the KOREAN RAILWAY.

OTHER STEAMER CONNECTIONS AT DAIREN.-Regular Steam- ship Services are maintained from DAIREN TO MOJI, KOBE, CHEM- ULPO, TIENTSIN, CHEFOO, TSINGTAO and other ports in JAPAN AND CHINA.

RAILWAY HOTELS.-YAMATO HOTEL (Tel. Add: "YAMATO ") at DAIREN, PORT ARTHUR, MUKDEN, FUSHUN AND CHANGCHUN. All managed by the Company and provide comfortable accommodation.

TICKET AGENTS IN EUROPE AND THE FAR EAST.

THE

INTERNATIONAL SLEEPING CAR AND EXPRESS TRAINS Co., MESSRS, THOS, COOK & SON, AND THE HAMBURG - AMERIKA

LINIE.

SOUTH MANCHURIA RAILWAY COMPANY,

DAIREN,

Tel. Add:

"MANTETSU"

MANCHURIA.

Codes: A. B. C. 5th Ed., A.1. and Lieber's.

44

NAVY CONTRACTORS

BISMARCK & Co.

NAVY CONTRACTORS

SHIPCHANDLERS, CENERAL

IMPORTERS, COAL AND

PROVISION MERCHANTS.

Cable Address:

"BISMARCK" HONGKONG.

ENGLISH, GERMAN,

X

Calling Flag.

FRENCH,

RUSSIAN -

AND AMERICAN NAVY

PURVEYORS.

SAIL AND FLAC MAKERS,

RIGGERS AND

CENERAL COMMISSION

ACENTS.

Price List Sent

on Application.

Codes used:

A1, A.B.C., 4th and 5th

Editions.

Telephone 309.

ELECTRIC FITTINGS, CABLES,

WIRES, LAMPS, BELL SETS,

BATTERIES, &C., &C.

LARGE STOCK ON HAND.

Ships' and Engine Rooms' Stores of all Descriptions Always in Stock at REASONABLE PRICES.

*

*

FRESH CARDIFF AND JAPANESE COAL

PAINTS, COLOURS, OILS AND VARNISHES.

Pure Fresh Water Supplied to Shipping by Steam Pumping Boat on Shortest Notice.

*

*

BAKERY:-Capable of putting out 10,000 lbs. of Biscuits per Day.

18 & 19, CONNAUGHT ROAD CENTRAL, Near Blake Pier, HONGKONG.

CEMENT MANUFACTURERS

INDO-CHINA PORTLAND CEMENT CO., LTD.

45,

Telephone :

No. 266.

CODE

English:

A.B.C. Code

5th EDITION.

GIMENT

SOCIÉTÉ DES

ORTLAND

LIEGE 1905

AND

HORS

1900

DXPOSITION

100

É DES CIMENTS PORTLAND ARTIFICIELS DE L'INDO-C

натр НА

ON

G

Telegraphic

Address:

CIPORTIN

HAIPHONG."

CODE

French:

A. Z. Code

3rd EDITION.

China

Indo Chine

-

{

SHANGHAI,

Manila,

Cebu

and

Iloilo:

SMITH, BELL &

Co., Ltd.

GENERAL

HANKOW,

TIENTSIN, DALNY,

AGENTS:

} Racine, Ackermann & Co.

HANOI, HAIPHONG, L'Union Commerciale Indo-

TOURANE PNOMPENH.

SAIGON,

AND

PORTLA

PRIX

Chinoise.

CEMENT

CONCOURS

ANO

1902

LIEGA

1905

RAND

INDO - CHINA

PORTLAND

1906

COLONIAL

XHIBITH

EMENT Go { ́

HAIPHONG

Bangkok:

MONOD & FILS,

46

BREWERS

BEER

THE DAI NIPPON BREWERY CO., LTD.

CAPITAL

ANNUAL OUTPUT -

TRADE

ASAU

DAI NIFFON BREWERY

BEER

ASAHI

LAGER BEER

SPECIALLY KEVED

FOR

EXPORT

COMPANY LIMITED, I

Yen 12,000,000. Head Office: TOKIO, JAPAN

Gall. 10,000,000.

Branches:

BRANDS :-

YEBISU

ADAI NIPPON B

BEER

YLIMITED TOKYO JAPAN.

OSAKA and SAPPORO

DAI NIPPON BREWERY

LIMITED, TOKYO JAPAN.*

"RASE

MARK

TOKYO,

JAPAN

TRAJE

YEBISU

MARK

LAGER-BEER

BREWERY

SPECIALLY BREWED

FOR EXPORT

COMPANY

MARK

SAPPOROBEER

TRACE

SAPPORO

MARK

LAGER BEER

SPECIALLY BREWED

FOR EXPORT

COMPANY

ASAHI BEER YEBISU BEER SAPPORO BEER

'GRAND PRIZE'

JAPAN - BRITISH

EXHIBITION,

1910

CABLE ADDRESS:-

'Beer, Tokio'; 'Beer, Osaka'; 'Beer, Sapporo'

Code used:-A. B. C., 5th Edition.

SOLE AGENTS

FOR

CHINA, ORIENTAL COLONIES AND INDIA:

THE MITSUI BUSSAN KAISHA. LIMITED.

GENERAL MERCHANTS

47

SUZUKI & CO.

KOBE,

JAPAN.

Importers and Exporters of Sugar, Flour, Wheat, Rice and other Cereals; Importers of Metals, Chemicals, &c., &c.

Refiners, Manufacturers and Exporters of Refined Camphor, Camphor Oil, Menthol Crystals, Peppermint Oil and Fish Oil.

Exporters of Vegetable Wax, Ginger, Gallnuts, Peanuts, Rape Seed, Rape Seed Oil, Birdlime, Isinglass, and other Japanese Produce, and China Crude Camphor, &c.

PROPRIETORS OF THE

KOBE STEEL WORKS.

STEEL WORKS, CAMPHOR, PEPPERMINT AND FISH OIL REFINERIES AT KOBE.

Branch Offices and Agencies:

OSAKA, TOKYO, HAKODATO, SHANGHAI, MOJI, OTARU,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Agents and Correspondents:

LONDON,

GLASGOW,

NEW YORK,

LIVERPOOL,

SEATTLE, WASH.,

MIDDLESBROUGH,

PORTLAND, OR., HAMBURG,

BOMBAY,

MADRAS,

BATAVIA,

SAMARANG,

SOERABAYA,

MANILA,

HONGKONG, ETC.

48

PROVISION MERCHANTS

MEIDI-YA

Established 1886

General Office: GINZA NICHOME, TOKYO

Telegraphic Address: "MEIDI-YA, TOKYO"

IMPORTERS & DEALERS IN

PROVISIONS AND LIQUORS

SUPPLIERS TO H.I.J.M.'S SHIPS

CONTRACTORS TO THE N.Y.K. (JAPAN MAIL S.S. Co.)

PURVEYORS BY SPECIAL WARRANT ΤΟ THE

IMPERIAL

HOUSEHOLD

Offices:

Yokohama. Tokyo. Osaka. Kyoto. Kobe. Moji. Seoul.

Sole Agents for:

KIRIN BEER

STEAMSHIP COMPANY

Toyo Kisen Kaisha

Imperial Japanese Trans-Pacific Mail Lines

Head Office:-No. 1, YURAKUCHO I-CHOME, KOJIMACHIKU,

TOKIO.

Hongkong Office:-KING'S BUILDING, HONGKONG.

49

SAN FRANCISCO LINE:

From Hongkong to San Francisco via Shanghai, Nagasaki, Kobe,

Yokohama and Honolulu.

CONNECTING WITH EUROPEAN, AMERICAN AND AUSTRALIAN CITIES.

"TENYO MARU"

"CHIYO MARU

"SHINYO MARU"

"NIPPON MARU"

"AMERICA MARU"

-

-

Disp't. Tonnage Speed,

Turbine Engines with Triple Screws 21,650 21 Knots.

..

"

Twin Screws

21,650 21,650 21

21

I 1.000

18

**

11,000

18

The Finest and Fastest Fleet on the Pacific

SOUTH AMERICAN LINE:

(The only Regular Service from the Orient to South America)

From Hongkong to Valparaiso and Coronel (Chile), via Moji. Kobe, Yokohama, Honolulu, Manzanillo, Salina Cruz, Callao and

Iquique.

"KIYO MARU

- Single Screw

-

BUYO MARU"

"

"

'HONGKONG MARU""

Twin Screws

Disp't. Tonnage Speed.

17,200 15 Knots.

10,500 15

་་

11,000

18 ""

All Steamers are Equipped with Wireless Telegraph Offices.

AGENCIES: AT THE RESPECTIVE PORTS OF CALL AND

IMPORTANT CITIES OF THE WORLD.

50

MACHINERY MANUFACTURERS

OLDEST AND LARGEST MAKERS IN THE WORLD OF

OIL MILL MACHINERY

SUITABLE FOR EVERY VARIETY OF OIL-SEED AND NUT;

ON MOST EFFICIENT AND MODERN PROCESSES,

-:0:

OVER 4,000,000 TONS OF SEEDS & NUTS CRUSHED ANNUALLY IN MACHINERY MANUFACTURED BY US.

:0:

SOYA

BEAN PLANT

A SPE

ALITY.

:0:

Oil Refining. Tiltering and Boiling Plant.

Grain Elevating and Warehousing Plant.

Automatic Weighers for Seeds, Flour, Cement, &c., also Liquids.

:0:

RUBBER SEED OIL MACHINERY.

66

MAKERS OF

THE

KINGSTON" GRAB DREDGER AND

~~) * (--

SIMPLEST.

EXCAVATOR.

CHEAPEST.

BEST.

AS SUPPLIED TO

POSSESSES

IMPORTANT ADVANTAGES

OVER

ALL OTHER

SYSTEMS.

For Deepening Rivers, Harbours,

Creeks, &c.

Excavating

Clay

and Sand. LiftingCoal,Grain, &c., &c.

CATALOGUES,

ESTIMATES

AND FULL INFORMATION

ON

APPLICATION.

ALL THE PRINCIPAL

GOVERNMENTS.

CONTRACTORS TO

HOME, COLONIAL & FOREIGN

ROSE, DOWNS AND

Eastern Branch:

GOVERNMENTS.

THOMPSON,

SHANGHAI.

CABLE ADDRESS :-" ROSEDOWNS," SHANGHAL

LTD.

HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS:-HULL, ENGLAND.

ESTABLISHED

LONDON OFFICE:-12, MARK LANE, E.C. 1777.

TREATIES, CODES, &c.

TREATIES WITH CHINA

GREAT BRITAIN

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Ratifications exchanged at Peking, 24th October, 1860.

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous to put an end to the existing misunderstanding between the two countries and to place their relations on a more satisfactory footing in future, have resolved to proceed to a revision and improvement of the Treaties existing between them; and, for that purpose, have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say :-

Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, the Right Honourable the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, a Peer of the United Kingdom, and Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, the High Commissioner Kweiliang, a Senior Chief Secretary of State, styled of the East Cabinet, Captain-General of the Plain White Banner of the Manchu Banner force, Superintendent-General of the Administration of Criminal Law; and Hwashana, one of His Imperial Majesty's Expositors of the Classics, Manchu President of the Office for the Regulation of the Civil Establishment, Captain-General of the Bordered Blue Banner of the Chinese Banner Force, and Visitor of the Office of Interpretation:

     Who after having communicated to each other their respective full powers and found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :-

Art. I.-The Treaty of Peace and Amity between the two nations signed at Nanking on the twenty-ninth day of August, in the year eighteen hundred and forty- two, is hereby renewed and confirmed.

     The supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of Trade having been amerded and improved, and the substance of their provisions having been incor- porated in this Treaty, the said Supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of Trade are hereby abrogated.

      Art. II.-For the better preservation of harmony in future, Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and His Majesty the Emperor of China mutually agree that, in accordance with the universal practice of great and friendly nations, Her Majesty the Queen may, if she see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers, or other Diplomatic Agents to the Court of Peking; and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, in like manner, if he see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers, or other Diplomatic Agents to the Court of St. James.

Art. III.-His Majesty the Emperor of China hereby agrees that the Ambassador, Minister, or other Diplomatic Agent, so appointed by Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, may reside, with his family and establishment, permanently at the capital, or may visit it occasionally at the option of the British Government. shall not be called upon to perform any ceremony derogatory to him as representing the Sovereign of an independent nation on a footing of equality with that of China.

He

60

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

     On the other hand, he shall use the same forms of ceremony and respect to His Majesty the Emperor as are employed by the Ambassadors, Ministers, or Diplomatic Agents of Her Majesty towards the Sovereigns of independent and equal European

nations.

       It is further agreed, that Her Majesty's Government may acquire at Peking a site for building, or may hire houses for the accommodation of Her Majesty's Mission, and the Chinese Government will assist it in so doing.

Her Majesty's Representative shall be at liberty to choose his own servants and attendants, who shall not be subject to any kind of molestation whatever.

Any person guilty of disrespect or violence to Her Majesty's Representative, or to any member of his family or establishment, in deed or word, shall be severely punished. Art. IV. It is further agreed that no obstacle or difficulty shall be made to the free movements of Her Majesty's Representative, and that he and the persons of his suite may come and go, and travel at their pleasure. He shall, moreover, have full liberty to send and receive his correspondence to and from any point on the sea-coast that he may select, and his letters and effects shall be held sacred and inviolable. He may employ, for their transmission, special couriers, who shall meet with the same protection and facilities for travelling as the persons employed in carrying despatches for the Imperial Government; and, generally, he shall enjoy the same privileges as are accorded to officers of the same rank by the usage and consent of Western nations. All expenses attending the Diplomatic Mission of Great Britain shall be borne by the British Government.

Art. V.-His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to nominate one of the Secretaries of State, or a President of one of the Boards, as the high officer with whom the Ambassador, Minister, or other Diplomatic Agent of Her Majesty the Queen shall transact business, either personally or in writing, on a footing of perfect equality.

Art. VI.-Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain agrees that the privileges hereby secured shall be enjoyed in her dominions by the Ambassador, Minister, or Diplomatic Agent of the Emperor of China, accredited to the Court of Her Majesty.

Art. VII.-Her Majesty the Queen may appoint one or more Consuls in the dominions of the Emperor of China; and such Consul or Consuls shall be at liberty to reside in any of the open ports or cities of China as Her Majesty the Queen may consider most expedient for the interests of British commerce. They shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese authorities, and enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the Consular Officers of the most favoured nation.

Consuls and Vice-Consuls in charge shall rank with Intendants of Circuit; Vice- Consuls, Acting Vice-Consuls, and Interpreters, with Prefects. They shall have access to the official residences of these officers, and communicate with them, either personally or in writing, on a footing of equality, as the interests of the public service may require. Art. VIII.The Christian religion, as professed by Protestants or Roman Catholics, inculcates the practice of virtue, and teaches man to do as he would be done by. Persons teaching it or professing it, therefore, shall alike be entitled to the protection of the Chinese authorities, nor shall any such, peaceably pursuing their calling and not offending against the laws, be persecuted or interfered with.

Art. IX. British subjects are hereby authorised to travel, for their pleasure or for purposes of trade, to all parts of the interior under passports which will be issued by their Consuls, and countersigned by the local authorities. These passports, if demanded, must be produced for examination in the localities passed through. If the passport be not irregular, the bearer will be allowed to proceed, and no opposition shall be offered to his hiring persons, or hiring vessels for the carriage of his baggage or merchandise. If he be without a passport, or if he commit any offence against the law, he shall be handed over to the nearest Consul for punishment, but he must not be subjected to any ill-usage in excess of necessary restraint. No passport need be applied for by persons going on excursions from the ports open to trade to a distance not exceeding 100 li, and for a period not exceeding five days.

The provisions of this Article do not apply to crews of ships, for the due restraint of whom regulations will be drawn up by the Consul and the local authorities.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

61

     To Nanking, and other cities, disturbed by persons in arms against the Govern- ment, no pass shall be given, until they shall have been recaptured.

Art. X.-British merchant ships shall have authority to trade upon the Great River (Yangtsze). The Upper and Lower Valley of the river being, however, disturbed by outlaws, no port shall be for the present opened to trade, with the exception of Chinkiang, which shall be opened in a year from the date of the signing of this Treaty.

So soon as peace shall have been restored, British vessels shall also be admitted to trade at such ports as far as Hankow, not exceeding three in number, as the British Minister, after consultation with the Chinese Secretary of State, may determine shall be ports of entry and discharge.

Art. XI. In addition to the cities and towns of Canton, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo, and Shanghai, opened by the Treaty of Nanking, it is agreed that British subjects may frequent the cities and ports of Newchwang, Tangchow (Chefoo), Taiwan (Formosa), Chao-chow (Swatow), and Kiung-chow (Hainan).

They are permitted to carry on trade with whomsover they please, and to proceed

to and fro at pleasure with their vessels and merchandise.

They shall enjoy the same privileges, advantages, and immunities at the said towns and ports as they enjoy at the ports already open to trade, including the right of residence, buying or renting houses, of leasing land therein, and of building churches, hospitals and cemeteries.

Art. XII.-British subjects, whether at the ports or at other places, desiring to build or open houses, warehouses, churches, hospitals, or burial grounds, shall make their agreement for the land or buildings they require, at the rates prevailing among the people, equitably and without exaction on either side.

Art. XIII.-The Chinese Government will place no restrictions whatever upon the employment, by British subjects, of Chinese subjects in any lawful capacity.

Art. XIV. British subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the transport of goods or passengers, and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese Government. The number of these boats shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged in carrying the goods be granted to any parties. If any smuggling takes place in them the offenders will, of course, be punished according to law.

Art. XV.-All questions in regard to rights, whether of property or person, arising between British subjects, shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the British authorities. Art. XVI.-Chinese subjects who may be guilty of any criminal act towards British subjects shall be arrested and punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and punished by the Consul, or other public functionary authorised thereto, according to the laws of Great Britain.

Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.

      Art. XVII.-A British subject, having reason to complain of Chinese, must proceed to the Consulate and state his grievance. The Consul will inquire into the merits of the case, and do his utmost to arrange it amicably. In like manner, if a Chinese he reason to complain of a British subject, the Consul shall no less listen to his complaint, and endeavour to settle it in a friendly manner. If disputes take place of such a nature that the Consul cannot arrange them amicably, then he shall request the assistance of the Chinese authorities, that they may together examine into the merits of the case, and decide it equitably.

Art. XVIII.-The Chinese authorities shall at all times afford the fullest protection to the persons and property of British subjects, whenever these shall have been subjected to insult or violence. In all cases of incendiarism or robbery, the local authorities shall at once take the necessary steps for the recovery of the stolen property, the suppression of disorder, and the arrest of the guilty parties, whom they will punish according to law.

62

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Art. XIX.-If any British merchant-vessel, while within Chinese waters, be plundered by robbers or pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every endeavour to capture and punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover the stolen property, that it may be handed over to the Consul for restoration to the owner.

        Art. XX. If any British vessel be at any time wrecked or stranded on the coast of China, or be compelled to take refuge in any port within the dominions of the Emperor of China, the Chinese authorities, on being apprised of the fact, shall immediately adopt measures for its relief and security; the persons on board shall receive friendly treatment and shall be furnished, if necessary, with the means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station.

Art. XXI.-If criminals, subjects of China, shall take refuge in Hongkong or on board the British ships there, they shall, upon due requisition by the Chinese authorities, be searched for, and, on proof of their guilt, be delivered

up.

        In like manner, if Chinese offenders take refuge in the houses or on board the vessels of British subjects at the open ports, they shall not be harboured or concealed, but shall be delivered up, on due requisition by the Chinese authorities, addressed to the British Consul.

Art. XXII. Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to a British subject, or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do their utmost to effect his arrest and enforce recovery of the debts. The British authorities will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any British subject fraudulently absconding or failing to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese subject.

Art. XXIII.-Should natives of China who may repair to Hongkong to trade incur debts there, the recovery of such debts must be arranged for by the English Court of Justice on the spot; but should the Chinese debtor abscond, and be known to have property real or personal within the Chinese territory, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities on application by, and in concert with, the British Consul, to do their utmost to see justice done between the parties.

Art. XXIV.-It is agreed that British subjects shall pay, on all merchandise imported or exported by them, the duties prescribed by the tariff; but in no case shall they be called upon to pay other or higher duties than are required of the subjects of any other foreign nation.

       Art. XXV.-Import duties shall be considered payable on the landing of the goods, and duties of export on the shipment of the same.

        Art. XXVI. Whereas the tariff fixed by Article X. of the Treaty of Nanking, and which was estimated so as to impose on imports and exports a duty of about the rate of five per cent. ad valorem, has been found, by reason of the fall in value of various articles of merchandise therein enumerated, to impose a duty upon these considerably in excess of the rate originally assumed, as above, to be a fair rate, it is agreed that the said tariff shall be revised, and that as soon as the Treaty shall have been signed, application shall be made to the Emperor of China to depute a high officer of the Board of Revenue to meet, at Shanghai, officers to be deputed on behalf of the British Government, to consider its revision together, so that the tariff, as revised, may come into operation immediately after the ratification of this Treaty.

Art. XXVII.--It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties to this Treaty may demand a further revision of the tariff, and of the Commercial Articles of this Treaty, at the end of ten years; but if no demand be made on either side within six months after the end of the first ten years, then the tariff shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years, and so it shall be at the end of each successive ten years.

Art. XXVIII.--Whereas it was agreed in Article X. of the Treaty of Nanking that British imports, having paid the tariff duties, should be conveyed into the interior, free of all further charges, except a transit duty, the amount whereof was not to exceed a certain percentage on tariff value; and whereas, no accurate information having been furnished of the amount of such duty, British merchants have constantly complained that charges are suddenly and arbitrarily imposed by the provincial authorities as transit duties upon produce on its way to the foreign market, and on

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

838383

63

imports on their way into the interior, to the detriment of trade; it is agreed that within four months from the signing of this Treaty, at all ports now open to British trade, and within a similar period at all ports that may hereafter be opened, the authority appointed to superintend the collection of duties shall be obliged, upon application of the Consul, to declare the amount of duties leviable on produce between the place of production and the port of shipment upon imports between the Consular port in question and the inland markets named by the Consul; and that a notification thereof shall be published in English and Chinese for general information.

But it shall be at the option of any British subject desiring to convey produce purchased inland to a port, or to convey imports from a port to an inland market, to clear his goods of all transit duties, by payment of a single charge. The amount of this charge shall be leviable on exports at the first barrier they may have to pass, or, on imports, at the port at which they are landed; and on payment thereof a certificate shall be issued, which shall exempt the goods from all further inland charges whatsoever.

       It is further agreed that the amount of the charge shall be calculated, as nearly as possible, at the rate of two and a half per cent. ad valorem, and that it shall be fixed for each article at the conference to be held at Shanghai for the revision of the tariff.

      It is distinctly understood that the payment of transit dues, by commutation or otherwise, shall in no way affect the tariff duties on imports or exports, which will continue to be levied separately and in full.

       Art. XXIX.-British merchant vessels, of more than one hundred and fifty tons burden, shall be charged tonnage-dues at the rate of four mace per ton; if of one hundred and fifty tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton.

      Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the open ports, or for Hongkong, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to a special certificate from the Customs, ou exhibition of which she shall be exempted from all further payment of tonnage dues in any open ports of China, for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the port-clearance.

       Art. XXX. The master of any British merchant vessel may, within forty-eight hours after the arrival of his vessel, but not later, decide to depart without breaking bulk, in which case he will not be subject to pay tonnage-dues. But tonnage-dues shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. No other fees or charges upon entry or departure shall be levied.

      Art. XXXI.-No tonnage-dues shall be payable on boats employed by British subjects in the conveyance of passengers, baggage, letters, articles of provision, or other articles not subject to duty, between any of the open ports. All cargo-boats, however, conveying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage-dues once in six months, at the rate of four mace per register ton.

      Art. XXXII.--The Consuls and Superintendents of Customs shall consult together regarding the erection of beacons or lighthouses and the distribution of buoys and lightships, as occasion may demand.

       Art. XXXIII.-Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorised by the Chinese Government to receive the same in its behalf, either in sycee or in foreign money, according to the assay made at Canton on the thirteenth of July, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three.

      Art. XXXIV. Sets of standard weights and measures, prepared according to the standard issued to the Canton Custom-house by the Board of Revenue, shall be delivered by the Superintendent of Customs to the Consul at each port to secure uniformity and prevent confusion.

Art. XXXV. -Any British merchant vessel arriving at one of the open ports shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her departure, she shall be allowed to select a pilot to conduct her out of port.

Art. XXXVI.-Whenever a British merchant vessel shall arrive off one of the open ports, the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or more Customs officers to guard the ship. They shall either live in a boat of their own, or stay on board the ship, as may best suit their convenience. Their food and expenses shall be supplied

64

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

them from the Custom-house, and they shall not be entitled to any fees whatever from the master or consignee. Should they violate this regulation, they shall be punished proportionately to the amount exacted.

      Art. XXXVII.-Within twenty-four hours after arrival, the ship's papers, bills of lading, etc., shall be lodged in the hands of the Consul, who will within a further period of twenty-four hours report to the Superintendent of Customs the name of the ship, her registered tonnage, and the nature of her cargo. If, owing to neglect on the part of the master, the above rule is not complied with within forty-eight hours after the ship's arrival, he shall be liable to a fine of fifty taels for every day's delay; the total amount of penalty, however, shall not exceed two hundred taels.

For

      The master will be responsible for the correctness of the manifest, which shall contain a full and true account of the particulars of the cargo on board. presenting a false manifest, he will subject himself to a fine of five hundred taels; but he will be allowed to correct, within twenty-four hours after delivery of it to the customs officers, any mistake he may discover in his manifest without incurring this penalty.

Art. XXXVIII.-After receiving from the Consul the report in due form, the Superintendent of Customs shall grant the vessel a permit to open hatches. If the master shall open hatches, and begin to discharge any goods without such permission, be shall be fined five hundred taels, and the goods discharged shall be confiscated wholly. Art. XXXIX.-Any British merchant who has cargo to land or ship must apply to the Superintendent of Customs for a special permit. Cargo landed or shipped without such permit will be liable to confiscation.

       Art. XL.-No transhipment from one vessel to another can be made without special permission, under pain of confiscation of the goods so transhipped.

Art. XLI. When all dues and duties shall have been paid, the Superintendent of Customs shall give a port-clearance, and the Consul shall then return the ship's papers, so that she may depart on her voyage.

Art. XLII. With respect to articles subject, according to the tariff, to an ad valorem duty, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer in affixing its value, then cach party shall call two or three merchants to look at the goods, and the highest price at which any of these merchants would be willing to purchase them shall be assumed as the value of the goods.

Art. XLIII.-Duties shall be charged upon the net weight of each article, making a deduction for the tare, weight of congee, &c. To fix the tare of

any articles, such as tea, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Custom-house officer, then each party shall choose so many chests out of every hundred, which being first weighed in gross, shall afterwards be tared, and the average tare upon these chests shall be assumed as the tare upon the whole; and upon this principle shall the tare be fixed upon other goods and packages. If there should be any other points in dispute which cannot be settled, the British merchant may appeal to his Consul, who will communicate the particulars of the case to the Superintendent of Customs, that it may be equitably arranged. But the appeal must be made within twenty-four hours or it will not be attended to. While such points are still unsettled, the Superintendent of Customs shall postpone the insertion of the same in his books.

Art. XLIV. Upon all damaged goods a fair reduction of duty shall be allowed proportionate to their deterioration. If any disputes arise, they shall be settled in the manner pointed out in the clause of this Treaty having reference to articles which pay duty ad valorem.

of

Art. XLV.-British merchants who may have imported merchandise into any the open ports, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same, shall be entitled to make application to the Superintendent of Customs, who, in order to prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made by suitable officers, to see that the duties paid on such goods, as entered in the Custom-house books, correspond with the representation made, and that the goods remain with their original marks unchanged. He shall then make a memorandum of th port-clearance of the gods, and of the amount of duties paid, and deliver the same to the merchant, and shall also certify the facts to the officers of Customs of the other ports. All which

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

65

    being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in which the goods are laden, every- thing being found on examination there to correspond, she shall be permitted to break bulk, and land the said goods, without being subject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But if, on such examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in the case, then the goods shall be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

      British merchants desiring to re-export duty-paid imports to a foreign country shall be entitled, ou complying with the same conditions as in the case of re-exporta- tion to another port in China, to a drawback certificate, which shall be a valid tender to the Customs in payment of import or export duties.

Foreign grain brought into any port of China in a British ship, if no part thereof has been landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

      Art. XLVI.-The Chinese authorities at each port shall adopt the means they may judge most proper to prevent the revenue suffering from fraud or smuggling.

Art. XLVII.-British merchant-vessels are not entitled to resort to other than the ports of tra le declared open by Treaty; they are not unlawfully to enter other ports in China, or to carry on clandestine trade along the coast thereof. Any vessel violating this provision shall, with her cargo, be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

      Art. XLVIII.-If any British merchant-vessel be concerned in smuggling, the goods, whatever their value or nature, shall be subject to confiscation by the Chinese authorities, and the ship may be prohibited from tra ling further, and sent away as soon as her account shall have been adjusted and paid.

www.dic

      Art. XLIX. All penalties enforced, or confiscations made, under this Treaty shall belong and be appropriated to the public service of the Government of China.

       Art. L.-All official communications addressed by the Diplomatic and Consular Agent of Her Majesty the Queen to the Chinese Authorities, shall, henceforth, be writ- ten in English. They will for the present be accompanied by a Chinese version, but it is understood that, in the event of there being any difference of meaning between the English and Chinese text, the English Government will hold the sense as expressed in the English text to be the correct sense. This provision is to apply to the Treaty now negotiated, the Chinese text of which has been carefully corrected by the English original.

Art. LI.--It is agreed that henceforward the character "I" (barbarian) shall not be applied to the Government or subjects of Her Britannic Majesty in any Chinese official document issued by the Chinese authorities, either in the capital or in the provinces.

Art. LII.-British ships of war coming for no hostile purpose, or being engaged in the pursuit of pirates, shall be at liberty to visit all ports within the dominions of the Emperor of China, and shall receive every facility for the purchase of provisions, procuring water, and, if occasion require, for the making of repairs. The commanders of such ships shall hold intercourse with the Chinese authorities on terms of equality and courtesy.

Art. LIII. In consideration of the injury sustained by native and foreign commerce from the prevalence of piracy in the seas of China, the high contracting parties agree to concert measures for its suppression.

      Art. LIV.-The British Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in all privileges, immunities, and advantages conferred on them by previous Treaties: and it is hereby expressly stipulated that the British Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that may have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the Government or subjects of any other nation.

      Art. LV.-In evidence of her desire for the continuance of a friendly under- standing, Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain consents to include in a Separate Article, which shall be in every respect of equal validity with the Articles of this Treaty, the condition affecting indemnity for expenses incurred and losses sustained in the matter of the Canton question.

Art. LVI.-The ratifications of this Treaty, under the hand of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, and of His Majesty the Emperor of China, respec- tively, shall be exchanged at Peking, within a year from this day of signature.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this

66

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

    Treaty. Done at Tientsin, this twenty-sixth day of June, in the year of our Lord one- thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight; corresponding with the Chinese date, the sixteenth day, fifth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

(L.S.)

ELGIN AND KINCARDINE.

SIGNATURE OF 1ST CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY.

SIGNATURE OF 2ND CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY.

Separate Article annexed to the Treaty concluded between Great Britain and China on the twenty-sixth day of June, in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-eight.

It is hereby agreed that a sum of two millions of taels, on account of the losses sus- tained by British subjects through the misconduct of the Chinese authorities at Canton, and a further sum of two millions of taels on account of the Military expenses of the ex- pedition which Her Majesty the Queen has been compelled to send out for the purpose of obtaining redress, and of enforcing the observance of Treaty provisions, shall be paid to Her Majesty's Representatives in China by the authorities of the Kwangtung Province. The necessary arrangements with respect to the time and mode of effecting these payments shall be determined by Her Majesty's Representative, in concert with the Chinese authorities of Kwangtung.

When the above amounts shall have been discharged in fall, the British forces will be withdrawn from the city of Canton. Done at Tientsin this twenty-sixth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, corresponding with the Chinese date, the sixteenth day, fifth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung. (L.S.) ELGIN AND KINCARDINE.

SIGNATURE OF 1ST CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY.

SIGNATURE OF 2ND CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY

AGREEMENT IN PURSUANCE OF ARTICLES XXVI. AND XXVIII. OF THE TREATY OF TIENTSIN *

SIGNED AT SHANGHAI, 8TH NOVEMBER, 1858

      Whereas it was provided, by the Treaty of Tientsin, that a conference should be held at Shanghai between Officers deputed by the British Government on the one part and by the Chinese Government on the other part, for the purpose of determining the amount of tariff duties and transit dues to be henceforth levied, a conference has been held accordingly; and its proceedings having been submitted to the Right Honourable the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, High Commissioner and Plenipotentiary of Her Majesty the Queen on the one part; and to Kweiliang, Hwashana, Ho Kwei-tsing, Ming-shen, and Twan Ching-shih, High Commissioners and Plenipotentiaries of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor, on the other part, these High Officers have agreed and determined upon the revised Tariff hereto appended, the rate of transit dues therewith declared, together with other Rules and Regulations for the better explana- tion of the Treaty aforesaid; and do hereby agree that the said Tariff and Rules- the latter being in ten Articles, thereto appended-shall be equally binding on the Governments and subjects to both countries with the Treaty itself.

In witness whereof they hereto affix their Seals and Signatures.

     Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiangsu, this eighth day of November, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, being the third day of the tenth moon of the eighth year of the reign of Hien Fung.

(L.S.)

SEAL OF CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARIES.

ELGIN AND Kincardine.

SIGNATURES OF THE FIVE CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARIES.

*The Import Tariff has been superseded by one arranged in 1902.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

WITH ADDITIONAL ARTICLE THERETO FOR REGULATING THE

TRAFFIC IN OPIUM

Ratifications exchanged at London, 6th May, 1886

       Agreement negotiated between Sir Thomas Wade, K.C.B., Her Britannic Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of China, and Li, Minister Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Senior Grand Secretary, Governor-General of the Province of Chihli, of the First Class of the Third Order of Nobility.

      The negotiation between the Ministers above named has its origin in a despatch received by Sir Thomas Wade, in the Spring of the present year, from the Earl of Derby, Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, dated 1st January, 1876. This contained instructions regarding the disposal of three questions: first, a satis- factory settlement of the Yunnan affair; secondly, a faithful fulfilment of engagements of last year respecting intercourse between the high officers of the two Governments; thirdly, the adoption of a uniform system in satisfaction of the understanding arrived at in the month of September, 1875 (8th moon of the 1st year of the reign Kwang Su), on the subject of rectification of conditions of trade. It is to this despatch that Sir Thomas Wade has referred himself in discussions on these questions with the Tsung-li Yamên, further reference to which is here omitted as superfluous. The conditions now agreed to between Sir Thomas Wade and the Grand Secretary are as follows:-

SECTION I-Settlement of the Yünnan Case

      1.-A Memorial is to be presented to the Throne, whether by the Tsung-li Yamên or by the Grand Secretary Li is immaterial, in the sense of the memorandum prepared by Sir Thomas Wade. Before presentation the Chinese text of the Memorial is to be shown to Sir Thomas Wade.

      2. The Memorial having been presented to the Throne, and the Imperial Decree in reply received, the Tsung-li Yamên will communicate copies of the Memorial and Imperial decree of Sir Thomas Wade, together with copy of a letter from the Tsung-li Yamên to the Provincial Governments, instructing them to issue a proclama- tion that shall embody at length the above Memorial and Decree. Sir Thomas Wade will thereon reply to the effect that for two years to come officers will be sent by the British Minister to different places in the provinces to see that the proclamation is posted. Our application from the British Minister or the Consul of any port instructed by him to make application, the bigh officers of the provinces will depute competent officers to accompany those so sent to the places which they go to observe.

3.-In order to the framing of such regulations as will be needed for the conduct of the frontier trade between Burmah and Yunnan, the Memorial submitting the proposed settlement of the Yunnan affair will contain a request that an Imperial Decree be issued directing the Governor-General and Governor, whenever the British Government shall send officers to Yunnan, to select a competent officer of rank to confer with them and to conclude a satisfactory arrangement.

4. The British Government will be free for five years, from the 1st January next, being the 17th day of the 11th moon of the 2nd year of the reign of Kwang Su, to station officers at Ta-li Fu, or at some other suitable place in Yunnan, to observe the conditions of trade; to the end that they may have information upon which to

68

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

base the regulations of trade when these have to be discussed. For the consideration and adjustment of any matter affecting British officers or subjects, these officers will be free to address themselves to the authorities of the province. The opening of the trade may be proposed by the British Government as it may find best at any time within the term of five years, or upon expiry of the term of five years.

      Passports having been obtained last year for a Mission from India into Yünnan, it is open to the Viceroy of India to send such Mission at any time he may see fit. ·

5. The amount of indemnity to be paid on account of the families of the officers and others killed in Yünnan, on account of the expenses which the Yunnan case has occasioned, and on account of claims of British merchants arising out of the action of officers of the Chinese Government up to the commencement of the present year, Sir Thomas Wade takes upon himself to fix at two hundred thousand taels, payable on demand.

      6.-When the case is closed an Imperial letter will be written expressing regret for what has occurred in Yünnan. The Mission bearing the Imperial letter will proceed to England immediately. Sir Thomas Wade is to be informed of the constitution of this Mission for the information of this Government. The text of the Imperial letter is also to be communicated to Sir Thomas Wade by the Tsung-li Yamên.

SECTION II.-Official Intercourse

      Under this heading are included the conditions of intercourse between high officers in the capital and the provinces, and between Consular officers and Chinese officials at the ports; also the conduct of judicial proceedings in mixed cases.

      1. In the Tsung-li Yamên's Memorial of the 28th September, 1875, the Prince of Kung and the Ministers stated that their object in presenting it had not been simply the transaction of business in which Chinese and Foreigners might be concerned; missions abroad and the question of diplomatic intercourse lay equally within their prayer.

To the prevention of further misunderstanding upon the subject of intercourse and correspondence, the present conditions of both having caused complaint in the capital and in the provinces, it is agreed that the Tsung-li Yamên shall address a circular to the Legations, inviting Foreign Representatives to consider with them a code of etiquette, to the end that foreign officials in China, whether at the ports or elsewhere, may be treated with the same regard as is shown them when serving abroad in other countries and as would be shown to Chinese agents so serving abroad. The fact that China is about to establish Missions and Consulates abroad renders an understanding on these points essential.

who

2.-The British Treaty of 1858, Article XVI., lays down that "Chinese subjects may be guilty of any criminal act towards British subjects shall be arrested and punished by Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

      "British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and punished by the Consul, or any other public functionary authorised thereto, according to the laws of Great Britain.

66

Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides."

       The words "functionary authorised thereto" are translated in the Chinese toxt "British Government."

      In order to the fulfilment of its Treaty obligation, the British Government has established a Supreme Court at Shanghai, with a special code of rules, which it is now about to revise. The Chinese Government has established at Shanghai a Mixed Court; but the officer presiding over it, either from lack of power or dread of unpopularity, constantly fails to enforce his judgments.

      It is now understood that the Tsung-li Yamên will write a circular to the Lega- tion, inviting Foreign Representatives at once to consider with the Tsung-li Yamen the measures needed for the more effective administration of justice at the Ports open to Trade.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

69

3. It is agreed that, whenever a crime is committed affecting the person or property of a British subject, whether in the interior or at the open ports, the British Minister shall be free to send officers to the spot to be present at the investigation.

      To the prevention of misunderstanding on this point, Sir Thomas Wade will write a Note to the above effect, to which the Tsung-li Yamên will reply, affirming that this is the course of proceeding to be adhered to for the time to come.

It is further understood that so long as the laws of the two countries differ from each other, there can be but one principle to guide judicial proceedings in mixed cases in China, namely, that the case is tried by the official of the defendant's nationality; the official of the plaintiff's nationality merely attending to watch the proceedings in the interest of justice. If the officer so attending be dissatisfied with the proceedings. it will be in his power to protest against them in detail. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case. This is the meaning of the words hui t'ung. indicating combined action in judicial proceedings, in Article XVI. of the Treaty of Tientsin; and this is the course to be respectively followed by the officers of either nationality.

SECTION III.-Trade

1.-With reference to the area within which, according to the Treaties in force, lekin ought not to be collected on foreign goods at the open ports, Sir Thomas Wade agrees to move his Government to allow the ground rented by foreigners (the so-called Concessions) at the different ports, to be regarded as the area of exemption from lekin; and the Government of China will thereupon allow Ich'ang, in the province of Hu-pi; Wu-hu, in An-hui; Wên-chow, in Che-kiang; and Pei-hai (Pak-hoi), in Kwang-tung to be added to the number of ports open to trade and to become Consular stations. The British Government will, further, be free to send officers to reside at Chung-k'ing to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuen ; British merchants will not be allowed to reside at Chung-k'ing, or to open establish- ments or warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port. When steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be taken into consideration.

      It is further proposed as a measure of compromise that at certain points on the shore of the Great River, namely, Tat'ung and Ngan-Ching in the province of An- hui; Ho-Kou, in Kiang-si; Wu-such, Lu-chi kon, and Sha-shih in Hu-Kwang, these being all places of trade in the interior, at which, as they are not open ports, foreign merchants are not legally authorised to land or ship goods, steamers shall be allowed to touch for the purpose of landing or shipping passengers or goods; but in all instances by means of native boats only, and subject to the regulations in force affecting native trade.

      Produce accompanied by a half-duty certificate may be shipped at such points by the steamers, but may not be landed by them for sale. And at all such points, except in the case of imports accompanied by a transit duty certificate or exports similarly certificated, which will be severally passed free of lekin on exhibition of such certificates, lekin will be duly collected on all goods whatever by the native authorities. Foreign merchants will not be authorised to reside or open houses of business or warehouses at the places enumerated as ports of call.

     2. At all ports open to trade, whether by earlier or later agreement at which no settlement area has been previously defined, it will be the duty of the British Consul, acting in concert with his colleagues, the Consuls of other Powers, to come to an understanding with the local authorities regarding the definition of the foreign settlement area.

3.-On Opium, Sir Thomas Wade will move his Government to sanction an arrangement different from that affecting other imports. British merchants, when opium is brought into port, will be obliged to have it taken cognisance of by the Customs, and deposited in bond, either in a warehouse or a receiving hulk, until such time as there is a sale for it. The importer will then pay the tariff duty upon it,

70

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

    and the purchasers the lekin, in order to the prevention of evasion of the Treaty. The amount of lekin to be collected will be decided by the different Provincial Govern- ments according to the circumstances of each.

4.-The Chinese Government agree that Transit Duty Certificates shall be framed under one rule at all ports, no difference being made in the conditions set forth therein; and that, so far as imports are concerned, the nationality of the person possessing and carrying these is immaterial. Native produce carried from an inland centre to a port of shipment, if bonâ fide intended for shipment to a foreign port, may be, by treaty, certified by the British subject interested, and exempted by payment of the half duty from all charges demanded upon it en route. If produce be not the property of a British subject, or is being carried to a port not for exportation, it is not entitled to the exemption that would be secured it by the exhibition of a transit duty certificate. The British Minister is prepared to agree with the Tsung-li Yamên upon rules that will secure the Chinese Government against abuse of the privilege as affecting produce.

The words nei-ti (inland) in the clause of Article VII. of the Rules appended to the Tariff, regarding carriage of imports inland, and of native produce purchased inland, apply as much to places on the sea coasts and river shores, as to places in the interior not open to foreign trade; the Chinese Government having the right to make arrangements for the prevention of abuses thereat.

5.-Article XLV. of the Treaty of 1858 prescribed no limit to the term within which a drawback may be claimed upon duty-paid imports. The British Minister agrees to a term of three years, after expiry of which no drawback shall be claimed.

      6. The foregoing stipulation, that certain ports are to be opened to foreign trade, and that landing and shipping of goods at six places on the Great River is to be sanctioned, shall be given effect to within six months after receipt of the Imperial Decree approving the memorial of the Grand Secretary Li. The date for giving effect to the stipulations affecting exemption of imports from lekin taxation within the for- eign settlements and the collection of lekin upon opium by the Customs Inspectorate at the same time as the Tariff Duty upon it, will be fixed as soon as the British Gov- ernment has arrived at an understanding on the subject with other foreign Governments.

      7. The Governor of Hongkong having long complained of the interference of the Canton Customs Revenue Cruisers with the junk trade of that Colony, the Chinese Government agrees to the appointment of a Commission, to consist of a British Consul, an officer of the Hongkong Government, and a Chinese official of equal rank, in order to the establishment of some system that shall enable the Chinese Government to protect its revenue without preju lice to the interests of the Colony.

SEPARATE ARTICLE

      Her Majesty's Government having it in contemplation to send a Mission of Exploration next year by way of Peking through Kan-su and Koko-Nor, or by way of Ssu-chuen, to Thibet, and thence to India, the Tsung-li Yamên, having due regard to the circumstances, will, when the time arrives, issue the necessary passports, and will address letters to the high provincial authorities and to the Resident in Thibet. If the Mission should not be sent by these routes, but should be proceeding across the Indian frontier to Thibet, the Tsung-li Yamên, on receipt of a communication to the above effect from the British Minister, will write to the Chinese Resident in Thibet, and the Resident, with due regard to the circumstances, will send officers to take due care of the Mission; and passports for the Mission will be issued by the Tsung-li Yamên, that its passage be not obstructed.

Done at Chefoo, in the province of Shan-tung, this Thirteenth Day of September, in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-six.

THOMAS FRANCIS WADE.

[L.S.]

[L.S.]

LI HUNG-CHANG.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

Additional Articles to the Agreement between Great Britain and China

Signed at Chefoo on the 13th September, 1876

SIGNED AT LONDON, 18TH JULY, 1885

71

      The Governments of Great Britain and of China, considering that the arrange- ments proposed in Clauses 1 and 2 of Section III. of the Agreement between Great Britain and China, signed at Chefoo on the 13th September, 1876 (hereinafter referred to as the "Chefoo Agreement "), in relation to the area within which lekin ought not to be collected on foreign goods at the open ports, and to the definition of the Foreign Settlement area, require further consideration; also that the terms of Clause 3 of the same section are not sufficiently explicit to serve as an efficient regula- tion for the traffic in opium, and recognizing the desirability of placing restrictions on the consumption of opium, have agreed to the present Additional Article.

1.-As regards the arrangements above referred to and proposed in Clauses 1 and 2 of Section III. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agreed that they shall be reserved for further consideration between the two Governments.

     2.-In lieu of the arrangement respecting opium proposed in Clause 3 of Section II. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agreed that foreign opium, when imported into China, shall be taken cognizance of by the Imperial Maritime Customs, and shall be deposited in bond, either in warehouses or receiving-hulks which have been approved of by the Customs, and that it shall not be removed thence until there shall have been paid to the Customs the Tariff duty of 30 taels per chest of 100 catties, and also a sum not exceeding 80 taels per like chest as lekin.

3. It is agreed that the aforesaid import and lekin duties having been paid, the owner shall be allowed to have the opium repacked in bond under the supervision of the Customs, and put into packages of such assorted sizes as he may select from such sizes as shall have been agreed upon by the Customs authorities and British Consul at the port of entry.

The Customs shall then, if required, issue gratuitously to the owner a transit cer- tificate for each such package, or one for any number of packages, at option of the owner. Such certificates shall free the opium to which it applies from the imposition of any further tax or duty whilst in transport in the interior, provided that the package has not been opened, and that the Customs seals, marks, and numbers on the packages have not been effaced or tampered with.

Such certificate shall have validity only in the hands of Chinese subjects, and shall not entitle foreigners to convey or accompany any opium in which they may be interested into the interior.

     4.-It is agreed that the Regulations under which the said certificates are to be issued shall be the same for all the ports, and that the form shall be as follows:-

"6

Opium Transit Certificate.

"This is to certify that Tariff and lekin duties at the rate of―taels per chest of 100 catties have been paid on the opium marked and numbered as under; and that, in conformity with the Additional Article signed at London the 18th July, 1885, and appended to the Agreement between Great Britain and China signed at Clefoo the 13th September, 1876, and approved by the Imperial Decree printed on the back thereof, the production of this certificate will exempt the opium to which it refers, wherever it may be found, from the imposition of any further tax or duty whatever, provided that the packages are unbroken, and the Customs seals, marks, and numbers have not been effaced or tampered with.

"Mark, X

"Port of entry,

"Date

No.

<<

00 packages

Signature of Commissioner of Customs." 5.-The Chinese Government undertakes that when the packages shall have been opened at the place of consumption, the opium shall not be subjected to any tax or

72

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

contribution, direct or indirect, other than or in excess of such tax or contribution as is or may hereafter be levied on native opium.

      In the event of such tax or contribution being calculated ad valorem, the same rate, value for value, shall be assessed on foreign and native opium, and in ascertaining for this purpose the value of foreign opium the amount paid on it for lekin at the port of entry shall be deducted from its market value.

      6. It is agreed that the present Additional Article shall be considered as forming part of the Chefoo Agreement, and that it shall have the same force and validity as if it were therein inserted word for word. It shall come into operation six months after its signature, provided the ratifications have then been exchanged, or if they have not, then on the date at which such exchange takes place.

7. The arrangement respecting opium contained in the present Additional Article shall remain binding for four years, after the expiration of which period either Government may at any time give twelve months' notice of its desire to determine it, and such notice being given, it shall terminate accordingly. It is, however, agreed that the Government of Great Britain shall have the right to terminate the same at any time should the transit certificate be found not to confer on the opium complete exemption from all taxation whatsoever whilst being carried from the port of entry to the place of consumption in the interior. In the event of the termination of the present Additional Article the arrangement with regard to opium now in force and the regulations attached to the Treaty of Tientsin shall revive.

     8.-The High Contracting Parties may, by common consent, adopt any modifica- tions of the provisions of the present Additional Article which experience may show to be desirable.

9.-It is understood that the Commission provided for in Clause 7 of Section III. of the Chefoo Agreement to inquire into the question of prevention of smuggling into China from Hongkong shall be appointed as soon as possible.

10.-The Chefoo Agreement, together with, and as modifiel by, the present Additional Article, shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at London as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the Undersigned, duly authorized thereto by their respective Governments, have signed the present Additional Article, and have affixed thereto their seals.

this

     Done at London, in quadruplicate (two in English and two in Chinese), 18th day of July, 1885, being the seventh day of the sixth moon in the eleventh year of the reign of Kwang Hsu.

(L.S.) (L.S.)

SALISBURY.

TSENG.

The Marquis Tseny to the Marquis of Salisbury.

Chinese Legation, London, 18th July, 1885.

My Lord-In reply to your Lordship's note of this date, I have the honour to state that the Imperial Government accept the following as the expression of the understanding which has been come to between the Governments of Great Britain and China in regard to the Additional Article to the Chefoo Agreement relative to opium, which has been signed this day:

1.-It is un lerstood that it shall be competent for Her Majesty's Government at once to withdraw from this new arrangement, and to revert to the system of taxation for opium at present in operation in China, in case the Chinese Government shall fail to bring the other Treaty Powers to comform to the provisions of the said Additional Article.

     2. It is further understood that, in the event of the termination of the said Additional Article, the Chefoo Agreement, with the exception of Clause 3 of Section III., and with the modification stipulated in Clause 1 of the said Additional Article, nevertheless remain in force.

THE OPIUM CONVENTION

Memorandum of the basis of Agreement arrived at after discussion between Mr. James Russell, Puisne Judge of Hongkong; Sir Robert Hart, K.C.M.G., Inspector- General of Customs, aud Shao Taotai, Joint Commissioners for China; and Mr. Byron Brenan, Her Majesty's Consul at Tientsin, in pursuance of Article 7, Section III. of the Agreement between Great Britain and China, sigued at Chefo› on the 15th September, 1876, and of Section 9 of the Additional Article to the said Agreement, signed at London on the 18th July, 1885.

       Mr. Russell undertakes that the Government of Hongkong shall submit to the Legislative Council an Ordinance for the regulation of the trade of the Colony in Rav Opium subject to conditions hereinafter set forth and providing :- a.--For the prohibition to the import and export of Opium in quantities less than 1 chest. † b. For rendering illegal the possession of Raw Opium, its custody or control in quan-

tities less than oue chest, except by the Opium Farmer.

c. That all Opium arriving in the Colony be reported to the Harbour Master, and that no Opium shall be transhipped, landed, stored or moved from one store to another, or re- exported without a permit from the Harbour Master, and notice to the Opium Farmer. d. For the keeping by Importers, Exporters, and Godown Owners, in such form as

the Governor may require, books shewing the movements of Opium.

e. For taking stock of quantities in the stores, and search for deficiencies by the

Opium Farmer, and for furnishing to the Harbour Master returns of stocks. f.--For amendment of Harbour Regulations, as to the night clearances of junks.

The conditions on which it is agreed to submit the Ordinance are

     a. -That China arranges with Macao for the adoption of equivalent measures. b. That the Hongkong Government shall be entitled to repeal the Ordinance if it

be found to be injurious to the Revenue or to the legitimate trade of the Colony. c. --That an Office under the Foreign Inspectorate shall be established on Chinese Territory at a convenient spot on the Kowloon side for sale of Chinese Opium Duty Certificates, which shall be freely sold to all comers, and for such quantities of Opium as they may require.

d. That Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of not more than Tls. 110 per picul, shall be free from all further imposts of every sort, and have all the benefits stipulated for by the Additional Article on behalf of Opium on which duty has been paid at one of the ports of China, and that it may be made up in sealed parcels at the option of the purchaser.

e. That junks trading between Chinese ports and Hongkong and their cargoes shall not be subject to any dues or duties in excess of those leviable on junks and their cargoes trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and that no dues whatsoever shall be demanded from junks coming to Hongkong from ports in China, or pro- ceeding from Hongkong to ports in China, over and above the dues paid or payable at the ports of clearance or destination.

f-That the Officer of the Foreign Inspectorate, who will be responsible for the management of the Kowloon Office, shall investigate and settle any complaints made by the junks trading with Hongkong against the Native Customs Revenue Stations or Cruisers in the neighbourhood, and that the Governor of Hongkong, if he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send a Hongkong Officer to be present at and assist in the investigation and decision. If, however, they do not agree a reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for joint decision.

Sir Robert Hart undertakes on behalf of himself and Shao Taotai (who was com- pelled by unavoidable circumstances to leave before the sittings of the Commission were terminated) that the Chinese Government shall agree to the above conditions.

      The undersigned are of opinion that if these arrangements are fully carried cut, a fairly satisfactory solution of the questions connected with the so-called "Hong- kong Blockade" will have been arrived at.

Signel in triplicate at Hongkong, this 11th day of September, 1886.

*Sec Ordinauce 22 of 1887. A modification allowing export in smaller quantities than one chest was subsequently agreed to.

THE CHUNGKING AGREEMENT, 1890

ADDITIONAL ARTICLE TO THE AGREEMENT BETWEEN GREAT

BRITAIN AND CHINA OF SEPTEMBER 13TH, 1876

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 18th January, 1891

      The Governments of Great Britain and China, being desirous of settling in an amicable spirit the divergence of opinion which has arisen with respect to the First Clause of the Third Section of the Agreement concluded at Chefoo in 1876, which stipulates that "The British Government will be free to send officers to reside at Chungking to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuan, that British mer- chants will not be allowed to reside at Chungking, or to open establishments or warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port, and that when steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be taken into consideration," have agreed upon the following Additional Article:-

      I.-Chungking shall forthwith be declared open to trade on the same footing as any other Treaty port. British subjects shall be at liberty either to charter Chinese vessels or to provide vessels of the Chinese type for the traffic between Ichang and Chungking.

II.-Merchandise conveyed between Ichang and Chungking by the above class of vessels shall be placed on the same footing as merchandise carried by steamers between Shanghai and Ichang, and shall be dealt with in accordance with Treaty Tariff Rules, and the Yangtsze Regulations.

JII.-All regulations as to the papers and flags to be carried by vessels of the above description, as to the repackage of goods for the voyage beyond Ichang and as to the general procedure to be observed by those engaged in the traffic between Ichang and Chungking with a view to insuring convenience and security, shall be drawn up by the Superintendent of Customs at Ichang, the Taotai of the Ch'uan Tung Circuit, who is now stationed at Chungking, and the Commissioners of Customs in consultation with the British Consul, and shall be liable to any modifications that may hereafter prove to be desirable and may be agreed upon by common consent.

IV. Chartered junks shali pay port dues at Ichang and Chungking in accord- ance with the Yangtsze Regulations; vessels of Chinese type, if and when entitled to carry the British flag, shall pay tonnage dues in accordance with Treaty Regulations. It is obligatory on both chartered junks and also vessels of Chinese type, even when the latter may be entitled to carry the British flag, to take out at the Maritime Custom-house special papers and a special flag when intended to be employed by British subjects in the transport of goods between Ichang and Chungking, and without such papers and flag no vessels of either class shall be allowed the privileges and immunities granted under this Additional Article. Provided with special papers and flag, vessels of both classes shall be allowed to ply between the two ports, and they and their cargoes shall be dealt with in accordance with Treaty Rules and the Yangtsze Regulations. All other vessels shall be dealt with by the Native Customs. The special papers and flag issued by the Maritime Customs must alone be used by the particular vessel for which they were originally issued, and are not transferable from one vessel to another. The use of the British flag by vessels the property of Chinese is strictly prohibited. Infringement of these Regulations will, in the first instance, render the offender liable to the penalties in force at the ports hitherto opened under Treaty, and should the offence be subsequently repeated, the vessel's special papers and flag will be withdrawn, and the vessel herself refused permission thenceforward to trade between Ichang and Chungking.

     V.-When once Chinese steamers carrying cargo run to Chungking, British steamers shall in like manner have access to the said port.

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION, 1890

75

VI. It is agreed that the present Additional Article shall be considered as forming part of the Chefoo Agreement, and as having the same force and validity as if it were inserted therein word for word. It shall be ratified, and the ratifications exchanged at Peking, and it shall come into operation six months after its signature, provided the ratifications have then been exchanged, or if they have not, then on the date at which such exchange takes place.

Done at Peking in triplicate (three in English and three in Chinese), this thirty-first day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety, being the eleventh day of the Second Intercalary Moon of the sixteenth year of Kuang Hsü.

(L.S.)

JOHN WALSHAM.

(L.S.)

SIGNATURE OF CHINESE

PLENIPOTENTIARY.

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION, 1890

Ratified in London, 17th August, 1890

       Art. L.-The boundary of Sikkim and Thibet shall be the crest of the mountain range separating the waters flowing into the Sikkim Teesta and its affluents from the waters flowing into the Thibetan Machu and northwards into other rivers of Thibet. The line commences at Mount Gipmochi on the Bhutan frontier, and follows the above-mentioned water-parting to the point where it meets Nepaul territory.

Art. II. It is admitted that the British Government, whose protectorate over the Sikkim State is hereby recognised, has direct and exclusive control over the internal administration and foreign relations of that State, and except through and with the permission of the British Government neither the ruler of the State nor any of its officers shall have official relations of any kiud, formal or inforınal, with any other country.

        Art. III.-The Government of Great Britain and Ireland and the Government of China engage reciprocally to respect the boundary as defined in Article I. and to prevent acts of aggression from their respective sides of the frontier.

      Art. IV. The question of providing increased facilities for trade across the Sikkim-Thibet frontier will hereafter be discussed with a view to a mutually satisfactory arrangement by the high contracting powers.

Art. V.-The question of pasturage on the Sikkim side of the frontier is reserved for further examination and future adjustment.

Art. VI. The high contracting powers reserve for discussion and arrangement the method in which official communications between the British authorities in India and the authorities in Thibet shall be conducted.

Art. VII. Two Joint Commissioners shall within six months from the ratifica- tion of this Convention be appointed, one by the British Government in India, the other by the Chinese Resident in Thibet. The said Commissioners shall meet and discuss the questions which by the last three preceding articles have been reserved.

Art. VIII.-The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London, as soon as possible after the date of the signature thereof.

THE BURMAI CONVENTION

SIGNED AT PEKING, 4TH FEBRUARY, 1897

In consideration of the Government of Great Britain consenting to waive its objections to the alienation by China, by the Convention with France of June 29th, 1895, of territory forming a portion of Kiang Hung, in derogation of the provision

76

THE BURMAH CONVENTION

of the Convention between Great Britain and China of March 1st, 1894, it has been agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China that the following additions and alterations shall be made in the last named Convention, hereinafter referred to as the Original Convention.

      (Articles I. to XI. refer to the Burmah Frontier and trade across it between Burma and Yunnan.)

Art. XII. (Providing for the free navigation of the Irrawady by Chinese- vessels). Add as follows:-

               :- The Chinese Government agree hereafter to consider whether the conditions of trade justify the construction of railways in Yunnan, and in the event of their construction, agrees to connect them with the Burmese lines.

.

Art. XIII.-Whereas by the Original Convention it was agreed that China might appoint a Consul in Burmah to reside at Rangoon, and that Great Britain might appoint a Consul to reside at Manwyne, and that the Consuls of the two Governments should each within the territories of the other enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the Consuls of the most favoured nation, and further that in proportion as the commerce between Burmah and China increased, additional Consuls might be appointed by mutual consent to reside at such places in Burmah. and Yunnan as the requirements of trade might seem to demand.

It has now been agreed that the Government of Great Britain may station a Consul at Momein or Shunning Fu as the Government of Great Britain may prefer, instead of at Manwyne as stipulated in the Original Convention, and also to station a Consul at Szumao.

British subjects and persons under British protection may establish themselves and trade at these places under the same conditions as at the Treaty Ports in China.

The Consuls appointed as above shall be on the same footing as regards correspondence and intercourse with Chinese officials as the British Consu's at the Treaty Ports.

Art. XIV. (Providing for issue of passports by the Consuls on each side of the frontier). Instead of "Her Britannic Majesty's Consul at Manwyne" in the Original Convention read "Her Britannic Majesty's Consul at Shunning'or Momein,' in accordance with the change made in Article XIII.

Failing agreement as to the terms of revision the present arrangement shall remain in force.

SPECIAL ARTICLE.

Whereas on the twentieth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-six, the Tsung-li Yamén addressed an official despatch to Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires at Peking, imforming him that on the thirtieth day December, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, they had submitted a Memorial respecting the opening of ports on the West River to foreign trade, and had received an Imperial Decree in approval of which they officially communicated a copy.

     It has now been agreed that the following places, namely, Wuchow Fu in Kwangsi, and Samshui city and Bongkun Market in Kwangtung, shall be opened as Treaty Ports and Consular Stations with freedom of navigation for steamers between. Samshui and Wuchow and Hongkong and Canton by a route from each of these latter places to be selected and notified in advance by the Maritime Customs, and that the following four places shall be established as ports of call for goods and passengers under the same regulations as the ports of call on the Yangtze River namely, Kongmoon, Kamchuk, Shiuhing and Takhing.

It is agree that the present Agreement, together with the Special Article, shall come into force within four months of the date of signature, and that the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Peking as soon as possible.

     In witness whereof the undersigned duly authorised thereto by their respective- Governments have signed the present agreement.

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT, 1898

77

Done at Peking in triplicat (three copies in English and three in Chinese),. the fourth day of February in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven.

(Sd.) CLAUDE M. MACDONALD. (Hieroglyphic) LI HUNG-CHANG

(Seal) (Seal)

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT, 1898

Whereas it has for many years past been recognised that an extension of Hong- kong territory is necessary for the proper defence and protection of the colony.

      It has now been agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China that the limits of British territory shall be enlarged under lease to the extent indicated generally on the annexed map.

The exact boundaries shall be hereafter fixed when proper surveys have been made by officials appointed by the two Governments. The term of this lease shall be ninety-nine years.

It is at the same time agreed that within the City of Kowloon the Chinese officials now stationed there shall continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as may be inconsistent with the military requirements for the defence of Hongkong. Within the remainder of the newly-leased territory Great Britain shall have sole jurisdiction. Chinese officials and people shall be allowed, as heretofore, to use the road from Kowloon to Hsinab,

It is further agreed that the existing landing-place near Kowloon city shall be reserved for the convenience of Chinese men-of-war, merchant and passengers vessels, which may come and go and lie there at their pleasure; and for the convenience of movements of the officials and people within the city.

When, hereafter, China constructs a railway to the boundary of the Kowloon territory under British control, arrangements shall be discussed.

It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or expulsion of the inhabitants of the district included within the extension, and that if land is required for public offices, fortifications, or the like official purposes, it shall be bought at a fair price.

If cases of extradition of criminals occur they shall be dealt with in accordance with the existing treaties between Great Britain and Chiu and the Hongkong Regulations.

The area leased by Great Britain includes the waters of Mirs Bay and Deep Bay, but it is agreed that Chinese vessels of war, whether neutral or otherwise, shall retain the right to use those waters.

      This Convention shall come into force on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, being the thirteenth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kwang Hsü. It shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of the two countries, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London as soon as possible.

In witness whercof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective Governments; have signed the present agreement.

      Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and in Chinese) the ninth day of June, in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, being the twenty-first day of the fourth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kwang Hsü.

CLAUDE M. MACDONALD.

LI HUNG-CHANG, Į

HSU TING KUEI,

Members of Tsung-li Yamêu.

THE WEIHAIWEI CONVENTION, 1898

Ratifications exchanged in London, 5th October, 1898

      In order to provide Great Britain with a suitable naval barbour in North China, and for the better protection of British commerce in the neighbouring seas, the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to lease to the Government of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, Weihaiwei, in the province of Shantung, and the adjacent waters for so long a period as Port Arthur shall remain in the occupation of Russia.

     The territory leased shall comprise the island of Liukung and all other islands in the Bay of Weihaiwei, and a belt of land ten English miles wide along the entire coast line of the Bay of Weihaiwei. Within the above-mentioned territory leased Great Britain shall have sole jurisdiction.

Great Britain shall have, in addition, the right to erect fortificatious, station troops, or take any other measures necessary for defensive purposes, at any points on or near the coast of the region east of the meridian 121 degrees 40 min. E. of Green- wich, and to acquire on equitable compensation within that territory such sites as may be necessary for water supply, communications, and hospitals. Within that zone Chinese administration will not be interfered with, but no troops other than Chinese or British shall be allowed therein.

It is also agreed that within the walled city of Weihaiwei Chinese officials shall continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as may be inconsistent with naval and military requirements for the defence of the territory leased.

It is further agreed that Chinese vessels of war, whether neutral or otherwise, shall retain the right to use the waters herein leased to Great Britain.

It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or explusion of the inhabitants of the territory herein specified, and that if land is required for forti- fications, public offices, or any official or public purpose, it shall be bought at a fair price.

This Convention shall come into force on signature. It shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of the two countries, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London as soon as possible.

     In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective Governments, have signed the present agreement.

CLAUDE M. MACDONALD.

PRINCE CHING, Senior Member of the Tsung-li Yamên. LIAO SHOU HENG, President of Board of Punishments.

      Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and four in Chinese) the first day of July, in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, being the thirteenth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsü.

SUPPLEMENTARY COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

SIGNED AT SHANGHAI, 5TH SEPTEMBER, 1902

Ratifications exchanged at Peking, 28th July, 1903.

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Em- peror of China, having resolved to enter into negotiations with a view to carrying out the provisions contained in Article XI. of the Final Protocol signed at Peking on the 7th of September, 1901, under which the Chinese Government agreed to negotiate the amendments deemed useful by the Foreign Governments to the Treaties of Commerce and Navigation and other subjects concerning commercial relations with the object of facilitating them, have for that purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland, IIis Majesty's Special Com- missioner, Sir James Lyle Mackay, Knight Commander of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, a member of the Council of the Secretary of State for India, etc.

      And His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Imperial Commissioners Lü Hai-huan, President of the Board of Public Works, etc., and Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, etc.

      Who having communicated to each other their respective Full Powers, and found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :--

      Art. I.-Delay having occurred in the past in the issue of Drawback Certificates owing to the fact that those documents have to be dealt with by the Superintendent of Customs at a distance from the Customs Office, it is now agreed that Drawback Certificates shall hereafter in all cases be issued by the Imperial Maritime Customs within three weeks of the presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the applicant to receive such Drawback Certificates.

These Certificates shall be valid tender to the Customs Authorities in payment of any duty upon goods imported or exported (transit dues excepted), or shall, in the case of Drawbacks on foreign goods re-exported abroad within three years from the date of importation, be payable in cash without deduction by the Customs Bank at the place where the import duty was paid.

      But if, in connexion with any application for a Drawback Certificate, the Customs Authorities discover an attempt to defraud the revenue, the applicant shall be liable to a fine not exceeding five times the amount of the duty whereof he attempted to defraud the Customs, or to a confiscation of the goods.

Art. II.-China agrees to take the necessary steps to provide for a uniform national coinage which shall be legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other obligations throughout the Empire by British as well as Chinese subjects.

      Art. III.--China agrees that the duties and lekin combined levied on goods carried by junks from Hongkong to the Treaty Ports in the Canton Province and vice versa, shall together not be less than the duties charged by the Imperial Maritime Customs on similar goods carried by steamer.

Art. IV. Whereas questions have arisen in the past concerning the right of Chinese subjects to invest money in non-Chinese enterprises and companies, and whereas it is a matter of common knowledge that large sums of Chinese capital are so invested, China hereby agrees to recognise the legality of all such investments past,

present and future.

80

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

      It being, moreover, of the utmost importance that all shareholders in a Joint Stock Company should stand on a footing of perfect equality as far as mutual obligations are concerned, China further agrees that Chinese subjects who have or may become shareholders in any British Joint Stock Company shall be held to have accepted, by the very act of becoming shareholders, the Charter of Incorporation or Memorandum. and Articles of Association of such Company and regulations framed thereunder as interpreted by British Courts, and that Chinese Courts shall enforce compliance there- with by such Chinese shareholders, if a suit to that effect be entered, provided always that their liability shall not be other or greater than that of British shareholders in the same Company.

      Similarly the British Government agree that British subjects investing in Chinese Companies shall be under the same obligations as the Chinese shareholders in such companies.

The foregoing shall not apply to cases which have already been before the Courts and been dismissed.

Art. V.-The Chinese Government undertakes to remove within the next two years the artificial obstructions to navigation in the Canton River. The Chinese Government also agree to improve the accommodation for shipping in the harbour of Canton and to take the necessary steps to maintain that improvement, such work to be carried out by the Imperial Maritime Customs and the cost thereof to be defrayed by a tax on goods landed and shipped by British and Chinese alike according to a scale to be arranged between the merchants and the Customs Authorities.

The Chinese Government are aware of the desirability of improving the naviga- bility by steamer of the waterway between Ichang and Chungking, but are also fully aware that such improvement might involve heavy expense and would affect the interests of the population of the provinces of Szechuen, Hunan, and Hupeh. It is, therefore, mutually agreed that until improvements can be carried out steamship owners shall be allowed, subject to approval by the Imperial Maritime Customs, to erect, at their own expense, appliances for hauling through the rapids. Such appliances shall be at the disposal of all vessels, both steamers and junks, subject to regulations to be drawn up by the Imperial Maritime Customs. These appliances shall not obstruct the waterway or interfere with the free passage of junks. Signal stations and channel marks where and when necessary shall be erected by the Imperial Maritime Customs. Should any practical scheme be presented for improv- ing the waterway and assisting navigation without injury to the local population or cost to the Chinese Government, it shall be considered by the latter in a friendly spirit.

      Art. VI.-The Chinese Government agree to make arrangements to give increased facilities at the open ports for bonding and for repacking merchandise in bond, and, on official representation being made by the British Authorities, to grant the privi- leges of a bonded warehouse to any warehouse which, to the satisfaction of the Customs Authorities, affords the necessary security to the revenue.

      Such warehouses will be subject to regulations, including a scale of fees according to cominodities, distance from Custom-house and hours of working, to be drawn up by the Customs Authorities who will meet the convenience of merchants so far as is compatible with the protection of the revenue.

      Art. VII.-Inasmuch as the British Government affords protection to Chinese trade marks against infringement, imitation, or colourable imitation by British subjects, the Chinese Government undertake to afford protection to British trade marks against infringement, imitation, or colourable imitation by Chinese subjects.

The Chinese Government further undertake that the Superintendents of Northern and of Southern trade shall establish offices within their respective jurisdictions under control of the Imperial Maritime Customs where foreign trade marks may be registered on payment of a reasonable fee.

      Art. VIII. Preamble. The Chinese Government, recognising that the system of levying lekin and other dues on goods at the place of production, in transit, and at

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

81

destination, impedes the free circulation of commodities and injures the interests of trade, hereby undertake to discard completely those means of raising revenue with the limitation mentioned in Section 8.

The British Government, in return, consent to allow a surtax, in excess of the Tariff rates for the time being in force to be imposed on foreign goods imported by British subjects and a surtax in addition to the export duty on Chinese produce destined for export abroad or coastwise.

       It is clearly understood that after lekin barriers and other stations for taxing goods in transit have been removed, no attempt shall be made to revive them in any form or under any pretext whatsoever; that in no case shall the surtax ou foreign imports exceed the equivalent of one and a half times the import duty leviable in terms of the Final Protocol signed by China and the Powers on the 7th day of Sep- tember, 1901; that payment of the import duty and surtax shall secure for foreign imports, whether in the hands of Chinese or non-Chinese subjects, in original packages or otherwise, complete immunity from all other taxation, examination or delay; that the total amount of taxation leviable on native produce for export abroad shall, under no circumstances, exceed 7 per cent. ad valorem.

Keeping these fundamental principles steadily in view, the High Contracting Parties have agreed upon the following methods of procedure.

Section 1.-The Chinese Government undertake that all barriers of whatsoever kind, collecting lekin or such like dues or duties, shall be permanently abolished on all roads, railways, and waterways in the Eighteen Provinces of China and the Three Eastern Provinces. This provision does not apply to the Native Custom-houses at present in existence on the seaboard or waterways, at Open Ports, on land routes, and on land frontiers of China.

       Section 2.-The British Government agree that foreign goods on importation, in addition to the effective 5 per cent. import duty as provided for in the Protocol of 1901, shall pay a special surtax equivalent to one and a half times the said duty to com- pensate for the abolition of lekin, of transit dues in lieu of lekin, and of all other taxation on foreign goods, and in consideration of the other reforms provided for in this Article; but this provision shall not impair the right of China to tax salt, native opium and native produce as provided for in Sections 3, 5, 6 and 8.

The same amount of surtax shall be levied on goods imported into the Eighteen Provinces of China and the Three Eastern Provinces across the land froutiers as on goods entering China by sea.

       Section 3.-All Native Custom-houses now existing, whether at the Open Ports, on the seaboard, on rivers, inland waterways, land routes or land frontiers, as enumerated in the Hu Pu and Kung Pu Tse Li (Regulations of the Boards of Revenue and Works) and Ta Ch'ing Hui Tien (Dynastic Institutes), may remain; a list of the same, with their location, shall be furnished to the British Government, for purposes of record.

       Wherever there are Imperial Maritime Custom-houses, or wherever such may be hereafter placed, Native Custom-houses may be also established; as well as at any points either on the seaboard or land frontiers.

       The location of Native Custom-houses in the Interior may be changed as the circumstances of trade seem to require, but any change must be communicated to the British Government, so that the list may be corrected; the originally stated number of them shall not, however, be exceeded.

      Goods carried by junks or sailing-vessels trading to or from Open Ports shall not pay lower duties than the combined duties and surtax on similar cargo carried by

steamers.

      Native produce, when transported from ore place to another in the Interior, shall, on arrival at the first Native Custom-house, after leaving the place of production, pay duty equivalent to the export surtax mentioned in Section 7.

When this duty has been paid, a certificate shall be given which shall describe the nature of the goods, weiht, number of pack ges, etc., amount of duty paid and intended destination. This certificate, which shall be valid for a fixed period of not

82

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

less than one year from date of payment of duty, shall free the goods from all taxation, examination, delay, or stoppage at any other Native Custom-houses passed en route.

      If the goods are taken to a place not in the foreign settlements or concessions of an Open Port, for local use, they become there liable to the Consumption Tax described in Section 8.

If the goods are shipped from an Open Port, the certificate is to be accepted by the Custom-house concerned, in lieu of the Export Surtax mentioned in Section 7.

Junks, boats, or carts shall not be subjected to any taxation beyond a small and reasonable charge, paid periodically at a fixed annual rate. This does not exclude the right to levy, as at present, tonnage (Chuan Chao) and port dues (Chuan Liao) on junks.

      Section 4.-Foreign opium duty and present lekin-which latter will now become a surtax in lieu of lekin shall remain as provided for by existing Treaties.

      Section 5.-The British Government have no intention whatever of interfering with China's right to tax native opium, but it is essential to declare that, in her arrangements for levying such taxation, China will not subject other goods to taxation, delay, or stoppage.

     China is free to retain at important points on the borders of each province-either on land or water-offices for collecting duty on native opium, where duties or contribu- tions leviable shall be paid in one lump sum; which payment shall cover taxation of all kinds within that province. Each cake of opium will have a stamp affixed as evidence of duty payment. Excise officers and police inay be employed in connection with these offices; but no barriers or other obstructions are to be erected, and the excise officers or police of these offices shall not stop or molest any other kinds of goods, or collect taxes thereon.

A list of these offices shall be drawn up and communicated to the British Govern- ment for record.

Section 6.-Lekin on salt is hereby abolished and the amount of said lekin and of other taxes and contributions shall be added to the salt duty, which shall be collected at place of production or at first station after entering the province where it is to be consumed.

      The Chinese Government shall be at liberty to establish salt reporting offices at which boats conveying salt which is being moved under salt passes or certificates may be required to stop for purposes of examination and to have their certificates viséd, but at such offices no lekin or transit taxation shall be levied and no barriers or obstructions of any kind shall be erected.

     Section 7.-The Chinese Government may recast the Export Tariff with specific duties as far as practicable on a scale not exceeding five per cent. ad valorem; but existing export duties shall not be raised until at least six months' notice has been given.

     In cases where existing export duties are above five per cent. they shall be reduced to not more than that rate.

     An additional special surtax of one half the export duty payable for the time being, in lieu of internal taxation and lekin, may be levied at time of export on goods exported either to foreign countries or coastwise.

      In the case of silk, whether hand or filature reeled, the total export duty shall not exceed a specific rate equivalent to not more than five per cent. ad valorem. Half of this specific duty may be levied at the first Native Custom House in the interior which the silk may pass and in such case a certificate shall be given as provided for in Section 3, and will be accepted by the Custom-house concerned at place of export in lieu of half the export duty. Cocoons passing Native Custom-houses shall be liable to no taxation whatever.

             Silk not exported but consumed in China is liable to the Con- sumption Tax mentioned in Section 8.

    Section 8.-The abolition of the lekin system in China and the abandonment of all other kinds of internal taxation on foreign imports and on exports will diminish the revenue materially. The surtax on foreign imports and exports and on coastwise exports is intended to compensate in a measure for this loss of revenue, but there

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

83

remains the loss of lekin revenue on internal trade to be met, and it is therefore agreed that the Chinese Government are at liberty to impose a Consumption Tax on articles of Chinese origin not intended for export.

This tax shall be levied only at places of consumption and not on goods while in transit, and the Chinese Government solemnly undertake that the arrangements which they may make for its collection shall in no way interfere with foreign goods or with native goods for export. The fact of goods being of foreign origin shall of itself free them from all taxation, delay, or stoppage, after having passed the Custom-house.

      Foreign goods which bear a similarity to native goods shall be furnished by the Custom-house, if required by the owner, with a protective certificate for each package, on payment of import duty and surtax, to prevent the risk of any dispute in the interior.

      Native goods brought by junks to Open Ports, if intended for local consumption-- irrespective of the nationality of the owner of the goods-shall be reported at the Native Custom-house only, where the consumption tax may be levied.

      China is at liberty to fix the amount of this (consumption) tax, which may vary according to the nature of the merchandise concerned, that is to say, according as the articles are necessaries of life or luxuries; but it shall be levied at a uniform rate on goods of the same description, no matter whether carried by junk, sailing-vessel, or steamer. As mentioned in Section 3, the Consumption Tax is not to be levied within foreign settlements or concessions.

      Section 9.-An excise equivalent to double the import duty as laid down in the Protocol of 1901 is to be charged on all machine-made yarn and cloth manufactured in China, whether by foreigners at the Open Ports or by Chinese anywhere in China.

      A rebate of the import duty and two-thirds of the Import Surtax is to be given on raw cotton imported from foreign countries, and of all duties, including Consump- tion Tax, paid on Chinese raw cotton used in mills in China.

      Chinese machine-made yarn or cloth having paid excise is to be free of Export Duty, Export Surtax, Coast Trade Duty, and Consumption Tax. This Excise is to be collected through the Imperial Maritime Customs.

      The same principle and procedure are to be applied to all other products of foreign type turned out by machinery, whether by foreigners at the Open Ports or by Chinese anywhere in China.

      This stipulation is not to apply to the out-turn of the Hanyang and Ta Yeh Iron Works in Hupeh and other similar existing Government Works at present exempt from taxation; or to that of Arsenals, Government Dockyards, or establishments of that nature for Government purposes which may hereafter be erected.

      Section 10.-A member or members of the Imperial Maritime Customs Foreign Staff shall be selected by each of the Governors-General and Governors, and appointed, in consultation with the Inspector-General of Imperial Maritime Customs, to each pro- vince for duty in connection with Native Customs affairs, Consumption Tax, Salt and Native Opium Taxes. These officers shall exercise an efficient supervision of the work- ing of these departments, and in the event of their reporting any case of abuse, illegal exaction, obstruction to the movement of goods, or other cause of complaint, the Governor-General or Governor concerned will take immediate steps to put an end to

same.

      Section 11.-Cases where illegal action as described in this Article is complained of shall be promptly investigated by an officer of the Chinese Government of sufficiently high rank, in conjunction with a British officer and an officer of the Imperial Maritime Customs, each of sufficient standing; and in the event of its being found by a majority of the investigating officers that the complaint is well founded and loss has been incurred, due compensation is to be at once paid from the Surtax funds, through the Imperial Maritime Customs at the nearest open port. The High Provincial Officials are to be held responsible that the officer guilty of the illegal action shall be severely punished and removed from his post.

If the complaint turns out to be without foundation, complainant shall be held responsible for the expenses of the investigation.

'84

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

      His Britannic Majesty's Minister will have the right to demand investigation where from the evidence before him he is satisfied that illegal exactions or obstructions have occurred.

      Section 12.-The Chinese Government agree to open to foreign trade, on the same footing as the places opened to foreign trade by the Treaties of Nanking and Tientsin, the following places, namely:-

Changsha in Hunan;

Wanhsien in Szechuen; Nganking in Anhui;

Waichow (Hui-chow) in Kuangtung; and Kongmoon (Chiang-mên) in Kuangtung.

Foreigners residing in these Open Ports are to observe the Municipal and Police Regulations on the same footing as Chinese residents, and they are not to be entitled to establish Municipalities and Police of their own within the limits of these Treaty Ports except with the consent of the Chinese authorities.

      If this Article does not come into operation the right to demand under it the opening of these ports, with the exception of Konginoon, which is provided for in Article 10, shall lapse.

      Section 13.-Subject to the provisions of Section 14, the arrangements provided for in this Article are to come into force on 1st January, 1904.

      By that date all lekin barriers shall be removed and officials employed in the collection of taxes and dues prohibited by this Article shall be removed from their posts.

       Section 14.-The condition on which the Chinese Government enter into the present engagement is that all Powers entitled to most favoured nation treatment in China enter into the same engagements as Great Britain with regard to the payment of surtaxes and other obligations imposed by this Article on His Britannic Majesty's Government and subjects.

      The conditions on which His Britannic Majesty's Government enter into the present engagement are:

      (1.) That all Powers who are now or who may hereafter become entitled to most favoured nation treatment in China enter into the same engagements;

      (2.) And that their assent is neither directly nor indirectly made dependent ou the granting by China of any political concession, or of any exclusive commercial concession.

Section 15.-Should the Powers entitled to most favoured nation treatment by China have failed to agree to enter into the engagements undertaken by Great Britain under this Article by the 1st January, 1904, then the provisions of the Article shall only come into force when all the Powers have signified their acceptance of these engagements.

Section 16.-When the abolition of lekin and other forms of internal taxation on goods as provided for in this Article has been decided upon and sanctioned, au Imperial Edict shall be published in due form on yellow paper and circulated, setting forth the abolition of all lekin taxation, lekin barriers and all descriptions of internal taxation on goods, except as provided for in this Article.

     The Edict shall state that the Provincial High Officials are responsible that any official disregarding the letter or spirit of its injunction shall be severely punished and femoved from his post.

     Art. IX. The Chinese Government, recognising that it is advantageous for the country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract Foreign as well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprises, agree within one year from the signing of this Treaty to initiate and conclude the revision of the existing Mining Regulations. China will, with all expedition and earnestness, go into the whole question of Mining Rules and, selecting from the rules of Great Britain, India, and other countries, regulations which seem applicable to the condition of China, she will recast her present Mining Rules in such a way as while promoting the interests of

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

85

Chinese subjects and not injuring in any way the sovereign rights of China, shall offer no impediment to the attraction of foreign capital, or place foreign capitalists at a greater disadvantage than they would be under generally accepted foreign regulations. Any mining concession granted after the publication of these new Rules shall be subject to their provisions.

Art. X.-Whereas in the year 1898 the Inland Waters of China were opened to all such steam vessels, native or foreign, as might be especially registered for that trade at the Treaty Ports, and whereas the Regulations dated 28th July, 1898, and Supple- mentary Rules dated September, 1898, have been found in some respects inconvenient in working, it is now mutually agreed to amend them and to annex such new Rules to this Treaty. These Rules shall remain in force until altered by mutual consent.

It is further agreed that Kongmoon shall be opened as a Treaty Port, and that, in addition to the places named in the special Article of the Burmah Convention of 4th February, 1897, British steamers shall be allowed to land or ship cargo and passengers, under the same regulations as apply to the "Ports of Call on the Yangtze River, at the following "Ports of Call": Pak Tau Hau (Pai-t'u k'ou), Lo Ting Hau (Lo-ting kou), and Do Sing (Tou-ch′êng); and to land or discharge passengers at the following ten passenger landing stages on the West River:-Yung Ki (Jung-chi), Mah Ning (Ma- ning), Kau Kong (Chiu-chiang), Kulow (Ku-lao), Wing On (Yung-an), How Lik (Houli), Luk Pu (Lu-pu), Yuet Sing (Yüeh-ch'eng), Luk To (Lu-tu) and Fung Chuen (Feng-ch'uan).

Art. XI.-His Britannic Majesty's Government agree to the prohibition of the general importation of morphia into China, on condition, however, that the Chinese Government will allow of its importation, on payment of the Tariff import duty and under special permit, by duly qualified British medical practitioners and for the use of hospitals, or by British chemists and druggists who shall only be permitted to sell it in small quantities and on receipt of a requisition signed by a duly qualified foreign medical practitioner.

The special permits above referred to will be granted to an intending importer on his signing a bond before a British Consul guaranteeing the fulfilment of these conditions. Should an importer be found guilty before a British Consul of a breach of his bond, he will not be entitled to take out another permit. Any British subject importing morphia without a permit shall be liable to have such morphia con- fiscated.

This Article will come into operation on all other Treaty Powers agreeing to its conditions, but any morphia actually shipped before that date will not be affected by this prohibition.

The Chinese Government on their side undertake to adopt measures at once to prevent the manufacture of morphia in China.

Art. XII.-China having expressed a strong desire to reform her judicial system and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, Great Britain agrees to give every assistance to such reform, and she will also be prepared to relinquish her extra-territorial rights when she is satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the arrangement for their administration and other considerations warrant her in so doing.

      Art. XIII.-The missionary question in China being, in the opinion of the Chinese Government, one requiring careful consideration, so that, if possible, troubles such as have occured in the past may be averted in the future, Great Britain agrees to join in a Commission to investigate this question, and, if possible, to devise means for securing permanent peace between converts and non-converts, should such a Commission be formed by China and the Treaty Powers interested.

66

cash,'

"T

      Art. XIV.-Whereas under Rule V. appended to the Treaty of Tientsin of 1858. British merchants are permitted to export rice and all other grain from one port of China to another under the same conditions in respect of security as copper

agreed that in cases of expected scarcity or famine from whatsoever cause in any district, the Chinese Government shall, on giving twenty-one days' notice, be at liberty to prohibit the shipment of rice and other grain from such district.

it is now

86

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

Should any vessel specially chartered to load rice or grain previously contracted for have arrived at ber loading port prior to or on the day when a notice of prohibition to export comes into force, she shall be allowed an extra week in which to ship her cargo.

If during the existence of this prohibition, any shipment of rice or grain is allowed by the authorities, the prohibition shall, ipso facto, be considered cancelled and shall not be re-imposed until six weeks' notice has been given.

      When a prohibition is notified, it will be stated whether the Government have any Tribute or Army Rice which they intend to ship during the time of prohibition, and if so, the quantity shall be named.

     Such rice shall not be included in the prohibition, and the Customs shall keep a record of any Tribute or Army Rice so shipped or landed.

The Chinese Government undertake that no rice, other than Tribute or Army Rice belonging to the Government, shall be shipped during the period of prohibition. Notifications of prohibitions, and of the quantities of Army or Tribute Rice for shipment shall be made by the Governors of the Province concerned.

Similarly, notificatious of the removals of prohibitions shall be inade by the same authorities.

The export of rice and other grain to foreign countries remains prohibited.

     Art. XV.-It is agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties to this Treaty may demand a revision of the Tariff at the end of 10 years; but if no demand be ma·le on either side within 6 months after the end of the first 10 years, then the Tariff shall remain in force for 10 years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding 10 years, and so it shall be at the end of each successive 10 years.

Any Tariff concession which China may hereafter accord to articles of the produce or manufacture of any other State shall immediately be extended to similar articles of the produce or manufacture of His Britannic Majesty's Dominions by whomsoever imported.

      Treaties already existing between the United Kingdom and China shall continue in force in so far as they are not abrogated or modified by stipulations of the present Treaty.

      Art. XVI.-The English and Chinese Texts of the present Treaty have been care- fully compared, but in the event of there being any difference of meaning between them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the correct sense.

The ratifications of this Treaty, under the hand of His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland and of His Majesty the Emperor of China respectively shall be exchanged at Peking within a year from this day of signature.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this Treaty, two copies in English and two in Chinese.

     Done at Shanghai this fifth day of September in the year of Our Lord, 1902, corresponding with the Chinese date, the fourth day of the eighth moon of the twenty- eighth year of Kwang Hsu.

(L.8.)

JAS. L. MACKAY.

ANNEX A.-(1)

(TRANSLATION.)

Lu, President of the Board of Works;

SHENG, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of Works;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the Commercial Treaties, to

Sir JAMES MACKAY, His Britannic Majesty's Special Commissioner for the dis- cussion of Treaty matters.

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

87

Shanghai: K. H. XXVIII., 7th moon, 11th day.

(Received August 15, 1902)

      We have the honour to inform you that we have received the following telegram from His Excellency Liu, Governor General of the Liang Chiang, on the subject of Clause II. mutually agreed upon by us:

"f

"

As regards this clause, it is necessary to insert therein a clear stipulation, to the "effect that, no matter what changes may take place in the future, all Customs' duties must continue to be calculated on the basis of the existing higher rate of the Haikwan "Tael over the Treasury Tael, and that 'the touch' and weight of the former must be "made good."

      As we have already arranged with you that a declaration of this kind should be embodied in an Official Note, and form an annex to the present Treaty, for purposes of record, we hereby do ourselves the honour to make this communication.

ANNEX A-(2.)

Shanghai, August 18th, 1902.

GENTLEMEN,

       I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 14th instant forwarding copy of a telegram from His Excellency Liu, Governor-General of the Liang Chiang, on the subject of Article II. of the new Treaty, and in reply I have the honour to state that His Excellency's understanding of the Article is perfectly correct.

      I presume the Chinese Government will make arrangements for the coinage of a national silver coin of such weight and touch as may be decided upon by them. These coins will be made available to the public in return for a quantity of silver bullion of equivalent weight and fineness plus the usual mintage charge.

The coins which will become the national coinage of China will be declared by the Chinese Government to be legal tender in payment of Customs duty and in discharge of obligations contracted in Haikwan taels, but only at their proportionate value to the Haikwan tael, whatever that may be.

Their Excellencies

I have the honour to be,

Gentlemen,

Your obedient Servant,

(Signed)

LU HAI-HUAN and SHENG HSUAN-HUAI,

JAS. L. MACKAY.

etc.,

etc.,

etc.

ANNEX B-(1.)

(TRANSLATION.)

Lu, President of the Board of Works;

      SHENG, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of Works;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the Commercial Treaties, to

SIR JAMES L. MACKAY, His Britannic Majesty's Special Commissioner.

Shanghai, September 2nd, 1902. We have the honour to inform you that on the 22nd of August, we, in conjunction with the Governors-General of the Liang Chinng and the Hu-kuang Provinces, Their Excellencies Liu and Chang, addressed the following telegraphic Memorial to the

Throne:

64

Of the revenue of the different Provinces derived from lekin of all kinds, a "portion is appropriated for the service of the foreign loans, a portion for the Peking Government, and the balance is reserved for the local expenditure of the Provinces

"C concerned.

88

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

"In the negotiations now being conducted with Great Britain for the amendment "of the Commercial Treaties, a mutual arrangement has been come to providing for "the imposition of additional taxes, in compensation for the abolition of all kinds of "lekin and other imposts on goods, prohibited by Article VIII. After payment of "interest and sinking fund on the existing foreign loan, to the extent to which lekin "is thereto pledged, these additional taxes shall be allocated to the various Provinces "to make up deficiencies and replace revenue, in order that no hardships may be "entailed on them. With a view to preserving the original intention underlying the proposal to increase the duties in compensation for the loss of revenue derived from "lekin and other imposts on goods, it is further stipulated that the surtaxes shall not "be appropriated for other purposes, shall not form part of the Imperial Maritime "Customs revenue proper, and shall in no case be pledged as security for any new

foreign loan.

£6

CC

CC

"It is therefore necessary to memorialize for the issue of an Edict, giving effect "to the above stipulations and directing the Board of Revenue to find out what proportion of the provincial revenues derived from lekin of all kinds, now about to be abolished, each Province has hitherto had to remit, and what proportion it "has been entitled to retain, so that, when the Article comes into operation, due "apportionment may be made accordingly, thus providing the Provinces with funds "available for local expenditure and displaying equitable and just treatment towards "all,"

On the 1st instant an Imperial Decree "Let action, as requested, be taken," was issued, and we now do ourselves the honour reverently to transcribe the same for your information.

ANNEX B-(2).

Shanghai, September 5th, 1902.

GENTLEMEN,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 2nd instant forwarding the text of the Memorial and Decree dealing with the disposal of the

surtaxes.

I understand that the surtaxes in addition to not being pledged for any new foreign loan are not to be pledged to, or held to be security for, liabilities already contracted by China except in so far as lekin revenue has already been pledged to an existing loan.

I also understand from the Memorial that the whole of the surtaxes provided by Article VIII. of the New Treaty goes to the Provinces in proportions to be agreed upon between them and the Board of Revenue, but that out of these surtaxes each Province is obliged to remit to Peking the same contribution as that which it has hitherto remitted out of its lekin collections, and that the Provinces also provide as hitherto out of these surtaxes whatever funds may be necessary for the service of the foreign loan to which lekin is partly pledged.

      I hope Your Excellencies will send me a reply to this despatch and that you will agree to this correspondence forming part of the Treaty as an Annex.

I have the honour to be,

Gentlemen,

Their Excellencies,

Your obedient servant,

(Signed)

JAS. L. MACKAY.

LU HAI-HUAN and SHENG HSUAN-HUAI,

etc.,

etc.,

etc.

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

ANNEX B-(3.)

(TRANSLATION.)

89

Lu, President of the Board of Works;

SHENG, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of Works;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions, connected with the Commercial Treaties, to

SIR JAMES L. MACKAY, His Britannic Majesty's Special Commissioner.

Shanghai, September 5th, 1902.

We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of to-day's date with regard to the allocation of the surtax funds allotted to the Provinces, and to inform you that the views therein expressed are the same as our own.

We would, however, wish to point out that, were the whole amount of the alloca- tion due paid over to the Provinces, unnecessary expense would be incurred in the retransmission by them of such portions thereof as would have to be remitted to Peking in place of the contributions hitherto payable out of lekin revenue. The amount, therefore, of the allocation due to the Provinces, arranged between them and the Board of Reven .e, will be retaine 1 in the hands of the Maritime Customs, who wil await the instructions of the Provinces in regard to the remittance of such portion thereof as may be necessary to fulfil their obligations, and (on receipt of these instructions) will send forward the amount direct. The balance will be held to the order of the Provinces.

In so far as lekin is pledged to the service of the 1898 loan, a similar method of procedure will be adopted.

      As you request that this correspondence be annexed to the Treaty, we have the honour to state that we see no objection to this being done.

ANNEX C.

INLAND WATERS STEAM NAVIGATION

ADDITIONAL RULES.

1.-British steamship owners are at liberty to lease warehouses and jetties on the banks of waterways from Chinese subjects for a term not exceeding 25 years, with option of renewal on terms to be mutually arranged. In cases where British mer-

chants are unable to secure warehouses and jetties from Chinese subjects on satis- factory terms, the local officials, after consultation with the Minister of Commerce, shall arrange to provide these on renewable lease as above mentioned at current equitable r tes

      2.-Jetties shall only be erected in such positions that they will not obstruct the inland water way or interfere with navigation, and with the sanction of the nearest Commissioner of Customs; such sanction, however, shall not be arbitrarily withheld,

      3.-British merchants shall pay taxes and contributions on these warehouses and jett'es on the same footing as Chinese proprietors of similar properties in the neigh- bourhood. British me chants may only employ Chinese agents and staff to reside in warehouses so leased at pla es touched at by steamers engaged in inland traffic to carry on their business; but Brit sh merchants may visit these places from time to time to look after their aff irs. The existing rights of Chinese jurisdiction over Chinese subjects shall not by reason of this clause be diminished or interfered with in any way.

4.-Steam vessels navigating the inland waterways of China shall be responsible for loss caused to riparian proprietors by damage which they may do to the banks or works on them and for the loss which may be caused by such damage. event of China desiring to prohibit the use of some particular shallow waterway by

In the

2

90

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

launches, because there is reason to fear that the use of it by them would be likely to injure the banks and cause damage to the adjoining country, the British authorities, when appealed to, shall, if satisfied of the validity of the objection, prohibit the use of that waterway by British launches, provided that Chinese launches are also prohibited from using it.

      Both Foreign and Chinese launches are prohibited from crossing dams and weirs at present in existence on inland waterways where they are likely to cause injury to such works, which would be detrimental to the water service of the local people.

      5.--The main object of the British Government in desiring to see the inland waterways of China opened to steam navigation being to afford facilities for the rapid transport of both foreign and native merchandise, they undertake to offer no impedi- ment to the transfer to a Chinese company and the Chinese flag of any British Steamer which may now or hereafter be employed on the inland waters of China should the owner be willing to make the transfer.

      In event of a Chinese company registered under Chinese law being formed to run steamers on the inland waters of China the fact of British subjects holding shares in such a company shall not entitle the steamers to fly the British flag.

6. Registered steamers and their tows are forbidden, just as junks have always been forbidden, to carry contraband goods. Infraction of this rule will entail the penalties prescribed in the Treaties for such an offence, and cancellation of the Inland Waters Navigation Certificate carried by the vessels, which will be prohibited from thereafter plying on inland water.

       7.-As it is desirable that the people living inland should be disturbed as little as possible by the advent of steam vessels to which they are not accustomed, inland waters not hitherto frequented by steamers shall be opened as gradually as may be convenient to merchants and only as the owners of steamers may see prospects of remunerative trade.

       In cases where it is intended to run steam vessels on waterways on which such vessels have not hitherto run, intimation shall be made to the Commissioner of Customs at the nearest open port who shall report the matter to the Ministers of Commerce. The latter in conjunction with the Governor-General or Governor of the Province, after careful consideration of all the circumstances of the case, shall at once give their approval.

8. A registered steamer may ply within the waters of a port, or from one open port or ports to another open port or ports, or from one open port or ports of places inland, and thence back to such port or ports. She may, on making due report to the Customs, land or ship passengers or cargo at any recognised places of trade passed in the course of the voyage; but may not ply between inland places exclusively except with the consent of the Chinese Government.

     9. Any cargo and passenger boats may be towed by steamers. The helmsman and crew of any boat towed shall be Chinese. All boats, irrespective of ownership, must be registered before they can proceed inland.

10. These Rules are supplementary to the Inland Steam Navigation Regulations of July and September, 1898. The latter, where untouched by the present Rules, remain in full force and effect: but the present Rules hold in the case of such of the former Regulations as the present Rules affect. The present Rules, and the Regulations of July and September, 1898, to which they are supplementary, are provisional and may be modified, as circumstances require, by mutual consent.

Done at Shanghai this fifth day of September, in the year of Our Lord, 1902, corresponding with the Chinese date, the fourth day of the eighth moon of the twenty-eighth year of Kwang Hsü.

(L.S.)

JAS. L. MACKAY.

CUSTOMS TARIFF OF CHINA

The following is the Chinese Tariff of Import Duties as agreed upon in 1902 between the British Special Commissioner for commercial negotiations in China and the Chinese Commissioners. The Tariff is now in operation, but negotiations are still proceeding with the representatives of other Powers, and until these negotiations are completed the Tariff cannot be corrected with authority.

Note.-If any of the articles enumerated in this Tariff are imported in dimensions exceeding those specified, the Duty is to be calculated in proportion to the measurements as defined.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Agar-agar..

Agaric. See Fungus.

Amber

Aniseed, Star, 1st Quality] (value Tls. 15 and over

per picul).

Aniseed, Star, 2nd Quality

(value under Tls. 15

per picul).

Apricot Seed

Arrowroot and Arrʊwroot

Flour

Asafoetida

Asbestos Boiler Compo-

sition

Asbestos Fibre

Value

5 p. cent.

Picul

1 0 0 0

TARIFF UNIT and DUTY,

Per

¡T. m. c.c.

Picul

0 3 0 0

Catty

0 3 2 5

Picul

1 0 0 0

"

0440 0900

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Basins, Tin (Common).... Basins. Iron, Enamelled: Up to 9 ins. in diame- ter, Decorated or Un- decorated

Over 9 ins, in diameter, Agate, Blue & White, Grey or Mottled, Un- decorated

Over 9 ins. in diameter, Decorated (with Gold) Over 9 ins. diameter,

decorated Gold)

Per [T. m. c. c Gross 0250

Dozen

0 0 5 0

0 0 90

0 17 5

""

(without

200

21

Beads, Coral

Catty

0 7 5 5

000

"

Beads, Cornelian

Picul

7000

Asbestos Millboard

500

"

Beads, Glass, of all kinds.

Value

Asbestos Packing, includ-

      ing Sheets and Blocks. Asbestos Packing, Metal-

lic

     Asbestos Yarn... Awabi

5 p. cent.

Beer. See Wines, etc.

3500

Beeswax, Yellow

Picul

1 6 0 0

Belting

Value

5 p. cent.

5 0 0 0

"

Betel-nut Husk, Dried

Picul

0 077

2 2 5 0

Betel-nut Husk, Fresh

"

1 5 0

Bacon and Ham..

Bags, Grass...

Bags, Gunny

Bags, Gunny Old Bags, Hemp

Bags, Hemp Old...

Bags, Straw.....

22

Value 5 p. cent. Thousand 1:50 4 2 5 0

Value 5 p. cent. Thousand

425 0 E p. cent.

Value Thousan i 1 2 5 0

Betel-nut Leaves, Dried...

Betel-nuts, Fresh Bezoar, Cow, Indian

Biche de Mer, Black........... Biche de Mer, White.... Bicycle Materials

Value Picul

"

Value

5 p. cent.

1 6 0 0 0700 5 p. cent.

23

Betel-nuts, Dried

0018

0 45 02 25

"

0 0 1 8

"

Bicycles

Each

Baking Powder :-

4 oz. bottles or tins...

Birds' Nests. 1st Quality. Birds' Nests, 2nd Quality

Catty

3000 1 4 0 0

0450

Dozen

0 0 8 3

Birds' Nests, 3rd Quality.

0 1 5 0

6

01 10

>>

Blue, Paris

Picul

1 5 0 0

"

"

8

0 145

Blue, Prussian

1500

"

12

1 lb.

0 2 2 3

Bones, Tiger

J

"

0 3 0 0

Books, Chinese

2500

Free.

""

3

081 0

J

"

"

5

1 3 5 3

"

""

Barley, Pearl

Bark, Mangrove.

Bark, Plum-tree .........................

Bark, Yellow (for dyeing)

Bark, Yellow (Medicinal)

ور

Picul

0070

Books (Printed) Charts,

Maps, Newspapers and Periodicals

01 20

Borax, Crude

Value

5 cent.

Picul

p. 0800

0300

Borax, Refined

Braid, Llamas..

Bricks, Fire......

Value

Free. 0610

1 4 6 0

5000 15 p. cent.

Picul

"}

2*

92

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT and Duty.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY

Per

Bronze Powder

Butter, in tins, jars, and

        other Package、 Buttons. Agate and Por-

celain

Buttons Brass, and other

       kinds (not Jewellery).. Byrrh See Wines, etc.

Ficul

\T. m. c. c. 2200

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Canned Meats.-

2000

Bacon or ham, Sliced:

lb. tins

Dozen

0 0 7 7

事情

1

U 14 4

""

وو

12 Gross

0 0 1 0

Dried Beef, Sliced......

Dozen 10 144

lb. jars

Gross

0 0 20

Mincemeat:

1 lbs. pails..

Dozen

0 1 0 0

Camphor

Camphor Baroos,

Picul

lean.]

Carty

Camphor Baroos, Refuse

Value

650 2045 p. cent.

3

0 1 8 1

"

Kits, barrels and

barrels

Picul

0 7 29

Case of 25)

Pork and Beans I lain

Candles, 9 oz.

packages

0 0 7 5

or with Tomato

6 Candles

Sauce:-

Dozen

Candles, 12 oz.................

0 1 0 0

1 lb. tins

"

0 1 3 3

2

وو

004 0 0 0 7 5 0 0 8 5

Candles, 16

Other weights, duty in

proportion.)

Candles, of all kinds dif-

ferently packed

Canes, Bamboo

Picul Thousand

075 0 4 0 0

Canes, oir 1 ft. long.

Picul

0 200

Canes, Coir 5 long

Thousand

0 3 0 0

""

Canned Fruits. Vegeta-

bles, etc (all weights

and measures approxi-

"

Potted

and

Devilled

Meat:- lb. tins

"

39

Potted and Devilled

Poultry and Meat combined :-

:-

1 lb. tins

*

Soups and Bouilli:

2 lbs. tins

وو

Tamales Chicken :-

1 lb. tins

Tongues of every des-

1

cription:- lb. tins

mate):

Apples

Apricots

Table Fruits.

Dozen 21 lb.

0 0 6 5

G

"

Grapes

cans

Peaches

Pie

l'ears

Fruits.

"

0 0 5 7

1

Plums

Preserved Fruits in glass

bottles, jars, cardboard or wooden boxes, in-

"

"

     cluding weight of im- mediate package.....

1}

در

""

Picul

0 6 5 0

2

"

29

Dozen

2

Asparagus

21 lb. tins

0 1 1 8

Corn

39

0054

Peas

      String Beans Tomatoes....

"

6 0

22

5 4

0 0 54

Picul

0 5 2 5

* A

0022 0042

0042

U 072

0101 0244

0 0 5 1

""

0 0 8 0

0098

0204

""

0287

""

0 3 3 3

"

0445

31

""

19

19

All other Canned Meats,

including Game of every description, with or without Vegetables:

lb. tins

0 5 1 5

0 54 5

"

52

وو

35

23

and

6

11

39

14

""

0 0 5 2 0063

"

0120

0210

21

0 37 0

""

0 8 1 0

"

"

Dozen

0 0 8 7

Canvas and Cotton Duck,

not exceeding 36 inches wide

Yard

JJ

0 0 6 0

Capoor Cutchery

Value

0 0 1 0 5 p. cent.

"

01 18

Cardamoms,

Superior,

Case of 4

and Amomums

Picul

10 000

dozen 1 lb. tins

0 25 0

Cardamoms, Inferior, or

Grains of Paradise...

1 0 0 0

Cardamoms, Husk.................

Cards, Playing

Case

0 2 3 0

Cassia Lignea.

0 260

Cassia Twigs

0260

Cassia Buis

Value Picul

5 p. cent.

0750

0920

"

0170

39

All other Vegetables pre- served in tins, bottle, or jars, including weight of immediate package

Tomato Sauce

Catsup- pint bottles

""

Jams and Jellies:

1 lb. tins, bottles, or jars

2

""

33

Milk (including Con-

densed)

Cream, Evaporated:-

4 dozen pints family

size)

2 dozen quarts (hotel

size)

Cement.....

CUSTOMS TARIFF

93

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per \T. m. c. c. Cask of 3

0 1 5 0 piculs.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY...

Per

¡T. m. c. c.

Coral Beads....... Coral, Broken and Refuse Cornelian Beads....... Cornelian Stones, Rough Corundum Sand.........

Catty

07

0 5 5 0

""

Picul

7 0 0 0

Hundred

0 3 0 0

Picul

0 19 5

Grey

Shirtings

or

Cereals and Flour

Including Barley.Maize, Millet, Oats, Paddy, Rice, Wheat, and Flour made there-

from;

also Buck- wheat and Buck- wheat Flour, Corn- flour and Yellow Corn Meal, Rye Flour, and Hovis Flour

But not including Ar- rowroot and Arrow- root Flour, Cracked] Wheat, Germet, Ho- miny, Pearl Barley, Potato Flour, Quaker Oats, Rolled Oats, Sago and Sago

Flour, Shredded Wheat, Tapioca and

Free

0800 0030 5 p. cent. 0 180

Tapioca Flour, and

Yam Flour

Free

Chairs, Vienna Bent-wood

Dozen

Charcoal

Picul

Cheese

Value

Chestnuts

Picul

China-root, Whole, Sliced,

or in Cubes

ficul

Chinaware,

Coarse and

Fine

Value

5 p. cent.

Chloride of Lime

Picul Pound

0 3 0 0

0 0 1 2

Chocolate, Sweetened Cigarettes, 1st Quality (value exceeding Tls. 4.50 per 1,000).............. Cigarettes, 2nd Quality (value not exceeding Tls. 4.50 per 1,000)

Cigars

0650

Thousand 0 5 0 0

0 0 9 0

"

0 5 0 0

"

Cinnabar

Picul

3 7 5 0

Cinnamon

4000

Clams, Dried

0550

Clocks of all kinds.

Value

15 p.

cent.

Cloves

Picul

06 30

Cloves, Mother

Coal, Asiatic

Ton

025 0

Coal, other kinds

0 6 0 0

Coal, Asiatic, Briquetts

Cochineal

"

Value Picul

"

"

Cocklo, Dried..

Cockles, Fresh

Coroa

Coffee

Coir Canes, 1 ft. long

Thousand

Ton

Coir Canes, 5 ft. long

Coke, Asiatic

Coke, other kinds

Coral

Compoy

93

Picul

Catty

0 3 6 0

0 5 0 0 5 p. cent.

0 5 0

500

3 6 0 0 1 0 0 0

0200

0 3 0 0 0500 0 9 0 0

2000

1 1 1 2

Cotton Piece Goods:-

Sheetings: not ex- ceeding 40 ins. wide and not exceeding 40 yds. long:

a.Weight 7b.and under b. Over 7 lb. and not

over 9 lb........

c. Over 9lb. and not

over 11 lb........

d. Over 11 lb.

Imitation Native Cot- (tonClothhandmade)

+

Grey or Bleached :

a. Not exceeding 20 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 20 yds. long weight 3 pounds and under

b. Exceeding 20 ins.

wide

White Shirtings, White Irishes, White heet- ings, White Brocades, and White Striped or potted hirtings:] not exceeding 37 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 42 yds. long Drills, Grey or White not exceeding 31 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 40yds.long :

a. Weight 123 lb. and

under.

b. Weight over 123 lb. Jeans, Grey or White: a. Not exceeding 31 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 30 yds. long b. Not exceeding 31 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 40 yds. long T-Cloths, Grey or

White:

a. Not exceeding 34 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 24 yds. long b. Not exceeding 3 ins. wide and exceeding 24 yds. but not ex- ceeding 40 yds, long.. c. Exceeding 3-4 ins. but not exceeding 37 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 24 yds. long.

Piece

0 0 5 0

0 0 8 0

0 1 1 0

0 1 2 0

0 0 2 7

Value

5 p. cent.

Piece

0 1 3 5

Piece

0 1 0 0

0 1 2 5

11

0 9 0 0

25

0 120

"

0 0 7 0

"

0 1 3 5

0080

94

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Per

T.m.c.c.

Crimp Cloth and Crape,

Plain

a. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 6 yds. long

b. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide, exceeding 6 yds. but not exceeding 10 yds. long

c. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide but exceeding 10 yds. long

White Muslins, White Lawns, and White Cambrics: not exceed- ing 46 ins. wide and not exceeding 12 yds. long.

Mosquito Netting, White or Coloured: not exceeding 90 ins. wide

Lenos and Balzarines'

White, Dyed or Print ed: not exceeding 31 ins. wide and not ex- ceeding 30 yds. long

Leno Brocades and Bal-

zarine Brocades, Dyed I rints:

a. Printed

Cambrics,

Lawns or Muslins : not exceeding 46 ins. wide and not exceed-

ing 12 yds. long

b. Printed Chintzes, Printed Crapes, Print-

ed Drills,

Printed

Furnitures, Printed

Shirtings,

Printed

T-Cloth including those goods known as Blue and White Painted T-Cloths, Printed Twills; but not including goods (ment ioned in e .(h:)] 1. Not exceeding 20 ins.

wide

2. Exceeding 20 ins. but not exceeding 31 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 30 yds. long

c. Printed Crimp Cloth: 1. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 6 yds. long

2. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide,exceeding 6 yds. but not exceeding 10 yds. long

3. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide but exceeding Iu yds. long

Piece

0027

0 0 3 5

00031

"

Piece

0 0 3 2

Yard

0 0 1 0

Piece

0 0 6 0

Value

5 p. cent.

Piece

0 0 3 7

Value

5 p. cent.

Piece

0 0 8 0

0 0 27

0 0 3 5

Yard

0003}

d. Printed Lenos and Balzarines: not ex- ceeding 31 ins. wide and not exceeding 30 yds. long

e. Printed Sheetings: not exceeding 36 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 43 yds. long f. Printed Turkey Reds,] of all kinds: not ex- ceeding 31 ins, wide and not exceeding 25 yds. long g. Printed Sateens, Printed Satinets, Printed Reps, Printed Cotton Lastings, in- cluding all Cotton Piece Goods which are both Dyed and Printed, except those specified in (ƒ) and (h,) and including any special finish, such as Mercerised Finish, Schreiner Fi- nish, Gassed Finish, silk Finish or Electric Finish, not exceeding 32 ins. wide or 32 yds. long........ Coloured Woven Cot- tons, i.e., dyed in the Yarn except Crimp Cloth....

Silk Finish, or Elec- tric Finish: not exceeding 32 ins. wide and not exceeding 32| yds. long

or

h. Duplex Prints

Reversible Cretonnes (not including those goods known as Blue and White Printed (T-cloths) Dyed Cottons:

a. Dyed Plain Cottons. i.e., without woven or embossed figures in- cluding Plain Ita- lians, Lastings, Reps, and Ribs, and all other Dyed Plain Cottons not other- wise enumerated, and including any special finish, such as Mercerised Finish, Schreiner Finish, Gassed Finish, Silk Electric Finish, or Finish): not exceedg. 36 ins. wile aud not exceedg. 33 yds. long|

Piece

0 0 0 9

0 18 0

0 1 0 0

>>

0 25 0

Value

5 p. cent.

Piece

0 250

Value

ō p. cent.

Piece

0240

CUSTOMS TARIFF

:95

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Per

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY,

T. m. c. c.

b. Dyed Figured Cot- tons, i.e., with woven or embossed figures (including Figured Italians and Last- ings, Figured Reps, and Figured Ribs, and all other Dyed Figure Cotton not otherwise enumerat-[ ed, and including any special finish, such as Mercerised Finish, Schreiner Finish, Gassed Finish, Silk Finish, or Electric Finish) not exceed- ing 36 ins. wide and not exceeding 33 yds. long

<. Dyed Crimp Cloth: 1. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide and not exceeding 6 yds.| long

2. Not exceeding 30

ins. wide, exceed-| ing 6 yds. but not exceeding 10 yds. long

3. Not exceeding 30| ins. wide but ex- ceeding 10 yds.long|

d. Dyed Drills: not

exceeding 31

ing 43 yds. long

Piece

0 1 5 0

"

0 0 27

0 0 3 5

Yard

00031

ins.

wide and not exceed-

0170

Piece

e.

Dyed Lenos and Bal-

zarines: not excced-

ing 31 ins. wide and not exceeding 30 yds. long

f. Dyed Leno Brocades. g. Dyed Muslins, Lawns, and Cambrics not exceeding 46ins. wide and not exceeding 12 yds. long

h. Dyed Shirtings and Sheetings: not ex- ceeding 36 ins. wide and not exceeding 43 yds. long Hongkong-dyed Shirtings: not ex- ceeding 36 ins. wide and not exceeding 20| yds. long

j. Dyod Cotton Cuts: not exceeding 36 ins. wide and not exceed-

ing 5 yds. long

N. B. The pro rata rule does not apply.)|

k. Dyed T-Cloths in-

cluding

Dyed Al-

pacianos), Dyed Real and Imitation Turkey Reds of all kinds; not exceeding 32 ins. wide and not exceeding 25 yds. long:

1. Weight 34 lb. and

under

2. Weight over 31lb. Flannelettes and Cotton

Spanish Stripes: a. Cotton Flannel, Can- ton Flannel, Swans- downs, Flannelettes, and Raised Cotton Cloths of all kinds, Plain, Dyed, and Printed:

1. Not exceeding 36 ins. wide and not exceeding 15 yds. long.

2. Not exceeding 36 ins. wide, exceed- ing 15 yds. but not exceeding 30 yds,

long

b. Dyed Cotton Spanish

Stripes:

1. Not exceeding 32 ins. wide and not exceeding 20 yds. long..

2. Exceeding 32 ins. but not exceeding

64 ins. wide and

not exceeding 20| yds. long.

Cordage, of all kinds

0 0 90

p. cent..

Crimp Cloth:

Value

Piece

0 0 3 7

0150

0 1 0 0

Pieco

0 0 2 2}

a. Not exceeding 30 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 6 yds. long.

b. Not exceeding 30 ins.

wide and exceeding yds., but not exceed- ing 10 yds. long c. Not exceeding 30 ins.

wide but exceeding 10| yds, long

Velvets and Velveteens, Velvet Cords, and Fus- tians:

a. Velvets and Velve-

teens: Clain:

1. Not exceeding 18

ins. wide...

2. Exceeding 18 ins. but not exceeding 22 ins. wide

3. Exceeding 22 ins. but not exceeding 26 ins. wide

Piece

0 0 6 0

0 1 0 0

"

"

0 0 6 5

"

0 1 3 0

0 0 8 5

""

Value

0 170 5p cent.

Piece

0 0 2 7

0 0 3 0

39

Yard

0003 1

0 0 0 6

0 0 0 7

"

10 0 0 8

96

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TRAIFF UNIT and Duty,

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Per

T. m. c. c.

Dyes,

Colours,

and!

Paints:-

Aniline

Value

5 p.cent.

Yard

0 0 1 5

Blue, Paris

Blue, Prussian... Bronze Powder Carthamin Chrome, Yellow

"2

Value

"

2200 5 p. cent.

Picul

1 500

1 500

"J

b. Velvets and Velve- teens, Printed or Em- bossed, not exceeding 30 ins. wide

c. Dyed Velvet Cords, Dyed Velveteen

      Cords, Dyed Cordu- roys, Dyed Fustians of any description: not exceeding 30 ins. wide Blankets, Cotton, Plain,

Printed or Jacquard Handkerchiefs, Cotton:

a. Plain, Dyed, or Print- ed, not Embroidered, Hemstitched, or Ini- tialled: not exceeding 1 yd, square.

b. All other Handker-

chiefs

Cinnabar

Gambodge

0015

Green, Emerald

""

Piece 0030

Dozen

Value

0 0 20

5 p. cent.

Singlets or Drawers, Cot-

ton.....

Dozen

0 1 2 5

Socks, Cotton, including

Lisle Thread:

1st Quality, i.e. valued

Green, Schweinfurt, or

Imitation....

Indigo, Dried, Artificial

or Natural

Indigo, Liquid, Artifi-

cial

Indigo, Liquid, Natural Indigo, Paste, Artificial Lead, Red, Dry or mixed

with Oil

Lead White, Dry or

mixed with Oil.... Lead Yellow, Dry or

mixed with Oil.

Logwood Extract

at Tls. or over per dozen pairs

Ochre

Pairs

0 0 7 5

Smalt

2nd Quality, i.e. valued] at less than Tls. 1 per dozen pairs

Ultramarine

Dozen

0 4 3 2

J

Picul

3 7 5 0 2700

"

"J

1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0

Value

5 p. cent.

Picul

""

2025 0 2 1 5. 2025

D

"

0 450

0 15 0

045 0 0600

066 0 0

1 0 0

0500

4 0 0 0

"

""

Value

5 p. cont.

"

..

**

J9

Vermilion......

Vermilion Imitation White Zinc

Paints, Unclassed Elephants's Teeth (other than Tusks) and Jaws, Whole or Parts

Elephants Tusks, Whole

Picul

3 0 0 0

or arts

Catty

0 17 0

Emery loth and Sand-

0 0 20

paper (sheets not ex- ceeding 144 square ins.)

Ream Value

0 250 5 p. cent.

Towels, Cotton:

a. Honeycomb orHucka- back, Plan or Printed dimensions exclusive of fringe :

1. Not exceeding 18 ins. wide and not exceeding 40 ins. long

2 Exceeding 19 ins. wide and not ex- ceeding 50ins. long. b. All other Towels... Cottons, Unclassed

Cotton, Raw

Cotton, Thread :

Ball Thread, Dyed or

"

Value

0 0 3 0 5 p. cont.

"

Picul

0 6 0 0

Undyed

On Spools, 50 yds.

On

JJ

100 yds.

On

200 yds.

Bleached

Cotton Ya-n, Dyed...

Cotton Yarn, Gassed

Cotton Yarn, Grey or

Cotton Yarn, Mercerised Cotton Yarn, Wooloa or

Berlinette

Cow Bezoar, Indian

Crabs, Fresh

Crocodile (including Ar-

madillo) Scales

Currants

Cutch

Cuttle-fish

"

Gross

3 0 0 0 0040 0 0 8 0 0160

Picul Value

0 9 5 0 5p. cent.

"

>>

"

Picul

3500

Value 15 p. cent.

Picul 0 6 0 0

"

2725 0300 0300

6 67

"

Fmery Powder Enamelled Ironware :-

Mugs, ups Basins, and Bowls, 9 ins. or under in diamete, Decorated or Un- decorated. Basins and Bowls, over 9 ins. in diameter, Agate, Blue and White, Grey Mottled

-Undecorated Basins and Bowls, over 9 ins. in diameter, De- corated (with Gold).... Basins and owls,over 9 ins. diameter, Decor- ated without Gold) Enamelware, Unclassed... Fans, Palm-leaf, oa se... Fans, Palm-leaf, Fine Fans, Palm-leaf, Fancy... Fans, Paper or Cotton of

all kinds

Dozen

0 0 5 0

0 0 9 0.

""

"

Value Thousand

22

"

0175

0125

p. cent. 0 2 8

0450 1000

1400

"

CUSTOMS TARIFF

97

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Fans, Silk...

Per Value

T, m. c. c. 5 p. cent.

Feathers, Kingfisher, Part

   Skins (ie., Wings, Tails) or Parks)

Hundred 0 2 50

Feathers,

Kingfisher,

Whole Skins

0 6 0 0

Glass, Window, Common, not Stained, Coloured, or otherwise Obscured.

Glue

Gold Thread, Imitation.

See Thread,

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per Box of 100 q.

T. m. c. c.

feet.

}

0 17 0

Picul

0 8 3 0

33

Feathers, Peacock

Value

15

P. cent.

Ground nuts

Gum Arabic

Files. See Tools.

Fireclay

Firewood

Picul

050 0 0 1 0 06 67

Gum Benjamin

Gum Benjamin, Oil of...

Gum Dragon's Blood...

Gum Myrrh..

Gum Olibanum

0 150

1 0 0 0

""

0 6 0 0

32

Value

5 p. cent.

Picul

4000

0 4 6.5

0 5 0

"

0 187

19

Fish, Cuttle

Fish, Dried or Smoxed,

in bulk (including Stock-fish but not in-

cluding Cuttle-fish)

Fish, Fresh

Fish Maws

Fish, Salt...

Fish, Stuck

Flints

0 3 1 5

Gum Resin

Gutta-percha. See India-

rubber

0 1 3 7

Hair, Horse

1400

"

4 2 5 0

"

Hair, Horse, Tails

2 5 0 0

""

Hams

Value

5 p. cent.

0 3 1 5

Handkerchiefs. Sce Cot-

>>

0 0 4 0

ton Piece Goods,

"

Flour. See Cereals.

Flour, A rowroot, Potato,

Sago, Tapioca, Yam

Hartall or Orpiment

Picul

Hemp

Value

0450 5 p. cent,

Value

5p. cent.

Fungus, or Agaric.

Picul

Fungus, White

Catty

0250

Galangal

Picul

0 1 7 0

Hessians or Burlaps, all

1715Hide Poison or Specific...

Hollow-ware, Cast: Coat-]

weights....

1,000 Yds.

28 50

Value

5 p. cent.

Hides, Buffalo and Cow...

Picul

0 8 0 0

Gambier

0 3

ed or Tinned

0 500

"

39

Gambier False, or Cunao

Hoofs, Animal..

0 1 2 5

(Yamroot Dye-stuff)......

0150

Hops

Value

p. cent.

Camboge

2700

"

Gasolene or StoveNaph- | 10 gallon

Horns, Buffalo and Cow... Horns, Deer........

Picul

0 3 5 0

I

Value 5 p. cent.

tha

drum

0150

Horns, Rhinoceros

Catty

2400

Ginseng, Crude, 1st Qua-

Catty

0220

007 2

""

per catty)

Ginseng,

lity (value exceeding Tls, 2 per catty)...................... Ginseng, Crude, 2nd Qua-

lity (value not exceed-] ing 'T'ls. per catty Ginseng,

Clarified or

Cleaned, 1st Quality (value exceeding l'is. 11

Clarifiel or

   Cleaned, 2nd Quality (value exceeding Tls. 6 but not exceeding Tls.

11 per catty)

Ginseng,

Clarified

2025

021 5

2025 ō p. cent.

"

or

0375 Indigo, Liquid, Natural...

Indigo, Paste, Artificial.. Ink, Printing

"

13

Value

Isinglass (Fish Glue).

Picul

Isinglass, Vegetable

4000 1 7 5 0

02 20

""

Jams and Jellies, 1 lb.,

Dozen

0060

lea ned, 3rd Quality (value exceeding Tis, 2 but not exceeding Tls. 6 per catty).

Ginseng,

Clarified or

Cleaned, 4th Quality (value not exceeding

Tls. 2 per catty)

Glass, Plate, Silvered.....

Glass, Plate, Unsilvered... Glass Powder (see Match- Making Materials)...... Glas, Window, C lour- ed, Stained, Ground, or obseured

0080

Square foot Value

P.

0 0 2 5

cent.

Picnl Box of

100 sq. foet.

01 10

03 50

tins, bottles, or jars

Jams and Jellies, 2 lb.

tins, bottles, or jars

Joss Sticks

Kerosene Oil Cans and ƒ

Cases, Empty

"

Picul

2 cans in

1

1 case

1

Lace, Open-work or Inser- tion-work of Cotton, Machine made :-

(a.) Not exceeding 1

in. wide, outside measurement

}

1 18 0 0640

0 0 0

000

Hosiery. See Cotton Piece Goods (Socks).

India-rubber and Gutta-

percha Articles (other than Boots and Shoes}

Value

5p. cent.

India-rubber and Gutta-

percha, Crude

Picul

India-rubber Boots

Pair

India-rubber Shoes

3 1 4 0 0080 0 0 20

13

1100

for remanufacture)

India-rubber, Old (fit only

Indigo, Dried, Artificial

or Natural

Indigo, Liquid, Artificial..

Picul

0 2 5 0

Value

5 p. cent.

Picul

98

NAME OF ARTICLE.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

\T'. m. c. c.

Per

\T. m. c. c.

(b.) Exceeding 1 in.

but not exceeding

2 ins. wide, outside measurement

(c.) Exceeding 2 ins, but not exceeding 3 ins. wide, outside

surement

(4.) Exceeding 3 ins.

wide, outside

surement

Lace Open-work or Inser- tion-work of any fibrous material except Silk or Cotton ΟΙ imitation Gold or Silver Thread:-

12 dozen yards

Marsala. See Wines, etc.

Vin de Liqueur.

0 1 0 0

Matches, Rainbow or

Brilliant.

{

50

gross boxes

1 5 0 0

mea-

0 16 6

mea-

0 216

"

Matches, Wood, Safety

Matches, Wax Vestas: not exceeding 100 in a box

Matches, Wood, Safety orother; Large: boxes not exceeding 24 ins. by 14 ins. by in.

or other; Small: boxes not exceeding 2 ins. by 13 ins. by

ins.

Matches, Wood, Safety or

10 gross

boxes

1 6 0 0

50 gross boxes

0 6 3 0

100 gross

0920

boxes

(a.) Machine made.....

Catty

0 500

other, boxes exceeding

(b.) Hand made (includ-

ing Cotton)

above sizes

Value

5 p. cent.

Lacquerware

Value

2400 5 p. cent.

Lamps and their Acces-

sories....

"

Lampwick

Picul

ос

Match-making

Materials:-

Phosphorus

Splints.

Glass Powder.

Picul

0 1 1 0

1 2 5

"

0088

J

Lard, Pure or Compound.

Lead, Red, White, Yellow, Dry or mixed with Oil.

Leather Belting

0 600

J

Wax, Paraffin

0 5 0 0

"J

Wood Shavings

1 1 1 0

""

0450

Leather, Calf

Leather, Coloured

Value Picul

Mats, Coir Door..

Dozen

1 0 0 0

p. cent.

Mats, Formosa, Grass Bed

Each

0 0 5 0

0

Matches, Rush

Hundred

0500

0

"

Matches, Straw

0225

Leather, Cow

Leather, Harness (not in- cluding Enamelled or Pigskin)

Leather, Kid

500

15

Matches, Tatami

Each

0045

Matting, Coir not ex- Roll of

ceeding 36 ins. wide

100 yards}

2750

3 0 0 0

"

7000

Leather, Sole

"

""

2500

Leather, Patent

7000

Lichees, Dried.....

Leather, all other kinds.

Lily Flowers, Dried

Value

5 p. cent.

Picul

0450

0 3 2 5

3.

Lily Seed (ie., Lotus-nuts

without Husks)

1 0 0 0

"

Lime, Chloride of

Linen

Value

0 3 0 0 15 p. cent.

Liqueurs. See Wines, etc..

Liquorice

Picul

Logwood Extract

0500 0600

Matting, Straw: not ex-i ceeding 36 ius. wido

Meats, in bulk :-

Beef, Corned, Pickled,

in barrels..

Dry Salted Meat, in

boxes and barrels

Dry Sausages

Ham and Breakfast

Bacon; in boxes or barrels

Lard, Pure or Com-

pound

Roll of

|

40 yards }

0 250

Picul

0 3 7 5

0475 0808

"

Melon Seeds

V lue

5 p. cent.

Picul

0600 0250

1

Lotus-nuts

(ie., Lily

Seed with Husks)

Metals:-

99

0 4 0 0

Lucraban Seed

19

0350

Lung-ngan Pulp

Lung-ngans, Dried

Macaroni and Vermicelli,

and similar Paste

Mace...

Machines, Sewing, Hand

or Foot.....

Madeira. See Wines, etc.

(Vins de Liqueur.)

Malaga. See Wines, etc.,

(Vins de Liqueur.)

"

0 5 5

Antimony

0

"

Value

0 3 2 15 p. cent.

Anti-friction

Brass & Yellow Metal:-

Bars and ods

Bolts and Nuts and]

Value Picul

Accessories

Foil

"

Nails

"

"

Screws

Value

5 p. cont. 0700

1 1 5 0

1150 1 6 7 5

1150 5 p. cent.

Shects,

Plates, and

Ingots

Picul

1 1 5 0

Tubes

1 1 5 0

"}

Malt

Mangrove Bark

Wire

1 1 5 0

Manure, Chemical.

Margarine, in tins, jars,

Picul

Value 5 p. cent.

037 0 0 0 7 3

Copper:-

Bars and Rods

1 3 0 0

21

or kegs.

Picul

1 4 0 0

Bolts, Nuts, Rivets,

and Washers

Value

[5 p. cont.

"

0 26 5

CUSTOMS TARIFF

99

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Per

T. m. c. c.

Ingots Nails...

Picul

1 1 7 5

Steel, Plates and Sheets

Picul

0 2 5 0

1 3 0 0

>>

Steel, Tool and Cast

0 7 5 0

Sheets and Plates

1 3 0 0

22

Steel, Wire and Wire

Slabs..

1 17 5

">

Rope

075 0

Tacks

Value

15 p. cent.

Tubes

""

Tin Compound

Wire...

Picul

Dross, Tin

Dross, Iron

Dross, Iron and Tin

German Silver, Sheets German Silver, Wire... Iron & Mild Steel, New:-

Anchors,

and Parts

thereof, Mill Iron, Mill and Ships' Cranks, and For- gings for Vessels, Steam-engines, and Locomotives weigh- ing each 25 lbs. or

over

Angles

Anvils, and Parts of

1 3 0 016

Tin Foil

0 3 0

"J

Tin Slabs.....

5 0

31

Steel, Mild. See Iron.

Tin Sheets and Pipes

Tin Tacks, Blue, of all

sizes

Tinned Plates, Decorated Tinned Plates, Plain...... White Metal, Sheets...... White Metal, Wire Yellow Metal. See Brass. Zinc Bolier Plates..

Zinc Powder

Zinc Sheets, including

Perforated

Value

p. cent.

Picul

1 7 2 5

1 5 0 0

39

0400 03 50

J

0 290

J

2 2 0 0

12

1 5 0 0

0600

"

0400

"

05 20

Case of

Milk,Condensed, in tins

4 dozen

0 2 5 0

Bar

01 40

Bolts and Nuts

Value

15

p. cent.

Castings, Rough

Cobbles and

Picul

01 40

Chains, and Parts of...

0 2 6

Wire

!"

01 40 0 400

Mineral Waters

Morphia, in all forms Moulding

I lb. tins.

¡12 b'tles.

or 24 - bottles

0 0 5 0

Mirrors...

Value

Ounce

5 p. cent. 3000

1,000 feet

Shorts

01 30

Mushrooms

Picul

Hoops

0140

Musical Boxes

Value

Kentledge

0075

Musk

Catty

Nail-rod

Nails, Wire

01 40

0 200

Mussels, Dried

Picul

1 0 5 0 1 8 0 0 p. cent. 9000 4000

"

Needles, No. 7/0

100 mille

1 8 0 0

Nails, other kinds

Value

15 p. cent.

93

No. 3/0

12

Pig

Picul

0 0 7 5

"

Assorted, not in-

Pipes and Tubes

Value

5 p. cent.

cluding 7/0

1 5 0 0

098

Plate Cuttings

Picul

Plates and Sheets

0100 0140

Nutgalls

Picul

0 8 7 0

Nutmegs

1 5 0 0

*

Rails...

0 1 2 5

Oakum

0500

J

Rivets

0250

"

Oil, Castor, Lubricating..

0 5 10

J

Screws

Sheets and Plates

Value

licul

p. cent.

Oil,

Medicinal

1

0 0

"

0 1 4 0

Oil, Slove

Tacks, Blue, of all sizes

0400

Oil, Cocoa-nut.

Catty

Picul

0150 0400

"

Wire...

0250

Amern.

Iron, Galvanized:

وه

Oil, Colza

0 0 5 0

Bolts and Nuts

Value

5 p. cent.

Oil, Engine:

Cobbles

and Wirel

gallon

Ameri-

Shorts

Picul

0 1 3 0

Sheets, Corrugated

0 2 7 5

ΟΙ

can

0 0 1 5

gallon

2

0 275

"

Sheets, Plain

Tubes

Wire....

Wire Shorts

Iron, Old, and Scrap, of

any description fit

only for

facture

re-manu-

Lead, in Sheets

Nickel, Unmanufactured

Lead, in Pigs

Lead, Pipes......

Quicksilver

Steel, Bamboo

Steel Bars

Spelter.

Value 5

Picul

=

21

p. cent.

0250

0 1 3 0

28 5

(a.) Wholly

partly of mi- neral origin...

(b.) All other kinds (except Castor.)

Oil, Ginger

Oil, Kerosene

Oil,

Oil,

"

"

in bulk

Cans and

Cases, Empty

Oil, Olive.......

0 3 3 0

"

0 3 7 5

"

2600

"

4280

Oil, Sandalwood

JJ

0 3 7 5

Oil, Wood.....

21

2500

Olives Fresh, Pickled, or;

0 2

Salted

0 0 2 5

>

Picul

6 7 5 0

00 70

Case of 10 Amern. gallons

- 10 Ameru. gallons 2 Cans in

1 Case

Imperial}

0050

0 0 0 5

006 2

Catty Picul

0240 0500

01 8 3

J

100

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE

TARIFT UNIT and Duty,

NAME OF ARTICLE,

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Opium

.Picul

Duty

30 0 0 0

Rose Maloes

Likin

80 0 0 0

Safflower

Opium, Husk

Catty

0 0 6 2

Saké, in barrels

Orange Peel

Picul

8000

Oysters, Dried

Saké, in bottles

Value

5 p. cent.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY,

Pe, per, White

Packing, Asbestos. See

Asbestos.

Packing, Engine

and

        Boiler, all other kinds. Paints. See Dyes. Colours,

and Paints....

Paper, Cigarette: not ex- ceeding ins. by 4 ins. Paper, Printing, Calen-,

dered and/or Sized Paper, printing, Uncal- endered or Unsized.... Paper, Writing or Fool-

sc p

       Paper, all other kinds.. Peel, Orange

Pepper, Black

Perfumery

"

29

100,000 leaves

J

Saltpetre and Nitrate of

Soda Sand, Red Sandalwood

Sapanwood

Seahorse Teeth

Seaweed, Cut

Per Picul

\T.m.

C.

C.

1 0 0

"}

""

{

12 bots. or 24 4-bots.

Picul

"

"

0 5 2 0400

0 1 1 0

03 25

0 0 4 5 0400

0 1 1 2

"

Value

5 p. cent.

Picul

0 1 5 0

0 1 2 5

Seaweed, Long.

Seaweed, Prepared

Picul

07

>>

0 3 0 0 Seed,

Seed, (Lily i.e., Lotus-nuts

without Husks)

Lily Seeds with Husks)

Lotus-nuts

(i,e.,

دو

1 2 0 0

Seed, Lucraban

"

"

Value Picul

p.cent

Seed, Melon

0100 1000

1 0 0 0

0400

0 3 5 0 0250

D

O NOO

seed, Pino or Fir-nuts

0 200

"

0760

Seed, Sesamum

0200

"

1 3 3 0

Value

5 p. cent.

Phosphorus

Picul

4 1 2 5

Sharks' Fins, Black.....

Sharks' Fins, Clarified or

Prepared

1 6 0 8

6000

"

Pitch

0 1 2 5

Sharks' Fins, white..

4600

Plushes and Velvets:-

Shellac

2500

""

a. Plushes and Velvets

of pure Silk

Shells, Mother-of pearl

0700

"

Catty

0 6 5 0

Shells, other kinds

Value

5 p. cent.

Sherry. See Wines, etc.

200

(Vins de Liqueur.)

Shoes and Boots, India-

rubber, for Shinese:

b. Silk Seal(with Cotton

back)

c. Plushes and Velvets of silk mixed with other fibrous mate- rials (with Cotton back)

d. Plushes, all Cotton,

(including

ised)

Mercer-

e, Velvets, Cotton, See, Co ton Piece Goods

Pork Rind..

Prawn, Dried (see also

Shrimps)

Freserved Fruits, in glass bottles, jars, cardboard or woolen boxes, inclu- ding weight of imme- diate packago

Purses, Leather (not in-

cluding Silver or Gold

mounted)

Putchuck

Raisins and Currants

Rattan Chairs

Rattan Core

Rattan Skin

Rattans, Split

Boots

Pair

Shoes

0 0 8 0 0020

;

0 150

""

Shrimps, Dried (see also

Prawns)

Picul

06

2

01 10

a Plain

Picul

0 0

1 0

""

Catty

0 3 2 5

0700

065

Gross

Picul

00 7 1 5

""

Value Picul

5 p. cent.

"

0 3 25 0225

0225 0750

01 87

Silk Piece Goods, all Silk, (including Crape :-)

b. Brocaded or other-

wisy Figured

Mix-

Silk Piece Goods

tures (ie., Silk and Cotton, or Silk and other materials) inclu- ding Crape but not in- cluding Mixtures with Real or Imitation Gold or Silver Thread :- a. Plain

b. Brocaded or other-

wise Fi ured

Silver Thread, Imitation,

See Thread.

Sinews, Buffalo and Cow... Sinews, Deer........

Singlets or Drawers,

Cotton

Singlets or Drawers,

Mixture Skins, Fish

Rattans, Whole

Resin

Ribbons, Silk, Silk and

Cotton, Silk and other'

fibre, with or without

Imitation Gold or Silver Thread Rope

Catty

0 5 5 0

Smalt Snuff

Value ¡5 p. cent.

Skins, Sharks

0

"

"

500

Picul

0550 1 0 5 0

"

Dozen 0 1 2 5

Value 5 p. cent.

Picul

U 600

Valuo

5 p. cent

Picul

1600

Value 5p. cont.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Soap, Household and Laundry including Blue Mottled), in bulk, bars and doublets weighing not less than

lb. each

Soap, Toilet and Fancy.... Socks, Cotton (including

Lisle Thr. ad) :-

1st Quality (i.e., valued

at 'Ils. 1 or over per dozen pairs).

2nd Quality (i.e., valued

at less than Tls. 1 1er dozen pairs)

Soda Ash

Soda Bicarbonate

Soda austic

Soda Crystals

Soda Crystals, Concen-

trated

Scy

Spirits. See Wines, etc.. Spirits of Wine.

Wines, etc.

Stickbac

See

Stout. See Wines, etc. Sugar, Brown, up to No.

10 Dutch Standard................. Su ar Candy..

Sugar, White, No. 11 Dutch Standard and ever, including Cube and Refined.... Sulphur and Brimstone,

Crude

Sulphur and Brimstone,

Sun-had 8. See Umbrellas!

CUSTOMS TARIFF

101

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Per

[T. m. c. c.

Masts and Spars, Solt-

wood......

Value

5 p. cent.

Files and Piling, includ-

Picul Value

0 240

p. cent.

Cubic foot

115 0 0 0 20

Soft-wood, including

(Dozen } pairs

fornian Red-wood, and

0 0 7 5

"

Picul

})

"

02 25 0 1 2 0

"}

ing Oregon Pn and Californian R‹d-wood:] 1,000 sup.

of a thickness of 1 in. feet Planks, Hard wood

Planks, and Flooring

Orgon Pine and Cali-

allowing 10 per cent. of each shipment to bel

in.

f.et

Tongued and Grooved: 1,000 sup of a thickness of Planks, and Flooring, Soft-wood, Tong ed and Grooved, in exc +8 of above 1 per cent. Planks, Tek-wood........... Railway Sleepers Tak-wood Lumber,of all lengths and descrip-

1 1 5 0

Value

5 p. cent Cubic foot 0 0 8 1

Value

5 p. cent

0140

0250

Tinder

.

0 7

Picul

"

0190 0 3 0 0

"

0 150

Refired.....

5)

Sulpheric Acid

0 250 0 18 7

Telescope 8,

Binocu ars,

and Mirrors....

Value

15 p. cent.

Thread, Cotton:-

Picul

3000

Gross

0040

Value

5 p. cent.

Bals, Dyed or Undyed Spo1, 50 yards...... Thread, Gold and Silver, Imutation, on Silk ....... Thread, Gold and Silver,

Real

Thread, Gold Imitation,

on Cotton..

Thread. Silver, Imitation,

on Cotton....

Tiles, 6 ins, square..

Timber:-

Beums. Hard-wood

"

"

tions,....

Tin-foil.....

Tobacco Leaf

Tobacco,Frej ar d, in bulk Tobacco, Prepared, in tis or packages under 5 lbs, each Tools :-

Axes and Hatches.. Files,

File Blanks,

Rasps and Floats, of

all kinds :-

Not exceeding 1 ins long

Exceeding 4 ins and not

exceeding 9 ins. long... Exceeding 9 ins. and not

exceeding 14 ins long Exceeding 1+ ins. long...

'Tortoiseshell

Trimmings, Bead

Trimmings, of Cotton, pure or mixed with other materials but not Silk Trimmings, of Cott, n, mixed with Silk and Imitati n Gold 0.

Catty

0125

Hundred

0090 0600

Silver Thread

Turmeric.

Turpentine

Twine

Cubic foot 0 0 20

Cubic foot

0 0 8 1

Picul

0 3 5 0

Value

5 p. cent.

P.cul

0800

0950

25

Value

5 p. cent.

Dozen

0 5 0 0

0040

007 2

0 1 6 8

0224

>

Catty

0450

Value

p. cent.

21

Picul

0

1 8 5

Gallon

0036

Beams, Soft-wood, in-

cluding Oregon Pine

and Californian Red-

ness of 1 in....................

wood, of a thick-1000 sup.

Beams, Teak-wood Cubic foot 0081

feet

1 1 5 0

Laths

Thousand 0 210

wood..........

Masts and Spars, Hard-

Value

15 p. cent.

Ultramarine

Umbrella Fr: mes

Umbrellas, Para: ols, and

Sunshades:- With Handles wholly or partly of Precious Me als, Ivory, Mo- ther-of-pearl, Torto- iseshell, Agate, etc, or Jewelled

Value 5 P. cent.

Picul

Dozen

Value

0500

0080

15 p. cent.

102

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

T. m. c. c.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

With all other Hand- les, all Cotton...... With all other Hand-'

les, Mixtures, not Silk

Each

0 0 2 0

Brandy and Cognac,

Per Case of 12)

T. m. c. c.

in bottles

reputed quarts

0 500

0 0 3 0

...!

With all other Hand-

,

    les, Silk and Silk Mixtures

0 0 8 0

Varnish, Crude Lac- quer, Gum Lacquer, or Oil Lacquer

Vaseline

Vegetables, Dried and

Salted or Pickled, in

Value

5 p. cent.

Wax, Bees, Yellow..

Wax, Japan...

Wax, Paraffin

Wax, Sealing

Wax, White

Wines, etc. :--

Champagnes and all other Sparkling Wines, in bottles Still Wines, Red or White, exclusively the produce of the natural fermenta- tion of grapes: a. Having less than 14 degrees of alcohol:

1. In bottles

2. In bulk

ase of 12

bots. or 24-bots.

Case of 12)

bots. or

(Imperial

gallon

b. Having 14 degrees or more of alcohol; also Vins de Liqueur other than Port......

1. In bottles

2. In bulk

Port Wine, in bottle

Port Wine, in bulk

Vermouth and Byrrh Sake, in barrels

Sake, in bottles

.....

Brandies and Whis-

kies, in bulk

Case of 12 bots. or 21-bots.

Imperial gallon Case of 12

bots. or

0 500

0150

0 7 0 0

21-bots. Imperial gallon Case 12 litres

0 1 7 5

0 250

0400

Picul Case of 12

bots. or 24-bots. Imperial

0 1 1 0

0125

gallon

Woollen and Cotton Mix-

tures:-

Flannel (Woollen and Cotton): not exceed- ing 33 inches wide... Italian Cloth, Plain or Figured, having warp entirely Cotton and all one colour, and weft entirely Wool and all one Colour: not exceeding 32 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 32 yards long Poncho Cloth: not ex- ceeding 76 ins. wide. Spanish Stripes (Wool- len and Cotton.) not exceeding 64ins.wide. Union Cloth: not ex- ceeding 76 ins. wide.

bulk

Vermicelli

Picul

Vermilion

0 3 40

21 10

Vermouth. See Wines,

etc.

Watches, of all kinds..

Value

p. cent.

Waters, Aerated and (12bots. or )

Mineral

21-bots.

0 0 5 0

Picul

0690

0650

"

0500

Value

5 p. cent.

"

0025

in casks

gallon

Liqueurs

Value

5 p. cent.

Wood, Camagon..

Picul

0090

0650

Wood Ebony

0 200

Wood, Fragrant..

Value

p. cent.

Wood, Garoo

Catty

0 1 0 0

Wood, Kranjee

Value

5 p. cent.

Wood, Laka............

Picul

0 1 2 5

Wood, Lignum-vitæ

Value

5 p. cent.

Wood, Purn

Picul

0 0 7 5

Wood, Red

0200

Wood, Rose

0200

22

Wood, Sandal

0400

{

2+

0 3 0 0

Wood, Sapan

0 1 1 2

"

Wood, Scented

Value

p. cent.

Wood, Shavings, Hinoki.

Ficul

1 0 0 0

0 0 2 5

Whisky, in bottles.. Other Spirits (Gin, Rum, etc.), in bot- tles Other Spirits (Gin, Rum, etc.), in bulk Spirits of Wine, in packages of any description

Ales, Beers, Cider, Perry, in bottles...

Ales, Beers, Cder,

Perry, in casks

Porters and Stouts,

in bottles.

Case of 12 reputed quarts or 24 reputed pints

}

0 0 8 5

Imperial 0 0 20

gallon

Case of 12 reputed quarts or 24reputed

0 1 0 0

pints

Porters and Stouts, Imperial

0 350

0 200

""

Imperial gallon

0 0 9

0028

Yard

0 0 1 5

Piece

0 3 7 2

Yard

0 0 3 0

0014

"

"

0 0 3 0

CUSTOMS TARIFF

103

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

T. m. c. c.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

\T. m. c. c.

Woollen and Cotton

Long Ells: not exceed-

Mixtures, Unclassed,!

including Alpacas,

Lustres, Orleans, Si-

ing 31 ins. wide and not exceeding 25 yds. long

Piece

0 25 0

cilians, etc.

Value

5 p. cent.

Medium Cloth: not ex-

Woollen Manufactures:

ceeding 76 ins. wide. Russian Cloth: not ex-

Yard

0047

Blankets and Rugs

Pound

0 0 20

Broadcloth: not exceed-

ing 76 ins. wide

Yard

00471

ceeding 76 ins. wide. Spanish Stripes: not!

ins. exceeding 61

047

wide

0 0 2 1

Bunting: not exceeding 24 ins. wide and not! exceeding40yds.long.

Camlets, Dutch: not ex- ceeding 33 ins. wide and not exceeding 61 yards long Camlets, English: not exceeding 31 ins, wide and not exceeding 61 yards long

Flannel: not exceeding

33 ins. wide...........

Habit Cloth: not ex- ceeding 76 ins. wide. Lastings, Plain, Figur- ed or Creped: not] exceeding 31 ins. wide and not exceeding 32 yards long Llama Braid

"

Woollens, Unclassed... Woollen and Worsted]

Value

5 p. cent.

Piece

2000

Yarns and Cords (not including Berlin Wool).

Picul

Berlin Wool

5 3 0 0 4000

23

1 0 0 0

Wooloa or Berlinette......

Worm Tablets, in bottles,

3 5 0 0

not exceeding 60 pieces

Dozen

Yarn, Asbestos.....

Picul

0055

2250

Yarn, Coir.......

Value

5p. cent.

Yarn, Cotton, Bleached

Yard

0 0

5

or Grey....

Picul

09 50

Yarn, Cotton, Dyed.

Value

15

Yarn, Cotton, Grey.

Picul

p. cent.

5950

Yarn, Cotton, Mercerised

00471

or Gassed...

Value

5 p. cent.

Yarn, Cotton, Wooloa or

Berlinette

Picul

3 5 0 0

Yarn, Wool, Berlin...

4 0 0 0

Yarn, Woollen and Worst-

Piece

Picul

0 4 5 0'

5000

ed (not including Berlin Wool)

5300

11

RULES

5

RULE I.-Imports unenumerated in this Tariff will pay Duty at the rate of per cent. ad valorem; and the value upon which Duty is to be calculated shall be the market value of the goods in local currency. This market value when converted into Haikwan Taels shall be considered to be 12 per cent. higher than the amount upon which Duty is to be calculated.

If the goods have been sold before presentation to the Customs of the Application to pay Duty, the gross amount of the bona fide contract will be accepted as evidence of the market value. Should the goods have been sold on c. f. and i. terms, that is to say, without inclusion in the price of Duty and other charges, such c. f. and i. price shall be taken as the value for Duty-paying purposes without the deduction mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

101

CUSTOMS TARIFF

If the goods have not been sold before presentation to the Customs of the application to pay Duty, and should a dispute arise between Customs and importer · regarding the valuer classification of goods, the case will be referred to a Board of Arbitration composed as follows:-

An official of the Customs;

A merchat selected by the Consul of the importer; and

A merchant, differing in nationality from the importer, selected by the Senior

Consul.

Questions regarding procedure, etc., which may arise during the sittings of the Board shall be decided by the majority. The final finding of the majority of the Board, which must be an ounced within fifteen days of the reference (not including holidays), will be binding upon both parties. Each of the two merchants on the Board will be entitled to a fee of ten Hikwan Taels. Should the Board sustain the Customs valution, or, in the event of not sustaining that valuation, should it decided that the gools have been undervalued by the importer to the extent of not less than 7 per cent., the importer will pay the fees; if otherwise; the fees will be paid by the Cust ›ms. Should the Board decide that the correct value of the goods is 20 per cent. (or more) higher than that upon which the importer originally claimed to pay Duty, the Customs authorities may retain possession of the goods until full Duty has been paid and may levy an additional Duty equal to four times the Duty sought to be evade l.

In all cases invoices, when available, must be produced if required by the Customs. RULE II. The following will not be liable to Import Duty: Foreign Rice, Cerea's, and Flour; Gold and Silver, both Bullion and Coin; Printe Books, Chart, Maps, Periodicals and Newspapers.

A freight or part freight of Daty-free commodities (Gold and Silver Bullion and Foreign Coins excepted) will render the vessel carrying them, though no other cargo be on boar, liable to Tonnage Dues.

Drawbacks will be issued for Ship's Stores and Bunker Coal when taken on

board.

RULE III. Except at the requisition of the Chinese Government, or for sale to Chiese duly authorised to purchase them, Import trade is prohibited in all Arms, Ammunition, and Munitions of War of every description. No Permit to land them will be issued until the Customs have proof that the necessary authority has been given to the Importer. Infraction of this rule will be punishable by confiscation of all the goods concerned. The import of Salt is absolutely prohibited.

CUSTOMS NOTIFICATION

Notification issued by the Imperial Maritime Customs at Canton on the 14th November, 1901.

Notice is hereby given that:-

1. On and after the 11th inst., the Tariff of Import Duties hitherto existing and the list of Dy free Goods cease to be operative and, until further notice, whatever is imported with certain exceptions, is to pay an effective 5 per cent. ad valorem Duty

2. The exceptions are as follows:-

(a.) Foreign Rice, Cereals and Flour, as well as Gold and Silver, coined and

uncoined, are exempt from Duty.

(6.) The Import Duty on Opium remains unchanged at thirty taels, that and lekin at the rate of eighty taels, or one hundred and ten taels in all, per picul, being payable simultaneously as at present.

CUSTOMS TARIFE

105

(c.) Foreign Goods on the way to China or which shall have been despatched to China within six days after the signature of the Protocol-that is, on or before the 13th September-are to pay Import Duty according to the old Tariff, a fixed Duty if enumerated, and an ad valorem 5 per cent. Duty if unenumerated, and are to be exempt from Duty if on the Duty-free list. Goods despatched after the 13th September are to pay an effective 5 per cent. according to the new rule. (d.) Merchandise taken out of bond is to pay Duty according to its liability on the day of bonding-that is, if already in bond, or if bonded on any future day, but forming part of a cargo now on the way to China, or despatched to China on or before the 13th September, it is to be treated according to the old Tariff and Tariff Rules. All other bonded imports are to pay an effective 5 per cent.

(e.) Whatever is imported for the use of Legations at Peking is exempt. from Import Duty-applications for Exemption Permits, etc., to be countersigned and scaled by the Consulate of the Legation concerned. (f.) Whatever is shipped or discharged for the use of Foreign forces, military or naval, is exempt from Import Duty-applications for Exemption Permits, etc., to be countersigned and sealed by the Consulate of the flag concerned.

       3. The values on which the new Tariff is to fix Duties will be the average values for the three years 1897, 1898, 1899. Where the valuation

is questioned, the market value of the day minus Duty and charges, or where that cannot be ascertained, invoice value plus 10 per cent. will rule instead; but as this will involve detention of goods concerned at owner's risk and expense till such market, or failing market, invoice value can be ascertained and settled, it is hoped the valuation

will be acquiesced in.

4. Goods exported pay Duty according to the Tariff hitherto existing.

5. Coast Trade Duty, which is not an Import Duty, but a Coast Duty on Native produce inwards, remains as before, and is not affected by the effective 5 per cent. rules.

106

CUSTOMS TARIFF

TARIFF ON EXPORTS

(As annexed to the Tientsin Treaty of 1858)

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT and Duty.

Per

T. m. c. c.

Alum.....

Picul

0045

Galangal

Per Picul

[T, m. c. c.

0105

"

Green or Copperas

0 1 0 0

Garlic

0 0 3 0

"

Aniseed, Star

0 500

"

Ginseng, Native.

ad valorem 5

p.

cent.

Broken

""

Oil...

0 250

23

35

Corean or Ja- Į

5 0 0 0

55

25

pan, 1st quality

Catty

0500

Arsenic

Apricot Seeds, or Almonds

Artificial Flowers

Bamboo Ware......

0450

"

22

وو

2nd quality...

03 50

0450

Glass Beads...

Picul

0500

"

1 5 0 0

"

0750

33

Bangles, or Glass Armlets

"

Beans and Peas

39

0500

60

Glass or Vitrified Wire... Glasscloth, Fine..

"

Coarse

Ground-nuts

0500

22

2500

0750

33

0 1 0 0

"

Bean Cake

0 0 3

Cake

0030

29

وو

Bone and Horn Ware

1 5 0 0

"

Brass Buttons

3 0 0 0

Gypsum, Ground,

Plaster of Paris

ΟΙ

0030

"

Foil

1 5 0 0

""

Hair, Camels

1 0 0 0

Ware

1 0 0 0

59

"

Wire

1150

Hair, Goats Hams

وو

ور

دو

0 18 0

0550

*

Camphor

0750

Canes

Thousand 0500

Hemp

Cantharides

Capoor Cutchery

Carpets and Druggets

Cassia Lignea

Picul

2000

Honey

030

"

Hartall, or Orpiment..

Horns, Deers', Young

0

33

50

0350

"

0900

93

Pair

0900

Hundred Picul

3 50

Old..

Picul

1 3 5 0

33

0600

India Ink

4000

Buds

0800

22

Indigo, Dry.

1000

25

>>

Twigs

0150

21

Ivory Ware

Catty

0150

Oil.

9000

Joss-sticks

Picul

200

""

35

Castor Oil

0200

Kittysols, or Paper

Hundred

Chestnuts..

0 1 0 0

Umbrellas

China Roots..

0 1 3 0

3.5

Lacquered Ware..

Picul

Chinaware, Fine..

09

Lamp wicks..

Coarse

"

Cinnarbar

19

Clothing, Cotton

"

Silk..

10

"

Lead, Red, (Minium)

22

White, (Ceruse)

Yellow, (Massicot).

Leather Articles,

ور

Coal

Pouches, Purses.

Coir

0 1 0 0

Green

"

Copper Ore

0 500

Lichees

"

25

0 3 5 0

0350

"

as

1 5 0 0

"

1800

0200

0500

1 0 0 0 0600

03 50

Sheathing, Old

and Pewter Ware

0 500

*

1 1 5 0

""

Corals, False

Cotton, Raw

Cow Bezoar...

03 50

0 3

"

Rags

Crackers, Fireworks

Cubebs....

Curiosities, Antiques Dates, Black

Red

29

ad valorem 5 p. cent. Picul 0150

**

0090

0800

"

Catty Picul

0 3

05

1 500

0

0 1 3

0250

0350

0090

0200

Mats of all kinds

Hundred

0200

roll of

Matting

40 yards)

200

Dye, Green

Eggs, Preserved.

Fans, Feather..

Catty Thousand

Hundred 0 7

Melon Seeds...

Picul

0 100

0 3 5

Mother-o'-Pearl Ware

Catty

0 1 0 0

Mushrooms

Picul

1500

Paper..

""

Palm Leaf, trimmed Thousand

"

Palm Leaf, un-)

trimmed...

J

Felt Cuttings..

Caps......

Fungus, or Agaric.....

0045 0 60

0200

Picul 0 1 0 0 Hundred Picul

Musk

Catty

0900

Nankeen and

Native

Picul

1 5 0 0

Cotton Cloths

0 0

Nutgalls

**

Oil, as Bean, Tea, Wood,

3 00

25

1 2 50

0 600

Cotton & Hemp Seed Oiled Paper......

0450

*"

"

Liquorice

Lung-ngan

"

Lily Flowers, Dried

Seeds or Lotus Nuts

without Stone.

Manure Cakes, or

Poudrette...

Marble Slabs

0270

وو

CUSTOMS TARIFF

107

NAME OF ARTICLE,

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY,

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Olive Seed

Oyster-shells, Sea-shells.

"

Per Picul

IT. m. c. c.

Per ¡T', m. c. c.

0 3 0 0

0090

Silk, Ribbons and Thread

Piece Goods,-

Picul

10 0 0 0

Paint, Green

0450

"

Palampore,

or Cotton

Hundred

27 5 0

Bed Quilts

Paper, 1st quality

Picul

0700

2nd

0400

>>

"

"

Pearls, False

2000

Peel, Orange

0300

23

""

Pumelo, 1st quality

2nd

0450

"J

""

"

وو

Peppermint Leaf

Pictures and Paintings.

1 5 0100

Pictures

Oil

on Pith

3 500

Pongees, Shawls, Scarves, Crape,

Satin, Gauzes, Velvet and Em- broidered Goods Piece Goods,-Sze-

chuen, Shantung f Tassels

Caps

Silk and Cotton Mixtures

Silver and Gold Ware

12 0 0

4500

وو

Each

0 1 0 0

Snuff

or

Hundred

0 1 0 0

Soy

Rice Paper

Pottery, Earthenware

Preserves, Comfits, and

Straw Braid.

Picul

0 0 5 0

0500

وو

Sweetmeats

Rattans, Split

Rattan Ware

Rhubarb

J

0 250

"

0 3 0 0

""

1 2 50

Rice or Paddy, Wheat,

0100

Millet,

and

other

"

Grains

Rugs of Hair or Skin.

Each

0090

Samshoo

Picul

0 1 5 0

Sandalwood Ware

Catty

0 1 0 0

Seaweed

Picnl

0 1 5 0

Sessamun Seed

0 1 3 5

Shoes and Boots, Lon- ?

Pairs

3 0 0

ther or Satin

"

Shoes, Straw

0 18

"

0 500

*

Silks, Raw and Thrown...

Picul

10 0 0

quer

"

Yellow, from Sze-

chuen

Reeled from Dupions

Silk, Wild Raw

Vermicelli

0 1 8 0

59

7000

Vermillion

2500

"

5000

Wax, White or Insect

1 5 0 0

23

""

2500

23

Refuse...

1 0 0 0

Wood-Piles, Poles, &

Joists....

Each

0 0 3 0

"

Cocoons

"

J5

Floss, Canton...

3 0 0 0 4300

Wood Ware

Picul

1 1 5

Wool

0 3 5 0

"

from other Provinces

10

"

Tin Foil

Sugar, Brown

White

Candy

Tallow, Animal

"

Vegetable

Tea (see Note at the

end of the Tariff)

Tobacco, Prepared

Tobacco, Leaf

Tortoiseshell Ware.. Trunks, Leather Turmeric

Twine, Hemp, Canton

"

Soochow.

Turnips, Salted Varnish, or Crude Lac- Į

Catty Picul

5 0

0 1 0 0

1 5 0

0 0

0 18 0

Hundred

10 0 0 0 0900

Picul

5 0 0 0

10 0 0 0

"J

0 8 0 0 0400

"

21

0 1 2 0

"

0 200

>>

0 250

19

**

700

0200 3 0

2500

O

وو

"

1 2 5 0

0 4 5 0

33

1 50

""

0 0

         TEA-Coarse unfired Japanese Tea imported for local consumption.-Since February, 1861, it has been the practice of the Shanghai Customis to charge duty ad valorem on Tea of this description.

         Tea imported from Japan for the purpose of being refired and re-exported to a Foreign country.-Since the 1st of April, 1861, Japanese Tea imported for re-exportation has been dealt with at Shanghai according to the following rule:

         "Tea imported into this port from Japan for the purpose of being refired and re-exported to a Foreign country will be allowed a reduction on the actual weight imported of Twenty per cent. on the Import duty, and when re- exported a Drawback Certificate for the entire amount of duty paid will be granted or application in the usual manner, provided that the terms of Article XLV. of the Treaty between Great Britain and China be complied with, and that the weights, &c., &c., be correctly declared."

         Brick Tea. In the Tariff appended to the Russian Regulations of 186, the Export duty on Brick is fixed at 6 Mace per picul.

RULES

(Annexed to the Tariff of 1858.)

      RULE I.-Unenumerated Goods.-Articles not enumerated in the list of exports, but enumerated in the list of imports, when exportel, will pay the amount of duty set against them in the list of imports; and, similarly, articles not enumerated in the list of imports, but enumerated in the list of exports, when imported, will pay the amount of duty set against them in the list of exports.

     Articles not enumerated in either list, nor in the list of duty-free goods, will pay an ad valorem duty of 5 per cent., calculated on their market value.

RULE II.-Duty-free Goods.-Gold and silver bullion, foreign coins, flour, Indian meal, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery, foreign clothing, jewellery, plated-ware, perfumery, soap of all kinds, charcoal, firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco (foreign), cigars (foreign), wine, beer, spirits, household stores, ship's stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, druggeting, cutlery, foreign medicines, glass, and crystal ware.

     The above pay no import or export duty, but, if transported into the interior will, with the exception of personal baggage, gold and silver bullion, and foreign coins, pay a transit duty at the rate of 21 per cent. ad valorem.

     A freight, or part freight, of duty-free commodities (personal baggage, gold and silver bullion, and foreign coins, excepted) will render the vessel carrying them, though no other cargo be on board, liable to tonnage dues.

RULE III.-Contraband Goods.-Import and export trade is alike prohibited in the following articles: Gunpowder, shot, cannon, fowling-pieces, rifles, muskets, pistols, and all other munitions and implements of war; and salt.

     RULE IV.-Weights and Measures. In the calculation of the Tariff, the weight of a picul of one hundred catties is held to be equal to one hundred and thirty-three and one-third pounds avoirdupois; and the length of a chang of ten Chinese feet to be equal to one hundred and forty-one English inches.

     One Chinese chih is held to be equal to fourteen and one-tenth inches English; and four yards English, less three inches, to equal one chang.

     RULE V.-Regarding Certain Commodities Heretofore Contraband.-The restric- tions affecting trade in opium, cash, grain, pulse, sulphur, brimstone, saltpetre, and spelter are relaxed, under the following conditions;-

     1.-*Opium will henceforth pay thirty Taels per picul import duty. The importer will sell it only at the port. It will be carried into the interior by Chinese only, and only as Chinese property; the foreign trader will not be allowed to accompany it. The provisions of Article IX. of the Treaty of Tientsin, by which British subjects are authorized to proceed into the interior with passports to trade, will not extend to it, nor will those of Article XXVII. of the same treaty, by which the transit dues are regulated. The transit dues on it will be arranged as the Chinese Government see fit: nor in future revisions of the Tariff is the same rule of revision to be applied to opium as to other goods.

     2.-Copper Cash.-The export of cash to any foreign port is prohibited; but it shall be lawful for British subjects to ship it at one of the open ports of China to another, on compliance with the following Regulation:-The shipper shall give notice of the amount of cash he desires to ship, and the port of its destination, and shall bind himself either by a bond, with two sufficient sureties, or by depositing

* For duty Opium see Convention signed in 1885, also the Treaty of 1902.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

109'

such other security as may be deemed by the Customs satisfactory, to return, within six months from the date of clearance, to the collector at the port of shipment, the certificate issued by him, with an acknowledgment thereon of the receipt of the cash at the port of destination by the collector at that port, who shall thereto affix his seal; or failing the production of the certificate, to forfeit a sum equal in value to the cash shipped. Cash will pay no duty inwards or outwards; but a freight or part freight of cash, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel carrying it liable to pay tonnage dues.

      3.-The export of rice and all other grain whatsoever, native or foreign, no matter where grown or whence imported, to any foreign port, is prohibited; but these commodities may be carried by British inerchants from one of the open ports of China to another, under the same conditions in respect of security as cash, on pay- ment at the port of shipment of the duty specified in the Tariff.

      No import duty will be leviable on rice or grain; but a freight or part freight of rice or grain, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel importing it liable to tounage dues.

      4. The export of pulse and beancake from Tung-chau and Newchwang, under the British flag, is prohibited. From any other of the ports they may be shipped, on payment of the tariff duty, either to other ports of China, or to foreign countries.

      5.-Saltpetre, sulphur, brimstone, and spelter, being munitions of war, shall not be imported by British subjects, save at the requisition of the Chinese Government, or for sale to Chinese duly authorized to purchase them. No permit to land them will be issued until the Customs have proof that the necessary authority has been given to the purchase. It shall not be lawful for British subjects to carry these commodities up the Yang-tsze-kiang, or into any port other than those open on the seaboard, nor to accompany them into the interior on behalf of Chinese. They must be sold at the ports only, and, except at the ports they will be regarded as Chinese property.

      Infractions of the conditions, as above set forth, under which trade in opium, cash, grain, pulse, saltpetre, brimstone, sulphur, and spelter may be henceforward carried on, will be punishable by confiscation of all the goods concernel.

      RULE VI.-Liability of Vessels Entering Port. For the prevention of misunder- standing, it is agreed that the term of twenty-four hours, within which British vessels must be reported to the Consul under Article XXXVII. of the Treaty of Tien sin, shall be understood to commence from the time a British vessel comes within the limits of the port; as also the term of forty-eight hours allowed her by Article XXX. of the same Treaty to remain in port without payment of tonnage dues.

The limits of the ports shall be defined by the Customs, with all consideration for the convenience of trade compatible with due protection of the revenue; also the limits of the anchorages within which lading and discharging is permitted by the Customs; and the same shall be notified to the Consul for public information.

       RULE VII.-Transit Dues.-It is agreed that Article XXXVIII. of the Treaty of Tientsin shall be interpreted to declare the amounts of transit dues legally leviable upon merchandise imported or exported by British subjects to be one-half of the tariff duties, except in the case of the duty-free goods liable to a transit duty of 24 per cent. ad valorem, as provided in Article II. of these Rules. Merchandise shall be cleared of its transit dues under the following conditions:

      In the case of Imports.-Notice being given at the port of entry, from which the Imports are to be forwarded inland, of the nature and quantity of the goods, the ship

* NOTIFICATION.

BRITISH CONSULATE, Shanghai, 24th March, 1862.

Article IV. of Rule No. 3 appended to the Tariff of 1858 is rescinded.

Pulse and bean-cake may be henceforth exported from Tungchow and Newchwang, and from all other ports in China open by Treaty, on the same terms and conditions as are applied to other Native produce by the Regulation bearing date the 6th December last; that is to say, they may be shipped on payment of Tariff duty at the port of shipment, and dis charged at any Chinese port on payment of half-duty, with power to claim drawback of the half-duty if re-exported.

By order, WALTER H. MEDHURST, Consul.

110

CUSTOMS TARIFF

from which they have been landed, and the place inland to which they are bound, with all other necessary particulars, the Collector of Customs will, on due inspection made, and on receipt of the transit duty due, issue a transit duty certificate. This must be produced at every barrier station, and viséd. No further duty will be leviable upon imports so certificated, no matter how distant the place of their destination.

     In the Case of Exports.- Produce purchased by a British subject in the interior will be inspected, and taken account of, at the first barrier it passes on its way to the port of shipment. A memorandum showing the amount of the produce and the port at which it is to be shipped, will be deposited there by the person in charge of the produce; he will then receive a certificate, which must be exhibited and viséd at every barrier, on his way to the port of shipment. On the arrival of the produce at the barrier nearest the port notice must be given at the Customs at the port, and the transit dues due thereon being paid, it will be passed. On exportation the produce will pay the tariff duty*.

Any attempt to pass goods inwards or outward otherwise than in compliance with the rule here laid down will render them liable to confiscation.

Unauthorised sale, in transitu, of goods that have been entered as above for a port, will render them liable to confiscation. Any attempt to pass goods in excess of the quantity specified in the certificate will render all the goods of the same denomination, named in the certificate, liable to confiscation. Permission to export produce, which cannot be proved to have paid its transit dues, will be refused by the Customs until the transit dues shall have been paid. The above being the arrange- ment agreed to regarding the transit dues, which will thus be levied once and for all, the notification required under Article XXVIII. of the Treaty of Tientsin, for the information of British and Chinese subjects, is hereby dispensed with.

     RULE VIII.-Peking not Open to Trade.-It is agreed that Article IX. of the Treaty of Tientsin shall not be interpreted as authorising British subjects to enter the capital city of Peking for purposes of trade.

     RULE IX-Abolition of the Meltage Fee.--It is agreed that the percentage of one Tael two Mace, hitherto charged in excess of duty payments to defray the expenses of melting by the Chinese Government, shall be no longer levied on British subjects.

     RULE X.-Collection of Duties Under One System at all Ports.-It being by Treaty at the option of the Chinese Government to adopt what means appear to it best suited to protect its revenue accruing on British trade, it is agreed that one uniform system shall be enforced at every port.

     The high officer appointed by the Chinese Government to superintend foreign trade will, accordingly from time to time, either himself visit, or will send a deputy to visit the different ports. The said high officer will be at liberty, of his own choice, and independently of the suggestion or nomination of any British authority, to select any British subject he may see fit to aid him in the administration of the Customs Revenue, in the prevention of smuggling, in the definition of port boundaries, or in discharging the duties of harbour master; also in the distribution of lights, buoys, beacons, and the like, the maintenance of which shall be provided for out of the tonnage dues.

     The Chinese Government will adopt what measures it shall find requisite to prevent smuggling upon the Yang-tsze-kiang, when that river shall be opened to trade.

     Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiang-su, this eighth day of November, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, being the third day of the tenth moon of the eighth year of the reign of Hien Fung.

(L.S.) ELGIN AND KINCARDINE.

SEAL OF CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARIES. SIGNATURES OF FIVE CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARIES.

*

See Chefoo Convention, Section III., Article 4.

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND CHINA RESPECTING THE EMPLOYMENT OF

CHINESE LABOUR IN BRITISH COLONIES AND PROTECTORATES

(Signed in London, 13th May, 1904.)

Whereas a Convention between Her Majesty Queen Victoria and His Majesty the Emperor of China was signed at Peking on the 24th October, 1860, by Article V. of which His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China consented to allow Chinese subjects, wishing to take service in British Colonies or other parts beyond the seas, to enter into engagements with British subjects, and to ship themselves and their families on board of British vessels at the open ports of China in conformity with Regulations to be drawn up between the two Governments for the protection of such emigrants:

       And whereas the aforesaid Regulations have not hitherto been framed, His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Emperor of China have accordingly appointed the following as their respective Plenipo- tentiaries, that is to say:

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, the Most Honourable Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, Marquess of Lansdowne, His Majestys' Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs; and

      His Majesty the Emperor of China, Chang Têh-Yih, Brevet Lieutenant-General of the Chinese Imperial Forces, His Imperial Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India;

      And the said Plenipotentiaries having met and communicated to each other their respective full powers, and found them in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :-

Art. I.-As the Regulations to be framed under the above-mentioned Treaty were intended to be of a general character, it is hereby agreed that on each occasion when indentured emigrants are required for a particular British Colony or Protectorate beyond the seas, His Britannic Majesty's Minister in Peking shall notify the Chinese Government, stating the name of the Treaty port at which it is intended to embark them, and the terms and conditions on which they are to be engaged; the Chinese Government shall thereupon, without requiring further formalities, immediately instruct the local authorities at the specified Treaty port to take all the steps necessary to facilitate emigration. The notification herein referred to shall only be required once in the case of each Colony or Protectorate, except when emigration under indenture to that Colony or Protectorate from the specified Treaty port has uot taken place during the preceding three years.

112

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

Art. II.--On the receipt of the instructions above referred to, the Taotai at the port shall at once appoint an officer, to be called the Chinese Inspector; who, together with the British Consular Officer at the port, or his Delegate, shall make known by Proclamation and by means of the native press the text of the Indenture which the emigrant will have to sign, and any particulars of which the Chinese officer considers it essential that the emigrant shall be informed, respecting the country to which the emigrant is to proceed, and respecting its laws.

     Art. III. The British Consular officer at the port, or his Delegate, shall confer with the Chinese Inspector as to the location and installation of the offices and other necessary buildings hereinafter callel the Emigration Agency, which shall be erected or fitted up by the British Government, and at their expense, for the purpose of carrying on the business of the engagement and shipment of the emigrants, and in which the Chinese Inspector and his staff shall have suitable accommodation for carrying on their duties.

     Art. IV.--(1.) There shall be posted up in conspicuous places throughout the Emigration Agency, and more especially in that part of it called the Depôt, destined for the reception of intending emigrants, copies of the Indenture to be entered into with the emigrant, drawn up in the English and Chinese languages, together with copies of the special Ordinance, if any, relating to immigration into the particular Colony or Protectorate for which the emigrants are required.

(2.) There shall be kept a Register in English and in Chinese, in which the names of intending indentured emigrants shall be inscribed, and in this Register there shall not be inscribed the name of any person who is under 20 years of age, unless he shall have produced proof of his having obtained the consent of his parents or other lawful guardians to emigrate, or, in default of these, of the Magistrate of the district to which he belongs. After signature of the Indenture according to the Chinese manner, the emigrant shall not be permitted to leave the Depôt previously to his embarkation, without a pass signed by the Chinese Inspector, and countersigned by the British Consular Officer or his Delegate, unless he shall have, through the Chinese Inspector, renounced his agreement and withdrawn his name from the register of emigrants.

     (3.) Before the sailing of the ship each emigrant shall be carefully examined by a qualified Medical officer nominated by the British Consular Officer or his Delegate. The emigrants shall be paraded before the British Consular Officer or his Delegate and the Chines Inspector or his Delegate, and questioned with a view to ascertain their perfect understanding of the Indenture.

     Art. V. All ships employed in the conveyance of indentured emigrants from China un ler this Convention shall engage and embark them only at a Treaty port, and shall comply with the Regulations contained in the Schedule hereto annexed and forming part of the Convention.

     Art. VI. For the better protection of the emigrant, and of any other Chinese subject who may happen to be residing in the Colony or Protectorate to which the emiration is to take place, it shall be competent to the Emperor of China to appoint a Consul or Vice-Consul to watch over their interests and well-being, and such Consul or Vice-Consul shall have all the rights and privileges accorded to the Consuls of other nations.

     Art. VII.-Every Indenture entered into under the present Articles shall clearly specify the name of the country for which the labourer is required, the duration of the engagement, and, if renewable, on what terms, the number of hours of labour per working day, the nature of the work, the rate of wages and mode of payment, the rations, clothing, the grant of a free passage out, and, where such is provided for therein, a free passage back to the port of embarkation in China for himself and family, right to free medical attendance and medicines, whether in the Colony or Protectorate, or on the voyage from and to the port of einbarkation in China, and any other

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

113

    advantages to which the emigrant shall be entitled. The Indenture may also provide that the emigrant shall, if considered necessary by the medical authorities, be vaccinated on his arrival at the Depôt, and in the event of such vaccination being unsuccessful, revaccinated on board ship.

Art. VIII. The Indenture shall be signed, or in cases of illiteracy marked, by the emigrant after the Chinese manner, in the presence of the British Consular Officer or his Delegate and of the Chinese Inspector or his Delegate, who shall be responsi- ble to their respective Governments for its provisions having been clearly and fully explained to the emigrant previous to signature. To each emigrant there shall be presented a copy of the Indenture drawn up in Eng'ish and Chinese. Such Inden- ture shall not be considered as definitive or irrevocable until after the embarkation of the emigrant.

Art. IX.-In every British Colony or Protectorate to which indentured Chinese emigrants proceed, an officer or officers shall be appointed, whose duty it shall be to insure that the emigrant shall have free access to the Courts of Justice to obtain the redress for injuries to his person and property which is secured to all persons irrespec- tive of race, by the local law.

Art. X. During the sojourn of the emigrant in the Colony or Protectorate in which he is employed, all possible postal facilities shall be afforded to him for com- municating with his native country and for making remittances to his family.

       Art. XI. ---With regard to the repatriation of the emigrant and his family whether on the expiration of the Indenture or from any legal cause, or in event of his having been invalided from sickness or disablement, it is understood that this shall always be to the port of shipment in China, and that in no case shall it take place by any other means than actual conveyance by ship, and payment of money to the returning emigrant in lieu of passage shall not be admissible.

       Art. XII.-Nothing in any Indenture framed under these Articles shall constitute on the employer a right to transfer the emigraut to another employer of labour without the emigrant's free consent and the approval of his Consul or Vice-Consul; and should any such transfer or assignment take place, it shall not in any way invalidate any of the rights or privileges of the emigrant under the Indenture.

       Art. XIII.-It is agreed that a fee on each indentured emigrant shipped under the terms of this convention shall be paid to the Chinese Government for expenses of inspection, but no payment of any kind shall be made to the Chinese Inspectɔr or any other official of the Chinese Government at the port of embarkation. The above fee shall be paid into the Customs bauk previous to the clearance of the ship, and shall be calculated at the following rate:-3 Mexican dollars per head for any number of emigrants not exceeding 10,000, and 2 dollars per head for any number in excess thereof, provided they are shipped at the same Treaty port, and that not more than twelve months have elapsed since the date of the last shipment.

       Should the port of embarkation have been changed, or a space of more than twelve months have elapsed since the date of the last shipment, inspection charges shall be paid as in the first instance.

Art. XIV. The English and Chinese text of the present Convention have been carefully compared, but in the event of there being any difference of meaning between them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the correct sense,

       Art. XV. The present Convention shall come into force on the date of its signature and remain in force for four years from that date, and after such period of four years it shall be terminable by either of the High Contracting Parties on giving one year's notice.

In witness whereof the Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Convention, and have affixed thereto their seals.

      Done at London in four copies (two in English and two in Chinese), this thirteenth day of May of the year 1904.

(Signed)

LANSDOWNE.

T. Y. CHANG.

114

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

SCHEDULE

Regulations

     Ships employed in the transport of indentured emigrants from China under this Convention must be seaworthy, clean, and properly ventilated, and with regard to the following matters, shall comply with conditions as far as possible equivalent to those in force in British India with reference to the emigration of natives from India:-

     Accommodation required on board (vide Section 57 of "The Indian Emigration Act, 1883").

Sleeping accommodation consisting of wooden sheathing to the decks or sleeping platforms (vide rule regarding "iron decks," as amended the 16th August, 1902, in Schedule "A" to the rules under "The Indian Emigration Act, 1883").

     Rules as to space on board (vide Section 58 of "The Indian Emigration Act, 1883").

Carriage of qualified surgeon, with necessary medical stores.

     Storage of drinking water (vide Rule 113, as amended the 24th February, 1903. under "The Indian Emigration Act, 1883").

     Provision of adequate distilling apparatus (vide Schedule "C" to the rules under "The Indian Emigration Act, 1883").

     The dietary for each indentured emigrant on board ship shall be as follows per day :-

Rice, not less than 13 lb., or flour or bread stuffs

Fish (dried or salt) or meat (fresh or preserved) Fresh vegetables of suitable kinds

Salt

Sugar...

Chinese tea

Chinese condiments in sufficient quantities.

Water, for drinking and cooking

:

1 lb.

"ཅེས་དྲ-3-༥/ཀ。

19

1 29 1 oz.

11

01

"}

1 gallon

or such other articles of food as may be substituted for any of the articles enumerat- ed in the foregoing scale as being in the opinion of the doctor on board equivalent thereto.

NOTES EXCHANnged Between THE MARQUESS OF LANSDOWNE AND THE CHINESE

MINISTER ON SIGNING CONVENTION OF MAY 13TH, 1904

Foreign Office, London, May 13th, 1904.

      SIR,-By Article VI. of the Convention about to be concluded between Great Britain and China with regard to Chinese subjects leaving the Treaty ports of China under Indenture for service in British Colonies or Protectorates, it is provided that:-

     "For the better protection of the emigrant and of any other Chinese subject who may happen to be residing in the Colony or Protectorate to which the emigration is to take place, it shall be competent to the Emperor of China to appoint a Consul or Vice-Consul to watch over their interests and well-being, and such Consul or Vice-Consul shall have all the rights and privileges accorded to the Consul of other nations."

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

115

His Majesty's Government consider it specially important that the persons appointed to occupy, for the purpose named, the position of Consul or Vice-Consul should be experienced officers of Chinese nationality, that they should be exclusively in the service of the Emperor of China, and that in each case the name of the person selected should be communicated to His Majesty's Government, and their agreement to the appointment obtained.

      I have the honour to inquire whether the Chinese Government are prepared to meet the wishes of His Majesty's Government in the matter. If so, and if you will inform me accordingly, this note and your reply might be attached to the Convention in order to place on formal record the arrangement concluded.-I have, &c.

Chang Ta-Jen, &c., &c., &c.

(Signed)

LANSDOWNE.

Chinese Legation, London,

May 13th, 1904.

MY LORD MARQUESS,-In reply to your Lordship's note of this date, I have the honour to state that the Chinese Government are in entire accord with His Britannic Majesty's Government as to the great importance they attach to the Consuls and Vice- Consuls to be appointed under Article VI. of the Convention about to be concluded between the two Governments being men of great experience, and will consider it a duty which they owe to the emigrant to confine the selection of these officers to such as in all respects conform to the requirements specified in the note above referred to, which, together with the present one, it has been mutually agreed shall, in proof of that understanding, be appended to the said Convention.

I have, &c.

The Marquess of Lansdowne, K. G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

(Signed)

T. Y. CHANG

EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM

AND RUSSIA WITH REGARD TO THEIR RESPECTIVE

RAILWAY INTERESTS IN CHINA

No. 1

Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff

The Undersigned, British Ambassador, duly authorized to that effect, has the honour to make the following declaration to his Excellency Count Mouravieff,

Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs:-

      Great Britain and Russia, animated by a sincere desire to avoid in China all canse of rouflict on questions where their interests meet, and taking into considera- tion the economic and geographical gravitation of certain parts of that Empire, have agreed as follows:-

      1. Great Britain engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of British subjects or of others, any railway concessions to the north of the Great Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in that region supported by the Russian Governent.

2.-Russia, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of Russian subjects or of others, any railway concessions in the basin of the Yang- tze and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in that region supported by the British Government.

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view to infringe in any way the sovereign rights of China or existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate to the Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting all cause of com- plications between them, is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East, and to serve the primordial interests of China herself.

(Signed) CHARLES S. SCOTT.

St. Petersburg, April 28, 1899.

The Undersigned, Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs, duly authorized to that effect, has the honour to make the following declaration to his Excellency Sir Charles Scott, British Ambassador :-

Russia and Great Britain, animated by the sincere desire to avoid in China all cause of conflict on questions where their interests meet, and taking into considera- tion the economic and geographical gravitation of certain parts of that Empire, have agreed as followe

1.--Russia engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of Russian subjects or of others, any railway concessions in the basin of the Yangtze, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in that region supported by the British Government.

EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND RUSSIA 117

       2.-Great Britain, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of British subjects or of others, any railway concessions to the north of the Great Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in that region supported by the Russian Government.

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view to infringe in any way the sovereign rights of China or of existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate to the Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting all cause of complication between them, is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East, and to serve the primordial interests of China herself.

The Undersigned, etc.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

(Signed) Count MOURAVIEFF.

No. 3

Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff

In order to complete the notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of spheres for concessions for the construction and working of railways in China, it has been agreed to record in the present additional note the arrangement arrived at with regard to the line Shanhaikuan-Newchwang, for the construction of which a loan has been already contracted by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai- Hongkong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned notes is not to infring in any way the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, and the Chinese Government may appoint both an English engineer and an European accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question, and the expenditure of the money appropriated to it.

But it remains understood that this fact cannot be taken as constituting a right of property or foreign control, and that the line in question is to remain a Chinese line, under the control of the Chinese Government, and cannot be mortgaged or alienated to a non-Chinese Company.

As regards the branch lime from Siaoheichan to Sinminting, in addition to the aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China her- self, who may permit European-not necessarily British-engineers to periodically inspect it, and to verify and certify that the work is being properly executed.

       The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any way with the right of the Russian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of Russian subjects or establishments for Concessions for railways, which, starting from the main Manchurian line in a south-westerly direction, would traverse the region in which the Chinese line terminating at Siuminting and Newchwang is to be constructed.

St. Petersburg, April 28th, 1899.

(Signed) CHARLES S. SCOTT.

No. 4

Count Mouravieff to Sir C. Scott

In order to complete the notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of spheres for concessions for the construction and working of railways in China, it has been agreed to record in the present additional note the Agreement arrived at with regard to the line Shanhaikuan-Newchwang, for the construction of which a loan has been already contractel by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai-Hong- kong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

118

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

      The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned notes is not to infringe in any way the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, and the Chinese Government is at liberty to appoint both an English engineer and a European accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question and the expenditure of the money appropriated to it. But it remains well understood that this fact cannot be taken as constituting a right of property or foreign control, and that the line in question is to remain a Chinese line, subject to the control of the Chinese Government, and cannot be mortgaged or alienated to a non-Chinese Company.

As regards the brauch line from Siaoheïchan to Sinminting, in addition to the aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China herself, who may permit European-not necessarily British-engineers to periodi- cally inspect it, and to verify and certify that the works are being properly executed. The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any way with the right of the Russian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of Russian subjects or establishments for Concessions for railways, which, starting from the main Manchurian line in a south-westerly direction, would traverse the region in which the Chinese line terminating at Sinminting and Newchwang is to be constructed.

The Undersigned, etc.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

(Signed) Count MOURAVIEFF.

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

Signed at Peking, April 27th, 1906

TO WHICH IS ANNEXED THE CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM

and Tibet, SIGNED AT LHASA, SEPTEMBER 7TH, 1904

Ratifications exchanged at London July 23rd, 1906

     Whereas His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Emperor of China are sincerely desirous to maintain and perpetuate the relations of friendship and good understanding which now exist between their respective Empires;

     And whereas the refusal of Tibet to recognise the validity of or to carry into full effect the provisions of the Anglo-Chinese Convention of March 17th, 1890, and Regulations of December 5th, 1893, placed the British Government under the necessity of taking steps to secure their rights and interests under the said Convention and Regulations;

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

119

And whereas a Convention of ten articles was signed at Lhasa on September 7th, 1904, on behalf of Great Britain and Tibet, and was ratified by the Viceroy and Governor-General of India on behalf of Great Britain on November 11th, 1904, a declaration on behalf of Great Britain modifying its terms under certain conditions being appended thereto;

His Britannic Majesty and His Majesty the Emperor of China have resolved to conclude a Convention on this subject and have for this purpose named Plenipoten- tiaries, that is to say:

His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland:

Sir Ernest Mason Satow, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, His said Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of China; and His Majesty the Emperor of China:

His Excellency Tong Shoa-yi, His said Majesty's High Commissioner Pleni- potentiary and a Vice-President of the Board of Foreign Affairs;

Who having communicated to each other their respective full powers and find- ing them to be in good and true form have agreed upon and concluded the follow- ing Convention in six articles :-

Art. I. The Convention concluded on September 7th, 1904, by Great Britain and Tibet, the texts of which in English and Chinese are attached to the present Convention as an annexe, is hereby confirmed, subject to the modification stated in the declaration appended thereto, and both of the High Contracting Parties engage to take at all times such steps as may be necessary to secure the due fulfilment of the terms specified therein.

Art. II. The Government of Great Britain engages not to annex Tibetan territory or to interfere in the administration of Tibet. The Government of China also undertakes not to permit any other foreign State to interfere with the territory or internal administration of Tibet.

Art. III.-The concessions which are mentioned in Article 9 (d) of the Con- vention concluded on September 7th, 1904, by Great Britain and Tibet are denied to any state or to the subject of any state other than China, but it has been arranged with China that at the trade marts specified in Article 2 of the aforesaid Convention Great Britain shall be entitled to lay down telegraph lines connecting with India.

Art. IV. The provisions of the Anglo-Chinese Convention of 1890 and Regulations of 1893 shall, subject to the terms of this present Convention and annexe thereto, remain in full force.

Art. V.-The English and Chinese texts of the present Convention have been carefully compared and found to correspond, but in the event of there being any difference of meaning between them the English text shall be authoritative.

Art. VI. This Convention shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of both countries and ratifications shall be exchanged in Loudon within three months after the date of signature by the Plenipotentiaries of both Powers.

      In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this Convention, four copies in English and four in Chinese.

Done at Peking this twenty-seventh day of April, one thousand nine hundred and six, being the fourth day of the fourth month of the thirty-second year of the reign of Kuang Hsü,

(L.S.)

ERNEST SATow.

(Signature and Seal of the Chinese

Plenipotentiary.)

120

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

SIGNED AT LHASA, 7TH SEPTEMBER, 1904

WHEREAS doubts and difficulties have arisen as to the meaning and validity of the Anglo-Chinese Convention of 1890, and the Trade Regulations of 1893, and as to the liabilities of the Tibetan Government under these agreements; and whereas recent occurrences have tended towards a disturbance of the relations of friendship and good understanding which have existed between the British Government and the Government of 'Tibet; and whereas it is desirable to restore peace and amicable relations and tɔ resolve and determine the doubts and difficulties as aforesaid, the said Governments have resolved to conclude a Convention with these objects, an the following articles have been agreed upon by Colonel F. E. Younghusband, C.I.E., in virtue of full powers vested in him by His Britannic Majesty's Government and on behalf of that said Government, and Lo-Sang Gyal-Tsen, the Ga-den Ti-Rimpoche, and the representatives of the Council of the three monasteries Se-ra, Dre pung, and Ga-den, and of the ecclesiastical and lay officials of the National Assembly on behalf of the Government of Tibet:-

      I. The Government of Tibet engages to respect the Anglo-Chinese Convention of 1890 and to recognise the frontier between Sikkim and Tibet, as defined in Article I. of the said Convention, and to erect boundary pillars accordingly.

      II. The Tibetan Government undertakes to open forthwith trade marts to which all British and Tibetan subjects shall have free right of access at Gyangtse and Gartok, as well as at Yatung.

The Regulations applicable to the trade mart at Yatung, under the Anglo-Chinese Agreement of 1893, shall, subject to such amendments as mav hereafter be agreed upon by common consent between the British and Tibetan Governments, apply to the marts above mentioned.

      In addition to establishing trade marts at the places mentioned, the Tibetan Government undertakes to place no restrictions on the trade by existing routes, and to consider the question of establishing fresh trade marts under similar conditions if development of trade requires it.

      III. The question of the amendment of the Regulations of 1893 is reserved for separate consideration, and the Tibetan Government undertakes to appoint fully authorised delegates to negotiate with representatives of the British Government as to the details of the amendments required.

IV. The Tibetan Government undertakes to levy no dues of any kind other than those provided for in the tariff to be mutually agreed upon.

      V.The Tibetan Government undertakes to keep the roads to Gyangtse and Gartok from the frontier clear of all obstruction and in a state of repair suited to the needs of the trade, and to establish at Yatung, Gyangtse and Gartok, and at each of the other trade marts that may hereafter be established, a Tibetan Agent who shall receive from the British Agent appointed to watch over British tra le at the marts in question any letter which the latter may desire to send to the Tibetan or to the Chinese authorities. The Tibetan Agent shall also be responsible for the due delivery of such communications and for the transmission of replies.

      VI.-As an indemnity to the British Government for the expense incurred in the despatch of armed troops to Lhasa, to exact reparation for breaches of treaty obligations, and for the insults offered to and attacks upon the British Commissioner and his following and escort, the Tibetan Government engages to pay a sum of Pounds five hundred thousand, equivalent to Rupees seventy-five lakhs, to the British Government.

     The indemnity shall be payable at such place as the British Government may from time to time, after due notice, indicate, whether in Tibet or in the British districts of Darjeeling or Jalpaiguri, in seventy-five annual instalments of Rupees one lakh each on the 1st January in each year, beginning from the 1st January, 19J6.

VII.-As security for the payment of the above-mentioned indemnity, and for the fulfilment of the provisions relative to trade warts specified in Articles II., III., IV., V.

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

121

the British Government shall continue to occupy the Chumbi Valley until the indemnity has been paid and until the trade marts have been effectively opened for three years, whichever date may be the later.

        VIII. The Tibetan Government agrees to raze all forts and fortifications and remove all armaments which might impede the course of free communications between the British frontier and the towns of Gyangtse and Lhasa.

IX.-The Government of Tibet engages that, without the previous consent of the

British Government-

(a) No portion of Tibetan territory shall be ceded, sold, leased, mortgaged, or otherwise given for occupation, to any foreign Power;

(b) No such Power shall be permitted to intervene in Tibetan affairs;

(e) No representatives or agents of any foreign Power shall be admitted to Tibet; (d) No concessions for railways, roads, telegraphs, mining or other rights, shall be granted to any foreign Power, or the subject of any foreign Power. In the event of consent to such concessions being granted, similar or equivalent concessions shall be granted to the British Government;

(e) No Tibetan revenues, whether in kind or in cash, shall be pledged or assigned to any foreign Power, or the subject of any foreign Power.

       X.-In witness whereof the negotiators have signed the same, and affixed there- unto the seals of their arms.

       Done in quintuplicate at Lhasa, this 7th day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and four, corresponding with the Tibetan date, the 27th day of the seventh month of the Wood Dragon year.

ARRANGEMENT BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND RUSSIA CONCERNING TIBET.

       The Governments of Britain and Russia recognizing the suzerain rights of China. in Tibet, and considering the fact that Great Britain, by reason of her geographical position, has a special interest in the maintenance of the status quo in the external relations of Tibet, have made the following Arrangement:-

       I. The two High Contracting Parties engage to respect the territorial integrity of Tibet and to abstain from all interference in its internal administration.

       II. In conformity with the admitted principle of the suzerainty of China over Tibet, Great Britain and Russia engage not to enter into negotiations with Tibet except through the enterme liary of the Chinese Government. This engagement does not exclude the direct relations between British Commercial Agents and the Tibetan authorities provided for in Article V. of the Convention between Great Britain and Tibet of September 7th, 1901, and confirmed by the Convention between Great Britain and China of April 27th, 1906; nor does it modify the engagements entered into by Great Britain and China in Article I. of the said Convention of 1906.

        It is clearly understood that Buddhists, subjects of Great Britain or of Russia, may enter into direct relations on strictly religious matters with the Dalai Lama and the other representatives of Buddhism in Tibet; the Governments of Great Britain and Russia engage, as far as they are concerned, not to allow those relations to infringe the stipulations of the present arrangement.

III.-The British and Russian Governments respectively engage not to send representatives to Lhassa.

IV. The two High Contracting Parties engage neither to seek nor to obtain, whether for themselves or their subjects, any concessions for railways, roads, tele- graphs and mines, or other rights in Tibet.

      V-The two Governments agree that no part of the revenues of Tibet, whether in kind or in cash, shall be pledged or assigned to Great Britain or Russia or to any of their subjects.

3

122

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

ANNEX.

Great Britain reaffirms the Declaration, signed by his Excellency the Viceroy and Governor-General of India and appended to the ratification of the Convention of September 7th, 1904, to the effect that the occupation of the Chumbi Valley by British forces shall cease after the payment of three annual instalments of the indemnity of 25,000,000 Rupees, provided that the trade marts mentioned in Article II. of that Convention have been effectively opened for three years, and that in the meantime the Tibetan authorities have faithfully complied in all respects with the terms of the said Convention of 1904. It is clearly understood that if the occupa- tion of the Chumbi Valley by the British forces has, for any reason, not been terminated at the time anticipated in the above Declaration, the British and Russian Governments will enter upon a friendly exchange of views on this subject.

     The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications exchanged at St. Petersburg as soon as possible.

     In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Convention and affixed thereto their seals.

Done in duplicate at St. Petersburg, the 18th (31st) August, 1907.

(L.S.) (L.S.)

A. NICOLSO N. ISWOLSKY.

St. Petersburg, August 18th (31st), 1907.

      M. le Ministre,--With reference to the Arrangement regarding Tibet, signed to day, I have the honour to make the following Declaration to your Excellency :-

     "His Britannic Majesty's Government think it desirable, so far as they are concerned, not to allow, unless by a previous agreement with the Russian Government for a period of three years from the date of the present communication, the entry into Tibet of any scientific mission whatever, on condition that a like assurance is given on the part of the Imperial Russian Government.

     "His Britannic Majesty's Government propose, moreover, to approach the Chinese Government with a view to induce them to accept a similiar obligation for a corresponding period; the Russian Government will, as a matter of course, take similar action.

      "At the expiration of the term of three years above mentioned His Britannic Majesty's Goverment will, if necessary, consult with the Russian Government as to the desirability of any ulterior measures with regard to scientific expeditions to Tibet."

I avail, etc,

A. NICOLSON.

St. Petersburg, August 18th (31st), 1907.

M. l'Ambassadeur, -In reply to your Excellency's note of even date, I have the honour to declare that the Imperial Russian Government think it desirable, so far as they are concerned, not to allow, unless by a previous agreement with the British Government, for a period of three years from the date of the present communication, the entry into Tibet of any scientific mission whatever.

Like the British Government, the Imperial Government propose to approach the Chinese Government with a view to induce them to accept a similar obligation for a corresponding period.

It is understood that at the expiration of the term of three years the two Governments will, if necessary, consult with each other as to the desirability of any ulterior measures with regard to scientific expeditions to Tibet.

I have, etc.,

ISWOLSKY.

FRANCE

TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE, AND

NAVIGATION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE French and CHINESE LANGUAGES, AT TIENTSIN, 27TH JUNE, 1858

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 25th October, 1860

      His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous to put an end to the existing misunderstanding between the two Empires, and wishing to re-establish and improve the relations of friendship, com- merce, and navigation between the two powers, have resolved to conclude a new Treaty based on the common'interest of the two countries, and for that purpose have named as their plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

      His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Baron Gros, Grand Officer of the Legiou of Honour, Grand Cross of the Order of the Saviour of Greece, Commander of the Order of the Conception of Portugal, &c., &e., &c.

      And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Kweiliang, Imperial High Commis- sioner of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, Grand Minister of the East Palace, Director-General of the Council of Justice, &c., &c., &c.; and Hwashana, Imperial High Commissioner of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, President of the Board of Finance, General of the Bordered Blue Banner of the Chinese Banner Force, &c., &c., &c.;

      Who, having exchanged their full powers, which they have found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:-

      Art. I. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between the subjects of the two Empires, who shall enjoy equally in the respective states of the high contracting parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

      Art. II.-In order to maintain the peace so happily re-established between the two empires it has been agreed between the high contracting parties that, following in this respect the practice amongst Western nations, the duly accredited diplomatic agents of His Majesty the Emperor of the French of His Majesty the Emperor of China shall have the right of resorting to the capital of the empire when important affairs call them there. It is agreed between the high contracting parties that if any one of the powers having a treaty with China obtains for its diplomatic agents the right of permanently residing at Peking, France shall immediately enjoy the same right.

The diplomatic agents shall reciprocally enjoy, in the place of their residence, the privileges and immunities accorded to them by international law, that is to say, that their persons, their families, their houses, and their correspondence, shall be inviolable, that they may take into their service such employés, couriers, interpreters, servants, &c., &c., as shall be necessary to them.

     The expense of every kind occasioned by the diplomatic mission of France in China shall be defrayed by the French Government. The diplomatic agents whom

3*

121

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

it shall please the Emperor of China to accredit to His Majesty the Emperor to the French, shall be received in France with all the honours and prerogatives which the diplomatic agents of other nations accredited to the court of His Majesty the Emperor of the French enjoy.

Art. III. The official communications of the French diplomatic and consular agents with the Chinese authorities shall be written in French, but shall be accom- panied, to facilitate the service, by a Chinese translation, as exact as possible, until such time as the Imperial Government at Peking, having interpreters speaking and writing French correctly, diplomatic correspondence shall be conducted in this language by the French agents and in Chinese by the officers of the Emp in. It is agreed that until then, and in case of difference in the interpretation, ire reference to the French text and Chinese text of the clauses heretofore agreed upon in the conventions made by common accord, it shall always be the original text and not the translation which shall be held correct. This provision applies to the present Treaty, and in the communications between the authorities of the two countries it shall always be the original text, not the translation, which shall be held correct.

Art. IV. Henceforth the official correspondence between the authorities and the officers of the two countries shall be regulated according to their respective ranks and conditions and upon the basis of the most absolute reciprocity. This correspondence shall take place between the high French officers and high Chinese officers, in the capital or elsewhere, by dispatch or communication; between the French sub- ordinate officers and the high authorities in the provinces, on the part of the former by statement, and on the part of the latter by declaration.

      Between the officers of lower rank of the two nations, as above provided, on the footing of a perfect equality.

     Merchants and generally all persons not having an official character shall on both sides use the form of representation in all documents addressed to or intended for the notice of the respective authorities.

Whenever a French subject shall have recourse to the Chinese authority, his representation shall first be submitted to the Consul, who, if it appears to him reasonable and properly addressed, shall forward it; if it be otherwise, the Consul shall cause the tenour to be modified or refuse to transmit it. The Chinese, on their part, when they have to address a, Consulate, shall follow a similar course towards the Chinese authority, who shall act in the same manner.

Art. V. His Majesty the Emperor of the French may appoint Consuls or Con- sular Agents in the coast and river ports of the Chinese empire named in Article VI. of the present Treaty to conduct the business between 'the Chinese authorities and French merchants and subjects and to see to the strict observance of the stipulated rules. These officers shall be treated with the consideration and regard which are due to them. Their relations with the authorities of the place of their residence shall be established on the footing of the most perfect equality. If they shall have to complain of the proceedings of the said authorities, they may address the superior authority of the province direct, and shall immediately advise the Minister Plenipo- tentiary of the Emperor thereof.

       In case of the absence of the French Consul, captains and merchants shall be at liberty to have recourse to the intervention of the Consul of a friendly power, or, if this be impossible, they shall have recourse to the chief of the Customs, who shall advise as to the means of assuring to the said captains and merchants the benefits of the present Treaty.

     Art. VI.-Experience having demonstrated that the opening of new ports to foreign commerce is one of the necessities of the age, it has been agreed that the forts of Kiung-chow and Chao-chow in the province of Kwangtung, Taiwan and Tamsui in the island of Formosa (province of Fohkien), Tang-chow in the pro- vince of Shantung, and Nanking in the province of Kiangsu, shall enjoy the same privileges as Canton, Shanghai, Ningpo, Amoy, and Foochow. With regard to

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

125

Nanking, the French agents in China shall not deliver passports to their nationals for this city until the rebels have been expelled by the Imperial troops.

      Art. VII. French subjects and their families may establish themselves and trade or pursue their avocations in all security, and without hindrance of any kind in the ports and cities enumerated in the preceding article.

      They may travel freely between them if they are provided with passports, but it is expressly forbidden to them to trade elsewhere on the coast in search of clandestine markets, under pain of confiscation of both the ships and goods used in such operations, and this confiscation shall be for the benefit of the Chinese Govern- ment, who, however, before the seizure and confiscation can be legally pronounced, must advise the French Consul at the nearest port.

      Art. VIII.-French subjects who wish to go to interior towns, or ports not open to foreign vessels, may do so in all security, on the express condition that they are provided with passports written in French and Chinese, legally delivered by the diplomatic agents or consuls of France in China and vised by the Chinese authorities.

      In case of the loss of his passport, the French subject who cannot present it when it is legally required of him, shall, if the Chinese authorities of the place refuse him permission to remain a sufficient time to obtain another passport from the Consul, be conducted to the nearest consulate and shall not be maltreated or insulted in any way.

As is stipulated in the former Treaties, French subjects resident or sojourning in the ports open to foreign trade may travel without passports in their immediate neighbourhood and there pursue their occupations as freely as the natives, but they must not pass certain limits which shall be agreed upon between the Consul and the local authority. The French agents in China shall deliver passports to their nationals only for the places where the rebels are not established at the time the passport shall be demanded.

      These passports shall be delivered by the French authorities only to persons who offer every desirable guarantee.

Art. IX. All changes made by common consent with one of the signatory powers of the treaties with China on the subject of amelioration of the tariff now in force, or which may hereafter be in force, as also all rights of customs, tonnage, importation, transit, and exportation, shall be immediately applicable to French trade and mer- chants by the mere fact of their being placed in execution.

Art. X.-Any French subject who, conformably to the stipulations of Article VI. of the present Treaty, shall arrive at one of the ports open to foreign trade, may, whatever may be the length of his sojourn, rent houses and warehouses for the disposal of his merchandise, or lease land and himself build houses and warehouses. French subjects may, in the same manner, establish churches, hospitals, religious houses, schools, and cemeteries. To this end the local authority, after having agreed with the Consul, shall designate the quarters most suitable for the residence of the French and the sites on which the above mentioned structures may have place.

The terms of rents and leases shall be freely discussed between the interested parties and regulated, as far as possible, according to the average local rates.

      The Chinese authorities shall prevent their nationals from exacting or requiring exorbitant prices, and the Consul on his side shall see that French subjects use no violence or constraint to force the consent of the proprietors. It is further under- stood that the number of houses and the extent of the ground to be assigned to French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade shall not be limited, and that they shall be determined according to the needs and convenience of the parties. If Chinese subjects injure or destroy French churches or cemeteries, the guilty parties shall be punished with all the rigour of the laws of the country.

Art. XI.-French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade may freely engage, on the terms agreed upon between the parties, or by the sole intervention of the Consul, compradores, interpreters, clerks, workmen, watermen, and servants. They shall also have the right of engaging teachers in order to learn to speak and write

126

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

the Chinese language and any other language or dialect used in the empire, as also to secure their aid in scientific or literary works. Equally they may teach to Chinese subjects their own or foreign languages and sell without obstacle French books or themselves purchase Chinese books of all descriptions.

     Art. XII.-Property of any kind appertaining to French subjects in the Chinese empire shall be considered by the Chinese inviolable and shall always be respected by them. The Chinese authorities shall not, under any circumstances whatever, place French vessels under embargo nor put them under requisition for any service, be it public or private.

     Art. XIII.-The Christian religion having for its essential object the leading of men to virtue, the members of all Christian communities shall enjoy entire security for their persons and property and the free exercise of their religion, and efficient protection shall be given the missionaries who travel peaceably in the interior furnished with passports as provided for in Article VIII.

     No hindrance shall be offered by the authorities of the Chinese Empire to the recognised right of every individual in China to embrace, if he so pleases, Chris- tianity, and to follow its practices without being liable to any punishment therefor.

All that has previously been written, proclaimed, or published in China by order of the Government against the Christian religion is completely abrogated aud remains null and void in all provinces of the Empire.

     Art. XIV.-No privileged commercial society shall henceforward be established in China, and the same shall apply to any organised coalition having for its end the exercise of a monopoly of trade. In case of the contravention of the present article the Chinese Authorities, on the representations of the Consul or Consular Agent, shall advise as to the means of dissolving such associations, of which they are also bound to prevent the existence by the preceding prohibitions, so as to remove all that may stand in the way of free competition.

Art. XV.-When a French vessel arrives in the waters of one of the ports open to foreign trade she shall be at liberty to engage any pilot to take her immediately into the port, aud, in the same manner, when, having discharged all legal charges she shall be ready to put to sea, she shall not be refused pilots to enable her to leave the port without hindrance or delay.

     Any individual who wishes to exercise the profession of pilot for French vessels may, on the presentation of three certificates from captains of ships, be commissioned by the French Consul in the same manner as shall be in use with other nations.

     The remuneration payable to pilots shall be equitably regulated for each parti- cular port by the Consul or Consular Agent, who shall fix it having regard to the distance and circumstances of the navigation.

Art. XVI.-After the pilot has brought a French trading ship into the port, the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or two officers to guard the ship and prevent fraud. These officers may, according to their convenience, remain in their own boat or stay on board the ship.

     Their pay, food, and expenses shall be a charge on the Chinese Customs, and they shall not demand any fee or remuneration whatever from the captain or consignee. Every contravention of this provision shall entail a punishment proportionate to the amount exacted, which also shall be returned in full.

Art. XVII.-Within the twenty-four hours following the arrival of a French merchant vessel in one of the ports open to foreign trade, the captain, if he be not unavoidably prevented, and in his default the supercargo or consignee, shall report at the French Consulate and place in the hands of the Consul the ship's papers the bills of lading, and the manifest. Within the twenty-four hours next following the Consul shall send to the Superintendent of Customs a detailed note indicating the name of the vessel, the articles, the tonnage, and the nature of the cargo; if, in consequence of the negligence of the captain this cannot be accomplished within the forty-eight hours following the arrival of the vessel, the captain shall be liable to a penalty of 50 Dollars for each day's delay, to the profit of the Chinese Government, but the said penalty shall in no case exceed the sum of 200 Dollars.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

127

      Immediately after the reception of the consular note the Superintendent of Customs shall give a permit to open hatches. If the captain, before having received the said permit, shall have opened hatches and commenced to discharge, he may be fined 500 Dollars, and the goods discharged may be seized, the whole to the profit of the Chinese Government.

Art. XVIII.-French captains and merchants may hire whatever boats and lighters they please for the transport of goods and passengers, and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the intervention of the Chinese authority, and consequently without its guarantee in case of accident, fraud, or disappearance of the said boats. The number of these boats shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either of the boats or of the carriage of merchandise by porters be granted to any one.

Art. XIX. Whenever a French merchant shall have merchandise to load or discharge he shall first remit a detailed note of it to the Consul or Consular Agent, who will immediately charge a recognised interpreter to the Consulate to communicate it to the Superintendent of Customs. The latter shall at once deliver a permit for shipping or landing the goods. He will then proceed to the verification of the goods in such manner that there shall be no chance of loss to any party.

       The French merchant must cause himself to be represented (if he does not prefer to attend himself) at the place of the verification by a person possessing the requisite knowledge to protect his interest at the time when the verification for the liquida- tion of the dues is made; otherwise any after claim will be null and of no effect.

      With respect to goods subject to an ad valorem duty, if the merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officers as to their value, then each party shall call in two or three merchants to examine the goods, and the highest price which shall be offered by any of them shall be assumed as the value of the said goods.

Duties shall be charged on the net weight; the tare will therefore be deducted. If the French merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer on the amount of tare, each party shall choose a certain number of chests and bales from among the goods respecting which there is a dispute; these shall be first weighed gross, then tared and the average tare of these shall be taken as the tare for all the others.

If during the course of verification any difficulty arises which cannot be settled, the French merchant may claim the intervention of the Consul, who will immediately brin, the subject of dispute to the notice of the Superintendent of Customs, and both will endeavour to arrive at an amicable arrangement, but the claim must be made within twenty-four hours; otherwise it will not receive attention. So long as the result of the dispute remains pending, the Superintendent of Customs shall not enter the matter in his books, thus leaving every latitude for the examination and solution of the difficulty.

On goods imported which have sustained damage a reduction of duties propor- tionate to their depreciation shall be made. This shall be equitably determined, and if necessary, in the manner above stipulated for the fixing of ad valorem duties.

Art. XX.-Any vessel having entered one of the ports of China, and which has not yet used the permit to open hatches mentioned in Article XIX., may within two days of arrival quit that port and proceed to another without having to pay either tonnage dues or customs duties, but will discharge them ultimately in the port where sale of the goods is effected.

Art. XXI.-It is established by common consent that import duties shall be discharged by the captains or French merchants after the landing and verification of the goods. Export duties shall in the same manner be paid on the shipment of the goods. When all tonnage dues and Customs duties shall have been paid in full by a French vessel the Superintendent of Customs shall give a general quittance, on the exhibition of which the Consul shall return the ship's papers to the captain and permit him to depart on his voyage. The Superintendent of Customs shall name one or several banks, which shall be authorised to receive the sum due by French merchants on account of the Government, and the receipts of these banks for all payments which have been made to them shall be considered as receipts of the

128

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

   Chinese Government. These payments may be made in ingots or foreign money, the relative value of which to sycee shall be determined by agreement between the Consul or Consular Agent and the Superintendent of Customs in the different ports, according to time, place, and circumstances.

      Art. XXII.- *After the expiration of the two days named in Art. XX., and before proceeding to discharge hier cargo, every vessel shall pay tonnage-dues accord- ing to the following scale :-' Vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and upwards at the rate of four mace per ton; vessels of less than one hundred and fifty tons mea- surement at the rate of one mace per ton.

Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the open ports, or trading between China and such ports in Cochin-China as belong to France, or any port in Japan, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to a special certificate from the Superintendent of Customs, on exhibition of which the said vessel shall be exempted from all further paymeut of tonnage-dues in any open port of China for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the date of her port-clearance; but after the expiration of four months she shall be required to pay tonnage-dues again.

      Small French vessels and boats of every class, whether with or without sails, shall be reckoned as coming within the category of vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and under, and shall pay tonnage-dues at the rate of one mace per ton once in every four months.

Native craft chartered by French merchants shall in like manner pay tonnage- dues once in every four months.

Art. XXIII.-All French goods, after having discharged the Customs duties according to the tariff in one of the ports of China, may be transported into the interior without being subjected to any further charge except the transit dues according to the amended scale now in force, which dues shall not be augmented in the future.

If the Chinese Customs Agents, contrary to the tenor of the present Treaty, make illegal exactions or levy higher dues, they shall be punished according to the laws of the empire.

      Art. XXIV.--Any French vessel entered at one of the ports open to foreign trade and wishing to discharge only a part of its goods there, shall pay Customs dues only for the part discharged; it may transport the remainder of its cargo to another port and sell it there. The duty shall then be paid.

     French subjects having paid in one port the duties on their goods, wishing to re-export them and send them for sale to another port, shall notify the Consul or Consular Agent. The latter shall inform the Superintendent of Customs, who, after having verified the identity of the goods and the perfect integrity of the packages, shall send to the claimants a declaration attesting that the duties on the said goods have been paid. Provided with this declaration, the French merchants on their arrival at the other port shall only have to present it through the medium of the Consul or Superintendent of Customs, who will deliver for this part of the cargo, without deduction or charge, a permit for discharge free of duty; but if the autho- rities discover fraud or anything contraband amongst the goods re-exported, these shall be, after verification, confiscated to the profit of the Chinese Government.

Art. XXV.-Transhipment of goods shall take place only by special permission and in case of urgency; if it be indispensable to effect this operation, the Consul shall be referred to, who will deliver a certificate, on view of which the transhipment shall be authorised by the Superintendent of Customs. The latter may always delegate an employé of his administration to be present.

     Every unauthorised transhipment, except in case of peril by delay, will entail the confiscation, to the profit of the Chinese Government, of the whole of the goods illicitly transhipped.

Art. XXVI.-In each of the ports open to foreign trade the superintendent of Customs shall receive for himself, and shall deposit at the French Consulate, legal

Substituted for the original article in 1885.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

129

scales for goods and silver, the weights and measures agreeing exactly with the weights and measures in use at the Canton Custom-house, and bearing a stamp and seal certifying this authority. These scales shall be the base of all liquidations of duties and of all payments to be made to the Chinese Government. They shall be referred to in case of dispute as to the weights and measures of goods, and the decree shall be according to the results they show.

      Art. XXVII.-Import and export duties levied in China on French commerce shall be regulated according to the tariff annexed to the present Treaty under the scal and signature of the respective plenipotentiaries. This tariff may be revised every seven years in order to be in harmony with the changes brought about by time in the value of the products of the soil or industry of the two empires.

      By the payment of these duties, the amount of which it is expressly provided shall not be increased nor augmented by any kind of charge or surtax whatever, French subjects shall be free to import into China, from French or foreign ports, and equally to export from China, to any destination, all goods which shall not be, at the date of the signing of the present Treaty and according to the classification of the annexed tariff, the object of a special prohibition or of a special monopoly. The Chinese Government renouncing therefore the right of augmenting the number of articles reputed contraband or subjects of a monopoly, any modification of the tariff shall be made only after an understanding has been come to with the French Government and with its full and entire consent.

      With regard to the tariff, as well as every stipulation introduced or to be in- troduced in the existing Treaties, or those which may hereafter be concluded, it remains well and duly established that merchants and in general all French subjects in China shall always have the same rights and be treated in the same way as the most favoured nation.

      Art. XXVIII-The publication of the regular tariff doing away henceforth with all pretext for smuggling, it is not to be presumed that any act of this nature may be committed by French vessels in the ports of China. If it should be otherwise, all contraband goods introduced into these ports by French vessels or merchants whatever their value or nature, as also all prohibited goods fraudulently discharged, shall be seized by the local authority and confiscated to the profit of the Chinese Government. Further, the latter may, if it see fit, interdict the re-entry to China of the vessel taken in contravention and compel it to leave immediately after the settle-

ment of its accounts.

     If any foreign vessel fraudulently makes use of the French flag the French Government shall take the necessary measures for the repression of this abuse.

      Art. XXIX.-His Majesty the Emperor of the French may station a vessel of war in any principal port of the empire where its presence may be considered necessary to maintain good order and discipline amongst the crews of merchant vessels and to facilitate the exercise of the Consular authority; all necessary measures shall be taken to provide that the presence of these vessels of war shall entail no inconvenience, and their commanders shall receive orders to cause to be executed the provisions of Article XXXIII. in respect of the communications with the land and the policing

Vessels of war shall be subject to no duty.

of the crews.

Art. XXX.-Every French vessel of war cruising for the protection of commerce shall be received as a friend and treated as such in all the ports of China which it shall enter.

These vessels may there procure the divers articles of refitting and victualling of which they shall have need, and, if they have suffered damage, may repair there and purchase the materials necessary for such repair, the whole without the least opposition.

The same shall apply to French trading ships which in consequence of great damage or any other reason may be compelled to seek refuge in any port whatsoever

of China.

If a vessel be wrecked on the coast of China, the nearest Chinese authority, on being informed of the occurrence, shall immediately send assistance to the crew provide for their present necessities, and take the measures immediately necessary,

130

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

   for the salvage of the ship and the preservation of the cargo. The whole shall then be brought to the knowledge of the nearest Consul or Consular Agent, in order that the latter, in concert with the competent authority, may provide means for the relief of the crew and the salvage of the debris of the ship and cargo.

     Art. XXXI.-Should China be at war with another power, this circumstance shall not in any way interfere with the free trade of France with China or with the opposing nation. French vessels may always, except in the case of effective blockade, sail without obstacle from the ports of the one to the ports of the other, trade in the ordinary manner, and import and export every kind of merchandise not prohibited.

Art. XXXII.-Should sailors or other persons desert from French ships-of-war, or leave French trading vessels, the Chinese authority, on the requisition of the Consul, or failing the Consul that of the captain, shall at once use every means to discover and restore the aforesaid fugitives into the hands of one or the other of them. In the same manner, if Chinese deserters or persons accused of any crime take refuge in French houses or on board of French vessels, the local authority shall address the Consul, who, ou proof of the guilt of the accused, shall immediately take the measures necessary for their extradition. Each party shall carefully avoid concealment and connivance.

Art. XXXIII.-When sailors come on shore they shall be under special dis- ciplinary regulations framed by the Consul and communicated to the local authority, in order to prevent as far as possible all occasion of quarrel between French sailors and the people of the country.

     Art. XXXIV.-In case of French trading vessels being attacked or pillaged by pirates within Chinese waters, the civil and military authorities of the nearest place, upon learning of the occurrence, shall actively pursue the authors of the crime and shall neglect nothing to secure their arrest and punishment, according to law. The pirated goods, in whatever place or state they may be found, shall be placed in the hands of the Consul, who shall restore them to the owners. If the criminals cannot be seized, or the whole of the stolen property cannot be recovered, the Chinese officials shall suffer the penalty inflicted by the law in such circumstances, but they shall not be held pecuniarily responsible.

     Art. XXXV.-When a French subject shall have a complaint to make or claim to bring against a Chinese, he shall first state his case to the Consul, who, after having examined the affair, will endeavour to arrange it amicably. In the same manner, when a Chinese has to complain of a French subject, the Consul shall attentively hear his claim and endeavour to bring about an amicable arrangement. But if in either case this be impossible, the Consul shall invoke the assistance of a competent Chinese official, and these two, after having conjointly examined the affair shall decide it equitably.

Art. XXXVI.-If hereafter French subjects suffer damage, or are subjected to any insult or vexation by Chinese subjects, the latter shall be pursued by the local authority, who shall take the necessary measures for the defence and pro- tection of French subjects; if illdoers or any vagrant part of the population com- mence to pillage, destroy, or burn the houses or warehouses of French subjects or any other of their establishments, the same authority, either on the requisition of the Consul or of its own motion, shall send as speedily as possible an armed force to disperse the riot and to arrest the criminals, and shall deliver the latter up to the severity of the law; the whole without prejudice of the claims of the French subjects to be indemnified for proved losses.

     Art. XXXVII. If Chinese become, in future, indebted to French captains or merchants and involve them in loss by fraud or in any other manner, the latter shall no longer avail themselves of the combination which existed under the former state of things; they may address themselves only through the medium of their Consul to the local authority, who shall neglect nothing after having examined the affair to compel the defaulters to satisfy their engagements according to the laws of the country. But, if the debtor cannot be found, if he be dead, or bankrupt, and is not able to pay, the French merchants cannot claim against the Chinese authority.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

131

In case of fraud or non-payment on the part of French merchants, the Consul shall, in the same manner, afford every assistance to the claimants, but neither he nor his Government shall in any manner be held responsible.

       Art. XXXVIII.-If unfortunately any fight or quarrel occurs between French and Chinese subjects, as also if during the course of such quarrel one or more persons be killed or wounded, by firearms or otherwise, the Chinese shall be arrested by the Chinese authority, who will be responsible, if the charge be proved, for their punish- ment according to the laws of the country. With regard to the French, they shall be arrested at the instance of the Consul, who shall take the necessary measures that they may be dealt with in the ordinary course of French law in accordance with the forms and practice which shall be afterwards decided by the French Government.

       The same course shall be observed in all similar circumstances not enumerated in the present convention, the principle being that for the repression of crimes and offences committed by them in China French subjects shall be dealt with according to the laws of France.

Art. XXXIX.-Disputes or differences arising between French subjects in China shall, equally, be settled by the French authorities. It is also stipulated that the Chinese authorities shall not in any manner interfere in any dispute between French subjects and other foreigners. In the same way they shall not exercise any authority over French vessels; these are responsible only to the French authorities and the captain.

      Art. XL.-If the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of the French shall consider it desirable to modify any of the clauses of the present Treaty it shall be at liberty to open negotiations to this effect with the Chinese Government after an interval of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications. It is also understood that no obligation not expressed in the present convention shall be imposed on the Consuls or Consular Agents, nor on their nationals, but, as is stipulated, French subjects shall enjoy all the rights, privileges, immunities, and guarantees whatsoever which have been or shall be accorded by the Chinese Govern- ment to other powers.

Art. XLI-His Majesty the Emperor of the French, wishing to give to His Majesty the Emperor of China a proof of his friendly sentiments, agrees to stipulate in separate articles, having the same force and effect as if they were inserted in the present Treaty, the arrangements come to between the two governments on the matters antecedent to the events at Canton and the expense caused by them to the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of the French.

      Art. XLII.-The ratifications of the present Treaty of friendship, commerce, and navigation shall be exchanged at Peking within one year after the date of signature or sooner if possible.

      After the exchange of ratifications, the Treaty shall be brought to the knowledge of all the superior authorities of the Empire in the provinces and in the capital, in order that its publication may be well established.

In token whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty and affixed their seals thereto.

      Done at Tientsin, in four copies, this twenty-seventh day of June, in the year of grace one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, corresponding to the seventeenth day of the fifth moon of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

BARON GROS.

""

[L.S.]

KWEI-LIANG.

"

[L.S.]

HWASHANA.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 25TH OCTOBER, 1860

His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China being desirous to put an end to the difference which has arisen between the two Empires, and to re-establish and assure for ever the relations of peace and amity which before existed and which regrettable events have interrupted, have named as their respective Plenipotentiaries:-

His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Sieur Jean Baptiste Louis, Baron Gros, Senator of the Empire, Ambassador and High Commissioner of France in China, Grand Officer of the Imperial Order of the Legion of Honour, Knight Grand Cross of several Orders, etc., etc., etc.;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Prince Kung, a member of the Imperial Family and High Commissioner;

Who, having exchanged their full powers, found in good and due for, mhave agreed upon the following articles :-

Art. I. His Majesty the Emperor of China has regarded with pain the conduct of the Chinese military authorities at the mouth of the Tientsin river, in the month of June last year, when the Ministers Plenipotentiary of France and England arrived there on their way to Peking to exchange the ratifications of the Treaties of Tientsin.

Art. II. When the Ambassador, the High Commissioner of His Majesty th Emperor of the French, shall be in Peking for the purpose of exchanging the ratifica- tions of the Treaty of Tientsin, he shall be treated during his stay in the capital with the honours due to his rank, and all possible facilities shall be given him by the Chinese Authorities in order that he may without obstacle fulfil the high mission confided to him.

      Art. III. The treaty signed at Tientsin on the 27th June, 1858, shall be faith- fully placed in execution in all its clauses immediately after the exchange of the ratifications referred to in the preceding article, subject to the modifications introduced by the present Convention.

      Art. IV.-Article IV. of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin, by which His Majesty the Emperor of China undertook to pay to the French Government an indemnity of two mllion Taels, is aunulled and replaced by the present Article, which increases the amount of the indemnity to eight million Taels.

It is agreed that the sum already paid by the Canton Customs on account of the sum of two million Taels stipulated by the Treaty of Tientsin shall be considered as having been paid in advance and on account of the eight million Taels referred to in the present article.

The provisions of the article of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin as to the mode of payment of the two million Taels are annulled. Payment of the remainder of the sum of eight million taels to be paid by the Chinese Government as provided by the present Convention shall be made in quarterly instalments consisting of one-fifth of the gross Customs revenues at the ports open to foreign trade, the first term commencing on the 1st October of the present year, and finishing on the 31st December following. This sum, specially reserved for the payment of the indemnity due to France, shall be paid into the hands of the Minister for France or of his delegates in Mexican dollars or in bar silver at the rate of the day of payment.

      A sum of five hundred thousand Taels shall, however, be paid on account in advance at one time, and at Tientsin, on the 30th November next, or sooner if the Chinese Government judges it convenient.

      A Mixed Commission, appointed by the Minister of France and by the Chinese Authorities, shall determine the rules to be followed in effecting the payment of the whole of the indemnity, the verification of the amount, the giving of receipts, and in short fulfilling all the formalities required in such case.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

133

       Art. V.-The sum of eight million Teals is allowed to the French Government to liquidate the expenses of its armament against China, as also for the indemnification of French subjects and protégés of France who sustained loss by the burning of the factories at Canton, and also to compensate the Catholic missionaries who have suffered in their persons or property. The French Government will divide this sum between the parties interested, after their claims shall have been legally established, in satisfaction of such claims, and it is understood between the contracting parties that one million of Taels shall be appropriated to the indemnification of French subjects or protégés of France for the losses they have sustained or the treatment to which they have been subjected, and that the remaining seven million Taels shall be applied to the liquidation of the expenses occasioned by the war.

Art. VI.-In conformity with the Imperial edict issued on the 20th March, 1856, by the August Emperor Tao Kwang, the religious and charitable establishments which have been confiscated during the persecutions of the Christians shall be restored to their proprietors through the Minister of France in China, to whom the Imperial Government will deliver them, with the cemeteries and edifices appertaining to them.

Art. VII.-The town and port of Tientsin, in the province of Pechili, shall be opened to foreign trade on the same conditions as the other towns and ports of the Empire where such trade is permitted, and this from the date of the signature of the present Convention, which shall be obligatory on the two nations without its being necessary to exchange ratifications, and which shall have the same force as if it were inserted word for word in the Treaty of Tientsin.

The French troops now occupying this town shall, on the payment of the five hundred thousand taels provided by Article IV. of the present Convention, evacuate it and proceed to occupy Taku and the north-east coast of Shantung, whence they shall retire on the same conditions as govern the evacuation of the other points occupied on the shores of the Empire. The Commanders-in-Chief of the French force shall, however, have the right to winter their troops of all arms at Tientsin, if they judge it convenient, and to withdraw them only when the indemnities due by the Chinese Government shall have been entirely paid, unless the Commanders-in-Chief shall think it convenient to withdraw them before that time.

Art. VIII.--It is further agreed that when the present Convention shall have been signed and the ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin exchanged, the French forces which occupy Chusan shall evacuate that island, and that the forces before Peking shall retire to Tientsin, to Taku, to the north coast of Shantung, or to the town of Canton, and that in all these places or in any of them the French Government may, if it thinks fit, leave troops until such time as the total sum of eight million taels shall have been fully paid.

      Art. IX.-It is agreed between the high contracting parties that when the ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin shall have been exchanged an Imperial edict shall order the high authorities of all the provinces to permit any Chinese who wishes to go to countries beyond the sea to establish himself there or to seek his fortune, to embark himself and his family, if he so wishes, on French ships in the ports of the empire open to foreign trade. It is also agreed, in the interest of the emigrants, to ensure their entire freedom of action and to safeguard their rights, that the competent Chinese authorities shall confer with the Minister of France in China for the making of regulations to assure for these engagements, always voluntary, the guarantees of morality and security which ought to govern them.

Art. X.-It is well understood between the contracting parties that the tonnage dues which by error were fixed in the French Treaty of Tientsin at five mace per ton for vessels of 150 tons and over, and which in the Treaties with England and the United States sigued in 1858 were fixed at four mace only, shall not exceed this same sum of four mace, and this without the invocation of the last paragraph of Art. XXXII., of the Treaty of Tientsin, which gives to France the formal right to claim the same treatment as the most favoured nation.

      The present Convention of Peace has been made at Peking, in four copies, on the 25th October, 1860, and has been signed by the respective plenipotentiaries.

TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, AND COMMERCE

BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

SIGNED AT TIENTSIN, 9TH JUNE, 1885

      The President of the French Republic and His Majesty the Emperor of China each animated by an equal desire to bring to an end the difficulties which have given rise to their simultaneous intervention in the affairs of Annam, and wishing to re-establish and improve the relations of friendship and commerce which previously existed between France and China, have resolved to conclude a new Treaty to further the common interest of both nations on the basis of the preliminary Convention signed at Tientsin on the 11th May, 1884, and ratified by an Imperial decree of the 13th April, 1885.

      For that purpose the two high contracting parties have appointed as their pleni- potentiaries the following, that is to say :-

The President of the French Republic, M. Jules Patenôtre, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary for France in China, Officer of the Legion of Honour, Grand Cross of the Swedish Order of the Pole Star, &c., &c.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung-chang, Imperial Commissioner, Senior Grand Secretary of State, Grand Honorary Preceptor of the Heir Presumptive; Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Ports, Governor-General of the Province of Chihli, of the First degree of the Third Order of Nobility, with the title of Sou-yi

      Assisted by Hsi Chen, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsung-li Yamen, President of the Board of Punishments, Administrator of the Treasury at the Ministry of Finance, Director of Schools for the Education of Hereditary Officers of the Left Wing of the Yellow Bordered Banner;

And Teng Chang-su, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsung-li Yamên, Director of the Board of Ceremonies;

      Who having communicated their full powers, which have been found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :---

Art. I.-Frauce engages to re-establish and maintain order in those provinces of Annam which border upon the Chinese empire. For this purpose she will take the necessary measures to disperse or expel the bands of pirates and vagabonds who endanger the public safety, and to prevent their collecting together again. Nevertheless the French troops shall not, under any circumstances, cross the frontier which separates Tonkin from China, which frontier France promises both to respect herself and to guarantee against any aggression whatsoever.

      On her part China undertakes to disperse or expel such bands as may take refuge in her provinces bordering on Tonkin and to disperse those which it may be attempted to form there for the purpose of causing disturbances amongst the populations placed under the protection of France; and, in consideration of the guarantees which have been given as to the security of the frontier, she likewise engages not to send troops into Tonkin.

      The high contracting parties will fix, by a special convention, the conditions under which the extradition of malefactors between China and Annam shall be carried out.

       The Chinese, whether colonists or disbanded soldiers, who reside peaceably in Annam, supporting themselves by agriculture, industry, or trade, and whose conduct shall give no cause of complaint, shall enjoy the same security for their persons and property as French protégés.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

· 135

Art. II.-China, being resolved to do nothing which may imperil the work of pacification undertaken by France, engages to respect, both in the present and in the future, the Treaties, Conventions, and Arrangements concluded directly between France and Annam, or which may hereafter be concluded.

As regards the relations between China and Annam, it is understood they shall be of such a nature as shall in no way injure the dignity of the Chinese empire or give rise to any violation of the present Treaty.

Art. III.-Within a period of six months from the signature of the present Treaty commissioners appointed by the high contracting parties shall proceed to the spot in order to define the frontier between China and Tonkin. They shall place landmarks wherever necessary to render the line of demarcation clear. In those cases where they may not be able to agree as to the location of these landmarks or on such rectifications of detail as it may be desirable to make, in the interest of the two nations, in the existing frontier of Tonkin, they shall refer the difficulty to their respective Governments.

Art. IV.-When the frontier shall have been agreed upon, French or French protégés and foreign residents of Tonkin who may wish to cross it in order to enter China shall not be allowed to do so unless they shall have previously provided them- selves with passports issued by the Chinese frontier authorities on the requisition of the French authorities. For Chinese subjects an authorisation given by the Imperial frontier authorities shall be sufficient.

Chinese subjects wishing to proceed from China to Tonkin by the land route shall be obliged to provide themselves with regular passports, issued by the French authorities on the requisition of the Imperial authorities.

Art. V.-Import and export trade shall be permitted to French or French- protected traders and to Chinese traders across the land frontier between China and Tonkin. It shall, however, be carried on through certain spots which shall be settled later, and both the selection and number of which shall correspond with the direction and importance of the traffic between the two countries. In this respect the Regulations in force in the interior of the Chinese Empire shall be taken into

account.

In any case, two of the said spots shall be marked out on the Chinese frontier, the one above Lao-kai, the other beyond Lang-son. French traders shall be at liberty to settle there under the same conditions, and with the same advantages, as in the ports open to foreign trade. The Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China shall establish Custom-houses there, and the Government of the French Republic shall be at liberty to maintain Consuls there whose powers and privileges shall be identical with those of Agents of the same rank in the open ports.

On his part, His Majesty the Emperor of China shall be at liberty, with the concurrence of the French Government, to appoint Consuls in the principal towns of Tonkin.

Such

     Art. VI. A special code of Regulations, annexed to the present Treaty, shall define the conditions under which trade shall be carried on by land between Tonkin and the Chinese provinces of Yünnan, of Kwang-si, and of Kwang-tung. Regulations shall be drawn up by Commissioners, who shall be appointed by the High Contracting Parties, within three months from the signature of the present Treaty.

All goods dealt with by such trade shall be subject, on import and export between Tonkin and the provinces of Yünnan and Kwang-si, to duties lower than those laid down by the prensent Tariff for foreign trade. The reduced Tariff shall not, however, be applied to goods transported by way of the land frontier between Tonkin and Kwang-tung, and shall not be enforced within the ports already open by Treaty.

Trade in arms, engines, supplies, and munitions of war of any kind whatsoever shall be subject to the Laws and Regulations issued by each of the Contracting States within its own territory.

136

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

     The export and import of opium shall be governed by special arrangements to be inserted in the above-mentioned code of Regulations.

Trade by sea between China and Annam shall likewise be dealt with by a separate code of Regulations. In the meanwhile, the present practice shall remain unaltered.

      Art. VII.-With a view to develop under the most advantageous conditions the relations of commerce and of good neighbourship, which it is the object of the present Treaty to re-establish between France and China, the Government of the Republic shall construct roads in Tonkin, and shall encourage the construction of railways there.

When China, on her part, shall have decided to construct railways, it is agreed that she shall have recourse to French industry, and the Government of the Republic shall afford every facility for procuring in France the staff that may be required. It is, moreover, understood that this clause shall not be looked upon as constituting an exclusive privilege in favour of France.

Art. VIII. The commercial stipulations of the present Treaty and the Regula- tions to be agreed upon shall be liable to revision after an interval of ten complete years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty. But in case six months before it expires neither one nor other of the High Contracting Parties shall have expressed a wish to proceed to a revision, the commercial stipula- tions shall remain in force for a fresh period of ten years, and so further in like

manner.

Art. IX. As soon as the present Treaty shall have been signed, the French forces shall receive orders to retire from Kelung and to cease search, &c., on the high seas. Within one month from the signature of the present Treaty the Island of Formosa and Pescadores shall be entirely evacuated by the French troops.

Art. X.-All stipulations of former Treaties, Agreements, and Conventions between France and China, which are not modified by the present Treaty, remaia in full force.

The present Treaty shall be ratified at once by His Majesty the Emperor of China, and after it shall have been ratified by the President of the French Republic, the exchange of ratifications shall take place at Peking with the least possible delay.

     Done in quadruplicate at Tientsin, this ninth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five, corresponding to the twenty-seventh day of the fourth moon of the eleventh year of Kwang-Hsu.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

PATENOTRE.

[...]

HSI CHEN.

""

[L.S.]

LI HUNG-CHANG.

[L.S.]

TENG CHANG-SU.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

JOINTLY DETERMINED ON BY FRANCE AND CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 25TH APRIL, 1886

[Translated from the French Text]

       Whereas in Article VI. of the Treaty between the President of the French Re- public and His Majesty the Emperor of China, signed the 9th day of June, 1885, it is stated that "Regulations for the conduct of overland trade between Tonkin and the Chinese provinces of Yünnau, Kwang-si, and Kwang-tung shall be jointly discussed and concluded by Commissioners appointed by the two Powers, and will form a supple- ment to the present Treaty"; and whereas in Article X. of that Agreement it is set forth that "provisions of former Treaties and Regulations agreed to by France and China, except in so far as they are modified by the present agreement, will continue to retain their original validity," the two High Contracting Parties have for this purpose named as their plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

The President of the French Republic, G. Cogordan, Minister Plenipotentiary of France to China, Officer of the Legion of Honour, Knight of the Order of the Crown of Italy, &c., &c., together with E. Bruwaert, Consul of the first class, Assistant Commissioner for Treaty negotiations, Knight of the Order of Gustav of Sweden, and of the Order of Leopold of Belgium ;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li, Grand Preceptor of the Heir Ap- parent, Grand Secretary of State, Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Seaboard, Joint Commissioner of Admiralty, Governor of Chihli, and a member of the first degree of the third order of the hereditary nobility, with the title of Sou-yi;

Who after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and found them to be in due form, have concluded the following Articles:-

-

       Art. I. In accordance with the terms of Article V. of the Treaty of the 19th June, 1885, the high contracting parties agree that for the present two places shall be opened to trade, one to the north of Langson and the other above Laa-kai. China will establish Custom-houses there, and France shall have the right to appoint Consuls, who shall enjoy all rights and privileges conceded in China to the Consuls of the most favoured nation.

The work of the Commission charged with the delimitation of the two countries not being completed at the time of the signature of the present Convention, the place to be opened to trade north of Laugson shall be selected and determined in the course of the present year by arrangement between the Imperial Government and the representative of France at Peking. As to the place to be opened to trade above Lao-kai, this will also be determined by common accord when the frontier between the two countries shall have been defined.

Art. II. The Imperial Government may appoint Consuls at Hanoi and at Haiphong. Chinese Consuls may also be sent later on to other large towns in Tonkin by arrangement with the French Government.

      The agents shall be treated in the same manner and have the same rights and privileges as the Consuls of the most favoured nation in France. They shall maintain official relations with the French authorities charged with the Protectorate.

138

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

Art. III.-It is agreed, on the one side and the other, that in the places where Consuls are appointed the respective authorities will facilitate the installation of these agents in suitable residences.

Frenchmen may establish themselves in the places opened to trade on the frontier of China under the conditions set forth in the Articles VII., X., XI., XII., and others of the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858.

Annamites shall enjoy in these places the same privileged treatment.

    Art. IV. Chinese shall have the right of possessing land, erecting buildings, opening commercial houses, and having warehouses throughout Annam.

     They shall receive for their persons, their families, and their goods the same protection as the most favoured European nation, and, like the latter, may not be made the object of any ill-treatment. The official and private correspondence and telegrams of Chinese officials and merchants shall be freely transmitted through the French postal and telegraphic administrations.

Frenchmen will receive from China the same privileged treatment.

     Art. V.-Frenchmen, French protégés, and foreigners residing in Tonkin may cross the frontiers and enter China on condition of being furnished with passports. These passports will be given by the Chinese authorities at the frontier, où the requisition of the French authorities, who will ask for them only for respectable persons; they will be surrendered to be cancelled on the holder's return.

In the case

   of those who have to pass any place occupied by aborigines or savages, it will be mentioned in the passport that there are no Chinese officials there who can protect them.

Chinese who wish to come from China to Tonkin by land must in the same way he furnished with passports granted by the French authorities on the requisition of the Chinese authorities, who will ask for them only on behalf of respectable

persons.

     The passports so granted on the one side or the other shall serve only as titles to travel and shall not be considered as certificates of exemption from taxes for the transport of merchandise.

      Chinese authorities on Chinese soil and French authorities in Tonkin shall have the right to arrest persons who have crossed the frontier without passports and send them back to their respective authorities to be tried and punished if necessary.

     Chinese residing in Anuam may return from Tonkin to China on simply obtaining from the Imperial authorities a pass permitting them to cross the frontier.

     Frenchmen and other persons established in the open places on the frontier may travel without passports to a distance of 50 li (578 metres to the li) around such places.

     Art. VI.-Merchandise imported into the places opened to trade on the frontier of China by French merchants and French protégés may, after payment of the import duties, be conveyed to the interior markets of China under the conditions fixed by Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, and by the general rules of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs with regard to import transit passes.

     When foreign merchandise is imported into these places a declaration shall be made at the Custom House of the nature and quantity of the merchandise, as well as of the name of the person by whom it is accompanied. The Customs authorities will proceed to verification, and will collect the duty according to the general tariff of the Imperial Maritime Customs, diminished by one-fifth. Articles not mentioned in the tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent. ad valorem. Until this duty has been paid the goods may not be taken out of the warehouses to be sent away and sold.

A merchant wishing to send foreign merchandise into the interior shall make a fresh declaration at the Custom House, and pay, without reduction, the transit dues fixed by the general rules of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

After this payment the Customs will deliver a transit pass which will enable the carriers to go to the localities mentioned in the pass for the purpose of disposing of the said merchandise.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

139

       Under these conditions, no new duties will be levied at the interior barriers or lekin stations.

Merchandise for which transit passes have not been obtained will be liable to all the barrier and lekin duties imposed upon indigenous products in the interior of the country.

Art. VII.-Merchandise bought by Frenchmen and persons under French protection in the interior markets of China may be brought into the open places on the frontier, for the purpose of being from thence exported to Tonkin, under the conditions fixed by Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, with regard to the transit of merchandise for export.

When Chinese merchandise for export arrives at these places, declaration shall be made at the Custom-house as to the nature and quantity of the merchandise, as well as the name of the person accompanying it.

The Customs authorities will proceed to verification.

Such of this merchandise as shall have been bought in the interior by a merchant furnished with a transit pass, and which consequently has not paid any lekin or barrier duty, shall in the first place pay the transit duty fixed by the general tariff of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

       It shall then pay the export duty diminished by one-third. Articles not named in the tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent. ad valorem.

       After payment of these duties the merchandise will be allowed to pass free, and to be sent beyond the frontier.

       The merchant who, not being furnished with a transit pass, has bought goods in the interior, shall pay the duties levied at the barriers and lekin stations; receipts shall be delivered to him, and on arriving at the Custom-house he shall be exempted from payment of the transit dues on presentation of these receipts.

        French merchants and persons under French protection importing or exporting merchandise through the Customs offices on the frontiers of Yunnan and Kwangsi and Chinese merchants importing or exporting merchandise to or from Tonkin will not have to pay any toll on their carriages or beasts of burden. On the navigable water-courses on the frontier, vessels may, on the one side and the other, be subjected to the payment of tonnage-dues, conformably to the rules of the Maritime Customs of the two countries.

       As regards the provisions of the present article and the preceding one, it is agreed by the high contracting parties that if a new customs tariff should be established by common accord between China and a third Power, for trade by land on the south-western frontiers of the Chinese Empire, France shall obtain the application of it.

Art. VIII. Foreign merchandise which, not having been sold within a period of thirty-six months after having paid the import duty at one of the Chinese frontier Customs stations, is forwarded to the other frontier Customs station, shall be examined at the first of these stations, and if the wrappings are found intact, and if nothing has been disturbed or changed, a certificate of exemption for the amount of the first duty collected will be given. The bearer of this certificate will deliver it to the other frontier station, in payment of the new duty which he will have to pay. The Customs may in like manner give bonds which will be available for payment of duties at the Custom-house by which they are issued any time within three years. Money will never be returned,

If the same merchandise is re-despatched to one of the open ports of China, it will there, conformably to the general rules of the Chinese Maritime Customs, be subjected to payment of the import duties, and the certificates or bonds given at the frontier Customs shall not there be made use of. Neither will it be allowed to present there, in payment of duties, the quittances delivered by the frontier Customs on the first payment. As to transit dues, conformably to the rules in force at the Open ports, when once they have been paid, bonds or exemption certificates will never be given in respect of these.

;

!

140

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

Art. IX.-Chinese merchandise which, after having paid transit and export dues at one of the frontier Customs stations, may be sent to the other frontier Customs station to be sold, shall be subjected on its arrival at the second station only to a payment-called a re-importation duty-of one-half the export duty already collected. The merchandise conformably to the rules established in the open ports may not be transported into the interior by foreign merchants.

If this Chinese merchandise be transported to one of the open ports of China, it will be assimilated to foreign merchandise, and shall pay a new import duty in full, conformably to the general tariff of the Imperial Maritime Customs.

This merchandise will be allowed to pay transit duty on being sent into the in- terior. Chinese merchandise imported from a Chinese seaport into an Anuamite port in order to be transported to the land frontier and then to re-enter Chinese territory, will be treated as foreign merchandise and will pay the local import dues. This merchandise will be allowed to pay the transit duty on being sent into the interior.

      Art. X. Declarations to the Chinese Customs must be made within thirty-six hours of the arrival of the goods under a penalty of Tls. 50 for each day's delay; but the fine shall not exceed Tls. 200. An inexact declaration of the quantity of the goods, if it is proved that it has been made with the intention of evading payment of the duties, will entail upon the merchant confiscation of his goods. Goods not provided with a permit from the chief of the Customs, which are clandestinely introduced by by-ways, and unpacked or sold, or which are intentionally smuggled, shall be entirely confiscated. In every case of false declaration or attempt to deceive the Customs as regards the quality or the real origin or real destination of goods for which transit passes have been applied the goods shall be liable to con- fiscation. The penalties shall be adjudged according to the conditions and proce- dure fixed by the Rules of 31st May, 1868. In all cases where confiscation shall have been declared, the merchant shall be at liberty to recover his goods on payment of a sum equivalent to their value, to be duly settled by arrangement with the Chinese authorities. The Chinese authorities shall have every liberty to devise measures to be taken in China, along the frontier, to prevent smuggling.

Merchandise descending or ascending navigable rivers in French, Annamite, or Chinese vessels will not necessarily have to be landed at the frontier, unless there is an appearance of fraud, or a divergence between the nature of the cargo and the declaration of the manifest. The Customs will only send on board the said vessels

agents to visit them.

      Art. XI.-Produces of Chinese origin imported into Tonkin by the land frontier shall pay the import duty of the Franco-Annamite tariff. They will pay no export duty on leaving Tonkin. The Imperial Government will be notified of the new tariff which France will establish in Tonkin. If taxes of excise, of consumption, or of guarantee be established in Tonkin on any articles of indigenous production, similar Chinese productions will be subjected, on importation, to equivalent taxes.

Art. XII. Chinese merchandise transported across Tonkin from one of the two frontier Customs stations to the other, or to an Annamite port to be from thence exported to China, shall be subjected to a specific transit duty which shall not exceed two per cent. of the value. At the point where it leaves Chinese territory this merchandise will be examined by the French Customs authorities on the frontier, who will specify its nature, quantity, and destination in a certificate which shall be produced whenever required by the French authorities during its transport across Tonkin, as well as at the port of shipment.

     In order to guarantee the Franco-Annamite Customs against any possible fraud, such Chinese produce, on entering Tonkin, shall pay the import duty.

A transit permit will accompany the goods to the place of leaving the country whether this be the port of transhipment or the land frontier, and the sum paid by the proprietor of the merchandise will, after deducting the transit dues, be then restored to him in exchange for the receipt delivered to him by the Tonkin Customs.

     Every false declaration or act evidently intended to deceive the French admini- stration as to the quality, quantity, real origin, or real destination of merchandise

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

141

     on which the special treatment applicable to Chinese products traversing Tonkin in transit is asked, will entail the confiscation of such merchandise. In every case where confiscation has been declared, the merchant shall be free to recover his goods on payment of a sum equivalent to their value, which shall be duly determined by an arrangement with the French authorities.

The same rules and the same transit duty will be applicable in Annam to Chinese merchandise despatched from a Chinese port to an Annamite port in order to get to the Chinese frontier Customs by crossing Tonkin.

Art. XIII.-The following articles, that is to say, gold and silver ingots, foreign money, flour, Indian meal, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery, foreign clothing, jewellery, plated ware, perfumery, soaps of all kinds, charcoal, firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco, wine, beer, spirits, household stores, ship's stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, cutlery, drugs, foreign medicines, and glassware, shall be verified by the Chinese Customs on their entry and clearance; if they are really of foreign origin and intended for the personal use of foreigners, and if they arrive in moderate quantity, a duty exemption certificate will be given which will pass them free at the frontier. If these articles are withheld from declaration or the formality of an exemption certificate, their clandestine intro- duction will render them subject to the same penalty as smuggled goods.

With the exception of gold, silver, money, and luggage, which will remain exempt from duty, the above-mentioned articles destined for the personal use of foreigners and imported in moderate quantity, will pay, when they are transported into the interior of China a duty of 21 per cent. on their value.

The Franco-Annamite frontier Customs shall collect no duty on the following articles of personal use which Chinese carry with them, either on entering or leaving Tonkin, that is to say, money, luggage, clothes, women's head ornaments, paper, hair pencils, Chinese ink, furniture, or food, or on articles ordered by the Chinese Consuls in Tonkin for their personal consumption.

Art. XIV. The high contracting parties agree to prohibit trade in and trans- port of opium of whatsoever origin by the land frontier between Tonkin on the one side and Yunnan, Kwang-si, and Kwangtung on the other side.

Art. XV. The export of rice and of cereals from China is forbidden. The import of these articles shall be free of duty.

The import of the following articles into China is forbidden :-Gunpowder, pro- jectiles, rifles and guns, saltpetre, sulphur, lead, spelter, arms, salt, and immoral publications.

In case of contravention these articles shall be entirely confiscated.

       If the Chinese authorities have arms or munitions bought or if merchants receive express authority to buy them, the importation will be permitted under the special surveillance of the Chinese Customs. The Chinese authorities may, further- more, by arrangement with the French Consuls, obtain for the arms and munitions which they wish to have conveyed to China through Tonkin exemption from all the Franco-Annamite duties.

The introduction into Tonkin of arms, munitions of war, and immoral publica- tions is also prohibited.

Art. XVI.--Chinese residing in Annam shall be placed under the same condi- tions, with regard to criminal, fiscal, or other jurisdiction, as the subjects of the most favoured nation. Law-suits which may arise in China, in the open markets on the frontier, between Chinese subjects and Frenchmen or Annamites shall be decided in a Mixed Court by Chinese and French officers.

With reference to crimes or offences committed by Frenchmen or persons under French protection in China, in the places opened to trade, the procedure shall be in conformity with the stipulations of Articles XXXIII. and XXXIV. of the treaty of the 27th June, 1858.

Art. XVII.-If in the places opened to trade on the frontier of China, Chinese deserters or persons accused of crimes against the Chinese law shall take refuge in the houses or on board the vessels of Frenchmen or persons under French protection

142

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1887

the local authority shall apply to the Consul, who, on proof of the guilt of the accused, shall immediately take the necessary measures in order that they may be given up, and delivered to the regular course of the law.

Chinese guilty or accused of crimes or offences who seek refuge in Annam shall, on the request of the Chinese authorities and on proof of their guilt, be sought for, arrested, and extradited in all cases where the subjects of the countries enjoying the most liberal treatment in the matter of extradition might be extradited from France. Frenchmen guilty or accused of crimes or offences, who seek refuge in China, shall, at the request of the French authorities and on proof of their guilt, be arrested and delivered up to the said authorities to be tried according to the regular process of law.

On both sides all concealment and connivance shall be avoided.

      Art. XVIII.-In any difficulty not provided for in the preceding provisi ons recourse shall be had to the rules of the Maritime Customs, which, in conformity with existing Treaties, are now applied in the open towns or ports.

      In case these rules are insufficient the representatives of the two countries shall refer the matter to their respective Governments.

In accordance with the terms of Article VIII. of the treaty of the 9th June, 1885, the present stipulations may be revised ten years after the exchange of the

ratifications.

      Art. XIX. The present Convention of Trade, after having been ratified by the Governments, shall be promulgated in France, in China, and in Annam.

      The exchange of the ratifications shall take place at Peking within one year from the date of the signature of the Convention, or earlier if possible.

      Done at Tientsin, in four copies, the 25th April, 1886, corresponding to the 22nd day of the third moon of the twelfth year of Kwang Hsu.

(Signed)

"

[L.S.] [L.S.]

G. COGORDAN.

E. BRUWAERt.

""

[L.S.]

LI HUNG-CHANG.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1887

[Translated from the Chinese Text]

      His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China and the President of the French Republic, desiring to strengthen the commercial relations between the two countries and also to ratify and give effect to the Treaty signed at Tientsin on the 25th April, 1886, have appointed Plenipotentiaries to take the necessary steps thereto. H.I.M. the Emperor of China has specially appointed H.I.H. Prince Ching and H.E. Sun Yu-wen, member of the Tsung-li Yamên and Vice-President of the Board of Works. The President of the Republic has appointed His Excellency Constans, Deputy, ex-Minister of the Interior, and Minister Plenipotentiary in China. Who, having exchanged their full powers and established their authenticity in due form, have agreed on the following Articles :-

      Art. I. Such articles of the Treaty sigued at Tientsin as are not affected by this Convention shall on the exchange of the ratifications be put in force at once.

      Art. II. Whereas it was agreed by the Treaty of 1886 that Lungehow in Kwangsi and Mengtzu in Yunnan should be opened to trade, and whereas Manghao, which lies between Paosheng and Mengtzu, is in the direct road between the two places by water, it is agreed that this also should be opened to trade on the same conditions as the other ports, and that a deputy of the Consul at Mengtzu shall be allowed to reside there.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1887

143

Art. III.-In order to develop the trade between China and Tonkin as rapidly as possible the tariff rules laid down in Articles VI. and VII. of the Treaty of 1886 are temporarily altered, and it is agreed that foreign goods imported to Yunnan and Kwangsi from Tonkin shall pay 70 per cent. of the import duties collected by the Customs at the Coast Ports in China, and that produce exported from China to Ton- kin, shall pay 60 per cent. of the export duties in force at the Treaty Ports.

Art. IV. Chinese produce which has paid import duties under Art. XI. of the Treaty of 1886, and is transported through Tonkin to a port of shipment in Cochin- China, shall, if exported thence to any other place than China, pay export duties accord- ing to the Franco-Annamite tariff.

      Art. V. Trade in Chinese native opium by land is allowed on payment of an export duty of Tls. 20 per picul, but French merchants or persons under French pro- tection may only purchase it at Lungchow, Mengtzu, and Manghao, but no more than Tls. 20 per picul shall be exacted from the Chinese merchants as inland dues. When opium is sold the seller shall give the buyer a receipt showing that the inland dues have been paid, which the exporter will hand to the Customs when paying export duty. It is agreed that opium re-imported to China by the Coast Ports cannot claim the privileges accorded other re-imports of goods of native origin.

       Art. VI.-French and Tonkinese vessels other than men-of-war and vessels carrying troops and Government stores plying on the Songkat and Caobang Rivers between Langshan and Caobang shall pay a tonnage due of 5 candareens per ton at Lungchow, but all goods on board shall pass free. Goods may be imported to China by the Songkat and Caobang Rivers or overland by the Government road, but until the Chinese Government establishes Custom-houses on the frontier goods taken overland must not be sold at Lungchow until they have paid duty there.

      Art. VII. It is agreed that should China enter into treaties with regard to com- mercial relations on her southern and south-western frontiers all privileges accorded by her to the most favoured nation are at once without further formality accorded to France.

      Art. VIII.-The above Articles having been agreed to and translated into Chinese, H.I.H. the Prince on behalf of China and H.E. the Minister on behalf of France have signed duplicate copies and affixed their seals hereto.

Art. IX. When the ratifications of this Convention and of the Treaty of 1886 shall have been exchanged they shall be put in force as if they were one Treaty.

Art. X. The ratifications of the Convention shall be exchanged at Peking when the assent of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China and of His Excellency the President of the French Republic shall have been signified.

Signed at Peking on the 26th June, 1887.

E. CONSTANS.

PRINCE CHI'NG.

SUN YU-WEN.

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND

CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 20TH JUNE, 1895

Art. I.-It is agreed, to assure the policing of the frontier, that the French Government will have the right of maintaining an agent of the Consular order at Tonghing opposite Monkay on the frontier of Kwantung. A further regulation will determine the conditions under which these should be exercised in accordance with the French and Chinese authorities and the communal police of the Sino- Annamite frontier.

Art. II.--Article 2 of the Convention, signed at Peking, June 26th, 1887, is modified and completed as follows:-It is agreed between the high contracting parties that the town of Lungchow in Kwangsi and that of Mêngtse in Yunnan are open to French-Annamite commerce. It is intended besides that the port open to commerce on the river route of Laokay to Mêngtse will no longer be Manhao, but Hokow, and that the French Government have the right of maintaining at Hokow an agent under the Consul at Mêngtse, at the same time the Chinese Government can maintain a Customs agent.

Art. III.-It is agreed that the town of Szemao in Yunnan shall be open to French-Annamite commerce, like Lungchow and Mêngtse, and that the French Government will have the right as in the other open port of maintaining a Consul at the same time that the Chinese Government can maintain a Customs agent. The local authorities will employ themselves to facilitate the installation of the French Consul in the proper residence. Frenchmen and protected French subjects may establish themselves at Szemao under conditions of the Articles 7, 10, 11, 12, and others of the Treaty of June 27th, 1858; also by Article 3 of the Convention of April 25th, 1886. Goods destined for China can be transported by the rivers, particularly the Loso and the Mekong as well as by land routes, and particularly by the Mandarin-road, which leads either from Mongle or Ipang to Szemao and Puerli, the duties which these goods will be subject to being paid at Szemao.

Art. IV. Article 9 of the Commercial Convention of April 25th, 1886, is modified as follows:-(1) Chinese goods in transit from one of the other four towns open to commerce on the frontier, Lungchow, Mengtse, Szemao, and Hokow, in passing by Annam, will pay on leaving the reduced duties of four-tenths. A special certificate will be delivered stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods. When they have come to another town they shall be exempt from payment and import duty. (2) Chinese goods which shall be exported from the four above-named localities and transported to Chinese ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, shall be freed on leaving the frontier by payment of the reduced export duty of four-tenths. A special certificate will be delivered stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods. When they shall arrive at one of the ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, they shall be freed the half-duty of re-importation in conformity with the general rule for all such goods in the maritime or fluvial ports open to commerce. (3) Chinese goods which shall be transported from Chinese ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, by way of Annam, towards the four above-named localities, shall be freed on leaving of all duty. A special certificate will be delivered, stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods. When they shall have arrived at one of the frontier Customs they shall be freed on entry by half duty of re-importation based on the reduction of four-tenths. (4) The Chinese goods above mentioned, accompanied by the special certificate

1

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1895 145

above mentioned, shall be, before passing the export Customs, or after passing Customs re-importation, submitted to the regulations governing native Chinese goods.

Art. V.-It is understood that China, for the exploitation of its mines in the provinces of Yunnan, Kwangsi, and Kwangtung, will address itself, in the first instance, to French commerce and engineers, the exploitation remaining otherwise subject to the rules and the edicts by the Imperial Government which affects national industry. It is understood that railways already in existence or projected in Annam can, after mutual agreement, and under conditions to be defined, be prolonged on Chinese territory.

Art. VI.Article 2 of the Telegraphic Convention between France and China, signed at Chefoo, December 1, 1888, is completed as follows:-D.-A union shall be established between the secondary prefecture of Szemao and Annam by two stations which shall be Szemao in China and Muang Hahin in Annam, midway between Laichow and Luang Prabang. The tariff shall be fixed in conformity with Article 6 of the Telegraphic Convention of Chefoo.

      Art. VII-It is agreed that the commercial stipulations contained in the present Convention being of a special nature, and the result of mutual concessions deter- mined by the necessities of the relations between Lungchow, Hokow, Mêngtse, Szemao, and Annam, the advantages which result therefrom cannot be invoked by the subjects and protected subjects of the two high contracting parties, but on these points as well as on the fluvial and land ways here determined of the frontier.

Art. VIII. The present stipulations shall be put in force as if they were in- serted in the text of the additional convention of June 26th, 1887.

Art. IX.-The terms of former Treaties, Agreements, and Conventions between France and China not modified by the present Treaty remain in full force. The pre- sent complementary Convention shall be ratified immediately by His Majesty the Emperor of China, and after it has been ratified by the President of the French Republic the exchange of ratifications shall be made at Peking with the least delay possible.

Done at Peking in four copies, June twentieth, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, corresponding to the twenty-eighth day of the fifth moon of the twenty- first year Kwang Hsu.

(Signed)

A. GERARD.

CHING.

""

SIU.

""

GERMANY

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

SIGNED IN THE GERMAN, FRENCH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES AT TIENTSIN, 2ND SEPTEMBER, 1861

Ratifications Exchanged at Shanghai, 14th January, 1863

      Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation between the States of the German Customs Union, the Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg- Strelitz, and the free Hanseatic Towns of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg on the one part, and China on the other part.

      His Majesty the King of Prussia, for himself, as also on behalf of the other members of the German Zollverein, that is to say:-The Crown of Bavaria, the Crown of Saxony, the Crown of Hanover, the Crown of Wurtemburg, the Grand Duchy of Baden, the Electorate of Hesse, the Grand Duchy of Hesse, the Duchy of Brunswick, the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg, the Grand Duchy of Saxony, the Duchies of Saxe Meiningen, Saxe Altenburg, Saxe Coburg Gotha, the Duchy of Nassau, the Principalities Waldeck and Pyrmont, the Duchies Anhalt, Dessau, Koethen, and Anhalt Bernburg, the Principalities Lippe, the Principalities Schwarzburg Sondershausen and Schwarzburg Rudolfstadt, Reuss the Elder Line, and Reuss the Younger Line, the Free City of Frankfort, the Grand Baillewick Meisenheim of the Landgravate Hesse, the Baillewick Hamburg of the Landgravate Hesse, also the Grand Duchies Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and the Senates of the Hanseatic Towns, Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg, of the one part, and His Majesty the Emperor of China of the other part being sincerely desirous to establish friendly relations between the said States and China, have resolved to confirm the same by a Treaty of Friendship and Commerce, mutually advantageous to the subjects of both High Contracting Parties, and for that purpose have named for their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

      His Majesty the King of Prussia, Frederick Albert Count of Eulenburg, Chamberlain, His Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Knight of the Red Eagle, Knight of St. John, &c., &c., &c.; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Cheong-meen, a member of the Imperial Ministry of Foreign Affairs at Peking, Director-General of Public Supplies, and Imperial Commissioner: and Chong-hee, Honorary Under-Secretary of State, Superintendent of the three Northern Ports, and Deputy Imperial Commissioner, who after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and found the same in good and due form, have agreed upon the following articles:

      Art. I.-There shall be perpetual peace and unchanging friendship between the contracting States. The subjects of both States shall enjoy full protection of person and property.

      Art. II-His Majesty the King of Prussia may, if he see fit, accredit a diplomatic agent to the Court of Peking, and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, in like manner, if he see fit, nominate a diplomatic agent to the Court of Berlin.

      The diplomatic agent nominated by His Majesty the King of Prussia shall also represent the other contracting German States, who shall not be permitted to be represented at the Court of Peking by diplomatic agents of their own. His Majesty the Emperor of China hereby agrees that the diplomatic agent, so appointed by His Majesty the King of Prussia, may, with his family and establishment, permanently reside at the capital, or may visit it occasionally, at the option of the Prussian Government.

Art. III. The diplomatic agents of Prussia and China shall, at their respective residences, enjoy the privileges and immunities accorded to them by international law.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

147

    Their persons, their families, their residence, and their correspondence shall be held inviolable. They shall be at liberty to select and appoint their own officers, couriers, interpreters, servants, and attendants without any kind of molestation.

All expenses occasioned by the diplomatic missions shall be borne by the respective Governments.

The Chinese Government agrees to assist His Prussian Majesty's diplomatic agent, upon his arrival at the capital, in selecting and renting a suitable house and other buildings.

      Art. IV. The contracting German States may appoint a Consul-General, and for each port or city opened to foreign commerce a Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Agent, as their interests may require.

      These officers shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese authorities, and enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the Consular officers of the most favoured

nations.

      In the event of the absence of a German Consular Officer, the subjects of the contracting German States shall be at liberty to apply to the Consul of a friendly Power, or in case of need to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall use all efforts to secure to them the privileges of this Treaty.

      Art. V. All official communications addressed by the diplomatic agents of His Majesty the King of Prussia, or by the Consular officers of the contracting German States, to the Chinese authorities, shall be written in German. At present and until otherwise agreed, they shall be accompanied by a Chinese translation; but it is hereby mutually agreed that, in the event of a difference of meaning appearing between the German and Chinese texts, the German Government shall be guided by the sense expressed in the German text.

In like manner shall all official communications addressed by the Chinese autho- rities to the Ambassadors of Prussia, or to the Consuls of the contracting German States, be written in Chinese, and the Chinese authorities shall be guided by this It is further agreed that the translations may not be adduced as a proof in deciding difference.

text.

In order to avoid future differences, and in consideration that all diplomatists of Europe are acquainted with the French language, the present Treaty has been executed in the German, the Chinese, and the French languages. All these versions have the same sense and signification; but the French text shall be considered the original text of the Treaty, and shall decide wherever the German and Chinese versions differ.

      Art. VI. The subjects of the contracting German States may, with their families, reside, frequent, and carry on trade or industry in the ports, cities, and towns of Canton, Swatow or Chao-chow, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo, Shanghai, Tangchow or Chefoo, Tientsin, Newchwang, Chinkiang, Kiukiang; Hankow, Kiungchow (Hainan), and at Taiwan and Tamsui in the Island of Formosa. They are permitted to proceed to and from these places with their vessels and merchandise, and within these localities to purchase, rent, or let houses or land, build, or open churches, churhyards, and hospitals.

      Art. VII.-Merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German States may not enter other ports than those declared open in this Treaty. They must not, contrary to law, enter other ports, or carry on illicit trade along the coast. All vessels detected in violating this stipulation shall, together with their cargo, be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

Art. VIII. Subjects of the contracting German States may make excursions in the neighbourhood of the open ports to a distance of one hundred li, and for a time not exceeding five days.

Those desirous of proceeding into the interior of the country must be provided with a passport, issued by their respective Diplomatic or Consular authorities, and countersigned by the local Chinese authorities. These passports must upon demand be exhibited.

      The Chinese authorities shall be at liberty to detain merchants and travellers, subjects of any of the contracting German States, who may have lost their passports

143

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

until they have procured new ones, or to convey them to the next Consulate, but they shall not be permitted to subject them to ill-usage or allow them to be ill-used.

     It is, however, distinctly understood that no passport may be given to places at present occupied by the rebels until peace has been restored.

     Art. IX. The subjects of the contracting German States shall be permitted to engage compradores, interpreters, writers, workmen, sailors, and servants from any part of China, upon a remuneration agreed to by both parties, as also to hire boats for the transport of persons and merchandise. They shall also be permitted to engage Chinese for acquiring the Chinese language or dialects, or to instruct them in foreign languages. There shall be no restriction in the purchasing of German or Chinese books

at

Art. X-Persons professing or teaching the Christian religion shall enjoy full protection of their persons and property, and be allowed free exercise of their religion. Art. XI.-Any merchant-vessel of any of the contracting German States arriving any of the open ports shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her to port. In like manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties, and is ready to take her departure, she shall be permitted to select a pilot to conduct her out of port.

Art. XII.-Whenever a vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States has entered a harbour, the Superintendent of Customs may, if he see fit, depute one or more Customs officers to guard the ship, and to see that no merchandise is smuggled. These officers shall live in a boat of their own, or stay on board the ship, as may best suit their convenience. Their salaries, food, and expenses shall be defrayed by the Chinese Customs authorities, and they shall not be entitled to any fees whatever from the master or consignee. Every violation of this regulation shall be punished proportionally to the amount exacted, which shall be returned in full.

     Art. XIII.-Within twenty-four (24) hours after the arrival of the ship, the master, unless he be prevented by lawful causes, or in his stead the supercargo or the consignee, shall lodge in the hands of the Consul the ship's papers and copy of the manifest.

     Within a further period of twenty-four (24) hours the Consul will report to the Superintendent of Customs the name of the ship, the number of the crew, her registered tonnage, and the nature of the cargo.

     If owing to neglect on the part of the master the above rule be not complied with within forty-eight hours after the ship's arrival he shall be liable to a fine of fifty (50) Dollars for every day's delay; the total amount of penalty, however, shall not exceed two hundred (200) Dollars.

Immediately after the receipt of the report, the Superintendent of Customs shall issue a permit to open hatches.

     If the master shall open hatches and begin to discharge the cargo without said permit, he shall be liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred (500) dollars, and the goods so discharged without permit shall be liable to confiscation.

     Art. XIV. Whenever a merchant, a subject of any of the contracting German States, has cargo to land or ship, he must apply to the Superintendent of Customs for a special permit. Merchandise landed or shipped without such permit shall be subject

to forfeiture.

     Art. XV.-The subjects of the contracting German States shall pay duties on all goods imported or exported by them at the ports open to foreign trade according to the tariff appended to this Treaty; but in no case shall they be taxed with higher duties than, at present or in future, subjects of the most favoured nations are liable to.

     The commercial stipulations appended to this Treaty shall constitute an integral part of the same, and shall therefore be considered binding upon both the high con- tracting parties.

     Art. XVI. With respect to articles subject to an ad valorem duty, if the Gerinan merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officers as to their value, then each party shall call in two or three merchants to examine and appraise the goods, and the highest price at which any of these merchants may declare himself willing to purchase them shall be assumed as the value of the goods.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

149

       Art. XVII. Duties shall be charged upon the net weight of each article; tare therefore to be deducted. If the German merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officers on the exact amount of tare, then each party shall choose from among the goods respecting which there is a difference a certain number of chests or bales, which being first weighted gross, shall afterwards be tared and the tare fixed accord- ingly. The average tare upon these chests or bales shall constitute the tare upon the whole lot of packages.

       Art. XVIII.-If in the course of verification there arise other points of dispute, which cannot be settled, the German merchant may appeal to his Consul, who will communicate the particulars of the differences of the case to the Superintendent of Customs, and both will endeavour to bring about an amicable arrangement. But the appeal to the Consul must be made within twenty-four hours, or it will not be attended to.

      As long as no settlement be come to, the Superintendent of Customs shall not enter the matter at issue in his books, in order that a thorough investigation and the final settlement of the difference be not prejudiced.

      Art. XIX. Should imported goods prove to be damaged, a fair reduction of duty shall be allowed, in proportion to their deterioration. If any disputes arise, they shall be settled in the same manner as agreed upon in Art. XVI. of this Treaty having reference to articles which pay duty ad valorem.

     Art. XX.-Any merchant vessel belonging to one of the contracting German States having entered any of the open ports, and not yet opened hatches, may quit the same within forty-eight hours after her arrival, and proceed to another port, without being subject to the payment of tonnage-dues, duties, or any other fees or charges; but tonnage-dues must be paid after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours.

       Art. XXI.-Import duties shall be considered payable on the landing of the goods, and duties of export on the shipping of the same. When all tonnage-dues and duties shall have been paid, the Superintendent of Customs shall give a receipt in full (port-clearance), which being produced at the Consulate, the Consular officer shall then return to the captain the ship's papers and permit him to depart on the voyage.

The

      Art. XXII.-The Superintendent of Customs will point out one or more bankers. authorized by the Chinese Government to receive the duties on his behalf. receipts of these bankers shall be looked upon as given by the Chinese Government itself. Payment may be made in bars or in foreign coin, whose relative value to the Chinese Sycee silver shall be fixed by special agreement, according to circumstances, between the Consular Officers and the Superintendent of Customs.

      Art. XXIII.-Merchant-vessels belonging to the contracting German States of more than one hundred and fifty tons burden shall be charged four mace per ton; merchant-vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and under shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton.

      The captain or consignee having paid the tonnage-dues the Superintendent of Customs shall give them a special certificate, on exhibition of which the ship shall be exempted from all further payment of tonnage-dues in any open port of China which the captain may visit for a period of four mouths, to be reckoned from the date of the port clearance mentioned in Art. XXI.

      Boats employed by subjects of the contracting German States in the conveyance of passengers, baggage, letters, articles of provisions, or articles not subject to duties. shall not be liable to tonnage dues. Any boat of this kind, however, conveying merchandise subject to duty, shall come under the category of vessels under one hundred and fifty tons, and pay tonnage-dues at the rate of one mace per register ton.

Art. XXIV.-Goods on which duties have been paid in any of the ports open to foreign trade, upon being sent into the interior of the country shall not be subject to any but transit duty. The same shall be paid according to the tariff now existing, and may not be raised in future. This also applies to goods sent from the interior of the country to any of the open ports.

150

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

All transit duties on produce brought from the interior to any of the open ports, or importations sent from any of the open ports into the interior of China may be paid once for all.

If any of the Chinese officers violate the stipulations of this article by demanding illegal or higher duties than allowed by law, they shall be punished according to Chinese law.

     Art. XXV.-If the master of a merchant vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States, having entered any of the open ports, should wish to land only a portion of his cargo, he shall only pay duties for the portion so landed. He may take the rest of the cargo to another port, pay duties there, and dispose of the

same.

     Art. XXVI.-Merchants of any of the contracting German States, who may have imported merchandise into any of the open ports and paid duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same, shall be entitled to make application to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall cause examination to be made to satisfy himself of the identity of the goods and of their having remained unchanged.

On such duty-paid goods the Superintendent of Customs shall, on application of the merchant wishing to export them to any other open port, issue a certificate, testifying to the payment of all legal duties thereon.

The Superintendent of Customs of the port to which such goods are brought, shall, upon presentation of said certificate, issue a permit for the discharge and landing of them free of all duty, without any additional exactions whatever. But if, on comparing the goods with the certificate, any fraud on the revenue be detected, then the goods shall be subject to confiscation.

     But if the goods are to be exported to a foreign port, the Superintendent of Customs of the port from which they are exported shall issue a certificate stating that the merchant who exports the goods has a claim on the Customs equal to the amount of duty paid on the goods. The certificate shall be a valid tender to the Customs in payment of import or export duties.

Art. XXVII.-No transhipment from one vessel to another can be made without special permission of the Superintendent of Customs, under pain of confiscation of the goods so transhipped, unless it be proved that there was danger in delaying the transhipment.

     Art. XXVIII.-Sets of standard weights and measures, such as are in use at the Canton Custom-house, shall be delivered by the Superintendent of Customs to the Consul at each port open to foreign trade. These measures, weights, and balances shall represent the ruling standard on which all demands aud payments of duties are made and in case of any dispute they shall be referred to.

     Art. XXIX.-Penalties enforced or confiscations made for violation of this Treaty, or of the appended regulations, shall belong to the Chinese Government.

     Art. XXX.-Ships-of-war belonging to the contracting German States cruising about for the protection of trade, or being engaged in the pursuit of pirates, shall be at liberty to visit, without distinction, all ports within the dominions of the Emperor of China. They shall receive every facility for the purchase of provisions, the procuring of water, and for making repairs. The commanders of such ships shall hold intercourse with the Chinese authorities on terms of equality and courtesy. Such ships shall not be liable to payment of duties of any kind.

     Art. XXXI.-Merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German States, from injury sustained, or from other causes, compelled to seek a place of refuge, shall be permitted to enter any port within the dominions of the Emperor of China without being subject to the payment of tonnage dues or duties on the goods if only landed for the purpose of making the necessary repairs of the vessel, and remaining under the supervision of the Superintendent of Customs. Should any such vessel be wrecked or stranded on the coast of China, the Chinese authorities shall immediately adopt measures for, rescuing the crew and for securing the vessel and cargo. The crew thus saved shall receive friendly treatment, and, if necessary, shall be furnished with means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

151

Art. XXXII.-If sailors or other individuals of ships-of-war or merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German States desert their ships and take refuge in the dominions of the Emperor of China, the Chinese authorities shall, upon due requisition by the Consular Officer, or by the captain, take the necessary steps for the detention of the deserter, and hand him over to the Consular Officer or to the captain. Iu like manner, if Chinese deserters or criminals take refuge in the houses or on board ships belonging to subjects of the contracting German States, the local Chinese authorities shall apply to the German Consular Officer, who will take the necessary measures for apprehending the said deserter or criminal, and deliver him up to the Chinese authorities.

       Art. XXXIII.-If any vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States, while within Chinese waters, be plundered by pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every means to capture and punish the said pirates, to recover the stolen property where and in whatever condition it may be, and to hand the same over to the Consul for restoration to the owner. If the robbers or pirates cannot be apprehended, or the property taken cannot be entirely recovered, the Chinese authorities shall then be punished in accordance with the Chinese law but they shall not be held pecuniarily responsible.

       Art. XXXIV.-If subjects of any of the contracting German States have any occasion to address a communication to the Chinese authorities, they must submit the same to their Consular Officer, determine if the matter be just, and the lan- guage be proper and respectful, in which event he shall transmit the same to the proper authorities, or return the same for alterations. If Chinese subjects have occasion to address a Consul of one of the contracting German States, they must adopt the same course, and submit their communication to the Chinese authorities, who will act in like manner.

       Art. XXXV.-Any subjects of any of the contracting German States having reason to complain of a Chinese, must first proceed to the Consular Officer and state his grievance. The Consular Officer, having inquired into the merits of the case, will endeavour to arrange it amicably. In like manuer, if a Chinese have reason to complain of a subject of any of the contracting German States, the Consular Officer shall listen to his complaint and endeavour to bring about a friendly settlement. If the dispute, however, is of such a nature that the Consul cannot settle the same amicably, he shall then request the assistance of the Chinese authorities, that they may conjointly examine into the merits of the case, and decide it equitably.

Art. XXXVI.-The Chinese authorities shall at all times afford the fullest protection to the subjects of the contracting German States, especially when they are exposed to insult or violence. In all cases of incendiarism, robbery, or demolition,, the local authorities shall at once dispatch an armed force to disperse the mo b, to apprehend the guilty, and to punish them with the rigour of the law. Those robbed or whose property has been demolished shall have a claim upon the despoilers of their property for indemnification, proportionate to the injury sustained.

At. XXXVII.-Whenever a subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China fails to discharge the debts due to a subject of one of the contracting German States, or fraudulently absconds, the Chinese authorities, upon application by the creditor, will do their utmost to effect his arrest and to enforce payment of the debt. In like manner the authorities of the contracting German States shall do their utmost to enforce the payment of debts of their subjects towards Chinese subjects, and to bring to justice any who fraudulently abscond. But in no case shall either the Chinese Government or the Government of the contracting German States be held responsibl. for the debts incurred by their respective subjects.

      Art. XXXVIII.-Any subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China having committel a crime against a subject of one of the contracting German States, shall be apprehended by the Chinese authorities and punished according to the laws of China.

      In like manner, if a subject of the contracting German States is guilty of a crime against a subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Consular Officer shall arrest him and punish him according to the laws of the State to which he belongs.

152

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

Art. XXXIX.-All questions arising between subjects of the contracting German States in reference to the rights of property or person shall be submitted to the jurisdiction of the authorities of their respective States. In like manner will the Chinese authorities abstain from interfering in differences that may arise between subjects of one of the contracting German States and foreigners.

Art. XL.-The contracting parties agree that the German States and their subjects shall fully and equally participate in all privileges, immunities, and ad- vantages that have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the government or subjects of any other nation. All changes made in favour of any nation in the tariff, in the Customs duties, in tonnage and harbour dues, in import, export, or transit duties, shall as soon as they take effect, imme- diately and without a new Treaty, be equally applied to the contracting German States and to their merchants, shipowners, and navigators.

Art. XLI.-If in future the contracting German States desire a modification of any stipulation contained in this Treaty, they shall be at liberty, after the lapse of ten years, dated from the day of the ratification of this Treaty, to open negotiations to that effect. Six months before the expiration of the ten years it must be officially notified to the Chinese Government that modifications of the Treaty are desired, and in what these consist. If no such notification is made the Treaty remains in force for another ten years.

Art. XLII. The present Treaty shall be ratified and the ratifications be exchanged within one year, dated from the day of signature, the exchange of the ratiâcations to take place at Shanghai or Tientsin, at the option of the Prussian Government. Im- mediately after the exchange of ratifications has taken place, the Treaty shall be brought to the knowledge of the Chinese authorities, and be promulgated in the capital and throughout the provinces of the Chinese Empire, for the guidance of the authorities. In faith whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries of the high contracting powers, have signed and sealed the present Treaty.

Done in four copies, at Tientsin, this second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding with the Chinese date of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed)

COUNT EULENBURG.

[L.S.] [L.S.]

CHONG MEEN,

""

[L.S.]

CHONG HEE.

SEPARATE ARTICLE

      in addition to a Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation concluded this day between Prussia, the other states of the German Customs Union, the Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the Hanseatic towns of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg of the one part, and China of the other part, which Treaty shall take effect after exchange of the ratifications within twelve months from its signature, and which stipulates that His Majesty the King of Prussia may nominate a diplomatic agent at the Court of Peking with a permanent residence at that capital, it has been covenanted between the respective Plenipotentiaries of these States, that, owing to and in consideration of the disturbances now prevailing in China, His Majesty the King of Prussia shall wait the expiration of five years after the exchange of ratifications of this Treaty before he deputes a diplomatic agent to take his fixed residence at Peking.

      In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have hereunto set their signa- tures and affixed their seals.

Done in four copies at Tientsin, this second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding to the Chinese date of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

[L.S.

[L.S.1

COUNT EULENBURG. CHONG MEEN. CHONG HEE.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA 153

SEPARATE ARTICLE

In addition to a Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, concluded between Prussia, the other States of the German Customs Union, the Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and the Hanseatic towns of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg on the one part, and China on the other part;

It has been separately agreed that the Senates of the Hanseatic towns sball have the right to nominate for themselves a Consul of their own at each of the Chinese ports open for commerce and navigation.

This Separate Article shall have the same force and validity as if included word for word in the above-mentioned Treaty.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this present Separate Article and affixed their seals.

Done in four copies at Tientsin, the second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding to the Chinese date of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed) [L.S.]

""

""

[L.S.] [L.S.]

COUNT EULEnburg. CHONG MEEN. CHONG HEE.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY

AND CHINA, 1880

Ratified 16th September, 1881

[Translated from the German Text]

His Majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, &c., in the name of the German Empire, and his Majesty the Emperor of China, wishing to secure the more perfect execution of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, have, in conformity with Article XLI. of that Treaty, according to the terms of which the High Contracting German States are entitled, after a period of ten years, to demand a revision of the Treaty, decided to conclude a Supplementary Convention.

With this view they have appointed their Plenipotentiaries-viz., His Majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, &c., his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Max August Scipio von Brandt; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Minister of the Tsung-li Yamen, the Secretary of State, &c., Shen Kue-fen; and the Secretary of State, &c., Chin Lien ;

Who, after communicating to each other their full powers, and finding them in due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :-

       Art. I.-Chinese concession.-The harbours of Ichang, in Hupei; Wuhu, in Anhui; Wenchow, in Chekiang; and Pakhao, in Kwangtung, and the landing-places- Tat'ung and Anking in Anbui; Huk'ow, in Kiangsi; Wusueh, Luchikow, and Shah- shih, in Hukuang, having already been opened, German ships are in future also to be permitted to touch at the harbour of Woosung, in the province of Kiangsu, to take in or discharge merchandise. The necessary Regulations are to be drawn up by the Taotai of Shanghai and the competent authorities.

German concession. In the event of special regulations for the execution of concessions which the Chinese Government may make to foreign Governments being attached to such concessions, Germany, while claiming these concessions for herself and for her subjects, will equally assent to the regulations attached to them.

Art. XI. of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, is not affected by this regulation, and is hereby expressly confirmed.

4

154

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

     Should German subjects, on the strength of this article, claim privileges, immu- nities, or advantages which the Chinese Government may further concede to another Power, or the subject of such Power, they will also submit to the regulations which have been agreed upon in connection with such concession.

     Art. II.-Chinese concession.-German ships, which have already paid tonnage dues in China, may visit all other open ports in China, as well as all ports not Chinese, without exception, without being again obliged to pay tonnage dues, within the given period of four months.

     German sailing-vessels which remain in the same Chinese harbour for a longer period than fourteen days shall only pay for time over and above this period half of the tonnage dues stipulated by Treaty.

     German concession. The Chinese Government shall have the right of appointing Consuls to all towns of Germany in which the Consuls of other States are admitted, and they shall enjoy the same rights and privileges as the Consuls of the most favoured nation.

Art. III.-Chinese concession.-The Chinese Commissioner of Customs, and the other competent authorities, shall, after agreeing upon the necessary regulations, themselves take measures for the establishment of bonded warehouses in all the open ports of China in which they are required in the interests of foreign commerce, and where local circumstances would admit of such an arrangement being made.

     German concession.-German ships, visiting the open ports of Chica, shall deliver a manifest containing an exact statement as to the quality and quantity of their cargoes.

Mistakes which may have occurred in the manifests can be rectified in the course of twenty-four hours (Sundays and holidays excepted). False state- ments as to the quantity and quality of cargo are punishable by confiscation of the goods and also by a fine, to be imposed upon the captain, but not to exceed the sum of Tls. 500.

Art. IV. Chinese concession.-The export duty on Chinese coal, exported by German merchants from the open ports, is reduced to 3 mace per ton. In those ports in which a lower duty on the export of coal has already been fixed upon, the lower duty remains in force.

     German concession. Any one acting as pilot for any kind of craft whatever without being furnished with the regulation certificate, is liable to a fine not to exceed Tls. 100 for each separate case.

Regulations with a view to exercising a proper control over sailors are to be introduced with the least possible delay.

     Art. V.-Chinese concession.-German ships in want of repairs in consequence of damages sustained within or without the port are not required to pay tonnage dues during the period necessary for repairs, which is to be fixed by the Inspectorate of Customs.

     German concession.-Ships belonging to Chinese may not make use of the German flag, nor may German ships make use of the Chinese flag.

     Art. VI.--Chinese concession.-In the event of German ships, no longer fit for sea, being broken up in any open port of China, the material may be sold without any import duty being levied upon it. But if the materials are to be brought_ashore a "permit of discharge" must first be obtained for them from the Customs Inspec- torate, in the same manner as in the case of merchandise.

     German concession.-If German subjects travel into the interior for their own pleasure without being in possession of a passport issued by the Consul and stamped by the proper Chinese authority, the local authorities concerned are entitled to have them taken back to the nearest German Consulate, in order that the requisite supervision may be exercised over them. The offender is, in addition to this, liable to a fine up to 300 Taels.

     Art. VII.-Chinese concession.-Materials for German docks are free of duty. A list of articles which may be imported free of duty in conformity with this stipulation is to be drawn up and published by the Inspector-General of Customs.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

155

German concession.-Passes issued to German subjects for conveying foreign merchandise into the interior, as well as passports for the purpose of travelling issued to German subjects, are only to remain in force for a period of thirteen Chinese months from the day on which they were issued.

Art. VIII.--The settlement of the question relating to judicial proceedings in mixed cases, the taxation of foreign merchandise in the interior, the taxation of Chinese goods in the possession of foreign merchants in the interior, and intercourse between foreign and Chinese officials are to become the subject of special negotiations, which both Governments hereby declare themselves ready to enter upon.

      Art. IX. All the provisions of the former Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, which have not been altered by this agreement, are hereby confirmed anew, as both parties now expressly declare.

In the cases of those articles, on the other hand, which are affected by the present Treaty, the new interpretation of them is to be considered as binding.

      Art. X. The present Supplementary Convention shall be ratified by their Majesties, and the ratifications exchanged at Peking, within a year from the date of its signature.

The provisions of the agreement come into force on the day of the exchange of the ratifications.

In witness whereof the plenipotentiaries of both the High Contracting Powers have signed and sealed with their seals the above agreement in four copies, in the German and Chinese texts, which have been compared and found to correspond.

Done at Peking the thirty-first March, one thousand eight hundred and eighty, corresponding to the twenty-first day of the second month of the sixth year Kwang Hsu.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

L.S.

""

""

[L..S.]

M. VON BRandt. SHEN KUE-FEN. CHING LIEN.

SPECIAL STIPULATIONS TO THE SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION

For the sake of greater clearness and completeness, it has seemed fitting to append a number of special stipulations to the Supplementary Convention.

      The following stipulations must be observed by the subjects of both the Contracting Parties, in the same way as the stipulations of the Treaty itself. In proof whereof the plenipotentiaries of the two States have thereto set their seals and signatures:-

      1.-In accordance with the newly granted privileges for the port of Woosung in the province of Kiangsu, German ships shall be at liberty to take in and to unload there merchandise which is either intended for Shanghai or comes from Shanghai; and for this purpose the competent authorities there shall have the right of devising regulations in order to prevent frauds on the taxes and irregularities of every kind; which regulations shall be binding for the merchants of both countries, German merchants are not at liberty to construct landing-places for ships, merchants' houses, or warehouses at the said place.

2. An experiment to ascertain whether bonded warehouses can be established in the Chinese open ports shall first be made at Shanghai. For this purpose the Customs Director at the said place, with the Customs Inspector-General, shall forthwith draw up regulations suitable to the local conditions, and then the said Customs Director and his colleagues shall proceed to the establishment of such bonded warehouse.

      3. If any goods found on board a German ship, for the discharge whereof a written permit from the Customs Office is required, are not entered in the manifest, this shall be taken as proof of a false manifest, no matter whether a certificata of the reception of such goods on board, bering the captain's signature, be produced

or not.

4*

156-

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

      4.-If a German ship, in consequence of damages received in one of the open Chinese ports, or outside thereof, needs repair, the time required for such repair shall be reckoned in addition to the term after the lapse of which tonnage-dues are to be paid. The Chinese authorities have the right to make the necessary arrange- inents for this purpose. But if it appears therefrom that this is only a pretext and a design to evade the legal payments to the Customs, the ship therein concerned shall be fined in double the amount of the tonnage-dues whereof it has tried to evade the payment.

      5.-No ships of any kind which belong to Chinese subjects are allowed to make use of the German flag. If there are definite grounds for suspicion that this has nevertheless been done, the Chinese authority concerned is to address an official communication thereon to the German Consul, and if it should be shown, in con- sequence of the investigation instituted by him, that the ship was really not entitled to bear the German flag, the ship as well as the goods found therein, so far as they belong to Chinese merchants, shall be immediately delivered over to the Chinese authorities for further disposal. If it be ascertained that German subjects were aware of the circumstances, and took part in the commission of the irregularity, the whole of the goods belonging to them found in the ship are liable to confiscation, and the people themselves to punishment according to law.

      In case a German ship carries the Chinese flag without authority to do so, then, if it be ascertained through the investigation made by the Chinese authorities that the ship was really not entitled to bear the Chinese flag, the ship, as well as the goods found therein, so far as they belong to German merchants, shall be imme- diately delivered over to the German Consul for further disposal and the punishment of the guilty. If it be shown that German owners of goods were aware of the cir- cumstance and took part in the commission of this irregularity, all the goods belong- ing to them found in the ship shall incur the penalty of confiscation by the Chinese authorities. The goods belonging to Chinese may be immediately seized by the Chinese authorities.

6.-If on the sale of the materials of a German ship which, from unseaworthi- ness, has been broken up in one of the open Chinese ports, an attempt be made to mix up with them goods belonging to the cargo, these goods shall be liable to con- fiscation, and, moreover, to a fine equal to double the amount of the import duty which they would otherwise have had to pay.

      7.-If German subjects go into the interior with foreign goods, or travel there, the passes or certificates issued to them shall only be valid for thirteen Chinese months, reckoned from the day of their issue, and after the lapse of that term must no longer be used. The expired passes and certificates must be returned to the Customs authorities in whose official district they were issued in order to be cancelled.

N.B.-If a pleasure excursion be undertaken into regions so distant that the term of a year appears insufficient, this must be noted on the pass by reason of an understanding between the Consul and the Chinese authority at the time it is issued.

If the return of the passport be omitted, no further pass shall be issued to the person concerned until it has taken place. If the pass be lost, no matter whether within the term or after its expiration, the person concerned must forthwith make a formal declaration of the fact before the nearest Chinese authority. The Chinese official applied to will then do what else may be necessary for the invalidation of the pass. If the recorded declaration prove to be untrue, in case the transport of goods be concerned, they will be confiscated; if the matter relate to travelling, the traveller will be taken to the nearest Consul, and be delivered up to him for punishment.

8.-Materials for German docks only enjoy, in so far as they are actually employed for the repair of ships, the favour of duty-free importation in open ports. The Customs authority has the right to send inspectors to the dock to convince themselves on the spot as to the manner and way in which the materials are being If the construction of a new ship be concerned, the materials employed for this, in so far as they are specially entered in the import or export tariff, will be

used.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

157

    reckoned at the tariff duty, and those not entered in the tariff at a duty of 5 per cent. ad valorem, and the merchant concerned will be bound to pay this duty subsequently.

Any one who wishes to lay out a dock is to get from the Customs Office a gratis Concession certificate, and to sign a written undertaking, the purport and wording whereof is to be settled in due form by the Customs office concerned.

      9.-Art. XXIX. of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, shall be applicable to the fines established by this present Supplementary Convention.

      Done at Peking the thirty-first March, one thousand eight hundred and eighty, corresponding with the twenty-first day of the second month of the sixth year of Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) [L.S.]

>>

""

L.S. [L.S.]

M. VON BRANDT. SHEN KUE-FEN. CHING LIEN.

THE PRINCE OF KUNG AND THE MINISTERS OF THE TSUNG-LI YAMEN

TO HERR VON BRANDT

Kwang Hsu, 6th year, 2nd mouth, 21st day.

(Peking, March 31st, 1880.)

With regard to the stipulation contained in the second Article of the Supple- mentary Convention concluded on occasion of the Treaty revision, that German sailing-ships which lie for a longer time than fourteen days in Chinese ports shall only pay for the time beyond that term the moiety of the tonnage dues settled by Treaty, the Plenipotentiaries of the two contracting parties have agreed and declared that the said stipulation shall first of all be introduced by way of trial, and that in case, on carrying it out, practical difficulties should arise, another stipula- tion may be put in its place on the basis of a renewed joint discussion by both parties.

PROTOCOL

The undersigned, who have been expressly empowered by their Government to make the following arrangements, have agreed that the term settled by the Pleni- potentiaries of the German Empire and of China in the Supplementary Convention concluded at Peking on the 31st March this year, for the exchange of the Ratifica- tion of the Convention, shall be prolonged till the 1st December, 1881.

      The other stipulations of the Supplementary Convention of the 31st March, this year, are not affected by this alteration.

      In witness whereof the undersigned bave subscribed with their own hands and affixed their seals to this Agreement, in two copies of each of the German and Chinese texts, which have been compared with each other and found to correspond.

      Done at Peking the twenty-first August, one thousand eight hundred and eighty, corresponding with the sixteenth day of the seventh month of the sixth year Kwang Hsu.

(Signed)

[L.S.] [L.S.

L.S.

""

L.S.

31

"

[L.S.] [L.S.]

M. VON BRandt. SHEN KUE-FEN.

CHING LIEN.

WANG NEEn-Shou. LIN SHU.

CHUNG LI.

THE KIAOCHOW CONVENTION

     I. His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous of preserving the existing good relations with His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, and of promoting an increase of German power and influence in the Far East, sanctions the acquirement under lease by Germany of the land extending for 100 li, at high tide (at Kiaochow).

His Majesty the Emperor of China is willing that German troops should take possession of the above-mentioned territory at any time the Emperor of Germany chooses. China retains her sovereignty over this territory, and should she at any time wish to enact laws or carry out plans within the leased area, she shall be at liberty to enter into negotiations with Germany with reference thereto; provided always that such laws or plans shall not be prejudicial to German interests. Germany may engage in works for the public benefit, such as water-works, within the territory covered by the lease, without reference to China. Should China wish to march troops or establish garrisons therein she can only do so after negotiating with and obtaining the express permission of Germany.

II.-His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, being desirous, like the rulers of certain other countries, of establishing a naval and coaling station and constructing dockyards on the coast of China, the Emperor of China agrees to lease to him for the purpose all the land on the southern and northern sides of Kiaochow Bay for a term of ninety-nine years. Germany is to be at liberty to erect forts on this land for the defence of her possessions therein.

III. During the continuance of the lease China shall have no voice in the government or administration of the leased territory. It will be governed and administered during the whole term of ninety-nine years solely by Germany, so that the possibility of friction between the two Powers may be reduced to the smallest magnitude. The lease covers the following districts:-

(a)-All the land in the north-east of Lienban, adjacent to the north-eastern mouth of the Bay, within a straight line drawn from the north-eastern corner of Yintao to Laoshan-wan.

(b.)-All the land in the south-west of Lienban, adjacent to the southern mouth of the Bay, within a straight line drawn from a point on the shore of the Bay bearing south-west by south from Tsi-pe-shan-to.

(c.)-Tsi-pe-shan-to and Yintao.

(d.)-The whole area of the Bay of Kiaochow covered at high-water.

     (e.)-Certain islands at the entrance of the Bay which are ceded for the purpose of erecting forts for the defence of the German possessions. The boundaries of the leased territory shall hereafter be more exactly defined by a commission appointed jointly by the Chinese and German Governments, and consisting of Chinese and German subjects. Chinese ships of war and merchant-ships, and ships of war and merchant-ships of countries having treaties and in a state of amity with China shall receive equal treatment with German ships of war and merchant ships in Kiaochow Bay during the continuance of the lease. Germany is at liberty to enact any regula- tions she desires for the government of the territory and harbour, provided such regulations apply impartially to the ships of all nations, Germany and China included.

IV.-Germany shall be at liberty to erect whatever lighthouses, beacons, and other aids to navigation she chooses within the territory leased, and along the islands and coasts approaching the entrance to the harbour. Vessels of China and vessels of other countries entering the harbour shall be liable to special duties for the repair and maintenance of all lighthouses, beacons and other aids to navigation which Germany may erect and establish. Chinese vessels shall be exempt from other special duties.

      V. Should Germany desire to give up her interest in the leased territory before the expiration of ninety-nine years, China shall take over the whole area, and pay

RAILWAY AND MINING CONCESSION

159

    Germany for whatever German property may at the time of surrender be there situated. In cases of such surrender taking place Germany shall be at liberty to lease some other point along the coast. Germany shall not cede the territory leased to any other Power than China. Chinese subjects shall be allowed to live in the territory leased, under the protection of the German authorities, and there carry on their avoca- tions and business as long as they conduct themselves as peaceable and law-abiding citizens. Germany shall pay a reasonable price to the native proprietors for whatever lands her Government or subjects require. Fugitive Chinese criminals taking refuge in the leased territory shall be arrested and surrendered to the Chinese authorities for trial and punishment, upon application to the German authorities, but the Chinese authorities shall not be at liberty to send agents into the leased territory to make arrests. The German authorities shall not interfere with the lekin stations outside but adjacent to the territory.

THE RAILWAY AND MINING CONCESSION

I. The Chinese Government sanctions the construction by Germany of two lines of railway in Shantung. The first will run from Kiaochow and Tsinan-fu to the boundary of Shantung province via Wei-hsien, Tsinchow, Pashan, Tsechuen and Suiping. The second line will connect Kiaochow with Chinchow, whence an extension will be constructed to Tsinan through Laiwu-hsien. The construction of this extension shall not be begun until the first part of the line, the main line, is completed, in order to give the Chinese an opportunity of connecting this line in the most advan- tageous manner with their own railway system. What places the line from Tsinan-fu to the provincial boundary shall take in en route is to be determined hereafter.

      II.--In order to carry out the above mentioned railway work a Chino-German Company shall be formed, with branches at whatever places may be necessary, and in this Company both German and Chinese subjects shall be at liberty to invest money if they so choose, and appoint directors for the management of the undertaking.

III. All arrangements in connection with the works specified shall be determined by a future conference of German and Chinese representatives. The Chinese Govern- ment shall afford every facility and protection and extend every welcome to represent- atives of the German Railway Company operating in Chinese territory. Profits derived from the working of these railways shall be justly divided pro rata between the shareholders without regard to nationality. The object of constructing these lines is solely the development of commerce. In inaugurating a railway system in Shantung Germany entertains no treacherous intention towards China, and under- takes not to unlawfully seize any land in the province.

IV.-The Chinese Government shall allow German subjects to hold and develop mining property for a distance of 30 li from each side of these railways and along the whole extent of the lines. The following places where mining operations may be carried on are particularly specified along the northern railway from Kiaochow to Tsinan, Weihsien, Pa-shan-lisien and various other points; and along the Southern Kiaochow-Tsinan-Chinchow line, Chinchow-fu, Luiwuhsien, etc. Chinese capital may be invested in these operations and arrangements for carrying on the work shall hereafter be made by a joint conference of Chinese and German representatives. All German subjects engaged in such works in Chinese territory shall be properly protected and welcomed by the Chinese authorities and all profits derived shall be fairly divided between Chinese and German shareholders according to the extent of the interest they hold in the undertakings. In trying to develop mining property in China, Germany is actuated by no treacherous motives against this country, but seeks alone to increase commerce and improve the relations between the two countries.

      If at any time the Chinese should form schemes for the development of Shantung, for the execution of which it is necessary to obtain foreign capital, the Chinese

160

THE UNITED KINGDOM AND GERMANY RELATIVE TO CHINA

Government, or whatever Chinese may be interested in such schemes, shall, in the first instance, apply to German capitalists. Application shall also be made to German manufacturers for the necessary machinery and materials before the manu- facturers of any other Power are approached. Should German capitalists or manu- facturers decline to take up the business the Chinese shall then be at liberty to obtain money and materials from sources of other nationality than German.

     This convention requires the sanction of His Majesty the Emperor of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Germany. When the sanction of His Majesty the Emperor of China reaches Berlin the agreement approved by His Majesty the Emperor of Germany shall be handed to the Chinese Ambassador. When the final draft is agreed to by both parties four clean copies of it shall be made, two in Chinese and two in German, which shall be duly signed by the Chinese and German Minister at Berlin and Peking. Each Power shall retain one Chinese copy and one German copy, and the agreement shall be faithfully observed on either side.

     Dated, the fourteenth day of the second moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsu. (March 6th, 1898).

AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND

GERMANY RELATIVE TO CHINA

OCTOBER 16TH, 1900.

No. 1.

THE MARQUESS OF SALISBURY TO COUNT HATZFELDT.

Your Excellency,

Foreign Office, October 16th, 1900.

I have the honour to inform you that Her Majesty's Government approve the Agreement, annexed hereto, which has been negotiated between your Excellency and myself with regard to the principles on which the mutual policy of Great Britain and Germany in China should be based.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

SALISBURY.

Inclosure in No. 1.

AGREEMENT SIGNED ON THE 16TH OCTOBER, 1900.

Her Britannic Majesty's Government and the Imperial German Government being desirous to maintain their interests in China and their rights under existing Treaties, have agreed to observe the following principles in regard to their mutual policy in China :--

1. It is a matter of joint and permanent international interest that the ports on the rivers and littoral of China should remain free and open to trade and to every other legitimate form of economic activity for the nationals of all countries without distinction; and the two Governments agree on their part to uphold the same for all Chinese territory as far as they can exercise influence.

     2. Her Britannic Majesty's Government and the Imperial German Government will not, on their part, make use of the present complication to obtain for them- selves any territorial advantages in Chinese dominions, and will direct their policy towards maing intainundiminished the territorial condition of the Chinese Empire.

THE UNITED KINGDOM AND GERMANY RELATIVE TO CHINA

161

       3. In case of another Power making use of the complications in China in order to obtain under any form whatever such territorial advantages, the two Contracting Parties reserve to themselves to come to a preliminary understanding as to the eventual steps to be taken for the protection of their own interests in China.

       4. The two Governments will communicate this Agreement to the other Powers interested, and especially to Austria-Hungary, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and the United States of America, and will invite them to accept the principles recorded in it.

No. 2.

COUNT HATZFELDT TO THE MARQUESS OF SALISBURY.

(RECEIVED OCTOBER 16TH.)

(Translation.)

GERMAN EMBASSY, LONDON,

October 16th, 1900.

My Lord,

      I have the honour to inform your Excellency that my Government have con- curred in the following points agreed to between your Excellency and myself:-

The Imperial German Government and Her Britannic Majesty's Government, being desirous to maintain their interests in China and their rights under existing Treaties, have agreed to observe the following principles in regard to their mutual policy in China :

      1. It is a matter of joint and permanent international interest that the ports on the rivers and littoral of China should remain free and open to trade and to every other legitimate form of economic activity for the nationals of all countries without distinction; and the two Governments agree on their part to uphold the same for all Chinese territory as far as they can exercise influence.

2. The Imperial German Government and Her Britannic Majesty's Govern- ment will not, on their part, make use of the present complication to obtain for themselves any territorial advantages in Chinese dominions, and will direct their policy towards maintaining undiminished the territorial condition of the Chinese Empire.

      3. In case of another Power making use of the complications in China in order to obtain under any form whatever such territorial advantages, the two Contracting Parties reserve to themselves to come to a preliminary understanding as to the eventual steps to be taken for the protection of their own interests in China.

     4. The two Governments will communicate this Agreement to the other Powers interested, and especially to Austria-Hungary, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and the United States of America, and will invite them to accept the principles recorded in it.

With the highest respect, &c., &c.,

(Signed)

HATZFELDT.

RUSSIA

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE RUSSIAN, CHINESE, AND FRENCH LANGUAGES, AT ST. PETERSBURG, 12TH FEBRUARY, 1881

Ratifications exchanged at St. Petersburg, 19th August, 1881

[Translated from the French Text]

His Majesty the Emperor and Autocrat of all the Russias and His Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to regulate some questions of frontier and trade touching the interests of the two Empires, in order to cement the relations of friendship between the two countries, have named for their plenipotentiaries, to the effect of establishing an agreement on these questions:-

His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias: His Secretary of State Nicholas de Giers, senator, actual privy councillor, directing the Imperial Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and his envoy extraordinary and ministry plenipotentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of China, Eugène de Buzow, actual councillor of state.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China: Tseng, Marquess of Neyong, vice- president of the high court of justice, his envoy extraordinary and minister plenipo- tentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, furnished with special powers to sign the present Treaty in quality of ambassador extraordinary :-

The above named plenipotentiaries, furnished with full powers, which have been found sufficient, have agreed upon the following stipulations:--

Art. I. His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias consents to the re- establishment of the Chinese Government in the country of Ili, temporarily occupied since 1871 by the Russian Armies. Russia remains in possession of this country within the limits indicated by Article VII. of the present Treaty.

Art. II. His Majesty the Emperor of China engages to decree the proper measures to shelter the inhabitants of the country of Ili, of whatever race and to whatever religion they belong, from all persecution, in their goods or in their persons, from acts committed during or after the troubles that have taken place in that country, A proclamation in conformity with this engagement will be addressed by the Chinese authorities, in the name of His Majesty the Emperor of China, to the popula tion of the country of Ili, before the restoration of this country to the said authorities.

Art. III. The inhabitants of the country of Ili will be free to remain in the places of their actual residence as Chinese subjects, or to emigrate to Russia and to adopt Russian dependence. They will be called to pronounce themselves on the subject before the re-establishment of Chinese authority in the country of Ili, and a delay of one year, from the date of the restoration of the country to the Chinese authorities, will be accorded to those who show a desire to emigrate to Russia. The Chinese will oppose no impediment to their emigration or to the transportation of their moveable property.

      Art. IV. Russian subjects possessing land in the country of Ili will keep their rights of property, even after the re-establishment of the authority of the Chinese Government in that country.

This provision is not applicable to the inhabitants of the country of Ili who shall adopt Russian nationality upon the re-establishment of Chinese authority in this country.

Russian subjects whose lands are situated without places appropriated to Russian factories, in virtue of Article XIII. of the Treaty of Kuldja of 1851, ought to discharge the same taxes and contributions as Chinese subjects.

Art. V. The two governments will appoint commissioners of Kuldja, who will proceed to the restoration on the one part, to the resumption on the other, of

1

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

163

the administration of the province of Ili, and who will be charged, in general, with the execution of the stipulations of the present Treaty relating to the re-establish- ment, in this country, of the Chinese Government.

The said commissiouers will fulfil their commission, in conforming to the understanding which will be established as to the mode of restoration on the one part and of resumption on the other, of the administration of the country of Ili, between the Governor-General of Turkestan and the Governor-General of Shansi and Kansul, charged by the two governments with the high direction of the affair.

     The resumption of the country of Ili should be finished within a delay of three months or sooner, if it can be done, dating from the day of the arrival at Tashkend of the functionary who will be delegated by the Governor-General of Shansi and Kansuh to the Governor-General of Turkestan to notify to him the ratification and the promulgation of the present Treaty by His Majesty the Emperor of China.

Art. VI.-The Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China will pay to the Russian Government the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles, designed to cover the expenses occasioned by the occupation of the country of Ili by the Russian troops. since 1871, to satisfy all the pecuniary claims arising from, up to the present day, the losses which Russian subjects have suffered in their goods pillaged on Chinese territories, and to furnish relief to the families of Russian subjects killed in armed attacks of which they have been victims on Chinese territory.

The above mentioned sum of nine millions of metallic roubles will be paid within the term of two years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty, according to the order and the conditions agreed upon between the two governments in the special Protocol annexed to the present Treaty.

Art. VII. The western portion of the country of Ili is incorporated with Russia, in order to serve as a place of establishment for the inhabitants of this country who shall adopt the Russian dependence and who, by this action, will have had to abandon the lands which they possessed there.

The frontier between the possessions of Russia and the, Chinese province of Ili will follow, starting from the mountains Bèdjin-taou, the course of the river Khorgos, as far as the place where this river falls into the river Ili, and, crossing the latter, will take a direction to the south, towards the mountains Ouzoun-taou, leaving to the west the village of Koldjat. Proceeding from this point it will follow, whilst being directed to the south, the delineation fixed by the protocol signed at Tchugtu- chack in 1864.

      Art. VIII.A part of the frontier line, fixed by the protocol signed at Tchugtu chack in 1864, at the east of the Lake Zaisan, having been found defective, the two governments will name commissioners who will modify, by a common agreement, the ancient delineation in such a manner as to remove the defects pointed out and to establish an effective separation between the Kirghiz tribes submitted to the two Empires.

     To the new delineation will be given, as much as possible, an intermediate direc- tion between the old frontier and a straight line leading from the Kouitoun hill towards the Saour hills, crossing the Tcherny-Irtysh.

Art. IX. The commissioners to be named by the two contracting parties will proceed to place posts of demarcation, as well on the delineation fixed by the preceding Articles VII. and VIII., as on the parts of the frontier where posts have not yet been placed. The time and the place of meeting of these commissioners shall be fixed by an understanding between the two Governments.

The two Governments will also name commissioners to examine the frontier and to place posts of demarcation between the Russian province of Ferganah and the western part of the Chinese province of Kashgar. The commissioners will take for the base of their work the existing frontier.

      Art. X.-The right recognised by the Treaties of the Russian Government to nominate Consuls to Ili, to Tarbagatai, to Kashgar, and to Ourga is extended, from the present time, to the towns of Soutcheon (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan. In the following towns: Kobdo, Uliassoutai, Khami, Urumtsi, and Goutchen, the Russian

164

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

Government will establish consulates in proportion to the development of commerce, and after an understanding with the Chinese Government.

The Consul of Soutcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan will exercise consular functions in the neighbouring districts, where the interests of Russian subjects demand their presence.

      The dispositions contained in Articles V. and VI. of the Treaty concluded at Peking in 1860, and relative to the concession of land for the houses for the con- sulates, for cemeteries, and for pasturage, will apply equally to the towns of Sout- cheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan. The local authorities will aid the Cousul to find provisional habitations until the time when the houses of the consulates shall be built.

The Russian Consuls in Mongolia and in the districts situated on the two slopes of the Tien-shan will make use of, for their journeys and for their correspondence, the postal institutions of the government, conformably to the stipulations of Article XI. of the Treaty of Tientsin and of Article XII. of the Treaty of Peking. The Chinese authorities, to whom they will address themselves for this purpose, will lend them aid and assistance.

     The town of Turfan not being a locality open to foreign trade, the right of establishing a consulate will not be invoked as a precedent to obtain a right analogous to the ports of China for the provinces of the interior and for Manchuria.

      Art. XI.-Russian Consuls will communicate, for affairs of service, either with the local authorities of the town of their residence, or with the superior authorities of the circuit or of the province, according as the interests which are respectively confided to them, the importance of the affairs to be treated of, and their prompt expedition shall require. As to the rules of etiquette to be observed at the time of their interviews and, in general, in their relations, they will be based upon the respect which the functionaries of two friendly Powers reciprocally owe each other.

All the affairs which may arise on Chinese territory, on the subject of commer- cial or other transactions, between those under the jurisdiction of the two States, will be examined and regulated, by a common agreement, by the Consuls and the Chinese authorities.

In lawsuits on commercial matters, the two parties will terminate their difference amicably by means of arbitrators chosen by one side and the other. If agreement is not established in this way, the affair will be examined and regulated by the authorities of the two States.

Engagements contracted in writing, between Russian and Chinese subjects, relative to orders for merchandise, to the transport of it, to the location of shops, of houses, and of other places, or relating to other transactions of the same kind, may be presented for legalisation by the Consulates and by the superior local administrations, who are bound to legalize the documents which are presented to them. In case of non-execution of the engagements contracted, the Consul and the Chinese authorities will consult as to the measures necessary to secure the execution of these obligations.

     Art. XII.-Russian subjects are authorized to carry on, as in the past, trade free of duties in Mongolia subject to China, as well as in places and aimaks where there is a Chinese administration as in those where there in none.

     Russian subjects will equally enjoy the right of carrying on trade free of duties in the towns and other localities of the provinces of Ili, of Tarbagatai, of Kashgar. of Urumtsi, and others situated on the slopes north and south of the chain of the Tien-shan as far as the Great Wall. This immunity will be abrogated when the development of the trade necessitates the establishment of a customs tariff, conform- able to an understanding to be come to by the two Governments.

Russian subjects can import into the above-named provinces of China and export from them every description of produce, of whatever origin they may be. They may make purchases and sales, whether in cash, or by way of exchange; they will have the right to make their payments in merchandise of every description,

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

165

     Art. XIII.-In the places where the Russian Government will have the right to establish consulates, as well as in the town of Kalgan, Russian subjects may construct houses, shops, warehouses, and other buildings on the lands which they will acquire by means of purchase, or which may be conceded to them by the local authorities, conformably to that which has been established for Ili and Tarbagatai, by Article XIII. of the Treaty of Kuldja of 1851.

     The privileges granted to Russian subjects, in the town of Kalgan, where there will not be a consulate, constitute an exception which cannot be extended to any other locality of the interior provinces.

Art. XIV.-Russian merchants who may wish to dispatch merchandise from Russia, by land, into the interior provinces of China, can, as formerly, direct it by the towns of Kalgan and Tungchow, to the port of Tientsin, and from there to the other ports and interior markets, and sell it in those different places.

      Merchants will use this same route to export to Russia the merchandise purchased, as well in the towns and ports above named as in the interior markets.

     They will equally have the right to repair, for matters of trade, to Soutcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan), the terminal point of the Russian caravans, and they will enjoy there all the rights granted to Russian trade at Tientsin.

Art. XV. Trade by land, exercised by Russian subjects in the interior and exterior provinces of China, will be governed by the Regulations annexed to the present Treaty.

The commercial stipulations of the present Treaty, as well as the Regulations which serve as a supplement to it, can be revised after an interval of ten years has elapsed from the date of the exchange of ratifications of the Treaty; but if, in the course of six months before the expiration of this term, neither of the contracting parties manifest a desire to proceed to the revision, the trade stipulations as well as the Regulations will remain in force for a new term of ten years.

Trade by sea route of Russian subjects in China will be subject to the general regulations established for foreign maritime commerce in China. If it becomes necessary to make modifications in these regulations, the two Governments will establish an understanding on this subject.

     Art. XVI.--If the development of Russian overland trade provokes the necessity of the establishment, for goods of export and import in China, of a Customs tariff, more in relation than the tariffs actually in force to the necessities of that trade, the Russian and Chinese Governments will proceed to an understanding on this subject, by adopting as a base for settling the duties of entry and exit the rate of five per cent. of the value of the goods.

Until the establishment of this tariff, the export duties on some kinds of teas of inferior quality, actually imposed at the rates established for the tea of superior quality, will be diminished proportionately to their value. The settling of these duties will be proceeded with, for each kind of tea, by an understanding between the Chinese Government and the envoy of Russia to Peking, within the term of one year, at the latest, from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty. Art. XVII.-Some divergencies of opinion having arisen hitherto as to the application of. Article X. of the Treaty concluded at Peking, in 1860, it is established by these presents, that the stipulations of the above-named article, relative to the recoveries to be effected, in case of theft and the harbouring of cattle beyond the frontier, will be for the future interpreted in this sense, that at the time of the discovery of the individuals guilty of theft or the harbouring of catile, they will be condemned to pay the real value of the cattle which they have not restored. It is understood that in case of the insolvency of the individuals guilty of theft of cattle, the indemnity to be paid cannot be placed to the charge of the local authorities.

      The frontier authorities of the two States will prosecute with all the rigour of the laws of their country, the individuals guilty of the harbouring of or theft of cattle, and should take the measures in their power for the restitution to whom they belong of cattle diverted, or which may have passed the frontier.

166

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

      The traces of cattle turned aside or which may have passed the frontier may be indicated, not only to the guards of the frontier posts, but also to the elders of the nearest villages.

      Art. XVIII. The stipulations of the Treaty concluded at Aigoun the 16th May, 1858, concerning the rights of the subjects of the two Empires to navigate the Amoor, the Sungari, and the Oussouri, and to carry on trade with the populations of the riverine localities, are and remain confirmed.

      The two Governments will proceed to the establishment of an understanding concerning the mode of application of the said stipulations.

Art. XIX-The stipulations of the old Treaties between Russia and China, not modified by the present Treaty, remain in full vigour.

      Art. XX-The present Treaty, after having been ratified by the two Emperors, will be promulgated in each Empire, for the knowledge and governance of each one. The exchange of ratifications will take place at St. Petersburg, within a period of six months counting from the day of the signature of the Treaty.

      Having concluded the above Article, plenipotentiaries of the two contract- ing parties have signed and sealed two copies of the present Treaty, in the Russian, Chinese, aud French languages. Of the three texts, duly compared an found in agreement, the French text will be evidence for the interpretation of the present Treaty.

one.

Done at St. Petersburg, the twelfth of February, eighteen hundred and eighty-

(Signed)

[L.S.]

NICOLAS DE GIERS.

[L.S.]

EUGENE Burzow.

[L.S.]

TSENG.

PROTOCOL

      In virtue of Article VI. of the Treaty signed to-day by the plenipotentiaries of the Russian and Chinese Governments, the Chinese Government will pay to the Russian Government the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles, designed to cover the expenses of the occupation of the country of Ili by the Russian troops and to satisfy divers pecuniary claims of Russian subjects. This sum shall be paid. within a period of two years counting from the day of the exchange of the ratifica- tions of the Treaty.

      Desiring 10 fix the mode of payment of the aftermentioned sum the undersigned have agreed as follows:-

      The Chinese Government will pay the equivalent of the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles in pounds sterling, say one million four hundred and thirty-one thousand six hundred and sixty-four pounds sterling two shillings to Messrs. Baring Brothers & Co. in London, in six equal parts, of two hundred and thirty- eight thousand six hundred and ten pounds sterling thirteen shillings and eight- pence each, less the customary bank charge which may be occasioned by the transfer of these payments to London.

The payments shall be scheduled at four months' distance the one from the other; the first shall be made four months after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty signed to-day, and the last two years after that exchange.

      The present Protocol will have the same force and value as if it had been inserted word for word in the Treaty signed to-day,

     In faith of which the plenipotentiaries of the two Governments have signed the present Protocol and have placed their seals to it.

     Done at St. Petersburg, the twelfth of February, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-one.

j

REGULATIONS FOR THE LAND TRADE BETWEEN

RUSSIA AND CHINA

Art. I.-A trade by free exchange and free of duty (free trade) between Russian and Chinese subjects is authorised within a zone extending for fifty versts (100 li) on either side of the frontier. The supervision of this trade will rest with the two Governments, in accordance with their respective frontier regulations.

Art. II.-Russian subjects proceeding on business to Mongolia and to the districts situated on the northern and southern slopes of the Tian-shan mountains may only cross the frontier at certain points specified in the list annexed to those regulations. They must procure from the Russian authorities permits in the Russian and Chinese languages, with Mongolian and Tartar translatiću. The name of the owner of the goods, or that of the leader of the caravan, a specification of the goods, the number of packages, and the number of heads of cattle may be indicated in the Mongolian or Tartar languages, in the Chinese text of these permits. Merchants, on entering Chinese territory, are bound to produce their permits at the Chinese post nearest to the frontier, where, after examination, the permit is to be counter- signed by the chief of the post. The Chinese authorities are entitled to arrest merchants who have crossed the frontier without permit, and to deliver them over to the Russian authorities nearest to the frontier, or to the competent Russian Consul, for the infliction of a severe penalty. In case of the permit being lost, the owner is bound to give notice to the Russian Consul, in order that a fresh ne may be issued to him, and inform the local authorities, in order to obtain a temporary certificate which will enable him to pursue his journey. Merchandise introduced into Mongolia and the districts situated on the slopes of the Tian-shan, but which have found no sale there, may be forwarded to the towns of Tientsin and Sou- tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan), to be sold or to be sent farther into China. With regard to the duties on such merchandise, to the issue of permits for its carriage, and to other Customs formalities, proceedings shall be taken in accordance with the following provisions.

Art. III.-Russian merchants forwarding goods from Kiachta and the Nertchinsk country to Tientsin must send them by way of Kalgan, Dounba, and Toun-tcheou. Merchandise forwarded to Tientsin from the Russian frontier by Kobdo and Kouihoua-tchen is to follow the same route. Merchants must be provided with transport permits issued by the Russian authorities, and duly rised by the competent Chinese authorities, which must give, in the Chinese and Russian languages, the name of the owner of the goods, the number of packages, and a description of the goods they contain. The officials of the Chinese Custom-houses situated on the road by which merchandise is forwarded will proceed, without delay, to verify the number of the packages, and to examine the goods, which they will allow to pass onwards, after fixing a visa to the permit. Packages opened in the course of the Customs examinations will be closed again at the Custom-house, the number of packages opened being noted on the permit. The Customs examination is not to last more than two hours. The permits are to be presented within a term of six months at the Tientsin Custom-house to be cancelled. If the owner of the goods finds this term insufficient, he must at the proper time and place give notice to the Chinese authorities. In case of the permit being lost the merchant must give notice to the authorities who delivered it to him to obtain a duplicate and must for that purpose

168

TRADE REGULATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

    make known the number and date of the missing permit. The nearest Custom- house on his road, after having ascertained the accuracy of the merchant's declara- tions, will give him a provisional certificate, accompanied by which his goods may proceed on their journey. An inaccurate declaration of the quantity of the goods, if it be proved that it was intended to conceal sales effected on the road, or to escape payment of duty, will render the merchant liable to the infliction of the penalties laid down by Art. VIII. of the present regulations.

      Art. IV.-Russian merchants who may wish to sell at Kalgan any portion of the goods brought from Russia must make a declaration to that effect to the local authorities within the space of five days. Those authorities, after the merchant has paid the whole of the entrance duties, will furnish him with a permit for the sale of the goods.

       Art. V.-Goods brought by Russian merchants by land from Russia to Tientsin will pay an entrance duty equivalent to two-thirds of the rate established by the tariff. Goods brought from Russia to Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) will pay in that town the same duties and be subject to the same regulations as at Tientsin.

      Art. VI.-If the goods left at Kalgan, having paid the entrance duties, are not sold there, their owner may send them on to Toun-tcheou, or to Tientsin, and the Customs authorities, without levying fresh duties, will repay to the merchant one-third of the entrance duty paid at Kalgan, a note to that effect being made on the permit issued by the Kalgan Custom-house. Russian merchants, after paying transit dues, i.e., one-half of the duty specified in the tariff, may forward to the internal markets goods left at Kalgau which have paid the entrance dues, subject only to the general regulations established for foreign trade in China. A transport permit, which is to be produced at all the Custom-houses and barriers on the road, will be delivered for these goods. Goods not accompanied by such permit will have to pay duty at the Custom-houses they pass, and lekin at the barriers.

      Art. VII.-Goods brought from Russia to Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) may be forwarded to the internal markets under the conditions stipulated by Art. IX. of these Regulations for goods forwarded from Tientsin destined for the internal market.

       Art. VIII.-If it be ascertained, when the Customs examination of goods brought from Russia to Tientsin takes place, that the goods specified in the permit have been withdrawn from the packages and replaced by others, or that their quantity (after deducting what has been left at Kalgan) is smaller than that indicated in the permit, the whole of the goods included in the examination will be confiscated by the Customs authorities. It is understood that packages damaged on the road, and which, con- sequently, have been repacked, shall not be liable to confiscation, provided always that such damage has been duly declared at the nearest Custom-house, and that a note to such effect has been made by the office after it has ascertained the untouched condition of the goods as at first sent off. Goods concerning which it is ascertained that a portion has been sold on the road will be liable to confiscation. If goods have been taken by by-ways in order to evade their examination at the Custom- houses established on the routes indicated in Art. III., the owner will be liable to a fine equal in amount to the whole entrance duty. If a breach of the aforesaid regulations has been committed by the carriers, without the knowledge or connivance of the owner of the goods, the Customs authorities will take this circumstance into consideration in determining the amount of the fine. This provision only applies to localities through which the Russian land trade passes, and is not applicable to similar cases arising at the ports and in the interior of the provinces. When goods are confiscated the merchant is entitled to release them by paying the equivalent of their value, duly arrived at by an understanding with the Chinese authorities.

      Art. IX. On the exportation by sea from Tientsin to some other Chinese port opened to foreign trade by Treaty of goods brought from Russia by land, the Tientsin Customs will levy on such goods one-third of the tariff duty, in addition to the two-thirds already paid. No duty shall be levied on these goods in other ports. Goods sent from Tientsin or the other ports to the internal markets are subject to

TRADE REGULATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

169

transit dues (i.e., half of the tariff duty) according to the general provisions laid down for foreign trade.

       Art. X.-Chinese goods sent from Tientsin to Russia by Russian merchants must be forwarded to Kalgan by the route indicated under Art. III. The entire export duty will be levied on these goods when they leave the country. Nevertheless, re-imported goods bought at Tientsin, as well as those bought in another port and forwarded in transitu to Tientsin to be exported to Russia, if accompanied by a Customs receipt for the export duty, shall not pay a second time, and the half re-importation duty (coasting duty) paid at Tientsin will be repaid to the merchant if the goods upon which it has been paid are exported to Russia a year from the time of such payment. For the transport of goods in Russia the Russian Consul will issue a peruit indicating in the Russian and Chinese languages the name of the owner of the goods, the number of packages, and the nature of the goods they contain. These permits will be vised by the Port Customs authorities, and must accompany the goods for production when they are examined at the Custom-houses on the road. The rules given in detail in Article III. will be observed as to the term within which the permit is to be presented to the Custom-house to be cancelled, and as to the proceedings in case of the permit being lost. Goods will follow the route indicated by Article III., and are not to be sold on the road; a breach of this rule will render the merchant liable to the penalties provided for under Article VIII. Goods will be examined at the Custom-houses on the road in accordance with the rules laid down under Article III. Chinese goods bought by Russian merchants at Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan), or brought by thein from the internal markets to be forwarded to Russia, on leaving Sou-tcheou for Russia will have to pay the duty leviable upon goods exported from Tientsin, and will be subject to the regulations established for that port.

Art. XI.-Goods bought at Toun-tcheou, on leaving that place for Russia by land, will have to pay the full export duty laid down by the tariff. Goods bought at Kalgan will pay in that town, on leaving for Russia, a duty equivalent to half the tariff rate. Goods bought by Russian merchants in the internal markets, and brought to Toun-tcheou and Kalgan to be forwarded to Russia, will moreover be subject to transit dues, according to the general rules established for foreign trade in the internal markets. The local Custom-houses of the aforesaid towns after levying the duties will give the merchant a transport permit for the goods. For goods leaving Toun-tcheou this permit will be issued by the Dounba Customs authorities, to whom application is to be made for it, accompanied by payment of the duties to which the goods are liable. The permit will mention the prohibition to sell goods on the road. The rules given in detail in Article III. relative to permits, the examination of goods, &c., will apply in like manner to goods exported from the places mentioned in this Article.

      Art. XII.-Goods of foreign origin sent to Russia by land from Tientsin, Tour- tcheou, Kalgan, and Sou-tcheon (Tsia-yu-kwan) will pay no duty if the merchant produces a Customs receipt acknowledging payment of the import and transit duties on those goods. If they have only paid entrance duties the competent Custom-house will call upon the merchant for the payment of the transit dues fixed by the tariff.

      Art. XIII.-Goods imported into China by Russian merchants, or exported by them, will pay Custom duties according to the general tariff for foreign trade with China, and according to the additional tariff drawn up for Russian trade in 1862.

Goods not enumerated in either of those tariffs will be subject to a 5 per cent. ad valorem duty.

       Art. XIV. The following articles will be admitted free of export and import duty-Gold and silver ingots, foreign coins, flour of all kinds, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery, foreign clothes, jewellery and silver plate, perfumery and soaps of all kinds, charcoal, firewood, handles of foreign manufacture, foreign tobacco and cigars, wine, beer, spirits household stores and utensils to be used in houses and on board ship, travellers, luggage, official stationery, tapestries, cutlery, foreign medicines, glassware, and

170

AGREEMENT BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

ornaments. The afore-mentioned articles will pass free of duty on entering and on leaving by land; but if they are sent from the towns and ports mentioned in these regulations to the internal markets they will pay a transit duty of 23 per cent. ad valorem. Travellers' luggage, gold and silver ingots, and foreign coins will, however, not pay this duty.

      Art. XV.-The exportation and importation of the following articles is prohibited under penalty of confiscation in case of smuggling: -Gunpowder, artillery ammuni- tion, cannon, muskets, rifles, pistols, and all firearms, engines, and munitions of war, salt, and opium. Russian subjects going to China may, for their personal defence have one musket or one pistol each, of which mention will be made in the permit they are provided with. The importation by Russian subjects of saltpetre, sulphur, and lead is allowed only under special licence from the Chinese authorities, and those articles may only be sold to Chinese subjects who hold a special purchase- permit. The exportation of rice and of Chinese copper coin is forbidden. On the other hand, the importation of rice and of all cereals may take place duty free.

      Art. XVI.-The transport of goods belonging to Chinese merchants is forbidden to Russian merchants attempting to pass them off as their own property.

       Art. XVII. The Chinese authorities are entitled to take the necessary measures against smuggling.

Done at St. Petersburg, the 12th-24th February, 1881.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

NICOLAS DE GIERS.

[L.S.]

EUGENE Burzow.

[L.S.]

TSENG.

PROTOCOL

      The undersigned Nicolas de Giers, secretary of state, actual privy councillor directing the Imperial Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Tseng, Marquess of Neyong vice-president of the high court of justice, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China to His Majesty the Emperor of Russia, have met at the hotel of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to proceed to the exchange of the acts of ratification of the Treaty between Russia and China, signed at St. Petersburg, the 12/24 February, 1881.

      After perusal of the respective instruments, which have been acknowledged tex- tually conformable to the original act, the exchange of the act ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of Russia the 4/16 August, 1881, against the act ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China the 3/15 May, 1881, has taken place according to custom.

      In faith of which the undersigned have drawn up the present procés-verbal, and have affixed to it the seal of their arms.

one.

Done at St. Petersburg, the 7th August,one thousand eight hundred and eighty-

(Signed) [L.S.]

NICOLAS DE GIERS.

[L.S.]

TSENG.

"J

UNITED STATES

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

AND CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, AT TIENTSIN, 18TH JUNE, 1858

Ratifications exchanged at Pehtang, 16th August, 1859

      The United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire desiring to maintain firm, lasting, and sincere friendship, have resolved to renew, in a manner clear and positive, by means of a Treaty or general Convention of Peace, Amity, and Commerce, the rules which shall in future be mutually observed in the intercourse of their respective countries; for which most desirable object the President of the United States and the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire have named for their Plenipotentiaries, to wit: the President of the United States of America, William B. Reed, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to China; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Kweiliang, a member of the Privy Council and Superintendent of the Board of Punishments, and Hwashana, President of the Board of Civil Office and Major-General of the Bordered Blue Banner Division of the Chinese Baunermen, both of them being Imperial Commissioners and Plenipotenti- aries: And the said Ministers, in virtue of the respective full powers they have received from their governments, have agreed upon the following articles :-

Art I.-There shall be, as there has always been, peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire, and between their people respectively. They shall not insult or oppress each other for any trifling cause, so as to produce an estrangement between them; and if any other nation should act unjustly or oppressively, the United States will exert their good offices, on being informed of the case, to bring about an amicable arrangement of the question, thus showing their friendly feelings.

Art. II.-In order to perpetuate friendship, on the exchange of ratifications by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and by His Majesty the Emperor of China, this Treaty shall be kept and sacredly guarded in this way, viz.: The original Treaty, as ratified by the President of the United States, shall be deposited at Peking, the capital of His Majesty the Emperor of China, in charge of the Privy Council; and, as ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China, shall be deposited at Washington, the capital of the United States, in charge of the Secretary of State.

      Art. III. In order that the people of the two countries may know and obey the provisions of this Treaty, the United States of America agree, immediately on the exchange of ratifications, to proclaim the same and publish it by proclamation in the Gazettes where the laws of the United States of America are published by authority; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, on the exchange of ratifications, agrees immediately to direct the publication of the same at the capital and by the Governors of all the provinces.

Art. IV. In order further to perpetuate friendship, the Minister or Commis- sioner, or the highest diplomatic representative of the United States of America in China, shall at all times have the right to correspond on terms of perfect equality and confidence with the officers of the Privy Council at the capital, or with the Governor- General of the Two Kwang, of Fohkien and Chekiang, or of the Two Kiang; and whenever he desires to have such correspondence with the Privy Council at the capital he shall have the right to send it through either of the said Governors-General, or by general post; and all such communications shall be most carefully respected. The Privy Council and Governors-General, as the case may be, shall in all cases consider and acknowledge such communications promptly and respectfully.

      Art. V. The Minister of the United States of America in China, whenever he has business, shall have the right to visit and sojourn at the capital of His Majesty the

172

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

Emperor of China and there confer with a member of the Privy Council or any other high officer of equal rank deputed for that purpose, on matters of common interest and advantage. His visits shall not exceed one in each year, and he shall complete his business without unnecessary delay. He shall be allowed to go by land or come to the mouth of the Pei-ho, in which he shall not bring ships-of-war, and he shall inform the authorities of that place in order that boats may be provided for him to go on his journey. He is not to take advantage of this stipulation to request visits to the capital on trivial occasions. Whenever he means to proceed to the capital he shall communicate in writing his intention to the Board of Rites at the capital, and thereupon the said Board shall give the necessary direction to facilitate his journey, and give him necessary protection and respect on his way. On his arrival at the capital he shall be furnished with a suitable residence prepared for him, and he shall defray his own expenses; and his entire suite shall not exceed twenty persons exclusive of his Chinese attendants, none of whom shall be engaged in trade.

      Art. VI. If at any time His Majesty the Emperor of China shall, by Treaty voluntarily made, or for any other reason, permit the representative of any friendly nation to reside at his capital for a long or short time, then, without any further consultation or express permission, the representative of the United States in China shall have the same privilege.

      Art. VII. The superior authorities of the United States and of China in corresponding together shall do so on terms of equality and in form of mutual communication (chau-hwui). The Consuls and the local officers, civil and military, in corresponding together shall likewise employ the style and form of mutual communication (chau-hwui). When inferior officers of the one government address the superior officers of the other they shall do so in the style and form of memorial (shin-chin). Private individuals, in addressing superior officers, shall employ the style of petition (pin-ching). In no case shall any terms or style be used or suffered which shall be offensive or disrespectful to either party. And it is agreed that no present, under any pretext or form whatever, shall ever be demanded of the United States by China, or of China by the United States.

       Art. VIII. In all future personal intercourse between the representative of the United States of America and the Governors-General or Governors the interviews shall be had at the official residence of the said officers, or at their temporary resi dence, or at the residence of the representative of the United States of America, whichever may be agreed upon between them; nor shall they make any pretext for declining these interviews. Current matters shall be discussed by correspondence so as not to give the trouble of a personal meeting.

       Art. IX.--Whenever national vessels of the United States of America, in cruising along the coast and among the ports opened for trade for the protection of the com- merce of their country, or the advancement of science, shall arrive at or near any of the ports of China, the commanders of said ships and the superior local authorities of government shall, if it be necessary, hold intercourse on terms of equality and courtesy, in token of the friendly relations of their respective nations; and the said vessels shall enjoy all suitable facilities on the part of the Chinese Government in procuring provisions or other supplies, and making necessary repairs. And the United States of America agree that in case of the shipwreck of any American vessel and its being pillaged by pirates, or in case any American vessel shall be pillaged or captured by pirates on the seas adjacent to the coast, without being shipwrecked, the national vessels of the United States shall pursue the said pirates, and if captured deliver them over for trial and punishment.

      Art. X.-The United States of America shall have the right to appoint Consuls and other commercial agents for the protection of trade, to reside at such places in the dominions of China as shall be agreed to be opened, who shall hold official intercourse and correspondence with the local officers of the Chinese Government (a Consul or a Vice-Consul in charge taking rank with an intendant of circuit or a prefect), either personally or in writing, as occasion may require, on terms of equality and reciprocal respect. And the Consuls and local officers shall employ the style of mutual

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

173

communication. If the officers of either nation are disrespectfully treated, or aggrieved in any way by the other authorities, they have the right to make representation of the same to the superior officers of their respective Governments, who shall see that full inquiry and strict justice shall be had in the premises. And the said Consuls and agents shall carefully avoid all acts of offence to the officers and people of China. On the arrival of a Consul duly accredited at any port in China, it shall be the duty of the Minister of the United States to notify the same to the Governor-General of the province where such port is, who shall forthwith recognize the said Consul and grant him authority to act.

Art. XI.-All citizens of the United States of America in China, peaceably attending to their affairs, being placed on a common footing of amity and good- will with subjects of China, shall receive and enjoy for themselves and everything appertaining to them the protection of the local authorities of Government, who shall defend them from all insult or injury of any sort. If their dwellings or property be threatened or attacked by mobs, incendiaries, or other violent or lawless persons, the local officers, on requisition of the Consul, shall immediately despatch a military force to disperse the rioters, apprehend the guilty individuals, and punish them with the utmost rigour of the law. Subjects of China guilty of any criminal act towards citizens of the United States shall be punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China, and citizens of the United States, either on shore or in any merchant vessel, who may insult, trouble, or wound the persons or injure the property of Chinese, or commit any other improper act in China, shall be punished only by the Consul or other public functionary thereto authorized, according to the laws of the United States. Ar- rests in order to trial may be made by either the Chinese or United States authorities. Art. XII.--Citizens of the United States, residing or sojourning at any of the ports open to foreign commerce, shall be permitted to rent houses and places of business or hire sites on which they can themselves build houses or hospitals, churches, and cemeteries. The parties interested can fix the rents by mutual and equitable agreement; the proprietors shall not demand an exorbitant price, nor shall the local authorities interfere, unless there be some objections offered on the part of the inhabitants respecting the place. The legal fees to the officers for applying their seal shall be paid. The citizens of the United States shall not unreasonably insist on particular spots, but each party shall conduct themselves with justice and moderation. Any desecration of the cemeteries by natives of China shall be severely punished according to law. At the places where the ships of the United States anchor, or their citizens reside, the merchants, seamen, or others can freely pass and repass in the immediate neighbourhood; but in order to the preservation of the public peace, they shall not go into the country to the villages and marts to sell their goods unlawfully, in fraud of the revenue.

       Art. XIII. If any vessel of the United States be wrecked or stranded on the coast of China and be subjected to plunder or other damage, the proper officers of the Government, on receiving information of the fact, shall immediately adopt measures for its relief and security; the persons on board shall receive friendly treatment, and be enabled to repair at once to the nearest port, and shall enjoy all facilities for obtaining supplies of provisions and water. If the merchant vessels of the United States, while within the waters over which the Chinese Government exercises jurisdiction, be plundered by robbers or pirates, then the Chinese local authorities civil and military, on receiving information thereof, shall arrest the said robbers or pirates, and punish them according to law, and shall cause all the property which can be recovered to be restored to the owners, or placed in the hands of the Consul. If by reason of the extent of territory and numerous population of China it shall in any case happen that the robbers cannot be apprehended, and the property only in part recovered, the Chinese Government shall not make indemnity for the goods lost; but if it shall be proved that the local authorities have been in collusion with the robbers, the same shall be communicated to the superior authorities for memorializing the Throne, and these officers shall be severely punished and their property be confiscated

repay the losses.

to

.

174

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

Art. XIV. The citizens of the United States are permitted to frequent the ports and cities of Canton and Chan-chau, or Swatow, in the province of Kwangtung; Amoy, Foochow, and Tai-wan in Formosa, in the province of Fuhkien; Ningpo in the province of Chekiang; and Shanghai in the province of Kiangsu, and any other port or place hereafter by Treaty with other powers or with the United States opened to commerce; and to reside with their families and trade there, and to proceed at pleasure with their vessels and merchandise from any of these ports to any other of them. But said vessels shall not carry on a clandestine or fraudulent trade at other ports of China, not declared to be legal, or along the coasts thereof; and any vessel under the American flag violating this provision shall, with her cargo, be subject to confiscation to the Chinese Govern- ment; and any citizen of the United States who shall trade in any contraband article of merchandise shall be subject to be dealt with by the Chinese Government, without being entitled to any countenance or protection from that of the United States; and the United States will take measures to prevent their flag from being abused by the subjects of other nations as a cover for the violation of the laws of the Empire.

Art. XV.-At each of the ports open to commerce, citizens of the United States shall be permitted t› import from abroad, and sell, purchase, and export all merchan- dise of which the importation or exportation is not prohibited by the laws of the Empire. The tariff of duties to be paid by the citizens of the United States, on the export and import of goods from and into China, shall be the same as was agreed upon at the Treaty of Wanghia, except so far as it may be modified by Treaties with other nations, it being expressly agreed that citizens of the United States shall never pay higher duties than those paid by the most favoured nation.

Art. XVI.-Tonnage duties shall be paid on every merchant vessel belonging to the United States entering either of the open ports at the rate of four mace per ton of forty cubic feet, if she be over one hundred and fifty tons burden; and one mace per ton of forty cubic feet if she be of the burden of one hundred and fifty tons or under, according to the tonnage specified in the register; which, with her other papers, shall, on her arrival, be lodged with the Consul, who shall report the same to the Commis- sioner of Customs. And if any vessel, having paid tonnage duty at one port, shall go to any other port to complete the disposal of her cargo, or being in ballast, to purchase an entire or fill up an incomplete cargo, the Consul shall report the same to the Commissioner of Customs, who shall note on the port-clearance that the tonnage duties have been paid, and report the circumstance to the collectors at the other Custom-houses; in which case the said vessel shall only pay duty on her cargo, and not be charged with tonnage duty a second time. The collectors of Customs at the open ports shall consult with the Consuls about the erection of beacons or light- houses, and where buoys and lightships should be placed.

Art. XVII.--Citizens of the United States shall be allowed to engage pilots to take their vessels into port, and, when the lawful duties have all been paid, take them out of port. It shall be lawful for them to hire at pleasure servants, compradores, linguists, writers, labourers, seamen, and persons for whatever necessary service, with passage or cargo-boats, for a reasonable compensation, to be agreed upon by the parties or determined by the Consul.

      Art. XVIII.-Whenever merchant vessels of the United States shall enter a port the Collector of Customs shall, if he see fit, appoint Custom-house officers to guard said vessels, who may live on board the ship or their own boats, at their convenience. The local authorities of the Chinese Government shall cause to be apprehended all mutineers or deserters from on board the vessels of the United States in China on being informed by the Consul, and will deliver them up to the Consuls or other officers for punishment. And if criminals, subjects of China, take refuge in the houses, or on board the vessels of citizens of the United States, they shall not be harboured, but shall be delivered up to justice on due requisition by the Chinese local officers, addressed to those of the United States. The merchants, seamen, and other citizens of the United States shall be under the superintendence of the appropriate officers of their government. If individuals of either nation commit acts of violence or disorder, use arms to the injury of others, or create disturbances endangering life, the officers of

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

175

the two governments will exert themselves to enforce order and to maintain the public peace, by doing impartial justice in the premises.

Art. XIX.-Whenever a merchant vessel belonging to the United States shall cast anchor in either of the said ports, the supercargo, master, or consignee, shall, within forty-eight hours, deposit the ship's papers in the bands of the Consul or person charged with his functions, who shall cause to be communicated to the Super- intendent of Customs a true report of the name and tonnage of such vessel, the number of her crew, and the nature of her cargo, which being done, he shall give a permit for her discharge. And the master, supercargo, or cousignee, if he proceed to discharge the cargo without such permit, shall incur a fine of five hundred Dollars, and the goods so discharged without permit shall be subject to forfeiture to the Chinese Government. But if a master of any vessel in port desire to discharge a part only of the cargo, it shall be lawful for him to do so, paying duty on such part only, and to proceed with the remainder to any other ports. Or if the master so desire, he may within forty- eight hours after the arrival of the vessel, but not later, decide to depart without breaking bulk; in which case he shall not be subject to pay tonnage or other duties or charges, until, on his arrival at another port, he shall proceed to discharge cargo when he shall pay the duties on vessel and cargo, according to law. And the tonnage duties shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. In case of the absence of the Consul or person charged with his functions, the captain or supercargo of the vessel may have recourse to the consul of a friendly Power; or, if he please, directly to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall do all that is required to conduct the ship's business.

Art. XX.---The Superintendent of Customs, in order to the collection of the proper duties, shall, on application made to him through the Consul, appoint suitable officers, who shall proceed, in the presence of the captain, supercargo, or consignee to make a just and fair examination of all goods in the act of being discharged for importation, or laden for exportation, on board any merchant vessel of the United States. And if disputes occur in regard to the value of goods subject to ad valorem duty, or in regard to the amount of tare, and the same cannot be satisfactorily arranged by the parties, the question may, within twenty-four hours, and not after- wards, be referred to the said Consul to adjust with the Superintendent of Customs.

Art. XXI-Citizens of the United States who may have imported merchandise into any of the free ports of China, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same in part or in whole to any other of the said ports, shall be entitled to make application, through their Consul, to the Superintendent of Customs, who, in order to prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made, by suitable officers, to see that the duties paid on such goods as are entered on the Custom- house books correspond with the representation made, and that the goods remain with their original marks unchanged, and shall then make a memorandum in the port-clearance of the goods and the amount of duties paid on the same, and deliver the same to the merchant, and shall also certify the facts to the officers of Customs at the other ports; all which being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in which the goods are laden, and everything being found, on examination there, to correspond, she shall be permitted to break bulk, and land the said goods without being subject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But if, on such examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in the

        then the goods shall be subject to forfeiture and confiscation to the Chinese Government. Foreign grain or rice brought into any port of China in a ship of the United States, and not landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

case,

Art. XXII. The tonnage duty on vessels of the United States shall be paid on their being admitted to entry. Duties of import shall be paid on the discharge of the goods, and duties of export on the lading of the same. When all such duties shall have been paid, and not before, the Collector of Customs shall give a port-clearance, and the Consul shall return the ship's papers. The duties shall be paid to the shroffs authorized by the Chinese Government to receive the same. Duties shall be paid and received either in sycee silver or in foreign money, at the rate of the day. If the

176

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

    Consul permits a ship to leave the port before the duties and tonnage dues are paid he shall be held responsible therefor.

Art. XXIII.-When goods on board any merchant vessel of the United States in port require to be transhipped to another vessel application shall be made to the Consul, who shall certify what is the occasion therefor to the Superintendent of Customs, who may appoint officers to examine into the facts and permit the transhipment. And if any goods be transhipped without written permits, they shall be subject to be forfeited to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXIV. Where there are debts due by subjects of China to citizens of the United States, the latter may seek redress in law; and on suitable representation being made to the local authorities through the Consul, they will cause due examination in the premises, and take proper steps to compel satisfaction. And if citizens of the United States be indebted to subjects of China, the latter may seek redress by representation through the Consul, or by suit in the Consular Court; but neither government will hold itself responsible for such debts.

       Art. XXV.-It shall be lawful for the officers or citizens of the United States to employ scholars and people of any part of China, without distinction of persons, to teach any of the languages of the Empire, and assist in literary labours, and the persons so employed shall not for that cause be subject to any injury on the part either of the Government or individuals; and it shall in like manner be lawful for citizens of the United States to purchase all manner of books in China.

      Art. XXVI.-Relations of peace and amity between the United States and China being established by this Treaty, and the vessels of the United States being admitted to trade freely to and from the ports of China open to foreign commerce, it is further agreed that, in case at any time hereafter China should be at war with any foreign nation whatever, and should for that cause exclude such nation from entering her ports, still the vessels of the United States shall none the less continue to pursue their commerce in freedom and security, and to transport goods to and from the ports of the belligerent powers, full respect being paid to the neutrality of the flag of the United States, provided that the said flag shall not protect vessels engaged in the transportation of officers or soldiers in the enemy's service, nor shall said flag be fraudulently used to enable the enemy's ships, with their cargoes, to enter the ports of China; but all such vessels so offending shall be subject to forfeiture and confisca tion to the Chinese Government.

      Art. XXVII. All questions in regard to rights, whether of property or person, arising between citizens of the United States in China, shall be subject to the jurisdiction and be regulated by the authorities of their own government; and all controversies occurring in China between citizens of the United States and the subjects of any other government shall be regulated by the Treaties existing between the United States and such governments respectively, without interference on the part of China.

      Art. XXVIII.-If citizens of the United States have special occasion to address any communication to the Chinese local officers of Government, they shall submit the same to their Consul or other officer, to determine if the language be proper and respectful, and the matter just and right, in which event he shall transmit the same to the appropriate authorities for their consideration and action in the premises. If subjects of China bave occasion to address the Consul of the United States they may address him directly, at the same time they inform their own officers, representing the case for his consideration and action in the premises; and if controversies arise between citizens of the United States and subjects of China, which cannot be amicably settled otherwise, the same shall be examined and decided conformably to justice and equity by the public officers of the two nations, acting in conjunction. The extortion of illegal fees is expressly prohibited. Any peaceable persons are allowed to enter the Court in order to interpret, lest injustice be done.

     Art. XXIX-The principles of the Christian Religion, as professed by the Protestant and Roman Catholic Churches, are recognised as teaching men to do good, and to do to others as they would have others to do to them. Hereafter those who

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

177

    quietly profess and teach these doctrines shall not be harassed or persecuted on account of their faith. Any person, whether citizen of the United States or Chinese convert, who, according to those tenets, peaceably teaches and practises the principles of Christianity, shall in no case be interfered with or molested.

      Art. XXX. The contracting parties hereby agree that should at any time the Ta-Tsing Empire grant to any nation, or the merchants or citizens of any nation, auy right, privilege, or favour, connected either with navigation, commerce, political or other intercourse, which is not conferred by this Treaty, such right, privilege, and favour shall at once freely enure to the benefit of the United States, its public officers, merchants, and citizens.

The present Treaty of Peace, Amity, and Commerce shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, within one year, or sooner, if possible, and by the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire forthwith; and the ratifications shall be exchanged within one year from the date of the signature thereof.

      In faith whereof we, the respective plenipotentiaries of the United States of America and of the Ta-Tsing Empire, as aforesaid, have signed and sealed these presents.

      Done at Tientsin, this eighteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, and the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-second, and in the eighth year of Hien Fung, fifth moon, and eighth day.

1

[L.S.] [L.S.]

[L.S.]

WILLIAM B. REED.

KWEILIANG.

HWASHANA.

      [Appended to the foregoing Treaty are Tariff and Rules identical with those annexed to the British Treaty of Tientsin.]

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED

STATES AND CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, AT WASHINGTON, 28TH JULY, 1868

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 23rd November, 1869

Whereas, since the conclusion of the Treaty between the United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire (China) of the 18th June, 1858, circumstances have arisen showing the necessity of additional articles thereto; the President of the United States and the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire have named for their Plenipotentiaries: to wit, the President of the United States of America, William R. Seward, Secretary of State; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Anson Burlingame, accredited as his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- tentiary, and Chih-kang and Sun-chia-ku, of the second Chinese rank, associated high Envoys and Ministers of his said Majesty; and the said Plenipotentiaries, after having exchanged their full powers, found to be in due and proper form, have agreed upon the following articles:-

      Art. I.-His Majesty the Emperor of China, being of the opinion that in making concessions to the citizens or subjects of foreign Powers, of the privilege of residing on certain tracts of land, or resorting to certain waters of that Empire, for purposes of trade, he has by no means relinquished his right of eminent domain or dominion over the said lands and waters, hereby agrees that no such concession or grant shall be construed to give to any power or party which may be at war with or hostile to

178

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

the United States, the right to attack the citizens of the United States, or their property, within the said lands or waters: And the United States for themselves hereby agree to abstain from offensively attacking the citizens or subjects of any power or party, or their property, with which they may be at war, on any such tract of land or water of the said Empire. But nothing in this article shall be construed to prevent the United States from resisting an attack by any hostile power or party upon their citizens or their property.

      It is further agreed that if any right or interest in any tract of land in China, has been, or shall hereafter be, granted by the Government of China to the United States or their citizens for purposes of trade or commerce, that grant shall in no event be construed to divest the Chinese Authorities of their right of jurisdiction over persons and property within said tract of land except so far as the right may have been expressly relinquished by Treaty.

Art. II. The United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of China, believing that the safety and prosperity of commerce will thereby best be promoted, agree that any privilege or immunity in respect to trade or navigation within the Chinese dominions which may not have been stipulated for by Treaty, shall be subject to the discretion of the Chinese Government, and may be regulated by it accordingly, but not in a manner or spirit incompatible with the Treaty stipulations of the parties. Art. III. The Emperor of China shall have the right to appoint Consuls at ports of the United States, who shall enjoy the same privileges and immunities as those which are enjoyed by public law and Treaty in the United States by the Consuls of Great Britain and Russia, or either of them.

Art. IV. The 29th article of the Treaty of the 18th June, 1858, having stipulated for the exemption of the Christian citizens of the United States and Chinese converts from persecution in China on account of their faith, it is further agreed that citizens of the United States in China of every religious persuasion, and Chinese subjects in the United States, shall enjoy entire liberty of conscience, and shall be exempt from all disability or persecution on account of their religious faith or worship in either country. Cemeteries for sepulture of the dead, of whatever nativity or nationality, shall be held in respect and free from disturbance or profanation.

     Art. V. The United States of America and the Emperor of China cordially recognize the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance, and also the mutual advantage of the free migration and emigration of their citizens and subjects respectively from the one country to the other for the purposes of curiosity, of trade, or as permanent residents. The High Contracting Parties, therefore, join in reprobating any other than an entirely voluntary emigration for these purposes. They consequently agree to pass laws, making it a penal offence for a citizen of the United States, or a Chinese subject, to take Chinese subjects either to the United States or to any other foreign country; or for a Chinese subject or citizen of the United States to take citizens of the United States to China, or to any other foreign country, without their free and voluntary consent respectively.

Art. VI.-Citizens of the United States visiting or residing in China shall enjoy the same privileges, immunities, or exemptions, in respect to travel or residence as may there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

And reciprocally, Chinese subjects visiting or residing in the United States shall enjoy the same privileges, immunities, and exemptions in respect to travel or residence as may there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. But nothing herein contained shall be held to confer naturalization upon citizens of the United States in China, nor upon the subjects of China in the United States.

Art. VII.-Citizens of the United States shall enjoy all the privileges of the public educational institutions under the control of the Government of China; and reciprocally Chinese subjects shall enjoy all the privileges of the public educational institutions under the control of the Government of the United States, which are enjoyed in the respective countries by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. The citizens of the United States may freely establish and maintain schools within the Empire of China at those places where foreigners are by Treaty permitted.

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA 179

to reside; and reciprocally, Chinese subjects may enjoy the same privileges and immunities in the United States.

Art. VIII. The United States, always disclaiming and discouraging all prac- tices of unnecessary dictatiou and intervention by one nation in the affairs or domestic administration of another, do hereby freely disclaim and disavow any intention or right to intervene in the domestic administration of China in regard to the construc- tion of railroads, telegraphs, or other material internal improvements. On the other hand, His Majesty the Emperor of China reserves to himself the right to decide the time and manner and circumstances of introducing such improvements within his dominions. With this mutual understanding it is agreed by the contracting parties that, if at any time hereafter his Imperial Majesty shall determine to construct, or cause to be constructed, works of the character mentioned within the Empire, and shall make application to the United States or any other Western Power for facilities to carry out that policy, the United States will in that case designate or authorize suitable engineers to be employed by the Chinese Government, and will recommend to other nations an equal compliance with such applications; the Chinese Government in that case protecting such engineers in their persons and property, and paying them a reasonable compensation for their services.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty and thereto affixed the seals of their arms.

Done at Washington, the twenty-eighth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight.

[L.8.] (Signed) WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

ANSON BURLINGAME.]

[L.S.]

CHIH KANG.

[L.S.] (Signed) [L.S.]

""

SUN CHIAKU.

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN

THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, ON THE 17TH NOVEMBER, 1880

THE IMMIGRation TREATY

Whereas, in the eighth year of Hien Fung, Anno Domini 1858, a Treaty of Peace and Friendship was concluded between the United States of America and China, and to which were added in the seventh year of Tung Chi, Anno Domini 1868, certain supplementary articles to the advantage of both parties, which supplementary articles were to be perpetually observed and obeyed; and

       Whereas the Government of the United States, because of the constantly in- creasing immigration of Chinese labourers to the territory of the United States, and the embarrassments consequent upon such immigration, now desires to negotiate a modificaton of the existing Treaties which will not be in direct contravention of their spirit; now, therefore, the President of the United States of America appoints James B. Angell, of Michigan; John F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of South Carolina, as his Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has appointed Pao Chun, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council and Superintendent of the Board of Civil Office, and Li Hung Tsao, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipo- tentiary; and the said Commissioners Plenipotentiary, having conjointly examined their full powers, and having discussed the points of possible modifications in existing Treaties, have agreed upon the following articles in modification:-

Art. I.-Whenever, in the opinion of the Government of the United States, the coming of Chinese labourers to the United States, or their residence therein, affects,

180 IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA

or threatens to affect, the interests of that country, or to endanger the good order of any locality within the territory thereof, the Government of China agrees that the Government of the United States may regulate, limit, or suspend such coming or residence, but may not absolutely prohibit it. The limitation or suspension shall be reasonable, and shall apply only to Chinese who may go to the United States as labourers, other classes not being included in the limitation. Legislation in regard to Chinese labourers will be of such a character only as is necessary to enforce the regulation, limitation, or suspension, of immigration, and immigrants shall not be subject to personal maltreatment or abuse.

     Art. II. Chinese subjects, whether proceeding to the United States as traders or students, merchants, or from curiosity, together with their body and household servants, and Chinese labourers who are now in the United States, shall be allowed to go and come of their own free will and accord and shall be accorded all the rights, privileges, immunities, and exemptions which are accorded to the citizens and subjects of the most favoured nations.

     Art. III.-If Chinese labourers, or Chinese of any other class, now either permanently or temporarily residing in the territory of the United States, meet with ill-treatment at the hands of any other persons, the Government of the United States will exert all its power to devise measures for their protection, and secure to them the same rights, privileges, immunities, and exemptions as may be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation, and to which they are entitled by Treaty.

     Art. IV. The high contracting Powers, having agreed upon the foregoing Articles, whenever the Government of the United States shall adopt legislative measures in accordance therewith, such measures will be communicated to the Government of China, and if the measures, as effected, are found to work hardship upon the subjects of China, the Chinese Minister at Washington may bring the matter to the notice of the Secretary of State of the United States, who will consider the subject with him, and the Chinese Foreign Office may also bring the matter to the notice of the U.S. Minister at Peking and consider the subject with him, to the end that mutual and unqualified benefit may result. In faith whereof, the Plenipo- tentiaries have signed and sealed the foregoing at Peking, in English and Chinese, there being three originals of each text of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year from the date of its execution.

Done at Peking, this 17th day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Hsu sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day. Signed and sealed by the above-named Commissioners of both Governments.

THE COMMERCIAL TREATY

The President of the United States of America and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, because of certain points of incompleteness in the existing Treaties between the two Governments, have named as their Commissioners Plenipotentiary: The President of the United States of America, James B. Angell, of Michigan; John F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of South Carolina, as his Com- missioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has appointed Pao Chun, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council and Super- intendent of the Board of Civil Office; and Li Hung Tsao, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and the said Com- missioners Plenipotentiary, having conjointly examined their full powers, and having discussed the points of possible modification in existing Treaties, have agreed upon the following Additional Articles:-

Art. I.-The Governments of the United States and China, recognizing the benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order to still further promote such relations between the citizens and subjects of the two Powers, mutually agree to give the most careful and favourable attention to the representations of either as to such special extension of commercial intercourse as either may desire.

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA 181

      Art. 11.-The Governments of China and of the United States mutually agree and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not be permitted to import opium in any of the ports of the United States, and citizens of the United States shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the open ports of China, or transport from one open port to any other open port, or to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports in China. This absolute prohibition, which extends to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power and employed by other persons for the transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of China and the United States, and the benefits of the favoured nation clauses in existing Treaties shall not be claimed by the citizens or subjects of either Power as against the provisions of this article.

of

Art. III. His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China hereby promises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports or ex- ports or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the United States, or upon the produce, manu- factures, or merchandise imported in the same from the United States, or from any foreign country, or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise exported in the same to the United States, or any foreign country, or transported in the same from one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levied on vessels or cargoes any other nation, or on those of Chinese subjects. The United States hereby pro- mises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage duties and dues for imports shall be imposed or levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels wholly belonging to the subjects of his Imperial Majesty, coming either directly or by way of any foreigu port from any of the ports of China which are open to foreign trade to the ports of the United States, or returning therefrom either directly or by way of any foreign port to any of the open ports of China, or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from China, or from any foreign country, than are imposed or levied on vessels of any other nations which make no discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports, exports, or coastwise trade, or than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of citizens of the United States.

Art. IV. When controversies arise in the Chinese Empire between citizens of the United States and subjects of His Imperial Majesty, which need to be examined and decided by the public officer of the two nations, it is agreed between the Governments of the United States and China that such cases shall be tried by the proper official of the nationality of the defendant. The properly authorized official of the plaintiff's nationality shall be freely permitted to attend the trial, and shall be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper facilities for watching the proceedings in the interest of justice, and if he so desire he shall have the right to be present and to examine and to cross-examine witnesses. If he is dissatisfied with the proceedings, he shall be permitted to protest against them in debate. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case.

     In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and scaled the foregoing, at Peking, in English and Chinese there being three originals of each text, of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year

from the date of its execution.

      Done at Peking, this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Hsu sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day.

(Signed)

JAMES B. Angell.

JOHN F. SWIFT.

""

WILLIAM H. TRESCOTT.

(Signed)

PAO CHUN.

LI HUNG-TSAO.

*

IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CHINA, 1894

RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED AT WASHINGTON, 7TH DECEMBER, 1894

Whereas, on the 17th of November, a. d. 1880, and of Kwang Hsu, the sixth year, the tenth month, and the 15th day, a Treaty was concluded between the United States and China for the purpose of regulating, limiting, or suspending the coming of Chinese labourers to and their residence in the United States, and, whereas, the Government of China, in view of the antagonism and much depreciated and serious disorders to which the presence of Chinese labourers has given rise in certain parts of the United States, desires to prohibit the emigration of such labourers from China to the United States; and, whereas, the two Governments desire to co-operate in prohibiting such emigration and to strengthen in many other ways the bonds of relationship between the two countries; and, whereas, the two Governments are desirous of adopting reciprocal measures for the better protection of the citizens or subjects of each within the jurisdiction of the other; now, therefore, the President of the United States has appointed Walter Q. Gresham, Secretary of State, as his Plenipotentiary, and his Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has appointed Yang Yui, Officer of the Second Rank, Sub-director of the Court of Sacrificial Worship and Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, and the said Plenipotentiaries having exhibited their respective full powers, found to be in due form and good faith, have agreed upon the following articles :-

      Art. I. The high contracting parties agree that for a period of ten years beginning with the date of the ratifications of this Convention, the coming, except under the conditions hereinafter specified, of Chinese labourers to the United States shall be absolutely prohibited.

      Art. II. The preceding article shall not apply to the return to the United States of any registered Chinese labourer who has a lawful wife, child, or parent in the United States or property therein of the value of $1,000, or debts of like amount due to him and pending settlement. Nevertheless, every such Chinese labourer shall, before leaving the United States, deposit, as a condition of his return, with the collector of customs of the district from which he departs, a full description in writing of his family or property or debts as aforesaid, and shall be furnished by the said collector with such certificate of his right to return under this Treaty as the laws of the United States may now or hereafter prescribe, and not inconsistent with the provisions of the Treaty; and, should the written description aforesaid be proved to be false, the rights of return thereunder, or of continued residence after return, shall in each case be forfeited. And such right of return to the United States shall be exercised within one year from the date of leaving the United States; but such right of return to the United States may be extended for an additional period, not to exceed one year, in cases where by reason of sickness or other cause of disability beyond his control, such Chinese labourer shall be rendered unable sooner to return, which facts shall be fully reported to the Chinese Consul at the port of departure, and by him certified to the satisfaction of the collector of the port at which such Chinese subject shall land in the United States. And no such Chinese labourer shall be permitted to enter the United States by land or sea without producing to the proper officer of the Customs the return certificate herein required.

IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA 183

or

Art. III. The provisions of the convention shall not affect the right at present enjoyed of Chinese subjects, being officials, teachers, students, merchants, travellers for curiosity or pleasure, but not labourers, of coming to the United States and residing therein. To entitle such Chinese subjects as are above described to admission into the United States they may produce a certificate either from their Government or from the Government of the country where they last resided, viséd by the diplomatic or consular representative of the United States in the country or port whence they depart. It is also agreed that Chinese labourers shall continue to enjoy the privilege of transit across the territory of the United States in the course of their journey to or from other countries, subject to such regulations by the Government of the United States as may be necessary to prevent the said privilege of transit from being abused.

      Art. IV.-In pursuance of Article 3 of the Immigration Treaty between the United States and China, signed at Peking on the 17th day of November, 1880, it is hereby understood and agreed, that Chinese labourers or Chinese of any other class, either permanently or temporarily residing in the United States, shall have for the protection of their persons and property all rights that are given by the laws of the United States to citizens of the more favoured nations, excepting the right to become naturalized citizens. And the Government of the United States reaffirms its obligations, as stated in the said Article 3, to exert all its power to secure the protection to the person and property of all Chinese subjects in the United States.

      Art. V. The Government of the United States having, by an Act of Congress, approved May 5th, 1892, as amended and approved November 3rd, 1893, required all Chinese labourers lawfully within the United States, before the passage of the first-named Act, to be registered, as in the said Acts provided, with a view of affording them better protection, the Chinese Government will not object to the enforcement of the said Acts, and reciprocally the Government of the United States recognises the right of the Government of China to enact and enforce similar laws and regulations, for the registration, free of charge, of all labourers, skilled or unskilled (not merchants, as defined by the said Acts of Congress), citizens of the United States in China whether residing within or without the Treaty Ports. And the Government of the United States agrees that within twelve months from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Convention, and annually thereafter, it will furnish to the Government of China registers or reports showing the full name, age, occupation, and number or place of residence of all other citizens of the United States, including missionaries residing both within and without the Treaty Ports of China, not including, however, diplomatic and other officers of the United States residing or travelling in China upon official business, together with their body and household servants.

Art. VI. This convention shall remain in force for a period of ten years, beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications, and, if six months before the expiration of the said period of ten years neither Government shall have formally given notice of its final termination to the other, it shall remain in full force for another like period of ten years.

      In faith whereof, we, the respective plenipotentiaries, have signed this Convention and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done, in duplicate, at Washington, the 17th day of March, A.D. 1894.

WALTER Q. GRESHAM,

YANG YUI,

Secretary of State.

Chinese Minister to the United States.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED

STATES AND CHINA

SIGNED AT SHANGHAI, 8TH OCTOBER, 1903

[Translation]

      The United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being animated by an earnest desire to extend further the commercial relations between them and otherwise to promote the interests of the peoples of the two countries, in view of the provisions of the first paragraph of Article XI. of the Final Protocol signed at Peking on the 7th day of September, A.D. 1901, whereby the Chinese Gov- ernment agreed to negotiate the amendments deemed necessary by the foreign Governments to the Treaties of Commerce and Navigation and other subjects concern- ing commercial relations, with the object of facilitating them, have for that purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries :---

The United States of America-Edwin H. Conger, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to China; John Goodnow, Consul-General of the United States of America at Shanghai; John F. Seamau, a Citizen of the United States of America resident at Shanghai;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China-Lu Hai-huan, President of the Board of Public Works; Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, formerly Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works; Wu Ting-Fang, Senior Vice-President of the Board of Commerce;

Who, having met and duly exchanged their full powers which were found to be in proper form, have agreed upon the following amendments to existing Treaties of Commerce and Navigation previously concluded between the two countries, and upon the subjects hereinafter expressed connected with commercial relations, with the object of facilitating them.

      Art. I. In accordance with international custom, and as the diplomatic representative of China has the right to reside in the Capital of the United States, and to enjoy there the same prerogatives, privileges and immunities as are enjoyed by the similar representative of the most favoured nation, the diplomatic representa- tive of the United States shall have the right to reside at the capital of His Majesty the Emperor of China. He shall be given audience of His Majesty the Emperor whenever necessary to present his letters of credence or any communication from the President of the United States. At all such times he shall be received in a place and in a manner befitting his high position, and on all such occasions the ceremonial observed toward him shall be that observed toward the representatives of nations on a footing of equality, with no loss of prestige on either side.

      The diplomatic representatives of the United States shall enjoy all the preroga- tives, privileges and immunities accorded by international usage to such representatives, and shall in all respects be entitled to the treatment extended to similar representatives of the most favoured nation.

      The English text of all notes or despatches from United States officials to Chinese officials, and the Chinese text of all from Chinese officials to United States officials shall be authoritative.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

185

Art. II. As China may appoint consular officers to reside in the United States and to enjoy there the same attributes, privileges and immunities as are enjoyed by consular officers of other nations, the United States may appoint, as its interests may require, consular officers to reside at the places in the Empire of China that are now or that may hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade. They shall hold direct official intercourse and correspondence with the local officers of the Chinese Government within their consular districts, either personally or in writing as the case may require, on terms of equality and reciprocal respect. These officers shall be treated with proper respect by all Chinese authorities, and they shall enjoy all the attributes, privileges and immunities, and exercise all the jurisdiction over their nationals which are or may hereafter be extended to similar officers of the nation the most favoured in these respects. If the officers of either government are disrespect- fully treated or aggrieved in any way by the authorities of the other, they shall have the right to make representation of the same to the superior officers of their own government, who shall see that full inquiry and strict justice be had in the premises. And the said consular officers of either nation shall carefully avoid all acts of offence to the officers and people of the other nation.

       On the arrival of a consul properly accredited at any p ace in China opened to foreign trade, it shall be the duty of the Minister of the United States to inform the Board of Foreign Affairs, which shall, in accordance with international usage, forth- with cause the due recognition of the said consul and grant him authority to act.

       Art. III. Citizens of the United States may frequent, reside, and carry on trade, industries and manufactures, or pursue any lawful av ca ion, in all the ports or localities of China which are now open or may hereafter be opened to foreign trade and residence; and, within the suitable localities at those places which have been or may be set apart for the use and occupation of foreigners, thy may rent or purchase houses, places of business and other buildings, and rent or lease in perpetuity land and build thereon. They shall generally enjoy as to their pe sons and property all such rights, privileges and immunities as are or may hereafter be granted t the subjects or citizens of the nation the most favoured in these respects.

Art. IV.The Chinese Government, recognising that te existing system of levying dues on goods in transit, and especially the syste o f taxation known as lekin, impedes the free circulation of commodities to the general injury of trade, hereby undertakes to abandon the levy of lekin and all ot er transit dues throughout the empire and to abolish the offices, stations 11 rriers maintained for their collection and not to establish other offices fo ing dues on goods in transit. It is clearly understood that, after the offices, stabo bar iers or taxing goods in transit have been abolished, no attempt shall be marit -establish them in any form or under any pretext whatsoever.

The Government of the United States, in return, consent to allow a surtax, in excess of the tariff rates for the time being in force, to be imposed on foreign goods imported by citizens of the United States and on Chinese produce destined for export abroad or coastwise. It is clearly understood that in no case shall the surtax on foreign imports exceed one and one-half times the import duty leviable in terms of the final Protocol signed by China and the Powers on the seventh day of September, A.D. 1901; that the payment of the import duty and surtax sl secure for foreign imports, whether in the hands of Chinese or foreigners, in original packages or other- wise, complete immunity from all other taxation, examination or delay; that the total amount of taxation, inclusive of the tariff export duty leviable on native produce for export abroad shall, under no circumstances, exceed seven and one-half per cent. ad valorem.

Nothing in this article is intended to interfere with the inheren right of China to levy such other taxes as are not in conflict with its provisions.

       Keeping these fundamental principles in view, the High Contracting Parties have agreed upon the following method of procedure:

The Chinese Government undertakes that all offic s, s atious and barriers of whatsover kind for collecting lekin, duties, or such like dies on goods in transit, shall

5

186

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

be permanently abolished on all roads, railways and waterways in the nineteen Provinces of China and the three Eastern Provinces. This provision does not apply to the native Customs offices at present in existence on the seaboard, at open ports where there are offices of the Imperial Maritime Customs, and on the land frontiers of China embracing the nineteen Provinces and the three Eastern Provinces.

      Wherever there are offices of the Imperial Maritime Customs, or wherever such may be hereafter placed, native Customs offices may also be established, as well as at any point either on the seaboard or land frontiers.

      The Government of the United States agrees that foreign goods on import- ation, in addition to the effective five per cent. import duty as provided for in the Protocol of 1901, shall pay a special surtax of one and one-half times the amount of the said duty to compensate for the abolition of lekin, of other transit dues besides lekin, and of all other taxation on foreign goods and in consideration of the other reforms provided for in this article.

The Chinese Government may recast the foreign export tariff with specific duties as far as practicable, on a scale not exceeding five per cent. ad valorem; but existing export duties shall not be raised until at least six months' notice has been given. In cases where existing export duties are above five per cent., they shall be reduced to not more than that rate. An additional special surtax of one-half the export duty payable for the time being, in lieu of internal taxation of all kinds, may be levied at the place of original shipment, or at the time of export on goods exported either to foreign countries or coastwise.

Foreign goods which bear a similarity to native goods shall be furnished by the Customs officers, if required by the owner, with a protective certificate for each pack- age, on the payment of import duty and surtax, to prevent the risk of any dispute in the interior.

Native goods brought by junks to open ports, if intended for local consumption, irrespective of the nationality of the owner of the goods, shall be reported at the native Customs offices only, to be dealt with according to the fiscal regulations of the Chinese Government.

      Machine-made cotton yarn and cloth manufactured in China, whether by foreigners at the open ports or by Chinese anywhere in China, shall as regards taxation be on a footing of perfect equality. Such goods upon payment of the taxes thereon shall be granted a rebate of the import duty and of two-thirds of the import surtax paid on the cotton used in their manufacture, if it has been imported from abroad, and of all duties paid thereon if it be Chinese grown cotton. They shall also be free of export duty, coast-trade duty and export surtax. The same principle and pro- cedure shall be applied to all other products of foreign type turned out by machinery

in China.

A member or members of the Imperial Maritime Customs foreign staff shall be selected by the Governors-General and Governors of each of the various provinces of the Empire for their respective provinces, and appointed in consultation with the Inspector-General of Imperial Maritime Customs, for duty in connection with native Customs affairs to have a general supervision of their working.

Cases where illegal action is complained of by citizens of the United States shall be promptly investigated by an officer of the Chinese Government of sufficiently high rank, in conjunction with an officer of the United States Government, and an officer of the Imperial Maritime Customs, each of sufficient standing; and, in the event of it being found by the investigating officers that the complaint is well founded and loss has been incurred, due compensation shall be paid through the Imperial Mari- time Customs. The high provincial officials shall be held responsible that the officer guilty of the illegal action shall be severely punished and removed from his post. If the complaint is shown to be frivolous or malicious, the complainant shall be held responsible for the expenses of the investigation.

     When the ratifications of this Treaty shall have been exchanged by the High Contracting Parties hereto, and the provisions of this Article shall have been accepted by the Powers having Treaties with China, then a date shall be agreed upon wheu

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

187

the provisions of this Article shall take effect, and an Imperial Edict shall be published in due form on yellow paper and circulated throughout the Empire of China setting forth the abolition of all lekin taxation, duties on goods in transit, offices, stations and barriers for collecting the same, and of all descriptions of internal taxation on foreign goods, and the imposition of the surtax on the import of foreign goods and on the export of native goods, and the other fiscal changes and reforms provided for in this Article, all of which shall take effect from the said date. The Edict shall state that the provincial high officials are responsible that any official disregarding the letter or the spirit of its injunction shall be severely punished and removed from his post.

      Art. V.-The tariff duties to be paid by citizens of the United States on goods imported into China shall be as set forth in the schedule annexed hereto and made part of this Treaty, subject only to such amendment and changes as are authorised by Article IV. of the present Convention, or as may hereafter be agreed upon by the present High Contracting Parties. It is expressly agreed, however, that citizens of the United States shall at no time pay other or higher duties than those paid by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

Conversely, Chinese subjects shall not pay higher duties on their imports into the United States than those paid by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

      Art. VI. The Government of China agrees to the establishment by citizens of the United States of warehouses approved by the proper Chinese authorities as bonded warehouses at the several open ports of China, for storage, re-packing, or preparation for shipment of lawful goods, subject to such needful regulations for the protection of the revenue of China, including a reasonable scale of fees according to com- moditics, distance from the Custom-house, and hours of working, as shall be made from time to time by the proper officers of the Government of China.

Art. VII.-The Chinese Government, recognising that it is advantageous for the country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract foreign as well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprises, agrees, within one year from the signing of this Treaty, to initiate and conclude the revision of the existing mining regulations. To this end China will, with all expedition and earnestness, go into the whole question of mining rules; and, selecting from the rules of the United States and other countries, regulations which seem applicable to the condition of China, will recast its present mining rules in such a way as, while promoting the interests of Chinese subjects and not injuring in any way the sovereign rights of China, will offer no impediment to the attraction of foreign capital nor place foreign capitalists at a greater disadvantage than they would be under generally accepted foreign regulations; and will permit citizens of the United States to carry on in Chinese territory mining operations and other necessary business relating thereto, provided they comply with the new regulations and conditions which may be imposed by China on its subjects and foreigners alike, relating to the opening of mines, the renting of mineral land, and the payment of royalty, and provided they apply for permits, the provisions of which in regard to necessary business relating to such operations shall be observed. The residence of citizens of the United States in connection with such mining operations shall be subject to such regulations as shall be agreed upon between the United States and China.

     Any mining concession granted after the publication of such new rules shall be subject to their provisions.

Art. VIII. Drawback certificates for the return of duties shall be issued by the Imperial Maritime Customs to citizens of the United States within three weeks of the presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the applicant to receive such drawback certificates, and they shall be receivable at their face value in payment of duties of all kinds (tounage dues excepted) at the port of issue; or shall, in the case of drawbacks on foreign goods re-exported within three years from the date of importation, be redeemable by the Imperial Maritime Customs in full in ready money at the port of issue, at the option of the holders thereof. But if, in conection with any application for a drawback certificate, the Customs authorities discover an

5*

188

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

attempt to defraud the revenue, the applicant shall be dealt with and punished in accordance with the stipulations provided in the Treaty of Tientsin, Article XXI. in the cas of detected frauds on the revenue. In case the goods have been removed from Chinese territory, then the Consul shall inflict on the guilty party a fine to be paid to the Chinese Government.

      Art. IX. Whereas the United States undertakes to protect the citizens of any country in the exclusive use within the United States of any lawful trade-marks, provided that such country agrees by Treaty or Convention to give like protection to citizens of the United States:

Therefore the Government of China, in order to secure such protection in the United States for its subjects, now agrees to fully protect any citizen, firm or corpora- tion of the United States in the exclusive use in the Empire of China of any lawful trade-mark to the exclusive use of which they are entitled in the United States, or which they have adopted and used, or intend to adopt and use as soon as registered, for exclusive use within the Empire of China. To this end the Chinese Government agrees to issue by its proper authorites proclamations having the force of law, for- bidding all subjects of China from infringing on, imitating, colourably imitating, or knowingly passing off an imitation of trade marks belonging to citizens of the United States, which shall have been registered by the proper authorities of the United States at such offices as the Chinese Government will establish for such purpose, on payment of a reasonable fee, after due investigation by the Chinese authorities, and in com- pliance with reasonable regulations.

Art. X.-The United States Government allows subjects of China to patent their inventions in the United States and protects them in the use and ownership of such patents. The Government of China now agrees that it will establish a Patent Office. After this office has been established and special laws with regard to inventions have been adopted it will thereupon, after the payment of the legal fees, issue certificates of protection, valid for a fixed term of years, to citizens of the United States on all their patents issued by the United States, in respect of articles the sale of which is lawful in China, which do not infringe on previous inventions of Chinese subjects, in the same manner as patents are to be issued to subjects of China.

Art. XI.-Whereas the Government of the United States engages to give the benefits of its copyright laws to the citizens of any foreign State which gives to the citizens of the United States the benefits of copyrights on an equal basis with its own citizens:

Therefore the Government of China, in order to secure such benefits in the United States for its subjects, now agrees to give full protection, in the same way and manner and subject to the same conditions upon which it agrees to protect trade- marks, to all citizens of the United States who are authors, designers or proprietors of any book, map, print or engraving especially prepared for the use and education of the Chinese people, or translation into Chinese of any book, in the exclusive right to print and sell such book, map, print, engraving or translation in the Empire of China during ten years from the date of registration. With the exception of the books, maps, etc., specified above, which may not be reprinted in the same form, no work shall be entitled to copyright privileges under this article. It is understood that Chinese subjects shall be at liberty to make, print and sell original translations into Chinese of any works written or of maps compiled by a citizen of the United States. This article shall not be held to protect against due process of law any citizen of the United States or Chinese subject who may be author, proprietor or seller of any publication calculated to injure the well-being of China.

Art. XII.-The Chinese Government having in 1898 opened the navigable inland waters of the Empire to commerce by all steam vessels, native or foreign, that may be specially registered for the purpose, for the conveyance of passengers and lawful merchandise, citizens, firms and corporations of the United States may engage in such commerce on equal terms with those granted to subjects of any foreign power. In case either party hereto considers it advantageous at any time that the rules and regulations then in existence for such commerce be altered or amended, the

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

189

    Chinese Government agrees to consider amicably, and to adopt such modifications thereof as are found necessary for trade and for the benefit of China.

      The Chinese Government agrees that, upon the exchange of the ratifications of this Treaty, Mukden and Antung, both in the province of Sheng-king, will be opened by China itself as places of international residence and trade. The selection of fitting localities to be set apart for international use and occupation, and the regula- tions for these places set apart for foreign residence and trade shall be agreed upon by the Governments of the United States and China after consultation together.

      Art. XIII.-China agrees to take the necessary steps to provide for a uniform national coinage which shall be legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other obligations throughout the Empire of China by the citizens of the United States as well as Chinese subjects. It is understood, however, that all Customs duties shall continue to be calculated and paid on the basis of the Haikuan Tael.

      Art. XIV. The principles of the Christian religion, as professed by the Pro- testant and Roman Catholic Churches, are recognised as teaching men to do good and to do to others as they would have others do to them. Those who quietly pro- fess and teach these doctrines shall not be harassed or persecuted on account of their faith. Any person, whether citizen of the United States or Chinese convert, who, according to these tenets, peaceably teaches and practises the principles of Chris- tianity shall in no case be interfered with or molested therefor. No restrictions shall be placed on Chinese joining Christian Churches. Converts and non-converts, being Chinese subjects, shall alike conform to the laws of China; and shall pay due respect to those in authority, living together in peace and amity; and the fact of being con- verts shall not protect them from the consequences of any offence they may have com- mitted before or may commit after their admission into the Church, or exempt

exempt them from paying legal taxes levied on Chinese subjects generally, except taxes levied and contributions for the support of religious customs and practices contrary to their religion. Missionaries shall not interfere with the exercise by the native authorities of their jurisdiction over Chinese subjects; nor shall the native authorities make any distinction between converts and non-converts, but shall administer the laws without partiality so that both classes can live together in peace.

Missionary societies of the United States shall be permitted to rent and to lease in perpetuity, as the property of such societies, buildings or lands in all parts of the Empire for missionary purposes and, after the title deeds have been found in order and duly stamped by the local authorities, to erect such suitable buildings as may be required for carrying on their good work.

      Art. XV.-The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform its judicial system and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, the United States agrees to give every assistance to this reform, and will also be prepared to relinquish extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the arrangements for their administration, and other considerations warrant it in so doing.

Art. XVI.-The Government of the United States consents to the prohibition by the Government of China of the importation into China of morphia and of instru- ments for its injection, excepting morphia and instruments for its injection imported for medical purposes, on payment of tariff duty, and under regulations to be framed by China which shall effectually restrict the use of such import to the said purposes. This prohibition shall be uniformly applied to such importation from all countries. The Chinese Government engages to adopt at once measures to prevent the manu- facture in China of morphia and of instruments for its injection.

      Art. XVII.-It is agreed between the High Contracting Parties hereto that all the provisions of the several Treaties between the United States and China which were in force on the first day of January A.D. 1900, are continued in full force and effect except in so far as they are modified by the present Treaty or other Treaties to which the United States is a party.

      The present Treaty shall remain in force for a period of ten years beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications and until a revision is effected as hereinafter provided.

190

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

     It is further agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties may demand that the tariff and the articles of this convention be revised at the end of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications hereof. If no revision is demanded before the end of the first term of ten years, then these articles in their present form shall remain in full force for a further term of ten years reckoned from the end of the first term and so on for successive periods of ten years.

The English and Chinese texts of the present Treaty and its three Annexes have been carefully compared; but, in the event of there being any difference of meaning between them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the correct one.

     This Treaty and its three Annexes shall be ratified by the two High Contracting Parties in conformity with their respective constitutions, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in Washington not later than twelve months from the present date.

     In testimony whereof, we, the undersigned, by virtue of our respective powers, have signed this Treaty in duplicate in the English and Chinese languages, and have affixed our respective seals.

     Done at Shanghai, this eighth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and three, and in the twenty-ninth year of Kuang Hsü eighth month and eighteenth day.

ANNEX I.

      As citizens of the United States are already forbidden by Treaty to deal in or handle opium, no mention has been made in this Treaty of opium taxation.

As the trade in salt is a Government monopoly in China, no mention has been made in this Treaty of salt taxation.

      It is, however, understood, after full discussion and consideration, that the col- lection of inland duties on opium and salt and the means for the protection of the revenue herefrom and for preventing illicit traffic therein are left to be administered by the Chinese Government in such manner as shall in no wise interfere with the provision of Article IV. of this Treaty regarding the unobstructed transit of other goods.

ANNEX II.

      Article IV. of the Treaty of Commerce between the United States and China of this date provides for the retention of the native Customs offices at the open ports. For the purpose of safeguarding the revenue of China at such places, it is understood that the Chinese Government shall be entitled to establish and maintain such branch native Customs offices at each open port within a reasonable distance of the main native Customs offices at the port, as shall be deemed by the authorities of the Imperial Maritime Customs at that port necessary to collect the revenue from the trade into and out of such port. Such branches, as well as the principal native Customs offices at each open port, shall be administered by the Imperial Maritime Customs as pro- vided by the Protocol of 1901.

ANNEX III.

The schedule of tariff duties on imported goods annexed to this Treaty under Article V. is hereby mutually declared to be the schedule agreed upon between the representatives of China and of the United States and signed by John Goodnow for the United States and Their Excellencies Lü Hai-huan and Sheng Hsüan-huai for China at Shanghai on the sixth day of September, A.D. 1902, according to the Proto- col of the seventh day of September, A.D. 1901.

PORTUGAL

PROTOCOL, TREATY, CONVENTION AND AGREEMENT BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

Art. 1st.-A Treaty of friendship and commerce with the most favoured nation clause will be concluded and signed at Peking.

Art. 2nd.-China confirms perpetual occupation and government of Macao and its dependencies by Portugal, as any other Portuguese possession.

Art. 3rd.-Portugal engages never to alienate Macao and its dependencies without agreement with China.

Art. 4th.--Portugal engages to co-operate in opium revenue work at Macao in the same way as England in Hongkong.

Done at Lisbon, the 26th March, 1887.

HENRIQUE DE BARROS GOMES. JAMES DUNCAN CAMPBELL.

THE TREATY

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking 28th April, 1888

      His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to draw closer and to consolidate the ties of friendship which have subsisted for more than three hundred years between Portugal aad China, and having agreed in Lisbon on the 26th day of March, 1887, 2nd day of 3rd moon of the 13th year of the reign of the Emperor Kwang Hsu, through their representatives, on a Protocol of four Articles, have now resolved to conclude a Treaty of Amity and Commerce to regulate the relations between the two States; for this end they have appointed as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal, Thomas de Souza Roza, his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Peking, Knight of the Order of Nossa Senhora de Conceicao de Villa Vicosa, Grand Cross of the Order of the Rising Sun of Japan and of the Crown of Siam, Commander of the Order of Charles II. and of Isabella the Catholic of Spain, and Knight of the Iron Crown of Austria:

      His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, His Highness Prince Ching, Pre- sident of the Tsung-li Yamên, and Sun, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamên and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works;

      Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers and found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:

      Art. I. There shall continue to exist constant peace and amity between His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, whose respective subjects shall equally enjoy in the dominions of the High Contracting Parties the most complete and decided protection for their persons and property.

Art. II.-China confirms in its entirety the second article of the Protocol of Lisbon, relating to the perpetual occupation and government of Macao by Portugal. It is stipulated that Commissioners appointed by both Governments shall proceed to the delimitation of the boundaries, which shall be determined by a special cou- vention; but so long as the delimitation of the boundaries is not concluded, every- thing in respect to them shall continue as at present, without addition, diminution, or alteration by either of the parties.

Art. III.-Portugal confirms the third article of the Protocol of Lisbon, relating to the engagement never to alienate Macao without previous agreement with China.

Art. IV. Portugal agrees to co-operate with China in the collection of duties on opium exported from Macao into China ports, in the same way, and as long as England co-operates with China in the collection of duties on opium exported from Hongkong.

192

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA.

The basis of this co-operation will be established by a convention appended to this Treaty, which shall be as valid and binding to both the High Contracting Parties as the present Treaty.

Art. V. His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal may appoint an Ambassador, Minister, or other diplomatic agent to the Court of His Im- perial Majesty the Emperor of China, and this agent, as well as the persons of his suite and their families, will be permitted, at the option of the Portuguese Govern- ment, to reside permanently in Peking, to visit that Court, or to reside at any other place where such residence is equally accorded to the diplomatic representative of other nations. The Chinese Government may also, if it thinks fit, appoint an Ambassador, Minister, or other diplomatic agent to reside at Lisbon, or to visit that Court when his Government shall order.

Art. VI. The diplomatic agents of Portugal and China shall reciprocally enjoy in the place of their residence all the prerogatives and immunities accorded by the laws of nations; their persons, families, and houses, as well as their correspondence shall be inviolate.

Art. VII. The official correspondence addressed by the Portuguese authorities to the Chinese authorities shall be written in the Portuguese language accompanied by a translation in Chinese, and each nation shall regard as authoritative the document written in its own language.

      Art. VIII. The form of correspondence between the Portuguese and the Chi- nese authorities will be regulated by their respective rank and position, based upon complete reciprocity. Between the high Portuguese and Chinese functionaries at the capital or elsewhere, such correspondence will take the form of dispatch (Chau-hoei); between the subordinate functionaries of Portugal and the chief authorities of the provinces, the former shall make use of the form of exposition (Xen-chen) and the latter that of declaration (Cha-hsing); and the subordinate officers of both nations shall correspond together on terms of perfect equality. Merchants and generally all others who are not invested with an official character shall adopt, in addressing the authorities, the form of representation or petition (Pin-ching).

     Art. IX. His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal may appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Consular Agents in the ports or other places where it is allowed to other nations to have them. These functionaries will have powers and attributes similar to those of the Consuls of other nations, and will enjoy all the exemptions, privileges, and immunities which at any time the consular functionaries of the most favoured nation may enjoy.

The Consuls and the local authorities will show to each other reciprocal civilities and correspond with each other on terms of perfect equality.

The

      The Consuls and acting Consuls will rank with Tao-tais, Vice-Consuls, acting Vice-Consuls, Consular agents and interpreters-translators, with Prefects. Consuls must be officials of the Portuguese Government and not merchants. The Chinese Government will make no objection in case the Portuguese Government should deem it unnecessary to appoint an official Consul at any port and choose to entrust a Consul of some other nation, for the time being, with the duties of Portu- guese Consul at that port.

Art. X.-All the immunities and privileges, as well as all the advantages con- cerning commerce and navigation, such as any reduction in the duties of navigation importation, exportation, transit or any other, which may have been or may be here- after granted by China to any other State or to its subjects, will be immediately extended to Portugal and its subjects. If any concession is granted by the Chinese Government to any foreign Government under special conditions, Portugal, on claim- ing the same concession for herself and for her own subjects, will equally assent to the conditions attached to it.

      Art XI.-Portuguese subjects are allowed to reside at, or frequent, the ports of China opened to foreign commerce and there carry on trade or employ themselves freely. Their boats may navigate without hindrance between the ports open to foreign

7

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

193

    commerce, and they may import and export thier merchandise, enjoying all the rights and privileges enjoyed by the subjects of the most favoured nation.

Art. XII.-Portuguese subjects shall pay import and export duties on all mer- chandise according to the rates specified in the tariff of 1858, adopted for all the other nations; and in no instance shall higher duties be exacted from them than those paid by the subjects of any other foreign nation.

Art. XIII.-Portuguese subjects are permitted to hire any description of boats they may require for the conveyance of cargo or passengers, and the price of said hire will be fixed by the contracting parties alone, without interference by the Chinese Government. No limit shall be put to the number of boats, neither will it be per- mitted to any one to establish a monopoly of such boats or of the service of coolies employed in the carriage of merchandise.

Should contraband articles be on board any such boats, the guilty parties shall immediately be punished according to law.

      Art. XIV.-Portuguese subjects residing in the open ports may take into their service Chinese subjects, and employ them in any lawful capacity in China, without restraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government; but shall not engage them for foreign countries in contravention of the laws of China.

      Art. XV.-The Chinese authorities are bound to grant the fullest protection to the persons and to the property of Portuguese subjects in China, whenever they may be exposed to insult or wrong. In case of robbery or incendiarism, the local autho rities will immediately take the necessary measures to recover the stolen property, to terminate the disorder, to seize the guilty, and punish them according to the law. Similar protection will be given by Portuguese authorities to Chinese subjects in the possessions of Portugal.

      Art. XVI.-Whenever a Portuguese subject intends to build or open houses, shops or warehouses, churches, hospitals, or cemeteries, at the Treaty ports or at other places, the purchase, rent, or lease of these properties shall be made out accord- ing to the current terms of the place, with equity, without exaction on either side, without offending against the usages of the people, and after due notice given by the proprietors to the local authority. It is understood, however, that the shops or ware- houses above mentioned shall only be allowed at the ports open to trade, and not in any place in the interior.

      Art. XVII.-Portuguese subjects conveying merchandise between open ports shall be required to take certificates from the Superintendent of Customs such as are specified in the regulations in force with reference to other nationalities.

      But Portuguese subjects, who, without carrying merchandise, would like to go to the interior of China, must have passports issued by their Consuls and counter- signed by the local authorities. The bearer of the passport must produce the same when demanded, and the passport not being irregular, he will be allowed to proceed and no opposition shall be offered, especially to his hiring persons or vessels for the carriage of his baggage or inerchandise.

      If he be without a passport, or if he commits any offence against the law, he shall be handed over to the nearest Consul of Portugal to be punished, but he must not be subjected to an oppressive measure. No passport need be applied for by persons going on excursions from the ports open to trade to a distance not exceeding 100 li and for a period not exceeding five days.

The provisions of this article do not apply to crews of ships, for the due restraint of whom regulations will be drawn up by the Consul and the local authorities.

      Art. XVIII.-In the event of a Portuguese merchant vessel being plundered by pirates or thieves within Chinese waters, the Chinese authorities are to employ their utmost exertions to seize and punish the said robbers and to recover the stolen goods, which, through the Consul, shall be restored to whom they belong.

      Art. XIX.-If a Portuguese vessel be shipwrecked on the coast of China, or be compelled to take refuge in any of the ports of the Empire, the Chinese authorities, on receiving notice of the fact, shall provide the necessary protection, affording

194

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

prompt assistance and kind treatment to the crews and, if necessary, furnishing them with the means to reach the nearest Consulate.

Art. XX.-Portuguese merchant vessels of more than one hundred and fifty tons burden will pay tonnage dues at the rate of four mace per ton; if of one hundred and fifty tons and under they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton. The Superintendent of Customs shall grant a certificate declaring that the tonnage dues have been paid.

Art. XXI.-Import duties shall be paid on the landing of goods; and export duties upon the shipment of the same.

      Art. XXII.-The captain of a Portuguese ship may, when he deems convenient, land only a part of his cargo at one of the open ports, paying the duties due on the portion lauded, the duties on the remainder not being payable until they are lauded at some other port.

     Art. XXIII.-The master of a Portuguese ship has the option, within forty- eight hours of his arrival at any of the open ports of China, but not later, to decide whether he will leave port without opening the hatches, and in such case he will not have to pay tonnage dues. He is bound, however, to give notice of his arrival for the legal registering as soon as he comes into port, under penalty of being fined in case of non-compliance within the term of two days.

     The ship will be subject to tonnage dues forty-eight hours after her arrival in port, but neither then nor at her departure shall any other impost whatsoever be exacted.

     Art. XXIV. All small vessels employed by Portuguese subjects in carrying passengers, baggage, letters, provisions or any other cargo which is free of duty, between the open ports of China, shall be free from tonnage dues; but all such vessels carrying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage dues every four months at the rate of one mace per ton.

     Art. XXV.-Portuguese merchant vessels approaching any of the open ports will be at liberty to take a pilot to reach the harbour; and likewise to take a pilot to leave it, in case the said ship shall have paid all the duties due by her.

Art. XXVI. Whenever a Portuguese merchant ship shall arrive at any of the open ports of China, the Superintendent of Customs will send off one or more Custom-house officers, who may stay on board of their boat or on board of the ship as best suits their convenience. These officers will get their food and all necessaries from the Custom-house, and will not be allowed to accept any fee from the captain of the ship or from the consignee, being liable to a penalty proportionate to the amount received by them.

      Art. XXVII-Twenty-four hours after the arrival of a Portuguese merchant ship at any of the open ports, the papers of the ship, manifest, and other documents, shall be handed over to the Consul, whose duty it will be also to report to the Superintendent of Customs within twenty-four hours, the name, the registered tonnage, and the cargo brought by the said vessel. If, through negligence or for any other motive, this stipulation be not complied with within forty-eight hours after the arrival of the ship, the captain shall be subject to a fine of fifty taels for each day's delay over and above that period, but the total amount of the fine shall not exceed two hundred taels.

The captain of the ship is responsible for the correctness of the manifest, in which the cargo shall be minutely and truthfully described, subject to a fine of five hundred Taels as penalty in case the manifest should be found incorrect. This fine, however, will not be incurred if, within twenty-four hours after the delivery of the manifest to the Custom-house officers, the captain expressed the wish to rectify any error which may have been discovered in the said manifest.

Art. XXVIII. The Superintendent of Customs will permit the discharging of the ship as soon as he shall have received from the Consul the report drawn up in due form. If the captain of the ship should take upon himself to commence discharging without permission, he shall be fined five hundred Taels and the goods so discharged shall be confiscated.

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

195

      Art. XXIX.-Portuguese merchants having goods to ship or to land will have to obtain a special permission from the Superintendent of Customs to that effect, without which all goods shipped or landed shall be liable to confiscation.

      Art. XXX.-No transhipment of goods is allowed from ship to ship without special permission, under penalty of confiscation of all the goods so transhipped.

      Art. XXXI.-When a ship shall have paid all her duties, the Superintendent of Customs will grant her a certificate and the Cousul will return the papers, in order that she may proceed on her voyage.

      Art. XXXII.-When any doubt may arise as to the value of goods which by the tariff are liable to an ad valorem duty, and the Portuguese merchants disagree with the Custom-house officers as regards the value of said goods, both parties will call two or three merchants to examine them, and the highest offer made by any of the said merchants to buy the goods will be considered as their just value.

      Art. XXXIII.-Duties will be paid on the net weight of every kind of merchandise. Should there be any difference of opinion between the Portuguese merchant and the Custom-house officer as to the mode by which the tare is to be fixed, each party will choose a certain number of boxes or bales from among every hundred packages of the goods in question, taking the gross weight of said packages, then the tare of each of the packages separately, and the average tare resulting therefrom will be adopted for the whole parcel.

      In case of any doubt or dispute not mentioned herein, the Portuguese merchant may appeal to the Consul, who will refer the case to the Superintendent of Customs; this officer will act in such a manner as to settle the question amicably. The appeal, however, will only be entertained if made within the term of twenty-four hours; and in such a case no entry is to be made in the Custom-house books in relation to the said goods until the question shall have been settled.

Art. XXXIV.-Damaged goods will pay a reduced duty proportionate to their deterioration; any doubt on this point will be solved in the way indicated in the clause of this Treaty with respect to duties payable on merchandise ad valorem.

      Art. XXXV.-Any Portuguese merchant who, having imported foreign goods into one of the open ports of China and paid the proper duties thereon, may wish to re-export them to another of the said ports, will have to send to the Superintendent of Customs an account of them, who, to avoid fraud, will direct his officers to examine whether or not the duties have been paid, whether the same have been entered on the books of the Customs, whether they retain their original marks, and whether the entries agree with the account sent in. Should everything be found correct, the same will be stated in the export permit together with the total amount of duties paid, and all these particulars will be communicated to the Custom-house officers at other ports.

      Upon arrival of the ship at the port to which the goods are carried, permission will be granted to land without any new payment of duties whatsoever if, upon examination, they are found to be the identical goods; but if during the exam- ination any fraud be detected, the goods may be confiscated by the Chinese Govern-

ment.

      Should any Portuguese merchant wish to re-export to a foreign country any goods imported, and upon which duties have been already paid, he will have to make his application in the same form as required for the re-exportation of goods to another port in China, in which case a certificate of drawback or of restitution of duties will be granted, which will be accepted by any of the Chinese Custom-houses in payment of import or export duties.

      Foreign cereals imported by Portuguese ships into the ports of China may be re-exported without hindrance if no portion of them has been discharged.

Art. XXXVI.-The Chinese authorities will adopt at the ports the measures which

they may deem the most convenient to avoid fraud or smuggling.

Art. XXXVII. The proceeds of fines and confiscations inflicted on Portuguese subjects, in conformity to this Treaty, shall belong exclusively to the Chinese Government.

196

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

      Art. XXXVIII.-Portuguese subjects carrying goods to a market in the interior of the country, on which the lawful import duties have already been paid at any of the open ports, or those who buy native produce in the interior to bring to the ports on the Yang-sze-kiang, or to send to foreign ports, shall follow the regulations adopted towards the other nations.

Custom-house officers who do not comply with the regulations, or who may exact more duties than are due, shall be punished according to the Chinese law.

Art. XXXIX. The Consuls and local authorities shall consult together, when neces sary, as to the construction of Light-houses and the placing of Buoys and Light-ships. Art. XL.-Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorized by the Chinese Govern- ment to receive them in sycee or in foreign coin, according to the official assay made at Canton on the 15th July, 1843.

Art. XLI. In order to secure the regularity of weights and measures and to avoid confusion, the Superintendent of Customs will hand over to the Portuguese Consul at each of the open ports standards similar to those given by the Treasury Department for collection of public dues to the Customs at Canton.

Art. XLII.-Portuguese merchant ships may resort only to those ports of China which are declared open to commerce. It is forbidden to them, except in the case of force majeure provided for in Article XIX., to enter into other ports, or to carry on a clandestine trade on the coast of China, and the transgressor of this order shall be subject to confiscation of his ship and cargo by the Chinese Government.

     Art. XLIII.-All Portuguese vessels despatched from one of the open ports of China to another, or to Macao, are entitled to a certificate of the Custom-house, which will exempt them from paying new tonnage dues, during the period of four months reckoned from the date of clearance.

Art. XLIV.-If any Portuguese merchant ship is found smuggling, the goods. smuggled, no matter of what nature or value, will be subject to confiscation by the Chinese authorities, who may send the ship away from the port, after settlement of all her accounts, and prohibit her to continue to trade.

Art. XLV. As regards the delivery of Portuguese and Chinese criminals, with the exception of the Chinese criminals who take refuge in Macao, and for whose extradition the Governor of Macao will continue to follow the existing practice, after the receipt of a due requisition from the Viceroy of the Kwangs, it is agreed that, in the Chinese ports open to foreign trade, the Chinese criminals who take refuge at the houses or on board ships of Portuguese subjects, shall be arrested and delivered to the Chinese authorities on their applying to the Portuguese Consul; and likewise the Portuguese criminals who take refuge in China shall be arrested and delivered to the Portuguese authorities on their applying to the Chinese authorities; and by neither of the parties shall the criminals be harboured nor shall there be delay in delivering them."

Art. XLVI.-It is agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties to this Treaty may demand a revision of the Tariff, and of the commercial articles of this Treaty, at the end of ten years; but if no demand be made on either side within six months after the end of the first ten years, then the tariff shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years; and so it shall be; at the end of each successive ten years.

Art. XLVII.-All disputes arising between Portuguese subjects in China with regard to rights, either of property or person, shall be submitted to the jurisdiction of the Portuguese authorities.

Art. XLVIII.-Whenever Chinese subjects become guilty of any criminal act towards Portuguese subjects, the Portuguese authorities must report such acts to the Chinese authorities in order that the guilty be tried according to the laws of China.

     If Portuguese subjects become guilty of any criminal act towards Chinese subjects, the Chinese authorities must report such acts to the Portuguese Consul in order that the guilty may be tried according to the laws of Portugal.

     Art. XLIX.-If any Chinese subject shall have become indebted to a Portuguese subject and withholds payment, or fraudulently absconds from his creditors, the

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

197

Chinese authorities shall use all their efforts to apprehend him and to compel bim to pay, the debt being previously proved and the possibility of its payment ascertained. The Portuguese authorities will likewise use their efforts to enforce the payment of any debt due by any Portuguese subject to a Chinese subject.

      But in no case will the Portuguese Government or the Chinese Government be considered responsible for the debts of their subjects.

      Art. L.-Whenever any Portuguese subject shall have to petition the Chinese authority of a district, he is to submit his statement beforehand to the Consul, who will cause the same to be forwarded should he see no impropriety in so doing, otherwise he will have it written out in other terms, or decline to forward it. Likewise, when a Chinese subject shall have occasion to petition the Portuguese Consul he will only be allowed to do so through the Chinese authority who shall proceed in the same manner.

Art. LI.-Portuguese subjects who may have any complaint or claim against any Chinese subject, shall lay the same before the Consul, who will take due cognizance of the case and will use all his efforts to settle it amicably. Likewise, when a Chinese subject shall have occasion to complain of a Portuguese subject, the Consul will listen to his complaint and will do what he possibly can to re-establish harmony between the two parties.

      If, however, the dispute be of such a nature that it cannot be settled in that conciliatory way, the Portuguese Consul and Chinese authorities will hold a joint investigation of the case, and decide it with equity, applying each the laws of his own country according to the nationality of the defendant.

Art. LII.-The Catholic religion has for its essential object the leading of men to virtue. Persous teaching it and professing it shall alike be entitled to efficacious protection from the Chinese authorities; nor shall such persons pursuing peaceably their calling and not offending against the laws be prosecuted or interfered with.

Art. III.-In order to prevent for the future any discussion, and considering that the English language, among all foreign languages, is the most generally known in China, this Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, is written in Por- tuguese, Chinese, and English, and signed in six copies, two in each language. All these versions have the same sense and meaning, but if there should happen to be any divergence in the interpretation of the Portuguese and Chinese versions, the English text will be made use of to resolve the doubts that may have arisen.

Art. LIV. The present Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, shall be ratified by His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China. The exchange of the ratificatious shall be made, within the shortest possible time, at Tientsin, after which the Treaty, with the Convention appended, shall be printed and published in order that the functionaries and subjects of the two countries may have full knowledge of their stipulations and may fulfil them.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty and have affixed their seals thereto.

Done in Peking, this first day of the month of December in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, corresponding to the Chinese date of the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of Kwang-Hsu.

[L.S.] (Signed) [Chinese Seal]

Signatures of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

CONVENTION

THOMAS DE SOUZA ROZA.

PRINCE CH'ING. SUN-IU-UEN.

      It having been stipulated in the Art. IV. of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, concluded between Portugal and China on the 1st day of the month of December,

198

CONVENTION BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

1887, that a Convention shall be arranged between the two High Contracting Parties in order to establish a basis of co-operation in collecting the revenue on opium ex- ported from Macao to Chinese ports, the undersigned Thomas de Souza Roza, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, in special mission to the Court of Peking, and His Highness the Prince Ching, President of the Tsung-li Yamen, and Sun, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamen and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, Min- isters Plenipotentiary of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, have agreed on the following Convention in three articles:-

-

      Art. I.-Portugal will enact a law subjecting the opium trade of Macao to the following provisions

*----

1.-No opium shall be imported into Macao in quantities less than one chest. 2.-All opium imported into Macao must, forthwith on arrival, be reported to the competent department under a public functionary appointed by the Portuguese Government, to superintend the importation and exportation of opium in Macao.

3.-No opium imported into Macao shall be transhipped, landed, stored, removed from one store to another, or exported, without a permit issued by the Superintendent. 4. The importers and exporters of opium in Macao must keep a register, accord- ing to the form furnished by the Government, showing with exactness and clearness the quantity of opium they have imported, the number of chests they have sold, to whom and to what place they were disposed of, and the quantity in stock.

5.-Only the Macao opium farmer, and persons licensed to sell opium at retail, will be permitted to keep in their custody raw opium in quantities inferior to one chest. 6.-Regulations framed to enforce in Macao the execution of this law will be equivalent to those adopted in Hongkong for similar purposes.

      Art. II.-Permits for the exportation of opium from Macao into Chinese ports, after being issued, shall be communicated by the Superintendent of Opium to the Commissioner of Customs at Kung-pac-uan.

      Art. III. By mutual consent of both the High Contracting Parties the stipula- tions of this Convention may be altered at any time.

      In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this Convention.

       Done in Peking this first day of December in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, corresponding to the Chinese date of the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of Kwang Hsu.

[L.S.] (Signed) [Chinese Seal]

THOMAS DE SOUZA Roza.

Signature of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

PRINCE CH'ING. SUN-IU-UEN.

AGREEMENT

      The basis of the co-operation to be given to China by Portugal in the collection of duties on opium conveyed from Macao to Chinese ports, having been fixed by a Convention appended to the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, concluded between China and Portugal on the 1st December, 1887, and it being now convenient to come to an understanding upon some points relating to the said co-operation as well as to fixed rules for the treatment of Chinese junks trading with Macao, Bernardo Pinheiro Correa de Mello, Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty in Peking, duly authorized by His Excellency Thomas de Sonza Roza, Chief of the said Mission, and Sir Robert Hart, K.C.M.G., Inspector-General of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs, provided with the necessary instructions from the Chinese Government, have agreed on the following:

1.An office under a Commissioner appointed by the Foreign Inspectorate of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs, shall be established at a convenient spot on

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

199

    Chinese territory, for the sale of opium duty certificates, to be freely sold to merchants and for such quantities of opium as they may require. The said Commissioner will also administer the Customs stations near Macao.

2.--Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of not more than 110 Taels per picul, shall be free from all other imposts of every sort, and have all the benefits stipulated for by the Additional Article of the Chefoo Convention between China and Great Britain on behalf of opium on which duty has been paid at one of the ports of China, and may be made up in sealed parcels at the option of the purchaser. 3.-The Commissioner of Customs responsible for the management of the Customs stations shall investigate and settle any complaint made by Chinese mer- chants of Macao against the Customs stations or revenue cruisers; and the Governor of Macao, if he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send an officer of Macao to be present and assist in the investigation and decision. If, however, they do not agree, a reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for a joint decision.

      4.-Junks trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and their cargoes, shall not be subject to any dues or duties in excess of those leviable on junks and their cargoes trading between Chinese ports and Hongkong, and no dues whatsoever shall be de- manded from junks proceeding to Macao from ports of China, or coming from Macao to ports in China, over and above the dues paid, or payable, at the ports of clearance or destination. Chinese produce which has paid Customs duties and lekin tax before entering Macao may be re-exported from Macao to Chinese ports without paying Customs duties and lekin tax again, and will be only subject to the payment of the tax named Siao-hao.

      In witness whereof, this agreement has been written in Portuguese and English and signed in duplicate at Peking this the first day of December, 1887.

(Signed)

(Signed)

!

BERNARDO PINHEIRO CORREA DE MELLO,

Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty.

SIR ROBERT HART,

Inspector-General of Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA

AND PORTUGAL

SIGNED AT SHANGHAI, NOVEMBER, 1904

Art. I.-The Treaty of Amity and Commerce between China and Portugal dated the first day of December, 1887 (17th day, 10th moon, 13th year of Kwang Hsu) continues in force except in so far as modified by the present Treaty.

     Art. II.-Portugal accepts the increase in the import duties stipulated for in Article VI of the Peking protocol of 7th September, 1901, from the date of the ratifica. tion of this Treaty. Portugal will enjoy the privileges of the most favoured nation, and in no case shall Portuguese subjects pay higher or lower duties than those paid by the subjects of any other foreign nation. Article XII. of the Treaty of First Decem- ber, 1887, is therefore rendered null and void.

Art. III. The duty and lekin on foreign opium will continue as provided for in existing Treaties. The Government of His Most Faithful Majesty agrees to con- tinue as heretofore to co-operate with the Government of His Imperial Chinese Majesty in the collection of the duty and lekin on opium exported from Macao to China, and also to co-operate in the repression of smuggling in accordance with the Treaty and Special Opium Convention of 1st December, 1887. In order to render this co-operation effective, it is clearly stipulated that all opium imported into Macao

11

200

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

    shall, on arrival, be registered at the Special Government Bureau provided for this purpose, and the Portuguese Government will take the necessary steps, in order to have all this opium stored under its exclusive control in a depôt from which it will be removed as required by the demands of trade. The quantity of opium required for consumption in Macao and its dependencies will be fixed annually by the Government of Macão in agreement with the Commissioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs referred to in Article II. of the above mentioned Convention, and under no pretext will removal from the Portuguese Government depôt be permitted of any quantity of opium for local consumption in excess of that fixed by the said agreement, and neces- sary measures will be taken to prevent opium removed from the depôt for re-export to any port other than a port in China being sent fraudulently to Chinese territory. The removal from the depôt of opium for export will not be permitted except on production of proof that such opium has already paid all dues and duties leviable thereon by China. The rules for the carrying out of this Article shall be arranged by delegates from the Government of Macao and the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

      Art. IV. Such steps as are necessary for the repression of smuggling in the territory and waters of Macao shall be taken by the local Portuguese Government in concert with the Commissioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs, aud similar steps in the Chinese territory and waters near Macao shall be taken by the Imperial Maritime Customs in concert with the Portuguese Government of Macao. This co- operation is intended to render such steps effective on all points in respect of which co-operation is needel, and to avoid at the same time any injury to the sovereign rights of either of the High Contracting Parties. Special delegates from the local Government of Macao and the Imperial Maritime Customs shall proceed to fix the re- spective zones of operations, and shall devise practical means for the repression of smuggling.

      Art. V. With a view to the development of trade between Macao and neigh- bouring ports in the Kwangtung Province, the High Contracting Parties have agreed as follows:-

1.--Portuguese steamers desirous of proceeding for the purposes of trade from Macao to any of the ports of call and passenger stages on the West River, enumerated in the Special Article of the English-Burmah Convention of 1897, and Article X of the British Treaty of Commerce of 1902, shall be permitted to do so, provided they comply with the Special Regulations to be framed for this purpose by the two High Contracting Parties.

      2.-Steamers specially registered for trade under the Inland Waters Steam Navigation Rules shall be permitted to ply between Macao and places in the Depart- ment of Kwang-chow-fu other than those mentioned in Section 1, provided "they report to the Kungpei-kuan Customs for examination of cargo and payment of duties in accordance with Special Regulations to be framed for this purpose by the two High Contracting Parties. Such vessels may engage in all lawful trade, including the tow- age of junks and conveyance of passengers and cargo, subject to the regulations for the time being in force.

The privileges hereby granted are granted on the express understanding that Special Regulations shall be framed defining in detail the conditions under which such traffic may be carried on. Until then, the said Regulations have been agreed upon and published, the Article shall not become operative; and subsequently only on compliance with the said Regulations.

      Art. VI.-Portugal having the right of most favoured nation treatment, it is clearly stipulated that any advantages China may think fit to grant to any nation in the importation of agricultural products, specially wines and oil, or in the importa- tion of industrial products, specially woollen and cotton goods and preserved food stuffs, shall be extended to similar Portuguese goods on exactly the same conditions It is also clearly understood that Portuguese wine of all kinds proved by means of certificate of origin, issued by Portuguese Consuls, to have been imported from Portugal, direct or otherwise, shall when their alcoholic strength exceeds 14° pay the duty leviable according to the annexed tariff on wines exceeding 14° of alcholic

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

201

"Port

strength. Wine passed through the Chinese Customs under designation Wine" shall not be entitled to the benefit of this Article unless accompanied by a certificate of origin as above.

-

Art. VII.-Portuguese subjects may frequent, reside at, and carry on trade, industries and manufactures, and pursue any other lawful avocation in all the ports and localities in China which have already been or may hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade; and wherever in any such ports or localities a special area has been or may hereafter be set apart for the use and occupation of foreigners, Portuguese subjects may therein lease land, erect buildings, and in all respects enjoy the same privileges and immunities as are granted to subjects of the most favoured nations. Art. VIII. Whereas China, with the object of reforming its fiscal system, proposes to levy a surtax in addition to the tariff duties on all goods passing through the Custom-houses, whether maritime or inland and frontier, in order to make good the loss incurred by the complete abolition of lekin, the Portuguese Government agrees that foreign goods imported into China by Portugeuse subjects shall on entry pay an import surtax equivalent to one and a half times the duty fixed by the Import Tariff as now revised, and that Chinese produce exported abroad by Portuguese sub- jects shall pay export duties, inclusive of the tariff export duty, not exceeding seven and a half per cent. ad valorem, provided always that such import surtax and export duties have been accepted by all the Powers having Treaties with China. With regard to the produce tax, consumption tax, and excise, as well as the duties on native opium and salt, leviable by China, Portugal further agrees to accept the same arrangements as shall be agreed upon between all the Treaty Powers and China. It is, however, understood that the commerce, rights, and privileges of Portugal shall not, in consequence of this undertaking, be placed in any way at a disadvantage as compared with the commerce, rights, and privileges of any other power.

       Art. IX.-Drawback certificates for the return of duties shall be issued by the Imperial Maritime Customs to Portuguese subjects within twenty-one days from the date of presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the applicant to receive such drawback certificates. These certificates will be accepted at their face value by the Customs authorities at the port of issue in payment of duties of all kinds, ton- nage dues excepted; or shall, in the case of drawbacks for duty paid on foreign goods re-exported abroad within three years from the date of importation, be redeemable in full in ready money by the Imperial Maritime Customs at the port of issue, at the option of the holders thereof. But if, in connection with any applica tion for a drawback certificate, the Customs authorities discover an attempt on the part of a Portuguese subject to defraud the revenue, he shall be liable to a fine not exceeding five times the amount of the duty whereof he attempted to defraud the Customs, or to a confiscation of the goods. In case the goods have been removed, from Chinese territory, then the Consul shall inflict on the guilty party a suitable fine to be paid to the Chinese Government.

      Art. X.-China agrees to herself establish a system of uniform national coinage and provide for a uniform national currency, which shall be freely used as legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes, and other obligations by Portuguese subjects as well as by Chinese subjects in the Chinese Empire. It is understood, however, that all Customs duties shall continue to be calculated and paid on the basis of the

Hai-Kwan Tael.

      Art. XI.-The Government of His Most Faithful Majesty agrees to the prohibi- tion by the Chinese Government of the importation into China of morphia and of instruments for its injection, on condition, however, that the Chinese Government will allow the importation of morphia and of instruments for its injection for medical purposes by Portuguese doctors, chemists, and druggists, on payment of the prescribed duty and under special permit which will only be granted to an intending importer upon his signing at the Portuguese Consulate a suitable bond undertaking not to sell morphia except in small quantities and on receipt of a requisition signed by a duly qualified foreign medical practitioner. If fraud in connection with such importation be discovered by the Customs authorities the morphia and instrument

202

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

for its injection will be seized and confiscated, and the importer will be denied the right to import these articles.

Art. XII.-The Chinese Government recognizing that it is advantageous for the country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract foreign as well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprise, agrees to revise its exist- ing mining regulations in such manner, by the selection of those rules in force in other nations which seem applicable to conditions in China, that the revision while promoting the interests of Chinese subjects and in no way prejudicing the sovereign rights of China, will offer no impediment to the employment of foreign capital, nor place foreign capitalists at a greater disadvantage than they would be under generally accepted foreign regulations, and will permit Portuguese subjects to carry on in Chinese territory mining operations and other necessary business relating thereto, provided they comply with the new regulations and conditions which will be imposed by China on its subjects and foreigners alike, relating to the opening of mines, the renting of mineral land, and payment of royalty, and provided they apply for permits, the provisions of which, in regard to necessary business relating to such operations, shall be observed. The residence of Portuguese subjects in connection with such mining operations shall be agreed upon between Portugal and China. Any mining concession granted after the publication of such new rules shall be subject to these provisions.

Art. XIII.-It being only right that the shareholders of any joint stock com- pany, or the partners in any commerical undertaking, should all be on a footing of equality as regards division of profits and payment of obligations, according to the partnership agreement or memorandum and articles of association, the Chinese Government agrees that Chinese subjects joining with Portuguese subjects in the or- ganisation of a joint stock company or commercial undertaking, legally constituted, shall be liable to the fulfilment of the obligations imposed by said agreement or memorandum and articles of association, and that Chinese Courts will enforce fulfil- ment of such obligations, if a suit to that effect be entered; provided always that their liability shall not be other or greater than that of Portuguese shareholders or partners in the same company or partnership. Similarly Portuguese subjects who invest their capital in Chinese enterprises shall be bound to fulfil the obligations imposed by the partnership agreement or memorandum, and articles of association, and their liability shall be the same as that of the Chinese subjects engaged in the same undertaking. But as existing Treaty stipulations do not permit foreign mer- chants to reside in the interior of China for purpose of trade, such joint stock com- panies and commercial undertakings may be established in the interior by Portuguese and Chinese subjects conjointly.

      Art. XIV.-As Portugal affords protection to trademarks used by subjects of any other nationality, provided a like protection is reciprocated for trademarks used by Portuguese subjects, China, in order to obtain this protection for its subjects in Portuguese territory, agrees to grant protection to Portuguese trademarks against unlawful use, falsification or imitation by Chinese subjects. To this end the Chinese Government will enact the necessary laws and regulations, and will establish registration offices at which foreign trademarks may be registered on payment of reasonable fees. Further, the Chinese Government agrees that, as soon as a Patent Office has been established, and special laws with regard to inventions have been adopted, it will, after payment of the prescribed fees, issue certificates, valid for a fixed term of years, to Portuguese inventors, extending to their inventions the same protection as shall be given to Chinese patents in Portugal, provided that such inven- tions do not infringe on previous inventions by subjects of China. Any Chinese or Portuguese subject who is the author, proprietor, or seller of any publication injurious to the peace and good government of China shall be dealt with in accordance with the laws of his own country.

Art. XV.-The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform its judicial system, and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, Portugal agrees to give every assistance to such reform, and will also be prepared to relinquish

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

203

extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the arrangements for their administration, and other considerations warrant it in so doing.

Art. XVI.-The missionary question in China demands, in the opinion of ths Chinese Government, careful consideration, so as to avert in the future troublee which have occurred in the past. Portugal, as a nation specially interested in the protection of its Catholic missions in Chinese territory, agrees to join in a commission to investigate this question and, if possible, to devise means for securing permanent peace between converts and non-converts, should such a commission be formed by China and the Treaty Powers interested. No person, whether Portuguese subject or Chinese convert who, according to the tenets of Christianity, peaceably teaches or practises the principles of that religion, which aims at teaching men to do good, shall be persecuted or harassed on account of his faith. But converts and non-converts, being alike subjects of China, shall conform to her laws, and shall pay due respect to those in authority, living together in peace and amity; and the fact of his being a convert shall protect no one from the consequence of any offence he may have committed before or may commit after his admission into the Church, or exempt him from paying legal taxes and contributions levied for the support of religious customs and practices contrary to his faith. Missionaries shall not interfere with the exercise by the native authorities of their jurisdiction over Chinese subjects, nor shall the native authorities make any distinction between converts and non-couverts, but shall administer the law without partiality, so that both classes may live together in peace. Portuguese missions shall be permitted to rent and lease in perpetuity, as the property of the mission, buildings or lands in all parts of the Empire for mission purposes and, after the title deeds have been found in order and duly stamped by the local authorities, to erect such suitable buildings as may be required for carrying out their good work.

Art. XVII. The present Treaty shall remain in force for a period of ten years beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications and until à revision is effected as hereinafter provided.

a

It is further agreed that either of the two High Contracting Parties may demand revision of the Tariff and the Articles of the Treaty six months before the end of ten years from the date of the exchange of ratifications thereof. If no re- vision is demanded before the end of the first term of the ten years, then these articles in their present form shall remain in full force for a further term of ten years reckoned from the end of the first term and so on for successive periods of ten years.

      Art. XVIII.-In order to prevent in the future any discussion, this Treaty is written in Portuguese, Chinese and English, and signed in six copies, two in each lan- guage. All these versions have the same sense and meaning, but if there should happen to be any divergence in the interpretation of the Portuguese and Chinese versions, the English text will be made use of to resolve the doubts that may have arisen.

Art. XIX. The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and Algarves and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China. The exchange of the ratifications shall be made within the shortest possible time, and the Treaty will be printed and published, in order that the functionaries and subjects of the respective countries may have full knowledge of its stipulations and may fulfil them.

      In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty and have affixed their seals thereto.

JAPAN

TREATY OF PEACE BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

SIGNED AT SHIMONOSEKI (BAKAN), JAPAN, ON THE 17TH APRIL, 1895

Ratifications Exchanged at Chefoo, China, on the 8th May, 1895

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and His Majesty the Emperor of China desiring to restore the blessings of peace to their countries and subjects, and to remove all cause for future complications, have named as their Plenipotentiaries for the purpose of concluding a Treaty of Peace, that is to say:-

     His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Count Ito Hirobumi, Junii, Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of Paulownia, Minister-President of State, and Viscount Mutsu Munemitsu, Junii, First Class of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung Chang, Senior Tutor to the Heir Apparent, Senior Grand Secretary of State, Minister Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Ports of China, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl of the First Rank, and Li Ching Fong, ex-Minister of the Diplomatic Service of the Second Official Rank;

     Who, after having exchanged their full powers, which were found to be in good and proper form, have agreed to the following Articles:-

Art. I.-China recognizes definitely the full and complete independence and autonomy of Corea, and, in consequence, the payment of tribute and the perform- ance of ceremonies and formalities by Corea to China in derogation of such independ- ence and autonomy shall wholly cease for the future.

Art. II.-China cedes to Japan in perpetuity and full sovereignty the follow- ing territories, together with all fortifications, arsenals, and public property thereon:- (a.) The southern portion of the Province of Fêng-tien, within the following boundaries-

      The line of demarcation begins at the mouth of the River Yalu, and ascends that stream to the mouth of the River An-ping; from thence the line runs to Fêng Huang; from thence to Haicheng; from thence to Ying Kow, forming a line which describes the southern portion of the territory. The places above named are included in the ceded territory. When the line reaches the River Liao at Ying Kow it follows the course of that stream to its mouth, where it terminates. The mid-channel of the River Liao shall be taken as the line of demarcation.

This cession also includes all islands appertaining or belonging to the Province of Fêng Tien situated in the eastern portion of the Bay of Liao Tung, and in the northern part of the Yellow Sea.

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

205

     (b.) The Island of Formosa, together with all islands appertaining or belonging to the said Island of Formosa.

     (c.) The Pescadores Group, that is to say all islands lying between the 119th and 120th degrees of longitude east of Greenwich and the 23rd and 24th degrees of north latitude.

Art. III. The alignments of the frontiers described in the preceding Article, and shown on the annexed map, shall be subject to verification and demarcation on the spot by a Joint Commission of Delimitation, consisting of two or more Japanese and two or more Chinese Delegates, to be appointed immediately after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act. In case the boundaries laid down in this Act are found to be defective at any point, either on account of topography or in consideration of good administration, it shall also be the duty of the Delimitation Commission to rectify the same.

The Delimitation Commission will enter upon its duties as soon as possible, and will bring its labours to a conclusion within the period of one year after appointment.

      The alignments laid down in this Act shall, however, be maintained until the ratifications of the Delimitation Commission, if any are made, shall have received the approval of the Governments of Japan and China.

Art. IV.-China agrees to pay to Japan as a war imdemnity the sum of 200,000,000 Kuping taels. The said sum to be paid in eight instalments. The first instalment of 50,000,000 taels to be paid within six months, and the second instalment of 50,000,000 taels to be paid within twelve months after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act. The remaining sum to be paid in six equal annual instalments as follows: the first of such equal annual instalments to be paid within two years, the second with- in three years, the third within four years, the fourth within five years, the fifth within six years, and the sixth within seven years after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act. Interest at the rate of 5 per cent. per annum shall begin to run on all unpaid portions of the said indemnity from the date the first instalment falls due.

China shall, however, have the right to pay by anticipation at any time any or. all of said instalments. In case the whole amount of the said indemnity is paid within three years after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act, all interest shall be waived, and the interest for two years and a half, or for any less period if then already paid, shall be included as a part of the principal amount of the indemnity.

      Art. V.--The inhabitants of the territories ceded to Japan who wish to take up their residence outside the ceded districts shall be at liberty to sell their real property aud retire. For this purpose a period of two years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act shall be granted. At the expiration of that period those of the inhabitants who shall not have left such territories shall, at the option of Japan, be deemed to be Japanese subjects.

      Each of the two Governments shall, immediately upon the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act, send one or more Commissioners to Formosa to effect a final transfer of that province, and within the space of two months after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act such transfer shall be completed.

      Art. VI. -All Treaties between Japan and China having come to an end in- consequence of war, China engages, immediately upon the exchange of the ratifica- tions of this Act, to appoint Plenipotentiaries to conclude with the Japanese Pleni- potentiaries a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, and a Convention to regulate frontier intercourse and trade. The Treaties, Conventions, and Regulations, now subsisting between China and European Powers, shall serve as a basis for the said Treaty and Convention between Japan and China. From the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Act until the said Treaty and Convention are brought into actual operation the Japanese Government, its officials, commerce, navigation, frontier intercourse and trade, industries, ships and subjects, shall in every respect be accorded by China most favoured-nation treatment.

206

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

China makes, in addition, the following concessions, to take effect six months after the date of the present Act:-

      1. The following cities, towns, and ports, in addition to those already opened shall be opened to the trade, residence, ́industries, and manufactures of Japanese subjects under the same conditions, and with the same privileges and facilities as exist at the present open cities, towns, and ports of China.

(a.) Shashib, in the Province of Hupeh.

(b.) Chung King, in the Province of Szechuan, (c.) Suchow, in the Province of Kiang Su.

(d.) Hangchow, in the Province of Chekiang

      The Japanese Government shall have the right to station Consuls at any or all of the above-named places.

2. Steam navigation for vessels under the Japanese flag for the conveyance of passengers and cargo shall be extended to the following places:

(a.) On the Upper Yangtsze River, from Ichang to Chung King.

(b.) On the Woosung River, and the Canal, from Shanghai to Suchow and Hangchow.

The Rules and Regulations which now govern the navigation of the inland waters of China by foreign vessels, shall, so far as applicable, be enforced in respect of the above-named routes, until new Rules and Regulations are conjointly agreed to.

      3. Japanese subjects purchasing goods or produce in the interior of China or transporting imported merchandise into the interior of China, shall have the right temporarily to rent or hire warehouses for the storage of the articles so purchased or transported, without the payment of any taxes or exactions whatever.

      4. Japanese subjects shall be free to engage in all kinds of manufacturing industries in all the open cities, towns, and ports of China, and shall be at liberty to import into China all kinds of machinery, paying only the stipulated import duties

thereou.

      All articles manufactured by Japanese subjects in China, shall in respect of inland transit and internal taxes, duties, charges, and exactions of all kinds and also in respect of warehousing and storage facilities in the interior of China, stand upon the same footing and enjoy the same privileges and exemptions as merchandise imported by Japanese subjects into China.

In the event of additional Rules and Regulations being necessary in connection with these concessions, they shall be embodied in the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation provided for by this Article.

      Art. VII. Subject to the provisions of the next succeeding Article, the evacua- tion of China by the armies of Japan, shall be completely effected within three months after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act.

     Art. VIII.-As a guarantee of the faithful performance of the stipulations of this Act, China consents to the temporary occupation by the military forces of Japan, of Wei-hai-wei, in the Province of Shantung.

     Upon the payment of the first two instalments of the war indemnity herein stipulated for and the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, the said place shall be evacuated by the Japanese forces, provided the Chinese Government consents to pledge, under suitable and sufficient arrangements the Customs Revenue of China as security for the payment of the principal and interest of the remaining instalments of said indemnity. In the event of no such arrangement being concluded, such evacuation shall only take place upon the pay- ment of the final instalment of said indemnity.

It is, however, expressly understood that no such evacuation shall take place until after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation.

     Art. IX.-Immediately upon the exchange of the ratifications of this Act, all prisoners of war then held shall be restored, and China undertakes not to ill-treat or punish prisoners of war so restored to her by Japan. China also engages to at once

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

207

release all Japanese subjects accused of being military spies or charged with any other military offences. China further engages not to punish in any manner, nor to allow to be punished, those Chinese subjects who have in any manner been compromised in their relations with the Japanese army during the war.

Art. X.-All offensive military operations shall cease upon the exchange of the ratifications of this Act.

Art. XI. The present Act shall be ratified by their Majesties the Emperor of Japan and the Emperor of China, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Chefoo on the eighth day of the fifth month of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji, corresponding to fourteenth day of the fourth month of twenty-first year of Kuang Hsü.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto the seal of their arins.

Done at Shimonoseki, in duplicate, this seventeenth day of the fourth month of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji, corresponding to twenty-third of the third month of the twenty-first year of Kuang Hsü.

(L.S.) Count Iro HIROBUMI, Junii, Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of Paullownia, Minister-President of State, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan.

(L.S.)

(L.S.)

(L.S.)

!

Viscount MUTSU MUNEMITSU, Junii, First Class of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan.

LI HUNG-CHANG, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Senior Tutor to the Heir Ap- parent, Senior Grand Secretary of Northern Ports of China, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl of the First Rank.

LI CHING-FONG, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Ex-Minister of the Diplomatic Service, of the Second Official Rank.

TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION

MADE AT PEKING, JULY 21st, 1896

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China having resolved, in pursuance of the provisions of Article VI. of the Treaty signed at Shimonoseki on the 17th day of the 4th month of the 28th year of Meiji, corresponding to the 23rd day of the 3rd month of the 21st year of Kwang-Hsü, to conclude a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, have for that purpose, named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Shoshii, Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Grand Officer of the Imperial Order of the Rising Sun, Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Chang Yin-hoon, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamên, holding the rank of the President of a Board and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Revenue.

      Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles.

Art. I.-There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between their respective subjects who shall enjoy equally in the respective countries of the High Contracting Parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

Art. II. It is agreed by the High Contracting Parties that His Majesty the Emperor of Japan may, if he see fit, accredit a Diplomatie Agent to the Court of Peking and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, if he see fit, accredit a Diplomatic Agent to the Court of Tokyo.

     The Diplomatic Agents thus accredited shall respectively enjoy all the pre- rogatives, privileges and immunities accorded by international law to such Agents and they shall also in all respects be entitled to the treatment extended to similar Agents of the most favoured nation.

Their persons, families, suites, establishments, residences and correspondence shall be held inviolable. They shall be at liberty to select and appoint their own officers, couriers, interpreters, servants, and attendants without any kind of molestation.

     Art. III.-His Majesty the Emperor of Japan may appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at such of the ports, cities, and towns of China which are now or may hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade, as the interests of the Empire of Japan may require.

These officers shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese Authorities, and they shall enjoy all the attributes, authority, jurisdiction, privileges and immunities which are or may hereafter be extended to similar officers of the nation most favoured in these respects.

     His Majesty the Emperor of China may likewise appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at any or all of those places in Japan where Consular Officers of other nations are now or may hereafter be admitted, and, saving in the matter of jurisdiction in respect of Chinese subjects and property in Japan which is reserved to the Japanese Judicial Courts, they shall enjoy the rights and privileges that are usually accorded to such officers.

     Art. IV. Japanese subjects may, with their families, employés and servants, frequent, reside and carry on trade, industries and manufactures or pursue any other lawful avocations, in all the ports, cities and towns of China, which are now or may

or from

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

200

hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade. They are at liberty to proceed to any of the open ports with their merchan lise and effects, and within the localities at those places which have already been or may hereafter be set apart for the use and occupation of foreigners, they are allowed to rent or purchase houses, rent or lease land and to build churches, cemeteries and hospitals, enjoying in all respects the same privileges and immunities as are now or may hereafter be granted to the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

Art. V.-Japanese vessels may touch for the purpose of landing and shipping passengers and merchandise, in accordance with the existing Rules and Regulations concerning foreign trade there, at all those places in China which are now ports of call, namely, Ngan-ching, Ta-tung, Hu-kow, Wu-sueh, Lu-chi-kow and Woosung and such other places as may hereafter be made ports of call also. If any vessel should unlawfully enter ports other than open ports and ports of call in China or carry on clandestine trade along the coast or rivers, the vessel with her cargo shall be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

      Art. VI.-Japanese subjects may travel, for their pleasure or for purpose of trade, to all parts of the interior of China, under passports issued by Japanese Consuls and countersigned by the Local Authorities. These passports, if demanded, must be produced for examination in the localities passed through. If the passports be not irregular, the bearers will be allowed to proceed and no opposition shall be offered to their hiring of persons, animals, carts or vessels for their own conveyance or for the carriage of their personal effects or merchandise. If they be without passports or if they commit any offence against the law, they shall be handed over to the nearest Consul for punishment but they shall only be subject to necessary restraint and in no case to ill-usage. Such passports shall remain in force for a period of 13 Chinese months from the date of issue. Any Japanese subject travelling in the interior without a passport shall be liable to a fine not exceeng 300 Taels. Japanese sub- jects may, however, without passports go on excursions from any of the ports open to trade, to a distance not exceeding 100 Chinese li and for a period not exceeding five days. The provisions of this Article do not apply to crews of ships.

Art. VII.-Japanese subjects residing in the open ports of China may take into their service Chinese subjects and employ them in any lawful capacity without restraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government or Authorities.

      Art. VIII.-Japanese subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the conveyance of cargo or passengers and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese Government or Officers. No limit shall be put upon the number of boats, neither shall a monopoly, in respect either of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged in carrying goods, be granted to any parties. If any smuggling takes place in them the offenders will of course be punished according to law.

        Art. IX. The Tariffs and Tariff Rules now in force between China and the Western Powers shall be applicable to all articles upon importation into China by Japanese subjects or from Japan, or upon exportation from China by Japanese subjects or to Japan. It is clearly understood that all articles, the importation or exportation of which is not expressly limited or prohibited by the Tariffs and Tariff Rules existing between China and the Western Powers, may be freely imported into and exported from China, subject only to the payment of the stipulated import or export duties. But in no case shall Japanese subjects be called upon to pay in China other or higher import or export duties than are or may be paid by the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation; nor shall any article imported into China from Japan or exported from China to Japau, be charged upon such importation or exportation, other or higher duties than are now or may hereafter be imposed in China on the like article when imported from or exported to the nation most favoured in those respects.

Art. X. All articles duly imported into China by Japanese subjects or from Japan shall, while being transportel, subject to the existing Regulations, from one open port to another, be wholly exempt from all taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges

210

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, irrespective of the nationality of the owner or possessor of the articles, or the nationality of the conveyance or vessel in which the transportation is made.

     Art. XI.-It shall be at the option of any Japanese subject desiring to convey duly imported articles to an inland market, to clear his goods of all transit duties by payment of a commutation transit tax or duty, equal to one-half of the import duty in respect of dutiable articles, and two and a half per cent. upon the value in respect of duty-free articles; and on payment thereof a certificate shall be issued which shall exempt the goods from all further inland charges whatsoever.

It is understood that this Article does not apply to imported Opium. Art. XII.-All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects in China elsewhere than at an open port thereof and intended for export abroad, shall in every part of China be freed from all taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties when exported, upon the payment of a commutation transit tax or duty calculated at the rate mentioned in the last preceding Article, substituting export duty for import duty, provided such goods and produce are actually exported to a foreign country within the period of 12 months from the date of the payment of the transit tax All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects at the open ports of China and of which export to foreign countries is not prohibited, shall be exempt from all internal taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties upon exportation, and all articles purchased by Japanese subjects in any part of China, may also, for the purposes of export abroad, be transported from open port to open port subject to the existing Rules and Regulations.

Art. XIII.-Merchandise of a bond fide foreign origin, in respect of which full import duty shall have been paid, may at any time within three years from the date of importation, be re-exported from China by Japanese subjects to any foreign country, without the payment of any export duty, and the re-exporters shall, in addition, be entitled forthwith to receive from the Chinese Customs drawback certi- ficates for the amount of import duty paid thereon, provided that the merchandise remains intact and unchanged in its original packages. Such drawback certificates shall be immediately redeemable in ready money by the Chinese Customs Authorities at the option of the holders thereof.

Art. XIV. The Chinese Governinent consents to the establishment of Bonded Warehouses at the several open ports of China. Regulations on the subject shall be made hereafter.

Art. XV.-Japanese merchant vessels of more than 150 tons burden, entering the open ports of China, shall be charged tonnage dues at the rate of 4 mace per registered ton; if of 150 tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of 1 mace per registered ton. But any such vessel taking its departure within 48 hours after arrival, without breaking bulk, shall be exempt from the payment of tonnage dues.

Japanese vessels having paid the above specified tonnage dues shall thereafter be exempt from all tonnage dues in all the open ports and ports of call of China, for the period of four months from the date of clearance from the port where the pay- ment of such tonnage dues is made. Japanese vessels shall not, however, be required to pay tonnage dues for the period during which they are actually undergoing repairs

in China.

No tonnage dues shall be payable on small vessels and boats employed by Japanese subjects in the conveyance of passengers' baggage, letters, or duty-free articles between any of the open ports of China. All small vessels and cargo boats, however, conveying merchandise which is, at the time of such conveying, subject to duty, shall pay tonnage dues once in four months at the rate of 1 mace per ton.

No fee or charges, other than tonnage dues, shall be levied upon Japanese vessels and boats, and it is also understood that such vessels and boats shall not be required to pay other or higher tonnage dues than the vessels and boats of the most favoured nation.

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

211

Art. XVI.-Any Japanese merchant vessel arriving at an open port of China shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her departure, she shall be allowed to employ a pilot to take her out of port.

     Art. XVII.-Japanese merchant vessels compelled on account of injury sustained or any other cause, to seek a place of refuge, shall be permitted to enter any nearest port of China, without being subject to the payment of tonnage dues or duties upon goods landed in order that repairs to the vessel may be effected, provided the goods so landed remain under the supervision of the Customs authorities.

Should any such vessel be stranded or wrecked on the coast of China, the Chinese authorities shall immediately adopt measures for rescuing the passengers and crew and for securing the vessel and cargo. The persons thus saved shall receive friendly treatment, and, if necessary, shall be furnished with means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station. Should any Chinese merchant vessel be compelled on account of injury sustained or any other cause to seek a place of refuge in the nearest port of Japan, she shall likewise be treated in the same way by the Japanese authorities.

      Art. XVIII.-The Chinese authorities at the several open ports shall adopt such means as they judge most proper to prevent the revenue suffering from fraud or smuggling.

Art. XIX.-If any Japanese vessel be plundered by Chinese robbers or pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every endeavour to capture and punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover and restore the stolen property.

Art. XX.-Jurisdiction over the persons and property of Japanese subjects in China is reserved exclusively to the duly authorized Japanese authorities, who shall hear and determine all cases brought against Japanese subjects or property by Jap- anese subjects or by the subjects or citizens of any other Power, without the interven- tion of the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXI.-If the Chinese authorities or a Chinese subject make any charge or complaint of a civil nature against Japanese subjects or in respect of Japanese property in China, the case shall be heard and decided by the Japanese authorities. In like manner all charges and complaints of a civil nature brought by Japanese authorities or subjects in China against Chinese subjects or in respect of Chinese property, shall be heard and determined by the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXII.-Japanese subjects, charged with the commission of any crimes or offences in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty, punished by the Japanese authorities according to the laws of Japan.

In like manner Chinese subjects charged with the commission of any crimes or offences against Japanese subjects in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty, punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

Art. XXIII. Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to a Japanese subject or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do their utmost to effect his arrest, and enforce recovery of the debts. The Japanese Authorities will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any Japanese subject who fraudulently absconds or fails to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese subject.

Art. XXIV.-If Japanese subjects in China who have committed offences or have failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond, should flee to the interior of China or take refuge in houses occupied by Chinese subjects or on board of Chinese ships, the Chinese authorities shall, at the request of the Japanese Consul, deliver them to the Japanese authorities.

In like manner if Chinese subjects in China who have committed offences or have failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond, should take refuge in houses occupied by Japanese subjects in China or on board of Japanese ships in Chinese waters, they shall be delivered up at the request of the Chinese authorities made to the Japanese authorities.

212

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

Art. XXV.-The Japanese Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in all privileges, immunities and advantages conferred on them by the Treaty stipulations between Japan and China which are now in force; and it is hereby expressly stipu- lated that the Japanese Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that may have been or may be hereafter granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the Government or subjects of any other nation.

Art. XXVI.-It is agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties may demand a revision of the Tariffs and of the Commercial Articles of this Treaty at the end of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications; but if no such demand be made on either side and no such revision be effected within six months after the end of the first ten years then the Treaty and Tariffs, in their present form, shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years, and so it shall be at the end of each successive period of ten years.

     Art. XXVII.-The High Contracting Parties will agree upon Rules and Regulations necessary to give full effect to this Treaty. Until such Rules and Regulations are brought into actual operation the Arrangements, Rules and Regulations subsisting between China and the Western Powers, so far as they are applicable and not inconsistent with the provisions of this Treaty, shall be binding. between the Contracting Parties.

Art. XXVIII.-The present Treaty is signed in the Japanese, Chinese and English languages. In order, however, to prevent future discussions, the Pleni- potentiaries of the High Contracting Parties have agreed that in case of any divergencies in the interpretation between the Japanese and Chinese Texts of the Treaty, the difference shall be settled by reference to the English Text.

Art. XXIX.--The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and the ratification thereof shall be exchanged at Peking not later than three months from the present date.

In Witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at Peking this twenty-first day of the seventh month of the twenty- ninth year of Meiji, corresponding to the eleventh day of the sixth month of the twenty-second year of Kuang Hsü (July 21st, 1896).

[L.S.] [L.S.]

CHANG YIN-HOON.

HAYASHI TADASU.

PROTOCOL REGARDING NEW PORTS

MADE AT PEKING, 19TH OCTOBER, 1896

Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of His Majesty the Emperor of China have agreed upon the following stipulations supple- mentary to the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation :-

     Art. I.-It is hereby agreed that special Japanese settlements shall be formed at the places newly opened to commerce, and that affairs relating to roads and police shall be under the control of the Japanese Consul.

Art. II.-Regulations with respect to steamers or ships owned or chartered by Japanese subjects at Suchow, Hangchow, and Shanghai shall be determined after conference with Japan, on the basis of the Provisional Regulations for the conduct of business by foreign merchants at those places, issued by the Shanghai Customs on August third of the twenty-second year of Kwang Hsü.

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

213

Art. III.-The Government of Japan concedes the right of the Chinese Govern- ment to impose upon articles manufactured by Japanese subjects in China such a tax as may seem expedient, provided that the said tax shall not differ from, or exceed, the tax paid by Chinese subjects; and provided that the Chinese Govern- ment shall, when the Japanese Government so desires, immediately provide sites for the formation of special Japanese Settlements in Shanghai, Tientsin, Amoy, and Hankow.

Art. IV. Instructions shall be issued in Sunfu, in Shantung, that no Chinese troops shall approach, or take possession of any position, within 5 Japanese ri, that is to say, about 40 Chinese li, of the limits of any positions held by Japanese forces in accordance with Treaty stipulations.

      The above Protocol shall be drawn up in the Chinese and Japanese languages and after comparison, the two copies shall be signed and sealed, each side taking one of the copies.

HAYASHI TADASU. PRINCE KING.

[Signed]

YIN LU.

CHANG YIN-WHAN.

"

      Nineteenth day, tenth month, twenty-ninth year of Meiji; thirteenth day, ninth month, twenty-second year of Kuang Hsü.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY OF COMMERCE AND

NAVIGATION BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

SIGNED AT SHANGHAI, 8th OCTOBER, 1903

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, in order to give full effect to the provisions of Article XI. of the Final Protocol signed at Peking on the seventh day of the ninth month of the thirty-fourth year of Meiji, corresponding to the twenty-fifth day of seventh moon of the twenty-seventh year of Kuang-hsü, have resolved to conclude a Supplementary Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, designed to facilitate and promote the commercial relations between Japan and China, and have for that purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that

is to say:

      His Majesty the Emperor of Japan:-Hioki Eki, Jugoi, Fifth Class of the Imperial Order of the Rising Sun, First Secretary of Legation, and Odagiri Masnoske, Shorokui, Fifth Class of the Imperial Order of the Rising Sun, Consul-General; and

      His Majesty the Emperor of China:-Lü Hai-huan, President of the Board of Public Works; Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent formerly Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works; and Wu T'ing-fang, Senior Vice-President of the Board of Commerce.

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :--

      Art. I. Whereas China, with the object of reforming its fiscal system, proposes to levy a surtax in excess of the tariff rates on all goods passing through the Custom- houses, whether maritime, or inland and frontier, in order to compensate, in a mea- sure, for the loss incurred by the complete abolition of lekin, Japan consents to pay the same surtax as is agreed upon between China and all the Treaty Powers. With

214

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

regard to the production tax, consumption tax, and excise, and the taxes on native opium and salt, leviable by China, Japan also consents to accept the same arrange- ments as are agreed upon between all the Treaty Powers and China. It is under- stood, however, that the commerce, rights and privileges of Japan shall not, on account of the above, be placed at any disadvantage as compared with the commerce, rights and privileges of other Powers.

     Art. II. The Chinese Government agrees to permit Japanese steamship-owners to erect, at their own expense, appliances for hauling through the rapids of that part of the Yangtzekiang between Ichang and Chungking; but as the interests of the population of the provinces of Szechuen, Hunan and Hupeh are involved, it is there- fore necessary that the approval of the Imperial Maritime Customs be obtained before such appliances may be so erected. These appliances, which shall be at the disposal of all vessels, both steamers and junks, shall not obstruct the waterway nor interfere with the free passage of junks or of persons on the banks on the river.

Such ap- pliances shall be subject to special regulations to be drawn up by the Imperial Customs.

      Art. III. The Chinese Government agrees that any Japanese steamer capable of navigating the inland waterways, upon reporting at the Imperial Maritime Cus- toms, may proceed for the purpose of trade from a Treaty Port to places inland so reported, on complying with the Original and Supplementary Regulations for Steam Navigation Inland.

Art. IV.-In case Chinese subjects conjointly with Japanese subjects organise a partnership or company for a legitimate purpose, they shall equitably share the profits and losses with all the members according to the terms of the agreement or memorandum and articles of association and the regulations framed thereunder, and they shall be liable to the fulfilment of the obligations imposed by the said agreement or memorandum and articles of association and the regulations framed thereunder, as accepted by them and as interpreted by the Japanese Courts. Should they fail to fulfil the obligations so imposed and legal action be taken against them. in consequence, Chinese Courts shall at once enforce fulfilment of such obligations. It is understood that in case Japanese subjects conjointly with Chinese subjects organise a partnership or company, they shall also equitably share the profits and losses with all the members according to the terms of the agreement or memorandum and articles of association and the regulations framed thereunder. Should such Japanese subjects fail to fulfil any of the obligations imposed by the said agreement or memorandum and articles of association, or by the regulations framed thereunder, Japanese Courts shall in like manner at once enforce fulfilment of such obligations by them.

Art. V. The Chinese Government agrees to make and faithfully enforce such regulations as are necessary for preventing Chinese subjects from infringing regis- tered trade-marks held by Japanese subjects. The Chinese Government likewise agrees to make such regulations as are necessary for affording protection to registered copyrights held by Japanese subjects in the books, pamphlets, maps and charts written in the Chinese language and specially prepared for the use of Chinese people. It is further agreed that the Chinese Government shall establish registration offices where foreign trade-marks and copyrights held by Japanese subjects in protec- tion of the Chinese Government, shall be registered in accordance with the provisions of the regulations to be hereafter framed by the Chinese Government for the purpose of protecting trade-marks and copyrights. It is understood that Chinese trade- marks and copyrights properly registered according to the provisions of the laws and regulations of Japan, will receive similar protection against infringement in Japan.

This Article shall not be held to protect against due process of law any Japanese or Chinese subject who may be the author, proprietor, or seller of any publication calculated to injure the well-being of China.

Art. VI.-China agrees to establish itself, as soon as possible, a system of uniform national coinage, and provide for a uniform national currency, which shall be

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

215

freely used as legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other obligations by Japanese subjects as well as by Chinese subjects in the Chinese Empire. It is understood, however, that all Customs duties shall continue to be calculated and paid on the basis of the Haikwan tael.

      Art. VII.---As the weights and measures used by the mercantile and other classes for general and commercial purposes in the different provinces of China vary and do not accord with the standards fixed by the Imperial Government Boards, thus resulting in detriment to the trade of Chinese and foreigners, the Governors-General and Governors of all the provinces, after careful inquiry into existing conditions, shall consult together and fix upon uniform standards which, after a Memorial to the Throne for sanction, shall be adopted and used in all transactions by officials and people throughout all the Empire. These standards shall be first used in the places opened to foreign trade and gradually extended to inland places. Any differences resulting from divergence between the new weights and measures and those now in vogue shall be equitably settled, whether by way of increase or decrease, according to the amount of such difference.

Art. VIII.-The Regulations for Steam Navigation Inland of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsu and the Supplementary Rules of the seventh moon of the same year, having been found in some respects inconvenient in working, the Chinese Government hereby agrees to amend them, and to annex such new Rules to this Treaty. These Rules shall remain in force until altered by mutual consent.

Art. IX.--The provisions of all Treaties and Engagements now subsisting between Japan and China, in so far as they are not modified of repealed by this Act, are hereby expressly stipulated in addition, that the Japanese Government, Officers, Subjects, Commerce, Navigation, Shipping, Industries and Property of all kinds shall be allowed free and full participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages which have been or may hereafter be granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China by the Chinese Government or by the Provincial or Local Administrations of China to the Government, Officers, Subjects, Commerce, Navigation, Shipping, In- dustries or Property of any other nation. The Japanese Government will do its utmost to secure to Chinese Officers and Subjects resident in Japan the most favourable treatment compatible with the laws and regulations of the Empire.

Or

Art. X.-The High Contracting Parties hereto agree that, in case of and after the complete withdrawal of the foreign troops stationed in the province of Chihli and of the Legation guards, a place of international residence and trade in Peking will be forthwith opened by China itself. The detailed regulation relating thereto shall be settled in due time after consultation. The Chinese Government agrees to open to foreign trade, within six months from the exchange of the Ratifications of this Treaty, Changsha-fu in the province of Hunan on the same footing as the ports already opened to foreign trade. Foreigners residing in this open port are to observe the Municipal and Police Regulations on the same footing as Chinese residents, and they are not to be entitled to establish a Municipality and Police of their own within the limits of this Treaty Port, except with the consent of the Chinese authorities. The Chinese Government agrees that, upon the exchange of the Ratifications of this Treaty, Moukden and Tatungkow, both in the province of Shengking, will be opened by China itself as places of international residence and trade. The selection of suitable localities to be set apart for international use and occupation and the regul- ations for these places set apart for foreign residence and trade shall be agreed upon by the Governments of Japan and China, after consultation together.

Art. XI.-The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform its judicial system and to bring it into accord with that of Japan and Western nations, Japan agrees to give every assistance to such reform, and will also be pre- pared to relinquish its extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the arrangements for their administration, and other considerations warrant it in so doing,

216

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

Art. XII.--The present Treaty is signed in the Japanese, Chinese and English languages. In order, however, to prevent future discussions, the Plenipotentiaries of the High Contracting Parties have agreed that in case of any divergence in the in- terpretation between the Japanese and Chinese texts of the Treaty, the difference shall be settled by reference to the English text.

Art. XIII. The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Peking as soon as possible, and not later than six months from the present date. In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto the seals of their arms.

Done at Shanghai, this eighth day of the tenth month of the thirty-sixth year of Meiji, corresponding to the eighteenth day of the eighth moon of the twenty-ninth year of Kuang Hsü.

[L.S.] [L.S.] (Signed)

""

Ηιοκι ΕκΙ.

ODAGIRI MASNOSKE. LU HAI-HUAN. SHENG HSUAN-HUAI. WU TING-FANG.

ANNEX 1

INLAND WATERS STEAM NAVIGATION

ADDITIONAL RULES

      1.-Japanese steamship owners are at liberty to lease warehouses and jetties on the banks of waterways from Chinese subjects for a term not exceeding twenty-five years, with option of renewal on terms to be mutually arranged. In cases where Japanese merchants are unable to secure warehouses and jetties from Chinese subjects on satisfactory terms, the local officials, after consultation with the Governor or Governor-General or Minister of Commerce, shall arrange to provide these on renewable lease, as above mentioned, at current equitable rates.

2.-Jetties shall only be erected in such positions that they will not obstruct the inland waterway or interfere with navigation, and with the sanction of the nearest Commissioner of Customs; such sanction, however, shall not be arbitrarily withheld.

      3.-Japanese merchants shall pay taxes and contributions on these warehouses and jetties on the same footing as Chinese proprietors of similar properties in the neighbourhood. Japanese merchants may only employ Chinese agents and staff to reside in warehouses so leased at places touched at by steamers engaged in inland traffic to carry on their business; but Japanese merchants may visit these places from time to time to look after their affairs. The existing rights of Chinese jurisdiction over Chinese subjects shall not by reason of this clause be diminished or interfered with in any way.

      4. Steam vessels navigating the inland waterways of China shall be responsible for loss caused to riparian proprietors by damage which they may do to the banks or works on them, and for the loss which may be caused by such damage. In the event of China desiring to prohibit the use of some particular shallow waterway by launches, because there is reason to fear that the use of it by them would be likely to injure the banks and cause damage to the adjoining country, the Japanese authorities, when appealed to, shall, if satisfied of the validity of the objection, prohibit the use of that waterway by Japanese launches, provided that Chinese launches are also prohibited from using it. Both Foreign and Chinese

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

217

    launches are prohibited from crossing dams and weirs at present in existence on inland waterways where they are likely to cause injury to such works, which would be detrimental to the water service of the local people.

      5. The main object of the Japanese Government in desiring to see the inland waterways of China opened to steam navigation being to afford facilities for the rapid transport of both foreign and native merchandise, they undertake to offer no impediment to the transfer to a Chinese company and the Chinese flag of any Japanese steamer which may now or hereafter be employed on the inland waters of China, should the owner be willing to make the transfer. In the event of a Chinese company registered under Chinese law being formed to run steamers on the inland waters of China, the fact of Japanese subjects holding shares in such a company shall not entitle the steamer to fly the Japanese flag.

      6.-Registered steamers and their tows are forbidden, just as junks have always been forbidden, to carry contraband goods. Infraction of this rule will entail the penalties prescribed in the Treaties for such an offence and cancellation of the Inland Waters Navigation Certificate carried by the vessels, which will be prohibited from thereafter plying on inland waters.

       7.-As it is desirable that the people living inland should be disturbed as little as possible by advent of steam vessels to which they are not accustomed, inland waters not hitherto frequented by steamers shall be opened as gradually as may be convenient to merchants and only as the owners of steamers may see prospect of remunerative trade. In cases where it is intended to run steam vessels on water- ways on which such vessels have not hitherto run, intimation shall be made to the Commissioner of Customs at the nearest open port, who shall report the matter to the Ministers of Commerce. The latter, in conjunction with the Governor-General or Governor of the province, after careful consideration of all the circumstances of the case, shall at once give their approval.

8.-A registered steamer may ply within the waters of a port, or from one open port or ports to another open port or ports, or from one open port or ports to places inland, and thence back to such port or ports. She may, on making due report to the Customs, land or ship passengers or cargo at any recognised places of trade passed in the course of the voyage; but may not ply between inland places exclusively except with the consent of the Chinese Government.

      9.-Any cargo and passenger boats may be towed by steamers. The helmsman and crew of any boat towed shall be Chinese. All boats, irrespective of ownership, must be registered before they can proceed inland.

      10.-lhe above Rules are supplementary to the Regulations published in the fifth and seventh moons of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsü, which remain in full force and effect in so far as they are not modified by the Rules now agreed upon. The present Rules and the Regulations of the fifth and seventh moons of the twenty-fifth year of Kuang Hsü may hereafter be modified, as circumstances require, by mutual consent.

      Done at Shanghai this eighth day of the tenth moon of the thirty-sixth year of Meiji, corresponding to the eighteenth day of the eighth moon of the twenty-ninth year of Kuang Hsü.

[L.S.]

HIOKI EKI.

[L.S.]

ODAGIRI MASNOSKE.

(Signed)

LU HAI-HUAN.

SHENC HSUAN-HUAI

WU TING-FANG

6

218

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

ANNEX 2

IMPERIAL JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS For TREATY REVISION TO IMPERIAL CHINESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION

Shanghai, the 8th Day of the 10th Month of the 36th Year of Meiji. GENTLEMEN,-According to Article III. of present Treaty, the Chinese Govern- ment agree that any Japanese steamer capable of navigating the Inland Waterways, upon reporting at the Imperial Maritime Customs, may proceed for purpose of trade from a treaty port to places inland, so reported, on complying with the Original and Supplementary Regulations for Steam Navigation Inland.

It is understood that all classes of Japanese steamers, whatever their size, provided they are capable of navigating the Inland Waterways, may, on complying with the Regulations, receive an Inland Waters Certificate, and carry on trade with Inland places, and the Chinese Government will in no case raise difficulties and stop such steamers from plying to and from Inland places.

      We have the honour, in order to prevent future misunderstandings, to address this despatch to Your Excellencies and to request that instructions be sent to the Inspector General of Maritime Customs to act in accordance with this understanding.

We have further the honour to request a reply from Your Excellencies.

We have the honour &c.,

(Signed)

""

HIOKI EKI. ODAGIRI MASNOSKE.

ANNEX 3

IMPERIAL CHINESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION TO IMPERIAL JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION

Shanghai, the 18th Day of the 8th Moon of the 26th Year of Kuang Hsü. GENTLEMEN,--We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excel- lencies' despatch of this date, written with a view of preventing future misunder- standings, to the effect that, in accordance with the provisions of Article III. of the present Treaty, all classes of Japanese steamers, whatever their size, provided they are capable of navigating the Inland Waterways, may on complying with the Regulations receive an Inland Waters Certificate, and ply to and from inland places, and that the Chinese Government will in no case raise difficulties and stop them.

      During the negotiations of this Article, we received a list from Your Excellencies of the Japanese steamers, viz:-Sanyo Maru, Setagawa Maru, Hiuga Maru, Urato Maru, Neisei Maru, Heian Maru, Taiko Maru, Yoshino Maru, Meiko Maru, Fukuju Maru, Hijikawa Maru, Nagata Maru, Kyodo Maru, Horai Maru, Kwanko Maru, Keiko Maru, Kinriu Maru, Zensho Maru and Kohei Maru, ranging from one hundred and twenty-one tous to four hundred and ten tons register-plying from Chefoo to inland places in Manchuria, under Inland Waters Certificate and in accordance with the Regulations for Steam Navigation Inland, which vessels have not been prevented from doing so on account of their class.

     At that time we instructed the Deputy Inspector General of Customs to make inquiries into the records of the Custom-houses, and he reported that the circum- stances were in accordance with Your Excellencies' statement.

     In consequence of the receipt of Your Excellencies' despatch we shall communi- cate with the Waiwupu and request that instructions be sent to the Inspector General of Customs to take these circumstances into consideration and to act accordingly, and we have the honour to write this despatch for purposes of record.

We have the honour to be,

(Signed)

LU HAI-HUAN. SHENG HSUAN-HUAN. WU TING-FANG.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

ANNEX +

219

IMPERIAL JAPANESE COMMISSioners for TREATY REVISION TO IMPERIAL CHINESE

COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION

Shanghai, the 8th Day of the 10th Month of the 26th Year of Meiji GENTLEMEN,-The provision contained in No. 9 of the Supplementary Rules governing steam navigating on Inland Waters, published in the seventh moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsü, regarding the appointment of an officer to collect dues and duties, not having in all cases been given effect to, we have the honour to request that Your Excellencies' Government will again issue instructions to all pro- vinces to give strict effect to this provision, as it is a matter of importance.

We trust that Your Excellencies will comply with the request contained in this despatch and that you will favour us with a reply.

We have the honour, &c.,

(Signed)

""

HIOKI EKI.

ODAGIRI MASNOSKE.

ANNEX 5

IMPERIAL CHINESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION TO IMPERIAL JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION

Shanghai, the 18th Day of the 8th Moon of the 29th Year Kuang-Hsü, GENTLEMEN, We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excel- lencies' despatch of this date to the effect that, the provision contained in No. 9 of the Supplementary Rules governing steam navigation on Inland Waters, published in the seventh moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsü, regarding the appoint- ment of an officer to collect dues and duties, not having in all cases been given effect to, you request that instructions be again issued to all provinces to give strict effect to this provision, as it is a matter of importance.

      We have noted the above and have communicated with proper authorities in order that action may be taken, and have now the honour to write this reply for Your Excellencies' information.

We have the honour, &c.,

(Signed)

22

LU HAI-HUAN.

SHENG HSUAN-HUAI.

WU TING FANG.

ANNEX 6

IMPERIAL CHINESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION TO IMPERIAL JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION

Shanghai, the 18th Day of the 8th Moon of the 29th Year of Kuang Hsü. GENTLEMEN,-According to the provision of Article X. of this Treaty, regarding the establishment in Peking of a place of international residence and trade, it is agreed that in case of, and after, the complete withdrawal of the foreign troops, now guarding the Legations and communications, a place in Peking outside the Inner City, convenient to both parties and free from objections, shall be selected and set apart as a place where merchants of all nationalities may reside and carry on trade.

6*

220

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

    Within the limits of this place merchants of all nationalities shall be at liberty to lease land, build houses and warehouses, and establish places of business; but as to the leasing of houses and land belonging to Chinese private individuals, there must be willingness on the part of the owners, and the terms thereof must be equitably arranged without any force or compulsion. All roads and bridges in this place will be under the jurisdiction and control of China. Foreigners residing in this place are to observe the Municipal and Police Regulations on the same footing as Chinese residents, and they are not to be entitled to establish a Municipality and Police of their own within its limits except with the consent of the Chinese authorities. When such place of international residence and trade shall have been opened and its limits properly defined, the foreigners who have been residing scattered both within and without the city walls, shall all be required to remove their residence thereto and they shall not be allowed to remain in separate places, and thereby cause inconvenience in the necessary supervision by the Chinese authorities. The value of the land and buildings held by such foreigners shall be agreed upon equitably, and due compen- sation therefore shall be paid. The period for such removal shall be determined in due time, and those who do not remove before the expiry of this period shall not be entitled to compensation.

      We have considered it to be to our mutual advantage to come to the present basis of understanding in order to avoid future unnecessary negotiations, and we beg that Your Excellencies will consider and agree to it, and will favour us with a reply.

We have the honour, &c.,

(Signed)

""

""

LU HAI-HUAN.

SHENG HSUAN-HUAI. WU TING-FANG.

ANNEX 7

IMPERIAL JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION TO IMPERIAL CHINESE

COMMISSIONERS FOR TREATY REVISION

Shanghai, the 8th Day of the 10th Mouth of the 36th Year of Meiji.

     GENTLEMEN,We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellencies' despatch of the 18th day of the 8th moon of the 29th year of Kuang Hsu.

In reply we beg to inform you that we agree generally to all the terms contained in the despatch under acknowledgment. As to the detailed regulations, these shall in due time be considered and satisfactorily settled in accordance with Article X. of this Treaty; but it is understood that such regulations shall not differ in any respect to our prejudice from those which may be agreed upon between China and other Powers. We have the honour to send Your Excellencies this communi- cation in reply and for your information.

We have the honour, &c.,

(Signed)

HIOKI EKI.

ODAGIRI MASNOSKE.

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN RELATING TO MANCHURIA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 22ND DECEMBER, 1905.

     I.-The Chinese Government agrees to all the transfers made to Japan by Russia by Articles V. and VI. of the Treaty of Peace between Japan and Russia.

II. The Japanese Government agrees to observe as much as possible the exist- ing Treaties in regard to the lease of land for the construction of railways, which have been concluded between China and Russia.

     In case of any question arising in future, the Japanese Government will consult with the Chinese Government before settlement.

      III. This present Treaty will take effect from the date of signing, and will be ratified by his Imperial Japanese Majesty and his Imperial Chinese Majesty, and ratifications will be exchanged in Peking as early as possible within two months from the date of signing.

     In witness whereof the Plenipotentiaries of the two contraccting parties have signed and affixed their respective seals on the Treaty done in duplicate in Japanese and Chinese.

Done at Peking, 22nd December, 1905.

KOMURA JUTARO,

Minister for Foreign Affairs, Special Ambassador;

UCHIDA KOSAI,

Minister Plenipotentiary;

PRINCE CHING,

Minister Plenipotentiary;

KU KO-KI,

Minister Plenipotentiary ;

YUAN SHI-KAI,

Minister Plenipotentiary.

SUPPLEMENTARY AGREEMENT

     The Governments of the two contracting parties have decided on the following matters in which both parties are interested in Manchuria and agreed upon the following stipulations for their guidance:-

I. The Chinese Government agrees to open the following cities in Manchuria to the residence of foreigners and foreign trade with as little delay as possible after the evacuation of Manchuria by the Japanese and Russian armies:-

     Shingking Province:-Whangfengcheng, Liaoyang, Sinminting, Tieling, Tung- kiangtze, and Fakumen.

     Kirin Province:-Changchun (Kwangchengtze), Kiriu, Harbin, Ninguta, Hong- chun and Sanchin.

Heilunking Province :-Tsitsikar, Hailar, Aihon and Manjuri.

     II. The Chinese Government having expressed its earnest desire for the speedy withdrawal of the Japanese and Russian armies and railway guards in Manchuria, and the Japanese Government being desirous of complying with the desire of the Chinese Government, agrees to make similar arrangements in case of the Russian Government agreeing to the withdrawal of its railway guards, or of any special under- standing having been arrived at between China and Russia in the matter. When order has been perfectly established in Manchurid and the Chinese authorities have become able to fully protect the life and property of foreigners in Manchuria, the Japanese Government, in common with the Russian Government, will withwraw the railway guards.

III. The Japanese Government will immediately inform the Chinese Govern- ment of any locality in Manchuria which is evacuated by the Japanese troops, and

222

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN RELATING TO MANCHURIA

on receiving such information the Chinese Government is authorised to send a force of troops necessary for the maintenance of the public security and order to the locality evacuated by the Japanese troops, even before the expiration of the term specified in the Japanese-Russian Treaty for the withdrawal of the troops. In case of bandits molesting villages in the district still under occupation of the Japanese troops, the Chinese local authorities may send troops to arrest the bandits, but Chinese troops dispatched on this work shall not be allowed to enter within twenty Chinese miles of the place where Japanese troops are stationed.

      IV. The Japanese Government agrees to return to their respective owners all the Government or private property in Manchuria occupied or taken possession of by the Japanese army for military purposes, as Manchuria is evacuated by the troops. Even before the evacuation such property, when useless for the needs of the troops, will be returned to the respective owners.

      V. The Chinese Government agrees to take all measures necessary for protecting the tombs of the Japanese soldiers killed in battle in Manchuria, and the monuments erected in commemoration of their loyalty.

The

      VI.-The Chinese Government agrees to the military railway constructed between Antongcheng and Mukden being transformed into a line for the transmission of merchandise of all nationals and conducted by the Japanese Government. term in which the railway will be conducted by the Japanese to be fifteen years from the date on which the transformation of the line is completed. Upon the expiry of the term, the railway will be sold to the Chinese Government, its value being decided by two experts, one to be appointed by each of the contracting parties. During the time the line is under the control of the Japanese, Chinese troops, arms, and provi- sions will be transported according to the terms of the Chinese Eastern Railway Treaty. In effecting the transformation of the railway, the Japanese authorities in charge will consult with commissioners to be appointed by the Chinese Government. Rates of freight on goods belonging to the Chinese Government or private individuals will be specially arranged.

      VII.-The two contracting parties agree to make arrangements as soon as possible for connecting the service of railways in South Manchuria and those in China proper, in order to promote and facilitate the communications and transport of goods.

      VIII. The Chinese Government agrees to exempt materials required for the railways in South Manchuria from all duties and lekin.

       IX. At Yingkow (Newchwang), which is already opened to foreign trade, and also in Antongcheng, Mukden, and other places in the Shingking province, which it is agreed to open to foreign trade, settlements for the exclusive use of Japanese will be established, and the provision for this purpose made by the Japanese and Chinese authorities in a special agreement.

X. The Chinese Government agrees to a joint-stock lumber company of Japanese and Chinese being formed with a view to carrying on a business of cutting lumber in the forests on the right bank of the Yalu. The Chinese Government further agrees that the area of land where the business will be carried on, the term of the charter, the process of the formation of the company, and the articles of the business, will be determined upon in a special agreement. The interest in the company of the Japanese and Chinese shareholders will be equally divided.

XI.-In regard to the trade on the frontier of Manchuria and Corea, treatment according to most-favoured-nation principle will be extended to each contracting party.

XII. The Governments of the two contracting parties agree that in all the matters specified in the Articles of the Treaty signed this day, and in the supplementary agree- ment, each party will give the most considerate treatment to the other.

      This agreement will take effect from the date of signing and is to be considered as ratified with the ratification of the Treaty signed this day.

In witness whereof the contracting parties have signed and affixed their seals in duplicate in Japanese and Chinese, with due authority entrusted to them by their respective Governments.

FINAL PROTOCOL MADE BETWEEN CHINA

AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901

[Translation]

The Plenipotentiaries of Germany, Monsieur A. Mumm von Schwartzenstein; Austria-Hungary, Baron M. Czikann; Belgium, Monsieur Joostens; Spain, Monsieur B. J. de Cologan; United States, Mr. W. W. Rockhill; France, Monsieur Beau; Great Britain, Sir Ernest Satow; Italy, Marquiss Salvago Raggi; Japan, Monsieur Jutaro Komuro; Netherlands, Monsieur F. M. Knobel; Russia, Monsieur Michael de Giers; and the Plenipotentaries of China, His Highness Yi-K'uang, Prince of the first rank; Ch'ing, President of the Board of Foreign Affairs; and His Excellency Li Hung-chang, Count of the first rank, Su-Yi, Tutor of the Heir Apparent, Grand Secretary of the Wên-IIua Throne Hall, Minister of Commerce, Superintendent of Trade for the North, Governor-General of Chihli, have met for the purpose of declaring that China has complied with the conditions laid down in the Note of the 22nd of December, 1900, and which were accepted in their entirety by His Majesty the Emperor of China in a Decree dated the 27th of December, 1900 (Annex No 1).

Art. I.-By an Imperial Edict of the 9th of June last (Annex No. 2) Tsai- Fêng, Prince of the first rank, Chun, was appointed Ambassador of His Majesty the Emperor of China and directed in that capacity to convey to His Majesty the Emperor of Germany the expression of the regrets of His Majesty the Emperor of China and of the Chinese Government at the assassination of His Excellency the late Baron von Ketteler, German Minister. Prince Chun left Peking the 12th of July last to carry out the orders which had been given him.

      Art. II.-The Chinese Government has stated that it will erect on the spot of the assassination of II. E. the late Baron von Ketteler, a commemorative monument, worthy of the rank of the deceased, and bearing an inscription in the Latin, German and Chinese languages, which shall express the regrets of H. M. the Emperor of China for the murder committed.

The Chinese Plenipotentiaries have informed II. E. the German Plenipotentiary, in a letter dated the 22nd of July last (Annex No. 3) that an arch of the whole width of the street would be erected on the said spot, and that work on it was begun the 25th of June last.

Art. IIa.-Imperial Edicts of the 13th and 21st of February, 1901 (Annexes Nos. 4, 5 and 6), inflicted the following punishments on the principal authors of the attempts and crimes committed against the Foreign Governments and their nationals:-

Tsai-I, Prince Tuan, and Tsai-Lan, Duke Fu-kuo, were sentenced to be brought before the Autumnal Court of Assize for execution and it was agreed that if the Emperor saw fit to grant them their lives, they should be exiled to Turkestan and there imprisoned for life, without the possibility of commutation of these punishments. Tsai Hsün, Prince Chuang, Ying-Nien, President of the Court of Censors; and Chao Shu-chiao, President of the Board of Punishments,' were condemned to commit suicide.

       Yü Hsien, Governor of Shansi; Ch'i Hsiu, President of the Board of Rites; and Hsu Ch'êng-yû, formerly senior Vice-President of the Board of Punishments, were condemned to death.

Posthumous degradation was inflicted on K'ang Yi, Assistant Grand Secretary President of the Board of Works; IIsu Tung, Grand Secretary; and Li Ping-hêng former Governor-General of Szu-ch'uan.

224

FINAL PROTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901

       Imperial Edict of February 13th, 1901 (Annex No. 7), rehabilitated the memories of Hsû Yung-yi, President of the Board of War; Li Shan, President of the Board of Works; Hsû Ching-ch'êng, Senior Vice-President of the Board of Civil Office; Lien Yuan, Vice-Chancellor of the Grand Council; and Yuan Ch'ang. Vice-President of the Court of Sacrifices, who had been put to death for having protested against the outrageous breaches of International Law of last year.

      Prince Chuang committed suicide on the 21st of February, 1901: Ying Nien and Chao Shu-chiao the 24th, Yû-Hsien was executed the 22nd, Ch'i-Hsiu and Hsü Ch'êng-yü on the 26tb, Tung Fu-hsiang, General in Kansu, has been deprived of his office by Imperial Edict of the 13th of February, 1901, pending the determination of the final punishment to be inflicted on him.

      Imperial Edicts dated the 29th April and the 19th August, 1901, have inflicted various punishments on the provincial officials convicted of the crimes and outrages.

of last summer.

Art. IIb.-An Imperial Edict promulgated the 19th August, 1901 (Annex No. 8) ordered the suspension of official examinations for five years in all cities where foreigners were inassacred or submitted to cruel treatment.

Art. III. So as to make honourable reparation for the assassination of Mr. Sugiyama, Chancellor of the Japanese Legation, H.M. the Emperor of China by an Imperial Edict of the 18th of June, 1901 (Annex No. 9), appointed Na Tung Vice-President of the Board of Finances, to be his Envoy Extraordinary, and specially directed him to convey to H.M. the Emperor of Japan the expression of the regret of H.M. the Emperor of China and of his Government at the assassination of Mr. Sugiyama.

Art. IV. The Chinese Government has agreed to erect an expiatory monument in each of the foreign or international cemeteries which were desecrated or in which the tombs were destroyed.

It has been agreed with the Representatives of the Powers that the Legations interested shall settle the details for the erection of these monuments, China bearing all the expenses thereof, estimated at ten thousand Taels for the cemeteries at Peking and in its neighbourhood, and at five thousand Taels for cemeteries in the Provinces. The amounts have been paid and the list of these cemeteries is enclosed herewith (Annex No. 10).

       Art. V.-China has agreed to prohibit the importation into its territory of arms and ammunition as well as of materials exclusively used for the manufacture of arins and ammunition.

      An Imperial Edict has been issued on the 25th of August, 1901 (Annex No. 11), forbidding said importation for a term of two years. New Edicts may be issued subsequently extending this by other successive terms of two years in case of necessity recognised by the Powers.

Art. VI. By an Imperial Edict dated the 22nd of May, 1901 (Annex No. 12), H. M. the Emperor of China agreed to pay the Powers an indemnity of four hundred and fifty millions of Haikwan Taels.

This sum represents the total amount of the indemnities for States, Companies. or Societies, private individuals and Chinese referred to in Article VI of the Note of December 22nd, 1900.

(a) These four hundred and fifty millions constitute a gold debt calculated at the rate of the Haikwan Tael to the gold currency of each country as indicated below.

Haikwan Tael-Mark

Austro-Hungary crown Gold dollar

Franc

3.055

3.595

0.742

3.740

£0. 3s. Od.

Yen ...

1.407

Netherlands florin

1.796

Geld rouble

1.412

...

Pound sterling

225

FINAL PROTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901

This sum in gold shall bear interest at 4 per cent. per annum, and the capital shall be reimbursed by China in thirty-nine years in the manner indicated in the annexed plan of amortization. (Annex No. 13). Capital and interest shall be payable in gold or at the rates of exchange corresponding to the dates at which the different payments shall fall due.

The amortization shall commence the 1st of January, 1902, and shall finish at the end of the year 1940. The amortizations are payable annually, the first payment being fixed on the first of January, 1903.

Interest shall run from the first of July, 1901, but the Chinese Government shall have the right to pay off within a term of three years, beginning January, 1902, the arrears of the first six months ending the 31st of December, 1901, on condition, however, that it pays compound interest at the rate of four per cent. per annum on the sums, the payments of which shall have been thus deferred.

Interest shall be payable semi-annually, the first payment being fixed on

the 1st of July, 1902.

(b) The service of the debt shall take place in Shanghai in the following

manner :-

Each Power shall be represented by a delegate on a commission of bankers authorised to receive the amount of interest and amortization which shall be paid to it by the Chinese Authorities designated for that purpose, to divide it among the interested parties and to give a receipt. for the same. (c) The Chinese Government shall deliver to the Doyen of the Diplomatic Corps at Peking a bond for the lump sum, which shall subsequently be converted into fractional bonds bearing the signature of the delegates of the Chinese Government designated for that purpose. operation and all those relating to issuing of the bonds shall be performed by the above-mentioned Commission, in accordance with the instructions which the Powers shall send their delegates.

This

(d) The proceeds of the revenues assigned to the payment of the bonds

shall be paid monthly to the Commission.

(e) The revenues assigned as security for the bonds are the following:- (1.) The balance of the revenues of the Imperial Maritime Customs after payment of the interest and amortization of preceding loans secured on those revenues, plus the proceeds of the raising to five per cent. effective of the present tariff on maritime imports, including articles until now on the free list, but exempting rice, foreign cereals and flour, gold and silver bullion

and coin.

(2.) The revenues of the native Customs, administered in the open ports by

the Imperial Maritime Customs.

(3.) The total revenues of the salt gabelle, exclusive of the fraction previously

set aside for other foreign loans.

The raising of the present tariff on imports to five per cent. effective is agreed to on conditions mentioned below. It shall be put in force two months after the signing of the present protocol, and no exceptions shall be made except for merchandise in transit not more than ten days after the said signing.

(1.) All duties levied on imports ad valorem shall be converted as far as

possible and as soon as may be into specific duties.

The average

This conversion shall be made in the following manner: value of merchandise at the time of their landing during the three years 1897, 1898 and 1899, that is to say, the market price less the amount of import duties and incidental expenses, shall be taken as the basis for the valuation of merchandise.

226

FINAL PROTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901

Pending the result of the work of conversion, duties shall be levied ad valorem.

(2.) The beds of the rivers Whangpoo and Peiho shall be improved with the

financial participation of China.

Art. VII.-The Chinese Government has agreed that the quarter occupied by the Legations shall be considered as one specially reserved for their use and placed under their exclusive control, in which Chinese shall not have the right to reside and which may be made defensible.

      The limits of this quarter have been fixed as follows on the annexed plan (Annex No. 14.)-

On the East, Ketteler Street ( 10, 11, 12).

On the North, the line 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

On the West, the line 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

On the South, the line 12-1 drawn along the exterior base of the

Tartar wall and following the line of the bastions.

       In the Protocol annexed to the letter of the 16th of January, 1901, China recognised the right of each Power to maintain a permanent guard in the said quarter for the defence of its Legation.

        Art. VIII. The Chinese Government has consented to raze the forts of Taku and those which might impede free communication between Peking and the sea. Steps have been taken for carrying this out.

       Art. IX.-The Chinese Government conceded the right to the Powers in the Protocol annexed to the letter of the 16th of January, 1901, to occupy certain points, to be determined by an agreement between them for the maintenance of open com- munication between the capital and the sea. The points occupied by the Powers are:-Huang-ts'un, Lang-fang, Yang-ts'un, Tientsin, Chun-liang-Ch'eng, Tong-ku, Lu-t'ai, Tong-shan, Lan-chou, Chang-li, Ch'in-wang Tao, Shanhai-kwan.

Art. X.-The Chinese Government has agreed to post and to have published during two years in all district cities the following Imperial Edicts:--

(a) Edict of the 1st of February, 1901 (Annex No. 15), prohibiting for

ever, under pain of death, membership in an anti-foreign society. (b) Edicts of the 13th and 21st of February, 29th of April and 19th of August, 1901, enumerating the punishments inflicted on the guilty. (c) Edict of the 19th of August, 1901, prohibiting examinations in all cities

where foreigners were massacred or subjected to cruel treatment. (d) Edict of the 1st of February, 1901 (Annex No. 16), declaring all Governors-general, Governors and Provincial or local officials responsible for order in their respective districts, and that in case of new anti-foreign troubles or other infractions of the Treaties which shall not be immedi- ately repressed and the authors of which shall not have been punished, these officials shall be immediately dismissed without possibility of being given new functions or new honours.

The posting of these Edicts is being carried on throughout the Empire. Art. XI. The Chinese Government has agreed to negotiate the amendments deemed necessary by the Foreign Governments to the Treaties of Commerce and Navigation and the other subjects concerning commercial relations with the object of facilitating them.

At present, and as a result of the stipulation contained in Article VI concern- ing the indemnity, the Chinese Government agrees to assist in the improvement of the courses of the rivers Peiho and Whangpoo, as stated below.

(a) The works for the improvement of the navigability of the Peiho, begun in 1898 with the co-operation of the Chinese Government, have been resumed under the direction of an International Commission. As soon as the administration of Tientsin shall have been handed back to the Chinese Government it will be in a position to be represented on this Commission, and will pay each year a sum of 60,000 Haikwan Taels for maintaining the works.

FINAL PROTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901

227

(b) A Conservancy Board, charged with the management and control of the works for straightening the Whangpoo and the improvement of the course of that river, is hereby created.

This Board shall consist of members representing the interests of the Chinese Government and those of foreigners in the shipping trade of Shanghai.

      The expenses incurred for the works and the general management of the under- taking are estimated at the annual sum of 460,000 Haikwan Taels for the first twenty years. This sum shall be supplied in equal portions by the Chinese Government and the foreign interests concerned. Detailed stipulations concerning the composition, duties and revenues of the Conservancy Board are embodied in Aunex No. 17.

Art. XII. An Imperial Edict of the 24th of July, 1901 (Annex No. 18), reformed the Office of Foreign Affairs, Tsungli Yamen, on the lines indicated by the Powers, that is to say, transformed it into a Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Wai Wu Pu, which takes precedence over the six other Ministries of State: the same Edict appointed the principal members of this Ministry.

An agreement has also been reached concerning the modification of Court Ceremonial as regards the reception of the Foreign Representatives, and has been the subject of several notes from the Chinese Plenipotentiaries, the substance of which has been embodied in a memorandum herewith annexed. (Annex No. 19.)

Finally it is expressly understood that as regards the declarations specified above and the annexed documents originating with the Foreign Plenipotentiaries, the French Text only is authoritative.

The Chinese Government having thus complied to the satisfaction of the Powers with the conditions laid down in the above-mentioned Note of December 22nd, 1900, the Powers have agreed to accede to the wish of China to terminate the situation created by the disorders of the summer of 1900. In consequence thereof the Foreign Plenipotentiaries are authorised to declare in the names of their Governments that, with the exception of the Legation guards mentioned in Article VII, the Interna- tional troops will completely evacuate the city of Peking on the 17th of September, 1901, and, with the exception of the localities mentioned in Article IX, will withdraw from the Province of Chihli on the 22nd of September, 1901.

     The present Final Protocol has been drawn up in twelve identical copies and signed by all the Plenipotentiaries of the contracting countries. One copy shall be given to each of the Foreign Plenipotentiaries, and one copy shall be given to the Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

(Signed)

Certified copy.

A. VON MUMM

M. CZIKANN

JOOSTENS

B. J. DE COLOGAN W. W. ROCKHILL

BEAU

ERNEST SATOW

SALVAGO RAGGI

JUTARO KOMURA

F. M. KNOBEL

M. DE GIERS

YI K'UANG

LI HUNG-CHANG

(Signed)

A. D'ANTHOUARD

B. KROUPENSKY

REGINALD TOWER

VON BOHLENUND HALBACK

TREATY

KOREA

OF ANNEXATION TO JAPAN

CONCLUDED 29TH AUGUST, 1910

DECLARATION

Notwithstanding the earnest and laborious work of reforms in the adminis- tration of Korea in which the Government of Japan and Korea have been engaged for more than four years since the conclusion of the agreement of 1905, the existing system of Government in that country has not proved entirely equal to the duty of preserving public order and tranquillity, and in addition a spirit of suspicion and misgiving dominates the whole peninsula. In order to maintain peace and stability in Korea, to promote the prosperity and welfare of Koreans and at the same time to ensure the safety and repose of foreign residents, it has been made abundantly clear that fundamental changes in the actual régime of Government are absolutely essential. The Government of Japan and Korea being convinced of the urgent necessity of introducing reforms respective to the requirements of the situation and of furnishing sufficient guarantees for the future, have, with the approval of His Majesty the Emperor of Korea, concluded through their respective plenipotentiaries a treaty providing for the complete aunexation of Korea to the Empire of Japan. By virtue of that important act, which shall take effect on its promulgation, the Imperial Government of Japan undertake the entire government and administration of Korea, and they hereby delare that the matters relating to foreigners and foreign trade in Korea shall be conducted in accordance with the following rules:-

P

1.--The Treaties hitherto concluded by Korea with Foreign Powers ceasing to be operative, Japan's existing treaties will, so far as practicable, be applied in Korea. Foreigners resident in Korea will, as far as conditions permit, enjoy the same rights and immunities as in Japan proper and the protection of their legally acquired rights, subject in all cases to the jurisdiction of Japan. The Imperial Government of Japan are ready to consent that the jurisdiction in respect of cases actually pend- ing in any foreign consular courts in Korea at the time the Treaty of Annexation takes effect shall remain in such courts until final decision.

2.--Independently of any conventional engagements formerly existing on the subject, the Imperial Government of Japan will for a period of ten years levy upon gods imported into Korea from foreign countries or exported from Korea to foreign countries and upon foreign vessels entering any of the open ports of Korea the same import or export duties and the same tonnage dues as under the existing schedules. The same import or export duties and tonnace dues as those to be levied upon the aforesaid goods and vessels will also for a period of ten years be applied in respect of goods imported into Korea from Japaù or exported from Korea to Japan and Japanese vessels.

3. The Imperial Government of Japan will also permit for a period of ten years vessels under the flags of Powers having treaties with Japan to engage in the coasting trade between the open ports of Korea and between those ports and any open ports of Japan.

      4.-The existing open ports of Korea, with the exception of Masampo, will be continued as open ports, and in addition Shinwiju will be newly opened, so that vessels foreign as well as Japanese will there be admitted and goods may be import- ed into and exported from those ports.

TREATY OF ANNEXATION TO JAPAN

TREATY

229

      His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of Korea, having in view the special and close relations between their respective countries, desiring to promote the common weal of the two nations and to assure permanent peace in the Extreme East, being convinced that these objects can be best attained by the annexation of Korea to the Empire of Japan, have resolved to conclude a treaty of such annexation and have for that purpose appointed as their plenipoten- tiaries, that is to say, His Majesty the Emperor of Japan Viscount Masakata Terauchi, His Resident General, and His Majesty the Emperor of Korea Ye Wan Yong, His Minister President of State, who upon mutual conference and deliberation have agreed to the following articles :-

      1. His Majesty the Emperor of Korea makes complete and permanent cession. to His Majesty the Emperor of Japan of all rights of sovereignty over the whole

of Korea.

2. His Majesty the Emperor of Japan accepts the concession mentioned in the preceding article and consents to the complete annexation of Korea to the Empire of Japan.

3.-His Majesty the Emperor of Japan will accord to their Majesties the Emperor and Ex-Emperor and His Imperial Highness the Crown Prince of Korea and their consorts and heirs such titles, dignity and honour as are appropriate to their respective ranks, and sufficient annual grants will be made for the maintenance of such titles, dignity and honour.

4.-His Majesty the Emperor of Japan will also accord appropriate honour and treatment to the members of the Imperial House of Korea and their heirs other than those mentioned in the preceding articles, and the funds necessary for the mainten- ance of such honour and treatment will be granted.

+

5.-His Majesty the Emperor of Japan will confer peerages and monetary grants upon those Koreans who on account of meritorious services are regarded as deserving such special recognition.

6.-In consequence of the aforesaid annexation the Government of Japan as- sume the entire government and administration of Korea and undertake to afford full protection for the persons and property of Koreans obeying the laws there in force and to promote the welfare of all such Koreans.

7. The Government of Japan will, so far as circumstances permit, employ in the public service of Japan in Korea those Koreans who accept the new régime loyally and in good faith and who are dully qualified for such service.

8. The treaty, having been approved by His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor or Korea, shall take effect from the date of its promulgation.

REGULATIONS UNDER WHICH BRITISH TRADE IS TO BE CONDUCTED IN COREA (CHOSEN).

I.-Entrance and Clearance of Vessels

1. Within forty-eight hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) after the arrival of a British ship in a Corean port, the master shall deliver to the Corean Customs authorities the receipt of the British Consul showing that he has deposited the ship's papers at the British Consulate, and he shall then make an entry of this ship by handing in a written paper stating the name of the ship, of the port from which she comes, of her master, the number, and, if required, the names of her passengers, her tonnage, and the number of her crew, which paper shall be certified by the master to be a true statement, and shall be signed by him. He shall, at the same time, deposit a written manifest of his cargo, setting forth the marks and numbers of the packages and their contents as they are described in the bills of lading, with the names of the persons to whom they are consigned. The master shall certify that this description is correct, and shall sign his name to the same. When a vessel has been duly entered, the Customs authorities will issue a permit to open hatches, which shall be exhibited to the Customs officer on board. Breaking bulk without having obtained such permission will render the master liable to a fine not exceeding one hundred Mexican Dollars.

2.-If any error is discovered in the manifest, it may be corrected within twenty- four hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) of its being handed in, without the payment of any fee; but for alteration or post entry to the manifest made after that time a fee of five Mexican dollars shall be paid.

3.-Any master who shall neglect to enter his vessel at the Corean Custom-house within the time fixed by this Regulation shall pay a penalty not exceeding fifty Mexican Dollars for every twenty-four hours that he shall so neglect to enter his ship.

4.-Any British vessel which remains in port for less than forty-eight hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) and does not open her hatches, also any vessel driven into port by stress of weather, or only in want of supplies, shall not be required to enter or pay tonnage dues so long as such vessel does not engage in trade.

       5. When the master of a vessel wishes to clear, he shall hand in to the Customs authorities an export manifest containing similar particulars to those given in the import manifest. The Customs authorities will then issue a clearance certificate and return the Consul's receipt for the ship's papers. These documents must be handed into the Consulate before the ship's papers are returned to the master.

6. Should any ship leave the port without clearing outwards in the manner above prescribed, the master shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding two hundred

Mexican Dollars.

7. British steamers may enter and clear on the same day, and they shall not be required to hand in a manifest except for such goods as are to be landed or transhipped at the port of entry.

II.-Landing and Shipping Cargo and Payment of Duties

      1.-The importer of any goods who desires to land them shall make and sign an application to that effect at the Custom-house, stating his own name, the name of the ship in which the goods have been imported, the marks, numbers, and contents of the packages and their values, and declaring that this statement is correct. The Customs authorities may demand the production of the invoice of each consignment of

REGULATIONS FOR BRITISH TRADE WITH COREA

231

merchandise. If it is not produced, or if its absence is not satisfactorily accounted for, the owner shall be allowed to land his goods on payment of double the Tariff duty, but the surplus duty so levied shall be refunded on the production of the invoice.

2.-All goods so entered may be examined by the Customs officers of the places appointed for the purpose. Such examination shall be made without delay or injury to the merchandise, and the packages shall be at once re-sorted by the Customs authorities to their original condition, in so far as may be practicable.

      3.--Should the Customs authorities consider the value of any goods paying an ad valorem duty as declared by the importer or exporter insufficient, they shall call upon him to pay duty on the value determined by an appraisement to be made by the Customs appraiser. But should the importer or exporter te dissatisfied with that appraisement, he shall within twenty-four hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) state his reasons for such dissatisfaction to the Commissioner of Customs, and shall appoint an appraiser of his own to make a re-appraisement. He shall then declare the value of the goods as determined by such re-appraisement. The Commissioner of Customs will thereupon, at his option, either assess the duty on the value deter- mined by this re-appraisement, or will purchase the goods from the importer or exporter at the price thus determined, with the addition of five per cent. latter case the purchase money shall be paid to the importer or exporter within five days from the date on which he has declared the value determined by his ownl appraiser.

In the

4.-Upou all goods damaged on the voyage of importation a fair reduction of duty shall be allowed, proportionate to their deterioration. If any disputes arise as to the amount of such reduction, they shall be settled in the manner pointed out in the preceding clause.

5. All goods intended to be exported shall be entered at the Corean Custom- house before they are shipped. The application to ship shall be made in writing, and shall state the name of the vessel by which the goods are to be exported, the marks and number of the packages, and the quantity, description, and value of the contents. The exporter shall certify in writing that the application gives a true account of all the goods contained herein, and shall sign his name thereto.

6.-No goods shall be landed or shipped at other places than those fixed by the Corean Customs authorities, or between the hours of sunset and sunrise, or on Sundays or holidays, without the special permission of the Customs authorities, who will be entitled to reasonable fees for the extra duty thus performed.

7.-Claims by importers or exporters for duties paid in excess, or by the Customs authorities for duties which have not been fully paid, shall be cutertained only when made within thirty days from the date of payment.

     8. No entry will be required in the case of provisions for the use of British ships, their crews and passengers, nor for the baggage of the latter which may be landed or shipped at any time after examination by the Customs officers.

9.-Vessels needing repairs may land their cargo for that purpose without the payment of duty. All goods so landed shall remain in charge of the Corean Autho- rities, and all just charges for storage, labour, and supervision shall be paid by the master. But if any portion of such cargo be sold, the duties of the Tariff shall be paid on the portion so disposed of.

     10.-Any person desiring to tranship cargo shall obtain a permit from the Customs authorities before doing so.

III.-Protection of the Revenue

1.-The Customs authorities shall have the right to place Customs officers on board any British merchant vessel in their ports. All such Customs officers shall have access to all parts of the ship in which cargo is stowed. They shall be treated with civility, and such reasonable accommodation shall be allowed to them as the ship affords.

2. The hatches and all other places of entrance into that part of the ship where cargo is stowed may be secured by the Corean Customs officers between the hours of sunset and sunrise, and on Sundays and holidays, by affixing seals, locks, or other

232

PROTOCOL TO TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND COREA

fastenings, and if any person shall, without due permission, wilfully open any entrance that has been so secured, or break any seal, lock, or other fastening that has been affixed by the Corean Customs officers, not only the person so offending, but the master of the ship also, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding one hundred Mexican Dollars.

      3.-Auy British subject who ships, or attempts to ship, or discharges, or attempts to discharge, goods which have not been duly entered at the Custom-house in the manner above provide 1, or packages containing goods different from those described in the import or export permit application, or prohibited goods, shall forfeit twice the value of such goods, and the goods shall be confiscated.

       4. Any person signing a false declaration or certificate with the intent to defraud the revenue of Corea shall be liable to a fine not exceeding two hundred Mexican dollars.

      5. Any violation of any provision of these Regulations, to which no penalty is specially attached therein, may be punished by a fine not exceeding one hundred Mexican dollars.

Note. All documents required by these Regulations, and all other communications addressed to the Corean Customs authorities, may be written in the English language.

[L.S.]

HARRY S. PARKES.

[L.S.]

MIN YONG-MOK.

COREAN TARIFF

IMPORTS

233

No.

Ad valorem

ARTICLE.

Rate of Duty. Per cent.

No.

ARTICLE.

1 Agricultural implements

2

Alum

3 Amber

A

5

Anchors and chains

Arms, ammuuition, fire-arms, fowling. pieces, or sidearms imported under special permit of the Corean Govern- ment for sporting purposes or for self- defence

6 Artificial flowers

7 Bamboo, split or not

Free

52

Fans, all kinds

5

53

Feathers, all kinds

20

54

Felt

...

55

Fire engines

56

Fireworks

57

Fish, fresh

58

dried and salted

59

Flax, hemp, and jute...

20

60

Flints

20

61

Floor rugs, all kinds

22 NO

62 Flour and meal, all kinds

Ad valorem Rate of Duty.

Per cent.

:

:

tin, copper, and all other kinds...

Fruit, fresh, all kinds

dried, salted, or preserved

8

Bark for tanning

63

Foil, gold and silver

9

Beaus, peas, and pulse, all kinds

64

10 Beer, porter, and cider

10

65

11 Beverages, such as lemonade, ginger-

66

beer, soda and mineral waters

7

67

12

Birds' nests ...

20

68

13

Blankets and rugs

74

14 Bones

15 Books, maps, and charts

16

Bricks and tiles

17 Bullion, being gold or silver refined

18 Buttons, buckles, hooks and eyes, &c. 19 Camphor, crude

20

refined

21

Candles

22 Canvas

23 Carmine

24 Carpets of jute, hemp, or felt, patent

tapestry

25 Carpets, superior quality, as Brussels, Kidderminster, and other kinds not enumerated

26 Carpots, velvet

27 Carriages...

28 Cement, as Portland and other kinds

30 Chemicals, all kinds...

31 Clocks and parts thereof

32 Clothing and wearing apparel, all kinds,

hats, boots and shoes, &c.

33 Clothing and wearing apparel made

wholly of silk...

5 69

Free 70 5 71 Free

772

Furniture of all kinds

Furs, superior, as sable, sea otter, seal,

otter, beaver, &c.

Gamboge

71

71

7}

Free

20

5

7)

74

7}

7}

Ginseng, red, white, crude, and clarified 20 Glass, window, plain and coloured, all

qualities

...

Glass, plate, silvered or unsilvered,

framed or unframed...

Glassware, all kinds...

:

Grasscloth, and all textiles in hemp,

jute, &c.

...

Guano and manures, all kinds Hair, all kinds except human

ornaments, gold and silver

...

Hides and skins, raw and undressed tanned and dressed

"

Horns and hoofs all kinds not otherwise

provided for

Incense sticks

India-rubber, manufactured or not

5

10 73

71 74

Glue

7 75

Grain and corn, all kinds

10

76

...

7 77

78

79

human...

10

: 80

***

11

20

81

29

Charcoal...

20 82 7 83 71

7 84

10

85

86

Isinglass, all kinds

...

7187

Ivory, manufactured or not

88

Jade-ware

10

89

Jewellery, real or imitation

34 Coal and coke

5

90

35

Cochineal

20

Kerosine, or petroleum, and other

minerial oils

36

Cocoons

791

Lacquered-ware, common ...

37 Coins, gold and silver

Free

92

superior

38

Confectioneries and sweetmeats, all kinds

10

93

Lamps, all kinds

20

94

Lanterns, paper...

795

5 96

74

7 97

71 98

7 99

48

400

7100 7 101

20

Enamel-ware

20

...

102

10

39 Coral, manufactured or not 40 Cordage and rope, all kinds and sizes... 41 Cotton, raw

42 Cotton manufacture, all kinds... 43 Cotton and woollen mixtures, all kinds 44 Cotton and silk mixtures, all kinds 45 Cutlery, all kinds

46 Drugs, all kinds

47 Dyes, colours, and paints, paint oils, and materials used for mixing paints Earthenware

49 Embroideries in gold, silver, or silk 50

51 Explosives used for mining, &c., and imported under special permit

Leather, all ordinary kinds, plain...

superior kinds, and stamped, figured, or coloured...

Leather manufactures, all kinds Lime

Linen, linen and cotton, linen and wool- len mixtures, linen and silk mixtures, all kinds

Matches

Matting, floor, Chinese, Japanese, coir,

&c., common qualities

Matting, superior qualities, Japanese

tatamis," &c.

103 Meat, fresh...

a-õ ganbba ööönbba naböna aa55 2 öND ÖNÜNÕNNGG

73

10

7}

234

COREAN TARIFF

105 Medicines, all kinds not otherwise

provided for

106 Metals, all kinds, in pig, block, ingot, slab, bar, rod, plate, sheet, hoop, strip, band and flat, T and angle-iron, old and scrap iron...

107 Metals, all kinds, pipe or tube, cor- rugated or galvanized, wire, steel, tin- plates, quicksilver, nickel, platina, German silver, yellow metal, tuten- auge or white copper, unrefined gold and silver

...

108 Metal manufactures, all kinds, as nails, screws, tools, machinery, railway plant,

and hardware...

109 Models of inventions

110 Mosquito netting, not made of silk

111

112 Musical boxes...

made of silk...

113 Musical instruments, all kinds

114 Musk

115 Needles and pins...

116

Oil-cake

117 Oils, vegetable, all kinds

:

No.

ARTICLE.

Ad valorem Rate of Duty.

No.

Per cent.

10

Meat, dried and salted...

71

5

5

154

155

ARTICLE.

Ad valorem Rate of Duty.

Per cent.

152 Silk manufactures, as gauze, crape, Japanese amber lustrings, satins, satin damasks, figured satins, Japanese white silk ("habutai")

...

153 Silk manufactures not otherwise pro-

vided for

Silk thread and floss silk in skein...

Soap, common qualities

156 Soap, superior qualities

157 Soy, Chinese and Japanese

158

Spectacles

159

Spices, all kinds

7

160

Spirits, in jars

161

Spirits and liqueurs, in wood or bottle,

all kinds

7}

162

Stationery and writing materials, all

Free

kinds, blank books, &c.

7

163

Stones and slate, cut and dressed...

10

164

10

...

10

165

Sugar candy

20

166

Sulphur

71

167

provisions

7/

168

Sugar, brown and white, all qualities,

molasses, and syrups...

Table stores, all kinds, and preserved

Tallow

7}

118 Oil, wood (Tung-yu)...

5

169

Tea

119 Oil, and floor cloth, all kinds

71

170

Telescopes and binocular glasses

120 Packing bags, packing matting, tea-

171

Tobacco, all kinds and forms...

lead, and ropes for packing goods Free

172

Tortoise shell, manufactured or not

121 Paper, common qualities

5

173

Tooth powder ...

:

122

all kinds, not otherwise provided

for

14

71

175

Trunks and portmanteaux

123 Paper, coloured, fancy,wall and hanging 124 Pearls

1C

20

in silk

125 Pepper, unground

5

177

Types, new and old

174 Travellers' baggage...

176 Twine and thread, all kinds, excepting

Free

...

126

Perfumes and scent

20

178

Umbrellas, paper

127 Photographic apparatus

10

179

cotton

128 Pictures, prints, photographs, engrav- ings, all kinds framed or unframed...

180

silk

"

10

181

Umbrella frames

129 Pitch and tar

5

182

Varnish

...

130

Plauks, soft

74

183

131

hard

10

184

""

132 Plants, trees and shrubs, all kinds

Free

185

Vermicelli

133 Plate, gold and silver

20

186

Vermilion

134 Plated-ware, all kinds...

10

187

Vegetables, fresh, dried, and salted

Velvet, silk...

Watches, and parts thereof in common

ΤΗ

135 Porcelain, common qualities

7}

metal, nickel, or silver

...

136

superior qualities

10

188

Watches, in gold or gilt

...

137 Precious stones, all kinds, set or unset

20

189

Wax, bees' or vegetable

138 Rattans, split or not

5

190

cloth...

""

139 Rhinoceros horns

20

191

140

Resin

7} 192

Wines in wood or bottle, all kinds Wood or timber, soft

...

141

Saddlery and harness

10

193

hard

"2

142

Salt

7}

194

143 Samples in reasonable quantities

Free

195

144 Sapanwood

145 Scales and balances..

146 Scented wood, all kinds

147 Scientific instruments, as physical, ma-

thematical, meteorological, and sur-

gical, and their appliances

148 Seals, materials for...

149

Sea products, as seaweed, bêche-de-mer,

&c.

150 Seeds, all kinds

7+

196

5

Wool, sheep's, raw...

Woollen manufactures, all kinds Woollen and silk mixtures,

kinds

:

::

:

all

71

20

197

Works of art

Eg nonëngët ögöagnögafa 88 NON 2 8 Nõõõ õ

71

7

74

71

7+

Free

198

Yarns, all kinds, in cotton, wool, hemp,

&c.

...

5

Free

...

10

151

Silk, raw, reeled, thrown, floss or waste

7}

བཙ

All unenumerated articles, raw or un-

manufactured... ...

5

All unenumerated articles, partly manu-

factured

7

All unenumerated articles, completely

manufactured...

10

COREAN TARIFF

         Foreign ships, when sold in Corea, will pay a duty of 25 cents per ton on sailing vessels, and 50 cents per tou on steamers.

Prohibited Goods.

Adulterated drugs or medicines.

         Arms, munitions, and implements of war, as ordnance, or cannon, shot and shell, firearms of all kinds, cartridges, side-arms, spears or pikes,

|

235

saltpetre, gunpowder, guucotton, dynamite, and other explosive substances.

The Corean authorities will grant special permits for the importation of arms, firearms, and ammunition for purposes of sport or self-defence on satisfactory proof being furnished to them of the bona fide character of the application.

Counterfeit coins, all kinds. Opium, except medicinal opium.

EXPORTS

CLASS I.

Duty-Free Export Goods.

Bullions, being gold and silver refined, Coins, gold and silver, all kinds, Plants, trees, and shrubs, all kinds. Samples in reasonable quantity. Traveller's baggage,

CLASS II.

All other native goods or productions not enumerated in Class I. will pay an ad valorem duty of five per cent.

bited.

The exportation of red ginseng is prohi-

RULES

         I. In the case of imported articles the ad valorem duties of this Tariff will be calculated on the actual cost of the goods at the place of production or fabrication, with the addition of freight, insurance, etc. In the case of export articles the ad valorem duties will be calculated on market values in Corea.

II.-Duties may be paid in Mexican dollars or Japanese silver yen.

       III. The above Tariff of import and export duties shall be converted, as soon as possible and as far as may be deemed desirable, into specific rates by agreement between the competent authorities of the

two countries.

[L.S.]

HARRY S. PARKES.

[L.S.]

MIN YONG-MOK.

TREATIES WITH JAPAN

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN

GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

SIGNED AT LONDON, 16TH JULY, 1894 Ratifications Exchanged at Tokyo, 25th August, 1894

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, being equally desirous of maintaining the relations of good understanding which happily exist between them, by extending and increasing the intercourse between their respective States, and being convinced that this object cannot better be accomplished than by revising the Treaties hitherto existing between the two countries, have resolved to complete such a revision, based upon principles of equity and mutual benefit, and, for that purpose, have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say :--

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, the Right Honourable John, Earl of Kimberley, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, &c., &c., Her Britannic Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs;

And His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Viscount Aoki Siuzo, Junii, First Class of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, His Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of St. James';

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :--

      Article I.-The subjects of each of the two High Contracting Parties shall have full liberty to enter, travel, or reside in any part of the dominions and possessions of the other Contracting Party, and shall enjoy full and perfect protection for their persons and property.

They shall have free and easy access to the Courts of Justice in pursuit and defence of their rights; they shall be at liberty equally with native subjects to choose and employ lawyers, advocates, and representatives to pursue and defend their rights before such Courts, and in all other matters connected with the administration of justice they shall enjoy all the rights and privileges enjoyed by native subjects.

In whatever relates to rights of residence and travel; to the possession of goods and effects of any kind; to the succession to personal estate, by will or otherwise, and the disposal of property of any sort in any manner whatsoever which they may lawfully acquire, the subjects of each Contracting Party shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other the same privileges, liberties, and rights, and shall be subject to no higher imposts, or charges in these respects than native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation. The subjects of each of the Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other entire liberty of conscience, and, subject to the Law, Ordinances, and Regulations, shall enjoy the right of private or public exercise of their worship, and also the right of burying their respective countrymen, according to their religious customs, in such suitable and convenient places as may be established and maintained for that purpose.

They shall not be compelled, under any pretext whatsoever, to pay any charges or taxes other or higher than those that are, or may be, paid by native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

      Article II.-The subjects of either of the Contracting Parties residing in the dominions and possessions of the other shall be exempted from all compulsory military service whatsoever, whether in the army, navy, national guards, or militia,

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

237

from all contributions imposed in lieu of personal service; and from all forced loan or military exactions or contributions.

Article III.-There shall be reciprocal freedom of commerce and navigation between the dominions and possessions of the two High Contracting Parties.

The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties may trade in any part of the dominions and possessions of the other by wholesale or retail in all kinds of produce, manufactures, and merchandize of lawful commerce, either in person or by agents, singly, or in partnerships with foreigners or native subjects: and they may there own or hire and occupy the houses, manufactories, warehouses, shops, and premises which may be necessary for them, and lease land for residential and commercial purposes, conforming themselves to the Laws, Police, and Customs. Regulations of the country like native subjects.

They shall have liberty to come with their ships and cargoes to all places, ports, and rivers in the dominions and possessions of the other which are or may be opened to foreign commerce, and shall enjoy, respectively, the same treatment, in matters of commerce and navigation, as native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation, without having to pay taxes, imposts, or duties, of whatever nature or under whatever denomination levied in the name or for the profit of the Government, public functionaries, private individuals, corporations, or establish- ments of any kind, other or greater than those paid by native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation, subject always to the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of each country.

Article IV. The dwellings, manufactories, warehouses, and shops of the subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties in the dominions and possessions of the other, and all premises appertaining thereto destined for purposes of residence or commerce, shall be respected.

It shall not be allowable to proceed to make a search of, or a domiciliary visit to, such dwellings and premises, or to examine or inspect books, papers, or accounts except under the conditions and with the forms prescribed by the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations for subjects of the country.

Article V.-No other or higher duties shall be imposed on the importation into the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty of any article, the produce or manufacture of dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, from whatever place arriving; and no other or higher duties shall be imposed on the importation into the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan of any article, the produce or manufacture of the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, from whatever place arriving than on the like article produced or manufactured in any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition be maintained or imposed on the importation of any article, the produce or manufacture of the dominious and possessions of either of the High Contracting Parties, into the dominions and possessions of the other, from whatever place arriving, which shall not equally extend to the importation of the like article, being the produce or manufacture of any other country. This last provision is not applicable to the sanitary and other prohibitions occasioned by the necessity of protecting the safety of persons, or of cattle, or of plants useful to agriculture.

Article VI.-No other or higher duties or charges shall be imposed in the dominions and possessions of either of the High Contracting Parties on the exporta- tion of any article to the dominions and possessions of the other than such as are, or may be, payable on the exportation of the like article to any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation of any article from the dominions and possessions of either of the two Contracting Parties to the dominions and possessions of the other which shall not equally extend to the exportation of the like article to any other country.

Article VII.-The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other exemptions from all transit duties and a perfect equality of treatment with native subjects in all that relates to warehousing, bounties, facilities, and drawbacks.

288

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

Article VIII.-All articles which are or may be legally imported into the ports of the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan in Japanese vessels may likewise be imported into those ports in British vessels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges of whatever denomination than if such articles were imported in Japanese vessels; and reciprocally, all articles which are or may be legally imported into the ports of the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty in British vessels may likewise be imported into those ports in Japanese vesssels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges of whatever denomination than if such articles were imported in British vessels. Such reciprocal equality of treatment shall take effect without distinction, whether such articles come directly from the place of origin or from any other places.

In the same manner there shall be perfect equality of treatment in regard to exportation, so that the same export duties shall be paid and the same bounties and drawbacks allowed in the dominions and possessions of either of the High Contract- ing Parties on the exportation of any article which is or may be legally exported therefrom, whether such exportation shall take place in Japanese or in British vessels, and whatever may be the place of destination, whether a port of either of the Contracting Parties or of any third Power.

Article IX. No duties of tonnage, harbour, pilotage, lighthouse, quarantine, or other similar or corresponding duties of whatever nature or under whatever denomination, levied in the name or for the profits of the Government, public functionaries, private individuals, corporations, or establishments of any kind, shall be imposed in the ports of the dominions and possessions of either country upon the vessels of the other country which shall not equally and under the same conditions be imposed in the like cases on national vessels in general, or vessels of the most favoured nation. Such equality of treatment shall apply reciprocally to the respective vessels, from whatever port or place they may arrive, and whatever may be their place of destination.

Article X.-In all that regards the stationing, loading, and unloading of vessels in the ports, basins, docks, roadsteads, harbours, or rivers of the dominions and possessions of the two countries, no privilege shall be granted to national vessels which shall not be equally granted to vessels of the other country; the intention of the High Contracting Parties being that in this respect also the respective vessels shall be treated on the footing of perfect equality.

Article XI.-The coasting trade of both the High Contracting Parties is excepted from the provisions of the present Treaty, and shall be regulated according to the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Japan and of Great Britain respec- tively. It is, however, understood that Japanese subjects in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, and British subjects in the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, shall enjoy in this respect the rights which are or may be granted under such Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations to the subjects or citizens of any other country.

     A Japanese vessel laden in a foreign country with cargo destined for two or more ports in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, and a British vessel laden in a foreign country with cargo destined for two or more ports in the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, may discharge a portion of her cargo at one port, and continue her voyage to the other port or ports of destination where foreign trade is permitted, for the purpose of landing the remainder of her original cargo there, subject always to the Laws and Custom- house Regulations of the two countries.

      The Japanese Government, however, agrees to allow British vessels to continue, as heretofore, for the period of the duration of the present Treaty, to carry cargo between the existing open ports of the Empire, excepting to or from the ports of Osaka, Niigata, and Ebisu-minato.

Article XII.-Any ship of war or merchant vessel of either of the High Contracting Parties which may be compelled by stress of weather, or by reason of any other distress, to take shelter in a port of the other, shall be at liberty to refit

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

239

therein, to procure all necessary supplies, and to put to sea again, without paying any dues other than such as would be payable by national vessels. In case, how- ever, the master of a merchant vessel should be under the necessity of disposing of a part of his cargo in order to defray the expenses, he shall be bound to conform to the Regulations and Tariffs of the place to which he may have come.

If any ship of war or merchant vessel of one of the Contracting Parties should run aground or be wrecked upon the coast of the other, the local authorities shall inform the Consul-General, Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Agent of the district of the occurrence, or if there be no such Consular officer, they shall inform the Consul-General, Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Agent of the nearest district.

       All proceedings relative to the salvage of Japanese vessels wrecked or cast on shore in the territorial waters of Her Britannic Majesty shall take place in accordance with the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Great Britain, and, reciprocally, all measures of salvage relative to British vessels wrecked or cast on shore in the territorial waters of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan shall take place in accordance with the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Japan.

      Such stranded or wrecked ship or vessel, and all parts thereof, and all furniture, and appurtenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and merchandise saved therefrom, including those which may have been cast into the sea, or the proceeds thereof, if sold, as well as all papers found on board such stranded or wrecked ship or vessel, shall be given up to the owners or their agents, when claimed by them. If such owners or agents are not on the spot, the same shall be delivered to the respective Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Consular Agents upon being claimed by them within the period fixed by the laws of the country, and such Consular officers, owners, or agents shall pay only the expenses incurred in the preservation of the property, together with the salvage or other expenses which would have been payable in the case of a wreck of a national vessel.

       The goods and merchandise saved from the wreck shall be exempt from all the duties of Customs unless cleared for consumption, in which case they shall pay the ordinary duties.

      When a ship or vessel belonging to the subjects of one of the Contracting Parties is stranded or wrecked in the territories of the other, the respective Consuls- General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents shall be authorized, in case the owner or master, or other agent of the owner, is not present, to lend their official assistance in order to afford the necessary assistance to the subjects of the respective states. The same rule shall apply in case the owner, master, or other agent is present, but requires such assistance to be given.

      Article XIII. All vessels which, according to Japanese law, are to be deemed Japanese vessels, and all vessels which, according to British law, are to be deemed British vessels, shall, for the purposes of this Treaty, be deemed Japanese and British vessels respectively.

Article XIV. The Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents of each of the Contracting Parties, residing in the dominions and possessions of the other, shall receive from the local authorities such assistance as can by law be given to them for the recovery of deserters from the vessels of their respective countries. It is understood that this stipulation shall not apply to the subjects of the country where the desertion takes place.

      Article XV. The High Contracting Parties agree that, in all that concerns commerce and navigation, any privilege, favour, or immunity which either Contract- ing Party has actually granted, or may hereafter grant to the Government, ships, subjects, or citizens of any other State, shall be extended immediately and uncondi- tionally to the Government, ships, subjects, or citizens of the other Contracting Party, it being their intention that the trade and navigation of each country shall be placed, in all respects, by the other on the footing of the most favoured nation.

Article XVI. Each of the High Contracting Parties may appoint Consuls- General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Pro-Consuls, and Consular Agents in all the ports,

240

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

cities, and places of the other, except in those where it may not be convenient to recognize such officers.

This exception, however, shall not be made in regard to one of the Contracting Parties without being made likewise in regard to every other Power.

The Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Pro-Consuls, and Consular Agents may exercise all functions, and shall enjoy all privileges, exemptions, and immunities which are or may hereafter be granted to Consular officers of the most favoured nation.

Article XVII. The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other the same protection as native subjects in regard to patents, trade marks, and designs, upon fulfilment of the formalities prescribed by law.

* Article XVIII.-Her Britannic Majesty's Government, so far as they are concerned, give their consent to the following arrangement :--

      The several foreign Settlements in Japan shall be incorporated with the respective Japanese Communes, and shall thenceforth form part of the general municipal system of Japan.

The competent Japanese authorities shall thereupon assume all municipal obligations and duties in respect thereof, and the common funds and property, if any, belonging to such Settlements, shall at the same time be transferred to the said Japanese authorities.

When such incorporation takes place existing leases in perpetuity under which property is now held in the said Settlements shall be confirmed, and no conditions whatsoever other than those contained in such existing leases shall be imposed in respect of such property. It is, however, understood that the Consular authorities mentioned in the same are in all cases to be replaced by the Japanese authorities.

      All lands which may previously have been granted by the Japanese Government free of rent for the public purposes of the said Settlements shall, subject to the right of eminent domain, be permanently reserved free of all taxes and charges for the public purposes for which they were originally set apart.

      Article XIX.-The stipulations of the present Treaty shall be applicable, so far as the laws permit, to all the Colonies and foreign possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, excepting to those hereinafter named, that is to say, except to-

The Dominion of Canada. † Newfoundland.

India. The Cape. Victoria.

Natal. Queensland.

New South Wales. Tasmania.

South Australia.

Western Australia.

New Zealand.

      Provided always that the stipulations of the present Treaty shall be made applicable to any of the above-named Colonies or foreign possessions on whose behalf notice to that effect shall have been given to the Japanese Government by Her Britannic Majesty's Representative at Tokyo within two years from the date of the exchange of ratifications of the present Treaty.

Owing to serious difference of opinion which arose between Japan of the one part and Great Britain, France and Germany of the other part regarding the interpretation of this clause with regard to leases held in perpetuity, an Arbitration Tribunal was appointed. The Governments of Germany, France and Great Britain named as Arbitrator M. Louis Renault, Professor of Law in the University of Paris and Legal Adviser to the Department of Foreign Affairs, and Japan named as Arbitrator His Excellency Itchiro Motono, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, at Paris, Doctor of Law. M. Gregers Gram, formerly Norwegian Minister of State, was chosen by the Arbitrators as Umpire. The Tribunal sat at the Hague, and on May 22nd, 1905, decided by a majority of votes and declared that: "The provisions of the Treaties and other engagements mentioned in the Protocols of Arbitration exempt not only the land held in virtue of the leases in perpetuity granted by or on behalf of the Government of Japan, but they exempt the land and buildings of every description constructed or which may hereafter be constructed on such land from all imposts, taxes, charges, contributions or conditions whatsoever, other than those expressly stipulated in the leases in question." Mr. Motono recorded his entire disagreement with the decision.

      + On January 31st, 1906, an agreement was signed in Tokyo making the Stipulations of this Treaty applicable to the Dominion of Cana·la.

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

241

Article XX. The present Treaty shall, from the date it comes into force, be substituted in place of the Conventions respectively of the 23rd day of the 8th month of the 7th year of Kayai, corresponding to the 14th day of October, 1854, and of the 13th day of the 5th month of the 2nd year of Keiou, corresponding to the 25th day of June, 1866, the Treaty of the 18th day of the 7th month of the 5th year of Ansei, corresponding to the 26th day of August, 1858, and all Arrangements and Agreements subsidiary thereto concluded or existing between the High Con- tracting Parties; and from the same date such Conventions, Treaty, Arrangements and Agreements shall cease to be binding, and, in consequence, the jurisdiction then exercised by British Courts in Japan, and all the exceptional privileges, exemp tions, and immunities then enjoyed by British subjects, as a part of or appurtenant to such jurisdiction, shall absolutely and without notice cease and determine, and thereafter all such jurisdiction shall be assumed and exercised by Japanese Courts.

Article XXI. The present Treaty shall not take effect until at least five years after its signature. It shall come into force one year after His Imperial Japanese Majesty's Government shall have given notice to Her Britannic Majesty's Govern- ment of its wish to have the same brought into operation. Such notice may be given at any time after the expiration of four years from the date hereof. The Treaty shall remain in force for the period of twelve years from the date it goes into operation.

Either High Contracting Party shall have the right, at any time after cleven years shall have elapsed from the date this Treaty takes effect, to give notice to the other of its intention to terminate the same, and at the expiration of twelve months after such notice is given this Treaty shall wholly cease and determine.

Article XXII. The present Treaty shall be ratified, and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Tokyo as soon as possible, and not later theu six months from the present date.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

       Done at London, in duplicate, this sixteenth day of the seventh month of the twenty-seventh year of Meiji.

PROTOCOL.

[L.S.] [L.S.]

KIMBERLEY. AOKI.

The Government of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland and Empress of India, and the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, deeming it advisable in the interests of both countries to regulate certain special matters of mutual concern, apart from the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation sigued this day have, through their respective Plenipotentiaries, agreed upon the following stipula- tions:-

Bul

1.-It is agreed by the Coutracting Parties that one month after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day, the Import Tariff hereunto annexed shall, subject to the provisions of Article XXIII. of the Treaty of 1858 at present subsisting between the Contracting Parties, as long as the said Treaty remains in force and thereafter, subject to the provisions of Articles V. and XV. of the Treaty signed this day, be applicable to the articles therein enumerated, being the growth, produce, or manufacture of the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, upon importation into Japan. nothing contained in this Protocol, or the Tariff hereunto annexed, shall be held to limit or qualify the right of the Japanese Government to restrict or to prohibit the importation of adulterated drugs, medicines, food, or beverages, indecent or obscene prints, paintings, books, cards, lithographic or other engravings, photographs, or any other indecent or obscene articles; articles in violation of patent, trade-mark, or copy-right laws of Japan, or any other article which for sanitary reasons, or in view of public security or morals, might offer any danger.

-242 SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

      The ad valorem duties established by the said Tariff shall, so far as may be deemed practicable, be converted into specific duties by a supplementary Convention, which shall be concluded between the two Governments within six months from the date of this Protocol; the medium prices, as shown by the Japanese Customs Returns during the six calendar months preceding the date of the present Protocol, with the addition of the cost of insurance and transportation from the place of purchase, production or fabrication, to the port of discharge, as well as commission, if any, shall be taken as the basis for such conversion. In the event of the Supplementary Convention not having come into force at the expiration of the period for the said Tariff to take effect, ad valorem duties in conformity with the rule recited at the end of the said Tariff shall, in the meantime, be levied.

      In respect of articles not enumerated in the said Tariff, the General Statutory Tariff of Japan for the time being in force shall, from the same time, apply, subject, as aforesaid, to the provisions of Article XXIII. of the Treaty of 1858 and Articles V. and XV. of the Treaty signed this day respectively.

From the date the Tariffs aforesaid take effect, the Import tariff now in opera- tion in Japan in respect of goods and merchandise imported into Japan by British subjects shall cease to be binding.

      In all other respects the stipulations of the existing Treaties and Conventions shall be maintained unconditionally until the time when the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day comes into force.

2.-The Japanese Government, pending the opening of the country to British subjects, agrees to extend the existing passport system in such a manner as to allow British subjects, on the production of a certificate of recommendation from the British Representative in Tokyo, or from any of Her Majesty's Consuls at the open ports in Japan, to obtain upon application passports available for any part of the country, and for any period not exceeding twelve months, from the Imperial Japanese Foreign Office in Tokyo, or from the chief authorities in the Prefecture in which an open port is situated; it being understood that the existing Rules and Regulations governing British subjects who visit the interior of the Empire are to be maintained. 3. The Japanese Government undertakes, before the cessation of British Consular jurisdiction in Japan, to join the International Conventions for the Pro- tection of Industrial Property and Copyright.

      4. It is understood between the two High Contracting Parties that, if Japan thinks it necessary at any time to levy an additional duty on the production or manufacture of refined sugar in Japan, an increased customs duty equivalent in amount may be levied on British refined sugar when imported into Japan, so long as such additional excise tax or inland duty continues to be raised.

Provided always that British refined sugar shall in this respect be entitled to the treatment accorded to refined sugar being the produce or manufacture of the most favoured nation.

5.-The undersigned Plenipotentiaries have agreed that this Protocol shall be submitted to the two High Contracting Parties at the same time as the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day, and that when the said Treaty is ratified the agreements contained in the Protocol shall also equally be considered as approved, without the necessity of a further formal ratification.

      It is agreed that this Protocol shall terminate at the same time the said Treaty ceases to be binding.

     In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same, and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

      Done at London, in duplicate, this sixteenth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four.

[L.S.] KIMBERLEY. [L.S.] AKOI.

     [In place of the Tariff above referred to we give in the following pages the Tariff officially promulgated in 1906, which embodies all the changes effected by Treaties with other Powers.]

DRAFT CUSTOMS TARIFF LAW.

       Article I.-Customs duties shall be imposed according to the annexed Tariff upon articles imported from foreign countries.

      Article II.-Duty upon an article subject to ad valorem duty shall be levied according to the value thereof at the time of its arrival at the port of importation.

Article III.-With regard to those articles in respect of which it is found advisable to convert the ad valorem daties into specific duties, such conversion may be made by Imperial Ordinance on the basis of the average values for a period of not

less than six months.

       Articles enumerated in the annexed Tariff may be further classified or their gross weight may be taken, in determining the rates of the specific duties mentioned in the preceding paragraph

Article IV. With regard to articles, the produce or manufacture of the regions which do not enjoy the benefit of special conventional arrangements, a benefit not exceeding the limits provided for in those arrangements may, by Imperial Ordinance designating the regions and articles, be extended to such articles, if necessary.

Article V.-With respect to articles, the produce or manufacture of a country in which vessels, or pro luce or manufacture of Japan are subjected to less favourable treatment than those of other countries, the articles of such country may be designated by Imperial Ordinance, which shall be liable to Customs duties not exceeding in amount the value of such articles in addition to the duties prescribed in the annexed Tariff.

Article VI.-Iu respect of articles on which an export bounty is granted in foreign countries, a Customs duty of the same amount as the said bounty may be imposed by Imperial Ordinance in addition to the duty prescribed in the annexed Tariff.

Article VII. The following articles are exempted from import duty:- 1.-Articles for the use of the Imperial Household;

www.

       2.-Articles belonging to chiefs of foreign States, their families, and suites, visiting Japan;

3.-Arms, ammunition, and explosives imported by the Army or the Navy; 4.--Mmeral oils, imported for use as fuel by the Army or the Navy, with a specific gravity exceeding 0.875 at 15 degrees Centigrade;

5. -Warships;

       6.-Articles for personal use of foreign Ambassadors and Ministers accredited to Japan and articles for official use of foreign Embassies and Legations in Japan;

7.-Articles for personal use of the members of the Embassies and Legations in Japan of those countries which exempt from Customs duty the articles for personal use of the members of the Japanese Embassies and Legations in such countries and articles for official use of the Consulates in Japan of those countries which exempt from Customs duty the articles for official use of the Japanese Consulates in such countries;

8.--Orders, decorations, medals, and badges conferred upon persons resident in this country;

9.-Records, documents and others papers;

10.-Articles imported as specimens or objects of reference which are to be exhibited in Government or public schools, museums, commercial museums, and other institutions ;

11.---Articles contributed for the purpose of charity or relief;

12.-Government monopoly articles imported by the Government;

13. Samples of merchandise which are only fit to be used as such;

14.-Travellers' effects, and tools and instruments of professional necessity to travellers, in so far as they correspond to the social status of such travellers and are recognised as reasonable by the Customs;

15.-Articles sent back by Japanese military or naval forces and warships abroad; 16.-Effects of persons changing their residences provided that such effects have already been used;

DRAFT CUSTOMS TARIFF LAW.

17.-Exported articles which are re-imported within five years without any change in the character and form as at the time of exportation, excepting, however, alcohol, alcoholic liquors, sugar, and articles which were exempted from import duty or granted a drawback thereof under Art. VIII. or Art. IX;

18. Receptacles of exported goods designated by ordinance when such re- ceptacles are re-imported;

      19.-Fish, shell-fish, mollusca, sea-animals, seaweeds, and other aquatic products caught or gathered by vessels which set out for the purpose from Japan, and their manufactures of simple process, provided that they are imported by the same vessels or vessels attached thereto;

20.-Articles for ship's use delivered in open ports to warships and vessels bound for foreign countries;

21.-Wreckages and equipments of shipwrecked Japanese vessels;

22.-Exported goods shipped by vessels which cleared Japanese ports, and brought back on account of the shipwreck of such vessels;

      23.-Horses, cattle, swine, sheep, and poultry, for breeding imported by the State and pre'ectures, and horses and cattle for breeding imported by associations of horse or cattle breeding.

Article VIII.-The following articles are exempted from import duty if they are to be re-exported within one year from the date of importation, provided that security corresponding in amount to the duty is deposited at the time of im- portation:

      1.-Articles imported for the purpose of having work done thereon, which are designated by ordinance;

2.-Receptacles of imported goods, designated by ordinance;

3. Articles imported for repair;

4. Articles imported for the purpose of scientific research; 5.-Articles imported as articles for trial;

6.-Samples imported for the purpose of collecting orders;

7.-Articles imported for use in theatrical and other performances.

      Article IX.-When articles designated by ordinance have been manufactured with imported raw materials and are exported to foreign countries, the whole or part of the import duty on such materials may be refunded in a manner to be determined by ordinance.

When manures designated by ordinance have been manufactured with imported raw materials, the whole or part of the duty on such materials may be refunded in a manner to be determined by ordinance.

Any person who obtains or attempts to obtain fraudulently or illegally the refundment mentioned in the preceding two paragraphs shall be dealt with accord- ing to the provision of Art. LXXV. of the Customs Duties Law.

Article X.-Imported manufactured articles which are furnished or fitted up in a vessel which is constructed in Japan are exempted from import duty if they are exported together with such vessel within two years from the date of importation provided that security corresponding in amount to the duty is deposited at the time of importation.

Article XI.-The importation of the articles specified hereunder is prohibited:- 1.-Opium and utensils for smoking opium, excepting those imported by the Government;

2.-Counterfeit, altered, or imitation coins, paper money, bauk notes, and negotiable papers;

3.-Books, pictures, carvings, and other articles injurious to public security or

morals;

     4.-Articles which infringe rights in patents, utility models, designs, and trade- marks and copyrights.

SUPPLEMENTARY ARTICLE.

Article XII. The date at which the present Law will be put in operation shall be determined by Imperial Ordinance.

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN.

Articles.

GROUP I.- Plants and Animals (Living).

Plants, twigs, stems, stalks and roots (for planting or

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

1

grafting

free

2

Fungi for cultura:

1. Yeast.

A. Pressed

100 kins

2.60

:..

B. Other

free

2. Saccharifying fungi, known as Koji"

"6

ad val.

20%

3. Other

free

3456789

Horses

"

5%

Bulls, oxen and cows

وو

10,,

Sheep

骨骼

Goats

Swine

Poultry

Fish, shellfish and mollusca:

1. Fry and roes...

per head

ad val.

3.00

2.30

""

20%

A

20,

2. Other

10

Bees...

11

All other live animals...

...

25

free 20%

10,

"

20,

GROUP II.-Grains, Flours, Starches and Seeds.

12

Rice and paddy

13

Barley

14

Pearl barley

15

Malt...

16

Wheat

17

Oats...

18

Millet, Italian or German

19

Millet, common (Panicum miliaceum)

20

Indian corn

21

Beans and pease:

100 kins

0.64

0.42

4.00

12

2.20

"}

0.60

""

0.65

0.50

35

0.35

35

0.30

**

...

22

5. Sago

...

***

23

24

1. Soja beans

2. Red or white beans, small (Phaseolus subtrilobata)

3. Beans (Victa faba)

4. Green beans, smalí (Phaseolus radiatus).....

5. Pease (Pisum sativum)

6. Ground nuts:

A. Unshelled B. Other

7. Other

Flours, meals or groats of grains and starches:

1. Wheat flour

2. Oatmeal...

3. Corn meal

...

4. Tapioca and manioca

6. Other

Sesame seed

Seeds of Perilla ocimoides

0.50

"

AAAAA

0.50

0.40

0.50

0.45

0.80

""

0.95

23

0.45

1.65

"

5.00

>>

3.15

"

1.05

...

"

2.00

""

1.65

""

1.00

"

0.85

35

25

Rape Seed

0.65

26

Linseed

0.65

27

Cotton seed

0.10

***

""

28

Ivory nuts

free

29

Cocoa nuts

0.70

""

30

All other grains and seeds...

ad val.

i

15%

246

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

No.

Articles.

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

31

32

GROUP III.-Beverages, Comestibles and Tobacco.

Vegetables, fruits and nuts:

1. Preserved with sugar, molasses, syrup or honey (in-

cluding receptacles)

2. Other.

A.-Vegetables:

1. Preserved in tin

2.

3.

4. Other

A. Fresh

B. Dried

C. Other

""

bottle jar

B.-Other:

1. Preserved in tin

bottle

2.

"

"

3.

"

jar

A. Fresh fruits

B. Dried

""

C. Nuts

Tea:

D. Other

1. Black tea

2.

dust tea

"

...

:

*

...

***

...

Yen.

100 kins

12.70

including receptacles

7.90

35

7.60

JJ

"

35

1.95

"

...

ad val.

30%

...

... including receptacles

***

""

"

...

...

...

...

33

34

3. Other

Maté and other tea substitutes

Coffee:

1. In the bean

2. Other

35

36

...

...

Chicory and other coffee substitutes

Cocoa (not sugared):

1. In the bean

2. Other

37

888

38

Pepper:

1. In the seed

2. Other

Curry:

1. In powder

2. Other

39

Mustard:

1. In powder

2. Other

40

Sugar:

41

42

43

44

45

47

48

49

::

||

100 kins

7.25

8.50

>>

3.20

"}

4.00

6.90

"

7.85

ad val.

30%

100 kins

22.60

6.80

6.00

"

ad val.

45%

:

100 kins

15.10. 25.10

ad val.

45%

100 kins

6.00

...

***

including receptacles

... including receptacles

including receptacles

43.00

9.35

...

22

11.70

"

""

ad val.

21.10 40%

...

...

including receptacles

100 kins

8.35

ad val.

40%

...

100 kins

2.50

3.10

...

"

3.35

...

""

4.25

"

4.65

21

7.40

"

D

1. Under No. 11 Dutch standard 2. Under No. 15 Dutch standard 3. Under No. 18 Dutch standard 4. Under No. 21 Dutch standard 5. Other Rock candy sugar, cube sugar, loaf sugar, and similar sugar Molasses:

*

...

...

...

1. Containing not more than 60% by weight of sugar

calculated as cane sugar

2. Other

***

...

...

...

Grape sugar, malt sugar and "Ame" Honey

Confectioneries, and cakes...

1.30

2.50

"

13.65

"

including receptacles

7.20

"

32.00

...

...

"

17.50

"

13.30

"

7.90

Jams, fruit jellies and the like... Biscuits (not sugared)

Macaroni, vermicelli and the like

Fruit juices and syrups:

1. Fruit-juices (sugared) and syrups:

A. In bottle or tin B. Other

***

J

""

"

... including receptacles

15.30

""

10.70

"

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

247

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

2223

52

385888 7883

  2. Other Vinegar

Note.-Vinegar containing more than 10 grammes of acetic acid in 100 cubic centimetres at 15° C. is subject to an additional duty at the rate of 3 yen per 100 litres (3.33d. per gallon) for every ad- ditional one gramme of acetic acid.

Meats, poultry, game, fish, shellfish and mollusca:

1. Fresh:

A. Beef

B. Mutton

C. Other

2. Preserved in tin, bottle or jar:

A. Meats, poultry and game.. B. Fish, shellfish and mollusca:

a. Sardines in oil

b. Other

3. Other:

A. Sausiges

B. Ham and bacon

C. Salted meats

D. Salted whale meat:

a. Tail meat

b. Other

E. Salted fish

F. Other

Butter, artificial butter and ghee

:

:

::

Yen.

50

  2. Other Sauces:

. including receptacles 100 kins

11.00

1. In cask

8.25

including receptacles

وو

وو

11.00

51

100 litres

13.90

100 kins

3.80

6.00

"

ad val.

30%

35

>

40 "

""

"

40,

100 kins

17.00

16 20

5.65

21

3.60

1.90

22

2.00

"

ad val.

30%

100 kins

29.60

54

55

56

67

Cheese

20.50

""

Condensed milk

including receptacles

11.10

"

Infant foods

24.30

93

"

Meat extract...

72.50

Peptone, somatose, hemoglobin and similar tonic foods

ad val.

35%

59

Eggs, fresh

100 kins

6.00

60

Mineral waters, soda water and similar beverages, not con-

taining sugar or alcohol ...

100 litres

16.00

61

Saké

17.00

"

62

Chinese liquors, fermented

17.00

"

63

Beer, ale, porter and stout

12.00

وو

61

Wines of all kinds :

40.00

88

65

1. In bottle

2. In other receptacles:

A. Containing not more than 14% by volume of

pure alcohol:

a. Containing not more than 1 gramme of sugar calculated as grape sugar in 100 cubic centimetres at 15° C...

b. Other

B. Other

...

...

Note.-Those containing more than 20 grammes of sugar calculated as grape sugar in 100 cubic cen- timetres at 15° C. are subject to an additional duty at the rate af 25 sen per 100 litres (0.28d. per gallon) for every additional one gramme of sugar.

Champagne and other sparkling wines

...

12.00

20.00

"

30.00

"

100.00

248

No.

66

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

Alcoholic liquors, not otherwise provided for:

1. Containing not more than 7% by volume of pure alcohol which has a specific gravity of 0.7917 at 15° C.

2. Other:

A. In bottle

B. In other receptacles

Note. Those containing more than 50% by volume of pure alcohol which has a specific gravity of 0.7947 at 15° C. are subject to an additional duty at the rate of 1 yen per 100 litres (1.11d. per gallon) for every additional 1% of pure alcohol.

Beverages and comestibles, not otherwise provided for:

+88

67

1. Sugared...

2. Other

68

Tobacco:

1. Cigars, cigarettes and cut tobacco

2. Chewing tobacco...

3. Snuff

4. Other

GROUP IV. Skins, Hairs, Bones, Horns, Teeth,

Tusks, Shells, &c.

2. Other

69

Furs:

1. Of sheep and goats

22

70

71

Fur manufactures, not otherwise provided Hide and skins, animal, raw:

1. Of bulls, oxen, cows and buffaloes

2. Of deer

...

3. Of red deer (Cervus Elaphus)

4. Waste

5. Other

72

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 litres

20.00

110.00

€0.00

ad val.

35

60% 40,,

355

""

1 kin

2.23

5.17

*

ad val.

355%

...

100 kins ad val.

9.40 40%

"

50 "

100 kins

1.70

1.90

"

1.25

"

free

ad val.

5%

Leather:

1. Of bulls, oxen, cows, buffaloes, horses, sheep and goats:

A. Lacquered, japanned or enamelled.....

B. Dyed or coloured (excluding roller leather

C. Other:

I. Of bulls, oxen, cows, buffaloes and horses:

a. Sole leather

b. Tanned hide, known as "Indian blood

leather"

c. Other

II. Of sheep and goats:

a. Roller leather

b. Other

...

2. Of chamois (including imitation chamois leather)

3. Of swine...

4. Of alligators:

A. Each weighing not more than 150 grammes B. Other

5. Of lizards

6. Waste

22

"

2220

"

100 kins

15.20

...

9.50

"

ad val.

20%

100 kins

69.00

24.00

"

...

""

74.40

30.60

"

207.00

"

113 00 394.00

J

9.20

"

ad val.

20%

100 kins

37.20

88.80

""

7. Other

333

73

1.

Manufactures of leather, not otherwise provided for:

elts, belting, and hoses, for machinery

2. Sweat leathers for hats (including those made of

imitation leather)

...

!

I

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

3, Other:

4. Combined with precious metals, metals coat d with precious metals, precious stones, semi- precious stones, pearls, corals, elephant's ivery, or tortoise-shells

Hairs, animal, not otherwise provided for

Manufactures of feathers or bird's skin with feathers, not

B. Other

75

RE

74

Feathers and downs:

1. For ornament

2. Other

RE FROZ

76

Bird's skins with feathers

77

otherwise provided for

...

78

Quill bristles...

79

80

Tusks, animal

81

1. Of elephants' ivory

Bores, animal, excluding those for medicinal use..

Manufactures of animal tusks, not otherwise provided for:

2. Other

Animal horns, excluding those for medicinal use...

82

*****

83

Hoofs, animal

84

Sinews, animal

85

Bladder...

86 Shells of mollusca

87

Tortoise-shells:

1. Shells of hawkbill:

A. Dorsal and marginal shells

B. Other

...

...

2. Shells of loggerhead or of green turtle known as

"Wako":

A. Dorsal shells

B. Marginal shells

C. Other

3. Waste

4. Other

...

Tortoise-shell manufactures, not otherwise provided for

***

Coral manufactures, not otherwise provided for

88

!

89

Corals

90

91

Pearls

92

ponges :

1. Prepared

2. Other

:

93

91

95

90

97

Unit.

ad val.

"

249

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

50%

40

"

free

40%

13

19

20

free

"

50% free

J

>>

"

30%

40

free

"

""

10% free

100 kins

134.00 16.70

5.35

""

1.30

"

16.70

19

7.95

21

ad val.

10%

50

39

40

"2

29

50

·

39

"

5

""

J

100 kins

181.00 9.20

ad val.

10%

40,

"

Skin, hair, bones, horns, teeth, tusks, shells, not otherwise

provided for (excluding those for medicinal use,

Manufactures of skin, hair, bone, horn, teeth, tusk, shell,

not otherwise provided for

GROUP V.-Oils, Fats, Waxes, and Manufactures thereof.

Volatile oils, vegetable:

1. Fragrant

2. Other:

A. Of turpentine:

a. In cans or barrel

b. Other

B. Other...

Linseed oil:

1. In cans or barrel:

4. Boiled

B. Other

2. Other

Castor eil:

1. In can, barrel or jars

2. Other

444

free

100 kins ad val.

5.20

20%

*

"

20 "

100 kins

3.00

1.60

"

ad val.

20%

::

::

100 kins

ad val.

77

2.20 20%

250

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

98

Olive oil:

1. In can or barrel

100 kins

1.70

2. Other

including receptacles

9.59

21

99

Cocoa-nut oil...

1.50

100

Ground nut oil

4 65

93

101

Soja bean oil...

1.40

"

102

Cotton seed oil

4.45

"

103

Wood oil, obtained from the seeds of Aleurites cordata

1.90

101

Camellia cil

4.90

105

Cacao butter

1

18.30

19

100

Cod-liver oil

*

10.30

107

Fish oil and whale oil...

1.30

"

108

Fats, animal:

1. Lard

""

9.00

2. Other

0.80

""

109

Compound lard

110

Stearin

111

Olein

112

Mineral oils :

1. Crude:

7.70

"

4.50

1.70

Distillates between 120° and 275° by frational

distillation:

A. Not exceeding 20 % by volume ...

A.BCDE.H

25

"

JJ "

"

30

"

"

JI

33

21

35

"

33

40

"

"

*J

10 Am. gals.

0.17

0.21

"

0.25

**

0.29

0.33

0.30

F. Other...

Note. Those containing more than 45% are subject to an additional duty at the rate of 1 sen per 10 American gallons (0.30d. per 10 Imperial gallons)į for every additional 1%

2. Other, including lubricating oils containing animal and vegetable oils or fats, soaps, &c., of a specific gravity at 15' C.:

A. Not exceeding 0.730

B.

1)

C. Other

"

0.875

0.50

""

0.96

100 king

1.23

2.95

free

3.45

"

"

6.00 11.00

"

28.60

1. Melting point up to 42° C.

113

Vaseline

114

Paraffin wax:

2. Other

115

116

117

Soaps :

118

119

120

121

Vegetable tallow or wax, obtained from the seeds of Still-

  ingia sebifera, Rhus vernicifera or Rhus succedanea Candles

1. Perfumed (including inner packings) 2. Other

Perfumed oils, fats, and waxes, and preparations of per- fumed oil, fat or wax (including receptacles and inner packings)

Perfumed waters (including receptacles and inner packings. Oils, fats, and waxes, not otherwise provided for... Manufactures of oil, fat, and wax, not otherwise provided for

GROUP VI.-Drugs, Chemicals, Medicines, Compounds or Preparations thereof, and Explosives.

 Hops Liquorice

122

123

124

Saffron

...

***

...

4

***

404

:

* A

5.70

"

""

ad val.

78.00 90.00 20%

30,

21

100 kins

free 2.00

422.00

i

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

...

...

125

Ipecacuanha root...

126

Ginseng

127

Cassia and cinnamon bark...

128

Cinchona bark

129

Ryutan or gentian root

***

130

Rhubarb...

*

131

Semen cync

132

Senega root

133

Ergot of rye

134

Musk

135

Artificial musk

136

Nard or spikenard

137

Cloves

138

139

140

Unit.

251

Proposed Rate of Duty

Yen.

100 kins

82.00

ad val.

20%

20

100 kins

6.65

2.85

"

2.60

"

6.70

J

19.40

دو

14.30

1 kin

101.00

100 kins

81.50

4.80

"

6.10

"3

69.30

"

5.15

>>

free

0.50

"

25.00

free

Agalwood or aloeswood

Sandal wood

Galls, myrobalans, betel nuts, oak bark, mimosa bark, mangrove bark, chips or scraps of quebracho wood and similar tanning materials

Catechu and other tanning extracts

141

142

Balsam

143

144

Crude indiarubber, crude gutta percha, and substitutes

thereof

Gum arabic, shellac, rosin and other guins and gum resins, not otherwise provided for (excluding those for medicinal use)

145

Glue...

1.4

...

将咖啡

146

Gelatin

147

Isinglass...

148

Dextrin

149

Sulphur

150

*

Phosphorus, yellow and red or amorphous

151

Iodine

152

Zinc dust

...

153

Acid, boric

154

acetic

155

oxalic

"

+

156

"

157

158

159

71

tartaric salicylic carbolic picric

...

100

citric

"

161

:..

162

163

2.70

"

10.20

وار

"

40.90 1.15

**

ad val.

20%

free

100 kins

135.00

1.50

3.20

"

8.00

"

2.00

""

11.90

"1

11.60

"

6.00

ور

ad val.

20%

100 kins

18.40

...

"

144,00

20.70

:::

7.25

22

0.70

***

""

155.00

0,35

ན ན བ རྒྱུ

23

0.80

0,95

4,60

2.30

***

164

165

pyrogallic tannic...

Soda, caustic, and potash, caustic:

1. Refined

2. Other

lodide of soda

Soda, carbonate of :

1. Soda ash

2. Other

Soda, bicarbonate of

166

167

"

168

169

peroxide of...

:::

Nitrate of soda (Chili saltpetre):

1. Refined

2. Other

Soda sulphate of:

1. Refined

2. Other

44

Soda, borate of (borax)

170

171

silicate of

"

172

**

173

174

salicylate of

***

Cyanide of soda and cyanide of potash Potash, nitrate of (saltpetre)

⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀

***

*

...

...

::

::

:

22

free

ad val.

20%

100 kins

0.45

1,00

J

0.35

"

14.10

*

free 2.35

>>

7*

252

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

175

Potash, sulphate of :

1, Refined

***

2. Other

176

Potash, chlorate of

177

""

178

iodide of

23

179

180

181

182

Alum

183

184

>

185

13

of potash

186

187

188

189

ad val.

20%

free

bichromate of...

bromide of

Magnesium, carbonate of

Barium, peroxide of

Ferro-cyanide of soda...

100 kins

1.80

122.00

J

"

10.00

2.50

35

22

2.50

"}

0.45

2.05

ad val.

10%

100 kins

2.70

5.60

ور

"

  Bismuth, sub-nitrate of Ammonium, chloride of

1. Refined

2. Other

sulphate of:

Ammonium, carbonate of

Thorium, nitrate of

**

...

...

"

81.10

:

2.30

وو

ad val.

20%

free

"

Wood spirit or methyl alcohol Alcohol

Denatured alcohol

22

190

191

192

Cerium,

193

Calcium, acetate of

194

Acetone

195

Formalin

196

197

198

199

Glycerine

200

Chloroform

201

Iodoform...

202

Milk sugar

203

204

205

206

207

Antipyrin

208

Santonin...

1

209

Quinine, hydrochlorate of, and sulphate of...

210

Morphine,

27

"

211

Cocaine,

39

25

212

Cinchonine,

ງາ

21

213

Creosote, carbonnte of...

214

Guaiacol,

215

216

217

218

Insect

219

Fly paper

220

100 kins

3.45

,,

86.80

ad val.

10%

100 kins

0.41

15.13

"J

1

5.10

5.95

1 litre

0.73

0.73

...

100 kins

3,20

22.30

دو

202,00

+

25

7.60

"

  Saccharin and similar sweet substances... Naphthalin

  Borneo camphor, and blumea or ngai camphor Antifebrin

100 kins

1 kin

60.00

1,50

37 30

"

11.00

"

"

82.00

326.00

135.00

1 kin

13.50

19.30

100 kins

38.80

33,4)

>>

58.10

>>

Aniline salt or hydrochlorate of aniline...

Diastase

...

Baking powder

"

***

2.75

""

142.00

J

""

27.50 15.70

"

ad val.

30%

221

222

223

Joss sticks

224

Roller composition

225

226

Alcoholic medicinal preparations:

1. Tincture of opium

2. Other

Vanillin, coumarin, heliotropin, and similar aromatic

chemicals, not otherwise provided for...

Tooth powders, tooth washes, toilet powders, and other

perpared perfumeries, not otherwise provided for

Plasters (including inner packings)

100 kins

:

29.00

1 litre

0.73

ad val.

10%

53

50 "

40 "

100 kins

8.80

53,60

Gauze, wadding, bandage, catgut, and similar materials for

surgical use

ad val.

30%

227

228

Wafers

Gelatine capsules (including inner packings)

100 kins

67.30

***

ad val.

30%

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit

253

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

229 230

Drugs, chemicals, and medicines, not otherwise provided for Compounds or preparations of drugs, chemicals, and

medicines, not otherwise provided for

ad val.

20%

'9

30,,

231

Explosives:

1, Gunpowder

100 kins

8.05

2. Dynamite

6.10

""

3. Detonators (including inner packings)

25.50

23

37.40

"

ad val.

30%

4. Fuses

5. Other

232

Cartridges, loaded with explosives:

1. With bullets or shots:

A. Of metal shells (including inner packings) B, Other

100 kins

29.10

23.10

2. Other

ad val.

40%

233

Projectiles, loaded with explosives

234

Fir, works

235

ad val.

100 kins

40 12.70

40%

236

237

238

Matches...

GROUP VII.-Dyes, Pigments, Coatings, and

Indigo, natural :

1. Dry...

...

Filling Matters.

 2. Liquid or in paste Artificial indigo :

1. Dry

1

***

2. Liquid or in paste

Turmeric

100 kins að val.

21.20

10%

100 kins

22.00

ad val.

10%

100 kins

100

239

Safflower:

1. In cake

...

100 kins

9.65

2. Other

...

"

2.70

210

Logwood...

...

ad val,

5%

241

extract

...

...

...

100 kins

1.85

212

243

241

Oxide of cobalt

215

216

Caramel...

Alizarin dyes, aniline dyes and other coal tar dyes, not

otherwise provided for

Liquid gold, liquid silver and liquid platinum

Bronze powder, aluminium powder and similar metal pow-

ders not otherwise provided for

13.65

"

4.60

...

"

52.40

"

1 kin

12.40

100 kins

28.00

247

Prussian blue

9.25

248

Ultramarine blue ...

3.15

"J

249

White lead, red lead, and litharge

2.10

35

250

""

zinc (oxide of or sulphide of zinc)

2.10

""

251

Chalk or whiting ...

252

Vermillion or cinnabar

0.65 26.80

29

253

Realgar and orpiment...

ad val.

10%

25.1

Gamboge and dragon's blood

free

255

Carbon black...

100 kins

1.95

256

Lacquer (the juice of Rhus vernicifera)

6.90

""

257

Varnishes

14.50

258

Wood tar and coal tar...

دو

0.50

259

Pitch and asphalt...

0.55

"

260

Shoe polishes...

including receptacles

9.90

261

Pencils :

1. Not cased (slender strips of graphite or of colours) 2. Other, excluding those with metal sheaths:

ad val.

30%

A. Cased with wood or paper:

a. With metal attachments b. Other

B. Other

1 gross

0.75 0,55

ad val.

30%

262

Inks:

1. For copying or writing

...

including receptacles 100 kins

8.35

254

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

2. For printing:

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

A. Liquid or in paste:

I. In barrel:

a. Black

b. Other

II. Other

including receptacles

100 kins ad val. 100 kins

3.45

B. Solid

3. Other

263

Black solid inks, and red solid inks, Chinese

J

ad val.

""

25% 21.50 111.00 30%

264

Chalk-crayon and tailor's chalk

265

Artist's colours and artist's paints

including receptacles

1000 kins

50.00

266

Paints:

267

268 269 270

271

272

"

C.15

"

2.80

"

13.20

"

6.40

4.95

1.40

ad val.

30%

""

39

100 kins

ad val.

4.00 15%

30

29

1. Copper paints, international compositions, anti-fouling compositions, anti-corrosive paints, and similar ships')

bottom paints

2. Patent dryer...

3. Enamel paints

4. Other:

including receptacles

A. Each weighing not more than 6 kilogrammes in-

cluding the weight of receptacle

B. Other

***

Putty, mangan putty, marine glue pitch, and similar filling

matter:

1. Putty

...

2. Mangan putty

3. Marine glue pitch

4. Other

Sealing wax

...

...

...

Dyes and pigments, not otherwise provided for

Coatings,

"

}

>>

***

GROUP VIII.-Yarns, Threads, Twines, Cordages and

Materials Thereof.

Note. In case an article in this group is constituted of more thau one kind of fibre, any kind of fibre which does not exceed 5 per cent. by weight of the article shall not be considered as mixed in refer- ence to the tariff classification, silk and artificial silk excepted.

Cotton, in the seed or ginned, including carded or combed]

cotton ...

Cotton yarns :

1. Single or two-fold:

A. Grey, including gassed yarn:

a. Not exceeding No. 24 English

b.

""

C.

"

"J

d,

42 69 80

""

"

"

"

e. Other

free

100 kins

5.80

6.40

"

9.50

>>

11.00

"

11.30

1.00

"

1.00

"

28.00

19

30.00

B. Bleached simply, Duty on grey yarn with an

addition of 1 yen per 100 kiu.

C. Other, Duty on grey yarn with an addition of 3

yen per 100 kin.

2. Other:

A. Grey, including gassed yarn

B. Other

Cotton twines nor exceeding 3 grammes per 10 metres, and

cotton threads:

273

1. In skein:

A. Grey B. Other

...

...

...

***

28.00

22

30.00

"

No.

274

275

276

277

278

279

280

281

282

283

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

255

Proposed Rate of Duty.

2. Other:

Yen.

A. Reeled on wooden spool (including spools) ... B. Other

100 kins

35.90

ad val.

30%

free

Flax, China grass, ramie, hemp, jute, and other vegetable

fibres, not otherwise provided for...

Linen yarns.

1. Single:

A. Grey

B. Other

2. Other:

A. Grey

...

B. Other

Linen twines made by twisting together single yarns above No. 7 English and not exceeding 12 grammes per 10 metres, and linen threads:

1, Grey

2. Other

...

 China grass yarts and ramie yarns... China grass twines and ramie twines, made by twisting to- gether single yarns above No. 7 English and not exceed- ing 12 grammes per 10 metres, China grass threads and rawie threads

Hemp yarns

***

Jute yarns Hemp twines and jute twines, made by twisting together single yarns above No. 7 English and not exceeding 12 grammes per 10 metres, hemp threads and jute threads... Sheep's wool, goat's hair and camel's hair, including those

carded or combed

Woollen or worsted yarns:

1. Undyed or unprinted:

A. Yarns made by twisting woollen and worsted

yarns together

...

B. Yarus made by twisting those of different number

together and loop yarns.

C. Other:

I. Worsted:

a. Not exceeding No. 32 metric

b. Other

II. Woollen

2. Other, Duty on undyed or unprinted yarns with

an addition of 2.50 yen per 100 kin.

2. Other, Duty on undyed or unprinted yarns with

284

Mixed yarns of cotton and wool:

1. Undyed or unprinted ...

an addition of 3 yen per 100 kin. ...

285

Cocoons

286

Floss silk

287

Raw silk, including thrown silk :

1. Wild silk

2. Other

288

Spun silk yarns

289

Silk threads

290

Artificial silk...

291

Yarns, not otherwise provided for:

100 kins

8.60

9.25

40.90

"

44.90

"

""

að val.

40.90 44.90 10%

30

JI

10

99

10 J

100 kins

27.10

free

ad val.

15%

100 kins

13.20

17.50

"

**

12.00

9.90

"

free

100 kins

30.00

31.00

"J

að val.

30%

""

""

"

33

100 kins

87.90

ád val.

30%

15

1. Partly of silk, artificial silk, or metal 2. Other

Threads, not otherwise provided for

Fishing gut

...

Wool powder, silk powder, and artificial silk powder. Waste or old fibres, waste yarns and waste threads Twines, cordages, braids, and plaited ropes, not otherwise

292

293

29-1

295

296

provided for:

1. Of cotton

22

"

100 kins

ad val.

30 "

86.80

20%

free

19

100 kins

18.20

256

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

No.

Articles.

Unit.

297

298

2. Of flax, China grass, ramie, hemp, jute, or Manila

hamp, pure cr mixed with one another

***

3. Other Twines, cordages, braids, and plaited ropes, old excluding

those for trimming

-

GROUP IX-Tissues and Manufactures thereof.

Notes.

1. The term "tissues" in this Group includes felts and knitted tissues.

2. The term "silk" in this Group includes artificial silk. 3. In case a tissue in this Group is constituted of more than one kind of fibre, any kind of fibre which does not exceed 5% by weight of the tissue shall not be considered as mixed in reference to the tariff classification silk and artificial silk excepted.

4. The number of threads constituting the tissues shall be counted by elementary threads in the part where the greatest number of threads are used.

5. Figured tissues are those with a design or repeat con- stituted by interlacing both warps and woofs more than 20 in number. In case of counting number of thread aforesaid, twisted yarn consisting of two or more single yarns, or yarns put together to act as one shall be counted

as one.

Tissues of cotton :

1. Velvets, plushes, and other pile tissues, with piles cut

or uncut:

A. Gray

B. Other

...

2.

issues woven with chenille threads

3. Flannes and other raised tissues

4. Crapes

5. Gauze tissues

6. Tissues interwoven with laces

7. Plain tissues, not otherwise provided for:

A. Grey;

I. Weighing not more than 5 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side in warp and woof;

a. 19 threads or less...

b. 27

""

c. 35

J

d. 43

""

دو

e. More than 45 threads...

II. Weighing not more than 10 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof: a. 19 threads or less...

b. 27

c. 35

d. 43

""

>>

35

+

e. More than 43 threads.

III. Weighing not more than 20 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof:

a. 19 threads or less...

b. 27 c. 35

"

11

d. 43

"

"

"

e. More than 43 threads ...

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

ad val.

6.00

20%

100 kins

0.00

100 kins

34.00

40.00

""

ad val.

20%

100 kins

16.00

ad val.

20%

100 kins ad val.

36.00

20%

100 kins

23.00

31.00

43.00

57.00

25

77.00

11.00

"

14.00

18.00

J

22.00

28.00

"

10.00

وو

11.00

14.00

J

18.00

22.00

A

11

¡

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

IV. Weighing not more than 30 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof; a. 19 threads or less...

b. 27 c. 35

72

"

J

d. 43

12

"

e. More than 43 threads...

V. Other

...

B. Bleached simply (Duty on grey tissues with an

addition of 3 yen per 100 kin.)

C. Other (Duty on grey tissues with an addition of

7 ven per 100 kiň.)

8. Figured or brocaded tissues, not otherwise provided for:

A. Grey;

I. Weighing not more than 5 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof;

a. 19 threads or less...

...

b. 27 c. 35

"

d. 43

"

"

e. More than 43 threads.

II. Weighing not more than 10 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof: a. 19 threads or less...

b. 27

"

"

c 35

*

"

d. 43

*

*

***

e. More than 43 threads...

III. Weighing not more than 20 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square] of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof; a. 27 threads or less...

b. 35 c. 43

"

وو

"

d. More than 43 threads

...

***

IV. Weighing not more than 30 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof; a. 27 threads or less...

b 35

c. 13

"

"

"

d. No e than 43 threads...

V Other

...

...

B. Bleached simply (Duty on grey tissues with an

addition of 3 yen per 100 kin.)

C. Other (Duty on grey tissues with an addition of

7 yen per 100 kin.) ..

9. Other:

A. Grey:

I. Weighing not more than 5 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a quare of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof:

a. 19 threads or less...

...

b. 27

"

"

c. 35

29

33

d. 43

ور

"

257

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kirs

9.00

10.00

""

12.00

"

16.00

""

20.00

14.00

""

""

"

26.00

"

35.00

**

47.00

65.00

"

88.00

""

14.00

"

18.00

22.00

29.00

36.00

2

17.00

93

21 CO

27.00

34.00

21

"

16 00 20.00

"

26.00

"

330)

...

"

24.00

"

24.00

32.00

"

44.00

...

"

...

59,00

""

80 00

e. More than 43 threads

II. Weighing not more than 10 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof:

a. 19 threads or less...

12.00

"

258

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles,

299

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

15,00

19.00

35

24.00

19

30.00

+

b. 27 threads or less...

c. 45 d. 43

"

>>

e. More than 43 threads...

...

III. Weighing not more than 20 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof; a. 27 threads or less...

b. 35 c. 43

23

d. More than 43 threads...

IV. Weighing not more than 30 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof; a. 27 threads or less...

b. 35

c. 43

59

"J

d. More than 43 threads...

V. Other

...

+

...

B. Bleached simply (Duty on grey tissues with an

addition of 3 yen per 100 kin.)

C. Other (Duty on grey tissues with an addition of

7 yen per 100 kiň.)

Tissues of flax, China grass, ramie, hemp or jute, pure or mixed with one another, including those mixed with cotton :

1. Velvets, plushes, and other pile tissues, with piles, cut

or uncut

2. Bolting cloth

3. Gauze tissues, excluding bolting cloth

4. Plain, figured or brocaded tissues, not otherwise pro-

vided for:

A. Tissues of jute:

Having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp

and woof:

a.

4 threads or less

b. 10

*

c. 20

d. More than 20 threads

B. Mixed with cotton:

I Grey:

A. Weighing not more than 40 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in

a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof:

a. 10 threads or less...

104

b. 20

c. 30

31

d. 40

**

وو

...

e. More than 40 threads..

B. Other

II. Other (Duty on grey tissues with an addition

of 8 yen per 100 kin.)

C. Other:

I. Grey:

A. Weighing not more than 40 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof:

a. 10 threads or less...

...

རྒྱུ རྒྱུ བ བ

12.00 15.00 20.00 25.00

11.00

13.00

17.00

"

وو

22.00

23

15.00)

"

ad val.

20%

15 20

ور

ور

100 kins

2.00

4.00

J

7.40

ad val.

20%

100 kins

8.00

14.00

J

24.00

32.00

"

42.00

>

10.00

J

""

b. 20 c. 30

"

"

A

*

***

...

10.00 18.00

}}

"

32,00

No.

300

301

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

d. 40 therads or less...

e. More than 40 threads...

B Other

...

II. Other (Duty on grey tissues with an addition'

5. Other:

of 8 yen per 100 kin.)

4. Mixed with cotton :

I. Grey:

A. Weighing not more than 40 kilogrammes per 100 square metres, and having in

a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp and woof:

a. 10 threads or less...

b. 20 c. 30

"

"

J

...

d. 40

"

...

"

o. More than 40 threads...

B. Other

...

II. Other (Duty on grey tissues with an addition

of 8 yen per 100 kin.)

B. Other:

I. Grey:

A. Weighing not more than 40 kilogrammes

!

per 100 square metres, and having in

a square of

warp and woof;

millimetres side, in

a. 10 threads or less...

b. 20

c. 30

""

d. 40

**

"

رو

""

...

259

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

44.00

56.00

"J

13.40

e. More than 40 threads...

B. Other

II. Other (Duty on grey tissues with an addition

of 8 yen per 100 kin.)

...

Tissues of pineapple, pueraria thunbergiana, Manila hemp, agave, and other vegetable fibres (excluding cotton, flax, ramie, hemp and jute), pure or mixed with one another: Having in a square of 5 millimetres side, in warp

and woof:

1. 4 threads or less

2. 10

"

3. 20

4. More than 20 threads

...

...

"

"

བ བ བ ན ནན

כן

7.00 13.00

"}

22.00

""

30.00 48.00 9.00

"3

རྒྱུ རྣ བ བ བ བ

""

9.00 16.00 29.00

40.00 50.00

"3

12.00

>>

""

"

2.00 6.00 12.00

"

ad val.

20%

Tissues of wool, and mixed tissues of wool and cotton, of

wool and silk, or wool, cotton and silk:

1. Velvets, plushes, and other pile tissues, piles, cut or

uncut:

A. Partly of silk

B. Other...

2. Other:

A. Of wool:

...

::

100 kins

180.00

50.00

"

57.50

"}

·

70.00

"

60.00

"

50.00

*

33

a. Weighing not more than 100 grammes per

square metre

...

b. Weighing not more than 200 grammes per

square metre

c. Weighing not more than 500 grammes per

square metre

d. Other

B. Of wool and cotton:

...

...

...

...

...

a. Weighing not more than 100 grammes per

square metre

b. Weighing not more than 200 grammes per

square metre

...

...

55.00

...

"

52.50

"

260

No.

302

303

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

c. Weighing not more than 500 grammes per

square metre

...

 d. Other C. Of wool and silk, or of wool, cotton and silk;

I. Containing not more than 10% by weight of silk: a. Weighing not more than 100 grammes

per square metre

...

b. Weighing not more than 200 grammes

per square metre

c. Weighing not more than 500 grammes

per square metre

d. Other

...

***

II. Containing not more than 25% by weight of silk: a Weighing not more than 100 grammes

per square metre

b. Weighing not more than 200 grammes

per square metre

c. Weighing not more than 500 grammes

per square metre

d. Other

***

III. Other...

...

***

Tissues of borse hair, including those mixed with other fibres Silk tissues and silk mixed tissues, not otherwise provided

for:

1. Velvets, plushes and other pile tissues, with piles,

cut or uncut:

A Of silk

B. Other...

2. Bolting cloth

8. Other:

A. Of silk:

...

a. Tissues of wild silk...

::

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

37.50

22.50

"J

29

144.00

"

·

136.00

128,00

"

120.00

188.00

180.00

"

"

ad val.

172,00 164.00 40%

"

25%

100 kins

520.00

180.00

"

ad val.

18%

100 kins

200.00

b. Other...

520,00

J

B. Other:

a. Containing not more than 10% by weight of silk

90.00

b.

"

C.

"

33

*

25% 50%

180,00

"

J

>>

280.00

"

"

380.00

"

304

...

d Other

Mixed tissues, not otherwise provided for:

1. Velvets, plushes, and other pile tissues, with piles, cut

or uncut

2. Other

305

...

...

Stockinet and similar knitted tissues, raised or not;

1. Wholly or partly of silk

2. Other:

...

***

*

"

A. Weighing not more than 200 grammes per

square metre

* A

57,00

37.00

ad val.

45%

100 kins

68.60

B, Weighing not more than 500 grammes per

square metre

54.10

***

C. Other

...

...

"

27.00

306

Lace tissues and netted tissues;

A. Of cotton

::

1. Curtainings;

B. Other

2. Mosquito nettings:

A. Of cotton

B. Other

3. Veilings:

4. Wholly or partly of silk B. Other

:

...

4. Nettings for fishing or hunting

5. Other:

A. Wholly or partly of silk B. Other

...

J

ad val.

20.00 30%

100 kins

78.80

.

::

:::

ad val.

30%

100 kins

680.00

ad val.

30%

25%

45%

30%

...

...

"

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

261

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

307

Felts:

1. Of wool, or wool and cotton

2. Other

100 kins ad val.

47.40

30%

308

Embroidered tissues

وو

309

Bookbinders' cloth

310

Tracing

"

100 kins

19

40%

20.00

64.20

311

Artists' canvas

ad val.

30%

312

Window holland

100 kins

30.70

313

Empire cloth...

30.10

99

314

315

316

Leather cloth or oil cloth

Oil cloth for floor, or linoleum Roofing canvas

22.40

6.60

""

11.00

+9

317

Tarred

ad val.

"

30%

318

Emery cloth, including glass cloth

100 kins

2.75

319

Waterproof tissues coated er inserted with india-rubber;

1. Wholly or partly of silk

ad val,

2. Other

100 kins

40% 75.40

320

Elastic webbing and elastic cords, elastic braids or the like;

1. Exceeding 8 centimetres in width:

A. Partly of silk

"

148.00 86.00

"

ad val.

40%

"}

30%

"

40%

"

30%

100 kins

19.60

ad val.

30%

"

30%

100 doz.

25.90

83.70

"

73.20

>>

ad val.

50%

..

"

35%

100 kins

40.00

ad val.

35%

100 kins

30.40

25.80

"

232.00

"

60.00

>>

321

322

323

321

325

326

327

328

329

B. Other

2. Other:

A, Woven:

a. Partly

b. Other

B. Other: 1

a. Partly of silk

b. Other

::

Insulating tapes of tissues...

Lamp wicks

Typewriter ribbons

Handkerchiefs, single:

1. Of cotton

2. Of flax

...

3. Of flax and cotton

4. Wholly or partly of silk

5. Other

***

Towels, single:

1. Of cotton 2. Other

...

Blankets, single:

...

⠀⠀

...

40

1. Of wool, or wool and cotton 2. Other

Travelling rugs, single:

1. Wholly or partly of silk 2. Other

Carpets and carpetings:

1. Wholly or partly of wool:

A. Woven with piles:

:

::

::

::

::

::

I. Having piles constituted with warp or woof

of one system:

a. With cut piles

b. Other

11. Other:

D

a. With cut piles

b. Other

B. Of felt

C. Other

...

2. Of hemp or jute

3. Other

Table cloths, single:

-

...

...

::

...

400

*

...

***

...

1. Of cotton, of cotton and hemp, or of cotton and jute... 2. Of flax, or cotton and flax...

36.10 21.40

***

"

44.50

39

27.20

***

*

17.10

***

...

"

ad val.

...

30%

30%

30%

100 kins

60.00

80.00

"

262

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

3. Of wool, or wool and cotton

100 kins

98.20

4. Wholly or partly of silk, combined with metal threads,

or embroidered ...

ad val.

50%

5. Other

"

40%

330

Curtains and window blinds:

1. Of wool, or wool and cotton

100 kins

93.00

2. Wholly or partly of silk, combined with metal threads,

or embroidered...

ad val.

50%

3. Other:

A. Of lace

B. Other

100 kins ad val.

39.50

40%

331

332

333

33-1

335

336

337

Trimmings:

1. Ribbons, laces, edgings, tapes, galloons, cords, braids,

and the like:

A. Wholly or partly of silk, or combined with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious strones, semi-precious stones pearls, corals, elephant's ivory or tortoise shells, B. Combined with imitation precious stones, glass

beads, base metals, &c.

C. Other:

a. Darned, embroidered or of lace work b. Other

2. Other, such as tassels, knots, loops, stars, &c.;

A. Wholly or partly of silk, or combined with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious stones, semi-precious stones, pearls, corals, elephant's ivory or tortoise shells, B. Other Mosquito nets

Hammocks

Fishing or hunting nets

Air cushions;

1. Wholly or partly of silk

2. Other

Bed quilts and cushions;

1. Wholly or partly of silk 2. Other:

A. Stuffed with feathers or downs B. Other

:

Woven belting for machinery and woven hoses :

1. Of cotton

...

:

:

:

2. Other

338

Filter bags

339

Gunny bags

340

Old gunny bags

341

Rags

342

343

344

345

Tissues, not otherwise provided for

Manufactures of tissues, not otherwise provided for:

1. Wholly or partly of silk, or combined with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious stones, semi-precious stones pearls, cor-ls, elephant's ivory, or tortoise shells, or embroidered 2. Other

GROUP X.-Clothing and Accessories thereof.

Note.-The term "silk" in this group includes arti-

ficial silk.

Raincoats:

1. Woolly or partly of silk 2. Other

Shirts, front, collars and cuffs

...

ad val.

50%

"

40%

23

40%

30%

"

"

50%

"}

40%

40%

"

"

40%

"

25%

100 kins

315.00

124.00

""

ad val.

50%

100 kius

124.00

78.10

ad val.

20%

100 kins

19.20

ad val.

20%

100 kins

2.55

free

"

ad val.

30%

""

50%

40%

"

50%

100 kins

136.00

134.00

"

}

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

263

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

346

347

348

349

Undershirts and drawers:

1. Knitted:

A Of cotton...

B. Of wool, or wool and cotton C. Wholly or partly of silk D. Other

2. Other:

A. Wholly or partly of silk B. Other

Gloves:

1. Of leather

10

...

2. Of leather and other materials except silk

3. Of cotton, ef flax, of cotton and flax, of wool or of

wool and cotton

1. Wholly or partly of silk 5. Other

Stockings and socks:

...

***

...

1. Of cotton, of flax, of cotton and flax, of wool or of

wool and cotton

2. Wholly or partly of silk...

3. Other

Shawls, comforters and mufflers:

1. Mufflers:

A. Of silk

B. Partly of silk...

:::

:

100 kins

115.00

133.00

ad val.

...

50%

40%

11

50%

40%

>>

100 kins

450.00

170.00

19

226.00

"

949.00

ad val.

40%

100 kins

138.00

ad val.

50%

23

40%

100 kins

853.00

530.00

C. Other

ad val

40%

2. Other:

A. Of cotton, of flax, of China grass, of wool or of

wool and cotton

100 kins

159.00

B. Of silk

750.00

C. Partly of silk excluding those combined with furs

or feathers

400.00

...

39

D. Wholly or partly of firs or feathers

ad val.

50%

350

351

1. Wholly or partly of silk

2. Other...

352

Belts:

E. Other

Neckties:

1. Wholly or partly of silk... 2. Other

Trouser suspenders or braces:

41%

1 kin

11.40

...

3.55

39

100 kins

45 1.00 102.00

353

354

1. Made of or combined with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious stones, semi- precious stones, pearls or corals...

2. Other:

A. Wholly and partly of silk...

B. Of leather

C. Other

Sleeve suspenders, stocking suspenders, and the like:

1. Wholly or partly of silk...

2. Of metal

3. Other

...

Hats and hat bodies, caps, bornets, and hoods:

1. Combined or trimmed with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious stones, semi- precious stones, pearls, corals, feathers artificial flowers, &c....

2. Other:

...

A. Wholly or partly of silk:

a. Silk hats or opera hats

b. Chineses hats

c. Hoods

d. Other

...

ad val.

50%

""

50%

*

40%

40%

50%

19

40%

100 kins

178.00

ad val.

50%

1 doz.

28.80

ad val.

50%

***

...

100 kins

3.80

...

ad val.

50%

264

No.

355

356

357

358

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

B. Of felt:

I. Hats

II. Hat bodies:

a. Shaped

b. Other

:

:

:

:

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

7.50

:

7.50

0.95

ad val.

20%

doz.

35.60

6.25

...

"

9.50

...

...

1.15

...

3.00

59

2.90

"

ad val.

10%

1. Of sheep's wool

2. Other ...

...

C. Of Panama straw or similar vegetable fibres D. Of straw or wood shaving, pure or mixed with

...

one another

a. Helmet hats...

E. Other:

***

b. Chinese hats

c. Caps of tissues, woven or knitted

d. Hoods

e. Other

Boots, shoes, silppers, sandals, clogs, and the like:

1. Boots:

A. Of leather

B. Of india-rubber

C. Other...

2. Shoes:

A. Of leather

B. Of canvas or duck:

a. With leather sole

b. Other

C. Wholly or partly of silk D. Other...

3. Chinese shoes:

A. Wholly or partly of silk B. Other

4. Over shoes of india-rubber

5. Slippers:

A. Of leather

B. Of tissues:

I Wholly or partly of silk .....

II. Of felt:

a. With leather ›ol›...

b. Other

III. Other...

...

C. Other...

6. Other

:

...

100 kins

134.00 50.00

"

ad val.

40%

100 kins

...

:

135,00

86.70

"

57.80

""

ad val.

50%

"

40%

100 kins

62.50

30.70

51.6)

"

119.00

"

ad val.

50%

100 kins ad val.

76.40

40%

40

***

...

""

40

***

***

...

"J

40

**

دو

40

"

:

:

:

:

:

:

Shoe laces

Buttons, excluding those made of or combined with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious stones, semi-precious stones, pearl-, corals,| elephant's ivory or tortoise shells:

1. Buttons for cuffs or shirts

2. Other:

A. Covered (including inner packings)... B. Of metal including inner packings)

C. Of porcelain or glass (including inner packings)..... D. Of ivory nut, including imitations (including inner

packings)

...

E. Of bone or horn (including inner packings) F. Other... Buckles, hooks, eyes, and the like, excluding these made of or combined with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious stones, semi-precious stones, pearls, corals, elephant's ivory or tortoise

shells:

1. Buckles...

2. Hooks and eyes

::

::

::

"

100 kins

"

""

99

ad val.

40%

118.00 34 30 12.0

111 00 109.00

40%

100 king

"

14.40 40.80

No.

359

360

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

3. Shoe hooks and shoe eyelets 4. Other...

Jewellery fo personal adornment.

Clothing and accessories or parts thereof, not otherwise

provided for:

1. Wholly or partly of fur, feather or silk, or made of, or combined or trimmed with precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, precious stones, semi-precious stones, pearls, corals, elephant's ivor or tortoise shells or embroidered

2. Other

GROUP XI.-Pulp for paper making, Papers, Paper Manufactures, Books, and Pictures.

361

Pulp for paper making:

1. Mechanical pulp...

2. Other

362

Printing paper:

1. Art paper

2. Other:

A. Coloured in the paste

B. Other:

::

:

:

:

a. Weighing not mere than 58 grammes per square

metre

b. Other

363

Writing paper

1...

86-1

Drawing paper

365

366

367

368

Cigarette paper

369

Wall paper

370

Blotting paper

Filter paper

Packing paper and match paper, excluding tissue paper

Pasteboard or cardboard

371

Chinese paper of all kinds...

372

Imitation Japanese paper and tissue paper

373

Imitation parchment, paraffin paper and wax paper:

1. Covered with, or with application of metal foil or

metal powder, embossed, or printed.....

2. Other

374

Tracing paper

375

Litho transfer paper

376

Oiled paper...

377

Glass paper for window pane

378

l'apers, not otherwise provided for:

379

1. Covered with, or with application of metal foil or

metal powder:

A. Covered with, or with application of fuil or powder

of precious metal

B. Other...

2. Coloured on the surface:

A. Embossed...

B. Other...

3. Printed:

4. Embossed...

B. Other...

4. Other:

A. Craped or wrinkled

B. Other...

Paper laces and paper borders:

::ཊྚེ ;;

1. Covered with, or with application of metal foil or

metal powder...

2. Other

+

Unit.

265

¡ Proposed

Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

$1.30

að val.

40%

50%

50% 40%

100 kins

0.22

0.27

3.20

1.60

1.00

2.20

3.15

3.55

"

3.80

17.40

11

1.75

"

12.40

او

ور

8.50

1.50

ور

ad val.

30%

100 kins

3.25

3.85

22

3.20

22.00

13

36.50

5.00

57.20

ad val.

30%

100 kins

10.90

4.95

3:30

""

5.30

"

4.10

"

12.70

"

að val.

25%

100 kins

37 80 9.50

J

266

No.

380

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

Blank books:

1. Of Chinese paper 2. Other:

A. With paper covers ...

B. Other...

381

Blank forms

382

Note paper in box...

283

Envelopes:

:

:

:

:..

***

1. In box, including those accompanying note paper

(including boxes)...

2. Other......

384

Albums:

1. With leather covers

385 386

:

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

9.00

25.30

"

47.90

"

16.40

22

ad val.

30%

100 kins

19.60

15,10

ad val.

50%

100 kins

48.90

20.00

23

15.30

ad val.

40%

20%

100 kins

19.30

85,60

134.00

80.50

ad val.

40%

100 kins

27.30

2.00

"

35.20

2. With cloth covers:

A. Wholly or partly of silk B. Other...

3. With paper covers

4. Other

Test paper

...

*

***

Baryta paper, albuminized paper, and sensitized papers

for photograph:

1. Baryta paper (including inner packings)

2. Albuminized paper (including inner packings)...

3. Bromide paper and platinum paper (including inner

packings)

4.P.O.P." (including inner packings)

5. Other

387

Carbon paper...

388

Emery paper, including glasspaper...

**

389

Labels

390

Playing cards

391

Photographs...

392

Caligraphies and pictures:

1. Printed...

...

2. Other

393

394

395

396

Card calendars and block calendars... Picture post-cards

Christmas cards and the like

::

***

**

*

D

Printed books, copy books, drawing books with designs, music, newspapers, periodicals and other printed matter, not otherwise provided for

Plans, architectural and engineering

Geographical atlases or maps, charts and scientifical dia-

grams or maps

...

...

"

ad val.

100 kins

ad val. 100 kins

113.00

50%

39,3)

1 ree

30% 52.40 50%

free

ad val.

397

وو

398

""

399

400

Waste paper...

401

Manufactures of paper or pulp, not otherwise provided for:

ad val.

10%

Paper money, bank notes, coupons, share certificates and

other negotiable papers

...

...

402

GROUP XII.-Minerals and Manufactures thereof.

Silica sands, quartz sand, and other sand, and gravel, not

otherwise provided for:

1. Coloured

2. Other

l'umice stone, powdered or not

403

Flint

404

405

406

407

Emery sand, corundum sand, tripoli and similar mineral

substances for grinding or polishing...

Bath bricks

Metal polishes, not otherwise provided for:

1. In paste (including receptacles)

2. Other

"

20% free

"

100 kins

0.45

5.00

2.60

!

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN.

Articles.

408

409

410

411 412

413

Grindstones or whetstones:

1. Artificial

2. Other

...

...

A. Oil stones, whetstones and the like B. Other:

Slate and manufactures thereof, not otherwise provided

for:

1. Unworked

2. Other:

A. Unsmoothed, unpolished or uncarved:

a. Roofing

b. Other

B. Other...

Lithographic stone:

1. Unworked

2. Other

...

Bort, carbonado and other black diamond Precious stones

...

Semi-precious stones and manufactures thereof, not other-

wise provided for:

1. Uncut or unpolished ..

2. Other

414

Stones and manufactures thereof, not otherwise provided

for:

1. Unworked, or split or roughly hewn as to present no

regular shape...

2. Other:

A. Unsmoothed, unpolished or uncarved

B. Other

Amber and manufactures thereof, not otherwise provided

for:

Unit.

267

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

9.00

27.90

""

ad val.

10%

free

100 kins

0.20

ad val.

10%

22

40%

free

100 kins

0.50

...

free

ad val.

5%

20%

"3

50%

415

1. Unworked

2. Other

416

Waste amber...

ad val.

10%

29

40%

"

20%

"

50%

free

417

Meerschaum or artificial meerschaum and manufactures

thereof:

1. Unworked

...

"

20%

2. Other

"

10%

418

Asbestos, and manufactures thereof, not otherwise pro-

vided for:

1. In lump, powder or fibre

100 kins

0.70

2. Yarn

6.00

J

3. Board

1.70

"

4. Other

10.30

"

419

Mica, and manufactures thereof, not otherwise provided for:

1. In slab or powder

free

2. Sheet:

A. Uncoloured or unornamented

B. Other...

ad val.

30%

3. Glued together with or without tissue, paper, etc. 4. Other

100 kins

ad val.

30.00

420

Talc and soapstone, powdered or not

30%

free

421

Phosphorite

""

422

Kainite, kieserite, carnallite and similar salts

"}

423

Gypsum:

1. Uncalcined

:

2. Other

424

425

Cryolite

426

Clay...

427

Plumbago

428

Manufactures of gypsum.....

Manufactures of plumbago, not otherwise provided for:

1. Crucibles

100 kins

0.06 0.30

"

ad val.

10%

free

*

2. Other

100 kins ad val.

6.15 30%

268

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

429

Coal...

430

Cokes

431

Brick coal or briquettes

432

Portland cement, Roman cement, puzzolana cement and

similar hydraulic cements

433

Manufactures of cement :

1. Unpolished, uncoated or uncoloured 2. Otter

434

435

Dolomite and magnesite, calcined or not

Minerals and manufactures thereof, not otherwise pro-

vided for:

1. Unworked

2. Other:

436

A. Powdered or calcined

B. Other...

***

...

GROUP XIII.-Potteries, Glass, and Glass Manufactures.

Bricks, excluding cement bricks :

1. Fire bricks

2. Other:

A. Glazed or coloured...

B. Other:

a. Perforated

b. Other

437

Tiles of clay:

438

439

1. Glazed or coloured

2. Other

:

:

:

:

:

::

Fireproof manufactures of clay, not otherwise provided

for:

1. Crucibles

2. Gas retorts

3. Nozzles and stoppers

4. Other

Potteries, not otherwise provided for:

...

1. Combined with precious metals, or metals coated with

precious metals

..

:

2. Other

410

Broken potteries

441

Glass in lump

442

Glass powder...

443

Glass rod and glass tubes...

444

Plate or sheet glass:

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty,

Yen.

free

10,000 kins

5.65

ad val.

10%

100 kins

0.30

ad val.

30%

40%

>>

free

"

5%

""

10%

30%

"

100 kins

0.45

ad val.

20%

""

20%

"1

20%

100 kins

3.10

9.00

"

3.00

>

ad vai.

20%

""

""

17

50%

40%

"

free

""

10%

""

10%

100 kins

7.00

1. Uncoloured or unstained, with flat surface:

A. Not exceeding 4 millimetres in thickness:

a. Not exceeding 1 square nietre each

b. Other

B. Other:

...

a. Not exceeding 1,000 square centimetres each b. Other

2. Silvered:

A. Not exceeding 1,000 square centimetres each

100 sq. in.

11,80

18.40

56.30

,,

142.00

""

132.00

"

B. Other...

159.00

**

3. Stained, coloured or ground, excluding those ribbed

embossed and the like:

A. Not exceeding 1 square metre each

B. Other

4. Ribbed, embossed or the like

5. Other

Plate glass having inlaid metal wire or net Side-light glass, without frame

445

446

447

Sky light glass

448

Spectacle glass, cut

29.30

""

37.20

29.70

ad val.

25%

100 sq. in.

55.20

100 kins

7.00

ad vol.

25%

2

30%

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

449

Optical lenses or prisms, without frames or handles:

1. Unpolished

...

2. Other

...

...

...

450

451

452

453

454

455

Deckglass for microscope

Object glass for microscope Dry plates for photograph:

1. Undeveloped (including inner packings) 2. Other

Spectacles and eyeglasses :

1. With frames or handles of precious metals, metals coated with precious metals, elephant's ivory or tortoise shells

2. Other

Looking glasses or mirrors:

1. Combined with precious metals or metals coated with

precious metals

2. Other

Glass gems or beads, including those of imitation precious stones, imitation metals, imitation pearls, imitation corals, &c.

456

Glass cullet

457

Glass manufactures, not otherwise provided for:

1. Combined with precious metals or metals coated with

precious metals...

2. Other

GROUP XIV.-Ores and Metals.

458

459

Ores...

Platinum:

1. Ingots, slabs, bars, plates and sheets

2. Wire

460

3. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing Gold:

461

462

1. Ingots, slabs, grains, plates, sheets and bands 2. Tubo and wire

3. Foils

...

...

4. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing . Silver:

1. Ingots, slabs, plates, sheets and bands ... 2. Tubes and wire

3. Foils

14

4. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing Iron:

1. In lumps, ingots, blooms, billets, and slabs:

A. Pig iron

B. Spiegeleisen

C. Ferro-manganese

D. Ferro-silicon and silico-spiegeleisen

E. Ferro-chrome, ferro-nickel, ferro-aluminium and

other non-malleable iron alloys

F. Other:

a. Ingots, blooms, billets, and slabs

b. Keg steel and bamboo stoel

c. Other

2. Bars or rods, including those having such a shape, as

T, angle &c.

3. Wire rods, in coils

4. Plates and sheets:

...

A. Not coated with metals:

I. Checkered

II. Corrugated.

...

::

::

::

::

Unit.

269

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

ad val.

20%

وو

30%

1,000 pieces

1.60

1.40

"

100 kins

20.10

ad val.

40%

"

50%

40%

""

50%

23

40%

>>

40% free

32

50% 40%

39

free

1 kin

44.00

193,00

"

ad val.

5%

free

99

20%

39

30%

free

د,

20%

30%

free

100 kins

0.10

""

0.16

0.25

0.20

ad val.

5%

100 kins

0.50

""

0.60

ad val.

71%

100 kins

0.60

19

1.10

"1

0.70 1.35

29

270

No.

463

484

PROPOSED NEW, CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

III. Other:

a. Not exceeding 0·7 millimetre in thickness

b. Not exceeding 1.5 millimetres in thickness c. Other ...

B. Coated with base metals :

...

I. Tinned (tinned iron sheets and tinned steel

sheets):

a. Ordinary

b. Crystallized, embossed or the like

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

0.40

0.75

"

0.60

II. Galvanized (corrugated or not) III. Other

..

5. Wire:

A. Not coated with metals :

a. Not exceeding 1.5 millimetres in diameter b. Other...

...

B. Coated with base metals:

I. Galvanized:

a. Not exceeding 1·5 millimetres in diameter

b. Other ...

II. Tinned ...

III. Other

6. Reed wire

7. Ribbons...

U

8. Bands (hoop iron):

...

A. Not coated with metals...

B. Coated with base metals

9. Paragon wire :

A. Not coated with metals

B. Coated with bast metals

0.90

2.35

""

2.00

"

ad val.

20%

100 kins

0.95

0.80

"

1.35

>>

1.20

"}

...

ad val.

20%

...

...

"

20%

41

100 king

1.85

1.50

"

::

:

:

::

:

:

0.50

""

ad val.

10%

100 kins ad val.

4.10

20%

+4

100 kins

6.15

2.20

"

10. Wire rope and twisted wires, coated or not with

base metals

11. Barbed twisted wires

...

12. Pipes and tubes, not otherwise provided for:

A. Not coated with metals:

I. Elbows and joints:

a. Non-malleable

b. Other

II. Other:

a. Cast

b. Drawn

c. Other...

...

2.40

...

...

"

2.80

1.00

"

"

2.30

1.10

"

ad val.

20%

0.18

B. Coated with base metals

...

13. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

Aluminium:

1. Ingots, slabs and grains

2. Bars er rods, plates and sheets

3. Wire and tubes

...

4. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

Copper:

1. Ingots and slabs

2. Bars cr rods

...

3. Plates and sheets

4. Wire:

A. Not coated with metals:

100 kins

J

3.20

...

*

18.50

"

ad val.

20%

5%

100 kins

1.20

""

8.90

9.95

...

...

...

...

"

a. Not exceeding 0.5 millimetre in diameter...

18.10

"

b. Other

B. Coated with base metals

5. Twisted wires

:::

9.50

ad val.

14.20 25%

6. Pipes and tubes:

A. Not coated with metals...

100 kins

B. Coated with base matals

7. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

ad val.

***

100 kins

14.80 25%

1.30

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

271

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

465

Lead:

1. Ingots and slabs

2. Plates and sheets

4. Wire, ribbons and bands

3. Tea lead

5. Tubes......

...

...

6. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

466

Tin:

1. Ingots and slabs

2. Plates, sheets, wire and tubes

3. Foils

...

4. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

467

Zinc:

1. Ingots, slabs and grains ...

2. Plates and sheets:

A. Nickeled

468

469

470

471

472

473

474

475

476

Yen.

100 king

0.40

1.80

>>

free

2.80

19

2.45

0.30

"

3.75

ad val.

20%

100 kins

22.50

ad val.

5%

100 kins

0.70

4.80

"

ad val.

20%

free

100 kins

2.95

ad val.

...

20%

100 kins

0.40

4.75

"

24.00

"

ad val.

20%

*

5% free

B. Coated with enamel paint, varnish, lacquer, &c.... C. Other...

...

a. Not exceeding 0-25 millimetre in thickness b. Other

3. Wire and tubes

***

...

...

 4. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing Nickel:

1. Ingots and grains

2. Bars or rods, plates and sheets

3. Wire and tubes ...

 4. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing Mercury...

Antimony and sulphide of antimony:

1. Ingots and slabs

2. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

Brass and bronze:

1. Ingots and slabs...

2. Bars or rods

3. Plates and sheets

4. Wire

5. Pipes and tubes:

...

...

A. Not coatod with metals

B. Coated with base metals

6. Foils

...

7. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

German silver:

1. Ingots and slabs

2. Bars or rods, plates and sheets

3. Wire and tubes...

 4. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing Solder

Babbitt's metal and other antifriction metals:

1. Ingotes and slabs

 2. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing Gilt or silvered metals:

1. Gilt wire

2. Silvered wire

ad val. 100 kins

J

10% 7.55

8.30

"

9.90

""

12.90

14.90

32,90

...

"

2.25

ad val. 100 kins

10%

14.60

ad val.

20%

"

10%

100 kins

5.20

4.80

"

ad val.

10%

100 kins

194.00

81.60

"

ad val.

40%

ad val.

10%

20%

"

25%

25%

"

10%

***

"

3. Other

Metals, not otherwise provided for, and aforementioned

metals having a form not otherwise provided for: 1. Ingots, slabs and grains

2. Bars or rods (including those baving such a shape, as T, angle, &c.), plates, sheets, ribbons, bands, wire, pipes and tubes

3. Wire rope and twisted wires

4. Foils

...

5. Waste or old, fit only for remanufacturing

272

No.

477

478

479

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

GROUP XV.-Metal Manufactures.

Nails, rivets, screws, bolts, nuts and the like, excluding those made of or combined or coated with precious metals:

1. Iron nails:

A. Not coated with metals

B. Other

2. Copper nails

3. Iron screws

4. Brass crews and bronze screws

+

5 Iron bolts, iron nuts, and iron washers

6. Iron rivets

7. Iron dog-spikes

8. Iron boot-protectors

9. Other

Belt-tasteners, not otherwise provided for:

1. Of iron

2. Other

Metal nets or nettings:

1. Woven:

A. Of iron, galvanized or not...

::

B. Of copper, brass or bronze, excluding endless

C. Other...

2. Other:

++

A. Of iron, galvanized or not...

B. Other...

480

Rivetted iron tubes

481

1. Of iron

482

483

Flexible tubes:

2. Other

Materials for railway construction, not otherwise pro-

vided for:

1. Rails

2. Portable rails

3. Turntables and parts thereof

4. Fish-plates, tio-plates and sleepers

5. Other

Posts and other materials for suspending electric lines,

not otherwise provided for:

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

100 kins

1.25

2.55

15.60

4.55

25.50

23

"

2.00

1.40

1.45

5 60

að val.

25%

100 kins

ad val.

9.00

25%

100 litres

13.50

34.10

ad val.

25%

100 kins

3.70

ad val.

30%

25%

100 kins

13.90

ad val.

20%

100 kins

0.80

1.80

"

2.55

"

1,10

ad val.

25%

1. Posts and parts thereof

2. Other:

A. Of iron

B. Other

100 kins

1.85

4.35

""

14.00

484

Materials for construction of buildings, bridges, ves-els,

docks, &c., not otherwise provide for:

1.90

29

485

486

  Gas holders, tanks for liquid and parts thereof (of iron) Insulated electric wires:

1.95

1. Armoured with metals:

A. Submarine telegraphic or telephonic cables... B. Other:

a. Combined with india-rubber or gutta-percha b. Other

2. Otber:

A. Flexible cords:

a. Combined with silk

b Other

B. Other:

a. Combined with india-rubber or gutta-percha

b. Other

487

488

Irom anchors

Harpoons

free

9.40

23

4.70

ad val. 100 kins

20%

15.10

12.00

J

ad val.

20%

100 kins

13.80

1.95

·

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

273

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

489

Chains, not otherwise provided for:

1. Made of, or combined or coated with precious metals 2. Other:

ad val.

50%

490

491

A. Of iron:

a. Gearing chains

b. Other

B. Other...

Chain belting for machinery

Chains for watches, spectacles, eyeglasses or other per-

sonal adornment:

1. Of gold or platinum

*

25%

100 kins

2.00

ad val.

30%

20%

"

J

50%

2. Gilt...

3. Other

492

1 kin

18.00

ad val.

...

...

Cocks and valves, excluding those made of, or combined

or coated with precious metals:

1. Coated with base metals ...

50%

""

35%

2. Other:

A. Of iron:

493

a. Each weighing not more than 100 kilogrammes b. Each weighing not more than 1,000 kilogrammes c. Other

B. Of brass or bronze

C. Other...

Hinges, hat-hooks, and metal fittings for doors, windows,

furniture, &c.:

1. Made of, or combined or coated with precious

metals

!

2. Costed with base metals

3, Other:

100 kins

8.00

6.95

"

ad val.

25%

100 kins ad val.

25.80

30%

A. Of iron

B. Of brass or bronze

C. Other...

494

Locks and keys:

1. Made of, or combined or coated with precious metals 2. Coated with base metals

3. Other:

A. Of iron

***

B. Of brass or bronze

C. Other...

Platinum crucibles or dishes

...

Mechanics' tools, agricultural implements and parts there-

495

496

of, not otherwise provided for:

1. Anvils...

50%

"

35%

100 kins

6.40

30.70

ad val.

30%

""

50%

وو

35%

100 kins

11.20

""

51.40

ad val.

37%

1 kin

208,00

100 kins

2.55

2. Hammers

4.00

3. Wrenches

"

12,60

4. Pipe cutters and ratchets...

5. Tongs, nippers and pliers:

15.90

""

A. Each weighing not more than 5 kilogrammes B. Other...

100 kins

22.10

ad val.

...

20%

6. Vices

100 kins

5.15

7. Files, having a length excluding the taugs:

A. Not more than 10 centimetres

27.90

,,

B. Not more than 20 centimetres

13.00

C. Not more than 30 centimetres

9.70

D. More than 30 centimetres

8.50

"

8. Augers

...

12.50

""

9. Stocks and dies, or screw plates (including boxes) 10. Shovels and scoops:

20.10

**

A. With hand es...

4.10

B. Other...

2.10

11. Other

ad val.

...

20%

497

Drills, bits, reamers, and screw taps, not having handles or

frames...

20%

274

No.

PROPOSED NEW CUSTOMS TARIFF OF JAPAN

Articles.

Unit.

Proposed Rate of Duty.

Yen.

498

Screw jacks

100 kins

7.80

499

Cutlery, not otherwise provided for:

1. Made of, or combined or coated with precious metals 2. Other:

ad val.

50%

A. Pocket knives:

a. With handles made of or combined with elephant's ivory, mother-of-pearl or tortoise shells, or n- amelled

b. Other

B. Tables knives:

a. With handles made of or combined with elephant's ivory, mother-of-pearl or tortoise shells, or en- amelled

b. Other...

C. Razers: