Administrative Reports - 1921

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1921

Table of Contents

1 Finances

2 Shipping and Trade, industries, Fisheries, agriculture and Land

3 Legislation

4 Education

5 Public Works

6 Government and aided institutions

7 Institutions Not Supported By Government

8 Criminal and Police

9 Vital Statistics

10 Postal and Telegraph Services

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

H Police Magistrates' Courts

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prison

M Sanitary

M(1) Medical

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 




I.-FINANCES.

The revenue for the year amounted to $17,728,132 being $2,391,782 more than the estimate and $3,038,460 more than the revenue for the previous year.

Compared with the returns for 1920 there were increases under every head.

The expenditure amounted to a total of $15,739,652 inclusive of a sum of $3,053,525 spent on Public Works Extraordinary.

The detailed figures for 1921 are set out in the following

statements :-

Light Dues

HEADS OF REVENUE.

Light Dues, Special Assessment -

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements in Aid -

$

C.

106,417.09

115,710.44

11,644,243.90

1,194,673.94

Post Office

663,914.42

Kowloon-Canton Railway

M

603,980.77

Rent of Government Property, Land, and

Houses

1,158,188.80

Interest

359,473.33

Miscellaneous Receipts

247.431.70

TOTAL, (Ordinary)-

$16,094,034.39

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

TOTAL

1,634,097.55

$17,728,131.94

The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $15,739,652 being $1,609,498 less than the estimate, and $1,250,058 more than the expenditure in 1920. Compared with the estimates there were increases under 18 heads as against 8 heads where there were decreases. The excess amounting to $196,971 under Miscel- laneous Services was due to transport of Government servants, and $210,530 in the case of Kowloon-Canton Railway due to two motor coaches and motor trailer. Military Expenditure was less than the estimate by $202,100 due to recovery of amount overpaid in 1920. Imports and Exports Department shows a saving of $254,086 due to less purchase of Opium and Public Works Extraordinary was less by $1,913,874 than the amount estimated. The item Charge on account of Public Debt was responsible for an excess over the estimates of $108,244 due to lower exchange.

EXPENDITURE.

C.

Governor

91,035.19

Cadet Service

239,948,92

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legis-

lature

58,415.07

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

18,705.03

Audit Department

51,440.87

Treasury

72,676.59

Harbour Master's Department

350,025.53

Imports & Exports Department

591,756.04

Royal Observatory

32,700.51

Miscellaneous Services

845,413.82

Judicial and Legal Departments -

271,948.20

Police and Fire Brigade

1,527,097.55

Prison Department

299,746.56

Medical Department

378,128.77

Sanitary Department

536,438.13

Botanical and Forestry Department

61,428.11

Education

589,323.92

Military Expenditure -

Public Works Department

Do.

Recurrent

-

Do.

Extraordinary

Post Office -

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions

Charitable Services

TOTAL

2,318,654.02

651,599.00 938,582.38

3,053,525.11.

293,710.10

1,108,838.99

890,336.88

389,845.50

78,331.61

- $15,739,652.40

The balance to the credit on the year's working was $1,988,480 and the assets and liabilities account showed on the 31st December a credit balance of $6,478,746.

The following is a statement of the revenue and expenditure of the Colony for the five years 1917-1921 :-

Revenue.

Expenditure.

$

$

1917

15,058,105

14,090,828

1918

18,665,248

16,252,172

1919

16,524,975

17,915,925

1920

14,689,672

14,489,594

1921

17,728,132 15,739,652

L

5

The amount of the consolidated loan stands at £1,485,733. Against this there is at credit of the Sinking Fund a sum of £368,403. The Local Loan under Ordinance No. 12 of 1916 amounts to $3,000,000 and there are the sums of $664,495 and £89,093 at credit of the Sinking Fund.

A new valuation for Assessment was made for the year com- mencing 1st July, 1921, resulting as follows:-

Increases:

The City of Victoria

$872,540

The Hill District

8,150

Shaukiwan, Saiwanho and Quarry Bay

9,700

Hongkong Villages

36,924

Kowloon Point

124,615

Yaumati

86,705

Mongkoktsui

79,630

Hunghom and Hok Un

40,285

Kowloon Villages.

15,606

13,546

New Territories

The rateable value of the whole Colony amounted to $18,696,660 having increased by $1,287,701.

During the period 1912-1921 the assessment of the whole Colony has risen from $12,312,306 to $18,696,660, an increase in rateable value of $6,384,354.

The circulation on the 31st December of notes of the three Banks having authorised issues was as follows:-

Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Cor-

poration

Chartered Bank of India, Australia, &

China

Mercantile Bank of India, Limited

.$ 40,395,225

9,074,137

1,321,503

$ 50,790,865

The currency of the Colony consists, in addition to the notes of these Banks, of British, Hongkong, and Mexican Dollars and of subsidiary coin, which continued at par throughout the year.

The total issue of subsidiary coins less those demonetized, now amounts to $20,789,370 nominal value, and they were up to the year 1905 readily absorbed at par, large quantities being taken by the neighbouring provinces of China. During 1916 ten cent pieces of the face value of $5,028,000 were shipped to Calcutta for purposes of demonetization. The discount which prevailed be- tween 1905 and 1916 may be attributed to the immense quantity of

6

similar coin which was minted at Canton as well as to the amount of Hongkong coin minted largely in excess of the needs of the Colony by itself In 1905 the Hongkong Government ceased to issue any subsidiary coin and in 1906 it began a policy of demonet- ising all its subsidiary coin received as revenue.

This policy was continuously followed till 1918 except during a brief period in 1911. Coin to the face value of $23,235,459 has thus been redeemed. The total issue by the Hongkong Government was of the face value of about $44,000,000.

II--SHIPPING AND TRADE, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,

AGRICULTURE, AND LAND.

(a.) SHIPPING.

The total of the shipping entering and clearing at ports in the Colony during the year 1921 amounted to 672,680 vessels of 43,420,970 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1920, shows a decrease of 10,816 vessels, with an increase of 3,298,443 tons.

Of the above, 52,222 vessels of 27,852,616 tons were engaged in foreign trade, as compared with 43,364 vessels of 24,194,022 tons in 1920 and were distributed as follows :-

1920.

Numbers. Numbers.

1921.

1920.

Tonnage.

1921.

Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going Ships,

9.6%

8.9%

34.5%

33.3%

Foreign Ocean-

going Ships,

12:5

11.1

38.1

38.8

British River

Steamers, ...

11.9

110

13:5

126

Foreign River

Steamers,

40

3.5

2.4

21

Steam Laun-

ches (under

60 tons),

116

12.8

0.7

0.7

Trading Junks,

50:4

52.7

10.8

12:5

100'0

100.0

100.0

100·0

N.B.-The movements of fishing junks are not included in this Table.

Of vessels of European construction, 5,226 ocean steamers, 3,775 river steamers, and 3,336 steamships not exceeding 60 tons, entered during the year, giving a daily average of 33-8 ships, as compared with 294 ships in 1920 and 29-1 ships in 1919.

6

similar coin which was minted at Canton as well as to the amount of Hongkong coin minted largely in excess of the needs of the Colony by itself In 1905 the Hongkong Government ceased to issue any subsidiary coin and in 1906 it began a policy of demonet- ising all its subsidiary coin received as revenue.

This policy was continuously followed till 1918 except during a brief period in 1911. Coin to the face value of $23,235,459 has thus been redeemed. The total issue by the Hongkong Government was of the face value of about $44,000,000.

II--SHIPPING AND TRADE, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,

AGRICULTURE, AND LAND.

(a.) SHIPPING.

The total of the shipping entering and clearing at ports in the Colony during the year 1921 amounted to 672,680 vessels of 43,420,970 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1920, shows a decrease of 10,816 vessels, with an increase of 3,298,443 tons.

Of the above, 52,222 vessels of 27,852,616 tons were engaged in foreign trade, as compared with 43,364 vessels of 24,194,022 tons in 1920 and were distributed as follows :-

1920.

Numbers. Numbers.

1921.

1920.

Tonnage.

1921.

Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going Ships,

9.6%

8.9%

34.5%

33.3%

Foreign Ocean-

going Ships,

12:5

11.1

38.1

38.8

British River

Steamers, ...

11.9

110

13:5

126

Foreign River

Steamers,

40

3.5

2.4

21

Steam Laun-

ches (under

60 tons),

116

12.8

0.7

0.7

Trading Junks,

50:4

52.7

10.8

12:5

100'0

100.0

100.0

100·0

N.B.-The movements of fishing junks are not included in this Table.

Of vessels of European construction, 5,226 ocean steamers, 3,775 river steamers, and 3,336 steamships not exceeding 60 tons, entered during the year, giving a daily average of 33-8 ships, as compared with 294 ships in 1920 and 29-1 ships in 1919.

The average tonnage of individual ocean vessels entering the Port has increased from 1,8310 to 1,919 8 tons, that of British ships has decreased from 2,002 3 to 1,997'5 tons while that of foreign ships has increased from 1,699 2 to 1,857.9 tons.

The average tonnage of individual river steamers entering during the year has decreased from 425'8 to 460·5 tons.

That of British river steamers has increased from 5161 to 570 5 tons, and that of foreign river steamers has decreased from 3243 to 3167 tons.

A comparison between the years 1920 and 1921 is given in the following table :

Class of Vessels.

1920.

1921.

Increase.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage.

British

going,

Foreign Ocean-

going,

Ocean-

4,173 8,351,084

4,630

9,247,198

457

896,114

5,418: 9,223,552 5,827

10,817,413

409

1,593,861

British

River

:

Steamers,

5,138 3,256,985 5,743

3,519,294

605

262,309

Foreign River

Steamers,

1,741

577,270 1,810

580,088

69

2,818

Steamships under

60 tons (Foreign Trade),

5,028 167,248 6,687

195,727 1,659

28,479

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

21,866 2,617,883 27,525

3,491,736 5,659 873,853

Total, Foreign

Trade,

43,364 24,194,022 52,222

27,852,616

8,858 3,658,594

Steam Launches plying in Wa-

ters of the

Colony,

619,068 14,636.848 597,386

14,174,320

21,682

462,528

Junks,

Local

Trade,

*21,065 †1,291,657 *23,072 †1,394,034 2,007

102,377

Grand Total,

683,497 40,122,527 672,680 43,420,970 10,865 3,760,971 21,682 462,528

t

Net Increase,.

3,298,443 10,817

Including 11,156 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 839,422 tons.

11,922

>>

""

895,788

17

In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in foreign trade, there is an increase of 1,659 ships with an increase in tonnage of 28,479 tons or 330 per cent. in numbers and 170 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to 19 newly licenced launches plying in 1921.

8

Junks in foreign trade show an increase of 5,659 vessels and an increase of 873,853 tons or 25.9 per cent. in numbers and 33·4 per cent. in tonnage.

In local trade, (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is a decrease in steam-launches of 21,682 and a decrease of 462,528 tons or 3.5 per cent. in numbers and 3.2 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to bigger launches being employed in local ferry services, making fewer trips.

Junks in local trade show an increase of 2,007 vessels and an increase of 102,377 tons or 9.5 per cent. in numbers and 7·9 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to more junks being employed on reclamation.

This table shows an increase in British ocean-going shipping of 457 ships or 109 per cent. and an increase of 896,114 tons or 10.7 per cent.

This increase is due to newly-built ships and enemy ships transferred to the British flag and various steamship lines running their eastern trade which were elsewhere employed during war times.

British river steamers have decreased by 605 ships with an increase in tonnage of 262,309 tons or 117 per cent. in numbers and 80 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due to the s.s. Chuen Chow, which was laid up being again put on the Macao run.

Foreign ocean-going vessels have increased by 409 ships with an increase of 1,593,861 tons or 75 per cent. in numbers and 172 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due to the large amount of new American, Norwegian and Chinese vessels frequenting the Port and enemy vessels being transferred to other nationalities.

Foreign river steamers show an increase of 69 ships with an increase in tonnage of 2,878 tons or 38 per cent. in numbers and 0.5 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due to two Chinese ships which were added to the Wuchow service at the end of last year making regular trips throughout the year.

The actual number of individual ocean-going vessels of European construction during the year 1921 was 988 of which 343 were British and 645 foreign. In 1920 the corresponding figures were 927 of which 330 were British and 597 foreign.

These 988 Ships measured 2,713,098 tons. They entered 5,232 times and gave a collective tonnage of 10,044,422 tons.

Thus 61 more ships entered 425 more times and gave a collect- ive tonnage greater by 1,242,802 tons, an average of 2,924-2 tons per entry.

1

9

Thus :-

Steamers.

No. of times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1920. 1921. | 1920. 1921. 1920.

1921.

British,

330

3432,090 2,319 4,184,927 4,632,195

Japanese.....

279

351

925 1,298 2,059,712 2,870,394

U.S.A.,

129

89

286

241

953,443 863,673

Chinese,

67

74

912 864

595,989 586,122

Brazilian,

1

3,041

Steamers

9

10

11

14

43,410 56,172

Danish

1

Sailing..

1

580

Dutch,

27

41

117

176

313,312 484,152

French,

34

32

156

149

276,962 282,834

Greek

1

1

1,882

Italian,....

7

14

21 !

54,512 78.372

Inter Allied,

2

10

4

30,980 19,738

Norwegian,

19

19

131

102

136,616 102,349

Portuguese,..

5

78

7

38.269

8.664

Russian,

9

1

36

55,468

4,479

Sarawak,

1

1

3

892

2,676

Siamese,

10

5

5

35

22

40,224 24,096

Swedish,

6

4

7 13,863 26,044

Total,....

927 988 4,807 5,232 8,801,620 10,044,422

10

The Nationality of the crews in British and in foreign ships were as follows:-

AMERICANS

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREW.

AND OTHER EUROPEANS.

ÁSIATICS.

1920. 1921. 1920. 1921.

1920. 1921. 1920. 1921.

British, 330

34326,284 28,262 1,214 600 140,882 176,476

Foreign,. 597

645 1,750 1,722 24,542 22,927 150,617 171,168

Total,

927 988 28,034 29,984 25,756 23,527 291,499 347,644

Hence in British ships ཡ--

And in Foreign ships :-

1920.

1921.

1920.

1921.

15.61%

13.76 % of the crews

0·99 %

0.73 %

were British. 0.29% of the crews

13.87 %

0.88 % of the crews were British. 11.71% of the crews

83.66 %

were other Europeans. 85-95% of the crews

were Asiatics.)

were other Europeans.

85.14 %

87.41% of the crews

were Asiatics.

100.00

100-00

100.00

100.00

TRADE.

Detailed and accurate statistics of imports and exports are collected and published by the imports and exports department.

IMPORTS.

The number and tonnage of ships of European type construc- tion carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1920, were as follows:-

Steamers.

1920.

No.

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

4,807 8,801,620 | 5,231 |10,043,842 424 1,242,222

River Steamers, 3,441 1,918,064 | 3,778 Sailing Vessels,

2,050,791 337 132,727

1

580

580

Total,. 8,248 10,719,684 | 9,010|12,095,213 762 1,375,529

Nett Increase....... 762 1,375,529

11

EXPORTS.

The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal, are as follows:-

1920.

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tounage.

Steamers,

4,784 8,773,016 5,226 10,020,769

River Steamers, 3,438 1,916,191 3,775 2,048,591

Sailing Vessels,

442 1,247,753

337: 132,400

580

580

Total,... 8,222 10,689,207 9,002|12,069,940

780 1,380,733

Net Increase,

780 1,380,733

1920.

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

Steamers,

4,784

River Steamers, 3,438

464,707 | 5,226

63,486 3,775

508,793 442 44,086

69.906 337

6,420

Total,... 8,222

528,193 9,001

578,699 779

50,506

Net Increase,................... 779 50,506

The River Trade, compared with 1920, is shown in the following Table :----

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

1920,

345,514

317,512

1,686,306

1921,

412,274

353,683

1.790,062

12

The following table shows the junk trade of the Colony for the years 1920 and 1921 :—

IMPORTS.

1920.

1921.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade, ...... 10,885

1,320,745

13,742

1,755,153

Local Trade,

4,917

223,104

5,495

244,730

Total,

.....

15,802

1,543,846

19,237

1,999,883

Imported 706,671 tons as under :---

Cattle, 1,607 head,

Swine, 20,359 head,

Earth and Stones, General,

Tons.

211

1,172

23,078

682,210

Total,.......

706,671

EXPORTS.

1920.

1921.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,..... 10,981

1,297,138

13,783

1,736,583

Local Trade,

4,992

229,134

5,655

253,516

Total,

15,973 1,526,272

19,438

1,990,099

Exported 1,247,170 tons as under :——

Kerosine, 2,073,953 cases,

Rice and Paddy,

Coal,.......

General,

Tons.

67,809

457,094

257,821

464,446

Total,.....1,247,170

ī

.

13

ÜPHEM.

Two hundred and twenty-three (223) chests of Persian opium were imported during the year. 29 chests were exported to Formosa.

Four hundred and thirty-five (435 chests of uncertificated Indian Opium were imported; 325 chests for the Macao opium farmer, and the remaining 120 chests for the government opium monopoly.

The table below shows the total imports and exports since 1913-

1921. 1920. 1919. 1918 MIT. 1916 1915. 1914. 1913. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests Chests, Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests.

Stock in hand on

1st January,

329

Imported during

the year,

658

Total,....

987

329 253 7994 977 1.3034 2,256 4,580 5,560

1,525 1,290 1.259 1.637 1,706 1,873 | 3,059 9,1081

1,8543 1,543 2,05832.634) 3,009) 4,129 7.640 14,6681⁄2

Boiled by Opium

36

667

Farmer,

Boiled by Govern.

ment,

2004

377

539 352

365

340

413

Spurious Opium

destroyed,

13

17

19

Used locally..

Missing or stolen, Sold to Govern-

ment,

Exported during

12

the year,

Total.......

548 1,2971 837

760 1,525, 1,211

1,2653 1,469 1,667

1.8054 1,835 2,032

2,469 4.9114 9,419

2,826 5,383; 10,08%

Stock remaining on; 31st December....

2263

329

329

253 7091 9773 1,303 2,256, 4,580

Emigration and Immigration.

One hundred and fifty-six thousand and eleven (156,011) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1921, (105,258 in 1920). Of these, 98,382 were carried in British ships, and 57,629 in foreign ships.

One hundred and fifty-nine thousand and sixty-four (159,064) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this colony or from coast ports, as against 122,438 in 1920. Of these, 107,301 arrived in British ships, and 51,763 in foreign ships.

14

Statement of number of emigrants to Straits Settlements, 1911 to 1921, compared with total Chinese emigration.

No. of Emigrants

to

Straits Settlements.

Total No. of

Emigrants.

1911

100,906

135,565

1912

84,024

122,657

1913

102,353

142,759

1914

44,974

76,296

1915

41,278

68,275

1916

82,797

117,653

1917

63.292

96,298

1918

8,019

43,830

1919

11,638

59,969

1920

43,935

105,258

1921

87,324

156,011

(b)-INDUSTRIES.

(i.)--Under European management.

Engineering and Shipbuilding.-The figures are as follows for the years 1920 and 1921 :-

H.K. & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld... vessels of 37,935 gross tons and 11,500 I.H.P. Taikoo Dockyard & Eng. Co., Ld.

W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld.... Kwong Hip Lung Co., Ld.

Kwong Fat & Co.

Kwong Sang Loong

Hung Fat

A King...

1920.

5

13,660

D

"?

22

:;

1,197

>>

1

50

"

356

1.374

25

>

77

9,700

1,336

."

30

85

48

276

Total

.62 vessels of 54,656 gross tons and 22.975 I.H.P.

1921.

9 vessels of 7,725 gross tons and 6,900 I.H.P.

Taikoo Dock & Eng. Co., Ld. H.K. & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld... 6 W. S. Bailey & Co.. Ld...... Kwong Book Cheong

20

26.637 3,387 200

17,700

2,192 ""

280

**

Total

36 vessels of 37,949 gross tons and 27,072 I.H.P.

Sugar Refineries.-The year 1921 saw the gradual adjustment of prices to a normal level and although sellers were successful in maintaining prices until May, they eventually dropped to about Guilders 10. A period of adjustment was unavoidable after the very high prices ruling in 1920 and the dislocation of stocks resulting, but a more satisfactory state of affairs may be looked for on the return of normal production and consumption.

Yarn. The yarn trade during 1921 was not unsatisfactory and the few native dealers who survived the collapse of the previous year, closed the period profitably.

15

The total quantity of Indian yarn imported into the colony during the year amounted to 110,000 bales and 25,000 bales were brought forward from the previous year.

bales.

Clearances totalled 121,000 bales leaving a carryover of 14,000

Cotton-Middling American cotton was quoted in Liverpool on 1st January at 8:65d. for spot. It advanced until the 17th idem, when 10'69d. was reached then slumped to its lowest point for the period under review, viz., 6'38d. on 28th February.

A fairly even position was maintained between 7d. and 8d. for 4 months, until the end of August, when the U.S.A. Cotton Bureau estimates reported a shortage in crop which brought in heavy buyers with the result that on 29th September, 1570d, was registered. Later it became apparent that the bureau's figures were incorrect and the rate gradually sagged away until on 31st December, the quotation was 11:36d.

Rope Making.-Trade during 1921 was very much the same as in 1920. Exchange ruled more favourably and bigger business should have resulted had it not been for increased competition with lower quality rope in some of the markets.

Cement Manufacture. The demand for cement continued unabated for the first 8 months of the year, but there was a material falling off in exports to India, Java, etc., during the last 4 months, due chiefly to the importation there of large quantities of cheap cement principally from Belgium, Germany and Italy. The total turnover, however, was almost exactly the same as that of the previous year.

(ii).-Under Chinese Management.

Tin. This line of business was not nearly as good as 1920, chiefly owing to the unsettled state of affairs in the interior of China, especially in the Kwangsi Province; also lack of demand from both Europe and America. Therefore, the local prices only varied from $5 to $7 per picul for the whole year round, in spite of a fair quantity having been seized by the Kwangtung military authorities from Fu-Roo of the Kwangsi Province after the civil war between the two provinces, and which were offered to be disposed of at a cheap rate. At the beginning of the year prices seemed to be very much stronger.

Imports and Exports for the year, in approximate figures,

were:

IMPORTS.

From Straits,.

EXPORTS.

700 Tons. To United Kingdom, 2,000 Tous.

United States, 1,000

China,

Yunnan,

""

>>

Kwangsi,.

50 8,000 200

""

China,

"

Japan,

8,950 Tons.

2,100

>>

1,000

>>

6,100 Tons.

16

Native Tobacco.-Practically nothing was done during the whole year.

Prices were down more than 50% and all houses lost heavily.

Leather and Hides.-Some improvements had been made in these lines and dealers made some money with a fair amount of business transacted, but, imports of hides from Kwangsi were scarce on account of the trouble in the interior of China.

Ginger and Preserves.-The export of these commodities increased a good deal and dealers made money on account of cheap prices of ginger and sugar.

Soy.-There was not much change in this line on that of the previous year.

Paper.-Owing to heavy stocks and small demand losses are

reported.

Vermilion. Very little business was done and was worse than 1920.

Lard. This line of business was very much behind 1920, owing to lack of demand from foreign countries.

Tinned Goods.--General improvement has been made in these lines, as cost of tin-plates, sugar and raw materials was less.

Shamshoo-Spirit of wine and sugar were cheaper, therefore, profits to native brewers were better, but exportation was about the the same as the previous year.

doue.

Vinegar.-Mollasses were low in price and good business was

Knitted Vests and Socks.-Up to date machinery is now being used, and these industries are progressing day by day. Great demand was made from the interior and from Australia, and pro- fitable business resulted.

Rattan and Fibre Furniture. These was not much improve- ment on the previous year. Local prices advanced 5% only on account of labour. Seagrass and rattan core were also slack.

(c.)-FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hongkong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shauki- wan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is im- ported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

17

(d.)-FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE, AND BOTANY.

At Kowloon Tsai, 2,500 one year old trees of pinus massoniana were planted.

On the hills between Cheung Sha Wan and the Taipo road, 50,000 sites were sown with pine seeds.

All sites in which seeds had failed to germinate at Cheung Chau and Fan Ling were resown with pine seeds, altogether 45 pounds of pine seeds were used.

294 pounds of pine seed was sown broad-cast on grass banks above and below roads at the following places. Taipo road, Tsin Wan road, Chai Wan gap to Tytam, Tytam to Stanley, Stanley road, Findlay road, Lagard road, Sai Kung gap to Ha Chan gap and roads on Cheung Chau.

On the grass slopes below Severn road 394 one year old trees of Pinus Massoniana were planted.

Broad leaved trees planted.

In the vicinity of Aberdeen reservoir, 186 young trees of

(Artocarpus integrifolea) were planted.

13

185 Tristanias and 45 Eucalyptus were planted on grass banks below Severn road.

The trees used for roadside planting were principally camphor, tristania, albizzia, melaleuca, poinciana, ficus, aleurites and bauhinia; these were used at the following places, Tytam road 20, Shaukiwan 12, Shaukiwan to Tytam 59, Bowen road 2, Pokfu- lam road 2, Barker road 6, Plantation road 13, Conduit road 2, Albany road 2, Nathan road 46, Mody road 3, Taipo road 422, Tsin Wan road 738 and 24 near the market on the Sham Shui Po reclamation.

Trees removed.

In connection with general improvements to and widening of roads in various parts of the Colony, large shade trees had to be felled at the following places. Queen's road east 9, Arsenal street 2, Caine road 4, Eastern street 2, Pokfulam road 1.

At Taipo police station a number of large specimens of tristania which were entirely shutting out the view of the railway station and the adjoining public road, were removed.

In connection with extensions at Kowloon and Yaumati reservoirs and the formation of the site for new cemeteries at Fo Pang Hang, numbers of pinus massoniana had to be removed from adjoining plantations.

19

The principal items were $563,000 for Marine Lots Nos. 430 and 431, (North Point), $124,000 (part premium) for Inland Lots Nos. 2316 and 2319, (Queen's Road Central and Pedder Street sites), $94,000 (part premium) for Inland Lots Nos. 2317 and 2318 (Queen's Road Central and Pedder Street sites), $71,000 for Kow- loon Inland Lot No. 1432, $41,000 for Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1439, $8,370 for Pier No. 6 and $1,067 for Pier No. 51.

In the New Territories the net amount received for premium on sales of land was $85,591.01, the principal items being $9,295.70 for New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 317 and $6,550 for New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 339, being $144,858.04 less than the year 1920, in which year New Kowloon Marine Lots Nos. 6 and 7 sold for $150,660 and New Kowloon Marine Lot No. 8 for $51,418.

The number of deeds and documents registered in the Land Office was 4,466 and exceeded the total of any previous year by 1061; the aggregate consideration set out in deeds registered was $107,855,703.10 as against $67,493,394 in 1920.

Resumptions include portion of Marine Lot No. 65 (Praya East). Inland Lot No. 358 (Caroline Hill) and Kowloon Farm Lot No. 9.

Development at Shamshuipo continues.

With one exception agreements relating to the Praya East Reclamation were entered into by all entitled to participate.

The total area of land sold or granted during the year was 564a. 3r. 7.91p. of which 523a. Or. 78p. (including 361 acres for camphor growing) were dealt with by the District Officers. The total area of land resumed was 116a. 1r. 18.74p.

In the New Territories the demand for land was steady with upward tendency.

HI. LEGISLATION.

Thirty-two (32) Ordinances were passed during 1921 of which fifteen were amendments of previous Ordinances.

The most important matters with which these Ordinances dealt

were:--

The Treaty of Peace (Amendment) (No. 2) Order, 1920, (No. 7).

The Treaty of Peace (Hungary) Order, 1921, (No. 29).

:

20

These two Ordinances were for the purpose of modifying certain provisions of the Orders in Council, and of adapting the provisions of the said Orders to the circumstances of the Colony,

The Holts Wharf, (No. 3).

The Mercantile Bank note issue, (No. 26).

The St. Joseph's College incorporation, (No. 27).

These are private enactments. The object of the first one was to give the Governor in Council power to make by-laws for the maintenance of order and safety in the conduct of the business carried on at Holts Wharf, while the second one was passed to extend the period in which the Mercantile Bank of India was empowered to make, issue, re-issue and circulate bank notes. The object of the third was to incorporate the Christian Brothers School in Hongkong known as St. Joseph's College.

The Custodian, (No. 6)—The object of which was to make it clear that property, rights and powers vested in, or conferred upon, any holder of the office of custodian passed to his successors in office.

The Stamp, (No. 8)—The objects of this ordinance were (a) to increase the revenue from stamp duties (b) to facilitate the collection of these duties and prevent evasion, and (c) to correct various defects in the law which had long been known to exist.

The Maintenance Orders (Facilities for Enforcement), (No. 9) -The object being to facilitate the enforcement in the Colony of maintenance orders made in England or Ireland and vice rersâ.

The Criminal Procedure, (No. 10)—The object of this ordi- nance was to effect several improvements in the criminal procedure of the Supreme Court.

The Non-Ferrous Metal Industry, (No. 11)-This was to repeal the Non-Ferrous Metal Industry Ordinance, 1919. It was recog- nised that the licence system introduced was of no practical use in Hongkong, which, as regards the metal industry, was a trans- shipping centre and not a producing country.

The Companies, (No. 12)-The object of this ordinance was to introduce into the Companies Ordinances, 1911-1915, some amend- ments which experience had shown to be advisable, and to bring the law of the Colony into conformity with the China (Companies) Amendment Order in Council, 1919.

The Rents, (No. 13)-The object of this ordinance was to protect the tenants of domestic tenements from unreasonable in- crease in rental and from arbitrary termination of their tenancies.

21

The Praya East Reclamation, (No. 17)—The object of this ordinance was to legalise and to provide for the reclamation of the eastern praya.

The Stocks, (No. 31)-The object of this ordinance was to abolish the penalty of stocks except for the offences of kidnapping. traffic in women and girls for the purposes of prostitution, and living on the proceeds of prostitution.

The Judgments (Facilities for Enforcement), (No. 32)-This ordinance was passed with a view to provide for the reciprocal enforcement of judgments and awards in the Colony and other parts of His Majesty's dominions and in territories under His Majesty's protection.

IV.-EDUCATION.

No important changes have taken place in the Education Department during the year under review. The staff, depleted by causes due to the war, is being gradually brought up to normal strength again.

The total number of pupils at schools in the Colony excluding the Police School and the uncontrolled schools in the New Terri- tories are:-

Number of Pupils.

Total.

English

Vernacular

Schools.

Schools.

Government Schools

3,386

19

3,405

Military Schools -

140

140

Excluded Private Schools

281

12

293

Grant Schools

2,401

3,736

6,137

Controlled Private

Schools

4,882

15,854

20,736

Controlled

Private

Schools, New Terri-

tories

3,989

3,989

Technical Institute

582

582

Total

11,672

23,610

35,282

The most important schools, apart from the excluded schools, are Queen's College for Chinese, four District Schools its feeders, and the Belilios Public School for Chinese girls. There is an Indian School of growing importance now housed in a new building pre-

22

sented to the Colony by Sir Ellis Kadoorie. Kowloon School and Victoria School for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 171. There is also a school for the children of the Peak District with an average attendance of 38. The Diocesan School and Orphanage and St. Joseph's College are important boys' schools in receipt of an annual grant. The Italian, French, and St. Mary's Convents, and the Diocesan Girls' School, are the most important of the English Grant Schools for girls.

The Hongkong Technical Institute affords an opportunity for higher education of students who have left school. Instruction was given in 1921 in Building Construction, Chemistry (Practical and Theoretical), Physics, Electricity, Commercial English, French, Shorthand, Book-keeping, Cookery and Translation. Classes in Sanitation (Public Hygiene) are also held, the examinations being conducted under the auspices of the Royal Sanitary Institute, London. Classes for men and women teachers, both "English" and Vernacular" are a feature of the Institute.

The lecturers are recruited from the members of the Medical and Educational faculties of the Colony, and from the Department of Public Works, and receive fees for their services. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped Chemical Laboratory and excel- lent Physical apparatus.

The University of Hongkong, incorporated under the local University Ordinance, 1911, and opened in 1912, is a residential University for students of both sexes, the object of which is declared by the said Ordinance to be "the promotion of Arts, Science and Learning, the provision of higher education, the con- ferring of degrees, the development and formation of the character of students of all races, nationalities, and creeds, and the main- tenance of the good understanding with the neighbouring country of China."

The inception of the University was primarily due to the initiative of Sir Frederick Lugard, Governor of the Colony from 1907 to 1912, and to the liberality of benefactors of varied national- ity and domicile, first amongst whom should be mentioned the late Sir Hormusjee Mody, by whom the entire expense of the erection of the main building was borne.

The University includes the three Faculties of Medicine. Engineering and Arts. Admission to all faculties is conditional upon passing the matriculation examination of the University or some examination recognised as equivalent thereto.

The Faculty of Medicine provides a five year course of study in the usual pre-medical and medical sciences, supplemented by clinical work in the Government Civil and Tung Wah Hospitals, leading to the degree of M.B., B.S. The degrees of M.D., and M.S., may be obtained for post-graduate work. The degrees above-mentioned are recognised by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

23

The Faculty of Engineering provides a four year course in practical and theoretical engineering, leading to the degree of B.Sc., (Eng). Fourth year students specialize in civil, in mechanical or in electrical engineering. The degree for post- graduate work is that of M.Sc., (Eng).

The Faculty of Arts includes departments of pure Arts and Science, Education (including practical teaching) and Commerce. The course is in all cases one of four years and leads to the degree of B.A. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.A.

With a view to better securing the maintenance of the desired standard--which in the Faculty of Medicine is that of an English University degree and in the Faculty of Engineering that of the corresponding degree in the University of London-external examiners are, in all Faculties, associated with the internal examiners in all annual and final examinations. In the Faculty of Engineering, but not in other Faculties, degrees with honours are granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.

The degree of LL.D., is also granted, honoris causa.

The site of the University was given gratuitously by the Colonial Government. As subsequently enlarged by minor grants and by purchase, it includes an area of some 25 acres, looking out upon the harbour over the City of Victoria.

The main buildings, as already stated, were the gift of the late Sir H. Mody. In them are housed the Chemical, Physical and Biological Laboratories, the University Library and portions of the Engineering Laboratories. They further include a Great Hall, a Senate Room and the Lecture and Class rooms used by the Faculty of Arts and for general purposes.

Special medical buildings include schools of Anatomy, Phy- siology, Pathology and Tropical Medicine, erected at the cost of Chinese gentlemen resident in the Colony. In the case of each of the three schools last mentioned a larger or smaller sum still remains available for further equipment.

Special engineering buildings include:-

(a) a Power Station, generating light and power for the estate, energy being supplied by internal combus- tion engines of varied types which are available for instructional purposes:

(b) a Prime Movers (steam) and Hydraulics Laboratory, at present housed in a converted Pumping Station, formerly the property of the Government; and (e) a Workshop, including a small machine-shop,

smithy and carpenter's shop.

24

Electrical machinery (other than the main generating plant), electrical technology, the testing of materials and experimental mechanics are dealt with in the main building.

The larger part of the engineering equipment was the gift of British engineering firms.

Other buildings upon the estate include:-

(a) the Vice-Chancellor's Lodge

(b) Staff-Quarters

(e) the residential Hostels, and

(d) the University Union Building.

The cost of the building last mentioned (some $62,000) was met in approximately equal shares from University moneys and from public subscriptions, the entire cost of furnishing being met out of further subscriptions.

66

Unless exempted from residence (such exemption being ordinarily granted on the ground that the student's manner of life is not such as is catered for in the hostels), every matriculated student is required to reside either in a University, or in a recognised Hostel.

The University Hostels are three in number-Lugard Hall, Eliot Hall, and May Hall.

Recognised Hostels are at present two in number-Morrison Hall, situate immediately above the University grounds and con- ducted by the London Missionary Society, and St. John's Hall, immediately opposite the front of the University, conducted by the Church Missionary Society.

Each student occupies a separate room or cubicle, and there are the usual Common rooms. Each University Hostel is in charge

of a member of the staff, as resident Warden.

No University Hostel at present exists for women students— whose right to admission to the University was first recognised in 1921: but by the courtesy of the school authorities, arrangements have been made for their lodging in connection with St. Stephen's Girls College.

University fees for tuition and board amount to $550 per annum, enabling a student who lives carefully to meet the whole of his expenses with a sum of $1,000 per annum, as compared with a minimum sum of $2,500 per annum, besides travelling expenses, in the case of a Chinese student going abroad for his education.

The number of students attending lectures at the beginning of 1922 was 251 made up of 86 in the Medical Faculty, 48 in the Faculty of Engineering and 117 in the Faculty of Arts.

རྩྭ

25

Numerous scholarships are available, including the King Edward VII Scholarships founded by His Majesty's Government, the President's Scholarships founded by His Excellency the President of China, together with Scholarships (some of which are in the nature of bursaries) given by the Hongkong Government, the Chinese Government, the Metropolitan District of Peking, the Provincial Governments of Canton, Chilli, Yunnan and Hupeh, the Governments of the Straits Settlements and the Federated Malay States, the Government of Kedah and the Siamese Government. Students are also drawn from the Philippines, French Indo-China and Australasia.

Noteworthy events in 1921 were the appointment of Sir William Brunyate, K.C.M.G., as Vice-Chancellor in succession to Sir Charles Eliot, K.C.M.G., C.B., who resigned upon appointment as His Majesty's Ambassador at Tokio: the creation of a 4 year course in Commerce, for which purpose a sum of $12,000 for 5 years was promised by the General Chamber of Commerce of Hongkong: the increase of the Government subsidy from $20,000 to $50,000 a year, and the completion of a grant from the Colonial Government of $1,000,000 as additional endowment together with a further sum of $700,000 to pay off an accumulated deficit and to make good a portion of the sum spent on buildings and equipment: a gift of $100,000 from Messrs. John Swire and Sons, Ltd., for the purposes of the Engineering Faculty: a promise of $100,000 by four half- yearly instalments from Sir Robert Ho Tung, for the building and equipment of an Engineering Workshop: a promise of $100,000 by four half-yearly instalments from Mr. H. M. H. Nemazee for general purposes: a promise of $50,000 spread over 10 years, from Mr. Kwok Chung Yung; and negotiations with the Rockefeller Foundation of New York, which, since the end of the year, have resulted in the offer of the sum of $750,000 for the foundation of three full-time chairs in the Faculty of Medicine.

The total cost of the land, buildings and equipment of the University may be placed at approximately $1,750,000 and their replacement value at not less than $2,500,000. The invested endowments exceed $2,500,000 excluding sums promised and not yet received.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

BUILDINGS.

The erection of the following houses for Senior Officers was completed Two blocks each of 4 houses at Leighton Hill, three houses on Severn Road, one house for the Puisne Judge, and one house for a senior engineer, and, in addition, two contracts were let for two additional blocks of 3 houses each at Leighton Hill, and for one block containing 6 flats and 4 detached houses on the Homestead site, respectively.

26

P

All the houses at Leighton Hill are being constructed by Messrs. Denison, Ram and Gibbs, and those on the Homestead site by Messrs. Little, Adams and Wood.

In addition, 12 houses at Happy Valley were completed for subordinate officers early in the year.

Good progress was made with the new police married quart- ers, containing 6 flats, in Caine Road,

Alterations were carried out to the Kitchen Block at Govern- ment House, and a new Garage Block was commenced which in- cludes quarters for the Custodian and two rooms for guests, for whom accommodation cannot be found in the main building.

The quarters for scavenging coolies at Hospital Road were completed towards the end of the year, and good progress was made with similar quarters in Belchers Street.

Foundations were commenced for the large building (New Fire Brigade Station) opposite the Central Market, the details of the accommodation of which were given in last year's report. A temporary Fire Station was completed in Wanchai.

A contract was let, and work commenced, for a maternity section next to the Victoria Hospital, Barker road, the Peak, and plans were prepared for the alteration to the main hospital block and to the nurses quarters; also, an outpatients' block was com- menced at the Civil Hospital.

In Kowloon, quarters for the Royal Observatory staff were com- pleted, and an extension to the pig lairage at Ma-tau-kok was made.

The preparation of the site for the Kowloon Hospital was in progress.

Drawings were prepared for the new police station at Yau- mati and Mong-kok-tsui, and for an extension to the fire brigade station at Kowloon.

Other works of a minor nature were carried out.

In the New Territories, work was proceeding in connection with the rebuilding of four of the prison sheds at the Lai-chi-kok branch Prison.

Good progress was made with the new clerks' quarters at Taipo, and the land bailiff's quarters at Pingshan.

COMMUNICATIONS.

The following Motor roads were in hand :-

A road contouring the South side of Mt. Davis and linking Pokfulam Road with the Victoria Road was completed, as was also

!

}

27

the extension of Lugard Road; the first section of the road from Taitam Gap to Shek O, about one mile in length, was also com- pleted, and good progress was made with the second section thereof, and a contract for the third section was let; the two latter sections are also each about a mile in length.

A twenty-foot road from Wanchai Gap to Magazine Gap and from thence to Chamberlain Road was under construction; one, from Bowen Road to Wongneichong Gap,--being the first part of the new road to Repulse Bay-was completed; and good progress was also made with the twenty-foot road from Bowen Road contouring the hill towards Sookunpoo Valley, passing over the ridge where it will be joined by Broadwood Road.

A further section of the scheme for widening Kennedy Road was completed and progress was also made with the scheme for widening Queen's Road, East, as opportunity afforded, though there still remains a considerable portion to be dealt with before the widening can be accomplished. Work on the scheme for the diversion of a certain portion of the Shankiwan Road through Quarry Bay Village and the improvement of the alignment and levels of a considerable section of the same road on either side of the diversion was commenced.

In Kowloon, further progress was attained with the extension of the Coronation Road to the North West of Mong-kok Village.

The section of the Kowloon City-Mong-kok-tsui Road, East of the Railway, was nearing completion, and the section, West of the Railway, was making good progress. The excavation from the hills to form the above-mentioned roads was being utilized to fill in the low lying areas to the south of the Old Kowloon boundary line.

Extensive widenings of existing roads were carried out as

follows:-

Kowloon City Road, between K.I.L. 1150 and the bridge over the stream course West of the 'Hill of the King of the Sung'; from this latter point a sixty foot width of roadway was constructed on a new alignment to the New Kowloon City-Mong- kok-tsui Road.

Salisbury Road, between Nathan and Chatham Roads. Hankow Road, between Salisbury and Peking Roads.

Argyle Street, between Coronation Road and Ho-mun-tin.

The improvements to the Taipo Road, between the 3rd and 5th milestones, and the section of this road--and the construction of a bridge--at Ma-nin-shui were completed.

A road extension, 10 feet wide, was made from the Fanling- Sheung Shui Road to the Sheung Shui Police Station.

28

A considerable amount of surfacing of the hilly portions of the Lai-chi-kok-Castle Peak, Mong-kok-tsui-Taipo, and Taipo- Fanling Roads was done.

DRAINAGE,

The construction of a nullah at Mong-kok-tsui between the Taipo Road and the Old Kowloon boundary line near Kau-lung- tong was in progress. A beginning was made with the training and diversion of the large stream course to the East of Lai-chi-kok.

WATER WORKS.

Drawings and specifications were completed and tenders invited for the large scheme of filter beds to be constructed at the Eastern end of Bowen Road; the contract had not, however, been awarded at the end of the year.

An additional rising main was laid to the Peak to enable more water to be pumped up to this district, and the laying of a new 8 inch main was commenced in order to connect Shaukiwan Village with the City supply system; this latter work had to be suspended for a time on account of the alterations to the Shaukiwan Road. a temporary measure, however, a 3-inch main was put through in order to obviate any difficulties which might arise until the larger pipe could be laid.

As

For the supply of an additional engine and boiler, required for the Pokfulam Road Pumping Station, the tender of Messrs. Tangye was accepted, and the foundation plans were received at the end of the year thus enabling a commencement to be made with the extension of the station so as to provide the necessary accommodation.

Tenders were considered for an additional steam pumping set for the Taitam Tuk Pumping Station, but in view of the excessive price quoted as compared with an electrically driven plant, the matter was again referred home for consideration by the Consulting Engineers.

The laying of a 3-inch main from the Wong-nei-chong reservoir to a service tank at Repulse Bay was completed and in service early in the year.

The work of substituting an 18" water inain for the existing one of 12" from the Kowloon Filter Beds to Yaumati was completed, except for a short section beyond the 3rd milestone on the Taipo Road where the road requires to be diverted. The replacing of the existing water mains in the Kowloon distribution system by larger ones was continued.

At the Kowloon Filter Beds, adjoining the Taipo Road, two new beds are in course of construction.

29

The taking over and the reconstruction of the existing Water Works supplying the Fanling Golf Club houses and a few other residences in that neighbourhood was completed.

Plans were prepared for a Water Supply at Taipo.

RECLAMATIONS.

At Aplichau, the reclamation under construction was nearly completed by the end of the year. It will provide a considerable area upon which it is hoped to be able to accommodate some of the old village lot-holders so that this insanitary area may be improved as opportunity arises.

Satisfactory progress was made with the filling in of the tidal flat and the cutting down of the hill between Tai-kok-tsui and Fuk-tsun-heung.

The work on the Shamshuipo reclamation scheme progressed satisfactorily, the rubble mound and the cement concrete blocks for the section under construction having been completed.

A commencement was made with a reclamation scheme at Cheung Sha Wan in conjunction with the tipping of the refuse collected from the Kowloon Peninsula and Hongkong.

The Kai Tak Laud Investment Company made but little progress with their reclamation at Kowloon Bay. The sea-wall of that portion of it acquired by the Government as the site for the new gaol was completed and the entire area filled in to coping level.

The reclamation work which is being carried out by the Standard Oil Company of New York at Lai-chi-kok made good progress.

The Marine Lot-holders fronting Praya East having in May, 1920, agreed to the terms and apportionment of the Reclamation to be carried out by the Government at Wanchai Bay and known as the Praya East Reclamation Scheme, the preparation of the necessary plans and documents were commenced forthwith, and an Ordinance (No. 17 of 1921) to give legal effect to this project became law on the 9th September, 1921. Tenders were invited on the 15th June, 1921, and the lowest one--that of Messrs. Sang Lee & Co.-amounting to $2,766,899.70 having been accepted, an order to begin work was served on them on the 1st November, 1921. The total cost of the scheme to those entitled to participate is estimated at $3,744,319.50.

PIERS.

The Queen Victoria Street Ferry Pier was practically com- pleted by the close of the year. A contract was let in September for the construction in reinforced concrete of the Public Square

1

30

Street Ferry Pier at Yaumati, and another contract was awarded in October for the construction-also in reinforced concrete-of the Pier opposite Queen's Statue Square.

A reinforced concrete pier at Cheung Chau (Dumb-bell Island) was completed and opened to traffic.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Two small foot-bridges were constructed, one at Siu Hang near Fanling and the other at Siu Lek Un near Shatin.

"Aga" light towers were erected at the follewing places:

Lam Tong Island, Channel Rocks, and Tong Ku Island.

Plans were prepared in connection with the installation of a Wireless Station at Gap Rock, inachinery and plant was obtained, and the work of erecting the mast, etc., commenced.

Plans were also prepared for the construction of a water-boat dock to the East of Lai-chi-kok, but the contract for its construc- tion had not been awarded by the end of the year under review.

Considerable progress was made with the hydrographic surveys required by the Consulting Engineers in connection with the report they are preparing on the development of the harbour.

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary was $3,053,525.11 and on annually recurrent works $938,582.38.

RAILWAY.

The installation of the electric turret clock and 1-ton hour bell was completed in March and the clock started on the 22nd, since when perfect time has been kept.

Three more sidings were laid at Kowloon Station as laybys, but these have not yet been connected to the signal cabin.

The old temporary station building at Hung Hom was con- demned, and an operating cabin of brickwork substituted, which provides only accommodation for the point levers for the sidings, and living rooms for the staft. This station is closed as a passen- ger station now but the marshalling sidings remain.

A brick building was erected at the workshops for the installa- tion of three rotary convertors and the necessary switchboards, for converting high tension alternating current from the China Light & Power Co.'s supply, to direct current for the workshops

31

motors, etc. The machinery for this purpose was taken over from the Company on its vacating its premises adjacent to the locomo- tive yard and removing to a new site about a mile away. The rotary convertors are not, however, of the most economical type and may have to be replaced.

In preparation for the building of the new over bridge to the north of Yaumati Station, the embankment was widened and ballast laid later for carrying the necessary railway deviation round the site of the new bridge during construction.

A new brickwork latrine was built at Yaumati Station to replace the old iron one.

Early in the year new rails were laid through Beacon Hill Tunnel (2,403 yards). The time occupied by this work was 30 nights, 7 lengths of 36 feet each being renewed each night.

The siding at Shatin Station was connected to the loop line at the far end and now forms a second loop which has proved very useful. A low temporary wooden platform of old sleepers was erected between the main line and No. 1 loop.

At Taipo Market Station a small open shelter consisting of a tiled roof on reinforced concrete columns has been provided for the convenience of consignors of live pigs and fresh fish, while waiting

for trains.

At Fanling Station the road approach to the goods yard was completed.

Since the train service has necessitated a train being stabled each night at Lowu to form the first inward train in the morning, it has become necessary to provide siding and stabling accom- modation at this point. During the year spoil was tipped to form an area for yard and sidings, and work was commenced on a single line running shed 150 feet long of brickwork with a tiled roof. The work, however, was not completed at the end of the year.

The 8-foot span bridge at mile 16, referred to in my last report, was doubled as proposed, and no fear of further flooding at this point need he anticipated.

The road bed at mile 16 where passing over a band of clay was taken up, drained and reballasted by night work. This place has given much trouble each year, owing to the moist nature of the subsoil during the rainy season.

Many of the steel bridges were given their periodical repainting; the steelwork of the workshop buildings was also gone over, repaired where necessary and painted.

32

Experiments were made with tar and asphalt surfacing on portions of the Kowloon platforms, and as these have proved successful so far, it is intended to asphalt the whole of the platforms and concourse area.

The rainfall for the year was above the average, a very large proportion occurring in the months of May and June; in fact 433 inches, out of a total for the year of 97 inches, fell in May; the heaviest fall per hour recorded being 3.25 inches. The railway however suffered very little damage, which is no small reward for previous expenditure in combating and repairing the rainstorm frequently experienced in this country.

There were two or three occasions on which typhoon blows occurred but fortunately none were serious.

A halt station was opened at Ho Mun Tin, mile 24, where the local morning and evening trains call for the convenience of a new community which has lately settled at this point, and a temporary platform built of old sleepers was provided. This is not an ideal site for a station and will probably not be required when the road trams serve the neighbourhood, as is anticipated will be the case in the near future.

The gross receipts for the year were $603,980.77 as against $520,176.10 for 1920, an increase of $83,804.67, and the balance after paying working expenses stands at $75,989.71.

The through and joint sectional passengers carried were as follows:-

Passengers booked by Stations in British Territory to

Stations in China

1919. 1920. 1921.

344,716 365,665 435,933

Passengers booked by Stations

in China to Stations in British Territory

354,699 373,776 462,379

The Local Passengers carried were as follows:-

1919. 1920. 1921.

Main line....

345,314 392,206 429,133

Fanling Branch

48,917 47,787 43,733

VI.-GOVERNMENT AND AIDED INSTITUTIONS.

(a.)-HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital, to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital

1

32

Experiments were made with tar and asphalt surfacing on portions of the Kowloon platforms, and as these have proved successful so far, it is intended to asphalt the whole of the platforms and concourse area.

The rainfall for the year was above the average, a very large proportion occurring in the months of May and June; in fact 433 inches, out of a total for the year of 97 inches, fell in May; the heaviest fall per hour recorded being 3.25 inches. The railway however suffered very little damage, which is no small reward for previous expenditure in combating and repairing the rainstorm frequently experienced in this country.

There were two or three occasions on which typhoon blows occurred but fortunately none were serious.

A halt station was opened at Ho Mun Tin, mile 24, where the local morning and evening trains call for the convenience of a new community which has lately settled at this point, and a temporary platform built of old sleepers was provided. This is not an ideal site for a station and will probably not be required when the road trams serve the neighbourhood, as is anticipated will be the case in the near future.

The gross receipts for the year were $603,980.77 as against $520,176.10 for 1920, an increase of $83,804.67, and the balance after paying working expenses stands at $75,989.71.

The through and joint sectional passengers carried were as follows:-

Passengers booked by Stations in British Territory to

Stations in China

1919. 1920. 1921.

344,716 365,665 435,933

Passengers booked by Stations

in China to Stations in British Territory

354,699 373,776 462,379

The Local Passengers carried were as follows:-

1919. 1920. 1921.

Main line....

345,314 392,206 429,133

Fanling Branch

48,917 47,787 43,733

VI.-GOVERNMENT AND AIDED INSTITUTIONS.

(a.)-HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital, to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital

1

34

Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in 1893, the Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in 1904, and the Ho Miu Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in-patients in 1921 was 1,681 and the expenditure $52,252.03. The number of labours in the Maternity Hospital was 450. The Government makes a grant of $300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives, which removal of Chinese plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital entailed, four District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony. These hospitals are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee.

The Kwong Wa Hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula was opened on the 9th October, 1911. It occupies a site having an area of three acres and provides accommodation for 210 patients. The existing buildings contain 70 beds and 4,486 patients were accommodated during 1921. The collection of sub- scriptions and the supervision of the building were undertaken by a special committee under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The hospital receives a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Government.

As will be noticed from the remarks made under the heading Education the Hongkong University is also an Aided Institution.

VII.--INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

One of the most important institutions in the Colony not sup- ported by the Government is the Matilda Hospital, which stands on a commanding site of nearly three acres at Mount Kellet in the Hill District. An account of this hospital will be found in the report for 1917.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Pó Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The actual management is entrusted to a committee elected annually by the members of the Society. The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, and almost all women and girls detained by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under that Ordinance are sent to the Pó Leung Kuk. During 1921 the number of persons admitted

1.

35

was 355 and at the close of the year 42 remained under the care of the Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron, and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution, under mission auspices, founded for rescue work among the Chinese. It was housed in the Belilios Reformatory up to the outbreak of war, but the work is at present carried on at Kowloon City.

A small grant is made by the Government.

ment.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Govern- It contains a theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, etc., a museum in which are some very fair specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent, the French Convent, (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and other charit- able institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of infectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence. The total cost of maintenance was $39,505 for the year 1920. The Government inakes an annual grant of $7,000, and the rest of the cost is defrayed by voluntary subscription. The Dispen- saries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

VIII CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 12,242 being an increase of 330 or 277 per cent. as compared with 1920. There was in 1921 a decrease in serious offences of 856 or 17.17 per cent. as compared with the previous year. The number of serious offences reported was 2 below the average of the quinquennial period com- mencing with the year 1917. The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 1186 as compared with 1920 and was 1713 over the average of the quinquennial period.

2

36

The total strength of the Police Force in 1921 was Europeans 185, Indians 430, Chinese 726, making a total of 1,341 exclusive of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the railway and other Government departments. Of this force 15 Europeans, 127 Indians, and 58 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 102, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 4,990 as compared with 5,153 in 1920. Of these 1,732 were committed for criminal offences against 1,999 in 1920. Of committals for non- criminal offences there were 7 less for hawking without a licence, and 9 less for unlawfully boarding steamers, than in 1920.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 764, the average for 1920 being 755, and the highest previous average being 756 in 1919. The percentage of prisoners to population. according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 012. The average percentage for the last ten years was 012. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Victoria Gaol has accommodation for 707 prisoners. The Branch Prison at Laichikok has accommodation for 200 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 1·26 as compared with 099 in 1920 and 0.96 in 1919.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including, printing, book-binding, tin-smithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, etc. The profit on the work done was $77,750.18 as against $64,014 in 1920. A sum of $4,658 was received and credited to Government for non-Government work as against $3,593 in 1920,

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.)-POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the census taken on April 24th, 1921, was 625,166, of whom 83,163 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the census taken in

36

The total strength of the Police Force in 1921 was Europeans 185, Indians 430, Chinese 726, making a total of 1,341 exclusive of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the railway and other Government departments. Of this force 15 Europeans, 127 Indians, and 58 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 102, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 4,990 as compared with 5,153 in 1920. Of these 1,732 were committed for criminal offences against 1,999 in 1920. Of committals for non- criminal offences there were 7 less for hawking without a licence, and 9 less for unlawfully boarding steamers, than in 1920.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 764, the average for 1920 being 755, and the highest previous average being 756 in 1919. The percentage of prisoners to population. according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 012. The average percentage for the last ten years was 012. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Victoria Gaol has accommodation for 707 prisoners. The Branch Prison at Laichikok has accommodation for 200 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 1·26 as compared with 099 in 1920 and 0.96 in 1919.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including, printing, book-binding, tin-smithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, etc. The profit on the work done was $77,750.18 as against $64,014 in 1920. A sum of $4,658 was received and credited to Government for non-Government work as against $3,593 in 1920,

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.)-POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the census taken on April 24th, 1921, was 625,166, of whom 83,163 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the census taken in

37

1911 it was 456,739 with 104,287 as the figure for the New Territories and New Kowloon. The estimated total population at the middle of the year under review was 686,680, but this includes the New Territories; and, as the birth and death figures given below do not include those from this area (with the exception of New Kowloon), the population for the purposes of calculating these rates is estimated at 585,880, of whom 14,100 were non-Chinese.

The distribution of population estimated to the middle of 1921 was as follows :-

Non-Chinese

Civil Community,...

14,100

Chinese

Population.

City of Victoria (including Peak),...

360,000

Villages of Hongkong,

18,360

Kowloon (including New Kowloon),

120,000

New Territories,

100,800

Population afloat,

73,420

Total Chinese Population,

672,580

686,680

Total Civil Population,

(b.)-PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

The activity in building operations, which has been so notice- able a feature since 1912, has not abated, and the demand for housing accommodation by the Chinese continued to be greatly in excess of the supply, as many of those who fled with their families to Hongkong during 1911, 1912, and 1913 elected to remain in the Colony.

The birth-rate for the year was 5'68* per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 25-88 per 1,000 among the non-Chinese community, as compared with 3·96 and 1978 for 1920.

The death-rate for the year was 2029 per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 18:08 among the non-Chinese civil com- munity, as compared with 22:78 and 179 for 1920.

The number of deaths from Malaria (332) was the same as for 1920. The deaths of Chinese from this cause in the City of Victoria numbered 142 out of a population of 360,000 or a rate of 0:39 per 1,000 per annum.

The deaths from Plague numbered 130 as compared with 120 in 1920.

Small-pox deaths numbered 162, all but two were Chinese.

There were 3,832 deaths from respiratory diseases other than Pulmonary Tuberculosis as compared with 3,834 in 1920, and 80 of

* This figure is wholly misleading as it is impossible to register more than a portion of the births.

39

The wind velocity was considerably below normal in January, March, April, May and October. In July it was normal and in the remaining months it was slightly below normal. The mean velocity for the year was 107 m.p.h. as against 120 m.p.h. in 1920 and 127 m.p.h. for the past 38 years. The maximum velocity for one hour as recorded by the Beckley Anemograph was 51 miles at 11 a.m. on July 24th as against 51 miles in 1920 and 108 for the past 38 years. The maximum squall velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell Anemograph, was at the rate of 69 m.p.h. at 5h. 53m. a.m. on September 3rd as against 61 m.p.h. in 1920 and 105 m.p.h. for the past 12 years.

The climate of Hongkong is similar in its broad features to that of Kowloon and the New Territories, but at the higher levels, from 1,400 to 1,800 feet above sea level the temperature is usually from 3 to 8° lower than at the Observatory, Kowloon. The humidity is usually greater than in Kowloon and approaches saturation for several days at a time during March and April when mist is very prevalent. In summer the city of Victoria, and the rising terraces behind it, derive little or no benefit from the SW monsoon, being sheltered by steep hills from SE to SW. In winter it is exposed to the NE monsoon, which occasionally blows along the harbour through Lyemun Pass with considerable violence. On the other hand the south-west side of the Island is protected from the NE monsoon in winter and enjoys the benefit of the SW monsoon in summer.

X-POSTAL AND TELEGRAPH SERVICES.

The total revenue from the postal service in 1921 amounted to $644,157.54 being $118,035.46 more than that collected in 1920. The net expenditure amounted to $261,077.84. The balance of revenue over expenditure amounted to $383,079.70.

The revenue collected in 1921 from radio-telegrams amounted to $19,082.98 being $4,491.25 more than that collected in 1920. Advices of vessels signalled at the lighthouses yielded $670.60, and semaphore messages $3.30, making a total of $19,756.88 for the telegraph service. The expenditure amounted to $45,592.19. The number of radio-telegrams forwarded during the year was 2,235 consisting of 30,239 words, and 6,182 received consisting of 82,513 words..

The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co.'s contract mail service between the United Kingdom and the Far East was resumed with the despatch of the s.s. Nellore from Hongkong on the 21st December, 1921.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Colonial Secretary.

8th August, 1922.

Light Dues...

Appendix A

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR T

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

Revenue for

HEADS OF Revenue.

Estimates, 1921.

Actual Revenue to

same

31st Dec., 1921.

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

Light Dues, Special Assessment

$

100,000

106,417.09

94,225.44

12,191.65

Govern

Cadet S

110,000 115,710.44 102,609.57

13,100.87

Colonia

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

10,896,570 11,644,243.90 |10,325,918.57|1,318,325.33

Secreta

Audit D

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

1,452,740 | 1,194,673.94 | 1,126,566.51

68,107.43

Treasur

Harbou

Post Office

510,000 663.914.42 541,295.01

122,619.41

Imports

Royal C

Kowloon-Canton Railway

549,000 603,980.77 520,176.10

83,804.67

Miscella

Judicial

Police a

Rent of Government Property, Land, and Houses

1,030,130 1,158,188.80 | 1,063,455.21 94,733.59

Prison I

Medical

Interest

260,000

359,473.33 240,460.84

119,012.49

Sanitary

Botanica

Educatio

Miscellaneous Receipts

127,910 247,431.70 118,615.55 128,816.15

Military

Public W

Do.

Do.

Post Offi

TOTAL, (exclusive of Land Sales)

15,036,350 16,094,034.39 14,133,322.80 1,960,711.59

Kowloon

Charge o

Pensions

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

300,000 1,634,097.55 556,349.13 1,077,748.42

Charitabl

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net

15,336,350 (17,728,131.94 14,689,671.93 | 3,038,460.01

...$ 3,038,460.01

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1921.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER,

Revenue for

INUE.

Estimates, 1921.

Actual Revenue to 31st Dec.,

same

period of preceding

Increase.

Decrease.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

1921.

Year.

100,000

106,417.09

94,225.44

12,191.65

Governor

Estimates, 1921.

$

80,760.00

Cadet Service

252,440.00

110,000 115,710.44 102,609.57

13,100.87

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ...

49,958.00

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

otherwise specified

10,896,570 11,644,243.90 |10,325,918.57 | 1,318,325.33

Audit Department .

for specific purposes,

1,452,740 1,194,673.94 |1,126,566.51

68,107.43

Treasury...

510,000 663.914.42 541,295.01 122,619.41

549,000

603,980.77 520,176.10 83,804.67

Harbour Master's Department

Imports & Exports Department...

Royal Observatory

Miscellaneous Services...

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Fire Brigade

and Houses

1,030,1301,158,188.80 1,063,455.21

94,733.59

Prison Department

Medical Departments

260,000

240,460.84 359.473.33

Sanitary Department

119,012.49

Botanical and Forestry Department

127,910 247,431.70 118,615.55 128,816.15

Education Department

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department

Recurrent

Do.

Do.

Extraordinary

:

:

19,904.00

45,992.00

55,480.00

251,421.00

845,843.00

31,805.00

648,442.00

254,947.00

1,429,077.00

286,636.00

368,794.00

563,150.00

}

64,394.00

786,653.00

2,520,755.00

632,510.00

840,600.00

4,967,400.00

292,317.00

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

Land Sales)

15,036,350 16,094,034-39 14,133,322.80 1,960,711.59

300,000 1,634,097.55 556,349.13 1,077,748.42

Post Office

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions ...

Charitable Services

luct

15,336,350 17,728,131.94 14,689,671.93 3,038,460.01

:

...$3,038,460.01

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net...

898,308.00

782,092.00

312,900.00

66,572.00

$17,349,150.00

Appendix A.

RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1921.

E AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1921.

sc.

Decrease.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE,

Estimates,

1921.

Actual Expenditure to 31st Dec., 1921.

Expenditure for same

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

كرة

1.65

Governor

80,760.00

91,035.19

90,526.45

508.74

Cadet Service

252,440.00

239,948.92

239,948.92

0.87

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature...

49,958.00

58,415,07 85,095.13.

26,680.06

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

19,904.00

18,705.03

57.716.27

39,011.24

5.33

45,992.00

51,440.87

34,887.83

16,553.04

Audit Department ..

Treasury...

97.43

19.41

04.67

Harbour Master's Department

Imports & Exports Department ...

Royal Observatory

Miscellaneous Services...

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Fire Brigade

33.59

Prison Department

Medical Departments

12.49

55,480.00 72,676.59 74,222.34

251,421.00 350,025.53 231,146.38 118,879.15

1,545-75

845,843.00 591,756.04

502,114.66

89,641.38

648,442.00

254,947.00

31,805.00 32,700.51 25,965.53

845,413.82 1,410,230.36

271,948.20

6,734.98

564,816.54

286,591.65

14,643.45

1,429,077.00 1,527,097.55

1,492,680.67 334,163.44

286,636.00 299,746.56)

:

:

:

:

:

:

T.

816.15

,711.59

748.42

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

Education Department

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department

Do.

Do.

Post Office

Recurrent

Extraordinary

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions

Charitable Services

,460.01

1460.01

TOTAL,

:

Deduct

Net

368,794.00 378,128.77 331,020.81 47,107.96

563,150.00 536,438.13

463,759.44

72,678.69

5,452.62

64,394.00 61,428.11 55,975.49

786,653.00 589,323.92 537,512.55 51,811.37

2,520,755.00 2,318,654.02 2,789,206.68

470.552.66

632,510.00 651,599.00!

468,987.78

182,611.22

840,600.00 938,582.38 806,254.37

132,328.01

4,967,400.00 3,053,525.11 2,555,877.69

497,647.42

292,317.00 293,710.10 268,713.85

24,996.25

898,308.00 1,108,838.99 822,567.68 286,271.31

782,092.00 890,336.88 677,341.19

212,995.69

312,900.00 389,845.50 252,081.83 137.763.67

66,572.00 78,331.61 169,116.89

90,785.28

$17,349,150.00 15,739,652.40 |14,489,593.52 | 2,458,093.86 | 1,208,034.98

$1,208,034.98

$1,250,058.88

Appendix A (1),

REPORT ON THE FINANCES FOR THE YEAR 1921.

REVENUE,

The total revenue for the year amounted to $17,728,132 being $2,391,782 more than the estimate and $3,038,460 more than the revenue in 1920. Compared with that year there were increases under every head.

2. The principal sub-heads showing excess over the estimate are as follows:-

(a) Assessed Taxes,

(b) Liquor Duties,

(c) Stamps,

(d) Tobacco Duties,

(e) Postage,

(f) Railway,

(g) Buildings,

$ 89,838

250,637

38,572

392,031

149.157

67,840

45,838

54,114

99,473

75,986

1,344,097

(h) Lands not Leased,

(*) Interest,

...

(j) Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

(k) Land Sales,...

The increases are due (a) to new buildings, (b) increase of duty,

(c) to increase of duties, (d) to increase of duty, (e) to increase of business, and (k) to more lands being disposed of.

3. The principal deficits compared with the Estimates were:-

(a) Kowloon (East) Ferry Licences,

$

(b) Opium Monopoly,

(c) China Companies Fees,

(d) Water Excess Supply and Meter Rents,

43,347

61,802

56,619

135,931

Of these (a) was overestimated, (b) due to decreased sales, (c)

and (d) to scale of fees not being increased as anticipated when the estimates were made out.

EXPENDITURE.

4. The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $15,739,652 being $1,609,498 less than the estimate, and $1,250,058 more than the expenditure in 1920.

Compared with the estimates there were savings under eight

heads.

Miscellaneous expenditure exceeded the estimate by $196,971 mainly due to transport of government servants. Kowloon & Canton Railway exceeded the estimate by $210,530 due to two motor coaches and trailer.

A (1) 2

The Imports and Exports Department decreased $254,086 on account of less opium purchased while Public Works Extraordinary saved $1,913,874 because the programme of works placed in the Estimates was not carried out.

5. The revenue for the year exceeded the expenditure by a sum of $1,988,480; with the result that the surplus balance increased to $6,478,745.

6. The following statement shows the Liabilities and Assets on the 31st December, 1921 :-

LIABILITIES.

$

C.

ASSETS.

$

C.

Deposits not Avail-

Subsidiary Coins,

1,562,379.74

able..

946,976.35 Advances,

314,844.23

Building Loans,

789,800.00

Postal Agencies,.

12.804.34 Imprest,

14,620.44

House Service A/c.,...)

6,053.14

Shipping Control

Crown Agents' De-

A/c...

2,231,204.11

posit Account,..... 2,199,691.24

Unallocated Stores,

Suspense Account,..

127.38

(P. W. D.)

331,445.56

Unallocated Stores,

Limewashing Ac-

count,

(Railway),

302,706.71

900.00

Coal Account,

52,336.50

Investment Account,

3,831,026.44

Balance Bank,.

248,195.04

Crown Agents' Cur-

rent Account,

17,658.99

Total Liabilities,.. 3,192,012.18

Balance, 6,478,745.85

Total...... $9,670,758.03

Total......$9,670,758.03

7. The following table shows the Revenue and Expenditure during the last five years:-

Revenue,

Expenditure, Surplus,

Deficit,

1917.

$

19 18. $

1919.

1920,

1921.

$

15,058,105 18,665,248 16,524,975 14,689,672 17,728,132 14,090,828 16,252,172 17,915,925 14,489,594 15,739,652

200,078 1,988,480 -

967,277 2,413,076

1,390,950

PUBLIC DEBT,

8. The Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amount to £1,485,733 and the Sinking Fund now stands at £368,403 being £29,716 more than the amount at credit of that fund at the end of 1920.

A (1) 3-

The local Loan (under Ordinance No. 12 of 1916) stands at $3,000,000 with a Sinking Fund of $664,495 and £89,093 sterling.

GENERAL REMARKS.

9. Stamp duties were increased at the beginning of May by the new Stamp Ordinance No. 8 of 1921. Liquor and Tobacco duties were also raised in April

10. The total receipts and payments in the Treasury books during the year were $33,343,922 and $33,078,068 respectively. The figures not accounted for under revenue and expenditure relate to transactions under various heads such as Deposits, Advances, Subsidiary Coin, Unallocated Stores, etc. ·

11. Subsidiary coins in stock on the 31st December were as follows:-

10 cents,

5

Copper,

$1,486,972 61,600

13,807

1,562,379

The nominal amount of coins in circulation is $20,789,370, and the market value is now practically par.

12. The local circulation in December of notes of the three Banks having authorized issues was as follows :-

Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation,...$ 40,395,225 Chartered Bank of India, Australia & China, ... Mercantile Bank of India, Limited,

9,074,137

1,321,503

$ 50,790,865

$ 33,200,000

The specie in Reserve came to,

13. The rate of exchange for the Estimates was taken at 3/4 whereas the average rate for purposes of conversion in the Treasury books was 2/8.

16th May, 1922.

C. MCI. MESSER,

Treasurer.

Appendix. B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1922-1923.

1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor in Council a new valuation of the whole Colony has been made and the Rateable Value has thereby been increased from $18,696,660 to $19,805, 929 an addition of $1,109,269 or 5.91 per cent.

2. The following Table gives a comparison of the Assessments for 1921-1922 and 1922-1923 :-

DISTRICT.

VALUATION 1921-1922.

VALUATION 1922-1923.

INCREASE.

PER

CENT.

%

The City of Victoria,. Hill District,........

14,902,870

14,902,870

352,465

15,625,813 371,230

15,625.813

722.943

4.85

Shaukiwan, Saiwanho

and Quarry Bay,

+25,250

454,625

Hongkong Villages,

352,904

1,130,619

407,109 1,232,964

102,345 9:05

Kowloon Point, ....

858,430

909,560

Yaumati,

577,290

673,230

Mongkoktsui,

465,145

504,635

Hunghom & Hokun,

434,575

462,035

Kowloon Villages,

154,515

170,085

New Territories,

173,216 2,663.171

227,607 2,947,152

283.981 10:67

Total,.........

18,696,660

19,805,929 1,109,269 5-91

3. The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 95 monthly, as compared with 79 last year.

4. During the year ending 30th April, 1922, 1,063 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

New or rebuilt tenements and tenements structurally altered

CITY OF VICTORIA.

REST OF COlony.

No.

Rateable Value.

No.

Rateable

Value.

184

357,033

662

265,983

Assessments cancelled, tenements resumed, pulled down or being in other respects not rateable..............

150

256,470

67

18,450

Number and increase ..

334

$100,563

729

$247,533

B 2

5. The following comparative statement shows the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each of the ten years from 1913-1914 to 1922-1923 inclusive :-

Year.

Increase Decrease

Rateable as compared as compared

Valne.

$

with pre- vious

vious year.

with pre-

year.

Percentage of

in Rateable Value Increase or Decreuse

as compared with previous year.

%

1.03 Increase.

1913-14

12,435,812

123,506

1914-15

14,410,103 1,974,291

15.87 do.

1915-16

14,287,285

122,818

085 Decrease.

1

1916-17

14,282,186

5,099

0.03 do.

1917-18

14,410,153

127,967

0.89 Increase.

1918-19

15,638,736 | 1,228,583

8.52

do.

1919-20

16,304,801

666,065

4.25 do.

:

1920-21

17,408,959

1,104,158

6.77 do.

1921-22

18,696,660 1,287,701

7:40 do.

1922-23

19,805,929 1,109,269

5.91

do.

6. In the ten years 1913-1914 to 1922-1923 the Rateable Value of the Colony has increased by $7,370,117 or 59-26 per cent.

THE TREASURY,

17th May, 1922.

:

C. McI. MESSER, Treasurer & Assessor.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS

FOR THE YEAR 1921.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I and II.)

REVENUE.

1. The revenue derived from all sources during the year was $18,294; more than that for 1920 by $288. -

EXPENDITURE.

2. The total expenditure was $18,705 as compared with $57,716 in 1920 and fell short of the estimate by $1,199. The decrease as compared with 1920 was due to the salaries of the Cadet Officers being paid from the Cadet Service vote.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS. (Table 111.)

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance No. 4 of 1897. Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance No. 6 of 1893.

3. The number of persons detained under warrant and sent direct to the Po Leung Kuk during the year was 86 as compared with 85 in 1920; the action taken in each case (as also in those cases not decided at the end of 1920) is shown in Table III. The number of women whose detention was found unnecessary and who were allowed to leave after investigation was 57 or 66.2%, as compared with 56 or 65.8% in 1920; 19 were sent to their native places; 3 were restored to their relatives; 5 were sent to Charit- able institutions in China; while I case was still under considera- tion on December 31st.

4. In this year no name was added to the list of girls under bond to report themselves periodically to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The names of three girls were struck off the list; one of them was sent back to her relatives, one was married, and the third absconded; in the last case the bond was forfeited. number of names on the list on December 31st was 10.

The

5. The number of persons reported by Hongkong residents to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was 66, of whom 20 were found, as compared with 80 and 33 in 1920. The total number of persons reported missing, including reports from China and Macao, was 99, of whom 24 were found, as compared with 24 out of 103 in 1920.

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EMIGRATION.

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

(i.)—EMIGRATION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN, (FREE).

(Table IV.)

6. The number of female and minor passengers examined and allowed to proceed abroad was 30,050 (women 18,514, girls 2,828 and boys 8,708) as compared with 20,690 in 1920.

7. The record of the occupations of the female emigrants over

16 years of age shows that out of a total of 18,514, 5,466 were

going to join relatives, 5,115 with relatives or husbands, 1,290 as tailoresses, 475 as prostitutes, 4,812 as maidservants or nurses, 661 as cooks, 630 to work on the land. There were also 5 teachers, 6 actresses, 1 hotelkeeper, 5 students, 24 hairdressers, 1 temple- keeper, 1 preacher, 1 traveller, and 17 nuns. 1 was repatriated by Government.

8. No women were detained for enquiries as against 5 in 1920.

9. Repatriation of Women and Girls.-

(a.) From Singapore.-Fifty-four (54) prostitutes who went to Singapore were sent back on the ground that they were too young to practise prostitution. They were all seen off to their destinations.

Ten (10) prostitutes were sent back from Singapore at their own request.

One prostitute who had become insane, and had been treated and cured, was sent back to her relatives.

Besides those enumerated above, eight (8) prostitutes were sent back from Singapore and returned to their homes.

Five applications were received for the recovery of women who had emigrated to Singapore. One was found to be based on false information: the subjects of the others, one of whom had emigrated as a prostitute and three who had run away from home, were recovered and handed back to their relatives.

One girl was repatriated from Singapore in connection with a "trafficking" case. She was sent to the Po Leung Kuk at her own request to await marriage.

(b.) From Bangkok.—One girl was sent back from Bangkok, whither she had been kidnapped for prostitution, and was placed in the Po Leung Kuk to await the arrival of her relatives.

10. Prosecutions under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance undertaken by this office numbered 6 with 1 convic- tion as compared with 12 cases and 10 convictions in 1920.

7

1

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(ii)-MALE EMIGRATION, (ASSISTED.)

(Table V.)

11.-(a.) The assisted emigration to Banca continued during the year, with a decrease of about one third in numbers as com- pared with 1920.

(b.) There were 3,551 emigrants to Billiton in March-June, an increase of over a thousand on the previous year.

(c.) From January to April emigration went on as usual to the petroleum depôt at Balik Papan, then ceasing except for one batch in September. The actual numbers were slightly less than in 1920.

12. There was a falling off by about one half in the number of enigrants to British North Borneo.

13. The totals for the year show that the tendency is still toward increase in assisted emigration.

(a.) Seven small batches of assisted emigrants went as labourers to work for the Phosphate Company in Christmas Island, Singapore. They were recruited through the Kwong Yuen Loi Boarding House, agent for Wong Man Tak in Singapore.

(b.) Western Samoa and Ocean Island.-During the year only two batches of emigrants-108 in all-went in May to Ocean Island. The agents were Messrs. Gibb, Livingston & Co.

A new feature of work in this office was the tracing of the relatives and returning the effects of men who died there since this emigration started.

One batch of 1,080 assisted labourers, also recruited by Messrs. Gibb, Livingston & Co., was passed for Western Samoa in September. To comply with the regulations governing assisted emigration, a licence was temporarily granted to a Boarding House to accommodate these men, and surrendered when the house closed after their embarkation.

These coolies went abroad under the usual very favourable

terms.

(c. & d.) There was no emigration to the British Solomon Islands nor to Makatea during the year.

(e.) Deli, Sumatra.-Deli emigration went on at regular in- tervals, organized by a manager of the Deli Planters' Association in Hongkong, the men (Hoklos) being taken mostly from Swatow and neighbouring districts. A great number of coolies who were going for the second time took with them their wives and children special conditions are laid down for married men. The work of accommodating these coolies has been confined to one Boarding House, the Nam Wah at Kennedy Town,

:

C 6

K

(e.) Ocean Island. One application was received and the case is still under negotiation. This is the first case of redemption applied for since emigration to Ocean Island started in 1920.

19. Seven (7) passage brokers' licences at $200 each were issued under the Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

20. Classification of emigrants by the language spoken is given in Table V.

THE BOARDING HOUSE ORDINANCE.

No. 23 of 1917.

21. Under this Ordinance Chinese Boarding Houses are divided into seven classes for the purpose of licensing and regulation.

22. Class 1, Chinese Hotels.-These are run very much on the lines of European Hotels, and are licensed for the sale of alcohol. There are only two houses of this class in the Colony, the Great Eastern and the Stag. Both applied for and were granted fresh licences after October 31st.

23. Class II, First Class Hak U.-These are large boarding houses, which cater principally for independent emigration and interport passenger business. During the year there was no new Boarding House of this class opened and none closed. At the end of the year there were 18 houses in existence all of which had renewed their licences. The lawful accommodation provided by these 18 houses is 2,907 as against the figure 2,850 for 18 houses of the year 1920.

24. Class III, Second Class Hak U.-These are small boarding houses for independent emigration mostly to and from the Straits Settlements and Java ports. During the year no new houses were opened nor any existing ones closed. The number of houses at the end of the year was 21 with lawful accommodation for 1,426 persons as compared with 1,396 provided for by the same 21 houses in 1920.

These three classes of Boarding Houses have done good business during the year owing to the great increase of emigration due to the reduction in passage rates by the competition of ships running and also because of the increased number of political passengers travelling between North and South China.

25. Class IV, Boarding Houses for Assisted Emigrants.- These houses are mainly used by assisted emigrants and their recruiters, who may not, while in this Colony, be lodged in any other place. During the year 11 assisted Boarding Houses were closed and 13 new ones opened. Most of these latter were only opened for a short time to cope with particular batches of emigrants such as that for Samoa and Ocean Island as the law requires. At the end of the year there were in existence 14 houses with accommodation for 908 men, as compared with 12 houses with accommodation for 673 men at the end of 1920.

C 7

During the year 17 licences for the transfer of names of licensees for the removal of premises and for the addition of floors were issued to Boarding Houses of classes II, III, and IV as compared with 6 licences issued in 1920.

26. Class V, Ku Li Kun, (lodging houses for coolies).—311 licences were issued as against 407 in 1920; of these 259 were renewed at the end of the year as against 364 in 1920. 5 licences were issued for transfer of name of licensee or for removal of premises (in 1920 there were none). No prosecutions were instituted against houses of this class (in 1920 there were 4).

27. Class VI, Ku Kung Ngoi U (lodging houses for employees of firms).—305 licences were issued as against 349 in 1920; of these 301 were renewed at the end of the year as against 259 in 1920. Eight licences were issued for transfer of name of licensee or for removal of premises, as against 5 in 1920. 30 houses were closed as against 23 in 1920. No prosecutions were instituted against houses of this class (in 1920 there were also none).

28. Class VII, Hang Shun Kun (residential clubs for seamen). 111 licences were issued as against 107 in 1920; of these 110 were renewed at the end of the year as against 106 in 1920. 12 licences were issued for transfer of name of licensee or for removal of premises as against 11 in 1920. 3 houses were closed as against 8 in 1920. No prosecutions were instituted against houses of this class (in 1920 there was one).

REGULATION OF CHINESE.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

(i.)-REGISTRATION OF HOUSEHOLDERS,

29. One thousand four hundred and forty-six (1,446) house- holders were registered as against 1,430 in 1920; of these 155 were first registration as against 297 in 1920, 7,668 changes of tenancy were also notified for registration as against 9,545 in 1920.

30. The number of Chinese business men in Victoria and Kowloon offering themselves as sureties to Government Depart- ments and reported on by this office was 1,114 as against 1,176 in 1920.

31. Two non-resident householders were required to enter into a bond; the figure was two in 1920 also. 48 certified extracts from the Registers were issued as against 39 in 1920. One duplicate Householder's Certificate was issued (the figure was also 1 in 1920), while 19 Householders' Removal Certificates were issued as against 24 in 1920.

(ii)-DISTRICT WATCHMEN.

(Table VI)

32. The District Watchmen Committee met on 12 occasions : the average attendance being 12. The loyal advice and assistance of this important Committee (which deals with every kind of question affecting the Chinese Community) continues to be of the greatest value to the Government.

33. Messrs. Ng Hou-tsz, Ho Kom-tong and Wong Kam- fuk's terms of 5 years expired and they were reappointed by His Excellency the Governor for a further period of 5 years.

During 1921 the two members selected from the retiring Committee of the Tung Wa Hospital and the Po Leung Kuk, who hold their appointments for one year, were Messrs. Li Wing- kwong and Kwok Siu-lau vice Messrs. To Sze-tun and Wong Tu-tung whose terms had expired.

34. The balance to the credit of the District Watchmen Fund at the end of the year was $31,063, as compared with $28,875 on January 1st, the income thus exceeding the expen- diture by $2,188. Of the balance, $28,000 is invested in Hong- kong 6% War Loan, and the remainder $3,063 deposited in the Colonial Treasury.

35. The total strength of the District Watchmen Force at the end of the year was 101, one less than on January 1st-one vacancy caused by death had not yet been filled. The approved strength is 102.

36. The number of convictions secured by members of the force was 363 as compared with 426 in 1920 and 164 in 1919.

37. The Detective Staff numbered 23 in 1921. Police Sub- Inspector Murphy continued in charge, but as in the latter half of the year this work was combined with police duty, the lack of complete supervision was reflected in falling off in cases.

(iii.)-PERMITS.

38. Eight hundred and ninety-seven (897) permits to fire crackers were issued as against 731 in 1920, and of these 632 were on the occasion of marriage.

39. Other permits issued were 22 for religious ceremonies and 11 for processions. 223 permits were issued for theatricals, 185 of which performances were held in permanent and 38 in temporary buildings.

C 9

MARRIAGES.

Ordinance No. 7 of 1875 and No. 6 of 1903.

40. The number of inarriages solemnised during the year was 165 as compared with 160 in 1920. The number contracted at the Registrar's Office was 29. In 1920 it was 28.

CERTIFICATES OF IDENTITY TO CHINESE ENTERING

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

41. 17 certificates were issued to Chinese to enter the United States of America (the figure was also 17 in 1920) and 2 to enter the Philippine Islands as against 1 in 1920.

These certificates are limited to Chinese British subjects resident in Hongkong.

BRITISH BORN SUBJECT CERTIFICATES.

42. There were twenty applications for these certificates, sixteen of which were granted and certificates issued; three were refused and one was still under consideration at the end of the year. Of the two cases which were under consideration at the end of 1920, one was granted and certificate issued and the other refused.

There were three applications for naturalisation; two of which were refused and one was still under consideration at the end of the year.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

43. Twenty-four books were registered during the year as compared with thirty-five in 1920.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE.

Ordinance No. 1 of 1870, No. 9 of 1904 and No. 10 of 1908. (Tables VII to XI.)

44. The following gentlemen were elected to form the Com- mittee for 1922 :-

Lo Chung-kue,

Ho Wa-tong,

Leung Pat-yu, Chan Siu-karr,

Wong Sau-shang,

Lai Hoi-shan,

Ip Lo-siu,

Fung Yu-shan, Li Kit-cho, Tsang-foo, Tong Tsz-sau, Au Shiu-cho, Li Ping-lau, Lam Fung-chou.

45. The year's work (1921) was carried out with the usual efficiency and detailed care, but there was no event during the year calling for special effort on the part of the Committee.

C 10

46. The accounts of the Tung Wah Hospital, and of its child the Kwong Wa Hospital in Kowloon, have this year been cast in a new shape: they are it is hoped in a form which will make it easy to extract any desired item of information, and will prevent the necessity in future for the extended comment on the accounts that has been required in the past.

47. The following items on the receipt side show increases :-

Increases.

Rent of Hospital property, Subscriptions generally,

Premium on notes, and discount on goods

purchased,

$24,138 10,625

933

48. The total number of in-patients admitted during 1921 was 6,881 as compared with 7,129 in 1920 and 6,726 in 1919. Of these 3,552 or 5162% as against 51.18% in 1920 elected to be treated by European methods.

The out-patients numbered 123,001 as against 148,589 in 1920 (140,271 in 1919) and of these 24,238, or 19.7% (as against 15.24% in 1920) chose European treatment.

1

49. The number of surgical operations performed was 292 as against 311 in 1920. There were also 93 eye operations per- formed as compared with 98 in 1920.

50. The number of destitutes temporarily housed and then sent to their homes was 2,014 (901 in 1920) most of whom were sent to the Hospital from this office.

51. Of the Charitable Funds managed by the Hospital the Man Mo Temple Fund (Table XI) shows an excess of receipts over expenditure of $20,296.98, and that of the new Saiyingpun Maternity Hospital, which was not yet open in the year under review, shows a credit balance of $8,286.18 (Table XIÏ).

52. The balance sheet of the Brewin Charity as set out in Table XIII shows that the income for the year exceeded the expenditure by $1,254.

The amount spent in gratuities and pensions was $4,689 as compared with $4,028 in 1920 and $3,022 in 1919.

$6,000 is invested in Hongkong 6% War Bonds.

KWONG WA HOSPITAL.

(Tables XIV and XT.)

53. The work of the Hospital again shewed an increase during 1920. In all, 4,291 patients were admitted (as against 4,104 in 1920) of whom 3,104, or 72-3% (as against 62% in 1920 and 58% in 1919) came under European treatment, while 1,187 elected to be treated by Chinese methods.

C 11

54. The total number of out-patients treated was 36,160 as against 36,353 in 1920 of these 28,291 elected to receive European treatment. This gives a percentage of 78.2% as against 784 in 1920 and 70:6 in 1919.

In the absence of any other Hospital in Kowloon, the Kwong Wa does much work-all cases from the Police and the Docks for instance are treated here-which perhaps falls outside the limits of a Chinese Charity.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES AND PLAGUE HOSPITALS.

(Tables XVI to XXI.)

55. The total number of cases treated at the Dispensaries during the year was 146,222 as compared with 137,891 in 1920. Of this total, 78.104 were new, and 68,118 return cases.

56. The number of vaccinations performed was 10,229 as against 6,121 in 1920.

57. The total expenditure on the Dispensaries was $77,206, This sum includes a subscription of $37,701 to the propose d Western Maternity Hospital, making a total net expenditure of $39,505, as compared with $37,293 in 1920.

.

58. The net revenue of the Dispensaries, excluding a grant of $4,000 by Government, was $44,273 as compared with 44,159 in 1920.

59. Of the two Kowloon Dispensaries at Hunghom and Sham- shuipo, the first shows an excess of income over expenditure of $128, with a corresponding increase in credit balance from $3,653 in 1920 to $3,782. The second shows an increase in credit balance from $4,239 to $6,505.

60. The number of dead and dying infants brought to the Dispensaries was 1,190 as compared with 1,340 in 1920.

61. The number of infants under the age of five years brought in for treatment again shows a considerable increase, 19,811 being treated as against 18,843 in 1920.

62. 970 corpses were removed to hospital or mortuary, as against 1,163 in 1920; 399 applications for coffins were received, as against 501 in 1920; and there were 257 attendances at the cleansing of infected premises as against 156 in 1920.

63. The Dispensaries Committee are again indebted to the authorities of the Alice Memorial Hospital for assistance in the atter of the issue of medicines and drugs, and the regulation of their consumption.

64. The number of bodies considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the year was 643 as compared with 685 in 1920. The monthly figures varied from

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J

46 in April to 18 in October. The percentage of these "dumpings to the total number of Chinese deaths was 5.54 (Table XX).

Of the 643 bodies abandoned, 4 were taken to the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

65. Table XIX compiled from statistics in the Sanitary Department shows the number of death certificates issued in proportion to the total number of Chinese deaths, and the number of cases in which post mortem examinations were held.

66. The percentage of cases in which death was certified was 35 as compared with 41 in 1920.

The Maternity Hospital at Wanchai has dealt with 703 cases as against 477 in 1920 and 194 in 1919.

The committee would again express their appreciation of the invaluable advice and personal assistance which Mrs. Hickling has given in this connection.

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.

(Table XXII)

67. The balance increased from $16.344 in 1920 to $22,749. In 1919 the figure was $10,282.

68. TRANSLATION WORK DONE IN THE SECRETARIAT FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS DURING THE YEAR 1921.

Translation from English into Chinese.

Translation from Chinese

into English.

Petitions,

100

Qrdinances,

5

Letters,....

117

Regulations,

74

Newspaper articles and

Government notices, ... 164

37

items of news,

Minutes,

2

Unspecified,

90

Unspecified,

19

Total,

344

Total,

264

Grand total,...608

The total number of translations done by the Translator was thus 608 as against 823 in 1920, 715 in 1919 and 617 in 1918.

69. In addition, a large number of translations made in other Government Departments are sent to this office for revision. Much translation work is done by members of the staff other than the Translator, but of this no record is kept.

і

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CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XXIII.)

70. The income from the stalls has again decreased, $3,205 as against $3,223 in 1920, the balance has increased from $4,479 to $5,607. There are increases in expenditure in the water account and in repairs.

PASSAGE MONEY FUND.

(Table XXIV.)

71. The net income of the Fund was $707, and the total expenditure $531 as compared with $477 and $916 last year.

NEW ORDINANCES.

72. The following Ordinances passed during the year have special reference to the Chinese

No. 13 of 1921 Rent Ordinance. This ordinance brought great numbers of tenants and landlords to this office for advice and assistance.

One feature of the year in this connection was the formation of a Tenants' Defence League. The Chinese petition in support of this Ordinance was signed by a greater meinber of people than any previously presented to the Government of the Colony.

No. 25 of 1921 amends No. 13 of 1921, and makes it a criminal offence to attempt to extort excess rent.

No. 30 of 1921, further amends No. 13 of 1921 in several details.

GENERAL.

73. Under the terms of the Deportation Ordinance (No. 25 of 1917) reports were furnished on 249 suspects arrested by the Police under warrants of detention. Of these suspects 100° were released and 149 banished. The number of reports furnished in 1920 was 274.

74. The allocation of the Annual Grant of $25,000 to Local Chinese Charities was the same as last year, viz:---

Kwong Wa Hospital,.

Sham Shui Po Chinese Public Dispensary,... Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary,

$ 20,000

3,000 2,000

$ 25,000

75. An unfortunate accident occurred in the old Small pox Hospital in Kowloon which not having been used as such for a

C 14

considerable time, was converted to a firecracker factory, and fifty women and girls were killed and injured by an explosion in February. The burial of the victims was carried out by the Government through the Tung Wah Hospital, and necessary relief measures were taken.

Owing to the hardship to certain aged long established small hawkers, resulting from the new regulations increasing the cost of licences, on the recommendation of, this office free licences were given in a few deserving cases by the Police Department.

more

76. A most noticeable feature of the year was the continued development and reorganization of guilds, brought to particular notice by a series of disputes between masters and men in various industries, with which this office was closely concerned. The following strikes were declared or averted in 1921.

Shipwrights and carpenters.

Rattan furniture-makers. Sandalwood workers.

Camphorwood box-makers (no guild).

Tea box makers.

Masons and quarrymen.

Eating house employees. Matshed builders.

A number of new guilds were started, and in addition many long-established ones redrafted their regulations, and made every effort to make their membership comprehensive in the craft which they represent. Intimidation with the object of compelling men to join a guild, became commoner, notably among the copper- smiths and rattan furniture-makers; there was keen competition between rival guilds in the endeavour to enlist the same members.

The total number of new trade societies reported to this office since the repeal of the old Societies Ordinance up to the end of the year is as follows

Masters' Societies,

1921.

1920.

12

11

Men's Societies (trade union), Masters and Men's joint

70

$1

3

societies guilds,

17

20

STAFF.

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

77. Mr. E. R. Hallifax went on leave from 1st January to 11th November, and resumed duty on 12th November. Mr. W. Schofield acted in addition to his other duties from 1st to 9th January and Mr. S. B. C. Ross acted from 10th January to 11th November.

:

C 15

Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

78. Mr. W. Schofield acted as Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs from 1st January to 6th December and Mr. A. E. Wood acted from 7th to 31st December.

Second Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

79. Mr. T. W. Ainsworth acted as Second Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs from 1st January to 9th November. Mr. P. Burn acted from 28th November to 6th December and Mr. W. Schofield from 7th to 31st December.

Third Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

80. Mr. P. Burn acted as Third Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs from 7th December until his death on the 28th December.

23rd August, 1922.

E. R. HALLIFAX, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Heads of Revenue.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1920 and 1921.

Details of Revenue.

Ordinance under which received.

Revenue in

1920.

Revenue in

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

2.

C.

C.

ments-in-aid,.

Licences and Internal Revenue not other- wise specified.

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for Specific

Purposes,

and Reimburse-

Interest,

Chinese Boarding House Licences. Marriage Licences,

Emigration Passage Brokers' Licences, Forfeitures,

Fines,

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908. No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902. No. 30 of 1915.

11,723 *

11.556

167

*

1.245

1,358

113

1.450

1.400

50

50

50

Certificates to Chinese entering U.S.A.,

No. 3 of 1898.

875

900

25

Bond by Non-resident Householders.. Official Signatures,

No. 3 of 1888.

· 10

10

No. 14 of 1913.

100

130

30

Registration of Societies,

No. 47 of 1911.

25

25

Interest accrued on official account,

34

15

11

Miscellaneous,

Refunds, etc.,

2,253

2,634

381

Other Miscellaneous

Receipts,

Permits for Firework Displays,

290

210

80

Total,.........S

18,007.65

18.291.13

610

322

Deduct Decrease,

322

288

Total Increase in 1921,

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

}

C 16-

C 17

Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs since 1912.

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Year,

Total.

Decrease. Increase. Total.

Decrease.

Increase.

Percent- age of Expen- diture to Revenue.

*

C.

C.

%

· 1912.

14,257.54

260.65

45,521.01 3,696.53

319-28

1913,

10,645.58 3,611.96

41.674.04 3.846.97

39147

1914,

7,258.10 3,387.48

51,178.04

9.504.00 705·12

1915, ..

5,072.07 2,186.03

53,188.73

2,010.69 1,048-66

1916,

9,236.95

4,164.88 54,966.19

1.777.46 595·07

1917. ... .

11,370.52

1913,

26,678.50

2,133.57 51,867.18

15,307.98 | 50,117.67

3,099.01

456·15

1,749.51

.187.86

1919,

21,430.72 5,247.78

52,634,7

2,516.90 245.60

1920, ....

18.007,65 3,423.07

57,716.27

5,081.70 320-51

1921,

18,294.13

286.48 18,705.03 39,011.24

102.25

Table III.

Detained during 1921.

Total.

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

Under Detention on 1st January, 1921.

Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total.

Permitted to leave,

2

2

57

57

Permitted to leave under bond,

Restored to husband,

Restored to relatives,

1

1

1

1

1

2

Sent to native place,

Married,.

Adopted,

3

19

19

1

1

Sent to Refuge or Convent, Died,

Awaiting marriage,

Cases under consideration,

5

...

1

1

- a 5-9

59

2

2

3

22

2

...

Total,

9

9

86

Cases brought forward, 9.

Cases dealt with during the year, 93.

1

:

- O 18 -

86

95

Cases carried forward, 2.

T

Table IV.

Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under "The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1915,” during the year 1921.

- C 19 -

Women and Children, 1921.

Total

Women

Whither Bonud.

and

Children,

Women.

Girls. Boys.

Total.

1920.

Burmah,

23

17

48

53

Japan,.

40

11

11

62

113

Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States,

15,706

2,282

4,227

22,215

16,262

Dutch Indies,

1,310

233

944

2,487

1,587

Belawan, Deli,

213

58

83

354

British North Borneo,

560

138

230

928

525

Honolulu,

133

29

66

228

88

Central America,

16

...

22

38

27

Canada,

35

13

2,059

2,107

1,009

United States of America,

145

24

622

791

369

Mexico,

2

10.

12

14

South America,

30

79

11 i

78

Mauritius & Re-Union, .

144

2

142

288

252

Australia,

73

6

84

163

146

India,

50

20

32

102

115

South Africa,

30

2

22

54

14

Cuba,

40

44

36

Samoa,..

2

West Indies (Jamaica),.

18

18

Total, 1921,

18,514 2

2,828

8,708

30,050

Total, 1920,

13,002 1,734

5,954

20,690

20,690

C 20

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Year.

Examined. Passed.

Un-

at

Rejected Rejected

Total Percentage

willing.

S.C.A. as unfit.

by

rejected.! Doctor.

of rejection.

1919,

13,875 12,236

$9

3

32

124

*89

1920,.

16,699 11.753

104

12

45.

161

+96

1921,

22.049 19,171

86

36

8

130

•58

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1921.

Sent home through Tung Wah Hospital at expense

of Boarding Houses,.

Sent away without help,......

Rejected by doctor and sent back to boarding houses

to be cured,

Total rejected,......

Native Districts of Assisted Emigrants Pussed.

West River,.

East River,

North River,

Canton,.....

Delta,

Kwong Sai,.

Southern Districts,

Mandarin, (Hunan, Kwong Sai and Kiang Si),

Total,.

112

10

130

1,364

10,843

612

1,928

1,279

1

1,330

617

1,198

19,171

C 21

Table V,-Continued.

Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.

Whither bound.

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1920.

1921.

Straits Settlements and F.M.S.,

470

292

British North Borneo,

1,784

828

Dutch Indies :-

Banca,.

3,170

3.269

Billiton,

3,551

2.187

Balikpapan,

1,847

1,478

Belawan Deli,.........

British Solomon Island,...

216

9,930

3

India,..

Samoa,...

Ocean Island,

Nauru,....

Makatea,

46

539

1,079

369

108

414

344

Total,

14,753

19.171

Classification of the Assisted Emigrants examined, according to the language spoken gives the following figures :-

Cantonese,

Hakka,

Hoklo,..

6.995

5,227

8,291

..... 1,467

69

Southern Mandarin (mostly from Kwong Sai and

Hunan),

Hainanese,

Total,

22.049

:

C 22

Table VI.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hongkong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1921.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

*

SA

€15

To Balance,

28,875,82

By Wages and Salaries :-

*

Chief District Watchmen,

2,958

Contributions,

38,564

Assistant Chief District Watch-

"

men,

2,380

Detectives,

6,000

Grant by Government,

2,000

1st Class District Watchmen,...10,944

2nd

"

3,965

Payment for District Watchmen for

Special Services,...

3rd

684

26,932

774

Fines,......

3

Miscellaneous :--

*

Cooks,..

768

""

Interest on Hongkong Government

6% War Loan,

Coolies,

600

Messengers,

81

1,680

1,452

Interest on Current Account,

56

""

Office Staff:-

"

21

""

Rent for 1921 from Mr. Yeung Ying-Ink for permission to erect the iron gate on Inland Lot No. 680,

Sale of Condemned Stores,

Manager,

90

Writer,

132

1

28

Interpreter, Collector,

498

576

1,296

Total......

29,680

Total,............$

71,983.61

"2

Other Charges

*--

Allowance to Detectives,

1,276

Medal Allowance,

1,600

Instructor Allowance,

80

Oil Allowance,

128

Electricity,

247

Conservancy Allowance,......

ნე

Coolie Hire and Conveyance

Allowance,

370

Uniform and Equipment,

1,679

Stationery and Printing,

285

Furniture,

70

Repairs and Fittings to D.W.

Stations,

1,076

Reut of Telephone,

308

Premium on Fire Policies,.

276

Gratuity and Reward,

767

Crown Rent,

16

Sundries,

284

Refund of advance from Pass-

age Money Fund

500

9,223

Pensions :-

Ex. Chief District Watchmen So Tai

and others,

2,016

Total Expenditure,.......

40.919.94

Balance,

22

31,063.67

Total,

..$

71.983.61

Balance in Colonial Treasury

In Hongkong Goverument 6% War Loan,.. $28,000.00 Cash,.....

Total,......

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

$3,063.00

.$31,063.67

*

:

Patients.

on 31st December, 1920.

Remaining in Hospital

Male,

Female,

93

Table VII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1921.

Admitted.

Out-patients.

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary

for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

237 2,575 2,017 4,5924,8293,350 | 1,282 197 58,090,14,081 72,171 2,865 858 2,014 7541,535 2,289 2,382 1,791 531

60

40,673 10,157 | 50,830

505

Total,.....

330 3,329 3,5526,881 7,211 5,141 1,813

257

98,763 24,238 123,001|2,865 | 1,363 2,014

Total for 1920,

2623,480 3,649 7,129 7,391 5,242 1,819

:

300 125,94622,643 |148,589 1,256 |1,532 901

C 23

Receipts.

- C 24

Table VIII.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL CASH ACCOUNT 1921. ̄

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

$

C.

C.

Credit Balance from last year's Tung Wah

Hospital Account

Subscriptions for sick rooms extension brought forward from last year................... Subscriptions for building Maternity Hos- pital brought forward from last year Credit Balance from last year's Kwong

Wah Hospital Account

...

40,942.14

Debit balance from last year's Man Mo

Temple account

3,481.20

Current account with Kwong Wah Hos-

55,000.00

pital

38,107.34

5,000.00

Current account with Mau Mo Temple... Current account with Emergency Fund... Current account with Maternity Hospital.

21,733.91

533.00

765.82

5,961.78

Provisions for staff

8,111.97

Credit Balance from last year's Emergency

Fund

Salaries for staff

27,114.20

57,193.47

Provisions for sick rooms

15,196.92

Current account with Kwong Wah Hos-

pital..

Sick room sundries

9,149.95

56,337.88

Hospital sundries

4,325.08

Current account with Man Mo Temple

45,512.09

Chinese drugs...

18,251.11

Interest collected on behalf of Emergency

Western drugs..

9,114.89

Fund

1,372.70

Repairs ...

7,229.47

Current account with Maternity Hospital

9,052.00

Destitutes' and Patients' passages

432.44

Balance of Fund for celebration of 50th

Repairs to Hospital property

2,188.98

Jubilee 1920

1,961.17

Lights

4,707.96

Rents

80,544.76

Insurance

771.47

Subscriptions collected from steamers

6,292.29

Crown rent and rates

8,398.40

Annual subscriptions of Hongs

11,511.00

Small-pox Hospital expenses

1,926.91

Subscriptions from wealthy persons..

5,310.00

Sick room extension....

53,365.10

Subscriptions and donatious

8,227.94

Yee Shan Coffin home

328.07

Subscriptions from Directors past and pre-

seut

5,461,00

Stamps, stationery and advertisements Purchase of Hospital property

2,452.79

469.42

Special contributions for supply of medi- cines, quilted clothing, coffins and

Transferred to Maternity Hospital account Grant to Kwong Wah Hospital

5,000.00

......

2,000.00

shrouds

2,214.60

Grant to Fong Pin Hospital, Canton.....

1,000.00

Government grants

8,000.00

Burial of bodies from Government Mor-

Grant from Man Mo Temple..

2,500 00

tuary ...

3,387.88

Contributions from Theatres..

3,400.00

Coffins for bodies from Government

Hongkong War Loan dividend

3,000.00

Mortuary....

5,601,69

Contributions for Mortuary expenses

2,240.00

Burial of bodies by Tung Wah Hospital...

2,125.50

Interest

14,489.37

Coffins for bodies by Tung Wah Hospital

Premium on notes and discount on goods

and coffins supplied to steamers

5,062.13

purchased

1,652.21

Balance

191,229.89

Contribution for Laboratory

4,200.00

Fees from Patients

889.35

Sale of medicines, kitchen refuse, rent of

coffin home and sundries

15,497.74

Grand Total...............

$ 453,763.49

Grand Total....

$ 453,763.49

The Balance of $191,229 89 consists of the following credit balances :-

Tung Wah Hospital....

Kwong Wah Hospital Man Mo Temple Emergency Fund

Maternity Hospital

$ 80,421.24 24,192.32 20.296 98 58,033.17 8,286.18

Total........

.$191,229.89

- C 25

Table IX.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

Statement of Income.

A. Ordinary:-

Suscriptions:--

Annual Subscriptions of Hongs,...

Subscriptions collected on steamers,

$11,511.00

6,292.29

and donations,

8,227.94

">

from wealthy persons,

5,310.00

""

from Directors, past and

present,

5,461,00

$36,802,23

Grants :-

Government,

Man Mo Temple,

$8,000.00

2,500.00

10,500.00

Special Contributions:--

For Mortuary Expenses,

$2,240.00

From Ko Shing and Kau Yu Fong

Theatres,...

3,400.00

For supply of medicines, quilted cloth-

ing, coffins and shrouds,

2,214.60

7,854.60

Invested property :-

Rents,

$80,544.76

Interest,

14,489.37

Hongkong War Loan Dividend,

3,000.00

98,034.13

Other receipts :---

Premium on notes and discount on-

goods purchased,

$1.652,21

Sale of medicines, kitchen refuse, rent

of coffin home and sundries,...

15,497.74

Fees from Patients,

889.35

18,039.30

B. Extraordinary:-

Balance of Fund for celebration of 50th

Jubilee in 1920,

...

$1,961.17

1,961.17

$173,191.43

A. Maintenance :-

C 26

Table IX (A).

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

Statement of Expenditure.

Provisions: ་་

Food for staff,...

patients,

$8.111.97

15,196.92

$23,308.89

Surgery and Dispensary:-

Chinese drugs,

$18,251,11

Western drugs,

9,114.89

27,366.00

Establishment:—

Light,

$4,707.96

Insurance,

771.47

Repairs,

7,229.47

Repairs to Hospital property,

2,188.98

Sick room expenses,

9,149.95

Small-pox Hospital expenses,

1,926.91

Mortuary expenses,

328.07

Crown Rents, rates and taxes

8,398.40

34,701.21

Salaries, Wages, &c. :-

Staff salaries, ...

$27,114,20

Sundries and Bonuses, ...

4.325.08

31,439.28

Appeals, Grants, &c. :-

Destitutes and Patients' passages Kwong Wah & Fong Pin Hospitals,

Miscellaneous :-

Stationery

Burial of bodies from Government, Coffins for bodies from Government

$

432.44 3,000.00

3.432.44

$ 2,452.79

3,587.88

Mortuary,

5,601.69

Burial of bodies by Tung Wah Hospital,

2,125,50

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah Hospital and coffins supplied to steamers,

5,062,13

18.829.99

B. Extraordinary Expenditure:---

Purchase of Hospital property

$5

469.42

469.42

$139,547.23

C 27

Table IX (B).

INFORMATION AS TO SPECIAL FUNDS.

New Wing.

Special Contribution

received, ... $55,000.00

Amount expended, 53,365,10

New Laboratory.

Special Contribution

received,

$ 4,200,00

Balance in hand, $1,634.90

$ 4,200.00

Receipts.

Table X.

Emergency Fund Account, 1921.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

Balance from account 1919,

57,193

Interest,

1,372

Boat-hire to 1 destitute, Boat-hire to 36 typhoon destitutes, Gratuity to Li Pak and Kwong Li Shi,

7

390

10

...

Total,........

Gratuity to 12 boatmen for a fire disaster at Shaukiwan,

Balance,

125

58,033

58,566.17

Total,....

58,566.17

棼 Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 28

Receipts.

Table XI.

Man Mo Temple Fund Account, 1921.

Amount.

*

Payments.

Amount.

C 29 -

Temple Keeper,..

6,159

Tung Wa Hospital,

2,500

Rent of Temple property,

12,390

Free Schools and sundries,

9,205

Refund of Police rates for the free schools,

122

Repairs to Temple property and free schools,

2,095

Interest,

240

Police Rates, Crown Rent, and Insurance

Deposits by Stalls,......

150

Premium,

1,457

Grant in Aid from the Education Department,..' Government Grant in Aid of Chung Wa

1,449

Refund of Deposits,

150

School,

25,000

Repair to water taps in front of Temple,. Coustruction of the Chung Wa School, Advertisement,

341

5,979

4

Loans repaid to Tung Wa Hospital, Balance,

3,481

20,296

Total,.

$

45,512.09

Total,.....

45,512.09

Cents omitted except in the totals.

:

£A

Table XII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Saiyingpun Maternity Hospital, 1921,

Receipts.

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount.

C-30

Rent of Hospital Property,

3,932.00

Deposits from Tung Wa Hospital,

5,000.00

Insurance Premium, Police Rate and Crown Rent to Cheung Tin Shan,

187.76

Interest,

120.00

Brokerage for 2 houses in Des Voeux Road West,

85.70

Police Rate and Crown Rent,

334.50

Limewashing and Repairs,

157.86

Balance,

8,286.18

Grand Total,.

9,052.00

Grand Total,

9,052.00

Revenue.

31

Table XIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity during the

To Balance from 1920,

""

Rent from shop property in Temple Street, Subscriptions from Dragon boat races in

front of the Ming Yuen Garden,

From Directors, Tung Wa Hospital,

19

Po Leung Kuk...............

Interest on War Bonds from H. & S. B. C.,

**

"J

">

77

"

77

of Singapore Govt.

>>

27

27

deposits with H.K.S.B.C.,

""

Commission on Insurance for Temple Street

property,..

Grand Total,..

Amount.

year

1921.

Expenditure.

Amount.

C.

C.

17,188.26

6,469.05

27

By Charity given to widows and orphans,.....

Photographs,

4,689.00

1.20

"}

145.50

Police rates paid for Temple Street

property,.

581.72

841.00

22

Crown Rent for Temple Street property,

103.00

120.00

Insurance for the above property,

525.50

360.00

Salary of rent collector Mr. Leung Fuk-

395.79 69.96

chi from December, 1920 to December,

1921,

260.00

262.50

"

Salary of accountant Mr. Chau Yik-wan, Repairs to Temple Street property,.

100.00

999.74

Sundries

:

2.30

"

وو

21

**

">

Lime washing Temple Street property, Fares for launch and tram car for rent

100.00

collector,....

4.40

"

Stamps, receipts, and printed matter,

42.55

*

Balance, *

18,442.65

25,852.06

Grand Total,.........................

25,852.06

C.

By Deposits with Tung Wa Hospital, *

168.46

""

"

""

H. K. & S. B. C................

4,274.19

War Bouds,

6,000.00

""

Fixed deposits with H. K. & S. B. C.............

3,000.00

""

War Bonds of Singapore Government,

5,000.00

#

18,442.65

""

21

OTHER SUMS IN HAND.

Gratuity deposited with the Wing Hing Bank, given to Sat Ah-li by the Tram- way Co.,

Subscriptions raised from threatrical per- formances and placed on fixed deposit with H. K. & S. B. C., .

250.00

2,040.00

2,290.00

Patients.

Table XIV.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wa Hospital during the year 1921.

Admitted.

Out-patients.

Male,

Female,

126

69

932 1,777 2,709 2,835 | 2,026 678 131 2551,327 1,582 1,651 1,227 3.18 76

5,336 |16,975 22,311

145

2,533 11,316 13,849

96

Total,..

195

1,187 3,104 4,291 4,4863,253 1,026 207

7,869 28,291 [36,160

241

Total for 1920,

200

1,555 2,549 4,104 4,304 2,993 1,116 195

7,835 28,518 36,353 |36,3

242

C 32

:.

:

:

:

C 33

Table XV.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Kwong Wa Hospital for 1921.

Receipts.

Amount.

$

*

Payments.

A mount.

15,152.26 Lights,

2,500.00

4,654.05

2,500.00

5,000.00

Balance brought forward from

previous year,

Government Grant,

""

Special Donation,... Subscription from Tung Wah

Hospital,

Current account with Tung Wal

Hospital,..

Subscriptions from Charitable persons and yearly subscrip- tions, Subscriptions from Chan Fu Shan and Chan Ping Him for Sick Room Extension, Entertainment by Chan Kang U

for Sick Room Extension,. Subscription from Kan Chin Nam for Sick Room Extension, Subscription from Nan Yang Brothers Tobacco Co. for Sick Room Extension,

509.67

Current account with Tung Wah

Hospital,

56,337,88

8,500.00

11,856.92

20,000.00

Salaries to Hospital staff,

Provisions for staff,

Hospital sundries,

2,000.00 | Provisions for patients,

Sick room expenses,. Charcoal,

38,107.34

2,846.01 712.52 9,174.64 3,652.45 447.98

Chinese drugs,

2,667.18

Western drugs,

11,078,80

1,299.69

Telephone,

92.63

Stationery, stamps, and adver-

tisements,

735.65

Water,

15.00

Discount on notes,

2.47

Furniture and Repairs,

2,589.80

Coffins,

2,451,61

Burial of bodies from Hospital

Mortuary,

315.28

Burial of bodies from Yaumati

Entertainment by Tung Wa Hospital for Sick Room Ex-

Public Mortuary,

322.35

Mortuary,

5.60

tension,

6,234.24

Grave stones,

72.54

Subscriptions by Ko Shing and

Cumsha to coolies, sale of refuse,

Tai Ping Theatres,......

2,200.00

&c.,

291.39

Donations from A Fong and Tai

BALANCE,

10,295.32

Wo Photographers,

600.00

Donation from Old

Yaumati

Chinese Public Dispensary,

5,699.72

Subscription by Po Hing Theatre,

693.00

Rent......

150.00

Payments by in-patients,

1,589.19

Sale of drugs and medicines,...

448.42

Premium on notes,

259.31

Sale of kitchen refuse,

328.66

Gratuities from Government for

burial of victims of Flash

Light Co. disaster,

128.45

Gratuities from Secretariat for

Chinese Affairs,

10.00

Grand Total,...............

$117,264.31

Grand Total,.......

$117,264.31

C 34

Table XV (A).

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

Statement of Income.

A. Ordinary

Government Grant,

.$8.500.00

$ 8,500.00

Subscriptions:-

Tung Wah Hospital, ...

Charitable persons,

$ 2,000.00 15,152.26

17,152.26

Entertainments :-

Ko Shing & Tai Ping Theatres, Po Hing Theatre,

$ 2.200.00

693.00

2,893.00

Donations :-

A Fong & Tai Wo Photographers, ...$ Old Yaumati Chinese Public Dis-

600.00

pensary,

5,699.72

6,299.72

Patients' Payments :-

In-patients,..

$ 1,589.19

Out-patients,

448.42

2,037.61

Other receipts :-

Rent,

$

150.00

Premium on Notes,

259.31

Sale of Kitchen refuse,

328.66

737.97

B. Extraordinary :-

Donations :-

Government Special Donation,... ...$ 20,000.00

Gratuities :-

Government for burial of Victims of

Flash Light Co. disaster,...

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,

20,000.00

$ 128.45

10.00

138.45

$ 57,759.01

A. Maintenance

Provisions

Staff,

Patients,

- C 35

Table XV (B).

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

Statement of Expenditure.

:

:

:

Dispensary :-

Chinese drugs, Western drugs,

Establishment :

Light,...

Furniture & Repairs, Sick room expenses,

Charcoal,

...

...

Telephone, ...

Water,...

Sundries,

Salaries:

Hospital staff,

$ 2,846.01 9,174.64

...$ 2,667.78 11,078.80

:

...

.$ 1,299.69 2,589.80 3,652.45

447.98

$ 12,020.65

13,746.58

:

:

92.63

15.00

...

1,003.91

9,101.46

...$ 11,856.92

11,856.92

Miscellaneous :---

Stationery, stamps & advertisements, $

Discount on notes,

Coffins,

...

Burial of bodies from Hospital

Mortuary,

...

Burial of bodies from Yaumati

Public Mortuary,

Mortuary,

Grave stones,

735.65

2.47

2,451.61

315.28

322.35

...

5.60

72.54

3,905.50

$50,631.11

C 36

Table XV (C).

FINANCIAL POSITION

OF THE

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

Amount left deposited in Tung Wah Hospital at end of

1920,

**

Amount paid to Tung Wah Hospital on current account

in 1921,

...$ 5,961.78

Amount received from Tung Wah Hospital on current

account in 1921,...

Amount left deposited in Tung Wah Hospital at end

of 1921,

...

Cash in hand at end of 1921,

56,337.88

$ 62,299.66

38,107.34

...$ 24,192.32

10,295.32

$34,487.64

INFORMATION AS TO SPECIAL FUNDS.

Sick Room Extension :-

Special subscriptions received in 1921,...

...$20,888.29

- C 37

Table XVI.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan, and Kowloon Peninsula.

Description,

Total. Total 1921.

Grand Grand Total 1920.

New Cases,..

Return Cases,

78,104 68,118

Total,......

146,222 137,891

Certificates of nature of disease issued,

cause of death,

Patients removed to hospital by ambulance,. Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,. Attendances at cleansing of infected premises, Compensation claims sent in,

Applications received for coffins,

for midwives,

>>

Confinement cases in Maternity Hospital,.

Infants brought to Dispensaries, (alive),

4

2

369

342

414

407

970

1,163

257

156

9

399

501

234

226

703

477

47

(dead),..

1,143

99

Total..

1,190

1,340

Vaccinations at private houses,

"

Dispensaries,

493 9.736

Total,..

10.229 6,121

C 38

To Balance,

މލ

Grant by Government,

Table XVII.

Chinese Public Dispensaries: Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1921.

Receipts.

ن

85,140

4,000

*

Expenditure.

By Maintenances of Dispensaries,

*

*

>>

Donations from :-

""

Tai Ping Theatre,

3,450

Wo Ping Theatre,

1,950

San Theatre,

1,270

,

Ko Shing Theatre,.

300

22

Subscriptions, Land,.

18,472

Harbour,

9,643

55

,

Shaukiwan,

1,592

25

Kowloon City,

1,510

38,188

Fees from Maternity Hospital in

Subscription towards the building of the Proposed Maternity Hospital, Western,

Crown Rent, for Proposed Maternity Hospital, Western,

Victoria, 24,256

Dispensary, Harbour

and Yaumati, 6,195

Shaukiwan, 5,260

Kowloon City, 3,793

39,505

37,700

C.P.D. at Wanchai,

Interest,

19

>>

Interest on Hongkong Government

6% War Loan,

1,2 49

37,701

504

Balance in Colonial Treasury :-

3,060

On Hongkong Government 6% War Loan,

51,000

Rent of house No. 3 Aberdeen Street,

1,272

In Cash,

4,588

Advance to:

Dispensaries Clerks,

120

Alice Memorial Hospital for purchase of drugs,

500

56,208

Total,.

133,414| 83

Total,...

$133,414 83

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 39

Table XVIII.

Hunghom and Shamshuipo Dispensaries.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1921.

Receipts:-

Balance,......

Subscriptions, etc.,

Donations from :-

Description.

Po Hing Theatre,

Kún Yam Temple,

Scavenging Contractor at Hunghom,

Sam Tai Tsz Temple,

Donation for permission to hold Theatrical perfor-

inances from Kai Fong at Shamshuipo,

Grant by Government,.

Total,

Hung-

Sham-

hom. shuipo.

th

#

C.

3,653

4,239

2,983

2,185

391

650

852

171

300

3,000

.$8,530.69 9,896.32

Expenditure:-

Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,

2,124

2,260

By Local Committees,

2,624

1,131

Total,

4,748.443,391.26

Balance

At Colonial Treasury,

With Local Committees,

Total,

* Ceuts omitted except in the totals.

1,418 6,297

2,363

207

3,782.25 6,505.06

*

*

1

Number of deaths.

2

3

4

Table XIX.

Deaths of Chinese in Hongkong and Kowloon during 1921 showing number in which the cause of death was duly certified and number in which a post-mortem examination was held.

Number certified.

uncertified.

Number

Percentage of 3 to 2.

CO

Number examined after death and not

sent to mortuary.

Victoria,

Harbour,

7,694

2,038

5,656

26.5

496

6.4

4,024

52.3

895

338

557

37.8

31

3.5

167

18.6

Kowloon,..

2,665

1,717

948

64·4

145

5*4

1,102

41.3

Shaukiwan,

241

65

176

26.9

20

8.3

56

23.2

Other Villages in Hongkong,

109

19

90

17.4

0

0

Co

27.5

Total,...

11,604

4,177

7,427

35.9

692

5.9

5,352

46.1

Percentage of

6 to 2.

7

mortuary.

Number sent to

Percentage of

8 to 2.

-- OF D

9

Table XX.

Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the year 1921.*

Victoria.

Harbour. Kowloon.

Month.

West.

Central. East.

Total.

Total.

Grand

Total.

January,

9

February,

24

March,.

22

296

31

21

27

April,

33

33

May,

13

25

32

53262

38

47

33

07

35

67

46

79

40

65

June,

19

28

36

55

-C 41-

5662

July,

August,

September,

6

21

26

30

51

2

14

10

18

1

29

43

16

October,

November,

December,

Grand Total,

13

8

21

6

20

4072

33

37

53

12

18

31

26

24

30 13:

2

35

56

29

49

83

83

237

68

314

24

406

643 *

94

82

104

280

98

271

35

405

685 †

Total for 1920,

* In 1921, of 643, 4 were taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries. † In 1920, of 685, 17 were taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries.

42

Table XXI.

Return of Bodies abandoned during the years 1919, 1920, and 1921.

(Figures supplied by the Police Department.)

1919.

Over

Male.

Female.

Unknown.

15 years.

15 years and under.

Over

15 years.

15 years and under.

Victoria,

1

108

Kowloon,...

120

Harbour,

58

Elsewhere,

24

339=

89

92

48

14

Total,

5

310

2

243

Victoria, Kowloon,.. Harbour, Elsewhere,

1920.

Over

15 years.

15 years

and

under.

:

60 30 12:

Total.

204 217 115

38

14

574

1

140

115

263

142

126

271

:ཨེ :

54

37

98

20

16

36

Total,

3356

Victoria,

Kowloon,..

129 154

Harbour,

4

34

Elsewhere,

14

1921.

མ:

294

14

668

99

151

10

8532

6

234

313

68

Total,

4 331

288

:

13

639

To Balance,

Receipts.

Table XXII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1921.

$

C.

16,344.53 By Rent of telephone,

Payments.

C.

146.68

>>

Interest from Hongkong and

>>

74 stone slabs from Tung Hing Shop,

29.60

Shanghai Bank,

Tai San Bank.........

96.53

327.20

19

Printing by Kung Wo Po,

2.00

Hoes from Ki Wo,

3.50

""

H. K. War Loan

"

Wages for Ma Shu Hoi & gardeners,

1,047.00

Bonds,

480.00

1 telephone box,........

4.00

>>

""

War Savings

Repairs on drains & embankment by Yeung Tam Kee,

439.90

Bouds,

.92

""

Sacks & earth from Tsui Kuu Un,

34.80

";

Sale of 115 lots,

4,585.00

4 oiled coats from U Tai,..

7.20

"

""

Stone Embankment,.

1,725.00

""

Flowers & 250 Pots including freight,.

23.70

Sale of open ground in front of

""

Construction of water fountain by I-Shun Hin Kec,

463.86

graves,

1,570.00

>>

Printing by Wing Fat,

3.30

}

""

Casual grass cutters,

102.30

Motor car hire,

13.50

"}

Stamps,

10.00

Fertiliser & bamboo sticks,

18.50

وو

"

Manure, etc.,

26.76

Rent of wharf,

1.00

>>

""

Rates for getting water from river,.

1.00

""

Crown Rent,

1.50

Balance,

22,749.08

Total,

25,129.18

Total,..

$25,129.18

By deposits with Hongkong & Shanghai Bank,

$4,669.02

55

""

""

Tai San Bank,

""

War Bonds,

Cash,

10,000.00

8,000.00

80,06

$22,719.08

To Balance,

Rent of Stalls,

Table XXIII.

Chinese Recreation Ground; Receipts and Expenditure, 1921,

Receipts.

Payments.

$

4,479

By Wages of Watchmen, &e.,....

810

Water Account,

255

3,205

>>

Consumption of Gas,

270

"}

Repair to stalls, pavilion and fountain,..

722

Miscellaneous,

20

"

Balance,

"

5,607

*

Total,....

.$

7,685,50

Total,.......

7,685.50

*Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 44

Receipts.

Table XXIV.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund.

*

Payments.

-C 45 ---

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,$4,250

By Gifts to 10 women on being married, Annual 'Charitable Allowances to two per-

20

""

in Colonial Treasury,......... 2,922

sons,

72

7,172

>>

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,

50

""

""

Refund of advance from District Watchmen Fund,

>>

500

"

Interest on Fixed Deposit,

$ 130

"

""

""

Small Gifts to destitutes,

"}

" on money deposited in Treasury,

77

>>

Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

Passage for Mrs. Lizzie Leung to South Africa, etc.,

Hawker's Licences to destitute persons,

Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,.

Refund of Passage Money,

130

51

55

109

11.

12

207

Miscellaneous,

21

""

Balance on Fixed Deposit,

$4,250

>>

in Colonial Treasury,

3,097

7,347

Total,

$

7,879.70

Total,

$ 7,879.70

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

Table XXV.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 30 of 1915, and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

Convicted.

Discharged.

No. of

Cases.

Male.

Female. Male.

Female.

**

co

87

80

}

2

1

:

:

Bills,-Posting without permission,

Fireworks, Discharged without permission, Drums and Gongs,--Night noises by beating, Processions,--Organising in the public streets without permission,

Householders' Registration,-Failing to register, Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

Decoying men or boys into or ont of the Colony,... Emigration House offences,.

Persouating emigrants, .....

Sending assisted emigrants out of the Colony with- out notifying the Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Abduction of girls under 21,

Decoying women and girls into or away from the Colony,

:

:

1

:

Remarks.

2

1

2

1

5

3

Detaining, harbouring, or receiving women, or girls,... Procuring women or girls to be common.prostitutes,. Procuring girls under age to have carnal con- nection,

16

}

6

10 30

6

:

1

1

Deriving profits from prostitution and trading in

women,

74

14

:

333

39

6

16

C 46 -

C 47

Annexe A.

Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1921.

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hongkong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women.' The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since, by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.

There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, amahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing Committee. This Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m.: the principal meeting of the week is held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory Committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs in all cases affect- ing women and children, and Chinese family life generally, which are often extremely difficult and tedious. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institutions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children or ill-treated muitsais, and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents or relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as concubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent to either adoption or marriage.

In addition to the annual Committee appointment by co-option, there is a Permanent Committee, which serves to maintain con- tinuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.

The buildings and their inmates are visited every month by two unofficial Justices of the Peace, one English and one Chinese. The following gentlemen were elected in March to serve as Managing Committee for the year :---

Li Wing-kwong, Tong Wan-ting, Tsang Fu,

Ma Yuk-shan, Chau Tsun-nin,

Wong Yung-kai

Tsoi Kung-po, Yik Ki-chau, Lam Po-heung, Wong Ping-yiu, Wan Man kai, Kwok Chun,

The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on January 1st 1921, was 47 and during the year 308 persons were admitted as against 343 in 1920. The circumstances of the admission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

C 48

86 women and girls were committed under warrant and 154 were admitted without warrant. Of the remainder 34 were lost children, 4 were accompanied by parents or guardians, and 30 were runaway maid-servants or muitsai".

66

On leaving the Kuk 139 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, 25 were sent to charitable institutions in China, 30 were given in adoption, 8 married and 3 released under bond, 4 sent to the Italian Convent, and two died. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was 42.

The income and expenditure during the year and the assets and liabitities of the institution are set out in Tables B and C attached.

The accounts of the Managing Committee in the customary form have been audited by Messrs. Wong Yung-kai and Tsoi Kung-po. The balance to the credit of the Society at the end of the year was $6,520 as compared with $2,987 at the end of 1920.

The institution was visited monthly by Justices of Peace, Messrs. A. Mackenzie, A. G. Coppin, “and Chau Siu-ki, who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment.

The average monthly number of inmates was 45.

The matron reports favourably on the conduct, health and industry of the inmates during the year. There were 99 cases of sickness of which 46 were sent to the Tung Wa Hospital for treatment and of these two died.

.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Table A.

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1921 and the

arrangements made regarding them.

January, 1921, In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st

Admitted during the year, ...

Total.

Kuk on the 31st Decem-

Remaining in the Po Leung

ber, 1921,

7

95

86

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Committed under Warrant from

the Emigration Office.

Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. sent with their own cousent from Singapore. Manila. and Swatow. Sent with their own consent by the Police.

Lost Children.

accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

Total.

2

>>

5

7 53 10 74 31

F

18 64 11 80 39 +44

19

2

1

9

8

1+

3

1

N

17

-

2

B

تان

47

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of husband.

Placeu in charge of parents

and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institutions

in China.

Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

BO

308

95 ...

11 |│121| 23

2 13

355

1021

12

-

39

308

3

تنت

12127 25

4 30

2 42

355

6F -

Table B.

PO LEUNG Kuk.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1921.

RECEIPTS.

*

*

..

At Current Account,

2,987

2,987

Subscriptions:-

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,.......

367

Elected Committee,

525

Guilds,

4,575

Man Mo Temple,

1,188

Theatres,

1,750

Hongkong Citizen,

145

Boy adoptions,

60

Citizens of Annam and Bangkok,

1,278

9,888

Interest :-

On Deposit,

On Current Account,

Total,..

EXPENDITURE.

By the Elected Committee :--- (see Table C),

1,993

14,870.99

Balance :~

At Current Acconut,

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

if

8,350

ይ.

6,520

6,520

Total,.

14,870.99

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from 1st January to 31st December, 1921.

C 51

RECEIPTS.

*

EXPENDITURE.

*

C.

£

C.

Balance from previous year,

55 Decorations,

73

Received from Permanent Board,

8,350

Food,.

2,856

Miscellaneous Receipts,

24

Light and Fire,

735

Premium on bank notes,

28

Miscellaneous,

282

Passage Money,

56

Petty Expenditure,

206

Printing,

108

Repairs,....

484

Stationery,

93

Telephone,

73

Insurance,

132

Wages,

3,322

Balance,

8,445

12

Total,.........$

Total,

8,457.96

8,457.96

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

:

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER

1.-Shipping.

2.-Trade.

FOR THE YEAR 1921.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

REPORT.

3.—Revenue and Expenditure. 4.-Steam-launches. 5.-Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping. 7.--Marine Magistrate's Court. 8.-Marine Court.

9.--Examination of Masters,

Mates, and Engineers. 10.-Examination of Pilots. 11.-Sunday Cargo Working. 12.-New Territories.

13.-Lighthouses and Signal

Stations.

14.-Government Harbour

Moorings.

15.-Staff.

TABLES.

I.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels entered. II.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels cleared. III.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels entered.

at each Port.

IV.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels cleared

at each Port,

V.--Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VII.-Junks entered from China and Macao. VIII.-Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

X.-Licensed Steam-launches entered, XI.-Licensed Steam-launches cleared. XII.-Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII.-Statement of Revenue.

XIV.-Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary.)

XV. Return of Emigration.

XVI.-Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

XVII.-Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary.)

XVIII.-Return of Immigration.

XIX.-Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

XX.-Vessels registered.

XXI.-Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII. Comparison in Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign

Trade entered and cleared since 1910.

XXIII.-Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. XXIV.-Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

D 2

ANNEXES.

A.-Report on the Mercantile Marine Office.

B.-Report on the Marine Surveyor's Office.

C.--Report on the Gunpowder Depôt.

D.-Government Coaling Depôt Yaumati.

Slipway.

Yaumati Junk office.

1.-Shipping.

1. The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1921 amounted to 672,680 vessels of 43,420,970 tons, which, compared with the figures of 1920 shows a decrease of 10,816 vessels with an increase of 3,298,443 tons.

Of the above 52,222 vessels of 27,852,616 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 43,364 vessels of 24,194,022 tons in 1920.

2. Of vessels of European construction 5,226 Ocean Steamers 3,775 River Steamers and 3,336 Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, entered during the year, giving a daily average of 33 8 ships as compared with 29′4 ships in 1920 and 29·1 ships in 1919.

3. The average tonnage of Individual Ocean Vessels entering the Port has increased from 1,8310 to 1,9198 tons, that of British Ships has decreased from 2,002·3 to 1,997·5 tons while that of Foreign Ships has increased from 1,699 2 to 1,857'9 tons.

The average tonnage of Individual River Steamers entering during the year has increased from 425 8 to 460'5 tons.

That of British River Steamers has increased from 5161 to 5705 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers has decreased from 324:3 to 3167 tons.

D 3

4. A comparison between the years 1920 and 1921 is given in the following table:-

1920.

1921

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage, No. Tonnage.

British Ocean- į

going,

Foreign Ocean-

going,

4,173 8.351,084 4,630 | 9,217,198

5,418 9,223,552 3.827 10,817,413

457 896,114

409 1,593,861|

:

British River Steamers, Foreign River Steamers, Steamships un- der: 60 tons

5,138 3,256,985 5.743

1,741 577,270 1,810

3.519,291

5800SS

605 262,309

69 2,818

(Foreign

5,028

167,248 6,687

195,727 | 1,659

28,479

Trade),

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

Total, Foreign

Trade,

Steam Laun- ches plying in Waters of the Colony,

Junks, Local

Trade,

21,866 | 2,617,883 27,525| 3,491,736 5,659 873,853

43,364 | 24,194,022 || 52,222|27,852,616 8,858 3,658,594!

619,068 14,636,848 597,386 | 14,174,320

*21,065 †1,291,657 *23,072 †1,394,034 2,007 102,377

21,682 462,528

Grand Total,... 683,497 40,122,527 | 672,680|13,420,970 10,865 3,760,971 21,682 462,528

Net Increase,

3,298,443 10,817|

*Including 11,156 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 839,422 tons.

+

11,922

??

of 895,788

In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign trade, there is an increase of 1,659 ships with an increase in tonnage of 28,479 tons or 33·0 per cent. in numbers and 170 per cent. in tou- nage. This is due to 19 newly licenced launches plying in 1921.

Junks in Foreign trade show an increase of 5,659 vessels and an increase of 873,853 tons or 25.9 per cent. in numbers and 334 per cent. in tonnage.

In Local trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is a decrease in Steam-Launches of 21,682 and a decrease of 462,528 tons or 3.5 per cent. in numbers and 3-2 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to bigger launches being employed in local Ferry Services, making fewer trips.

D 4

Junks in Local trade show an increase of 2,007 vessels and an increase of 102,377 tons or 9'5 per cent. in numbers and 7·9 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to more junks being employed on reclamation.

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean-going ship- ping of 457 ships or 10-9 per cent, and an increase of 896,114 tons or 10.7 per cent. This increase is due to newly-built ships and Enemy ships transferred to the British flag and various steamship lines running their Eastern trade which were elsewhere employed during war times.

British River Steamers have decreased by 605 ships with an increase in tonnage of 262,309 tons or 11.7 per cent. in numbers and 80 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due to the s.s. Chuen Chow, which was laid up being again put on the Macao run.

Foreign Ocean-going Vessels have increased by 409 ships with an increase of 1,593,861 tons or 75 per cent. in numbers and 17·2 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due to the large amount of new American, Norwegian and Chinese vessels frequenting the Port and Enemy Vessels being transferred to other Nationalities.

Foreign River Steamers show an increase of 69 ships with an increase in tonnage of 2,878 tons or 3.8 per cent. in numbers and 0.5 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due to two Chinese ships which were added to the Wuchow service at the end of last year making regular trips throughout the

year.

6. The actual number of Individual Ocean-going vessels of European construction during the year 1921 was 988 of which 343 were British and 645 Foreign. In 1920 the corresponding figures were 927 of which 330 were British and 597 Foreign.

These 988 Ships measured 2,713,098 tons. They entered 5,232 times and gave a collective tonnage of 10,044,422 tons.

Thus 61 more Ships entered 425 more times and gave a collective tonnage greater by 1,242,802 tons, an average of 2,924-2 tons per entry.

"

- D5

Thus

No. of times

:

Steamers.

entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1920. 1921. | 1920. 1921. 1920. 1921.

British,

330

Japanese,

279

343 2,090 2,319 4,184,927 4,632,195 351 925 1,298 2,059,712 2,870,394

U.S.A.,

129

89

286

241

953,443 863,673

Chinese,

67

74

912

864

595,989 586,122

Brazilian,

1

3,041

Steamers

10

11

14

43,410 56,172

Danish

i

Sailing..

1

1

580

Dutch,

27

41

117

176

313,312 484,152

French,

34

32

156

149

276,962

282,834

Greek

1

1,882

Italian,.

Inter Allied,

Norwegian,

Portuguese,.

10 00

3

19

131

Russian,

Sarawak.

Siamese,

t

པ དེ ཀླ 1:: ཤཱ ཀ 1:|

14

N.

54,512

78,372

10

4 30,980

19,738

102

136,616 102,349

78

7

38,269

8,664

36

B

55,468

4,479

892

2,676

22

40.224

24,096

Swedish,

4

13,863

26,044

Total,.... 927

988 4,807 5,232 8,801,620 10,044,422

7. The Nationality of the Crews in British and in Foreign Ships were as follows :-

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREW.

AMERICANS

AND OTHER EUROPEANS.

ASIATICS.

1920. 1921. 1920. 1921.

1920. 1921. 1920. 1921.

British, 330 343 26 284 28,262 1,214 600 140,882 176,476

Foreign,. 597 645

1,750 1,722 24,542 22,927 150,617 171,168

Total,

927

988 28,034 29,984 25,756 23,527 291,499 347,644

23,527|291,

4

D 6

Hence in British ships :-

And in Foreign ships

1920. 1921.

1920.

1921.

15.61% 13.76 % of the crews were British.

0.99 %

0.88% of the crews

were British.

0.73 % 0.29% of the crews were other Europeans.

13.87 %

11.71% of the crews

were other Europeans.

83.66% 85.95 % of the crews were Asiatics.

85.14% 87.41 % of the crews were Asiatics.

100.00 % 100·00 %

100·00 % 100·00 %

2.-Trade.

8. Detailed and accurate statistics of Imports and Exports are collected and published by the Imports and Exports Depart-

ment.

9. The number and tonnage of ships of European type of con- struction carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1920 were as follows:

1920.

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No, Tonnage.

Steamers,......... 4,807

River Steamers, 3,441

Sailing Vessels,{

8,801,620 | 5,231|10,043,842

1,918,064 3,778 | 2,050,791 337

424 1,242,222

132,727:

1

580

580

Total,... 8,248 10,719,684 | 9,010|12,095,213 || 762 1,375,529|

Nett Increase,.

762 1,375,529

Q

10. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal, are as follows:-

EXPORTS.

1920.

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

4,784 8,773,016 5,226 10,020,769 3,438 1,916,191 3,775 2,048,591

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

442 1,247,753

337

132,400

I

580

I

580

Total,

8,222 10,689,207 | 9,002 12,069,940

780

1,380,733

Nett Increase,.

780

1,380,733

Steamers,

River Steamers, Sailing Vessels,

D 7 -

1920.

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

Bunker

No.

Coal.

Steamers,

4,784

464,707 5,226

508,793 442

44,086

River Steamers,

3,438

63,486| 3,775

69,906 337

6,420

Total,.

8,222

528,193 | 9,001

578,699

779

30,506

Nett Increase,.

779

50,506

D 8

11. The River Trade, compared with 1920 is shown in the following Table :—

1920.

1921..

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

345,514

317,512

1,686,306

412,274

353,683

1,790,062

12. The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony for the year 1920 and 1921 :-

IMPORTS.

1920.

1921.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,......10,885

1,320,745

13,742

1,755,153

Local Trade,......

4,917

223,104

5,495

244,730

Total,.....15,802

1,543,846

19,237

1,999,883

Tons.

Cattle, 1,607 head, Swine, 20,359 head,

Earth and Stones, General,

Total

211

1,172

23,078

.682,210

.706,671

EXPORTS.

1920.

1921.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,...... 10,981

1,297,138

13,783

1,736,583

Local Trade,......... 4,992

229,134

5,655

253,516

Total, ......15,973

1,526,272

19,438

1,990,099

Exported 1,247,170 tons as under

Kerosine, 2,073,953 cases,

Rice and Paddy......

Coal,

General,.....

Tons.

.67,809

457,094

.257,821

.464,446

Total,..

..1,247,170

13. Summary of the Shipping of the Port for the year 1921 :-

Registered.

Passengers.

No. of

Ships.

Emigrants.

Tonnage.

Bunker Coal.

Arrived. Departed.

British Ocean-going,

4,630

9,247,198

286,664

238,891

204,591

98,473

Foreign Ocean-going,

5,827

10,817,413

222,129

137,575

138,196

57,538

British River Steamers,

5,743

3,519,294

50,686

838.753

821,562

Forcign River Steamers,

1.810

580,088

19,220

62,368

67,379

Total,.........

18,010

24,163,993

578,699

1,277,587

1,231.728

156,011

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade...

6,687

195,727

23,674

10.713

11.141

Junks, Foreign Trade,..

27,525

3,491,736

106,159

96,438

Total, Foreign Trade,

34,212

3,687,463

28,674

116,872

107,579

Steam-launches, Local Trade,

597,386

14,174,320

49.540

Junks, Local Trade,

11,150

498,246

Total, Local Trade,

608,536

14,672,566

49,540

5,997,066

5,476

6,002,542

6,046,179

5,994

6,052,173

Grand Total,

660,759

42,525,182

651,913

7,397,001 7,391,480

156,011

D 9-

*

D 10

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

14. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $800,798.13 as against $701,493.26 collected in the previous year showing an increase of $99,304.87.

Light Dues,

Light Dues, Special Assessment.. Licences and Internal Revenue,. Fees of Court and Office, Miscellaneous Receipts,

1920.

1921.

Increase. Decrease.

$ 94,225.44 $106,417.09 $ 12.191.65

102,609.57

152,139.46 171,124.80

115,710.44 13,100.87

18,985.34

352,459.72

407,066.80

54,607.08

59.07

479.00

419,93

$701,493.26 $800,798.13 $ 99,304.87

The principal increases are under Light Dues $12,191,65, Light Dues Special Assessments $13,100.87, Boat Licences $9,971.50, Fines $2,956.99, Junk Licences $3,609.25, Fees for use of Government Buoys $13,728.80, Medical Examination of Emigrants $31,941,50, Official Signatures $2,390.00 and Survey of Steamships $5,876.00.

The only noteworthy decrease is under Gunpowder Storage fees of $1,840.87, which is due to less Gunpowder and explosives having been stored in the Government Gunpowder Depôt.

The Expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1921 was $246,295.53 as against $230,033.12, showing an increase f $16,262.41 This increase is principally due to revised scale of salaries to non- European Staff of this Department.

Under Special Expenditure of the Harbour Department a sum of $5,850 was expended in purchasing a new Motor Boat for this Depart- ment and a sum of $7,000 was expended in providing a new Hull for

the S/L "H. D. 3". A sum of $90,430 was expended in purchasing

2 A class and 4 B class Buoys, Anchors and Moorings.

D 11

$115,710.44

$222,127.53

No. of

Class of Vessels.

Trips.

Tonnage.

Rate

per ton.

17. The Amount of Light Dnes collected during the year 1921 was as follows:-

Special Assessment.

Total Fees

Collected.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

$

Ocean Vessels,.

5,185

10,214,805

1 cent.

Steam-launches,

2,649

86,162 1

River Steamers, (Night Boats),.

1,990

1,022,212

102,148.05

861,62 1

3,407.42

""

Do.,

(Day Boats),

1,288

910,708

Nil.

Iako

B

C.

1 cent.

102,148.05

C.

204,296.10

861.62

1,723.24

"

5,111.49

8,518.91

7,589.28

7,589.28

وو

Total,..

11,112

12,233,887

:

$106,417.09

:

D 12

4.

Steam-launches.

Of

18. On the 31st December, 1921, there were 381 steam-launches (including licensed motor boats) employed in the harbour. these, 335 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, etc. 24 were the property of the Colonial Government, and 22 belonged to the Imperial Government, comprising 4 Military and 18 Naval. In addition to the above there were 23 motor boats privately owned for pleasure and private purposes.

Five coxswains' certificates were suspended for incompetence or negligence in the performance of their duties, and the holders were required to pass a further examination before their certificates were returned.

Five hundred and seventy-six (576) engagements and five hundred and eighty (580) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made during the year.

Seven (7) steam-launches were permitted to carry arms for their protection against pirates.

5.- Emigration and Immigration.

19. One hundred and fifty-six thousand and eleven (156,011) engrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1921, (105,258 in 1920). Of these, 98,382 were carried in British ships, and 57,629 in Foreign ships.

One hundred and fifty-nine thousand and sixty-four (159,064) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 122,438 in 1920. Of these, 107,301 arrived in British ships and 51,763 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, etc., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 22 ships were registered under the provi- sions of the Merchant Shipping Acts, and 20 Certificates of Registry cancelled. 318 documents, etc., were dealt with in con- nection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $1,902.00 a compared with $1,757.00 in 1920.

7-Marine Magistrate's Court.

as

21. Three hundred and sixty-four cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court (200 in 1920). Breach of Port Regula- tions, Boarding ships without permission, Failing to observe the Rule of the Road, Making fast to steamers while under way, Neglect- ing to exhibit the Regulation lights, Being in Causeway Bay Harbour of Refuge without permit, Being within 100 yards from low water mark during prohibited hours without permit and Car- rying passengers in excess were the principal offences.

- D 13

8.-Marine Court.

22. During the year 1921 two courts were held, riz.:-

On the 22nd day of March, 1921, to enquire into the circumstances of the stranding of the British Steamship Hong Moh, Official Number 85,862 of Singapore, Mr. Henry William Holmes, certificate of competency as Master No. 2279 of Hongkong, was Master.

On the 31st day of March, 1921, to enquire into the circum- stances of the stranding of the British Steamship "Hong Wan I”, Official Number 73,866 of Singapore, Mr. John Sylvester Liddell, certificate of competency as Master No. 477 of New Zealand, was Master.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers.

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance No. 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Compe- tency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed:-

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

21

14

Master, River Steamers,

1

1

First Mate,

32

18

Only Mate,

0

Second Mate,

15

15

Mate, River Steamers,...

1

2

Total,...

70

53

First Class Engineer, ...

15

4

Second Class Engineer,

35

15

Total,...

50

19

D 14

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899:-

For Master,

For Engineer,

Candidates.

Total,...

Passed.

Failed.

100

}

117

217

9

10. Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

21. There were five (5) candidates examined during the year. riz:--2 Passed and 3 Failed. Twenty (20) Licences were also re- newed during the year 1921.

11. Sunday Cargo-Working.

25. There were 1.140 permits issued during the year under Ordinance No. 1 of 1891, as compared with 1,010 in 1920. Of these, 461 were not used as the ships did not arrive up to time. and in some cases it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday. On three occasions typhoon prevented cargo being worked on Sundays.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $116,700 as against $115,350 in 1920 showing an increase of $1,350.

12.-New Territories.

(Twenty-third year of British Administration.)

26. The Out-stations attached to the Harbour Department con- tinued to perform the work allotted to them and during the year Licences, etc., were issued by them as follows:-

1920.

1921.

Cheung Chan, opened 1899......

2.233

3,642

Tai O,

1899

2.072

1,910

Tai Po.

1900..

2.217

1,891

14

Sai Kung,

1902..

746

927

Long Ket, Deep Bay, Lantao,

1905.

1,156

1.194

1911...

912

956

1912..

970

1,310

19

10,306

11,730

- D 15

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Territories during the year was $28,914.00 as compare with $27,978.95 in 1920.

13.-Lighthouses and Signal Stations.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSES.

27. During 1921 six hundred and sixty seven (667) vessels were reported by telegraph as passing this station and four hundred and sixty seven (467) were not reported, owing to telegraphic com- munication being interrupted. 253 Ships were signalled by Morse Lamp.

Two thousand four hundred and thirty-eight (2,438) messages. including Meteorological observations for the Observatory were sent and three hundred and eighty-six (386) messages were received.

Telegraphic communications were interrupted on one hundred and forty-three days and eight hours (143 days 8 hours) during the

year.

+

There were ninety four hours and forty minutes of fog, and the fog signal was fired six hundred and ten (619) times.

The fortnightly relief was delayed eight (8) times during the year owing to bad weather.

WAGLAN LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1921, two thousand nine hundred and twenty-five (2,925) vessels were reported by telegraph from this station. Of this number 622 were signalled by Morse Lamp.

Thirty nine (39) vessels were not reported owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted.

Three thousand and eighty-nine (3,089) telegraphic messages were sent including meteorological observations for the Observatory, and 548 messages were received.

There were 171 hours and 36 minutes of fog during the year, and the fog signal was fired 1,769 times.

Telegraphic communication was maintained throughout the year with the exception of 1 complete day and a few short inter- ruptions caused by the land line being in contact with telephoue wires.

On three occasions the relief was delayed by rough sea.

GREEN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE AND SIGNAL STATION.

During the year, one thousand five hundred and seventy-three (1573) vessels were signalled and reported, in addition to which four hundred and forty nine (449) messages were sent and thirty two (32) received.

D 16

Telephonic communication was interrupted twice only during the year thereby six vessels were not reported against thirty-two in 1920.

KAP SING LIGHTHOUSE.

This station has been regularly inspected and has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

On the 10th December three new Aga lights (flash) were installed and exhibited on Channel Rocks, Tathong Point, and Tong Ku Island. The total number of Aga Lights in the Colony is now fourteen (14) and all have been burning continously, accurately and satisfactorily during the year.

SIGNAL STATIONS.

The Peak signal station reported four thousand three hundred and sixty two (4,362) ships during the year and the Gun signal denoting the arrival of Mail steamers was fired sixty-three times.

Signal Hill station reported four thousand six hundred and eighty (4,680) ships as entering and two thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven (2,867) as leaving the harbour.

14.-Government Harbour Moorings.

There are at present laid down in the Harbour for the use of shipping frequenting the Port fifty six (56) sets of Government Harbour Moorings and are classed as follows:

1920.

1921.

A. Class Moorings

.11

13

B.

.15

19

""

"}

C.

.24

24

""

Total

50

56

Six (6) new complete sets of moorings were laid down during the year as follows:-2 A class and 1 B class in the central part of the Harbour and 3 B. class at Wanchai at a cost of $90,430.00.

The total expenditure on upkeep on Government Harbour Moorings and Buoys for the year was $19,958.94. Table showing the Gross revenue from Government Harbour Buoys for the follow- ing years :-

The Gross Revenue for the year 1916 was $51,916.

多多

>>

19

>>

15

>>

1917 1918

61,156. 59,594.

""

وو

1919

27

69,440.

1920

75,448.

""

1921

89,176.

22

$406,730.

Gross Revenue for six years

D 17

15.-Staff.

Commander C. W. Beckwith, R.N., Harbour Master was away on home leave from the 10th February to the 13th December. Lieutenant Conway Hake, R.N.R. acted as Harbour Master during his absence.

Mr. W. Russell was appointed Government Marine Surveyor on the 4th January.

Messrs. R. Hall and P. J. Taylor were appointed Assistant Government Marine Surveyors on the 20th September, 1920, and 1st October respectively.

Mr. G. W. Coysh was appointed Deputy Shipping Master on the 20th November, 1920.

Mr. C. J. Thomson was appointed First Boarding Officer on the 2nd December.

Mr. S. P. Leigh was appointed Second Boarding Officer on the 16th November, 1920.

Mr. M. McIver, First Boarding Officer retired on the 2nd December after 30 years' service in the Colony.

Mr. J. Macdonald died on the 3rd January while on leave in Australia. He had been Chief Government Marine Surveyor of this Colony for 19 years.

Mr. W. McGrann, Officer in charge Peak Signal Station died on the 20th February after 14 years' service.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT,

March, 1922.

C. W. BECKWITH, Commander R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

(01

Table I-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS, OF VESSELS ENTERED AT POINTS IN

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

BRITISH.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Ci

Australia,

29

British North Borneo.......

.18

65,633 3,044

30,476 1,761

20 65,633 3.044

19

54,661

18

Canada,

44

275,111 12,027

:

:.

:

:

30,476 1,761

7

9,985

44

Coast of China, Ships,..

2,890 2,160,507 | 166,437

126

171,557

9,216

27,511 12,027

3,016 | 2,632,064 175,653

3

18,207

1,386

1,038,323 6:

Steamships under 60 tons....

772

25,166 1:

"1

Junks,

...

:

8,912

294,052 140

Cochin China

Dutch East Indies,

Europe, Atlantic Ports,

110

164,193 7,820

33

73,073 2,368

7

34,100 577

110

:

164,193 7,820

108

157,994

33

73,073 2,368

126

326,503

7

34,100

577

46

190,140

"

Baltic Ports,

:

17

72,444

"

Mediterranean Ports,

33

149,693

Formosa,

Great Britain,

India,

Japan,

Kwong-chau-wan,

2

7,071

180

2

7,071

180

206

235,736 11

145

623,153 13,922

145

623,153 13,922

34

143,965 4

91 355,114 11,142

137 493,864 14,069

1

4,055

54

92

359,169 11.196

56

150,003

4

17,204

309

141

511,068 14,378

423

245

:

Macao, Ships,

19

930

566,298 37,590

Steamships under 60 tons,

Junks,

"}

Mauritius,

3,094

148

:

...

:

North and South Pacific Islands,

*

Philippine Islands,

91

179,564 6,700

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

195

207,989 13,551

2

185

Port Arthur,

...

Russia in Asia,

3

12,650

266

930

566,298 37,590

1,139,385 32

84,862 12

135 21,870 1

:

34

:

:

:

1,292

245

11,356

2

3,094

148

:

1

2,876 122

I

2.876

122

:

:

91 179,564 6,700

26 115,910 3

58

197

208,174 13,609

356 268,480 17

...

:

Siam,

South America,.........................

Straits Settlements,

Tsingtau,

164 212,705 13,190

:

...

:

90 184,937 9,756

14 19,153 1,032

3 5,423 244

United States of America,

Wei-hai-wei,

56 215,178 3,866

4

7,471

250

:

3

12,650

266

1

164

212,705 13,190

99

2,625

124,635 6.

...

6 28,373

93

190,360 10,000

51 116,010

3.

14

19,153 1,032

16

56

215,178 3,866

7,471

194

21,438

963,378 22.

250

1

1,686

TOTAL,

5,055 6,191,334 | 319,696

137 201,300 10,003

5,192 | 6,392,634 | 329,609

13,557 | 6,498,172 | 366

( ₺ 19 )

EWS, OF VESSELS ENTERED AT POINTS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessel

29

65,633 3,044

19

54,661 2,266

19

54,661

2,266

48 120,294 5,310

18

30,476

1,761

7

9,985 441

7

9,985

441

25

44

27,511

12,027

3

18,207 316

3

18,207

316

47

9,216

3,016 | 2,632,064 | 175,653

1,386 1,038,323 61,550

200

772

25,166 11,242

2,505

8,912

294,052 140,118

4,278

228,424

70,548

683,358 72,341

9,721

1,586 | 1,266,747

26,426

3,277

95,714

71,271

37,668

40.461 2,202

293,318 12,343

4,276 | 3,498,830 | 227,987

32

772

25,160 11,242

2,50

13,190 1,677,410 | 212,459

8,912

994,052 140,118 4,27

110

164,193

7,820

108

157,994 5,884

108

33

: :

:

:

73,073 2,368

126

326,503 9,828

34,100

577

46

190,140 3,293

17

:

:

72,444

699

33

149,693 6,068

2

7,071

180

206

235,736 11,565

145

623,153 13,922

34

143,965 4,331

:

:

:

126

157,940 5,884

326,503 9.828

218

322,187 13,704

159

399,576 12,196

:

:

46

190,140 3,293

53

221,240 3,870

17

72,444 699

17

72,444

699

33

149,693 6,068

33

149,693 6,068

206

235,736 11,565

208

242,807 11,745

:

34

143,965 4,331

179

767,118 18,253

54

92

359,169 11,196

56

150,003 3,646

1

4,271

40

57 154,274 3,686

147

505,117 | 14,788

309

141 511,068 14,378

423

1,139,385 32,258

3

4,584

143

426 1,143.969 32,401

560

1,633,249 46,327

245

:

:

:

84,862 12,504

245

84,862 12,504

245

84,862 12,504

:

930

566,298 37,590

135

21,870 1,755

13

11,677

638

148

33,547 2,393

1,065

588,168 39,345

1/

34

1,292

431

25

710

227

59

245

:

2,990 41,356

307

36,388

5,180

552

2,002 658

77,744 8,170

31

1,292

431

20

245

41,356

2,990

307

3,094

148

:

:

3,094

148

122

1

2,876

122

...

:

1

91

:

179,564 6,700

26 115,910 3,136

26 115,910 3,136

117

295,474 9,836

58

197

208,174 13,609

356

268,480 17,944

2

972-

81

358 269,452 18,025

551

476,469 31,495

4

1

5,042

39

1

5,042

39

1

÷

:

3 12,650

266

1

2,625

34

1

:

2,625

34

4

164

212,705 13,190

99

124,635

6

010

6,311

28,373 654

:

:

:

99

124,635

263 6,311

15,275

300

337,340 19,501

6

28,373

654

6

244

93 190,360 10,000

51

...

14 19,163 1,032

16

66 215,178 3,866

194

4

7,471

250

1,686

116,010 3,452

21,438

739

963,378 22,700

80

11,303

163

55

127,313

3 615

141

16

194

21,438

963,378 22,700

739

1

1,686

80

5

28,373 654

300,947 13,208

30 40,591 1,771

250 1,178,556 26,566

9,157

330

7

10,008

5,192 6,392,634 |329,609

13,557 6,498,172 366,235 7,389 1,057,277 | 114,999 20,896 7,555,419 | 481,234

18,612 12,689,506 | 685,931

7,476

19 )

IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1921.

CS.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

2,266

:

19

54,661

2,266

441

7

9,985

441

316

3 18,207

316

48

120,294 5,310

25 40,461 2,202

47

61,550

200

228,424

9,721

1,586 1,266,747

71,271

11,242

2,505 70,548

26,426

3,277

95,714

140,118 4,278 683,358

72.341

13,190

37,668

1,677,410 | 212,459 8,912

4,276

772

293,318 12,343

3,498,830 | 227,987

40,461 2,202

47 293,318 12.343

48

120,294 5,310

25

326

25,160 11,242

994,052 140,118

2,505

4,278

399,981 18,937 4,602

70,548 26,426

683,358 72,341

3,898,811246,924

3,277 95,714 37,668

13,190 1,677,410 212,459

5,884

108

157,940

5,884

218

322,187 13,704

***

218 322,187 13,704

9,828

126

326,503 9.828

159

399,576 12,196

:

159 399,576 12,196

3,293

:

46

190,140

3,293

53

221,240 3,870

53

224,240 3,870

699

17

72,444

699

17

72,444

699

17

72,444

699

6,068

33

149,693 6,068

33

149,693 6,068

33

149,693 6,068

11,565

206 235,736 11,565

208

242,807 11,745

208

242,807 12,745

4,331

:

34

143,965 4,331

179

767,118 18,253

:

179

767,118 18,253

3,646

1

4,271

40

57

154,274 3,686

147

32,258

3

4,584

143

426 1,143,969 32,401

560

505,117

1,633,249 46,327

14,788

2

8,326

94

7

21,788

452

12,504

:

245

...

84,862 12,504

245

1,755

13 11,677

638

148

33,547 2,393

1,065

84,862

588,168 39,345

12,501

245

13

11,677

638

1,078

149 513,443 14,882

567 1,655,037 46,779

84,862 12,504

599,845 39,983

431

25

710

227

59

2,002

658

34

1,292

431

25

710

227

59

2,990

307 36,388

5,180

552

77,744 8,170

245

41,356

2,990

307

36,388

5,180

552

2,002

77,744 8,170

658

:

:

:

:

:

2

3,094

148

2

:.

3,091

148

1

2,876

122

I

2,876

122

3,136

26

115,910 3,136

117

17,944

2

972.

81

358 269,452 18,025

551

295,471

476,469 31,495

9,836

...

117

295,474 9,836

4

1,157

139

555

477,626 31,634

1

5,012

39

1

5,042

39

1

5,042

39

1

5,042

39

34

6,311

:

1

2,625

34

99

124,635 6,311

263

15,275 300

337,340 19,501

4

15,275

300

654

...

6

28,373

654

6

3,452

739

22,700

80

4

11,303

163

55

127,313

3 615

141

16

21,438

739

30

194

963,378 22,700

250

28,373 654

300,947 13,208

40,591 1,771

1,178,556 26,566

:

:

:

263

337,340 19,501

:

6

28,373

651

7 16,726 407

250

148 317,673 13,616

30 40,591 1,771

1,178,556 26,566

1

1,686

80

5

9,157

330

L

5

9,157

330

366,235

7,389

1,057,277114,999

20,896 | 7,555,419 | 481,234 18,612 12,689,506 | 685,931 7,476 | 1,258,577 125,002

26,088 13,948,083 810,933

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNA

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons.

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

Australia,

British North Borneo,.....

Canada,

Coast of China, Ships,.

27

61,359 2,596

2,200

2

7,422

98

870

29

68,78

20

46,921 1,848

2,200

15

40.469

794

1,940

35

87,39

31 191,791 9,825

2,770

...

31

191,79

3,020 2,770,389 188,972

136,000

42

61,483

2,483

6,370

3,062

2,831,8

17

""

Steamships under 60 tons,...

Junks,

:

:

:

A

:

:

:

:.

:

Cochin China,.....

84

121,539 5,852

20,943

15

Dutch East Indies,

12

23,492 1,087

6,180

10

24,549

24,250

1,071

566 5,650

Europe, Mediterranean Ports,

3

11,053

257

950

""

Atlantic Ports,

7

34,738

719

Baltic Ports,

1

4,250

155

Formosa,

2.

6,570

284

:

:

:

:

Great Britain,.......... ........

101

472,463 11,314

India,

60 163,785 8,057

Japan,

167

638,283 17,552

Kwong-chau-wan,

Macao, Ships,

:

930

575,398 37,590

"

Steamships under 60 tons,

29

Junks,.

:

:

1,311

7,752

15,821

1

2,740

50

:

...

99

309

2223

146,08

47,74

3

11,0%

7

34,73

1

4,25

2

6,57

102

473,20

60

163,7.

6

17,310

448

1,085

173

655,5

3,685

:

:

:

...

6,448

930

575,39

:

:

:

...

Mauritius,

4

5,274 285

3,200

1,673

71

800

10

:

6,9-

North and South Pacific Islands,

1

2,786

118

1,900

1

7.

Philippine Islands,

90

185,025

6,640

16,409

5

12,917

350 1,775

95

197,9

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

139

133,739

9,569

6,540

66

101,291

1.467 8,478

205

235,0

Siam,

108

142,166

8,762

38,524

13

CY'S

18,745

1,033 4,160

121

160,9

South America,

:

Straits Settlements,

101

178,996

9,746

Tsingtau,

32

43,852

2,669

United States of America,

-50215,976-

-4,910

Persian Gulf,..

:

:

:

:

:

8,107

*33,866

12

23,054

818 3,100

113

202,0

2,140

32

2,155

.2

-600

52 224,0

:

TOTAL,

4,990 | 6,029,845 | 328,807

307,309

190 311,013 12.630 38,513 5,180 6,373,

- D 20

› II.—NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG T

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

:WS.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons Crews.

Vessels.

Tous. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Τα

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

98

870

29 68,781 2,694

794

1,940

35 87,390 2,642

+

:

31 191,791 9,825

483 6,370 3,062 2,831,872 191,455

:..

:

:

:

:

:

071 3,685

566 5,650

99

146,088 6,923

22

17,742

1,653

:

3 11,033

257

7 34,738

719

1

4,250

155

:

:

:

:

:

3,070

13

16,322

1,707

4,140

2,776

305

2,770

4 23,186

923

:

:

150

3,325

56

150

14

30

14

21,590

591 1,116

18

2

1

142,370

1,687 1,179,840 87,581

46,515

3,230

147- 207,878 6,614 4,362

51

5

20

525

19,136

8,707

5,044

10,879

1,438,719 | 161,247

21,628

37

66,552 2,673

10,672

11,830

41

203,570 6,108

10,040

2,769 76,983 29,122 18,387

2,411 231.353 32,687

38

64,195 2,308

7

13,379 331

1,834 1,381

3,294

13,290 1,670

96

10,070

75 130

1,100

48

214

950

33

153,815

5,979

3,580

33

153

:

19

112,496

2,163

2,000

:

19

112

2

10,735

83

2

10

2

6,570

284

118

200,029

9,123

1,920

109 139,239 3.817

1,190

227

33:

50

102

473,203 11,364

1,311

32

119,687 1,267

3,100

32

149

:

60 163,785 8,057

7,752

79

264,774 6,149

12,630

79

264

148

1,085

173

655,593 18,000

16,906

209

741,680 19,693,

18,233

68

122,925 2,885 1,145

277

861

:

:

195

85,947 12,579

8,497

195

8

930

573,398

37,590

6,448

2,486

141

50

146 26,087 2,220

711

150

23

31

:

:

1,160

400

63

26

:

405

53,214 5,706

71

800

T

6,947

356

4,000

1

3,085

92

1

786

118

1,900

:

350 1,775

95 197,942

6,990

18,181

38

186,031 4,029

£67 8,478

205 235,033 14,036

15,018

293

177,545 14,319

:

:

:

732

239

180

57

88

13,297

929

193

60

800

:

:

1

3

5,824

122

50

3

2,016

3 11,106

141

...

41

197

17,556

146

033

4,160

121

160,911 9,795

42,684

47

77,927

4,676

27,006

205,863 6,098 12,295

11.780

439

38:

451 2,105

58

$3

:

21

97,382 2,386

810

21

318

3,100

113

202,050 10,564

32

43,852 2,669

~600

221.083

5,021

36,966

58 147,733

4,656

15,715

S

20,109

395 1,910

66

167

2,140

9,587

209

2,755

167 869,698 1,231

200

10,040

11,010

312 1,210

13

20

18,020

131

850

170 88:

:

1

2,639

49

1,200

630 38,513

5,180 | 6,373,858 | 341,167

345,822 14,948 6,327,751 387,381

197,867

6,006 1,202,925 89,570

61,844 20,954 7,53

NY OF HONGKONG TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1921.

IGN.

LAST.

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Bunker

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

Cargoes. Coal.

56

150

14 49,647

1,763

1,650

40

107,681 4,303

2,350

3

10,747

154 2,370

43

591

1,116

18 24,366

896

1,146

24

49,697 2,153

2,230

29

62,0 59

1,385

3,056

53

51

5

26.416

974

6,614

4,362

1,834 1,387,718 94,195

50,877

35 214,977 10,748

4,707 | 3,950,229 |276,553

2,770

1

3,230

51

36

182,515

189

29,122

18,387

3,294 96,119

37,829

23,431

525

19,136 8,707

5,014

269,361

2,769 76,983 2,922 18,387

9,097 10,732

4,896

3,291

32,687

13,290 | 1,670,072 | 193,934

10,879

1,438,719 161,247

:

2,411

231,353 32,687

13,290

2,308

10,070

75 130,747

4,981

20,742

121

188,091 8,525

31,615

53

88,711 3,379 13,755

174

331

1,100

48

216,949 6,439

11,140

53

227,062 7,195

16,220

17

37,629

897 6,750

70

33

153,815

5,979

3,580

36

164,868 6,236

4,530

:

:

36

:

:

19

112,496 2,163

2,000

26

147,234 2,882

2,000

:

26

2

10,735

83

3

3,817

1,490

227 339,268 12,940

:

3,410

120

14,985

206,599 9,407

238

:

:

3

1,920

109

:

32 149,687 4,267

3,100

133 622,150 15,581

4,411

139,239

2,740

3,817

1,490

229

50

:

134

79

264,774 6,149

12,630

139

2,885

1,445

277

864,605 22,778

22,678

376

428,559 14,206

1,379,963 37,445

20,582

:

:

139

34,054

74

140,235 3,333

5,530

450

195

85,947 12,579

8,497

195

2,220

714

150

23,573

2,361

794

931

239

180

57

1.892

639

929

:

493

66,517 6,635

:.

1

3,085

92

122

50

3

5,824

122

141

6,098

:

41 197,137 4,170

:

:

:

:

85,947 12,579

577,884 37,731

8,497

...

195

6,498

146 26,087 2,220

744

1,080

243

31

1,160

400

63

26

405

53,214 5,706

:

:

732

239

180

57

88

13,297

929

193

800

8,359

877

4,000

1,673

71

800

6

50

2,786

118

1,900

5,824

122

50

4

2,016

128

371,056 10,669

18,425

24,023

491 1,775

136

12,295

439 383,408 20,417

29,851

432

311,284 23,888

24,096

212

307,157 10,565 20,773

644

451 2,105

58 89,707 5,127

29,111

155

220,093 13.438

65,530

24

30,525 1,484 6,265

179

:

21

97,382 2,386

SJ0

21

97,382 2,386

$10

21

395

1,910

66 167,842 5,051

17,655

159

326,729 14,402

49,581

20

43,163 1,213 5,040

179

312 1.210

13

20,597

521

1,410

37

53,439 2,878

2,340

131

850

170

882,718 21,362

10,890

217

1,085,674 26,141

12,190

5

11,010

21,127

312 1,210

242 1,450

15

222

I

:

1

2,639

49

1,200

1

2,639

49

1,200

89,570

61,844 20,951 7,530,676 476,951

259,711

19,938 12,357,596 716,188

505,176

6,196

1,546,938 101,930 100,357 26,134 1

A

NTRY IN THE YEAR 1921.

SHIPPED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Des.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

1,650

40 107,681 4,303

2,350

3

10,747 154

2,370

13

118,428

1,157

1,146

24 49,697 2,153

2,230

29

35 214,977 10,748

2,770

62,0 59 1,385 3,056

3,230

53

111,756 3,538

51

36

218,207

10,799

50,877

4,707 3,950,229 276,553

:

182,515

23.431

525 19,136

8,707

5,011

2,769

10,879 1,438,719 | 161,247

2,411

189 269,361

76,983 2,922 18,387

231,353 32,687

9,097 10,732

4,896

4,219,590 | 285,650

:

:

*

3,294 96,119

37,829

4,720

5.386

2,770

193,247

23,431

13,290 1,670,072 | 193,934

20,742

121 188,091

8,525

:

31,615

53

88,744

11,140

53 227,062

7,195

16,220

17 37,629 897

3,379 13,755

6,750

174

276,835

11,904

70

264,691 8,092

3,580

36

33

164,868

6,236

4,530

2,000

26 147,234

2,882

:

2,000

3 14,985

238

:

:

:

36

164,868 6,238

:

26

147,234 2,882

45.370

22,970

4,530

2,010

3

14,985

238

3,410

120 206,599 9,407

1,920

109 139,239 3,817

1,490

229

345,838 13,224

3410

3,100

133 522,150 15,581

4,411

1

2,740

50

134

624,890 15,631

4,411

12,630

139

428,559 14,206

20,582

139

428,559 14,205

20,382

22,678

376 1,379,963 37,445

34,054

74 140,235

3,333

5,530

450

1,520,198 40,778

39,524

8,497

195 85,947 12,579

8,497

195

85,917 12,579

8,497

794

934 577,884 37,731

6,498

146 26,087 2,220

744

1,080

603,971

39, 51

:

7,242

243

31

1,160

400

:

63

26

732

239

180

57

1,892

639

243

405

:

53,214 5,706

88

13,297

929

493

66,511

6,635

800

8,359 377

:

4,000

I

1,673

71

800

10,032

448

1,800

50

2,786

118

1,900

5,824

122

50

8,610

240

1,950

2,016

128

371,056 10,669

13,425

8 24,023

29,851

432

311,284 23,888

:

24,096

212 307,157

29.111

155

220,093 13,438

65,530

24

30,525

491 1,775

10,565 20,773

1,484 6,265

136

395,079 11,160

20,200

644

618,441 34.453

:

41,869

179

250,618

14,922

71,795

810

21

97,382 2,386

810

21

97,382 2,386

810

17,655

159 326,729 14,402

49,581

20

43,163

1,410

37 53,439 2.878

2,340

8

10,890

217 1,085,674 26,141

12,190

11,010

21,127

*

1,213 5,040

312 1,210

242 1,450

179

45

369,892 15,615

64,449 3,190

222 1,106,801 26,383

54.621

3,550

13.645

1,200

1

2,639

49

1,200

1

2,639

19

259,711

19,938 12,357,596 716,188

505,176

6,196 1,546,938 101,930 100,357

26,134 13,904,534 | 818,118

Names of Ports.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,..

Saikung,

Shaukiwan,.

Stanley,

Tai O,.........

Yaumati,.

Victoria,

!

( 21 )

Table III.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS ENTERED

BRITISH.

FOR

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN B

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tous. Crews. Vessels. T

:

:

93

6,270

$75

16

45

1,805

440

12

:

:

:

166

:

4,317

891

8

6

396

85

3

51

680

307

5,055 6,191,334319,696

137 201,300 10,003

5,192 6,392,634 329,696

663 34,239 7,044

12,533 6,450,465 356,590

160 12

7,140 1,01

Total,

5,055 | 6,191,334319,696 137 201,300 10,003

5,192 6,392,634 329,696 13,557 6,498,172 366,235

7,339 1,05

( D 21 )

MBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS ENTERED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1

IN

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

S.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.!

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

:

93

6,270

875

16

239

89

109

6,509

964

93

6,270

875

16

45

1,805

440

12

215

71

57

2,020

511

45

1,805

440

12

166

4,317

891

227

60

174

4,544

954

166

4,317

894

8

6

396

85

3

283

57

9

679

142

6

396

85

51

680

307

51

680

307

51

680

307

03

663

5,192 6,392,634 | 329,696 12,533 6,450,465 356,590

34,239

7,044

160

1,907

12,028

7,140 1,044,285 112,815 19,673 | 7,494,750 | 469,405

823

46,267❘ 8,951

663 1 34,239

7,044

160

17,588 12,641,799 | 676,286

7,277 1

003

5,192 | 6,392,634 329,696 13,557 6,498,172 366,235

7,339 1,057,277| 114,999

20,896 7,555,449 481,234 18,612 12,689,506 685,931

| |

7,476)

( D 21 )

- ENTERED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1921.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VS.

Vessels.

Tous.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

375

16

239

89

109

6,509

964

93

6,270

875

16

239

89

109

6,509

964

140

12

215

71

57

2,020

511

45

1,805

440

12

215

71

11/20

57

2,020,

511

:

391

8

227

60

174

4,544

954

166

4,317

891

00

227

60

174

4,544

954

85

3

283

57

9

679

142

6

396

85

283

57

9

679

142

307

51

680

307

51

680

307

51

51

30%

144

160 12,028 1,907

823

46,267 8,951

663

34,239

7,044

160 12,028 1,907

823

823

8,951

590

7,140 1,044,285 112,815

19,673 7,494,750 469,405 | 17,588 12,641,799 | 676,286

7,277 1,245,585 122,818 24,865

24,865 799,104

235

7,339 1,057,277 114,999 20,896

7,555,449 | 481,234 | 18,612 12,689,506 | 685,931

#

7,476 1,258,577 125,002 26,088 13,948,083 810,33

Names of Ports.

Vessels.

WITH CARGOES.

Table IV.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CRE

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker

Bunker

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Coal.

Coal.

Aberdeen

Cheung Chau,

Saikung,...

Shaukiwan,

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Stanley,

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

54

2,0€

33

81

:

2,67

2

:

Tai O,

1

]

Yaumati,

Victoria,..

638

$7,27

4,990 | 6,029,845 | 328,807 307,300

190 344,013

12.360

38,513 5,180 6,373,858 841,167 345,822

14,139 6,285.01

Total,

4,990 | 6,029,845328,807307,309

190 | 344,013

12,360 38,513 5,180 6,373,858 341,167 |345,822

11,948 6,327,75

D 22

¿ER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS CLEARED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1921

FOREIGN.

L.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

:

54

2,051

353

19 3,527

472

103

5,581

$25

51

33

516

230

12

457

96

45

973

326

:

:

2,054

353

3333

516

230

81

2,671

454

2

155

32

1

11

:

:

:

:

:

841,167 345,822

638

:

$7,270

6,958

14,139 | 6,285,071 379,348 | 197,867

92

1,810

547

:

:

...

173

4,481

1,001

81

2,671

454

396

85

551

:

117

155

32

50

668

301

:

51

682

307

14

6

210 9,768 2,258

848

47,038 9.216

638

5,587 1,186,299) 85,811 61,844 19,726

7,171,370 465,159 259,711

37.270 6.958

19,129 12,314,916 708,155 5

341,167 |345,822

11,948 | 6,327,751 | 387,381 | 197,867

6,006 1,202,925) 89,570 61,814

20,951 7,580,676 | 476,951 | 259,711

19,938 12,357,596 | 716,188 | 5

e COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1921.

TOTAL.

"

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Tons. Vessels.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

}

5,581

825

51

973

326

:

:

2,054

353

49

3,527

472

103

5,581

825

33

516

230

12

457

96

45

973

326

:

:

:

92

1,810

547

173

4,481

1,001

6

396

85

8

551

117

A

50

668

301

51

682

307

210

9,768

2,258

818

47,038

9,216

98,171100,357

24,906 13,845,228 806,326 605,533

4,481

1,001

81

2,671

454

551

117

2

155

32

682

307

1

14

6

:

:

47,038 9,216

7,471,370 465,159 | 259,711

638

6.958 37,270

19,129 12,314,916 708,155 505,176

5,777 1,530,312

7,530,676 | 476,951 | 259,711

19,938 12,357,596|716,188 505,176

6,196 1,540,938 | 101,930 | 100,357

26,154 13,904,534 818,118605,533

Table V.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1921.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

D 23

British,

American,

Chinese,

Junks,

""

Danish,

15

5,055 6,191,334 319,696 232 831,244 18,478 1,594 824,722 68,132 9,157 1,035,408 143,108 56,752 582

137201,300

10,003

5,192 6,392,634 329,699

9 32,429

434

241

863,673. 18,912

40 29,882

2,101

1,634

854,604) 70,233

4,585

719,746

77,521

13,742

1,755,154 220,629

15

56,752

582

Dutch,

152

467,718 13,609

24

16,434

977

176

484,152

14,586

French,.

147

277,054 13,822

2 5,780

94

149

282,834 13,916

Greek,

1

1,882

40

1

1,882

40

Inter-Allied,.

Italian,

4 19,738 540 21 78,372

19,738 540

2,457

21

78,372 2,457

Japanese,

1,173 2,705,632 84,854

125 | 164,762

6,185

1,298 |2,870,394 91,019

Norwegian,

84

89,408

4,625

18 12,941

785

102

102,349 5,410

Portuguese,

137

28,371

2,053

5

2,163

209

142

30,534

2,262

Russian,

3

4,479

199

4,479

199

Swedish,

7

26,044

312

26,044

312

Siamese,

22

24,096

1,640

22

24,096

1,640

Sarawak,

3

2,676

171

2,676

171

Steamships under 60

tons trading to ports outside the Colony,

806

26,458 11,673

2,530

71,258 26,653

3,336

97,716 38,326

TOTAL,

18,612 12,689,506 685,931

7,476 1,258,577 125,002

26,088 | 13,948,083 810,933

W

, ד'

Table VI.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1921.

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

CLEARED.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

American,.

Chinese,

Junks,

Danish,.

4,990 6,029,845 328,807 217 797,009 18,523 1,545 760,180 87,116 11,284 1,491,933 166,953 14 56,172 508

190

344,013 23 66,873 1,152 89 93,860

12,360 5,180 6,373,858 341,167

240 863,882 19,675

4,997

1,634

854,040 92,113

2,499 244,650

33,616

13,783

1,736,583 200,569

1

580

22

15

56,752 530

Dutch,

139

408,390 11,431

37

75,118

2,035

176

483,508 13,466

French,

141

267,587 13,848

13

21,988

609

154

289,575 14,457

1

Inter-Allied,.

Italian,

4 19,738 461 21 78,372 1,934

4 19,738 461 21 78,372 1,934

Japanese,

907 2,282,243 70,509

385

Norwegian,

86 85,432 4,681

568,232

17 22,311

14,592

1,292 2,850,475 85,102

819

103

107,743 5,500

Portuguese,

2

6,501

298

142 24,429

1,936

144

30,930 2,234

Russian,

2

2,986

101

2

2,986

78

5,972

179

Sarawak,

1.784

111

I

892

52

2,676

163

Swedish,

7

26,044

267

26,044

267

Siamese,

21

23,084 1,533

3 3,291

231

24

26,375 1,764

Steamships under 60 tons

trading to ports outside the Colony,

556

20,296 9,107

2,795 77,715 29,361

3,350

98,011 38,538

TOTAL,.

19,938 12,357,596 716,188

6,196 1,546,938 101,930

26,134 13,904,534 818,118

}

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED in the Colony of Hongkong,

from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1921.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Ves- gers. Tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers,

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Tons.

Canton,.

West River,

1,144 211,479 22,161 5,481 598,203 95,158 94,798

134,533 2,158 442,418 39,865

3,302

653,897

62,026

134,533

- D 25

333,754 1,860 | 230,277

30,307

12.233

7,341

828,480

125,465 | 107,071

333,754

1

Macao,

245

East Coast,

2,088

West Coast,

199

41,356 2,990

169,026 20.048

15,344 2,751

26,392 307 36,388

5,180

552

77,744

8,170 |

26,392

30

132,892 210 6,683

1,483

55

2,298

175,709

21,531

85

132,892

3

6,070 50 3.980

686

249 19,324

3,437

6,070

Total, 1921,

9,157 | 1,035,408 | 143,108

94,831

633,641 | 4,585 719,746

77,521

12,288

18,742 | 1,753,154 220,629 | 107,159

633,641

Total, 1920,

8,349

923,412 | 133,197

70,811

504,241 | 2,536 | 397,393

37,563

3,603

10,885 1,320,745 | 170,760 74,414

504,241

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1921.

Cargo.

Ballast.

Total.

Vessels.

Tous.

Crew,

Passen- Cargo, Ves- gers. tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo,

gers.

tons.

D 26

Canton,

4,662

West River.

•4.374

Macao,

405

East Coast...

West Coast.

1,647

807,267 63,741

538,506 81,373

53,214) 5.706

78,364 13,520

196 14.582) 2,613

795,983 32 5,609

85,585

37,846 88 13,297

472 268,531 1.670 | 124,235 23.503 12,136 929

4,694

812,876 64,213

795,983

46

48

31,306 626 98,160

7,747 83 3,349

7,871

841

6,044 | 662,741 104,876

493

2,273 176,524 21,391 279 17,931 3,454

96,344

268,531

66,511 6,635

37,846

46

31.306

18

7,747

Total 1921,

11,284 1,491,933| 166,953

85,679

141,413|2,499 | 244,650

33,616

12.136

13,783 (1,736,583) 200,569

96,438 1,141,413

Total 1920,

7,832 1,039,184| 129,167

68,930

654,004 3,149 | 257,954 43.189

3,487

10,981 |1,297,138 172,356

72,417 654,001

JAKAN A

F

もっ

}

FOREIGN TRADE.

D 27

Table IX.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

1920.

1921.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

4,497

5,591,038

Do.

do. in Ballast,

162

222,767

278,909 11,072

5,055

6,191,334

319,696

137

201,300

10,003

Total,

4,659

5,813,805

289,981

5,192

6,392,634

329,699

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

4,423

5.418,332

289,342

4,990

6,029,945

328,807

Do.

do. in Ballast,

229

375,932

14,920

190

344,013

12,360

Total,

4,652

5,794,264

304,262

5,180

6,373,858

341,167

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

3,383

4,682,894

208,183

3,594

5,436,306

211,454

Do.

do. in Ballast,

206

222,985

10,072

224

266,273

10,825

Total,

3,589

4,905,879

218,255

3,818

5,702,579

222,279

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

3,088

4,329,439

195,782

3,108

4,815,522

211,321

Do.

do. in Ballast,

482

565,504

21,091

713

880,560

26,523

Total,

3,570

4,894,943

216,873

3,821

5,696,082

237,844

do.

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,

Do.

911

34,458

14,066

806

26,458

11,673

do. in Ballast,

1,587

48,818

17,113

2,530

71,258

26,653

Total,

2,498

83,276

31,179

3,336

97,716

38,326

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,

755

30,498

12,388

556

20,296

9,107

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

Total,

1,775

53,474

19,033

2,795

77,715

29,361

2,530

83,972

31,421

3,351

98,011

38,468

Junks entered with. Cargoes,

8,349

923,412

133,197

9,157

1,035,408

143,108

Do. do. in Ballast,

2,536

397,333

37,563

4,585

719,746

77,521

Total,

10,885

1,320,745

170,760

13,742

1,755,154

220,629

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

7,832

1,039,184

129,167

11,284

1,491,933

166,953

3,149

257,945

43,189

2,499

244,650

33,616

Total,

10,981

1,297,129

172,356

13,783 1,736,583

200,569

Total of all Vessels entered,

21,631

Total of all Vessels cleared,

21,733

12,123,705 12,070,308

710,175 724,912

26,088 26,134

13,948,083 13,904,534

810,933

813,118

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in

43,364

Foreign Trade,

24,194,013 1,435,087 52,222

27,852,617 1,629,051

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

4,917

223,101

52,293

5,495

244,730

62,253

Do.

cleared,

4,992

229,134

52,554

5,655

253,516

64,276

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,...........................

9,909

452,235

104,847

11,150

498,246

126,529

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

43,364

9,909

24,194,013 452,235

1,435,087

52,222

27,852,617

1,629,05 I

104,847

11,150

498,246

126,529

Grand Total,

53,273

24,646,248

1,539,934 63,372

28,350,863

1,755,580

Outside the Waters of the Colony

PLACES.

Vessels.

Tounage.

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1921.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

Crew.

Passengers.

Vessels.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1920,

Do.,

1921,

217,196 | 4,412,480 203,994 | 3,940,216| 1,913,495

1,984,562

92,338 | 2,905,944

998,395 6,549,484 94,699 | 3,146,944|1,562,620 | 5,997,066 |

5,918

5,939

309,534 | 7,318,424 | 2,982,957 298,693 7,087,160 3,476,115|| 5,997,066

659,484 5,918

5,939

Tonnage.

Crew,

Passengers.

Canton,......

West River,

1,370 32,826 13,866 |

30912,087 3,745

333 8,610 3,367

9 1,703 41,436 |17,223|

9

Macao,

East Coast,

25 710 227

130 3,745 1,298

97 4,133 1,449 964 1,746 34 1,292 431 351 177 212 8,504 5,117: 3,141 137

406 16,220 5,194 964 1,746

59 2,002 658 351

177

342 12,249 6,415| 3,141

137

Other places,

696 21,890 7,517 4,036

180 3,919 1,309| 2,217|

37

826 25,809 8,826| 6,253

37

Total,.

2,530 71,258 26,653 4,036

11,67 10,713 806 26,458 11,678 6,617 2,106 3,336 97,716 38,326 10,713 2,106

Tons.

Cargo,

Vessels.

TOTAL.

Tonnage.

Crew.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

D 28

PLACES.

1

.

Tabe XI.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the

year

1921.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING,

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Vessels. gers. Tons.

Ton-

nage.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo,

gers.

Tons,

Bunker

Coal,

Tons.

Within the Waters of the Colony1920,

204,170

4,050,2771,808,327

Do.,

1921, 203,804 | 3,934,417|1,911,985

Outside the

Wa

Canton,..

West River,.

Macao,

East Coast,

Other places,

́aters of the Colony :

1,664 40,212 (16,806

31512,174 3,794

26 732 239

101 2,951 1,022

68921,646 7,500 4,147

88,924 | 2,618,024 956,692 | 6,265,695 94,889 | 8,152,743 1,564,127 | 6,046,179

3,731

293,094 6,668,301

2,765,019 |6,265,695 5,322 |✪ 298,693 | 7,087,160 | 3,476,112|6,046,179

3,731

46,207

5,322 49,540

46

1,324

425

127

21

165 1,710 41,536 17,231

21

165 14,089

:

:

86 3,787

1,324

999

1,699

401 15,961 | 5,118

31

1,160

400 301

229

57 1,892 639

999 1,699

301 229 243

4,298

239 9,223 5,389 3,240

137

340 12,174] 6,411| 3,240

137 2,100

| 1544,802 1,569 2,433

15

843 26,448 9,069 6,580

15

2,944

Total,

2,795 77,715 29,361 4,147

011 38,46% 556 20,296 9,107 6,994 | 2,245| 3,351|98,011 38,468 11,141

2,245 | 23,674

:

3,849.00

857.00

2,193

548.25

LICENCE.

LICENCE DUPLICATE BOAT RE- Books. LICENCE.

SPECIAL

FEES.

PAINTING

PERMITS.

3,849

Tabe XII.

Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and Fees collected during the year 1921.

(Under Table UT, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

3,428

:

:

:

:

:

:

Licence Book, $1.00 each,.

Boat Repainting, .25

Special Permits, .25

>>

Passenger Boats, Classes A & B,

1,619

Lighters, Cargo and Water Boats,

1,853

Other Boats,

12,129

Fish Drying Hulks,

73

Duplicate Licences,

TOTAL,

15,674

...

:

3,849

:

:

:

:

:

:

х

x

9,629.10

46,866.70

:

:

40,035.20

633.25

8.00

3,428

2,193 102,426.50

D 31

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour Department during the years 1920 and 1921.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount

Amount

1920.

1921.

1. Light Dues..........

"

Special Assessment,

2. Licences, Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified :-

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,

C.

..

94,225.44 106,417.09 102,60.57 115,710.44

92.455,00 102,426.50

1,635.00 2,070.00

3,607,81

6,664.80

27.00

$37.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

66.70

58.90

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, do.,

2,074.70

2,083.10

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

34,245.00

37,854.25

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

from the New Territories,

8,615.00

9,055.25

185.00

160.00

9,228.25 10,415.00

from the New Territories,

Pilots Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements- in-Aid:-

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ördinance 10 of 1899.............

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Fees for use of Government Buoys,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...... Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,

Official Signatures, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Printed Forms, Sale of, Ord. of 1889, Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,........

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...........

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899,...

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,.

4. Miscellaneous Receipts

Sale of condemned stores,

34,273.60 34,326.00

246.00

288.00

3,192.50

3,810.00

75,448.00

7,257.12

89,176.80 5,416.25

*72,663,50 † 104,605,00

3,946.00 6,336.00

314.00

288.75

1.757.00

1,902.00

7,965.00

8,295.00

30,047.00 35,923.00

115,350.00 116,700.00

59.07

479.00

Total,............$701,493.26 800,798.13

*k

† See next page.

*

D 32

Statement of Emigration Fees, 1920 :-

Revenue collected by.

Expenditure

incurred by.

Harbour Department,...... $ 72,663.50

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

Office of Secretary for

Chine seAffairs,

8,430.00

5,102.20

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

9,840.00

Medical Department,......

24,776.00

$90,933.50

$ 34,078.20

Net Revenue.....................

$ 56,855.30

↑ Statement of Emigration Fees, 1921 :-

Revenue collected by.

Office of Secretary for

Harbour Department,...... $104,605.00

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

5,285.25

Chinese Affairs,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,....

8,510.00

11,340.00

$124,455.00

Net Revenue.

23,897.64

$ 33,382.89

.$91,072.11

Table XIV.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1921.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

PORTS.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F

M.

F.

33

Australia,..

1,613

2

11

1,627 172

Africa (South),.

75

172 1,785

83

75

British Borneo, .

2,792

535 224

130 3,681

:

2,792

535

Calcutta,

1,347 78

49

21

1,195

1,547

Canada,

10,672

4 1,790

12,466.

241

18

25

Cuba (Havana),

33

33

85

Delagoa Bay,

39

13

2

3+

16

126} ༽.

288 10,913

སནྡྷུརྞསྶ

11

1.799

2

6

83

224 130

3,681

78

49

21

1,495

22 1,815

12,754

87 118

2

120

1

56

73

29

7

2

111

Dutch Indies,

761

44

17

828 17.614 1,246

895

195 19,950 18,375 | 1,290

912

201

20,778

Fiji,

49

:

19

49

49

Honolulu,

48

50 | 5,919

707 201

148 6,975 5,967 708

202

148

7,025

Japan,...

399

43

10

9 461

399

43

10

9

461

Jamaica (Torouto),

330

22

352

330

22

Mauritius,

827

81

95

1,005

360

Mexico,

...

783

ལྷམ

:

352

62

43

13

83

465 1,187

143

138

2

1,470

798

783

2

B

798

Panama,

74

2

76

74

2

76

Samoa Island,

978

978

978

978

South America,

1,161

70

90

Straits Settlements,.

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

(52,127|15,686| 4,660 2,228|74,701 9,345 2,006 900 7,173 519 324

3| 1,324 | 1,161

70

90

1,324

372 12,623 61,472|17,692 | 5,560 2,600 149 8,165 7,173 519 324 149

87,324

8,165

Tahiti,

114

53

3 174

114

53

+

3

174

Timor,

44

16

75

41

16

11

4

75

United States of America,

657

1}

737 5,545 163 445

29 6,182 6,202

174

512

31 6,919

Total 1921,.

Total 1920,

72,505 16,524 6,955

|50,679 |12,424|| 5,323

2,398 98,382 48,906| 4,854 | 2,959 1,808 70,234 32,295 | 1,344| 1,161

Total Passengers by British Ships, Total Passengers by Foreign Ships, .

910 57,629 12141121,378 || 9,914| 3,308 ||156,011 224 35,024 82,974|13,768| 6,484 | 2,032|105,258

Excess of Passengers by British Ships,

72,505 16,524 6,955 | 2,398 98,382 |48,906 | 4,854 | 2,959 910 57,629

|23,599|11,670| 3,996 1,488 | 40,753

Table XV.

:

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1885 to 1920 inclusive.

1885. 1890. 1895. 63,138 66,706 60,360

1900. 1905. 66,961 73,105

1910. 1915. 88,452 109,110

1920.

84,602

Tab e XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1912 to 1921 inclusive.

- D 34

Whither bound.

1912.

1913, 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918. 1919.

1920.

1921..

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

44,974

41,278 82,797 63,292

68.809 85,099 36.764 32,440 66,965 53,250 5,914 7,424 30.330 67,032 15,215 17,254 8,210 8,838 15,832 10,042 2,105 4,214 13,605 20,292

84,024 102,353 8,019 11,638 43,935 87,324

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

37,791

842

39,001 30,358 1,405 964

25,811

1,186

33,182 31,078

1,674 ( 1,928

34,096 46,044 59,128 1,715 2,287

64,293

2,195 4,394

Total,

38,633 40,406 31,322

26,997

34,856 33,006 | 35,811 48.331

61,323 | 68,687

Grand Total.

122;657 |142,759

76,296

68,275 | 117,653

1

96,298 43,830

59,969 105,258 | 156,011

!

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the year 1921.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Australia,

2,341

433

535

125

3,434

593

40

80

19

732

2,934

473

615

144

4,166

Bangkok,

653

74

139

46

912

151

14

23

192

804

88 162

50

1,104

British Borneo,

847

87

194

43

1,171

16

16

13

51

863

103

207

49

1,222

Canada,

7,929

571 1,043

266

9,809

721

70

104

22

917

8,650

641; 1,147

288

10,726

Delagoa Bay,.

200

18

3

228

200

7

18

3

228

Dutch Indies,

772

63 135

38

1,008

11,429

931

691

463 14,514

12,201

994 1,826

501

15,522

D 35

Honolulu.

282

23

47

12

364

2,108

243

457 133

2,941

2,390

266

504

145

3,305

Japan,

3,093

288 574 139

4,094

4,171

South America,

670

393 738 179

82 110

5,481

7,264

681

1,312

318

9,575

T

34

796

570

82 110 34

796

Straits Settlements...

67,713

5,3579,738 | 2,678

85,486

11,985

987 1,767 468

15,207

79,698

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

2,041

United States of America,

607

59 107 22

795

6,645

93 162 574 1,090

40

2.336

2,041

287

8,596

7,252

6,344 11,5053,146 | 100,693

93 162 40 6331,197

309

2,336

9,391

Total 1921,.

Total 1920,..

84,437

76,499

6,962 12,530 | 3,372 | 107,301

40,430

3,443 | 6,235 | 1,655

51,763 | 124,867

10,405 |18,765 | 5,027 159,064

3,488 | 6,116 | 1,663 87,766

29,822

1,463 | 2,655 732

34,672 | 106,321

4,951 8,771 2,395 | 122,438,

Total Passengers by British Ships,

84,437

6,962 12,530|3,372 107,301

15

""

1

Foreign

40,430

3.4436,235 | 1,655 51,763

Excess of

44,007

3,519 |6,295 | 1,717

55,538

"}

"

Table XVIII.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1885 to 1920 inclusive.

1885.

68,830

1890. 1895. 96,068 104,118

1900.

109,534

1905.

137,814

1910. 1915. 1920. 146,585 151,728 100,641

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1912 to 1921 inclusive.

D 36

Where from.

1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918. 1919. 1920.

1921.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,..

Other Ports, Males, . Other Ports, Females,

123,594 | 123,363 | 136,753 7,869 10,381 4,605 131,463 | 133,744 |141,358

79,349 46,454 65,539 36,662 60,812 68,316 1,482 1,201 6,896 2,534 2,871

91,203

4,610 9,190

80,831

47,655 72,435 39,196 63,683

72,926 | 100,693

30,335

31,756 26,462 1,450 1,421 1,007

27,953

969

Total,

31,785 33,177 27,469 28,922

24,750

23,933 23,827 32,014 70,070 46,776 52,429 817 1,970 2,899 2,267 2,736 5,942 25,797 34,913 72,337 49,512 58,371

Grand Total,

163,248 | 166,921 |168,827 |109,753 72,405 98,232

74,109 | 136,020 |122,438 |159,064

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong during the year 1921.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tounage.

Horse

Power.

Rig.

Build.

Where and

when built.

Remarks.

1. Hau Hoi I,

151,417

54

18, N.H.P.

2. Yue Ying Wa,

151,418

816

187.

None

Schooner

Carvel

Hongkong, ......1916

Purchased from Foreigners.

Clencher | Greenock,

3, Kwong Eng

150,114- 969

162,

In and out Lubeck,

...1876

.1906

"

Transferred from Singapore.

4. Teo Pao,

150,118

972

163,

1907

#

17

5. Soochow,

151,419 1.594

195.3,

Clencher Hongkong,

1920

First Registry.

6. Whangpu,

151,420 1,975

198.

Nil

.1921

::

7. Yuet Tùng,

151,421

14

24,

8. Nora I......

151.422

7

30, B.H.P.

9. Pin Seng,

82,865

378

99, N.H.P.

None

Nil

Schooner

Carvel

1921

>>

1921

Leith.

1881

10. Yannis,

151,423

2.063

231,

Clinker

.

Shanghai,

1920

11, Tin Sing,

123,099

380

65,

Carvel

17

Hongkong,

.1907

12. Henry Keswick.

151,424

53

800.

None

Clencher

1921

་!

Transferred from Penang. Purchased from Foreigners. Repurchased from Foreigners. First Registry.

13. Fayth,

151,425

15

24, B.H.P.

Ketch

Carvel

.1921

14. Hermes I,.

151,426

26

41.6, N.H.P.

Nil

Clencher

1921

11

15. Sumatra II.

151,427

20

14.73.

None

16. Kwangchow,

151,428

1,572

1,600 B.H.P.

Schooner

Carvel

Clencher

1921

"

17. Aphrodite I,

151,429

30

41.6, N.H.P.

.1921

..1921

""

18. Sui Sang,

19. Luen Tai,

20. Kwangtung,

21. Achatina,

22. Paludina,

105.772 1,776 151,430 151,431 1,572

300,

Schooner

""

246

1.600, B.H.P.

Schooner

"

151,432 3,521

368, N.H.P.

""

151,433 3,491

342,

""

Middlesbrough 1895 British Isles,

Hongkong, 1921 California U.S.A.1921

Hongkong, 1921

Transferred from London. First Registry.

11

>>

>>

- D 37 -

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hongkong during the year 1921,

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Rig.

Build,

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

1. Paco Figueras,

96,370

2,695 |

14.11.19

Schooner

Clencher Belfast.

.1889

Sold to Foreigners.

2. Rotorua,

75,214

555 5. 6.17

Dumbarton,

1876

"

3. Fatshan.

88,543

1.039 29. 6.87

4. Szechuen,

5. Gabo,

79.541

151,411 1,594 8. 7.20 1.246

None

Schooner

Leith,

1887

Hongkong,

1920

77

2.12.20

"

Kinghorn, Co., Fife,.

1883

*

}:

6. Sochow,

151.419

1,594 |18. 2.21

";

Hongkong,

1920

">

>>

Transferred to London.

15

Sydney, Australia. London.

7. Whangpu,

151,420

1.975 26. 2.21

8. Ming Sang,

150,114

96918. 2.21

Nil

Schooner

1921

"

}}

97

"

In & out

Lubeck,

1906

19

9. Lee Sang,

150,118

972|18. 2.21

1907

"

10. Singaporean,

87,587

830

9. 8.16

Clencher | Sunderland,

1883

་:་

>>

Calcutta.

17

11. liong Kheng.

93,210

12. Pin Seng,

82.865

13. Roberto Figueras,

95,100

14. Shiu Cheong,

139,570

3,085 | 27, 8,15 37821, 5.21 1,168|29. 7.15 89|17. 7.17

Greenock,

1888

יי

31

Sold to Foreigners.

Carvel

Leithi,

1881

**

>>

Belfast,

1888

::

::

15. Hunslet,

137,678

3,687 3. 2.15

Nil

Schooner

Hongkong.

1917

Clencher Newcastle on Tyne,

1898

at London,

16. Cavanba,

113,978

281| 16, 2 17

Paisley, Scotland,.

1901

"

"

to Foreigners.

17. Rupara,

123,662

18. Kwangchow,

151,428

1,572 5. 9.21

786 20, 1.20 Fore and Aft Schooner Schooner

Hebburn,

1906

!

"

Hongkong,

1921

Transferred to London.

19. Mausang,.

151.423

2,068 | 27, 5.21

Clinker

Shanghai,

1920

ད.

"}

20. Burrumbeet,

91,487

1,561 | 24. 7.20

Clencher Wallsend,

1881 Sold to Foreigners.

D 38

2.

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1921.

STAFF.

1. Commander C. W. Beckwith, R.N., Harbour Master, acted as Superintendent in addition to his other duties for the first ten days of January. For the remainder of the year Mr. N.L. Smith acted as Superintendent.

Chief Preventive Officer S. J. Clarke went on long leave on 28th April and Revenue Officer G. Watt acted in his place.

Senior Revenue Officer D. J. Mackenzie retired on pension on 1st October. Revenue Officer G. Watt was appointed Senior Revenue Officer in his place, but continued to act as Chief Preventive Officer.

The staff was augmented on 1st July by the addition of one European and ten Chinese Revenue Officers.

LIQUORS CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE.

2. The duty on all liquors was on 7th April increased by a Resolution of the Legislative Council. This increase was generally about 50%, except in the case of Champagnes and other sparkling wines, on which the duty went up from $4 to $10 per gallon. By a subsequent Resolution on 27th October the duty on brandy was restored to the same figure as before the general increase.

The net revenue collected under the Liquors Ordinance from Duties and Licensed Warehouses during 1921 was $1,040,637.04 as compared with $779,795.85 for 1920.

The general details are as follows

Duties on European Liquors Duties on Chinese Liquors......... Licensed Warehouse Fees

Licensed Warehouse Overtime

Fees

Total...

1921.

1920.

$331,183.58 241,544.70

702,563.46

530,928.49

6,750,00

6,729.16

140.00

593.50

.$1,040,637.04 779,795.85

Full particulars are shown in Tables I-V.

E 2

TOBACCO ORDINANCE.

3. The duty on all tobacco was on 7th April increased by a Resolution of the Legislative Council. This increase was generally slightly over 100% except in the case of the most expensive class of cigars, on which the duty was raised to only $2.50 per lb. from $1.50.

The net revenue collected under the Tobacco Ordinance was $1,062,031.14 as compared with $631,877.66 for 1920.

The general details are as follows :-

1921.

Duties on Tobacco

$1,051,568.39

1920. 621,229.91

Licensed Warehouse Fees

1,918.75

1,993.75

Licensed Warehouse Overtime

Fees

72.00

78.00

Retailers' Licences

7,596.00

7,692.00

Manufacturers' Licences

744.00

772.00

Importers' Licences

132.00

112.00

Total

$1,062,031.14 631,877.66

Full particulars are shown in Tables VI-IX.

OPIUM MONOPOLY.

4. The revenue for 1921 was $3,938,197.99 as compared with $4,317,970.90 for 1920, a decrease of $379,772.91. The price of $14.50 per tael was maintained throughout the year.

Tables X-XII show the movements of raw opium during the year. Apart from opium for the monopoly and opium in transit - for the Japanese and Macao Governments the only chests now in Hongkong are a small residue in the hands of local merchants left over from the days when Hongkong was an entrepôt for raw opium.

Table XIII shows the seizures of illicit opium, indicating another large increase on previous years.

TRADE STATISTICS.

5. Table XIV shows the number of permits, etc., issued during the year under the provisions of the Importation and Exportation Ordinance; the figures slightly exceed those of 1920.

The form of the Quarterly and Annual Trade Returns was altered early in the year, the effect being greater clearness and portability besides a saving on the expenses of production of over $10,000.

The total trade (excluding Treasure) for 1921 amounted to £135,834,936 as compared with £212,302,539 for 1920. Of this Imports were valued at £68,143,059 (as against €103.932,602 for

E 3

1920) and Exports at £67,691,877 (as against £108,369,937 for 1920).

Treasure imported during 1921 amounted to £13,797,095 (including £5,447,487 of gold and £8,193,934 of silver). Treasure exported during 1921 amounted to £17,981,357 (including £7,091,582 of gold and £10,519,014 of silver).

Tables have been included in the Annual Trade Return to show that the apparent drop in the volume of Trade as compared with 1920 is largely explained by the fall in the sterling value of the dollar, and in no way corresponds either to the dollar value or the actual quantities of the various commodities imported and exported.

Complete figures will be found in the Annual Trade Return for 1921, from which the following items may perhaps be of chief interest:-

Imports.

Exports.

GOODS.

VALUE.

GOODS.

VALUE.

Chinese Medicines (not

specially mentioned)

Coal

£

Chinese Medicines (not 1,248,634 specially mentioned) 1,233,232 2,320,398 Cigarettes

£

1,121,289

Fish and Fishery

Coal

510,800

Products, (Other).

889,276 Dyed Plain Cottons (not)

Flour, (Wheat)

1,675,042

specially mentioned) 1,507,402

Ginseng

884,765 Fish and Fishery

Kerosene

2,362,143

Products, (Other)

1,427,318

Leather, Sole

811,249 Flour, (Wheat)

1,091,694

Peanuts

527,051 Gunny Bags

685,597

Broken

Rice Meal, (Rice Bran)...

2,506,638 Leather, Sole.

618,251

Kerosene

2,390,041

921,750

32

Cargo

1,119,896 Matches.

534,618

White

6,694,037 | Rice Meal, (Rice Bran)..

680,175

Shirtings, White

Broken

2.202,620

""

(40/43 yds.)

774,800

"

Cargo

908,594

Silk, Piece Goods..

1,492,260

Glutinous

669,583

33

Sugar, Raw

8,771,351

White

5,278,244

Refined

949,392 Shirtings, White

Tin Slabs and Ingots Yarn, Cotton.

1,224,576

(40/43 yds.)

893,262

5,565,518 Silk, Piece Goods..

1,419,249

Sugar Candy...

606,302

Raw

2,774,115

Refined

22

7,774,824

Tea..

587,656

Tin Slabs and Ingots...

1,387,800

Tobacco, Prepared,

Native

322,966

Vermicelli

514,911

Yarn, Cotton

5,257,802

:

ΕΙ

GENERAL.

6. Apart from the unprecedented number of opium seizures, Revenue Officers in the course of their duties seized 526 gallons of Chinese wine (11 persons convicted), 552 bottles of European liquors (7 persons convicted), 738 lb. of Chinese tobacco, 45,650 cigars, 1,986,300 cigarettes (126 persons convicted), 95 arms of various kinds, 33,523 rounds of ammunition (40 persons convicted) and 36 lottery tickets (2 persons convicted).

A light motor-van was purchased towards the end of the year for the conveyance of opium and other miscellaneous duties." At the same time the Department's steam launch was transferred to the Police Department, which gave in exchange a capacious motor-boat.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

7. The net revenue collected by this Department was $6,040,866.17 an increase of $311,221.76 as compared with 1920.

The actual expenditure of this Department for the year was $591,756.04 an increase of $89,641.38 as compared with 1920. Of this increase over $73,000 is attributable to the lower purchas- ing power of the dollar in rupees, that being the figure by which the cost of exactly the same quantity of Indian opium exceeded the 1920 figure. Personal emoluments, due to an increased staff and the revised rates of clerical salaries, show an increase of some $17,000 over 1920, but this sum, as well as the cost of a motor- truck and of a more expensive type of uniform for Chinese Re- venue Officers, is more than offset by savings in other directions.

March, 1922.

N. L. SMITH, Superintendent of Imports and Exports.

Table I.

European Liquors.

Balance in

Exported

Bond on

ex Ship

Class of Liquor.

31st

to Ship

Arrivals.

Ships'

Stores.

Denatured.

Consumed

Locally.

December,

1920.

or ex

Bond.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1921.

In H.K. & K.

Wharf & Godown Co.'s General Bonded Warehouses.

In Holt's

Wharf

In Licensed

Total.

General

Bonded Warchouses.

Warehouses,

E 5 -

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons. Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Ale, Beer, and Stout,.

Bitters,

112,715

463

386,068

153,258

35,120

261,056

20,620

5,492

23,237

49,349

455

105

53

256

6

498

504

Brandy,

18,580

75,100

63,639

1,308

3,776

8,908

3,156

12,893

24,957

California Wine,

350

Champagne,

3,691

5,545

2,402

406

2,205

1,656

2,567

4,223

Cider,

296

14

5

251

26

26

Claret,

9,492

19,792

14,176

810

(d) 1,486

5,110

1,424

326

5,952

7,702

Cocktail,

95

374

191

157

110

11

121

Gin,

8,135

20,115

11,460

4,218

5,297

692

284

6,299

7,275

Ginger Wine,

279

61

55

1

139

:

145

145

Liqueurs,

3,897

6,586

4,663

721

1,426

703

2,970

3,673

Madeira,

258

187

72

39

Malaga,

2

Marsala,

226

20

88888

115

219

219

2

9

223

223

Medicated Wine,

81

494

489

86

86

Muscatel,..

4

650

560

90

4

4

Port,

9,019

8,925

8,536

819

3,407

488

50

4,644

5,182

Prune Wine,

160

120

:

Rum,

3,436

21,223

7,944

129

14,873

280

26

280

1.407

280

1,433

(a) (b) (c)

(a)

(b) (d)

(c)

(a) Includes 6,833 gallons distilled locally,

(b)

";

(0)

14,873

384

"

"

(d) Used in manufacture of tobacco.

Table I,-Continued.

European Liquors,-Continued.

Balance in

Exported

Bond on

ex Ship

Ship's

Class of Liquor.

31st

December,

1920.

Arrivals.

to Ship

Denatured..

Stores.

Consumed

Locally.

or ex

Bond.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1921.

In H.K. & K,

Wharf &

Godown Co.'s

General Bonded: Bonded

Warehouses. Warehouses.

In Holt's

Wharf

General

In Licensed Warehouses.

Total.

E 6

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Sake,

184

27,719

21,187

· 8

6,450

258

258

Sherry,

3,698

2,874

1,231

716

1,660

112

2,853

2,965

Sparkling Wine,.....

302

774

148

22

421

477

485

Spirits of Wine & Arrack,

94,261

481,169

371,747

71 (a) 149,153

152

12

52,895

54,307

Still Wine, (not specially

mentioned),

2,826

6,715

2,712

389

2,732

346

12

3,350

3,708

Tonic Wine,

5

4

...

Vermouth,

3,090

7,721

3,991

613

2,911

868

225

2,203

3,296

Vibroua,

9

95

52

16

36

52

Whisky,

15,863

73,331

38,581

10,989

Wincarnis,

58

697

314

16,999

281

764

4.242

17,616

22,622

160

160

Wine and Spirits, (Un-

classified),

11,804 (b)121,725 (4)122,323 | (b) 794

...

(b) 8,698 (b)1,054 (b) 660

10,412

(b)

Note.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

(a) For burning, perfumery, vinegar, etc.

(4) Transhipment eargo not examined.

?

Table II.

Chinese Liquors.

Balance in Bond

Consumed

on 31st Dec., 1920.

Arrivals.

locally

Exported.

Denatured and

used for

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1921.

Vinegar, etc.

Imported

Liquors

Bonded

Liquors. Distilled Locally.

In H.K. and

Ware- Dis- houses. tilleries. ported. locally. ported. locally.

Im- Distilled Im Distilled,

ex Bond or

ex Ship

to Ship.

ex Dis.

tilleries.

ex Bonded

Ware-

houses.

Gallons. ĮGallons. |Gallons. | Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons Gallons. Gallons. 5,647 22,342 938,750 | 792,072 | 653,788* | 610,538 | 276,818

Im- ported Distilled Godown Co.'s Liquors K. Wharf and Licensed In Dis- Ware- tilleries.

Liquors. Locally. houses.

In

General

Bonded

Warehouses.

Total

in

Bond.

E 7

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,

€6,364 | 20,496

394 92,066

1,019 12,348 24,950 38,347

35%

1,372

1,389 52,078 25,761

14,791

22,055

37,013

4,871

187

:

1,646

537 2,183

45%

7

"

76,599

12 317,136 49,732 47,517

789 234,580

850

1,656

45.738

4,752 106,986

761 112,449

"

50%

"

1,388

1,040

968

1,460

Abore

50%

3,261

419

Total,

85,006

23,743 1,312,265 867,615 | 717,483 633,382 | 549,821

71,585

کم

175

2,667

2.842

22,339

39£

137,804

5,976 | 128,597

26,248 | 155,821

Note.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

Table III.

Return of Distilleries for the year 1921.

Denatured for making preserving Tobacco.

Denatured

for

Stock on

Bean-curd.

31st Dec.,

1921.

Hongkong and New Kowloon

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,

Gallons. Gallons. | Gallons. | Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. 10,800 | 456,088 | 305,938

Gallons. Gallons.

Gallons.

20,146 43,443

87,197

10,164

"

35%

+0%

396

13,162

8,755

19,557

187

569 1,656

4,371

245

850

45,738

750

Rum,

(1) Total,

1,155

20,935

6,833 14,873

384

12,357 | 539,742 | 315,262

21,989 55,497 14,873

45,738

87,197

11,543

350 22,921

4,869

14,786

993 11,450 12,151

292

6

225

220

11

12,541

228,968 198,280

350 22,921

4,869

15,089

Manufactured in New Territories Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight, 11,542 217,293| 185,909 for consumption in Hongkong,

355%

+5%

(2) Total,

"

E 8

Table III,-Continued.

Return of Distilleries f

r the

year

1921,—Continued.

Manufactured in New Territories Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,

for consumption in New Territories.

""

35%

45%

',

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1920.

Output,

1921.

Consumed

locally.

Bond. Sold into

Exported.

Gallons.Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons,

118,691| 118,691

1,149 1,149

Denatured Denatured for making

for

preserving

Tobacco. Bean-curd.

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1921.

Gallons. | Gallons, Gallons. Gallons.

(3) Total..

(1) Hongkong and New Kowloon,

(2) Manufactured in New Territories for consumption in Hongkong, (3). Manufactured in New Territories for consumption in New Territories,

119,840 119,840

12,357|| 539,742 315,262 21,989 55,497 12,541 228,968 198,280

119,840 | 119,840

14,873 45,738 87,197

11,548

350 22,921

4,869

15,089

Grand Total,.

24,898 888,550| 633,382 22,339 78,418

14,873

45,738 92,066 26,632

NOTE.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

— E 9 -

Table IV.

Return of Duty Paid European Liquors during the year 1921.

MONTHS.

Brandy. Liqueurs. Champagne.

Sparkling

Wine.

Spirits

Gin.

Whisky.

Rum.

of

Madeira. Malaga. Port.

Sherry.

Marsala.

Claret

Bitters. in

Claret

in

Ginger

Wine.

Moscatel.

Wine.

Bottles. Wood.

Red Wine Red Wine in

Bottles.

in

Wood.

January, ....

+43

165

223

94

475

1,970

17

7

19

548

254

February,

426

132

275

22

486

1,672

26

March,

456

95

375

119

598

1,215

27

April,

180

141

147

3

428

1,507

22

May,

263

83

152

19

399

1,080

20

June,

208

86

59

258

1,042

8582 1

12

8

532

153

10 10

28

159

237

10

:

63

11

112

209

40

64

15

6

...

246

154

19

96

222

10

24

24

12

16

2

254

93

20

113

115

2

27

16

181

73

43

56

278

17

2-1

17

156

145

19

89

142

19

20

July,

117

79

115

255

825

16

9

151

73

19

132

42

28

...

Angust,.

118

113

90

62

425

1,432

2

19

188

119

10

160

139

$7

ོོ སམ ོ་

77

...

...

September,.

252

120

$1

10

580

1,288

54

11

213

161

24

St

73

38

2

52

October,

148

73

125

20

369

1,233

27

a

217

94

23

130

709

5

28

21

November,

297

166

226

12

564

1,438

19

17

189

112

7

78

372

19

46

8

December,

538

173

337

25

460

'2,295

8

12

532

229

N

33

111

249

18

89

34

Total,

8,776

1,426

2,205

421-

5,297

16,999

280

152

115

2

3,407

1,660

256

1,320

3,087

139

(4) 90

552

151

Note-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

N..B.-Rates of Duty increased on 7th April, 1921,

Table IV.

Return of Duty Paid European Liquors during the year 1921.

?

Amount

a.

Bitters.

Claret Claret

in in

Bottles. Wood.

Red Wine Red Wine

Wine.

Ginger Moscatel.

Tonic

in

in

Still Wine.

Vibrona. Vermouth.

Wine.

Bottles.

Wood.

White Wine White Wine in

bottles.

of

in

Wincarnis.

Sake.

Beer.

Stout. Cyder.

Wood.

Duty

Collected.

$

0.

28

159

237

10

63

97

438

108

47

20

52

25,273

4,168

11

112

209

6

40

64

77

94

21

183

82

35

54

873

24,710

3,214

28,652.50

26,206,71

19

96

222

10

24

24

111

282

144

52

76

352

16,934

1,661

50

21,897.94

20

113

115

27

71

265

80

4

16

787

21,471

1,960

43

56

278

24

52

144

75

38

16

681

14,520

1,869

29,709.72

24,794.18

E 10

19

$9

142

19

20

31

161

83

146

20

471

16,581

1,380

44

23,154.29 |

19

182

42

28

176

278

24

48

15

186

15,194

1,105

5

20,105.07

10

160

139

87

64

181

21

12

1

16,920

2,157

72

26,375.72

24

SI

73

38

~

52

78

225

40

20

14

331

19,358

2,383

4

28,898.43

23

130

709

28

24

72

155

40

40

14

711

17,061

2,166

26.353.41

78

372

19

46

153

12

-380

122

75

16

791

17,086

2,014

31,301.39

a

33

111

249

18

89

31

140

219

122

92

1,214

28,804

3,037

65

45,817,50

256

1,320

3,087

139

(a) 90

552

151

(b) 1,142

52

(c) 2,911

972

618

281

6,450

233,912

27,144

251

333,266.86

(a) Includes 56 gallons in wood.

330

(1)

25

"

37

มว

!!

Table V.

Return of Duty Paid Chinese Liquors during the year, 1921.

DUTY COLLECTED ON CHINESE WINES IMPORTED EX SHIP AND/OR EX BOND.

DUTY COLLECTED ON CHINESE WINES DELIVERED FROM DISTILLERIES FOR LOCAL CONSUMPTION.

DESCRIPTION.

DESCRIPTION.

Amount

MONTHS.

25%

Gallons.

35%

Gallons,

46%

Gllons.

46 to

50%

above

of Duty Collected.

50%

25%

Gallons.

35% +5% Gallons. Gallous.

46 to

50%

above

50%

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

Gallons. Gallons.

Gallons. Gallons.

January,

73,063

2,278

4,878

101

80

33,442.10

46,584

3,943

277

February.

34,400

1,020

3,843

112

72

16,574.01

47,861

3,639

33

20,112.00

20.088.50

March,

56,656

2,279

5,814

7

109

27,325.72

56 290

5,795

807

24,651.78

April,

58,028

3,408

2,322

46

36,825,66

48,045

2,522

40

25,189.53

May,

54 924

1,15%

4,802

24

38,619.93

40,374

1,215

46

23,817.45

June,

54,598

414

2,861

120

21

36,011.21

15,906

1.219

27,196.61

July,

38 709

844

3,102

225

48

27,185.93

36,492

505

33

20,199.13

Angust,

51,960

384

3,126

27

34,615.18 46,472

297

September,

25,586.30

48,408

929

3,145

78

11

32,979,44

40,722

729

33

October,

22,524 77

61,742

1,199

4,055

196

42,205.04 42,161

645

November,

22,299 10

54,476

656

5,184

29

38,172.99 49,611

577

December,

27,076.02

***

66,824

328

4385

45

44,698.11

46,010

939

24,613.23

546,528*

22,055

789

283,354.42

* Excludes 64,010 gallons-$10,565,55 duty collected and paid into the Treasury by the District Officer, North,

Total,

653,788

14,791

47,517

968

419

408,655,62

Note:-

N.B. :—

Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

Rates of Duty increased on 7th April, 1921,

E -

Table VI.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Manufactured Locally during the year 1921.

CIGARS.

CIGARETTES.

CHINESE TOBACCO.

MONTH.

$1.50

70 6.

30 c.

20 c.

10 e.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

70 0.

per lb.

30

20 e.

10 e.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

Amount

of Duty Collected.

10 e.

1er lb.

A mount

of Duty

Collected.

Total

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

$ e.

lb.

January,

G

43

258

650

1.710.06

3,020

18,060

8.205

17,390

26.131 05

56.843

5,681,30

33,525,41

February,

17:

G

57

267

695

1,968.61

3.631

15,000

7.435

14,135

23,909.90

40,263

4.026.30

29,904.81

March,

21

55

267

618

2.016.57

2.839

14.845

8,530 |

15,485

23,139.01

52,184

5,218.40

30,378.98

April 1st to 7th,

2

48

127

330,32

782

4,200

2.185

3,456

6.207.70

11,303

1,130,30

7,668.32

Total,

47

21

160

840

2,090

6.025 66

10.272

52,105

26,355

50,466

79,387,66

169,598

16,059,30

101,472,52

- E 12 -

Table VI.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Manufactured Locally during the year 1921, Continued.

CIGARS.

CIGARETTES.

CHINESE TOBACCO.

Amount

of Duty Collected.

Total

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

MONTH.

$2.50

per lb

$1.50

per lb.

70 c.

50 c.

30 e.

per lb.

Per th

per lb.

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

$1.50

per lb.

70 e.

50 c.

30 c.

Amount

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

of Duty

Collected

30 c.

per lb.

mille.

mille.

April 7th to 30th.

14

May,

June

July,

August,

:

September,

October,

November,

December,

33

Total,

00:00 - 00

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

mille.

lb.

21

145

273

2.828.24

972

8.585

4,520

8,926

29.323 35

35,847

10.754.10

42,405.69

34

188

285

2,719.72

1.513

11,160

6,590

13.777

41,556.16

49.787

14.936.10

59,211.98

30

149

223

2,383.32

1,740

10.620

7,860

15.031

43,134.87

51.104

15.331.20

60.849.39

19

111

175

1,780.88

1.497

10,000

7,120

14,397

40,408.21

55,573

16,671:90

58,857.99

23

130

154

4,824.11

1,447

11,460

7,513 17,833

45,322:02

56,460

16.938.00

64,084.13

42

148

186

2,164.46

744

6,720

6.880

15.110

32.785 09

50,490

25

158

223

2,085.81

813

8,620

7,315

15.986

36,491.00

23

135

270

2,207.64

699

9,510

6,650

13.687

85,897.80

122

857

334

6,307;63

609

7,500

7,690

16.401

34,676 53

15,147.00 50,096,55 55,449 16,634.70 55,211.51 49,602 14,880.60 52,486.04 52,841 15,852.30 56,836.46

103

37

339

1,521

2,123

23,801.81

10,034

84,175

61,638

131,148

339,092.03

457,153 137,145,90 500,039.74

Grand Total,

150

58

499

2.361

4,213

29,827.37

20,306. 186,280

87,993

J81.614 418,479.69

617,746 153.205.20 601,512.26

Note.—Fractions of a mille or a pound are not shown in this table.

E 13

Table VII.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Imported during the year 1921.

E 14 -

CIGARS.

CIGARETTES.

TOBACCO.

CHINESE TOBACCO.

TOBACCO LEAF.

MONTH.

$1.50

per lb.

70 c.

per lb.

30 c.

20 c.

per lb.

Amount

10. c.

70 c.

per 1b.

per lb.

of Duty

30 c.

20 c.

10 c.

Collected.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

Amount

of. Duty

700.

30 0.

20 e.

10 c.

Collected

per

lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

10 c.

per lb.

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

Amount

10 e.

per lb.

of Duty

Collected.

$1.50

per lb.

SNUFF.

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

Total

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Ib.

Ib.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

C.

January,.

40

February,

05

46

March,

73

10

April 1st to 7th.

34

1

5 6 70 19

3

1.250.54

3,127

11,909

3,257

2,400

17,416.15

1,223

96

20

99

899.25

15,938

1,593.75

1,319

131.88

21,291,57

36

12

1.631.78

2,929

12,595

3,293

2,572

17,031.19 887

24

37

504

686.39

10,645

1,064.52

274

27.40

20,441.28

54

3

2,128.30

16,323

5,654

4,523

5,481

27,252.56

950

77

38

491

744.72

18,352

1,835,24

5,712

571.27

27

39.75

32.571.84

31

901.35

3,320

4,118

2,800

472

11,210.81

592

104

!

720

517.28

4,798

479.82

13,109.26

To

202

19

170

152

18: 5,911.97

15,030

44,945

13,873

10,925

72,910.71 3,652

301

95

1,814

2,847.64

49,733

4,973.33

7,305

730,55

27

39.75

87.413.95

Table VII,-Continued.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Imported during the year, 1921.

— E 15 -

CIGARS.

CIGARETTES.

TOBACCO.

CHINESE TOBACCO.

TOBACCO LEAF.

MONTH.

$2.50

$1.50

70.c.

Amount

50 c.

30 %

per lb.

per lb. i

per lb

per lb.

per lb.

of Duty

$1.50

70 e.

50 c.

30 .

Collected.

per lb.

per lb.

per Ib.

per lb.

Amount

of Duty Collected. per 1 b.

$1.50

70 c.

50 c.

80 c

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

30 c.

per lb.

Amount

of Duty Collected.

30 c.

per lb.

A mount

of Duty Collected.

$2.50

per lb.

SNUFF.

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

Total

Amount

of Duty

Collected.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

April 7th to 30th..

25

30

24

1.434.23

3,226

May.

3,630

12

2,960

22,504.17 275

10

26

25

16

1,811.76

1,799

6,525

2,041

June,

1,975

23,583.14

275

72

105

45

11

3.313.84

2 312

6.994

July,

2.088

1,031

29,550.05

419

++

40

43

2,469,27

2,031

August.

7,033

2,680

586

25,380.84

335

ཁྐྲ ུ༠:

15

426.93

8,734

2,620.06

6

1.70

lb.

10

31

499.55

14,261

4.278.27

309

92.64

435

763.02

12,201

3,660.24

871

261.42

46

10

36

27

720

2,539.36

726.07

4.074

September,

7,894

3,270

12,700

3.310 03

1,989

50

37,738.01

931

279.36

1312

2.50

15.00

2.50

26,989.59

30,280.36

37,551.07

500

6.25

7

25

38

36

24

765.72

2,533.52

15.307

32,671.82

October,

3,628

12,122

3,007

3,312

44,351.51

4,592,26

300

2,179

653.58

63

52

14

33

31

864

752.93

46,288.93

2.880.49

3.277

November.

9,558

12,205

3.661.44

2,801

2.057

52

35,528.82

2,728

818.52

640

52.117.92

34

49

968.01

2.859.76

2,852

December,

12,785

4,640

657

106

42,170.31

11,048

3,314.25

714

1,772

531.48

60

43.223.05

82

29

5.436.98

1,103.10

2,988

8.685

2,442

1,307

82,721.07

1,658 3.497.40

3,434

624

1,030.14

136

720

1,219.34

11,899

3,569.79

2,645

793.62

22

3.75

50,664,46

5.00

43,745.80

Total....

483

70

365

254

25 25,279.21

26,187

75.226

23,014

18,874 293,527.92

4,082

203

236

2.806 7,224.67

110,013 83,003.74

14,875 4,462.46

14

35.00 363,533.00

Grand Total..

685

89

533

406

13 31.191.18

41,217

120,171 36,887

29,799 866.438.63 7,784

304

331 1,620 10.072.31

159,746 37.977.07

22,180 (a) || 5,193.01

41

74.75 450,946.95

(a) Used in manufacture of Chinese Pipe Tobacco consumed in New Territories. Note.-Fractions of a mille or a pound are not shown in this table.

Table VIII.

Tobacco Local Factories for the year 1921.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

Issued

for

Produced.

Exported.

Ships' Stores

1920.

manu-

Removed

to other

Factories.

Consumed locally.

Balance in Bond on 31st Deg..

1921.

Class of Tobacco.

facture.

=

Mille.

lb.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille

'Mille.

Hb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Cigars 1. Valued at not less than $2.20 per Ib.

92

1,353

1.212

12

150

87

$1.60

91

1,234

1,223

3

58

61

3.

$1.10

472

6,913

6,198

13

499

543

$ .60

499

3,700

995

65

2,361

792

Valued at less than

$..60

984

6,169

1.708

4.213

1,227

Total.

2,138

19,369

11,331

22

29

73

7.281

2,710

Cigarettes 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per lb...

9,862

424,610

407.587

20,306

12,529

2.

**

$1.10

5,475

426.030

321,176

136,280

5.938

3.

፡፡

$..60

15,369

1.729,457

1,587.744

87,993

108,340

Valued at less than

$ .60

5,113

192.957

13,241

45

181,614

2,455

Total,.

35,819

2,773,054

2.279,748

Note.~~Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

45

426,193

129,262

-E 16

Exported.

Ships' Stores.

Table VIII,—Continued.

Tobacco Local Factories for the year 1921.

Removed

to other

Factories.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1921.

Consumed locally.]

Mille.

lb.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille. lb. Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1920.

Issued

for

Class of Tobacco.

mauu-

facture.

Pipe Tobacco (non-Chinese) valued at not less than

"

"

$1.60 per lb at less than 60c. per lb.

Total..

:

Produced.

:

:

:

:

- E 17

617,746

19,842

617,746

19,842

g23,376

88,941

:

412,317

289,472

13,115

...

252,587

13.316

2,104

11,776

202

15,420

11,978

Pipe Tobacco (Chinese) valued at less than

60c. per lb.

Total..

17.535

17,535

1,028,414

408,361

1,028.414

408,361

American and Manila Tobacco Leaf,

502,782

6,610,420

Clean

95.330

""

}

7,619,040

Total,

598,112 6,610,420

7,619,040

:

(a)

Asiatic Tobacco Leaf.

336,380

1,591,113

9.722

Clean

9.818

976,734

་ ་་

Total..

346,198 1,591,113

976,734

9,722

Note.-Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table. (4) Includes 22,180 lbs. consumed in New Territories.

CLASS OF TOBACCO.

Cigars 1. Valued at not less than $2.20 per Ib.

2.

17

**

3.

.,

4.

**

"

less than

$1.60

$1.10

12

$ .60 $ .60

+9

(Unclassified),.

Total,

Cigarettes 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per lb.

BALANCE IN BOND ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1920.

TOBACCO

MAN

ARRIVALS

ISSUE

MA

FACT

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. H hds. Mille.

Ib

249

12

581

69

15

39

28

986

39

28

345

986

2.

$1.10

3.

**

$ .60

4.

less than

+

$ .60

(Unclassified),

292

Total,.

292

(Non Chinese)

Pipe Tobacco 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per lb.

2.

3:

>"

3.

"

""

19

19

$1.10 $ .60

"

$5

4.

11

less than $ .60

34

28

>

(Unclassified),

Total.....

(Chinese)

Pipe Tobacco, Valued at less than $ .60 per lb.

**

(Unclassified),

Total,.

Sunff.

(Unclassified),

Total,...

28

:

30

ون

*

ск

со

883

93

591

501

43

:

:

2,111

16,153

132,191

4,098

205,633

13,126

56,132

9,887

31,973

7,413 1,112

43,264

7,413 1,112

425,929

:

1,719

91

754

851

452 239

3,415 452 239

48,340

74,064 2,972

48,340 74,064 | 2,972

3,358

:

:

:

16,476 1.851

536 13,979

32,842

1,911,968

1,911.968

3,041

American and Manila Leaf,........

}:

**

(Unclassified),

Total,....

:

:

:

3,358

3.041

20,424

6.910,238 6,610.

1,430

1,430

568 7,410

783

20.424

568

7.410

783

16,970.238! 6,610.

Asiatic Leaf,

[1,150,558

5.140,835 1,591.

**

33

(Unclassified),

4,113 24,806

63,218

139

Total.....

4,113 24,806

1,150,558

63,218

:

139

5,140,835) 1,591,

Note.-Fractions of a

31ST

E 18

Table IX.

TOBACCO RETURN FOR THE YEAR 1921.

General Table.

MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.

CONSUMED

ARRIVALS.

ISSUED FOR MANU-

FACTURE.

EXPORTED EX SHIP OR EX Bond.

SHIPS' STORES.

IOCALLY.

He

WH

WA

HOU

le.

Ib. Cases.Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

lb.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

Ib.

Cases..

23

49

12

69

15

986

145

986

883

93

591

501

43

198

62

685

3

89

58

10

533

102

406

43

1,001 18

1,001

18

361

:

74

1.756

:

2,111

:

****

53

132,191

:

85,946

9,022

41.217

98

205,633

84,929

3,740

120,171

'6

56,132

18.341

3,067

36.887

37

31,973

4,067

132

29,799.

7,413 1,112

7,523

54

7.413 1,112

425,929

7,523 1,115

193,283

15,961

228,074

1,719

91

754

851

452

239

3,415 452 239

48,340

|74,064 | 2,972

48,340 71,064 | 2,972

3,358

3,358

:

:

16,476 1.851

536 13.979

448 239

32,842

448 239

:

::

1,911,968

74,018 2,980.

1,911,968

74,018 2,980

3,011

3,041

20,424

568 7,410

783

...

20,424

568 7.410 783

:

1,150,558

1,150,558

63,218

63.218

139

139

:

RAW TOBACCO.

6,910,238 6,610,420

5.476

1,542

7,784

1,064

327

504

99

331

4,310

246

4,620

27

10,857

2,214

13,189

27

:

:

1,710,647

1,710,647

5.518

5.518

246.420

477 7,012 333

...

|6,910,238

6,610,420

477 7,012 333

246,420

5,140,835

1,591,113

3,209.787

771 66,187

|5,140,835|

1,591,113

771 66,187

3.209,787

Note. Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

181.926

181.926

41

:

:

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONGKONG, FOR THE YEAR 1921.

I.-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS,

The grounds were kept in order by the Botanical and Forestry Department with the assistance of the Observatory coolies.

The old magnetic hut was pulled down early in the year and quarters for the European assistants built on the site. They were completed in September.

II. METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

Barometers.-The glass tube for the Marvin compensated syphon barometer was received in December and the instrument set up in February, 1922. The circuit for the seismograph minute time break apparatus is led through two contact springs on the face of the barograph clock. When the minute hand arrives at 591 minutes it breaks this contact and makes contact for one minute through a third spring placed above the other two. The current instead of passing through the seismograph time-break coil thus passes through the coil of an electric hammer which time-scales the barogram every hour. Diverting the current from the seismograph at the 60th minute also serves to identify the minute breaks on the seismograms.

Beckley Anemograph.-This instrument was oiled and the

orientation of the vane checked once a month.

Dines-Baxendell Anemograph.-The bearings of the vane were oiled and its orientation checked once a month. The spindle of the float was cleaned and oiled once a week. In November the instru- ment was carefully calibrated at low velocities by a pressure gauge constructed locally. The gauge was tilted about 80° from the vertical in order to obtain a measurable displacement of the water for a velocity as low as 5 miles an hour. The observations indicated that the float was too light; shot were therefore placed in the cup on the spindle until the float sank to the correct level. The criterion being that the line produced through the observations of the pressure gauge, plotted against the corresponding pressures read from the anemogram, should pass through the zero of the anemogram scale.

The mean monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph from 1910-1920 are given in the following table, together with the results for 1921,

F 2

Factor for converting the actual run of the Beckley Anemo- graph cups to velocities recorded by the Dines Pressure Tube Anemograph.

Factor (Dines÷ Beckley

3

Month.

Mean 1910-1920.

1921.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Year,

1.87

1'49

I'91

1*46

1'93

1.60

1'93

1'73

1.99

1.69

2'02

177

2:08

192

2004

1.88

2.03

1-83

197

178

1.89

1-83

1-85

1'96

196

174

Gap Rock Anemograph.-This instrument was dismounted and brought to the Observatory to be overhauled in November. A leak in the float was repaired, the vane lightened and a vertical tail added, with 'stream line cross section as recommended by the London Meteorological Office.

66

"

Owing to its exposed position the vane was designed to with- stand exceptionally heavy gales, with result that, owing to its weight, it was very sluggish. This caused erroneous records not only of direction but velocity also, as the true velocity is only recorded when the vane is pointing in the direction from which the wind blows. It follows that in estimating the amount of turbulence in the atmosphere from records of Dines Anemographs the sensibility of the vane must be taken into consideration, the alternate lulls and gusts shown on the anemograms being partly due to the vane not responding to changes of wind direction, and to the fact that the vane is continually oscillating on either side of the wind direction. only remaining parallel to the wind for a short time.

Thermometers.—All thermometers in use were compared with the Kew Standard in winter and summer.

Richard Thermograph.—This instrument worked satisfactorily during the year, though the base lines as laid down from the hourly eye observations of rotating thermometers still show irregularities, except on dull days with small range of temperature. The period during which the fan automatically aspirates the thermometers has been further increased to 5 minutes i.e. from the 55th to the 60th minute of each hour. The effect of the fan on the dry and wet bulb readings for the year 1921 is being measured. The results may modify the figures given on page 16 of the 1918 report.

F 3

III-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATION AT THE OBSERVATORY.

Automatic records of the temperature of the air and evaporation. were obtained with a Richard dry and wet bulb thermograph, and of the direction and velocity of the wind with a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph, modified as described in the report for 1912. The amount of rain is recorded automatically by a Naka- mura pluviograph, the amount of sunshine by two Campbell-Stokes universal sunshine recorders, and the relative humidity of the air by a small Richard hair hygrograph. Eye observations of barometric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation and the amount of cloud are made at each hour of Hongkong Standard time. The character and direction of the motion of the clouds are observed every three hours. Daily readings are taken of self-registering maximum and minimum thermometers.

Principal features of the Weather.-The principal features of the weather in 1921 were:

(a) Heavy rainfall from April 27 to July 6, during which period 59 inches of rain fell on 59 days; and a drought from September 9 to the end of the year when only 1 inch of rain fell.

(b) Abnormally low wind velocity in March, increasing

gradually to normal in July.

Barometric pressure was considerably above normal in January, July and October, and considerably below in May, June and August. The mean pressure for the year at station level was 29.848ius. as against 29.814ins in 1920 and 29.843ins for the past 38 years. The highest pressure was 30-323ins. on January 14 as against 30-374ius. in 1920 and 30-509ins for the past 38 years.

The lowest pressure was 29-319ins on July 24, as against 29 208. in 1920 and 28.735. for the past 38 years.

The temperature of the air was moderately above normal in February, March, April, August and December and moderately below in January. The mean temperature for the year was 72° 2 as against 72°0 in 1920 and 71°8 for the past 38 years. The highest temperature was 92°2 on August 22 as against 93°1 in 1920 and 970 for the past 38 years. The lowest temperature was 44°0 on February 4 as against 45°1 in 1920 and 32°0 for the past 38 years.

The rainfall was very considerably above normal in May and moderately above normal in March, August and September. It was considerably below normal in April, October, November and December. The total for the year was 97 34ins as against 107-88ins. in 1920, and 842 for the past 38 years. The greatest fall in one civil day was 6'06 on September 3 and the greatest in one hour was 3.25s between 1.30 p.m. and 2.30 p.m. on May 31.

The wind velocity was considerably below normal in January, March, April, May and October. In July it was normal and in the remaining months it was slightly below normal.

The mean

velocity for the year was 107 m.p.h. as against 120 m.p.h. in 1920 and 127 m.p.h. for the past 38 years. The maximum velocity for

F 4

one hour, as recorded by the Beckley Anemograph, was 51 miles at 11 a.m. on July 24 as against 51 miles in 1920 and 108 for the past 38 years. The maximum squall velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell Anemograph, was at the rate of 69 m.p.h. at 5h. 53m. a.m. on September 3 as against 61 m.p.h. in 1920 and 105 m.p.h. for the past 12 years.

Rainfall at Four Stations. In the following table the monthly rainfall for the year 1921 at the Observatory is compared with the fall at the Police Station, Taipo; the Botanical Gardens; and the Matilda Hospital, Mount Kellet :-

Months.

Observatory Police Station

(Kowloon)..

(Taipo).

Matilda

Botanical

Gardens Hospital (Hongkong). (Hongkong).

inches.

inches.

inches.

inches.

January,

0*195

0'19

0.28

0.31

February,

1040

1*48

I 20

0.80

March,

4'505

5'70

474

374

April,

2.820

2.70

3'01

2.95

May,

33.785.

35'49

33950

29.67

June,

14740

20'32

16.59

19.83

July,

11875

15'47

13.88

11.30

August,

15445

15°27

1595

1295

September,...

1 2 100

16.31

15'77

10*49

October,

0*395

0.80.

0.15

0'24

November,

O'220

0.88

243

0°25

December,

0.220

0'02

033

0*32

Year....

97'340

11463

107.83

92.85

Floods. The heaviest rainfall occurred at the Observatory as

follows:

Period.

Amount.

Duration.

Greatest fall

in 1 hour.

Amount. Time.

d. 11.

d. 1.

inches.

hours.

inches.

d. h.

May... 4 23 May... 9 10 May... 14 12 May... 22 6 May... 31

13 June 29 9 to July 6 21 Aug... 24 4 10 Aug. 26

18 Aug... 30 » to Sept. 7 14

to May 5 23 To May 10 to May 18

4:14

28

1 04

May... 4 23

B

5.10

17

200

May... 9. 16

G

6:56

46

1.76

May...17

12

to May 28

4

13.10

74

1:56

May...24

4

to May 31 16

351

3

325

May...31

14

10:43

17

1223

July... 2

B3

6.09

18

132

Aug...26

16:38

69

1 08

Ang...30

Typhoons. The tracks of 21 typhoons and 11 of the principal depressions which occurred in the Far East in 1921 are given in two plates in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December 1921.

+

F 5

The Captain of the S, S. Anamba reports a typhoon in latitude 15° 23' N. and longitude 110°33′ E on July 16. The wind veered from N at 10 p.m. on the 15th to SE by 6 a.m. on the 16th and SSW by 8 a.m. The force increased from 1 at 4 p.m. on the 15th

A

to II at 4 a.m. on the 16th and then decreased to 7 by 9 a.m. note adds that the vessel drifted approximately X 29° E 44 miles in the typhoon. The Euryalus, 120 miles to the northward, had a steady barometer with light to moderate ENE winds.

On July 22 a secondary formed in the southern portion of a depression to the east of Luzon which was travelling northward. The secondary moved westward and passed near Pakhoi on July 25. It caused a gale at Hongkong on July 24.

On September 2 a secondary formed in the north-east portion of a depression in the China Sea, whose direction of motion was uncertain. The secondary developed into a typhoon and caus- ed a gale at Hongkong. It filled up near Woochow on September

3.

Its

The attention of meteorologists is drawn to these three typ- hoons. No indication of the first was shown on the weather map. This Observatory had no knowledge of its existence till nearly 8 months later, when the log of the Anamba was received by the courtesy of the Director of the Philippines Weather Bureau. track is very uncertain. It was evidently short lived and of small diameter. Both of the others absorbed the primary cyclone, and one formed in the southern portion of it while the other formed in the north-east portion. They were evidently analogous to the typhoon which caused so much damage to Hongkong on September 18, 1906.

The formation of these secondaries in the China Sea, where there are no observing stations, adds to the difficulty of the weather forecaster, and emphasises the importance of wireless weather tele- grams from ships. In their own interests every vessel with a wireless outfit should send observations in accordance with the Notice to Mariners which is supplied to all shipping companies in Hongkong.

IV.---PUBLICATIONS,

Daily Weather Report and Map.-A weather map of the Far East for 6 a.m. of the 120th meridian, and the Daily Weather Re- port (containing meteorological observations, usually at 6h. and 14h., from about 40 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, the Philippines, and Borneo) and daily weather forecasts for Hongkong to Gap Rock, the Formosa Channel, the south coast of China between Hongkong and Lamocks, and between Hongkong and Hainan, were issued as in former years. Copies of the map were exhibited on notice boards at the Hongkong Ferry Piers, Blake Pier, and the Harbour Office. One copy was sent daily to the Director of the Meteorological Observatory, Macao. Forty copies of the Daily Weather Report were distributed to various offices, etc., in the Colony, and a copy was sent daily to the Director of the Meteorological Observatory, Macao. Copies were sent every week to the Hydrographic Office, Bangkok. -

66

F 6

The question of publishing the Daily Weather Report and Map in the Daily Bulletin" (a local publication devoted princi- pally to cable news) was raised, but as it required a high speed and costly lithographic plant at the Observatory, the project was left in abeyance.

A charge of $10 a year is made for supplying private firms and individuals with the Daily Weather Report, and $36 for the Weather Map. No maps were published on January 23, 24 and 26. February 27, March 11, and May 15, owing to the late arrival of the weather telegrams. On several other occasions the map, though published, contained but meagre information.

The weather forecast is telegraphed daily to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless Station in time for distribution at 1 p.m.

It is broad- cast again at 5 p.m.

Monthly Meteorological Bulletin.-The Monthly Meteorological Bulletin, which includes the Daily Weather Report, was published as usual, and distributed to the principal observatories and scienti- fic institutions in different parts of the world.

Monthly Seismological Bulletin.--The publication of a monthly seismological bulletin, giving particulars of earthquakes recorded by the Milne-Shaw seismograph, was commenced in October.

Miscellaneous Returns.--A monthly abstract of observations made at the Observatory is published in the Government Gazette, and daily, monthly, and yearly results are published in the Blue Book in the form suggested by the London Meteorological Office for the British Colonies. The monthly departures from normal of the barometric pressure at four China Coast Ports are communi- cated to the Commonwealth Meteorologist, Melbourne, in connec- tion with long range weather forecasts. Monthly meteorological returns are forwarded to the Meteorological Magazine, and annual returns to the Stock Exchange Official Intelligence, the Colonial Office List, and Whitaker's Almanack.

V.--WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS, AND STORM WARNINGS,

Daily Weather Telegrams.-The improvement in this service mentioned last year continues, but occasionally the observations from Japan and Indo-China still arrive too late for insertion in the Daily Weather Map.

A welcome addition to the list of reporting stations is Yap, in longitude 138° 08′ E and latitude 9°29′ N, Through the courtesy of the Director of the Philippines Weather Bureau observations from this station have been received since March 23, except when communication has been interrupted. While on a visit to the Zikawei Observatory in the Spring the Director discussed with Father Froc the possibility of obtaining daily weather telegrams from Hankow. Owing however to unforeseen difficulties the service has not yet commenced. Occasionally belated weather telegrams are received from Central and South China, but as a rule the observations from these districts are posted in batches to Hongkong. The prompt receipt of telegrams from these districts would be of great assistance in weather forecasting, particularly in the winter months.

F 7

Extra Weather Telegrams. The following stations send extra weather telegrams at half rates during typhoons, on receipt of certain code words from Hongkong:-Amoy, Canton, Macao, Phulien, Sharp Peak, and Taihoku. The Director of the Philippines Weather Bureau also sends extra telegrams, at his discretion, from Aparri or some other station nearer the typhoon centre. The extra 9 p.m. telegram, from Swatow, kindly sanctioned by the Chinese Telegraph Administration during the typhoon season, was seldom received.

Wireless Weather Telegrams.-There has been but a poor response to the Marconi Company's circular and the Observatory Notice to Mariners respecting wireless weather telegrams referred to in the 1919 report. Less than 10% of the ships within range sent weather telegrams to the Observatory during the year.

The following table gives the monthly number of ships, of different nationalities, from which wireless meteorological messages have been received, and the number of messages received, (each arrival and departure is counted separately).

! British

(including

Dutch.

Japanese.

H.M. Ships).

Month.

No. of

No. of

No. of

mes-

ships.

No. of ships.

sages.

mes-

sages.

No. of ships.

No. of

mes-

sages.

Other Nationalities.

No. of ships.

No. of

mes-

sages.

2

3

I

I

I

I

1132

1896 to a

7

13

4

:

24

I

3

:

:

:

September,

16

October,....

14

November,..

J 2

December,

I 2

January, February, March, April,.

May,

June. July, August,

I 2

1 2

22

O MONDA

6 1000 N IAN INIAN M

3+36∞ NO

19

12

40

23

46

14

6

1 2

10

mininm+mTOOL

13

20

26

32

2

27

17

6

31

14

Totals 1921,......... 121

84

40

Totals 1920,... 64

48

25

Totals 1919..........

17

36

6

Totals 1918,...

14

Totals 1917, . . .

Totals 1916,...

...

:

93

95

37

:

60

:

:

2

:

:

F 8

Results of Weather Forecasts.-The results of the comparison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather subsequently experienced are given below, with the results of the previous five

years:

Year.

Complete Partial

Success. Success.

Partial Failure.

Total

Failure.

%

6

1916

67

1917

67

1918

1919

1920

1921

CORRE

29

3

29

+

26

27

64

30

65

30

I

- O O O - O

No forecasts were issued on January 23, 24, 26, February 27 and March 11, owing to lack of telegraphic information.

The forecast comprises wind direction, wind force, and weather. Complete success means correct: in three elements. Partial success means correct in only two elements. Partial failure means correct in only one element. Total failure means correct in no element.

The method of analysis is described in the 1918 Report.

Storm Warnings.--At the request of the ('hamber of Commerce the Hongkong Government adopted the China Seas Storm Sigual Code from 1920, June 1, in place of the Hongkong Non-Local Code introduced in 1917, The signals are displayed on Kowloon Sigual Hill.

The following Ports are warned by a telegraphic adaptation of the code Sharp Peak, Swatow, Amoy, Santuao, Macao, Canton, Wuchow, Pakhoi, Hoihow, Plulien, Taihoku, Manila, Labuan, and Singapore. 87 storm warnings were sent in 1921 and 122 were received from Manila. 10 were received from Phulien, via Quang Chau Wan Radio Station.

Local typhoon signals are exhibited on the Observatory wire- less mast and repeated at the Harbour Office, H.M.S. Tamar, Green Island, the Godown Company, (Kowloon), Lyemun, and Lai Chi Lok, during the day.

The local night signals are exhibited on the Observatory Wireless Mast and repeated on the tower of the Kowloon Railway Station, on H.M.S. Tamar, and at the Harbour Office.

A translation of the non-local and local storm warnings is exhibited at the Harbour Office, the General Post Office and the Star Ferry Piers and also sent to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless station, which broadcasts the message at about noon and repeats it every two hours until midnight. If a second warning is issued during the day, the later warning is substituted.

F 9

When a local storm warning is displayed at the Observatory a cone is exhibited at several outlying stations for the benefit of native craft and passing ocean vessels.

In the following table is given the number of hours the local signals were hoisted in each of the years 1912-1921 :-

Red Signals.

Black Siguals.

Bombs. *

Year.

Number

Number of hours hoisted.

of times fired.

1912

151

164

1913

146

189

1914

146

178

1915

64

120

1916

70

201

I

1917

102

1918

33

102

36

I

1919

78

105

I

1920

107

156

1921

94

I2I

The figures in the above table include the number of hours that night signals, corresponding to the day signals, were hoisted,

The red signals indicate that a depression exists which may cause a gale at Hongkong within 24 hours. The black siguals indicate that a gale is expected at Hongkong.

Prior to July 1917, the red signals indicated that the centre of the typhoon was believed to be more than 300 miles distant, and the black less than 300 miles; the returns for 1912-1916 are therefore not strictly comparable with those for 1917-1921.

VI.

-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS,

TREATY PORTS, &c.

Logs received. In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 168 His ships operating in the Far East. These logs, representing 5662 days' observations, have been utilised for verifying typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for the year 1920 were 170 and 5872.

Comparison of Barometers. The corrections to ships' baro- meters are usually obtained by comparing their readings while at Hongkong with those of the Observatory Standard. Occasionally ship captains bring their barometers to the Observatory to be compared with the Observatory Standard.

* Three bombs fired at intervals of 10 seconds indicate that wind of typhoon force is anticipated.

F 10

VII.-MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

Magnetic observations.were resumed in the new hut in October, the quarters on the site of the old hut having been completed in September.

:

In the following table the results of observations made with magnetometer Elliott 83 and dip circle Dover 71 in the new hut, for the epoch 1921.9, are compared with the values extrapolated from the observations made with Elliott 55 and Dover 71 in the

old hut.

Observed in new hut with magnet 83 in unifilar 83 and dip cirele

Extrapolated

from observations in old but with magnet 55.1 in worfilar 55 and dip circle 71,

71.

(u)

(b)

(b)-(w)

!

Declination (west)

0.19·8

0·22·6

+28

Dip (north).

30-45·8

30-45·0

-0.8

Horizontal Force (C. G.

S. unit)

0:37295

0:37190

-00105

Vertical Force (C. G. S. unit)

022199

0-22125

-00074

Total Force (C. G. S. unit)...

0 43402

0-43276

-00126

The quantities in the last column should therefore be applied to observations with Elliott 83 and Dover 71 in the new hut, to reduce them to the 1884-1920 series of observations.

VIII TIME SERVICE.

Time Ball.-Prior to 1920, January 1, the Time Ball on Kowloon Signal Hill was dropped daily at 1 p.m. (120th Meridian Time). It is now dropped at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily, except on Saturdays when it is dropped at 10 a.m. and 1 p.n., and on Sundays and Holidays when it is dropped at 10 a.m, only.

The Ball is hoisted half mast at the 55th minute and full mast at the 57th minute. If the ball fails to drop at the correct time it is lowered at 5 minutes past the hour and the ordinary routine repeated at the following hour, if possible.

When the Time Ball is out of order the above routine is carried out with flag z", on the storm signal mast.

CC

From

Time Signals are also given at night by means of three white lamps mounted vertically on the Observatory wireless mast. 8h. 56m. Os. to 9. Om. Os. p.m. the lamps are extinguished momentarily at the even seconds, except at the 2nd, 28th, 50th, 52nd, and 54th of each minute. The hours refer to Hongkong Standard Time (8 hours East of Greenwich).

The Ball was dropped successfully 657 times. There were 5 failures attributable to electrical or mechanical defects, and on three occasions the ball was not raised owing to the prevalence of high winds.

F 11

The days on which the ball failed to drop were:-April 14, (10h.), April 15, (16h.), April 16, (10h. and 11k.) and November 25, (107.).

In the following table is given the number of times different errors occurred in the years 1920 and 1921 :-

Error.

Number of Times.

1920

1921

3 sec. or less

562

573

**

04

0.5 多多

8

0.9

ΓΟ

**

25

61

34

15

10

I

J

I

+

2

I I

I 2

6

+

2

I'I

1*3

15

1.6

1.8

2'0

2

I

2

2

2

I

The mean probable error of the time ball in each month for the past five years is given in the following table :—

Probable Error of the Time Ball.

Month.

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

January,

±0.17

±0.24

February,

*10

་ I 3

*20

±0.17 *30

±025

13

March..

*I I

I 2

"21

++

April..

∙18

· 10

19

15

*27

May,

'17

I 2

14

*17

•16

June,

*10

14

14

13

17

July,

*21

II

13

*22

10

August..

'I I

•26

15

* 1 I

10

September,

10

*16

*24

*20

October,

10

'12

15

15

JO

November,

*10

12

•14

19

'10

December,

*TO

· 14

12

*13

"I I

Menus,....

±0.13

±0.14

+0.15 ±0.18 ±0.18

F 12

Time Signals by Wireless Telegraphy.—In addition to the time signals given by the Time Ball, and on the wireless mast. signals are sent at 10h. and 21h. by wireless telegraphy ria Stonecutters. Particulars of the programme are given in the 1918 Report and in Government Notification No. 452 of 12.3.21. The service was transferred from Cape d'Aguilar to Stonecutters on May 1, 1921.

Wireless Receiving Sel.-The existing set was dismounted on September 115 and re-wired, with additional apparatus, by the Superintendent of Wireless Telegraphy on December 8. With the new set the Manila time signals on a 5,000 metre are are heard distinctly. Also the Funabashi signals. Those from Shanghai are still inaudible, though Mr. Bradshaw hopes to be able to pick them up soon.

Transit Instrument. --Observations for time were made daily with the 3-inch transit instrument and the Hipp tape chronograph by the Chinese computers, weather permitting.

The number of observations in the years 1920 and 1921 were as follows

Transits, ...

Level determination, Azimuth,...

Collimation,

1920 1921

985 1,502

557

869

20

50

20

37

Transits of the Sun were utilized occasionally during 1921.

A new reticule with darker, more distinct transit lines was received from England on August 5. It was put in place the same day and the transit line intervals determined. The lines were ruled with appreciable asymmetry to prevent any possibility of bias in observing.

The azimuth and collimation determinations were made by the Chief and First Assistants from observations of the old south mark. The error so obtained was checked occasionally by observations of polar stars.

Clocks.-The Standard Sidereal clock, Dent No. 39741, was cleaned and oiled on January 13. From this date its losing rate varied from 112 secs. on May 31 (Barometer 29 58 Temper- ature 78°.5) and June 18 (Barometer 29ins 42 Temperature 82°.5) to--0-25 sec. on December 5 (Barometer 30 15 Temperature 67°.1).

The rate during cloudy periods was usually derived from the formula :-

r=-0s 792+0x575 (b-29 ins.) + 0s 00021 (t-50°)

where r is the computed losing rate, and 6 and t the mean barometric pressure and temperature, respectively, for the preced. ing 24 hours.

F 13

In the following table is given the excess of the observed over the computed error after cloudy periods during 1921 :-

Date 1921.

Interval without observations.

Excess of observed over computed error.

2 days

7

I 2

""

22

secs.

0*23 + 0*17

199

February 17,

March

7.

April

I,

>>

30,

4

May

21,

7

29,

7

June

6,

3

21,

+

July

+,

4

25:

3

*

August 3:

3

September 6,

November 21,

December 21,

3992 & 3 3 3 3 3

י

27

+ 0.52

0°22

+ 0.04

+ 043

0'57

+ 0.10

+ 0.12

0'17 + 0.63

1

0.03

0'32

The Dent Mean Time clock (No. 39740) was used throughout the

year for dropping the Time Ball, maintaining the electric time service in the Observatory, and sending hourly signals to the Railway,

the Post Office, the Telephone Co., and the Eastern Extension Telegraph Co. The clock is corrected daily before 10 a.m. and before. 4 p.m. by the electric regulating apparatus. Its daily rate is kept below 0.5 sec. by the addition or removal of weights from the pendulum.

Chronometer Dent No. 40917 is on loan to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless Station, and chronometer Dent No. 39946 to the Peak Signal Station.

Batteries, Power Supply, &c.---The necessary current for the Time Service has been supplied by accumulator batteries, charged as found necessary from the alternating mains of the China Light & Power Co., Ld., by a rotary converter.

IX. MISCELLANEOUS.

Seismograph Installation.—One component of the Milne-Shaw Seismograph was received on September 26 and set up on a temporary mounting the next day.

The minute signal sent by the mean time clock for time scaling the records was found to be too short to make a perceptible break in the photographic record, a dash pot was therefore fitted to the eclipsing shutter. Its final form, as constructed by Mr. Evans, is similar in action to the piston in an oil force pump. allows a sharp forward movement of the shutter, with a slow backward movement. The duration of the eclipse is regulated by

it

F 14

a light spiral spring on the horizontál arm of the dash pot. seconds is found sufficient. A slot is cut in the shutter so as to make only a partial eclipse, thus avoiding loss of register while making a sufficient break to mark the minutes. This idea is due

to Mr. J. J. Shaw. The minutes are identified by leading the circuit through contact springs on the face of the barograph clock, the minute hand of which breaks the contact at the 60th minute, as explained on page 1.

The instrument is provided with a fixed mirror for producing a base line; a necessary adjunct for investigating diurnal and secular changes of level.

With its present mounting diurnal tilting of the instrument is very marked, following more closely the external than the internal temperature. This indicates that the movement is due to tilting of the stone pillar on which the instrument is mounted rather than to a temperature effect on the instrument.

37 earthquakes were recorded from September 26 to Decem- ber 31. Of these 5 were felt as slight shocks locally and 5 others were apparently of local origin, though unfelt.

Meteorological Observations at Victoria Peak.-Meteorological observations at Victoria Peak were commenced in June by Mr. C. H. Cotton, who succeeded Mr. MacGrann as Officer in Charge of the Peak Signal Station.

Mr. Cotton seems to have had considerable difficulty in keep- ing the Anemograph and thermograph in order. The hourly time signals from the Observatory have failed repeatedly and much register has been lost.

Observations made with rotating thermometers at Sh., 10h., noon 14h., and 16h. daily, indicate that in June the temperature of the air at Victoria Peak during the day was 8° F. lower than at the Observatory, Kowloon, and 3° lower in December. The temperature of evaporation was 4° lower in June and 5° higher in November. The relative humidity was 16% higher in June and 42% higher in November.

Atmospherics. The intensity of atmospherics was recorded by the operators at Stonecutters Naval Radio-Station 13 times daily, throughout the year, on a scale of 0 to 4, and curves have been prepared showing the annual inequality and the mean diurnal inequality in each month.

The maximum intensity, 292, occurred in May, with a secondary maximum, 2:35, at the end of August, and the minimum, 1.50, in December.

As regards diurnal inequality the maximum intensities occurred at midnight in the spring and autumn, at 3 a.m. in the summer, and at 2 a.. in the winter. The minimum intensity occurred at 10 a.m. in the spring and winter and at 9 a.m. in the summer and autumn.

3

F 15

The times are approximate and refer to Hongkong Standard Time (8 hours East of Greenwich).

Arrangements have been made for the hourly obervation at the Cape d'Aguilar Radio Station of the intensity and type of atmospherics also the wave on which they reach a maximum. It is hoped that these obervations will be of service to the Radio Research Board, and will determine whether systematic observa- tion of atmospherics can be utilised for weather forecasting.

-

Upper Air Research.—2 theodolites, slide rules, hydrogen and pilot balloons for upper air research were received in May, and 19 ascents made between June 10 and September 21. The longest flight was 70 minutes on July 11. The results of the observations have been communicated to the International Commission for the investigation of the upper air.

The military Authorities have been approached with a view to obtaining the assistance of two N.C.O.s from the Corps of Royal Engineers, in order that the balloons may be observed simultaneously with two theodolites, one at the Observatory and one on the Signal Hill, Kowloon. Observation with only one theodolite necessitates the assumption that the rate of ascent can be computed from the weight and free lift of the balloon, and that it remains constant; whereas simultaneous observations with two theodolites, one at each end of a base line, furnish data for the computation of the height of the balloon at each observation.

It was thought advisable to ascertain how far the assumptions necessitated by the one theodolite method are justified in Hongkong before continuing the ascents. The rate of ascent is of course affected by vertical currents, and accumulation of data by the two theodolite method may show that in certain types of weather the single theodolite method will suffice and that in certain other types the single theodolite method should not be used.

Up to the present only two balloons have been found defective. This is gratifying as it was feared they might suffer from the voyage and climate.

The Winds of Hongkong.-A memoir on the winds of Hongkong was completed during the year and will be published shortly.

Visit to Other Observatories. In the Spring the Director visited the Observatories at Shanghai, Kobe, Tokio and Manila to discuss with the directors the following questions:-

(1.) The substitution of Hankow observations for those at Gutzlaff in the Shanghai daily weather telegrams, and of a more westerly station than Nemuro in the list of Japanese reporting stations. Also the possibility of sending the Loochoos observations via Formosa instead of via Tokio.

}

F 16

(2.) The possibility of uniform hygrometric methods and uniform units for weather maps and other publications.

(3.) Adoption by the Japanese Authorities of the Hongkong telegraphic code for daily weather telegrams. This code is used by all the other Weather Bureaus in the Far East.

(4.) A uniform system of wireless time-signals.

The proposals were sympathetically received, but there are difficulties in adopting them which have not yet been overcome.

Staff. No change occurred in the European Staff. Mr. B.D. Evans, First Assistant, acted as Chief Assistant during the absence on leave of Mr. C.W. Jeffries from June 19 to the end of the year.

Yuen Lai Sang, VIth grade telegraphist, was promoted to Vth grade in the General Post Office on December, 31.

Ip Chun Woo, probationer telegraphist, was dismissed on April 2 and was replaced by Ng Hung Kui, who resigned on August 31. His successor, Lan Sing Tong, resigned on December 31.

Government has been asked to make the scale of pay for these telegraphist-observers sufficient to attract and retain good men.

Expenditure. The annual expenditure on the Observatory for the past ten years is as follows:-

Year.

Total Expenditure.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

1912

22,595.08

(.

757-94

C.

1913

24,255-49

1,660.41

1914

25.398.31

1,142.82

1915

23.233.12

2,165.19

1916

21,977.78

1,255.34

1917

26,890.50

4,192.72

1918

20,028.24

6,862.26

1919

23,450.57

3.422.33

1920

25.965.66*

2,515.09

1921

32.700.51+

6,734.85

* Increases to European Staff.

† Increases to Local Staff, seismograph, and instruments for upper air research

F 17

Acknowledgements.-Acknowledgements are here made to the Directors of Weather Services in the Far East, and the Chinese Maritime Customs authorities, for daily observations and extra observations during typhoon weather, to the Telegraph Companies for transmitting the observations free of charge, to the Commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological observations by post and by wireless telegraphy, to the Directors of the various Ŏbser- vatories and Institutions, and private persons, who have presented their publications to the Library, and to the Observatory staff for carrying on the routine work of the Observatory with a shortage of trained telegraphist-observers.

1922, February 20.

T. F. CLAXTON,

Director.

:

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1921.

1.—ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

Two hundred and seventy one (271) actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1921, as against 249 in 1920. One hundred and fifty seven (157) were disposed of during the year, 74 being settled or withdrawn before trial, as against 136 and 46 respectively in 1920. Of the 71 cases which had been set down for trial, 46 were disposed of during, the year.

Two interim injunctions were granted during the year.

The amounts involved were $5,428,494.50 and the equivalent in local currency of 15,000 Rupees and £1,243.14s.10jd.

The debts and damages recovered amount to $685,543.01 and the equivalent in local currency of $11,682.75 U.S. Currency and £249.158.8d. as against $588,102,94 and the equivalent in local currency of $24,263.29 U. S. Currency in 1920.

The fees collected amounted to $12,724.20 as against $12,699.25 in 1920.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at page 0 1,0 2, Y 2 and Y 3 of the Blue Book for the year 1921.

1A. IN PRIZE.

No action was instituted under this head during the year, and one vessel namely the S. S. "Rajaburi" was condemned.

2.-SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

One thousand seven hundred and sixty (1,760) actions were instituted during the year as against 1,699 in 1920.

The cases were disposed of as follows:-Settled or withdrawn 798, Judgment for the Plaintiff 668, Judgment for the Defendant 41, Non-suited 2, Struck off, Dismissed, or Lapsed 17, and Pending 234 as against 621, 677, 36, nil, 44 and 321 respectively in 1920. .

The claims amounted to $331,423.40 as against $308,807.66 in 1920 and the amounts recovered were $136,457.89 as against $120,490.35 in 1920.

The number of Reut Distress Warrants issued

was 509, representing unpaid rents amounting to $40,653.12 of which $12,056.70 was recovered, as against 678, $50,702.74 and $17,211.59 respectively in 1920.

:

G 2

Four hundred and ten (410) Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties as against 487 in 1920.

The fees collected amounted to $2,953.50 as against $3,727.00 in 1920.

3. CRIMINAL JURISDICTION,

There were 58 cases and 77 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 71 and 102 respectively in 1920.

The number of persons actually indicted was 73, of whom 54 were convicted and 19 were acquitted. Against 4 persons the case was abandoned. In 1920 the figures were respectively 100, 81, 19 and 4.

4.-APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

Four appeals were lodged during the year, two from the decis- ions of the Chief Justice, and two from the decisions of the Puisne Judge.

Of the two appeals from the decisions of the Chief Justice one was allowed and a new trial was ordered, and the other was dis- continued. Of the appeals from the decision of the Puisne Judge one was dismissed and the other discontinued.

Provisional leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted in two cases viz:-The Attorney General of Hongkong and the Castlefield Steamship Company, Limited . Toong Yue (O. J. No. 33 of 1919), and in the Matter of the Tai Sun Insurance and Banking Company Limited (in Liquidation) (M. P. No. 33 of 1918). The latter was discontinued.

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Six actions were instituted during the year. One was disposed of and the others are pending.

}

The fees collected amounted to $214.50 as against $438.95 in 1920.

6.

BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

Nineteen (19) petitions were filed, 10 being creditors' petitions and 9 debtors' petitions. The figures for 1920 were respectively 30, 18 and 12.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 7, being 3 on creditors' petitions and 4 on debtors' petitions. The figures for 1920 were respectively 20, 11, and 9.

The number of Public Examinations held was nil as against 4 in 1920. There were 7 Adjudications as against 9 in 1920.

No Scheme of Arrangement was put through. Five petitions were withdrawn, 2 bankrupts obtained their discharge, and 2 Receiving Orders were rescinded.

:

G 3

The estimated assets, in cases where Receiving Orders were made and not subsequently rescinded, were $24,561.18 and the estimated liabilities $128,334.43 as against $300,467.29 and $613,633.07 respectively in 1920.

The fees collected amounted to $1,529.95 as against $2,760.45 in 1920 and the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee, where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors, was $2,182.65 as against $4,625.00 in 1920.

7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

Two hundred and fourteen (214) grants were made by the Court being:-

Probate..

Letters of Administration......

Declarations for Commissioner......

90

120

2

214

The figures in 1920 were respectively 126 and 149, total 275.

The aggregate value of the estates was $7,724,350.00 as against $7,065,247.00 in 1920.

Probate and Estate Duties amounted to $332,319.95, Court Fees to $12,296.00, and Official Administrator's Commission to $1,206.83. The figures in 1920 were, respectively, $367,958.25, $10,295.15, and $979.90.

There were 97 Estates vested in or administered by the Official Administrator during the year, representing an aggregate value of $130,822.51. The figures for 1920 were, respectively, 82 and $127,514.87.

Thirteen (13) were wound up during the year, of the total value of $9,921.56 as against 28 in 1920 of the total value of $18,732.16.

Twenty five (25) new accounts were opened during the year amounting to $13,229.20.

8. OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustees at the end of 1921 was 18 with Trust Funds amounting to $85,643.01 as against 19 Estates aggregating $86,461.58 plus certain house property, in 1920. One was wound up during the year. No new Trust was opened.

The amount of Commission collected was $150.03 as against $85.77 in 1920.

G 4

9. REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

On the 31st December there were 421 companies on the Hong- kong Register, of which 13 were in course of liquidation. During the year 64 new companies were put on the Register and 21 struck off.

The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amounted to $53,380.31 and those in respect of other companies to $14,673.30.

No firm was registered under the Chinese Limited Partnership Ordinance, 1911, or under the Limited Partnership Ordinance, No. 18 of 1912.

Deposits of the total value of $4,265,000.00 have been made by Insurance Companies under Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.

10.-FEES AND COMMISSION.

The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $58,830.97 as against $59,957,31 in the previous year.

11. STAFF.

Sir William Rees-Davies, Chief Justice, returned from leave of absence on 9th October. Mr. Justice Gompertz, Puisne Judge, and Mr. J. R. Wood, Police Magistrate, acted as Chief Justice and Puisne Judge respectively from 1st January to 8th October.

Mr. C. D. Melbourne, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, proceeded on leave to Canada on 1st June and returned on 5th September.

The late Mr. P. Burn, Passed Cadet, acted as Deputy Registrar and Accountant from 1st January to 27th November.

Mr. A. W. Hill, First Bailiff, went on leave on 23rd January and returned on 21st November. During his absence Mr. T. F. O'Sullivan, acted as 1st Bailiff, Mr. E. L. Stainfield Bailiff and Mr. W. W. Cooper as Clerk and Usher.

as 2nd

HUGH A. NISBET, Registrar, Supreme Court,

28th February, 1922.

Table showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.

(From 1911 to 1921).

Year.

Total

Number of cases dealt

Expenditure.

Revenue.

with.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total.

Increase. Decrease.

Percentage

of Revenue.

to

Expenditure.

C.

$

1911

1,963

86,702.10

C. $

C.

5,087.05

*48,342.49

c.

%

17,185.31

55.75

1912

1,263

88,346.36

1,644.26

*60,544.30 12,201.81

68.53

1913

898 98,351.02

10,004,66

*63,303.78

2,759.48

64.36

1914

1,091 | 107,780.92

9,429.90

*73,422.69 10,118.91

68.12

1915

832 110,667.68

2,886.76

*63,382.63

10,040,06

57.27

1916

753 105,252.44

...

5,415,24

*56,719.68

6,662.95

53.88

1917

764

99,662.88

5,589.56 *48,334.81

8,384.81

48.48

1918

931

98,281.40

1,381.48 *68,032,72 19,697.91

69.22

1919

982 98,844.23

562.83

...

*61,305.87

6,726.85

62.02

1920

872 113,082.79

14,238.56

*55,957.31

5,348.56

49.48

1921

*58,830.97

2,873 66

...

49.52

- G 5 -

851 118,782.72 5,699.93

*Not including amounts paid direct to Treasury for fees in respect of Licences to keep Local Registers by the Registrar of Companies under the Companies Ordinance, 1911.

Appendix. H.

REPORT OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS FOR THE YEAR 1921.

Mr. G. N. Orme acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 1st January to the 28th November.

Mr. J. R. Wood assumed duty as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 28th November.

Mr. R. E. Lindsell acted as Second Police Magistrate from 10th January to the end of the year.

Mr. N. L. Smith acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 1st to the 9th January.

The number of cases was 17,374 as compared with 15,304 in 1920 and the Revenue was $149,195.72 as compared with $103,132.51 in 1920.

Table I shows the total number of cases tried and the Revenue and Expenditure of the Magistracy for the years 1912-1921.

Table II shows the list of offences tried during the year.

Table III gives an Abstract of Cases under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the year.

Table IV gives a return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain classes of offences during the year.

Table V gives an Abstract of cases brought under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during a period of the last ten years.

19th April, 1922.

J. R. WOOD, Police Magistrate.

:

Table. I.

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Magistracy for the years 1912 to 1921.

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE.

YEAR.

Total. Increase.

Decrease. Total.

Increase. Decrease.

Total

Number

of Cases

tried.

Percentage

of Ex-

penditure to Revenue.

$

C.

$

$9 C.

$

c. $ C.

c.

%

1912.

41,590.98

1,707.28 | 99,253.10 | 46,788.23

13,450

41.90

1913.

42,867,21*

1,276.23

158,451.56 59,198.46

13,954

27.05

1914.

42,807.15*

60.06 92,109.34*

66,342.22

11,034

46.47

1915.

44,041.33* 1,234.18

75,130.13*

16,979.21

12,263

58.62

1916.

40,642.43**

3,398.90 109,664.82* 34,534.69

15,057

37.06

1917.

38,510.07*

3,132.36

75,391.17*

34,273.65

11,922

51.08

1918.

40,804.18* 2,294.11

69,603.39*

5,787.78

10,051

58.62

1919.

40,774.23*

1920..

1921

45,539.94* 4,765.71 21,867.02*

29.95 90,851.36* 21,247,97 103,132.51* 12,281.15

12,998

44.77

15,304

44.15

149,19

23,672.92 149,195,72* 46,063.21

17,374

14.65

* Tai Po District not included.

- H 2 -

OFFENCES.

Table II.

POLICE COURTS.

LIST of OFFENCES TRIED during the year 1921.

No. OF

CASES.

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCES,

Brought forward,...

No. of

CASES.

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS.

271

326

Accessories and Abettors Ordinance-3 of 1865,

11

18 Dangerous Goods Ordinance-1 of 1873,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

Arms and Ammunition Ordinance-2 of 1900,—

Contraventions of,

160

188 Deportation Ordinance~ 25 of 1917,

12

13.

59

60

338

Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance-7 of 1896,— Contraventions of;

4

Dogs Ordinance-5 of 1893,— Contraventions of,

43

43

Chinese Extradition Ordinance-7 of 1889,-

Electricity Supply Ordinance-18 of 1911,

2

Proceedings under,

Chinese Marriage Preservation Ordinance-42 of 1912,

2

Employers and Servants Ordinance, 45 of 1902,- Proceedings under,

9

11.

Coinage Offences Ordinance—7 of 1865,—

Evidence Ordinance-2 of 1889,-

Offences relating to the King's gold and silver coin,

Contraventions of and Offences under,

1

1

(Sections 3-12),

14

15

Offences relating to the King's copper coin, (Sections

Extradition Acts-1870-1906,—

13-14),

1

1

Proceedings under,

Common Law Offences,

57

66

Fisheries (Dynamite) Ordinance-4 of 1911,

2

11

9

Criminal Intimidation Ordinance-13 of 1920,

18

27

Forgery Ordinance-4 of 1865,-

Forgery of Transfers of stock, &c, (Sections 4—8), .

7

Carried forward,

271

326

Carried forward,.

407

485

H 3

OFFENCES.

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.

No. of

CASES.

No. of

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

CASES.

No. of

PRI-

SONERS,

Brought forward,.

407

485

Brought forward,.

1,833 3,917

Forgery Ordinance-4 of 1865,—Continued.

Forgery of Bank notes, (Sections 14-15),.

4

10

""

Making and engraving Plates, &c., for bank notes,

Larceny of cattle and other animals, (Sections 9-17), of things attached to or growing on land, (Sections 22-28),

9

10

40

53

(Sections 16-21),

13

14

Larceny from the person and similar Offences,

Forgery of Deeds, Wills, Bills Exchange, (Sections

(Sections 29-37),

360

388

22-28),

11

12

Fugitive Offenders Act 1881,-

Proceedings under,

2

"}

Gambling Ordinance-2 of 1891,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

589 2,534

Gunpowder and Fireworks Ordinance-14 of 1901,— Contraventions of and Offences under,

1

Holts Wharf Ordinance-3 of 1921,.

Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co.'s Ordinance-6 of 1908,

Contraventions of By-laws made thereunder,.

Importation and Exportation Ordinance-32 of 1915,

Larceny Ordinance-5 of 1865,-

Simple Larceny,

1

Sacrilege Burglary and house breaking, (Sections 38-47),

Larceny in dwelling houses, (Sections 48-49),

in ships, wharves, &c., (Sections 50-53), or embezzlement by clerks, servants &c., (Sections 54-60),

Frauds by bankers, agents, &c., (Sections 62-74),. Obtaining property by false pretences, (Sections 75-78),

Receiving stolen property, (Sections 79-87), Restitution and recovery of stolen property, (Sections 88-90),

Licensing Ordinance--8 of 1887,— Contraventions of and Offences under,

""

4 Liquor Licence Ordinance-9 of 1911,- Contraventions of and Offences under Part I,

32 38

84 116

38 46

49

19

26

18

7

50 ∞ ∞ NOA

54

18

8

2

4

Regulations made thereunder,

2,2932,331

193

202

(Sections 3-40),

23

25

799 857

Carried forward,..

1,833.3,917

Carried forward,

5,000 |7,236

- H 4-

:

OFFENCES.

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.

No. of

CASES.

No. of

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

CASES

No. of

PRI-

SONERS

Brought forward,

5,000 7,236

Brought forward,.....

5,5157,889

Liquor Licence Ordinance-9 of 1911,—Continued. Contraventions of and Offences under Part II,

Military Stores (Prohibition of Exportation) Ordinance— 1 of 1862,-

(Sections 41-73),

43

48

Contraventions of,

1

1

Magistrates Ordinance-3 of 1890,—

Offences under............ .............................................

420

511

Misdemeanour Punishment Ordinance-1 of 1898,- Offences under,..

53

53

Malicious Damage Ordinance-6 of 1865,—

Injuries by fire to buildings and goods therein,

Offences against the Person (Amendment) Ordinance- 9 of 1913,

1

1

(Sections 2-9),.

Miscellaneous injuries, (Sections 42-44),

37

137

H 5

74

Offences against the person Ordinance-2 of 1865,- Homicide, (Sections 2-9),

13

19

I

Marrried Women (Maintenance in case of desertion)

Ordinance-10 of 1905,-

Acts causing or tending to cause danger to life, &c., (Sections 16-31),....................

28

34

Proceedings under,

Assaults, (Sections 32-43),

371

483

Forcible taking or detention of persons, (Sections

Merchant Shipping Ordinance-1 of 1899,-

44-45),

10

10

Contraventions of and Offences under Part VI,

Abominable offences, (Sections 50—54),.

3

5

(Sections 21-30),

2

Opium Ordinance-4 of 1914,—

Merchant Shipping Act-

Contraventions of Part I,

(Sections 5-18),

69

79

Breaches of discipline.

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-4 of 1890,—

ون

3

7

II,

19-34),

2,085 | 3,976

""

""

"" III,

"3

71

35-62),

2

1

Contraventions of and Offences under,

9 Opium Ordinance-27 of 1917,

5

8

Carried forward,

5,515 7,889

Carried forward,

8,156 12,559

OFFENCES.

Table II,-Continued.

List of OFFENCEE, ETC.,--Continued.

NUMBER No. OF

OF

CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCES.

NUMBER No. of

OF

BRI-

CASES. SONERS.

Brought forward,.

8,156 12,559

Brought forward,

8,698 13,135

Pawn Brokers Ordinance-1 of 1860,-

Contraventions of,

Pharmacy Ordinance-9 of 1916,

Plant Ordinance--11 of 1920,

Police Force Ordinance-11 of 1900,—

Offences under,.

Post Office Ordinance-6 of 1900,--

Contraventions of and Offences under,

48

55

11

20

Railway Ordinance-21 of 1909,

Public Places Regulation Ordinance-2 of 1870,— Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

3 Registration of Persons Ordinance-6 of 1916.

7

1

11

12

Regulation of Chinese Ordinance-3 of 1888,- Offences under Part V, (Sections 22-28),

87

""

};

>>

VII, (

>>

50-51),

80

87

3

3

80

86

:

Printers and Publishers Ordinance-4 of 1886,- Contraventions of and Offences under,

Prison Ordinance-4 of 1899,-

· Offences under,............................

Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance-1 of 1897,— Offences under,.

2

3 Rogue and Vagabond 5 Geo. IV, c. 83,

2

Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance-8 of 1896,- Offences under,..

Servant Quarters Ordinance-11 of 1903,- Offences under,..

00

20

Societies Ordinance-47 of 1911,

16

89

98 Stamp Ordinance-16 of 1901,— Offences under,..

77

77

Public Health.and Buildings Ordinance-1 of 1903,- Contraventions of Part II, (Sections 8- 95),

293

301

"}

III. (

91

96-235),

78

78

Stowaways Ordinance-5 of 1903,- Offences under,

27

66

Carried forward,

8,698 13,135

Carried forward,

9,005 13,498

H 6 -

OFFENCES.

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC., Continued.

NUMBER No. of

OF

PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

:

Bronght forward,

Summary Offences Ordinance—1 of 1845,-

Nuisancés. Trespasses and Similar

(Sections 3-21),

Offences against good order, (Sections 22-35), Possession of stolen goods, (Sections 36-41),

Proceedings under Miscellaneous Provisions, (Sec-

tions 41--42,)

Theatres and

Public Performances

OFFENCES.

9,005 13,498

Brought forward,

Offences,

Vagrancy Ordinance-9 of 1897,- Proceedings under,

3,331 3,355

238 354

287 315

Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance-40 of 1912,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

2 Water Works Ordinance-16 of 1903,--

Offences under,.

Weights and Measures Ordinance-2 of 1885,— Contraventions of and Offences under,

Undecided Cases...

Regulation

264

281

Ordinance-18 of 1908,

Tramway Ordinance-10 of 1902,--

Contraventions of Rules made thereunder,.

Traveller's Restriction Ordinance-19 of 1915,

Carried forward,.

13.133 17,811

NUMBER

OF

CASES.

No. or

PRI-

SONERS.

13,133 17,811

34

38

T

4,198 | 4,236

H 7

co

36

43

TOTAL,

17,410 22,138

:

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENCES.

Table III.

ABSTRACT of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during the Year 1921.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR.

Warrants.

TOTAL.

:

M. F.

M.

F. M. F. M. F.

M.

F. M. F.

M. F. M. F.

M. F. M.

F.

Assaults and other offences against the person, Malicious injuries to property, Gambling,

515

608

262 65

137

24 16 7

1

8

68

...

...

2

17 1 511

...

38

76

589 2,534

· 26

2,354

43

31

144

5

= 10

1 2

1

1

73

...

Offences against property other

than malicious injuries to property or predial larceny, Offences against Revenue Acts, Highway Acts, Health Acts,

and other Acts relating to the social economy of the Colony,

1,491 1,656 1,239 45

9,444 11,448 | 9,795 308 1,272 68

281

21 53

33383

:

::

2,498

36

3

...

Offences against Masters and Servants Acts, including Acts relating to indentured coo- lies,,..

Other offences,

14

24

8 3

1

...

:

5,283 5,792 5,042 241 363 31 14

1

+

Total,

17,374 22,138 18,726 695 2,247 151 85

8

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

-

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

62 3 2

14

74 」 8「 81」 2 「 1

18

:

:

-

*T

:.

:..

:.

11

1 2

:

1,589

ང་ཁྱ

97 6,483 20

со

8

176

921

318 30 7,956

67

10

:.

11,072

376

Co

ลง

18

12 25,513 279

38

5 21,274 864 6,483 20 8

176

921

318 30 7,956

22,138

* TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

1

(H8)

Table IV.

RETURN of PUNISHMENTS «warded in respect of CERTAIN CLASSES of OFFENCES, during the Year 1921.

PUNISHMENTS.

Assaults

and other

offences

Description.

Number of

each kind

against

the

person.

Malicious

injuries to

property.

Gam-

bling.

inflicted.

Offences against property other than malicious injuries to pro- perty or predial larceny.

Offences against Revenue Acts, Highway Acts, Health Acts, and

other Acts relating to the social economy of the colony.

Offences against Masters and Servants Acts,

including Acts

Other

offen-

relating to

ces.

indentured

coolies.'

Fines,

16,972

249

26

2,321

115

Imprisonment in lieu

of fine or security,

1,041

35

~

9,395

14

4,852

1

31

40

766

166

Peremptory Imprison-

ment,

1,515

52

1,009

Whipping,

124

3

Solitary Confinement,...

Exposed in Stocks,

41

1

Sentenced to House of

Detention,

30

Bound over with or

without Sureties,

194

102

Juvenile Offenders'

Prison,

22

:

:

:

:

:

54

83

23

396.

15

H 9 --

...

:.

39

:

1

30

:

:

TOTAL..

19,939

442

17

22

32

2,352

1,325

10,238

:

75

...

...

15

5,535

H 10

Table V.

ABSTRACT OF CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COUrts during a period of ten years 1912-1921.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Committed

Commit- to prison or

detained pending or-

der of His

Excellency

the Governor.

Ordered to

find security

Escaped before

To keep the peace, to be of good beha- viour, and to

answer any

charge.

being brought for trialat: the Ma-

gistracy.

Punished for preferring false charge

or giving false testimony.

Year

Total number

of

cases.

Convicted and punished.

Discharged.

ted for trial at

Supreme

Court.

1

N

Undecided.

Total number

of defendants.

3

4

5

6

8

9

10

11 12

18 14 15

16

17

18

19

20

21

শে

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M.

M.

F

M.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1912, 13,450

1913..... 14,218

19,856 641 2,559

1914, 11,192 12,890 267

1915, 12,268 12,788 305

1916.... 15,057 14,881 455

15,945 877 3,027

329 157

co

6

5

451 119

181169 24

25

00

415

97

2,401

115 116 2

18

296

22

2,056

111 149 10

7

272

20

2,233

96 116 4

10

313 40

O

:

:

:

16

19,6121,332

22

28,046 952

S

63:

15,789 406

48

15,320 446

72

17,625: 595

10

221

91,392 3,731

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

30

Total,.. 66,180

76,360 2,545 12,276

832 707 46

65

9 1,747 298

2

Average

ver

13,236

Year,

15,272 509- 2,455-2166-4 141-4 9.2 13 18349459.6

4

1917.

11.922 11,727 441 2,168

1918, 9,805 9,359 373

1919. 12,961 13,788 364

1920.. 15,267 15,520 517

1,947

1,662

92119 3

127 117 10

10

6

248 34

197 41

:

108 146

A

25

1,541

119136

5

1921, 17,374 18,726 695

2,247

151 85

00

4

10

76

143 19

:

5

173

ст

:

Total,... 67,329 69,120 2,390

9,565

597 603 28 17

837 106

Average per Year,

(13,465 8 13,824

478

1,913 119-41206] 5'6

3.4

167.4 21.2

:

Grand

Total

for the

133,509 | 145,480 | 4,935

21,8411,429 1,310 74

82

92,584 404

Years,

Average

per 13,350.9 14,548 493-5 2,184-1142-9 131 7-4

8.2

.9 258-4 40-4

Year.

•2

1Q

N

14.2

.2

18,2784 746°2

42

14,311 570

49

11,665 545

39

13,673 475

35

17,380 662

1

38

5

21,275 864

203

9

78,304 3,116

40.6

SI

15,660-8623-2

12

424

10

| 169,696 6,847

1-2

424 11 16,969-6684-7

Appendix I.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1921.

1.-REGISTRATION.

During the year Four thousand four hundred and sixty six (4,466) Deeds and Documents were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844, affecting six thousand five hundred and twenty six (6,526) lots of land. The total money consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous documents amounted to $107,855,703.10 particulars of which are shown in Table I. The total number of documents registered in the Land Office under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 to the end of 1921 was 78,131. The number of Deeds registered each year for the last ten years is shown in Table III.

2.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The total area of land sold and granted on lease during the year was 564 acres 3 roods 7·91 poles of which 523 acres O rood *78 poles (including 361 acres for camphor growing) was in respect of lands dealt with by the District Officers; the total area resumed was 116 acres 1 rood 1874 poles; the excess of land granted over land resumed during the year was 448 acres 1 rood 29 17 poles. This is exclusive of quarries and lands let for short terms or occupied under temporary permits issued by the Public Works Department. Particulars of the grants are shown on page WI of the Blue Book for 1921.

3.-GRANTS OF LEASES.

The number of Crown Leases granted during the year was 84 particulars of which are specified in Table II. The number of Crown Leases issued each year for the last ten years is shown in Table III.

4.-FEES.

The total amount of fees collected by stamps, exclusive of the New Territories, during the year was $77,537.00 being $18,248.25 more than the previous year. Land registration fees in the New Territories amounted to $6,692.00 and Crown Lease fees to $180.00.

The amounts of fees collected under the different headings for the years 1912 to 1921 are shown in Table IV.

5.-CROWN RENT ROLL.

The total Crown Rent due in respect of leased lands in Hongkong and Kowloon (excluding certain Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon entered in the Village Rent Roll) amounted for the year ending 25th December to $492,417.02, an increase of $43,037.78 on the previous

year,

I 2

The total amount due in respect of leased lands in the Villages of Hongkong and Kowloon appearing in the Village Rent Roll for the year ending 30th September was $3,412.95, a decrease of $113.50 on the previous year due mainly to the resumptions at Shaukiwan and Matauwei. The total number of lots of Crown Land appearing in the Rent Rolls with the Total Rents is shown in Table V.

6. NOISY AND OFFENSIVE TRADES.

One hundred and two licences were granted to Crown Lessees under the provisions of the Crown Leases to carry on offensive trades on their premises in cases where such licences were recom- mended by the Sanitary Department.

7.-BUILDING COVENANTS.

In ten cases applications by Crown Lessees for extension of time in which to comply with the Building Covenant or stipulation in their Crown Leases or grants were granted on payment of penalties and the agreements completed and registered.

8.-MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS.

one

In addition to the above eighty four Crown Leases, hundred and sixty miscellaneous documents were drawn and comp- leted, the latter including agreements to secure Government Con- tracts and Purchase Deeds on the resumption of properties by the Crown.

9. PRAYA EAST RECLAMATION.

With one exception, affecting an approximate area of 13,608 square feet, Agreements relating to the Praya East Reclamation were entered into by all entitled to participate.

10.-STAMP DUTY,

Stamp Duty paid on registered documents exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration amounted to $389,583.80. Stamp Duty on Probates and Letters of Administration registered amounted to $173,372.40.

11.-STAFF.

Mr. Philip Jacks, Land Officer, left on leave to England on 5th March, Mr. H. K. Holmes has acted since that date. On 28th April, Mr. T. M. Hazlerigg was appointed Assistant Land Officer in addition to his other duties.

Mr. Chan Tang-piu VI Grade Clerk died on 28th April. Mr. Fung Iu-tong was appointed a probationer on 9th May.

H. K. HOLMES,

Land Officer.

22nd February, 1922.

I 3

Table I.

Particulars of Deeds and Documents registered in the Land Office.

No. of Lots

Description of Documents.

Number Registered.

or portions of Lots affected,

Total Consideration.

C.

Assignments

1,723

2,685

47,080,257.50

Mortgages and Transfers of

Mortgages

1,160

1,429

33,539,618.50

·

Reassignments

and Satis-

factions

1,182

1,451

24,778,624.86

Surrenders

53

110

533,919.24

Judgments and Orders of

Court

37

64

22,202,00

Probates and Letters of

Administration

FOL

260

Miscellaneous Documents,

210

527

1,901,081.00

Total,..

4,466

6,526

107,855,703.10

Table II.

Crown Leases granted during the year 1921.

Marine.

Inland.

Rural Building.

Garden.

Aberdeen..

Shaukiwan.

Marine.

Pier.

Hongkong.

Kowloon.

Inland.

Marine.

Hunghom.

Inland.

Inland.

New Kowloon,

New Territories.

2

25

I 4

2

20

3

3 1 17

I 24

84

Total.

- I 4 -

Table III.

Number of Deeds registered and Crown Leases issued during the years from 1912 to 1921.

Year.

Deeds Registered.

Crown Leases Issued.

1912

2,353

57

1913

2,814

118

1914

2,433

66

1915

2,154

166

1916

2.670

118

1917

2,824

135

1918

2,922

117

1919

3,021

114

1920

3.405

74

1921

4,466

84

Table IV.

Fees collected during the years from 1912 to 1921.

Registration Searches and

Grants

Year.

of Deeds.

Copies of Documents.

of Leases.

Total.

C.

C.

..

1912.....

1913.

37,528.00

2,805.75

1,820.00

42,153.75

45,018.00

3,530.50

3,670.00

52,218.50

1914..

38,362.00 8,200.25

2,450.00

44,012.25

1915.

32,305.00

2,719,00

5,455.00

40,479.00

1916....

42,070.00

3,368.25

3,960.00

49,398.25

1917.

43,478.00

3.199.75

4,370.00

51,047.75

1918..

45.225.00

3,399.35

3,505.00

52,129.35

1919..

45,896.00

3,486.90

3,102.00

52,484.90

1920..

52,569.00

3,849.75

2,870.00

59,288.75

1921

70,617.00

4,235.00

2,685.00

77,537.00

- 15 -

Table V.

Crown Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

C.

Victoria Marine Lot

345

76,226.99

25

Praya Reclamation Marine Lot.. Inland Lot

80

9,243.91

""

1,904

195,703.24

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

2

18,334.00

Inland Lot

3,310.00

Victoria Farm Lot.......

36

2,388.53

Garden Lot

47

"

1,189.00

Rural Building Lot

156

17,085.84

Signalling Station

2.00

Aberdeen Marine Lot

579.16

Inland Lot....

71

2,232.24

Aplichau Marine Lot

22

152.64

Inland Lot

22

172.64

Shaukiwan Marine Lot..

10

1.928.00

Inland Lot

186

3,259.40

Stanley Inland Lot

4

4.00

Kowloon Marine Lot

54

45,420.13

Inland Lot

934

57,637.72

"3

Farm Lot

3

90.08

""

Hung Hom Marine Lot

"

Shek O Inland Lot Tai Tam Inland Lot Tong Po Inland Lot

New Kowloon Marine Lot

6,140.00

Inland Lot..

194

10,369.50

3

9.00

1

1.00

1.00

8

20,442.00

Inland Lot

267

"

13,721.00

Farm Lot

5

""

1,083.00

وو

Rural Building Lot

1

42.00

Sheung Shui Lot

Tai Po Inland Lot.....

Fan Ling Lot.............

Sai Kung Marine Lot

Inland Lot

Ping Chau Farm Lot Mining Lot.....

458.00

1,192.00

412.00

500.00

1

225.00

2,862.00

Total...

4,393

$492,417.02

I 6

Village Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

C.

Wongneichung,

128

224.50

Aberdeen

23

83.50

Pokfulam

24

28.25

Tai Hang

163

641.50

Ah Kuug Ngam..

25

18.25

Shaukiwan

37

24.50

Tai Kok Tsui

10

16.00

Mong Kok

45

98.50

Hok Un

Tokwawan Shek Shan

94

276.00

187

328.00

31

69.00

Sun Shan....

IS

59.50

Mataukok

31

14.50

Mati....

2

5.50

Ho Mun Tin

6

17.50

Ma Tau Chung

35

91.00

Ma Tau Wei

84

158.50

Kau Pui Shek..

31

12.00

Hau Pui Loong

15

53.50

Tung Lo Wan...

5

23.00

Wong Tsuk Hang

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

72.00

Little Hongkong

3.00

Tong Po

3.50

Stanley

Tytám

Tytam Tuk

Chai Wan

10

19.50

3.50

3

2.50

Wong Ma Kok

2.00

7

15.00

Shek O

Hok Tsui

Chung Hom Bay

Aplichau

Tsat Tsz Mui

Telegraph Bay

23.00

1.50

1

3.00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road, Victoria........

1

3.00

68

287.00

35

99.00

13

43.50

Hung Hom West

Little Hongkong

Shek O

Hok Tsui

2

6.00

1,581

280.75

1,064

173.20

181

34.50

Total......

3,994

$3,412.95

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1921.

A. NORTHERN DISTRICT.

I. STAFF.

Mr. D. W. Tratman continued in charge throughout the year. Mr. A. C. Burford, Land Bailiff, went on long leave in March and for the remainder of the year the work in both portions of the district was carried out by the remaining bailiff.

IL-MAGISTRACY.

Table A shews the number of cases heard by the District Office sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

66

21

64

The reduction in the number of Small Debts Cases and the still greater reduction in Writs of Execution are due to the policy of strong discouragement adopted towards "Wui" claims. For reasons indicated in last year's report, the Court gave assistance only where solid and final results were attainable. In the former category fall wui's' the running of which is menaced by wilful default on the part of members well able to pay their contribution in the latter "wui's" which have been drawn" to the end, pressure from the Court enabling the "head" to close his account with reduced losses. Further investigation of the Shün Wan "wui's" fully justified the strictures passed upon that district in the former report, no less than 52 "wui's" having their home in this small area. Under such circumstances all concerned must have been well aware that their participation was a gamble pure and simple and no serious injus- tice can result from ruling this group o of wui's en bloc out of Court. Of the 161 Writs of Execution issued only 20 proved ineffectual.

CC

12

The increase in the duties on native tobacco has given strong incentive to smuggling from Sham Chun, which even imprisonment in addition to a fine seems unable wholly to suppress. The long frontier and many passages by land and water make evasion easy and it is probable that much of the tobacco smoked in the Territory still pays no duty.

III-LAND OFFICE.

The number of sales of land and other transactions affecting land which took place during the year are set out in Table B.

The number of memorials registered was 3,576 as against 3,607 in 1920, but the registration fees amounted to $3,163 as against $2,435.60. The increase in fees is due to the entry into the market of

J 2

European and other residents of Hongkong. There was a notice- able increase in the number of deeds sent out for registration by solicitors' offices.

The opposition of the Kam Tin Villages to the proposed dam for the new Shan Pui-Mai Po reclamation assumed very serious proportions in March when the leading Elder of P'ing Shan, who acts as local agent for the syndicate, was roughly handled by a Kam Tin crowd. For a time there was a distinct danger of an old-style fight between the two groups of villages and although this was happily averted by the mediation of the Tai Po and Un Long branches of the same clan, it was evident that no dam could be constructed at the place proposed without inviting perpetual and dangerous friction. The original proposal for a dam below the road-bridge was then revived and it was decided that a dam might be constructed from the foot of a hill some mile downstream from the bridge to the opposite (right) bank of the creek, the height of the dam is strictly limited and in times of flood its whole length, 1,400 feet, will be available for overflow.

The embargo on "chai t'ong" continues in force. The revela- tions in a "fung shui" case noted below, coupled with certain vagne statements from the "Tongs" regarding funerals of members seem to indicate that one of the objects of these institutions is to find "good fung shui's" for their supporters.

Contrary to anticipation there has been no demand for sites on the new reclamation at the North-west end of Tai Po Market. This is probably due to the shallowness of the lots as first laid out and a substantial increase in depth is being planned.

IV. REVENUE,

The total revenue collected in this office is set out under the various heads in Table C the total being $121,080.38. Table D gives the revenue collected each year since 1912. To the figure in Table C should be added the following amounts paid by the district, but not through this office:----

Liquor Duties, Sai Kung, Harbour Dues

No. 2 Launch,

No. 3

21

No. 4

Crown rent paid in Land Office,

Mining Licences,

Prospecting Licences,

Tobacco Duties,

Licences,

...

...

:

$ c. 3,365 76

2,314.25

2,673.65

6,334.80

3,337.70

5,424.00

176.00

3,500.00 5.193.01 168.00

$ 32,487.17

J 3

The total revenue received from the Northern District during 1921 was therefore $153,567.55 as against $144,974.82 in 1920. The chief source of the increase was the raising of the duties on native liquors and tobacco.

The cost of the District Office for the year was $33,402.71.

V. GENERAL.

Crops. The April rains were very scanty and much of the higher land could not receive the first rice-crop until a week before the latest possible date. Subsequently not a little damage was done by over-heavy falls. Nevertheless the first crop was on the whole good. The second crop only averaged 70% owing to drought in the latter half of September.

The sugar-cane crop was an almost complete failure.

Cattle and pigs.-There appear to have been somewhat serious outbreaks of disease both among cattle and pigs; but the districts concerned successfully concealed the fact at the time. and no certain diagnoses can be made. It is probable that, as in former years, rinderpest was the cause of the mortality among the cattle.

Crime. The more serious crimes reported included 1 double murder and armed robbery, 1 murder, 2 armed robberies accom- panied by kidnapping, 3 armed robberies on land, 4 on water, 2 robberies with violence and I highway robbery. The double murder took place at Castle Peak, a district notorious as a home of political intrigue. The real motive appears to have been revenge on a person of mysterious antecedents who was living in the temple where the crime occurred. The other victim owed his fate to his endeavours to procure help. The other murder was committed by a man subsequently found to be insane, the victim being his own daughter. Of the piracies one was committed on the Sha U Chung Ferry Launch, the robbers boarding the vessel at Sha Ü Chung and carrying out their crime shortly after she left that Chinese port. The other three were all committed on the same day on cargo junks off So Shi Mun. One of the armed robberies with kidnapping took place close by at Leung Shin Wan only a fortnight later. The kidnapped persons were soon released and the whole circumstances of the 4 crimes are suspicious to a degree and thoroughly in keeping with the evil reputation of the neighbourhood. From its position effective patrol is extremely difficult and so far as the shore- population is concerned it is at least open to question whether they do not merit expulsion rather than protection. The children kidnapped in the other case (from Lin Fa Ti) were released from Chinese Territory after much negociation, a ransome being paid.

Fung Shui.-There were 3 violent disputes over "fung shui" during the year characterised by the usual venom and mendacity. In one case the manager of the Chai Tong" at Fan Ling induced a poor farmer of Lung Yeuk Tau to sell the resting place of his grand-parents and the village of Tung Kok Wai, near the grave, having received no share of the purchase money, entered a strong

J 4

The other

"

protest which was upheld, though not on that ground. dispute concerned a grave site near Liu Pok and a "she t'an at Wang Chan, where the various "Surnames" quarrel ceaselessly.

Fisheries. The fishing fleet working from Tai Po seems to be increasing steadily. Two new boat-building sheds were opened during the year and found sufficient business for night as well as day work. Numerous complaints were received from the stake-net fishermen of loss of fish owing to the new system of "Kitson" light fishing. The whole question was carefully considered by Govern- ment which decided not to interfere with the new method except in the interests of navigation.

Local Public Works.-Table E gives the works constructed or assisted from this Vote, which is of the greatest value to the district. Not only are communications improved but public spirit is stimulated since a grant is rarely recommended unless the general public value of the work is shewn in the practical form of public subscriptions.

Rainfall.-Table F gives the rainfall for the year at Tai Po and the average for the preceding 5 years.

D. W. TRATMAN, District Officer, North.

24th March, 1922.

5

POLICE COURT.

1921.

Average from 1916-1920.

Cases heard,

281

244

Persons brought before the

554

412

Police Magistrate,

Persons convicted and punished,

378

266

Persons bound over,

31

49

Persons discharged,

141

90

Persons committed,

4

5

Persons imprisoned,

92

103

Fines inflicted,

$2,103.00

$1,573.99

Warrants executed,

34

43

Cases heard,

Writs of Execution,

SMALL DEBTs Court.

236

224

161

213

d

Heading.

Permits, etc.

No. of Sales,

No. of Lots.

Table B.

Area.

**B

Increase of Annual Rent.

ि

Decrease of

Annual Rent.

:

-∞

ن

*

S

Amount of Premia, Fees,

etc.

Amount paid for Resump- tion of Land.

Term of Years.

""

Sales of Land for Agriculture

Building

76

26.95 s. f.

31.10

159

4.04

371.00

Building and Garden

4.

1.02

"

""

Camphor Growing

I

143.00

69.00

286.00

2,422.00

2,145.00

620.00

143.00

""

Drying Ground

238

.03

10

8.00

75

rrrr

Fruit Growing

1.22

1.40

135.00

75

>>

"

Garden

.45

50

50.00

75

"

Lime-kiln

4

.03

2.00

11.00

75

งง

99

Threshing Floor

24

.57

3.10

293.00

75

Encroachment-Grave

I

2.25

11.35

226.50

75

"

Garden

.02

14.00

2.45

75

"

Conversions,

.40

30.00

141.07

75

""

Exchanges

7.

.46

"}

Extensions

·05

14.00

"3

Permits to occupy Land for Agriculture,.

25

39

37.17

187.72

Re

5

"}

* Renewable for 57 years.

— J 6 —

Heading.

No. of Sales,

Permits, etc.

No. of Lots.

Table B,-Continued.

Area.

Permits to occupy Land for Agriculture,.. 178

330

74.11 acres.

99

Building, etc.

8

9

10.52

>>

Stone Quarry Leases

1

2

76.00

""

Surrenders

53

1.55

""

Resumptions

14

.69

Re-entries,

194

9.19

Stone Quarry Permits

100

Permits to cut Earth, etc.

101

Matshed Permits

115

1.59

Forestry Licences

490

31,146.50

Pineapple Land Leases

19

6.23

Ferry Licences

5

Water Wheel Licences

2

Grave Certificates

119

Deeds Registered and Fees

3,576

* Included $2.60 for crops.

$

Increase of Annual Rent.

C.

Decrease of Annual Rent.

Amount of Premia, Fees, etc.

Amount paid

for Resump- tion of Land.

Term of Years.

-€A

€9-

266.08

1

41.12

1

600.00

1

22.81

3.66

255.50

93.56

213.00

128.00

215.50

1

3,136.23

1

18.69

I

9.00

2.00

52.75

3,163.00

J 7 -

Table C.

Revenue

for 1921.

Acerage of Revenue for 1916-1920.

C.

C.

Crown Rent, (Leased Lands),

82,795.57

81.285.22

Kerosene Oil Licences,..

288.00

301.00

Chinese Wine & Spirit Licences,

3,593.75

3,811.65

Distillery Licences,

2,496.50

2.561.25

Pawnbrokers' Licences,

800.00

1.040.00

Money Changers' Licences,

470.00

636.00

Fines,

2,103.00

1,662.05

Reward Fund, (Opium).

410.00

181.66

""

(Liquor

and Tobacco),

150.00

Nil.

Forfeitures,

204.01

667.95

(Land Sales)

40.00

37.60

Distress Warrants.

146.00

136.20

2

(Crown Rent),

1.00

22.80

House Rent,

688.00

637.77

Liquor Duties,

10,565.55

8,602.15

Arms Fine Fund,

Nil.

87.40

Arrears of Revenue,

Nil.

9.73

Rent of Government Furniture,

25.00

19.20

Forestry Licences,....

3,136.23

3.129.49

Permits to cut Earth, etc.,

128.00

118.60

Mining Licences,

Nil.

50.00

Grave Certificates,

52.75

72.45

Pine-apple Land Leases,

18.69

37.22

Matshed Permits,.

215.50

139-20

Permits to occupy Land,

697.81

454.62

Stone Quarry Permits,

213.00

193-20

Stone Quarry Leases,....

600.00

672-12

Water Wheel Licences,

2.00

4:40

Ferry Licences,

9.00

9:00

Certified Extracts......

201.00

96.40

Sunprints,

97.00

71:00

Premia on Land Sales,

6,517.02

20.155'34

Stamps for Deeds,...

Boundary Stones,

Deposit not Available, Crown Leases.

Old Building,.

3,163.00

1,886 12

50.00

48.00

943.00

144.20

60.00

6.00

200.00

Nil.

Total,...........

$121,080.38

$128,986.93

J 9

Table D.

Revenue Collected from 1912-1921.

1912...... $106,607.67

1917.$117,095.84

1913....

.... 111,301.72

1918............ 120,244.93

1914.....

108,455.14

1919...... ... 117,174.51

1915....

112,075.71

1920....

115,865.45

1916.....

174,153.77

1921..

.... 121,080.38

Table E.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS 1921.

New Works.

Lam Ts'ün Road, Lower Section...

Upper Section

c.

200.00

80.00

Wo Hang-Sha T'au Kok Road

703.00

Bridge on Road from P'ó Sham P'ái to Ting Kok

15.00

Road fromn Wang Ling Tau to Kam Chuk Phá

90.00

Road from Sáu Tau Kok to Pó Sham Phái

125.00

Bridge at Lai Chi Wo ...

350.00

Bridge at Siu Lek Yün

1,100.00

Bridge at Siu Hang

1,150,00

Jetty for Fishing Boats at Tai Po

100.00

Road and bridge between Sha Kok Mi and Sai Kung

100.00

Road and bridge near Leng Tsai

200.00

Repairs,

Sha Tin Valley Bridge...

Luk Yeuk Bridge...

Bridge on road to Lo Wu Lead Mine Valley Bridge

Unexpended

:

198.32

350.00

95.00

140.16

:

3.52

$5,000.00

J 10

www.

Table F.

Rainfall at Tai Po Police Station.

1921.

Average 1916-1920.

Inches.

Inches.

January

·19

January

1.26

February

1.48

February

1.98

March

5.70 March

1.78

April

2.70

April

7:39

May

35.49

May.

111-67

June

20-32

June

23.10

July

15.47

July

24.03

August...

15.27

August...

22.31

September

16.31

September

8.31

October

·80

October

27:00

November

.88

November

3:36

December

·02

December

X2

Total Rainfall... 114·63

Average... 108 71

J 11

B.-SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

I. STAFF.

I had charge of the office for the whole year.

Mr. Chan Hi-wo, 5th Grade Clerk, was transferred to the Northern District on promotion on 1st April, and Mr. Yung Sik- fan was transferred from Colonial Secretary's Office to fill his post; but the services of the latter were dispensed with or on 5th December, when Mr. Ho Ping-nan was transferred from Medical Department to take his place.

II.- MAGISTRACY,

The District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate heard during the

161 cases affecting 261 persons. 155 year

persons convicted or bound over, 40 were discharged and 66 imprisoned.

were

The following table gives a comparison with 1919 and 1920:--

1919.

1920.

1921.

No. of cases..

194

115

161

No. of persons affected

282

172

261

No. of persons convicted or

bound over

177

108

155

No. of persons discharged

42

26

40

No. of persons imprisoned........... 63

38

66

Fines

.$724.30

$459.17 $1,455.25

Arms Fines...

$50.00

$275.00 $25.00

Forfeitures

$82.08

$61.30 $190.00

III-SMALL DEBTS COURT.

75 cases were instituted during the year as compared with 115 in 1920 and 176 in 1919. In pursuance of a theory I had formed in 1920, I did not hold quite so many Courts in the District during 1921. Full facilities however were granted to all parties to initiate proceedings for debt by application at the local police station. The figures speak for themselves. In my opinion the genuine cases remain while I have eliminated those which have been undertaken from trivial motives or from a mere love of litigation. It is however possible that the economic improvement. in the district has had a great deal to do with the reduction. The matter is receiving careful attention in 1922.

IV.--LAND OFFICE.

The number of land sales and other transactions affecting land which took place during 1921 are set forth in Table A.

1,520 deeds were registered during the year as compared with 2,329 in 1920. Registration fees for 1921 were $3,529.00 as compared with $2,392.90 in 1920.

J 12

V.-REVENUE.

The total revenue collected by the District Officer is shown in Table B. The increase in the total of rates is due to the rapid development of Sham Shui Po.

Table C gives details of revenue collected in Licence Fees by the Police in 1920 and 1921.

Table D shows the revenue collected in 1920 and 1921 in the District by all Departments other than the District Office and includes the totals of Table C.

Table E shows comparatively the total revenue collected from the Southern District by all Departments during the last three years.

VI.-LIQUOR.

Liquor duties were collected in the Southern District during 1921 amounting to $140,900,85. The total for 1920 was $122,498.99.

The chief sources of this revenue are given in the following Table which shows comparatively the totals of the last three years.

District.

No. of Distilleries

Revenue

1919.

Revenue Revenue

1920.

1921.

in 1921.

$

$

Sham Shui Po ..............

2

53,444

23.335 37,379

Kowloon City

1

11,286

15,010

19,112

Tsun Wan

9

764

60,266

65,868

Kwai Chung

2

26,926

17,461

11.779

Kap Shui Mun..

165

70

178

Cheung Chau

8,241

4,419

2,441

Tai O

1,473

1,626

2,518

Hang Hau

289

244

1,475

Po Toi

1

320

34

Tsing I..

1

80

63

116

VII-GENERAL.

1921 has on the whole been a successful year in the Southern District. Crops have been fair, trade good, and the fish seem to have returned to our waters. Prices of necessities appear to have been on the down grade and this no doubt has largely affected the Small Debts Cases, although I have elsewhere suggested another

reason.

Tai -The fishing season has been even better than that of 1920, on a rough estimate 13,700 piculs of fish more being taken this year. Trade has been very good, and the salt production has exceeded that of 1920 by 11,000 piculs. The road from Tai O to

+

J 13

Shek Pik has been greatly improved by the joint efforts of the two villages aided by a small grant from the Government. The people have been quiet, for the crimes of violence committed-two armed robberies were almost certainly the work of bad characters from Chinese Territory. The Market is well appreciated, and the revenue collected, after diminution in midsum ner, rose again to close upon $100 a month. I consider ninety to be a reasonable average, as far as can be judged, for a year of fair prosperity.

Cheung Chau. A good fishing season has helped Cheung Chau to recover from the previous depression there. The amount collected from fishing junk Licenses has exceeded the previous year's figures by nearly $3,000. The Market did well.

But as regards Distilleries, business was even worse than in 1920. A reduction of 20 cents per gallon (that is of 33%) in the duty was made during the year but the expected improvement was not effected. A great deal of wine is now imported from Tsun Wan, and it is said to be of better quality than that produced locally.

The European Reservation was visited by even greater numbers this sum.ner and five houses have been open all the winter. The Government has granted. at a nominal rent, the site for an Assembly Hall, and a permit for an Area for Golf has been issued and 10 holes are already being played over. The Residents' Association has put in very hard and useful work, and I hope to be able to report next year a great amelioration of "the fly nuisance," to which end action is at present being taken. The development of the place as a summer resort has undoubtedly brought much money into the Island but I fear it is sometimes forgotten that Cheung Chau was a prosperous place long before its "discovery" and that the District Officer has to consider the interests of a large and law-abiding body of Chinese, as well as those of the European population.

The death-rate of the Island was larger than in 1920 nearly 150 deaths being recorded. A nong them, I regret to say was that of Mr. Wong Tseak-ting, the head of the Wong Wai Tsak Tong. To my predecessors and to myself he always gave the most loyal support as a Kai Fong, and I personally owe much both to his courtesy and his capability.

The Kai Fong devote nuch attention to education, and a new Chinese free school was opened during the year by the Hon. Mr. Lau Chu-pak. The education of the Island is now generally supervised by the Education Department--a step in the right

direction.

Tsun Wan.-The crops of padi were good, and, in fact, the figures all round for the year under review approximate very closely to those of 1920. There have been none of the acrimonious local disputes which have taken place in this district in some

J 14

former years, and the general prosperity of the whole valley seems upon the increase. At Ping Chau the Lime Kiln business seems to be booming. Several extensions and a new site have been granted. The nut-oil business here also is improving.

Lamma. The padi and the sweet potato crops were much better than in 1920, but the bananas failed entirely. The island has been as quiet as usual.

17th March, 1922.

E. W. HAMILTON, District Officer, South.

Table A.

€6.

e.

No. of

Increase

Decrease

Amount

Sales,

No.

Area

of

of

of

Headings.

Permits,

of

in

Crown

Crown

Premia,

Licences,

Lots.

Acres.

Rent.

Rent.

Fees, &c.

&c.

Amount

paid for

Resump-

tion of

Land.

Term

of

years.

%

- J 15 —

Land Sale for Buildings (New Kowloon)

14

15

·40

55.00

1,424.10

""

ז,

Agriculture (New Kowloon)

6

9

1.61

5.80

Land Sale for Buildings (Island).

2,172.00

19

19

1.20

107.50

1,292.76

17

},

""

Agriculture (Island)

5

1:31

1.40

165.00

75

ગોવામા

Leases for Tree Plantation (New Kowloon)

Agriculture (New Kowloon).

14:00

28.00

21

1.26

Earth Permits

"

Conversions (New Kowloon)

"J

Stone Quarry Permits

Permits to occupy Land

Matshed Permits

Forestry Licences

Pineapple Land Leases

Deeds Registered

Resumption Surrender

Re-entry

"".

**

"

Tree Plantation (Island)

(Islands)

20.00

1-83

11.77

218.00

436.00

218.00

21

A

75

140.06

1,531.86

75

10

10

*48

47.73

75

260.00

875.00

148

997.78

667

909.50

305

1,000.50

113

1,664.24

418

884.89

3,529.00

37

80-94

215.68

1,715.21

9

*50

13.92

64

3.75

21.64

J 16

Table B.

Revenue collected by the District Officer, Southern District,

New Territories.

1920.

1921.

$e.

$ C.

· Land Sales......

Crown Rent

4,273.33

6,803.72

25,438.28 28,418.51

Assessed Taxes

Lease of Stone Quarries

Forestry Licences ....

Earth Permits

15,161.96

15,957.24

955.00

875.00

1,749.14

1,664.24

309.00 1,000.50

Matshed Permits

890.75

909.50

Permit to occupy Land

1,071.60

997.78

Pineapple Licences

1,046.12

884.89

Registration Fees

2,393.90

3.529.00

Crown Leases,

150.00

120.00

Distress Warrants, (Crown Rent)

35.00

21.00

(Small Debts)

32.00

17.00

Writs of Summons

152.00

82.00

Fines, (Police Court)

459.17

1,455.25

Forfeitures.....

61.33

190.00

Certified Extracts

21.00

13.00

Grave Certificates

6.25

7.00

Miscellaneous Receipts.

103.29

D.O./S Deposit Interest

131.72

77.90

Legal Costs

2.50

Sunprint Plans

25.00

60.00

Boundary Stones

539.50

34.70

Water Wheel Licences...

32.00

27.00

Arms Fine Fund

185.00

25.00

Market Fees,

1.232.46 1,079.27

Total...........

$56,351.51 $64,355.29

Table C.

Licence Fees collected by the Police Department.

Station.

Distilleries.

Wine and

Spirit.

Keroscue.

Eating

Pawn

Money

House.

Dogs.

Chan-

Total.

Brokers.

gers.

C.

$

c.

$

tA

ရာ

$

C.

1920

400.00

2,800.00

54

20

201

3,000

6,475.00

Kowloon City

1921

2,800.00

56

189

3,000

6,080.00

1920

800.00

4,000.00

42

372

4,000

9,249.00

Sham Shui Po

1921

600.00

4,800.00

-18

70

237

6,000

100

11,855.00

1920

50.00

525.00

56

400

40

1,071.00

Tai O

1921

50.00

525.00

56

400

40

1,071,00

1920

112.00

787.50

74

800

40

1,813,50

Cheung Chau

1921

75.00

950.00

68

800

40

1,933.00

1920

484.00

437.50

18

939.50

Tsun Wan

1921

373.00

415.00

34

822.00

Yung Shu Wan,

1920

400.00

75.00

30

1,500

2,005.00

Lamma Island

1921

400.00

75.00

38

1,500

2,013.00

1920 $2,246.00

8,625.00

244

85

Total

$599

573

9,700

80

21,553.00

1921 $1,498.00

9,565.00

· 300

105

426

11,700

180

23,774.00

J 18

Table D.

Revenue collected through Other Departments from the New Territories, Southern District.

1920.

1921.

$

C.

Treasury, (Crown Rent for Inland Lots)...

9,562.67

28,905.04

(Quarries in New Kowloon)

10,645.10

18,269.50

Harbour Office, (Harbour Dnes, Stake Nets,

&c.)

19,373.00

24,115.15

Police, (Licence Fees)...

21,553.00*

23.774.00*

Imports and Exports Office, (Liquor Duties) 122,498.99 140,900.85

Total,...

$183,632.76 $235,964.54

* See Table C.

Table E.

Total Revenue collected from Southern District, New Territories, during the last three years.

1919.

By District Office,

By Other Departments,

1920.

1921.

$

$

C.

56,351.51

64,355.29

$ C.

57,458.45 173,417.09† 183,632.76† 235,964.54

Total,

$230,875.54 $239,984.27 $300,319.83

+ See Table D.

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT

OF POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1921.

SUMMARY OF CRIME FOR 1921.

The total of all cases reported to the Police during the year 1921 was 12,242 as against 11,912 in 1920 being an increase of 330 or 2.77 per cent. The average for the last five years is 10,530.6.

In the division of these cases into Serious and Minor Offences there appears a decrease, as compared with 1920, of 856 cases or 17.17 per cent. in the former and an increase of 1,186 cases or 17·12 per cent. in the latter.

The increase and decrease as compared with 1920 in Serious Offences are shown as follows:-

Decrease.

Burglary and Larceny from Dwelling Assault with intent to rob...

40

5

Offences against Ordinance for Protection of

Women and Children

17

Unlawful Possession ...

146.

Larceny

642

Other Felonies

22

Total...

872

Increase.

Murder Robbery

:

:

:

:

:

Total...

Nett decrease

2

14

16

856

Table 1 shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during 1920 and 1921 and number of persons convicted and discharged in connection with these offences.

K 2

MURDER.

Twenty-five murders were reported to the Police during the year as against 23 in 1920.

In connection with 15 of these reports, no arrest was made, and in the remaining 10 cases, arrests were made. There were 2 cases in which convictions were obtained (2 persons both of whom were convicted). In 8 cases there was no conviction (14 persons).

MANSLAUGHTER.

Two manslaughters were reported to the Police during the year as against 10 in 1920.

In both of these two cases, arrests were made. In one case a conviction was obtained (one person). In the other case there was no conviction (one person).

GANG ROBBERIES.

Fifty-six gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 40 in 1920.

In 46 cases, no arrest was made, in the remaining 10 cases, arrests were made. In 8 cases convictions were obtained (22 per- sons of whom 15 were convicted and 7 discharged). In two cases there was no conviction (two persons).

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

Twenty-seven street and highway robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 31 in 1920.

In 22 cases, no arrest was made, in the remaining 5 cases arrests were made. In 3 cases convictions were obtained (3 persons all of whom were convicted). In two cases, there was no conviction (2 persons).

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND JUNKS.

Ten cases of robberies on boats and junks were reported to the Police during the year as against 14 in 1920.

No arrest was made in any of these ten cases.

ROBBERIES WITH VIOLENCE.

Twenty-two cases of robberies with violence were reported to the Police during the year as against 16 in 1920.

In 19 cases, no arrest was made; in the remaining 3 cases, arrests were made. In all of these three cases, convictions were obtained (7 persons all of whom were convicted).

K 3

OTHER FELONIES.

Under this heading are comprised the following:

Cutting and wounding,

Demanding money or goods with menaces,

Embezzlement,

Forgery,

House-breaking,

Receiving stolen property,

Child stealing,

Rape,...

Throwing corrosive fluid,

Arson or attempted arson,

Shooting with intent to kill,

1921. 1920.

32 30

11 21

51

45

25

16

48

65

56

59

6

15

1

Wounding with intent to murder,

Attempting to murder,

Wounding and causing grievous bodily harm,

Attempting to shoot with intent to prevent

lawful apprehension,

Administering poison with intent to murder, Attempting to administer poison with intent

to injure,

Indecent assault,

Seditious publication,

Abominable offence,

Accessory after the fact of murder,...

Possession of materials for making or printing

forged bank notes,

Uttering forged bank notes,

1

I

3

1

1

تن

1

1

24

131

256

270

The number of cases in which convictions were obtained was 103 as against 108 in 1920.

GAMBLING.

One hundred and fifty-seven Gambling Warrants were executed during the year as against 153 in 1920. There were 8 cases in which no conviction was obtained.

Thirty-two were lottery cases, compared with 11 in 1920.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $376,531.78 as against $537,567.20 in 1920, a decrease of $161,035.42.

The value of property recovered during the year was $34,383.99 as against $66,929.74 in 1920, a decrease under property recovered in the previous year of $32,545,75.

- K 4

LOST PROPERTY.

The following is a return showing property lost or recovered :-

Articles

Articles recovered and articles found

Year.

reported Value lost.

Value found.

lost.

which were not

reported lost.

1921

394

$ 21,445.80

131

$3,844.48

1920

419

$ 19,776.20

139

$5,689.16

THE PIRACY ORDINANCE.

Number of searchers employed under the Prevention of

Piracy Ordinance, 1914 :-

European and Chinese Searchers:--

European Sergeants

Chinese Constables

Female Searchers (Chinese).....

5

31

7

1

Female Searchers (Private)

Number of Guards employed up to 31st December, 1921 :—

One European Sergeant in charge.

One Indian Sergeant for patrol duty.

Steamer Guards.......

248

Steam Launch Guards (Chinese).....

28

Shore Guards (Indian)

203

Shore Guards (Chinese)

17

Total of Guards employed...........................................

496

Number of vessels which have entered into bond up to 31st

December, 1921:-

Steamers......

Steam Launches.......

205

36

K 5

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Weights and Measures

Correct.

Incorrect.

Total.

examined during the year 1921.

Foreign Scales

Chinese Scales

Yard Measures

Chek Measures...

185

185

2,024

20

2,044

372

372

675

679

Total...

3,256

24

3,280

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance :—

Number of Cases.

11

Convictions.

11

Fines.

$353.00

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE,

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dan- gerous Goods Ordinance:

Number of Cases.

Convictions.

3

Fines.

$300.00

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance :-

Number of Cases.

Convictions.

Fines.

Nil

Nil

Nil

K 6

Samples purchased and sent to the Government Analyst:-

Port. Sherry. Gin.

Beer. Brandy. Rum. Whisky.

4

2

8

3

3.

6

The Government Analyst certified all above samples to be genuine and free from injurious ingredients,

The examination of foods and drugs is now conducted entirely by the Sanitary Department.

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations, (Notification No 231 in the Government Gazette of 30th April, 1920-)

Prosecu- Convic- With-

tions. tions. drawn.

Dis- charged.

Remanded. Result.

Fines.

3,604 3,441

45

109

9

$13,773

MENDICANTS.

During the year 1921, five hundred and twenty-two mendicants

were arrested and dealt with as follows:-

8 mendicants charged before the Magistrate.

7.

""

7

7

sent to Tung Wah Hospital.

handed back to their parents. sent to Swatow.

sent to Hoi Fung.

sent to Canton once.

"

""

387

""

64

27

4

19

"

2

""

>>

""

2

>>

33

33

>>

2

""

1

*

1

27

""

1

*

>>

Ι

"

>"

17

""

""

A

A

"

33

>>

twice. 3 times.

4

5

6

8

9

13

15

11

**

Total, .......522

K 7

DEAD BODIES.

Table II shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year.

DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS.

847 persons were banished from Hongkong.

651 persons deported from Straits Settlements were sent

on by the Police.

1,081 Vagrants were received from Straits Settlements and

sent on by the Police.

817 Vagrants were received from the Dutch East Indies

and sent on by the Police.

1,582 Vagrants were received from Saigon and sent on by

the Police.

437 Coolies were received from Straits Settlements and

sent on by the Police.

1,748 persons were discharged from Victoria Gaol and

entered in the Police Criminal Records.

LICENCES.

The following licences were issued during 1921 :

1,150 Hongkong Public Jinrikshas.

1,324

Private

700 Kowloon Public

48 Sze Ka Che

"

"

850 Hongkong Public Chairs.

16 Upper Level Jinrikshas. 20 Peak Jinrikshas.

308 Hongkong Private Chairs.

60 Hill District Chairs.

18,235 Drivers and Bearers.

1,433 Truck Licences.

157 Motor Car (Livery).

351

25

666

""

(Private).

Drivers.

270 Motor Cycle Drivers.

294

""

Licences.

210 Money Changers.

134 Pawn-brokers Licences.

5 Licences to store Petroleum in Bulk.

6

2 6

26

"

Fuel.

55

*

Phosphorous. Rockets.

99

Poisons (wholesale).

263 Chinese Wine and Spirits (Old Territories).

80

15

>>

(New

25 Licences to store Sulphuric Acid and Nitric Acid.

3 Auctioneer Licences.

18 Licences to store Acetylene.

5 Billiard Tables or Bowling Alleys.

K 8

13 Licences to store Calcium Carbide.

وو

2

27

2

""

18

27

18

"

""

Chlorate Mixture.

59

of Potassium and other

Compressed Oxygen. Dissolved Acetylene.

8 Distillery Licences (Old Territories).

19

(New Territories).

94 Licences to store Dynamite.

58

321

7

14

1,055

74

[Chlorates.

Ether and Alcoholic Liquids.

to shoot and take Game.

to store Gunpowder.

Kerosene Oil (in godown).

""

""

**

22

33

39 Marine Store.

(ordinary). (New Territories).

27 Licences to store Naphtha and Benzine.

18

>>

2

""

"

(in Garage).

Nitrobenzine or Oil of Nirbane.

5,728 Hawkers.

DOGS ORDINANCE.

2,971 dogs were licenced during 1921.

17 watch dogs were licenced free of charge.

509 stray dogs were impounded. 330 were destroyed. 167 sold or claimed leaving 9 in Home at the end of the

year 1921.

3 dogs were destroyed at the request of owners.

ARMS ORDINANCE.

No licence for importing or dealing in arms or ammunition was issued during 1921.

The following arms and ammunition were seized and confiscat- ed during the year 1921 :-

Winchester Rifles... Revolvers

7

Winchester ammunition 11,137 rds.

.173

Automatic Pistols... 49

Revolver Automatic Pistol,,

"

Mauser Pistols

..536

Mauser

21.587 25,387 81,887

""

"

Shot guns

2

Shot

gun ammunition...

777

""

1 European 11 Indians

2nd

""

1st

"?

5

2nd

"

27

30

1st

PROFICIENCY IN LANGUAGES 1921.

15 Europeans obtained 1st certificate in Cantonese.

English.

Cantonese.

>

""

"

46

2nd

"

"}

25

62

2 Chinese

1

3rd

多多

J

..

1st

2nd

"

""

1

1st

3)

""

English.

Hindustani.

K 9.

ANNUAL MUSKETRY COURSE 1921-1922.

EUROPEANS.

One hundred and fifty-nine Europeans fired their Musketry Course and were classified as under :-

·---

Marksmen

1st Class Shots

2nd

25

3rd

16

35

73

35

159

P.C. 112 Mair obtained the highest score viz., 161 out of a possible 200 points.

INDIANS.

Two hundred and seventy-four Indians fired their Musketry Course and were classified as under :-

Marksmen

1st class Shots

2nd 3rd

""

27

3

10

49

212

274

I.P.C. 42 Mehdi Khan obtained the highest score viz., 168 out of a possible 200 points.

REVOLVER COURSE.

EUROPEANS.

One hundred and fifty Europeans fired their Revolver Course and were classified as under:

1st Class Shots

2nd

""

3rd

38

102

10

150

INDIANS AND CHINESE.

.

Two hundred and seventy-four Indians fired their Revolver Course. Ninety-three Chinese fired a Revolver Course.

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

Number of finger prints received from various police stations 4,099, being an increase of 23 impressions over 1920.

Number of persons identified by finger prints 1,184 being a decrease of 285 persons as compared with the year 1920. Number of records filed 4,040 being a decrease of 822 persons as compared with the year 1920.

K 10

Number of persons convicted of Breach of the Banishment Ordinance 51, being a decrease of 47 persons as compared with the year 1920. Number of persons identified by finger prints for Breach of Hawkers Licence 323, being an increase of 150 persons over 1920.

One person was identified by his foot impression, namely Yeung Po the fourth prisoner who escaped from Victoria Gaol.

1 U

A new classification for onwards, invented by Superin- tendent Collins of New Scotland Yard was put into use. This classification reduced 6,000 records into 16 covers.

The old system

was much slower, the search took some minutes, the present system reduces it to seconds,

CONDUCT.

The conduct of the European Contingent (average strength 185) was good. The total number of reports against them was 57 as against 50 in 1920.

There were 3 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 8 in 1920.

Four were reported for sleeping on duty as against 2 and 5 for neglect of duty as against 4.

year.

The conduct of the Indian Contingent (average strength 430) was good. There were 353 reports as against 324 for the preceding For drunkenness there were 10 as against 9, for disorderly conduct 30 as against 41, for neglect of duty 50 as against 25, for absence from duty 64 as against 84, for gossiping and idling on duty 42 as against 39 and for sleeping on duty 20 as against 21.

250 men had no report.

The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (average strength 541) was fair. There were altogether 994 reports as against 845 in 1920. For drunkenness there were 3 as against one, 73 for sleep- ing on duty as against 71, 22 for disorderly conduct as against 18 and 374 for minor offences as against 359.

268 men had no report.

11 C. Cs. were convicted by the Police Magistrate (dismissed from the force).

Six for misconduct as a P. C.

One for harbouring a married woman.

Two for larceny.

One for neglect of duty.

One for attempting to obtain a bribe.

The seamen, coxswains, engineers and stokers (average strength 185) had 176 reports as compared with 142 for last year. For

K 11

disorderly conduct there were 2 as against none, 5 for neglect of duty as against 9, 138 for absence from station, being late for duty as against 106, and 7 for sleeping on duty as against 15 in the pre- vious year.

91 men had no report recorded against them.

The slight increase throughout the force in reports is account- ed for by the fact that the state of the force is now much more normal, the vacancies in all ranks having been filled during the

year.

HEALTH.

Admissions to Hospital during the last three years were as

follows:-

1919.

1920.

1921.

Nationality.

Establish-

Admis-

ment of

sions.

the Force.

Establish- ment of the Force.i

Admis-

sions.

Establish- ment of the Force.

Admis- sions.

Europeans,...

159

100

178

170

185

135

Indians,

477

485

477

546

430

455

Chinese,,

592

281

626

322

726

381

Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever during the year 1921:-

Old Territories.

New Territories.

Nationality.

Establishment of the Force.

Establishment

Treated.

of the Force.

Treated.

Europeans,

Indians,

Chinese,

170

13

15

2

303

43

127

75

668

33

58

30

In addition to cases treated in Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever the cases treated for Fever in the various stations in the New Territories without being removed to Hospital were :—

Europeans 13, Indians 83, Chinese 9.

RECRUITING.

Details concerning recruiting and the Police Training School will be found in Annexe B.

SPECIAL EVENTS.

At 06.37 hours on April 13th, Nos. 9 and 11 Old Bailey totally collapsed. Six persons escaped without assistance, eleven were rescued alive, and nine persons were killed. Rescue work

K 12

was carried out by Police, Fire Brigade and Sanitary Department under the guidance of officers from the Public Works Department. Owing to the dangerous state of adjoining property the work of rescue and clearance was attended with considerable risk. H. E. the Officer Administering the Government was pleased to express his high appreciation of the work done by those engaged upon the work.

At 20.30 hours on August 16th, 1921, a Chinese actor was shot dead, whilst performing on the stage at the Wo Ping Theatre by one of the audience who escaped in the commotion and excite- ment that followed. One man was arrested soon after the murder and was charged at the Criminal Sessions but was discharged.

At 11.45 hours on September 5th, 1921, Nos. 313 and 315 Queen's Road West collapsed. A number of persons and children were rescued immediately by Police and others on the spot. Rescue work was carried out by Police, Fire Brigade and members of the Sanitary Department. 16 persons were sent to the G.C.H. for treatment. A number of other persons were rescued from the debris with minor injuries, 6 persons were killed.

REWARDS.

The following King's Police Medals were presented by His Excellency the Governor Sir R. E. Stubbs, K.C.M.G., on 8th July, 1921, at Central Police Station.

To Chief Inspector James Kerr and Chief Detective Inspector William Murison for most excellent work throughout the War, and for ability and untiring zeal in the performance of the onerous duties of their appointments.

To Station Officer Arthur Lane (Fire Brigade) and Detective Inspector Hau Hang (Police) for exceptionally valuable services.

Second Class Medal was granted to Inspector Robert Mac- Donald for long and valuable service and for zeal and courage in the performance of his duties in a difficult district and for bravery in following up armed robbers (34 Western Street).

Third Class Medal was granted to Inspector Patrick Francis Boulger for exceptional service while in charge of the Police in the Northern District of the New Territory.

Fourth Class Medal was granted to Sergeant A.145 Godfrey Albert Stimson for skill and intelligence shown in a case of larceny of a quantity of cargo from Holt's Godown in December, 1920. Three men were arrested and convicted and the stolen property recovered.

Fourth Class Medals were granted to the following European Police Officers for long and faithful services :—

Sub-Inspector William Pitt. Ex-Sergeant William Kerr.

K 13

Third Class Medal was granted to Inspector Nawab Khan for long and faithful service.

Fourth Class Medal was granted to C. C. 388 Yuen Yui for zeal and energy displayed by him in a case of larceny from Holt's Godowns in December, 1920. Three men were arrested and con- victed and the stolen property recovered.

Fourth Class Medals were granted to the following Chinese Police Officers for long and faithful services :-

P. S. 80 Lam Kwok.

Engineer-in-chief Wong Mui. Engineer Ho Tai Luk. Engineer Chan Wing.

Coxswain 403 Hau Fuk.

A reward of $10 was granted to P.C.C. 110 Wong Wing for his smart capture of a "Po Piu Lottery Plant " in Chater Road and in No. 5 Stone Nullah Lane on the 28th January, 1921.

A reward of $10 was granted to P.C.C. 580 Kwong On for promptness and zeal in securing the arrest and conviction of à Chinese male named Yeung On who committed a burglary at No. 23 Kowloon City Road on the 11th August, 1921.

A reward of $10 was granted to P.C.C. 105 Chan Chi for his prompt action in effecting the arrest of a snatcher in Lower Lascar Row on the 9th August, 1921.

E. D. C. WOLFE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

K 14

Annexe A.

REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.

I have the honour to report that the strength of the Water Police as it now stands (December 31st), is 1 Inspec- tor, 2 Sub-Inspectors, 2 Sergeants, 19 Lance Sergeants, 22 Chinese Coxswains, 4 Boatswains, 81 Seamen, 1 Motor Mechanic, 22 En- gineers, 19 Stokers, 3 Barrack Sergeants, 2 Station Sergeants, 4 Station Orderlies, 2 Carpenters, 2 Painters, 1 Sailmaker, 2 Signal- men, 12 Detectives, 17 Boatmen and 6 Coolies. This is the actual strength as on December 31st, 1921, and includes all the detectives stationed here and those under the Piracy Prevention Ordinance.

Yearly Return of Resignations, Dismissals, Desertions and Transferred to Land Force :-

Resignations...

Dismissals..

Desertions.....

7 2

.2

Transferred to Land Force ...2

Enlistments.

13

13

66

LAUNCHES.

Nos. 1, 2 and 4 Cruising Launches have been thoroughly overhauled during the year, they are now all in good running order. No. 2 launch is still troubled with white ants. The kitchens aft had to be stripped and the continuous application of Atlas A" is required. No. 3 Launch was brought into Hong- kong in May last and found to be in a very bad state. She was condemned and sold. S/L "Shun Lee" was hired to take the place of No. 3 and was later purchased by the Government and is now at Kwong Hip Loong's Shipyard undergoing an overhaul and should prove to be a very useful cruising launch when the work has been completed.

HARBOUR LAUNCHES.

Nos. 5, 6 and 7.-Nos. 6 and 7 have run continuously during the year, No. 6 is in excellent condition, No. 7 requires more attention. They have both done good work during the year. No. 5 is an old boat and it is hard to keep her in running order, she has also done fairly good work during the. year. 2 new fast launches have been laid down to replace Nos. 5 and 7 and should be ready by April or May.

MOTOR LAUNCHES.

Nos. 8, 9, 10 and 11.-No. 8 has been employed on passport work with very short breaks for small repairs from 1st January until 3rd December, 1921, when it was handed over to

K 15

Revenue Department in lieu of Steam Launch "R.D.I." which is now known as No. 8 Police Launch (Steam). No. 8 Steam Launch is a fast suitable Beat Launch and is in good running order. There are now only 3 Motor Boats Nos. 9, 10 and 11.

No. 9 did good work up to 17th October when the crank shaft broke. It has since been laid up for repairs.

No. 10 Motor Boat is in excellent condition and has done very good work. It has been employed on passport work during the year. No. 11 has done duty in Sham Chun River throughout the year. During the month of June it was brought in for overhaul. All woodwork from the cabin was removed and this was replaced by canvas which made the boat more useful and improved her speed. This launch is now fitted with a small searchlight.

All pulling boats and gear are in good order and condition. During the year No. 2 Police Launch has done most of her night patrols in Deep Bay. This Launch has also kept the buoys marking the Sham Chun River Channel in good order, which makes the navigation of this difficult channel a simple matter.

Rifle and Maxim gun practice has been carried out on a modified scale by Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Cruising Launches during the year.

All the Police Launches were inspected by the Assistant Superintendent of Water Police from time to time during the year and were found in good order.

C. W. BECKWITH, Commander, R.N.

Deputy Superintendent of Water Police.

K 16

Annexe B.

POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL REPORT FOR 1921.

Staff. No changes occurred in the personnel of the School Staff during 1921.

Principal

...Inspector W. G. Gerrard Indian Teacher & Interpreter...Mr. Sohan Singh Chinese Teacher & Interpreter...Mr. Pun Yau-tong Chinese Vernacular Teacher ...Mr. Li Man-wan 1 Indian Sergeant Major

Ali Bahadur Khan

1 Chinese Sergeant Major......Kwong Tin-kan

1 European Drill Instructor ...Sub-Inspector Clark 1 European Physical Drill Instructor...L. S. 114 Condon

5 Indian Drill Instructors

2 Chinese Physical Drill Instructors

Note: The Drill Instructors (European, Indian and Chinese) do not form part of the permanent staff of the School. They are regular duty men and receive extra pay for their services.

Recruiting Table from 1st January to 31st December 1921.

Euro-

pean.

Indian. Chinese.

District Watchmen.

Continuing Instruction

from 1920...

6

Recruited

41

17

Passed ...

32

6

Resigned

Dismissed

...

2882

:

28

95

:

56

6

12

Transferred to other Go-

vernment Departments..

~N

17

55

3

Continuing Instruction

:

Conduct and Discipline :-The conduct and discipline of all recruits, during the year, was satisfactory. There were no dismis- sals. Eight Chinese Recruits, who were found to be unsuitable, were allowed to resign during their probationary period. Four Chinese Recruits resigned voluntarily.

CURRICULUM.

- K 17

---

Europeans.

Police Regulations and General Instructions. Ordinances all those that apply to Police. Police Code. Sections and Beats. Local Knowledge. Educational Subjects. Police Court Routine. Observation Lessons. Jiu Jitsu-Police Holds. Physical Drill. Squad and Rifle Drill. Musketry and Revolver Course.

Indians.

Police Regulations and

General Instructions. Ordinances-selected. Sections and Beats. Local Knowledge. Police Court Routine. Observation Lessons. Jiu Jitsu--Police Holds. Physical Drill. Squad and Rifle Drill. Musketry and Revolver Course.

and

or

Urdu -Gurmukhi

English.

and

or

Chinese.

Police Regulations and General Instructions. Ordinances-selected. Sections and Beats. Local Knowledge. Police Court Routine. Observation Lessons. Jiu Jitsu-Police Holds. Physical Drill. Squad and Rifle Drill. Revolver Course. English and Arithmetic -elementary.

District Watchmen Recruits.

Police Regulation Book selected portions and General Instructions. Ordinances--selected. Local Knowledge. Squad Drill.

District Watchmen Regulars.

Two Classes are held weekly-Thursday & Friday for D. W. Regulars. They are also drilled weekly on Tuesday and Wednes- day.

Note:—(a) Defaulters sent to School (Indians and Chinese) receive special instructions in the subject in which they are reported to be inefficient. (b) During the year Mr. Pun Yau-tong and 13 European Recruits obtained "First Aid" Certificates.

Year.

1920.

Robbery with Violence and Assault with

intent to rob.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

Chinese,

Total,..

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

K 19

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1920 AND 1921.

Serious Offences.

Minor Offen

Burglaries.

Larcenies and Larcenies in Dwelling-

Houses.

Murder,

Manslaughter and Other

Offences against

Protection of Women and

Children

Unlawful

Possession.

Kidnapping.

Assault and

Disorderly

Gambling.

Drunkenness.

Conduct.

Felonies.

Ordinance.

1 3

:

:

:

:

29

:

:

33333

333

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

:

Cases.

:

:

4

1

1

2

333

I

:

:

:

108 45 14 132 20 2 |3,885 | 1,527|263 | 300 | 137

90 112 106 12 440 390

1921.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

Chinese,

27 11

53

53

...

9

9

3

12

11

11

417 498

90 | 436

2,129 86

15

15

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

117

:

:

:

:

108 45 14 133 23

23,889

1,532 | 263 | 303 | 138

92113 107 12 440 390 117

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

9

:

:

1

1

2

2

:

:

:.

:

1,189 | 189 | 281 | 118 8296

78

117 28 11 108 11

23,226

...

28 294 316 37

455 534 104 | 437

2,141

86 79 79

39

74

10

12224

42

11

14

11

9

478 557 80 459

1,974 : 193

61 61

:

:.

:

Total,..

128

108

11

23,232

1,199 | 189 | 283 | 120

82 96 78 28294 316 37

328645 85 460 1,975 193 114 114

:

:

K 19

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1920 AND 1921.

Serious Offences.

glaries.

Larcenies and Larcenies in

Dwelling-

Murder,

Manslaughter

and Other

Offences against Protection of Women and

Children

Unlawful

Possession.

Kidnapping.

Assault and

Disorderly

Gambling.

Conduct.

Houses.

Felonies.

Ordinance.

Minor Offences.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

Miscellaneous Offences.

3

3

4

I

N

20

23,885 | 1,527 | 263 | 300 137

:

-

:

:

29

27 11

9 9 3 1

417 498

12

53

11 11

90436 2,129 86 15 15

1,264 1,264

:

:

35393

:

2

:

:

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted,

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases,

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

283

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:..

:

:

:དྨེ

:

90 112 106 12 440 390 117

1,532 263303138 92 113 107 12 440 390 117

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

82 96 78 28 294 316 37

8296 78

28 1294

316 37

2 3,889

9

1

1

23,226 1,189 189281118

:

6698

:

2 |3,232 | 1,199|189|283 | 120

:

:

:

:.

11

11

455 | 534 | 104 | 437 | 2,141 86 79 79

Convicted.

Discharged.

Total of

all cases

29

48

+

4

117

12

11

38

4,648

5,339 | 465

11,757

,266 |1,266

4,689

5,398 473

11,912

:

:

:

:

937

937

:

:

:

=

389

11

74

5

10

14

:

:

...

}

:

122

42

11

42

478 557 80 459 1,974 193 61 61

528645 85 | 460 | 1,975 193 114 114

39

44

125

22

24

43

6,012 8,753817 12,069

937 937

6,073

$,821 | 827

12,242

VICTORIA.

KOWLOON.

K 20

-

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1921.

HARBOUR.

1 year and

under

5 years

and

under

15 years

and

Under

one

over.

month.

15 years.

4

month.

1 month

and

under

1 year.

5 years.

I month

Under

one

month.

and

under

1 year.

1 year and under

and 5 years 15 years

1 month

Under

5

years.

under

15 years.

and

over.

one

month.

and

under

1 year.

1 year and

under

5 years.

and

under

15 years.

years 15 years.

Under

and

over.

one

E

1 month

and

under

1 year.

ཋ ེ།

16 | 21

junk.

10

sex

f.

m.

f.

شبه

sex

sex

m.

نيه

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

unk.

unk.

m.

f.

sex

unk.

sex

sex

m.

f.

m.

f. m.

f.

m. f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

unk.

unk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

I.

21

10

61

49

13

9 1

1

22

20

20 4 48

38

69

69

58

co

8 11

1- 2-

6

1

00

7

32

26

Co

2

2

Year.

Victoria.

Kowloon, Harbour. Elsewhere. Total.

Males. Females. Unknown. Children. Adults.

1916,

250

183

101

36

570

321

239

10

470

100

1917,

349

233

142

74

798

397

386

15

751

47

1918,

335

330

182

88

935

509

405

21

902

33

1919,

220

144

139

77

580

312

252

16

574

1920,

235

257

126

38.

656

295

347

14.

650

836

1921,

208

282

108

43

641

340

287

14

630

11

LO

5 years

15 years

and

under

15 years.

and

over.

m.

13

f.

m. f.

KOWLOON.

:

K 20

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1921.

HARBOUR.

1 month

Under

one

month.

and

under

1 year.

5 years.

1 year and under

years

and

15 years

and

under

15 years.

over.

Under

one

month.

sex

m.

f.

junk.

m.

f.

sex

unk.

m.

f.

m.

f. m.

222

20

20

4

48

38

699

58

00

11

-

نيه

2

ลง

m.

f.

Co

sex

unk.

1 month

and

under

1 year.

ELSEWHERE.

1 year and

under

5 years.

5 years

1 month

and

under

15 years.

15 years

and

over.

Under

one

month.

and

under

1 year.

1 year and

under

5 years.

+

m.

f.

m.

f.

sex

unk.

m.

f.

3

8

7 32 26

to

m.

f.

نبه

2

3 years

and

under

15 years.

Total.

15 years

and

over.

sex

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

unk.

m. f. in.

f.

Year.

Victoria.

Kowloon. Harbour. Elsewhere.

Total.

Males.

Females. Unknown. Children.

Adults.

1916,

250

183

101

36

570

321

239

10

470

100

1917,

349

233

142

74

798

397

386

16

751

47

1918,

335

330

182

88

935

509

405

21

902

33

1919,

220

144

139

77

580

312

252

16

574

1920,

235

257

126

38

656

295

347

14.

650

1921,

208

282

108

43

641

340

287

14

630

11

N

LO

11

12

N

2 2

641

K 21

Table III.

Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1921:

Nationality.

Establishment

of the Force.

Enlistments.

Europeans,

185

23

Indians,

430

19

Chinese,

726 108

Total, 1,341 150

Deaths.

Resignations

through

sickness.

Resignations through expiry terms of service

or otherwise.

Dismissals or Desertions.

Total Number

of Casualties.

12 10

9

9

20

53

10

16

17

24

36

66

10

53

52

123

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments, also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers, etc., but it is exclusive

of :-

---

1 Captain Superintendent.

2 Deputy Superintendents. 2 Assistant Superintendents. 1 Probationer.

1 Accountant.

1 Storekeeper.

13 Clerks.

10 Telephone Clerks.

114 Messengers and Coolies,

2 Indian and 2 Chinese Constables who are employed by

Private Firms.

Actual Strength on the 10th December, 1921.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Present,

162

346

686

1,194

Sick or Absent on

leave,

23

60

40

123

Excess over Estimates

18

18

Vacancies,

24

24

• Total

185

430

744

1,359

K 22

EXECUTIVE STAFF.

Mr. P. P. J. Wodehouse, C.I.E. acted as Captain Superintendent of Police from January 1st, 1921, until March 12th, 1921, when Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe returned from leave and resumed duty as Captain Superintendent of Police.

From 31st March, 1921, to 18th December, 1921, Mr. P. P. J. Wodehouse, C.I.E. was on leave, Mr. T. H. King acted as Deputy Superintendent of Police from 31st March, 1921, to 4th April, 1921, and was subsequently appointed D. S. P. (Kowloon) from 5th April 1921.

From the 8th April to 16th May, 1921, when Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe acted as Colonial Secretary, Mr. T. H. King acted as Captain Superintendent of Police, Mr. C. G. Perdue as Deputy Super- intendent of Police and Mr. J. Kerr as Assistant Superintendent of Police.

Assistant Superintendent of Police, Mr. D. Burlingham, was on one month's vacation leave from 12th April, 1921, to 12th May, 1921, and from 3rd October, 1921, to 2nd November, 1921,

Table IV.

Table showing the Total Strength, Expenditure, and Revenue of the Police and Fire Brigade Departments for the years 1912 to 1921 :-

Total Strength.

Expenditure.

Revenue

Collected

Year.

by the

Police Force. Brigade.

Fire

Police Force.

Fire

Police

Brigade.

Force.

$

$

$

1912....

1,196

105

591,076

41,263

172,397

1913......

1,247

105

756,663

35,319

185,250

1914.

1,304

106

789,100

35,913

193,915

1915....

1,289

106

765,911

34,922

185,589

1916......

1,215

106

703,743

36,574

192,796

1917....

1,229

104 694,115

32,621

210,071

1918......

1,228

104

727.233

37,979

219,012

1919.

1,228

104 '840,977

75,798

225,031

1920...

1,281

127 1,165,084

63,844

229,122

1921

1,341

140 1,443,627

83,470

259,876

NOTE. No revenue is collected by the Fire Brigade.

K 23

REPORT BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE

FIRE BRIGADE.

The subjoined reports by (1) the Station Officer and (2) Engineer of the Fire Brigade give details of the working of the Brigade during the year.

As a result of one or two rather serious fires in 1920 and consequent questions in the Legislative Council following on the representations of the Chamber of Commerce referred to in the 1920 report of the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade an inquiry into the working of the Brigade (a mixed Brigade consisting of equal numbers of European Police Volunteers and Chinese pro- fessional firemen) was ordered. The Superintendent who had made special investigations of Fire Brigade matters while on leave in England undertook the inquiry and his report No. 7 of 1921, was published. and laid on the Council Table on 18th July, 1921, by order of H. E. the Governor. The main features of this report which was adopted without modification was to abandon the voluntary system as the Colony had outgrown it and form a Brigade consisting of 80 Chinese professionally trained firemen under three European professionally trained firemen, The number of land fire fighting appliances was to be largely increased and improvements in the floats were also advocated to increase their efficiency. The increase in fire plant and improvement in old plant is now being carried out.

The new Central Fire Station, the want of which has been severely felt for many years was commenced late in 1921. This Station is located in a central position in Des Voeux Road opposite the Central Market.

A temporary Sub-Station to house additional firemen and apparatus was built on the newly reclaimed land in Wanchai im the Eastern portion of the City of Victoria.

17th April, 1922.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

K 24

Annexe C.

Sir, I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending the 31st December, 1921, on the General working of the Fire Brigade.

Fires.

1920.

1921.

Increase. Decrease.

Fires,.....

49

27

22

Small Fires,

59

81

25

Chimney Fires,..

11

16

Harbour Fires,

2

False Alarms,

2

125

131

32

26.

Total Estimated Damage... $1,199,465 $454,728

Motor Engines were at work,................ Fires extinguished by Hydrants,

Float No. 1 at work,

No. 2

3

""

No.

""

93

""

3

$744,737

.23 times

...22

""

4

དྷཱཏུ

1

1

Leave and Appointments.

Station Officer Lane went on leave and pension on the 19th July, 1921.

Assistant Station Officer Moss was appointed Acting Station Officer from the 19th July, 1921.

Mr. P. Masterson was appointed as temporary Assistant Station Officer 19th July, 1921. and stationed at Central Fire Station. Sergeant A148 Alexander was appointed foreman in charge of Kowloon Fire Station on the 20th July, 1921.

Three additional ambulance attendants were appointed for the new motor ambulances. Eight new Chinese motor drivers and 18 new Chinese firemen were appointed so as to get them trained before the re-organization of the Fire Brigade commenced in January, 1922.

HEALTH OF STAFF.

The health of the Brigade generally has been very satisfactory. No infectious diseases have been contracted during the year. Mr.

:

K 25

Lane, Assistant Engineer and Station Officer, was in Hospital under surgical treatment from the 15th December, 1920, until 20th January, 1921.

Mr. Moss, Assistant Station Officer, was ill with pneumonia from 5th till 20th January, 1921.

DISMISSALS AND RESIGNATIONS.

One fireman (1st class) was invalided.

Two firemen deserted.

Three firemen were discharged for disorderly conduct.

Five firemen and one stoker (Float) resigned.

:

Three ambulance attendants were dismissed for irregular conduct and replaced by men from the Sanitary Department. Three firemen were commended by the Chief Officer.

STATION DUTIES.

A continuous watch by day and night has been kept at all stations.

DRILLS.

New drills as practised in the London Fire Brigade were introduced and carried out as circumstances permitted, the men taking readily to them. Different forms of recreation have also been introduced to keep the men as fit as possible.

THEATRE AND OTHER DUTIES..

Members of the Fire Brigade were on duty at public and private entertainments during the year and in great demand at times and leave had to be curtailed to prevent undermanning at the station.

NEW TEMPORARY FIRE STATION.

A temporary Fire Station was opened at Wanchai with accom- modation for 20 firemen on the 8th December, 1921. A 50-foot Hose Drying and Drill Tower has been erected at this station.

WATER SUPPLY.

Pressure generally for fire extinguishing purposes has been good but at some points the flow is poor. The Kowloon supply is bad at some points and needs early attention.

During the year more hydrants of the group pattern were connected to the mains.

CALLING THE BRIGADE.

There is still great delay in calling the Brigade which is very unsatisfactory. Cards printed in red letters with the Brigade

:

K 26

telephone number 600 and K295 hung in a conspicuous place over each public telephone would probably effect an improvement in calling up the Brigade.

The fire alarm system of street points is still unsatisfactory and will be so until the wires are put under-ground. It is pro- posed to relay the lines underground in 1922. Two calls only were received by this system.

GENERAL.

The Motor Pumps have been in use at Fires 23 times. No machine has failed to start up readily on receipt of a call.

There has been no delay in turning out to a fire or supposed fire. A crew of 1st and 2nd class firemen are detailed off at 9.00 hours every day to get away with 1st machine so as to get to work or send a stop message back as soon as possible.

All appliances are in good order except No. 1 Tender (Central) and No. 2 Engine (Kowloon) which are due for overhaul.

In the past the Chinese firemen have only been issued with one pair of ankle boots. It is proposed to issue topboots to all firemen in future.

18th February, 1922.

G. C. Moss.

Station Officer.

:

*

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS FOR THE YEAR 1921.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for the year 1920 were as follows:

Convicted by Ordinary Courts,

Convicted by Court Martial,

Supreme Court for China and Korea, Debtors,

1921. 1920.

.4,233

4,254

Nil

9

Nil

2

66

67

On remand or in default of finding surety,

:

691

821

Total,...

...4,990

5,153

There was a decrease of 163 on the total number of admissions as, compared with the year 1920. There was a decrease of prisoners convicted for larceny during the year under review, the number being 844 against 1,179 for the previous year.

2. The number of Revenue Grade prisoners admitted to prisons was 2,501 made up as follows:-

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

Gambling Ordinance,

Servants Quarters Ordinance,

866

122

...

Arms and Ammunition Ord.

51

"1

Vehicles Ordinance,...

52

"J

Sanitary By-Laws, ...

6

Harbour Regulations.

12

17

Stowaway Ordinance,

16

6

19

Marine Hawkers Ordinance,

75

15

15

22

16

4

1

71

24

1

">

* A

Dangerous Goods Ordinance,... Chinese Wine and Spirit Ord. Eating House Ordinance, Society Ordinance,

Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance, ...

Truck Ordinance,

Counterfeit Coins Ordinance,...

Women and Girls (Protection)

Ordinance,

Pawnbrokers Ordinance,

Importation and Exportation

Ordinance,

Pharmacy and Poisons Ord.

19

Tobacco Ordinance,...

99

15

*

15

Indecent Exhibition Ord.

Registration of Persons Ord.

Carried forward,

NO

12

1

113

2

1

1,475

:

L 2

Brought forward,

Convicted of committing nuisance in the street,

""

多多

unlawfully boarding steamers,

hawking without a licence,

eruelty to animals,...

keeping houses for prostitution,

""

""

illegal pawning,

35

"

""

""

A

travelling on river steamer without

paying legal fares,...

drunkenness, ...

trespass,

disorderly conduct,

assault,

obstruction,

cutting trees, fighting,

1,475

1

17

427

2

...

30

6

11

12

66

32

35

36

45

7

27

mendicancy,

38

...

""

causing malicious damage,

26

"}

unlawful possession of lottery tickets,...

56

unlawful possession,

80

""

stealing, ...

34

22

17

A

offering bribe,

>>

""

blasting stone in dangerous manner,

possession of implement fit for unlaw-

ful purpose,

obtaining by false pretences,

2

21

1

1

""

hours,

A

""

soliciting in a public thoroughfare for

the purpose of prostitution, ...

conveying pigwash during prohibited

unlawful receiving,

12

2

12

>>

avoiding payment of Tram Car fare,

2

:

J

27

11

removing dead body without permission, adultery,...

embezzlement,

exposing his person,

2

1

...

1

"

>>

as rogue and vagabond.

Total,

... 2,501

3. The above figures show that 59 per cent. of the total ad- mission to prison were Revenue Grade prisoners.

:

L 3-

The following table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of

fine:

In default of payment of fine.

Year.

Without option

served the Paid full

Total.

Paid Part

of fine.

imprison-

fine.

fine.

ment.

1920

1,999

1,931

147

188

4,265

1921

1,732

1,936

201

364

4,233

4. Seventy-six (76) juveniles were admitted during the year. In 10 cases corporal punishment was awarded. All these juveniles in addition to whipping, received sentences varying from 48 hours detention to 9 months hard labour.

5. The percentage of cor victed prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 10'6 as com- pared with 14·1 for 1920.

6. There were 104 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Police Court in the New Territories against 125 for the previous year (153 in 1919).

7. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past 10 years, and the per- centage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimat- ed population of Hongkong:--

Year.

Estimated Number of population. convicts.

Percentage

of

Daily average number of

Percentage

to

population

prisoners.

population.

1912 467,777

222

*047

701

*149

1913 489,114

253

*052

701

·144

1914 501,304

216

*044

600

*120

1915

516.870

213

041

594

*115

1916 528,010

203

*038

638

*121

1917

535,100

209

*038

600

112

1918 558,000

224

*040

601

*108

1919 598,100

259

:043

756

*126

1920 648,150

275

*043

755

·117

1921

665,350

231

*035

764

115

L 4

8. There were 968 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline as compared with 750 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in four cases for prison offences.

A

9. Sixty-three (33) prisoners were whipped by order of Courts.

10. There was no escape or attempt to escape.

11. There were 16 deaths (13 natural causes and 3 executious).

12. 7,458,735 forms were printed and issued to various Government Departments and 32,776 books bound or repaired, as compared with 7,006,540 forms and 32,880 books in 1920.

13. The buildings are in good repair.

14. The conduct of both the European and Indian Staff with some exceptions was very good.

15. The appliances for use in case of fire are in good condition and the water supply adequate.

16. In December the Y. M. C. A. began a course of lectures to the Juvenile Offenders at Lai Chi Kok.

17. On instructions from His Excellency the Governor husk- beating was introduced and proved a successful industry.

18. Husk-beating, and Coir teasing, which was also started during the year, have practically supplanted the antiquated and useless shot drill, stone carrying, and crank turning. These forms of labour are now reserved for badly behaved prisoners for whom some form of deterrent is necessary.

19. During the year the diet hitherto known as Class I was abolished. The new Class I diet is the old Class II. Class II is the old Class III,

The new

20. The rules laid down for the Government of prisons have been complied with.

21. I append the usual returns.

22nd May, 1922.

J. W. FRANKS,

Superintendent.

EXPENDITURE,

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1921.

C.

INCOME.

Pay and allowance of officers including Uni-

Earning of prisoners

form, etc.

194,160 | 52

Debtors' subsistence

Victualling of prisoners

Fuel, light, soap, and dry earth

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, and furniture

51,026 85

Vagrants

do.

28,549

23

Wei-Hai-Wei prisoners' subsistence

24,233

96 | Shanghai

Military

Naval

Canton

77,750

398

25

58 60

127

do.

do.

do.

do.

169

301

389

28 70

Subsistence of prisoners sentenced by Marine

Total..

1920.

Magistrate.....

Waste Food sold.

To Balance

$297,970

56

$258,609 17

363 30

48 00

218,334

Total

$297,970 56

** S R R R 82 38818

18

70

50

Average annual cost per prisoner $285.78, in 1920 $254.37, and in 1919 $87.66.

C.

L 5 -

:

L 6

Table II.

:

Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Actual cost

Average

Year.

Expenditure.

Income.

of prisoners' maintenance.

cost per

prisoner.

$ C.

C.

C.

$

1912

97,577.82

62,348.80

35,229.02 50.25

1913

106,275.20

61,298.50

44,976.70 64.07

1914

108,143.24

70,597.22

37,546.02 62.58

1915

109,369.95

65,544,33

43,825.62 73.78

1916

112,615.70

70,019.18

42,596.52 66.77

1917

108,212.43

68,815.01

39,397.42 65.66

1918

108,651.95

70,747.97

37,903.98 63.07

1919

135,550.16

69,277.07

66,273.09 $7.66

1920

258,609.17

66,547.61

192,061.56 254.37

1921

297,970.56

79,635.73

218,334.83 258.78

:

:

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1921.

5

6

7

Value of

Value of

articles

manufactur-

Stock on

Value of

earnings.

ed or work

hand

Total Cr.

ed or work

done for

December

done for

payment.

Gaol or other 31st, 1921. Departments.

(Difference between

columns

3 and 7.)

1

2

3

4

Value of

stock on

Value of

Nature of Industry.

hand

materials

Value of

articles Total Dr. manufactur-

January 1st purchased.

1921.

- L 7

$

C.

C.

C.

C.

$

C.

C.

C.

Oakum,

171.44

171.44

112.00

Coir,..

2,265.50

Net-making,

1.05

Tailoring,

2,363.30

1,720.18

156.30 11,147.14 | 13,510.44

3,985,68

2,420.48

831.92

157.35

612.43

97.29

2,055.07

1.66

209.29

5,307.47

614.09

37.85

1,321.79

456.74

183.85

12,567.31

2,222.80 | 14,973.96

1,463.52

Rattan,

Tin-smithing,

60.25

4.12

140.90

201.15

9.30

373.16

7.49

389.95

188.80

1,115.17

1,119,29

162.05

2,005.66

47.21

2,214.92

1,095.63

Carpentering,

709.38

1,808.32

2,517.70

86.25

2,670.38

702.24

3,458.87

941.17

Grass-matting,

1.78

36.20

37.98

110.00

1.70

111.70

73.72

Shoe-making,

1,138.55

3,555.62

4,694.17

31.81

3,607.52

1,924.29

5,563.62

869.45

Laundry,

4,214.45

4,244.45

7.05

11,863.26

11,870.31

7,625.86

Printing and Bookbinding,

55,201.18

66,795.58 121,996.76

94.25 113,360.66 | 72,003.90 185,458.81

63,462.05

Photography,

10.46

564.65

575.11

10.03

778.18

.50

788.71

213.60

Total,$ 61,927.01

91,284.51 153,211.52

3,729.50 148,168.05 79,064.15 230,961.70 77,750.18

Paid into Bank during 1921, which sum includes $1,130.78 for work executed in 1920, $4,657.92. Value of work executed during 1921 for which payment was deferred to 1922, $210.27.

M 1

SANITARY REPORT

FOR THE YEAR

1921

+

M 3

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY

DEPARTMENT.

The following were members of the Sanitary Board during the year :--

President, the Head of the Sanitary Department,

Mr. G. R. Sayer.

Vice-President, the Director of Public Works, the Honourable Mr. W. Chatham, C.M.G., retired, and the Honourable Mr. T. L. Perkins who was appointed to the vacancy with effect from 24th January. The Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Honourable Mr. E. R. Hallifax, O.B.E., for whom Mr. S. B. C. Ross, O.B.E, acted from 10th January to the 11th November.

The Medical Officer of Health, Mr. W. W. Pearse, M. D.,

D.P.H.

Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet-Colonel, L. Humphry,

C.M.G., D.D.M.S.

Dr. W. V. M. Koch went on leave and Dr. G. D. R. Black was appointed with effect from 14th October. Mr. Seen-Wan Tso.

The Honourable Mr. Chow Shou-son,

Dr. F. M. Graça Ozorio.

Mr. C. G. Alabaster, 0.B.E.

LEGISLATION.

(1) New by-laws were introduced for the maintenance of good order in Government Cattle Depôts and Slaughter Houses.

(ii) The By-laws regulating the Importation and Inspection of Animals were amended in order to give the Board power to cause any animal whatsoever to be slaughtered when in the opinion of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon such animal is suffering from or has been in contact with an animal suffering from a dangerously infectious or contagious disease.

Hitherto the powers of the Board as regards ordering slaughter have been limited to animals placed in segregation on importation and the expression "animals" appears to have been

limited to cattle, sheep, swine and goats.

Both the above by-laws were awaiting the approval of the Legislative Council at the end of the year.

M 4

STAFF.

(a.) Inspectors.-1. The establishment was increased by one Second Class Inspector for Shaukiwan who replaced the Rural Inspector.

2. Arrivals:

From leave.

Inspector Wood (14th March).

Inspector Duncan (7th April). Inspector Hill (12th May).

On probation. Inspector Lockhart (20th January).

3. Departures :—

On leave.

On transfer.

Resigned. Died.

Inspector Reid (26th April). Inspector Watson (9th May).

Inspector Blake (16th May).

Inspector Midwinter (15th December).

Inspector Kelly (14th January).

Inspector Taylor (5th February).

Senior Inspector Lyon (25th June). Inspector Leigh (16th March) To Har-

bour Office.

Inspector Peplow (14th June) To Public

Works Department temporarily.

Inspector Beesley (27th April).

Inspector Pearson (18th April).

(b.) Clerical Staff. Two probationary clerks were added in November.

(c.) Outdoor Staff.-Two motor drivers and two driver's mates were added in August.

32 additional Scavengers were engaged in January.

9 men hitherto ranked as cleansing coolies were given

the rank of skilled labourers.

Appendix A shows distribution of approved staffs on 31st November.

ADMINISTRATION,

The area controlled by the Sanitary Board is limited to the Island of Hongkong and to Kowloon and New Kowloon.

For the purpose of administering the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance the Island of Hongkong is divided into the City of Victoria; its extension eastwards as far as and including Shaukiwan; the Hill district and the outlying villages of Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam.

The City proper is divided into eastern, central, western- central and western districts each with a sanitary office, and

M 5

subdivided into 10 Health Districts each with a Sanitary Inspector in Charge. (See map A). The Shaukiwan extension has also a Sanitary Inspector in Charge. The Hill district is worked in conjunction with Health District 3.

Kowloon is divided into Kowloon peninsula, Shamshuipo and Kowloon City each with a Sanitary office, and subdivided into five Health Districts each with a Sanitary Inspector (See map B).

The outlying villages are controlled by Police officers under the title of Rural Sanitary Inspectors.

For the purpose of Refuse Collection the City and Hill District is divided into three main districts East, Central and West each with an Inspector in Charge. There is an Inspector in charge of Kowloon Peninsula and the district Inspectors of Health Districts 14 and 15 combine supervision of refuse collection with district work. The inspector in charge of Shaukiwan Health District also supervises refuse collection in this district. The villages of Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley, and Taitam are scavenged by contractors under the supervision of the Rural Inspectors.

Inspectors in charge of refuse collection also supervise the removal of nightsoil in this area the removal itself is carried out by contractors.

The removal of refuse from the city of Victoria and Kowloon is supervised by a Sanitary Inspector who is also in charge of Street- watering in Victoria. Kowloon street-watering is under the direction of the Inspector in charge of Disinfecting Station (Kowloon).

For purposes of disinfection of infected clothing there is a Disinfecting Station in Victoria and a Disinfecting Station in Kowloon under the control of an Inspector or Overseer.

Public cemeteries on Hongkong island are under the charge of a special Inspector. Those in Kowloon peninsula come under the Inspector in charge of Disinfecting Station (Kowloon) and outlying cemeteries at Kowloon City under the local district Inspector.

The Central and Western markets are under an Overseer. Other markets are supervised by the local district Inspector or Rural Inspector.

WORK DONE UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

(i) Sanitary Nuisances and Contraventions of Sanitary By- laws.-Appendix B shows the total number of nuisances reported; and the action taken to obtain compliance and the amount of fines.

M 6

J

:

Of the total number of nuisances reported in which action was taken 65% were complied with after receipt of a letter and in only 38 cases did a legal notice fail to produce compliance. Appendix C shows the nuisances in respect of which action was taken. Illegal cubicles and failure to provide dust bins account for approximately 50%. Appendix D line 1 shows the Health Districts from which these nuisances were reported. The number of Prosecutions includes prosecutions for offences under the Sum- mary Offences and Food and Drugs Ordinance.

(ii) Building Nuisances Appendix D line 2 shows by districts the number of nuisances under Part III of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance reported by the Sanitary Department to the Building Authority for action.

(iii) Miscellaneous improvements.-Appendix C lines 4,5,6,7,8 show miscellaneous improvements effected by District Inspectors in their districts.

(iv) House cleansing. The routine work under the by-laws for the Prevention and Mitigation of Epidemic disease was carried out during the year. Appendix E shows the number of floors cleansed in the various districts and as compared with the last two years. House cleansing is carried on continuously on five (5) mornings a week throughout the year by our staff. Appendix F shows approximately the total number of Chinese houses liable for cleansing.

(v) Limewashing.-The usual limewashing required by the Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation by-laws was carried out during the year. Appendix G shows the number of houses lime- washed. The experiment of departmental limewashing started last year was not a financial success but owners are still given the option of putting the work in the hands of the department, an approved contractor being employed under our supervision.

(vi) Rat catching.-Twenty members of the cleansing staff are employed throughout the year setting traps and collecting rats from street rat bins and taking to Bacteriological Institute for examination. Special Campaign in January and November were also undertaken when rat-poison was distributed throughout urban districts. The total number caught was:-

Hongkong,...............81,030.

Kowloon,

...31,672.

Of these 7 were found to be plague infected in Hongkong and none in Kowloon.

(vii) Mosquito prevention. The routine work of oiling pools and inspecting dwellings for breeding places was carried out by district Inspectors. The usual cutting of undergrowth in May and October was also carried out in conjunction with the Botanical and Forestry Department and the Military Authorities (as regards Military lands).

M 7

In addition a special survey was undertaken by the depart- ment in April and May of residential districts particularly The Peak, Leighton Hill, and Kowloon Peninsula as a result of which the Government set aside an additional $3,000 for brushwood clearing and agreed to train 22 additional nullahs at the estimated cost of $20,000.

WORK UNDER FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE AND SECTION

83 OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

(a.) 61 samples of milk were submitted for Analysis under section 12 of which 60 were found to pass the standard and one to be below standard.

The prosecution under section 10 in this case failed.

The following table shows the number and results of analysis of beer, wine and spirits submitted by the Police Department.

Beer Brandy

Gin

Samples.

Genuine.

Adulterated.

0

0

Port Wine

Rum

Sherry

Whisky

3

2

6

(b.) 5 cases were brought under section 10 (a) for failure to exhibit the necessary label on condensed milk tins and a fine of $20.00 was imposed in each case.

(c.) 1 case was brought under section 6 for selling milk not of the nature demanded. The case was dismissed.

(d.) Under section 83 of the Public Health and Buildings Or- dinance the following food stuffs were seized and destroyed by order of the President :--

46 tins of food stuffs.

46 cases of fish.

490 cases of tinned milk.

3 piculs of pears.

307 cans and 2 boxes of pickles.

VACCINATION OF CHILDREN.

Under Ordinance 2 of 1890 all resident children over 6 months and under 14 years are required to be vaccinated, and their parents or guardians to deliver a certificate of vaccination to the office if any at which the birth was registered. Appendix H shows the various birth registries, the number of children whose births were registered but who on 31st December, 1920, were under six months. the number of new registered births during the year 1921 the number vaccinated, the number accounted for by death, unfitness

M 8

or other causes and the number who on 31st December, 1921, were under six months and accordingly not liable for vaccination. The reason for the higher total carried forward to 1922 is the greater number of registered births.

The table as regards Chinese shows that approximately one half of those born and registered are also registered as having been vaccinated. It should not necessarily be concluded that the other half were not vaccinated; and it should be remembered that unregistered births, which undoubtedly greatly exceed the registered, are not recorded at all.

SCAVENGING.

Approximately 250 tons of refuse was received daily at the refuse depôts from the City of Victoria, Hill District and Kowloon peninsula. Slightly under 10 tons daily was collected from Shaukiwan and Quarry Bay and dumped on waste ground. Approximately 1 ton daily was collected in Kowloon City and burnt. The cost of the service in Hongkong (including Shauki- wan and Quarry Bay) and Kowloon is shown in Appendix I attached. The figures in column A are given for comparison only with the figures in 1919, 1920. Those figures will be found in Table 3. The adjusted figures exclude in the case of scavengers, the wages of 79 coolies in Hongkong and 15 in Kowloon employed otherwise than in refuse removal; in the case of drivers the wages of a proportion employed on street watering are excluded. The proportion of the cost of Scavenging Gear chargeable to Hongkong and Kowloon is adjusted so as to distribute equally the cost of canvas hose actually charged to Hongkong. The new items Maintenance of Bullocks and Maintenance of Dust-carts have not been shown in previous years. The totals entered in Column B are the actual sums paid from the votes named. The adjustment makes a conservative allowance for the proportion chargeable to street-watering.

street-watering. The proportion as between Hongkong and Kowloon is estimated on the proportion 2 to I representing approximately the establishment of bullocks and carts on either side of the harbour. The total cost of the service works out at $1.01 per ton exclusive of special expenditure. The increased cost is due to large increases in wages.

(b) Outlying villages of Stanley and Taitam, and Aberdeen and Aplichau were scavenged by contract at a yearly charge of $324 for the first two and $432 for the latter two.

The con- tractor has the privilege of receiving night-soil in each case in addition.

REFUSE REMOVAL.

Appendix I, Table 2 shows the cost of removing the refuse from the City of Victoria, the Hill district and Kowloon peninsula. Comparative figures for the last 3 years are shown in Table 3. The discrepancy between the grand total in Table 3 and the 1921 total in Table 2 is due to the inclusion this year of the item coal

M 9

of launches and the exclusion of the item Maintenance of dust and water carts (transferred to Table 1). The cost works out at 60 cents per ton exclusive of Special expenditure. The higher cost as compared with previous years is due, first, to increased wages and secondly to the installation of a new boiler in towing launch S. D. 1 the cost of which ($4,500) is included in working costs; and the practice of overhauling all launches and barges quarterly and not half-yearly as in previous years.

The barges were delayed on six occasions for a short time only by typhoon signals.

Towing launch S. D. 2 broke down on two occasions. Two small sailing barges to receive Sham Shui Po refuse were put in commission in November.

NIGHTSOIL REMOVAL.

The contracts for the removal of night-soil from Victoria and the Kowloon peninsula expired on September 30th and new con- tracts for a period of 5 years from October 1st were signed embracing the new reclamations at Shamshuipo and Kowloon City hitherto excluded. The sum payable monthly to revenue under the new contract for Victoria is $3,200, and for Kowloon $1,950. The transfer from the old to the new contractors was carried out on the night of September 30th without a hitch.

The contract for the removal of night-soil at Shaukiwan Quarry Bay and neighbouring villages expired on December 31st and a new contract for a period of 3 years from January 1st 1922 was signed. The sum payable monthly to revenue under the new contract is $226.

Night-soil from Aberdeen and Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam was removed by contract in conjunction with the work of refuse removal. These contracts for 3 years as from January 1st 1922 were signed.

WORK DONE AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.

The

The appended Table shows the number of articles and vehicles disinfected and washed after disinfection during 1921. figures for 1920 are given for comparison.

1921.

1920.

Hongkong Kowloon Hongkong Kowloon

No. of articles disinfected,

25,571

3,187

19,380

No. of public vehicles disinfected,..

24

19

No. of days disinfecting apparatus in use,

184

74

156

31

No. of articles washed after disinfection,

9.163

17,543

M 10

A small staff of tradesmen is kept at the disinfecting stations for the construction and maintenance of dust and water carts, and ambulances, and for miscellaneous repairs to the property of the department. During the year the following carts were construct- ed at the Hongkong Disinfecting Station :---

1 four-wheeled bullock cart,.

1 two-wheeled bullock cart,

2 four-wheeled water carts,

4 hand carts,

$368

224

800 each

200 each

and Miscellaneous repairs wers done to the value of $6,900. At Kowloon Disinfecting Station miscellaneous repairs to the value, $2,300 were done.

AMBULANCE AND DEAD BOX SERVICE.

Ambulance and dead boxes are obtainable at any time of the day or night at the two disinfecting stations and also by day at the Eastern and Western Sanitary offices at each of which a staff of bearers is kept. The appended table shows the number of times ambulance and boxes were used.

Disinfecting Disinfecting

Station Hongkong.

Eastern

Western

Station Kowloon.

District.

District.

116

52

31

1

262

73

101

677 1,168

216

454

Ambulances European, Ambulances Chinese,... 218

Dead boxes,

In 1920 ambulances were called for 692 times from Hong- kong Disinfecting Station. The smaller number of calls in 1921 is due to the introduction of motor-ambulances under the Police Department. Appendix J shows the stations at which Sanitary Department Ambulances are obtainable in emergencies. At these stations there are no bearers attached and volunteer bearers must be obtained when required.

PUBLIC BATH HOUSES.

The appended table shows the number of men, women and children who used the bath houses during 1921 and 1920.

1920.

1921.

Wanchai, Cross Lane

Bath House,

133,331

Men. 186,687

Pound Lane Bath

House,

Men. 426,553 222,131

Children. Women.

32,895 87,021

Second Street Bath

Men.

Children.

House,

89,706

84,663

16,997

Sheung Fung Lane

Females.

Female Children.

Bath House,

41,764

43.802

10.749

M 11

WATER CLOSETS AND PUBLIC CONVENIENCES,

During the year public trough closets were completed At the junction of Yee Kuk Street and Pei Ho Street,

Sham Shui Po.

At the junction of Apliu Street and Kweilin Street.

Sham Shui Po.

At Barker Road.

The Board approved the installation of 219 water closets, 7 trough closets and 55 urinals on private premises.

MARKETS AND SPECIAL FOOD LICENCES.

No new markets were opened during the year.

44 additional food licences were issued under section 78 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

Market rental exceeded those of 1920 by $2,503.85.

A comparative statement of rentals will be found in Appendix K.

CEMETERIES, MORTUARIES, CREMATORIA.

1. No cemeteries were closed and no new cemeteries opened during the

year.

2.-(a) Exhumations were carried out by relatives as follows:-

Chinese permanent,

Cheung Sha Wan,.

Hau Pui Lung,

Kai Lung Wan,

Ma Tau Wai,.

Mount Davis,.. Roman Catholic, Colonial,.... Kowloon Tong, Sai Yu Shek,.

Sham Shui Po,

Mount Caroline...

Tong Wah Hospital,

Chi Wan,

Aberdeen,

Stanley,

7

37

203

105

25

19

5

232

440

121

70

34

20

and from places other than unauthorised

cemeteries,.

Total,...

19

1,348

M 12

(b) General exhumation at public expense were carried out at Sai Yu Shek (Kowloon City) 252 and Kai Lung Wan (public cemetery) 1,359.

3. Cremations.-31 bodies were cremated at the Japanese Crematorium and 16 at the Sikh Temple.

4. Mortuaries.-123 bodies were awaiting burial at the Tung Wah Hospital Mortuary on 31st December, 1921.

5. Removals.-489 bodies were removed from the Colony before burial.

6. Interments. --The following table shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year-

PUBLIC.

PRIVATE.

Colonial

69

Roman Catholic (Happy

Chinese Mount Caroline

151

Valley)

124

Chai Wan

189

Mohammedan (Happy

Chai Wan Christian

2

Valley)

64

Stanley...

20

Jewish (Happy Valley)

Aberdeen

161

Parsee

Shek O...

2

Malay

Kai Lung Wan

1,056

Sai Yu Shek

125

Chinese Roman Catholic

(So Kon Po)

1,270

Sai Yu Shek Christian

Kowloon Tong

Hau Pui Lung

Mohammedan Tai Shek

1 Chinese Tung Wah

149

...

2.644

Hospital (Kai Lung Wan)

Chinese Permanent

...

...

4,481

Ku

(Aberdeen)

60

Chinese Protestant.

(Mount Davis)...

45

Chinese Christian

(Kowloon Tong)

3

5,171

6,050

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Appendix L shows under the various headings the revenue collected by the department during 1921.

2. One new head of revenue “use of motor vans

was opened

with the introduction of motor lorries to convey meat from the Slaughter House at Kennedy Town to the central market. For this service a charge of 12 cents a carcase is made.

3. Appendix M shows under various headings the expenditure of the year

M 13

The total expenditure during 1921 was $500,741.63 as compared with $440,357.30 in 1920; the estimate for the year was $504.500.00.

The total revenue was $319,598.37 as compared with $302,854.54 in 1920.

Other details of the working of the Department will be found in the reports of the Medical Officer of Health and the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

G. R. SAYER,

Head of Sanitary Department.

I H.S.D..

2 M.O.H.

I C.V.S.

1 Secretary

18 Clerks and Shroffs..

35 Inspectors

22 Interpreters

2 Overseers

1 Asst., Store Keeper

1 Office Attendant

1 Office Coolie

2 Foremen. G.I.

10

2.

3.

4.

5.

23

6.

27

7.

2

2

7 Engineers

8 Coxswains

Artisan Drivers

4 Stokers

5 Caretakers

25 Sextons

5 Tallymen

3 Bullock Boys......

1 Constable

7 Messengers

67 Drivers

88 Bargemen

146 Cl. Coolies.

674 Scavenging Coolies

17 Artisans

9 Skld. Labourers

2 Apprentices

2 Motor Drivers

2 Motor Drivers' Mates

10 Rat Catchers....

2 Probationers

90.

Q

1

1

13

Central.

D. S. Hongkong,

D. S. Kowloon.

14

3

:

41

26

31

11

7

:

10

NK

3

x

24

S. H. Kennedy Town.

S. H. Ma Tau Kok.

Cemeteries.

Street Watering.

Refuse Disposal,

H. D.'s 1-3 and Peak.

22

3

00.00

H. D.'s 4-6.

H. D.'s 7-10.

Kowlcon.

SCAVENGING.

1

1

CY

3

33

83

169

78

137

92

-

22

ነር

טרט

*UBA![meUS

Shaukiwan.

1.

la.

:

33

83

169

78

137

66

:

%

++

Hfin 30 30 ☺ -

=

**

N

10

30 13

00

心心

:

i

S. II.

Ma Tau Kok.

Cemeteries.

Street Watering.

Refuse Disposal.

SCAVENGING.

H. D.'s 1-3 and Peak.

H. D.'s 4-6.

H. D.'s 7-10,

Kowlcon.

Shaukiwan

1

1

Shaukiwan.

la.

2a.

2.

D.

6.

Ga.

7a.

10.

-M 15-

Appendix A.

II. D.'s.

:

*

:

18

26

:

»

N

10

WCION

88

146

674

N

62.

R.

7.

:

1

...

---

9

10.

1

12.

B.

N

NN

~) - DEDI OF Him CC my k~~~ the N CION-

14.

H. D.'s.

15.

N

East.

22

Central.

35

West Central.

West.

1

20

Bath houses.

I

Markets.

Leave.

Vacant.

District Offices.

Total.

1

M 17

Appendix B.

RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1921.

No. of nuisance reported

No. of nuisance reported in which no

action taken

No. of 1st letter sent

8,941

...

8,941

...

7,061

Compliance after 1st letter

560

5,436

No. of 2nd letter sent

... 1,349

...

Compliance after 2nd letter

1,267

...

No. of legal notices sent sections 29 & 30... 1,246

No. of legal notices withdrawn section 31...

18

18

...

No. of legal notices modified section 31...

No. of legal notices time extended

section 31

Compliance on legal notices

...

1,190

No. of summons applied for section 32 59 No. of summons refused

...

No. of Magistrate's orders section 33

Compliance on Magistrate's order (including compliance after summons) Fines $669.50

Re-summons for failure

section 35

to

comply

Compliance after re-summons Fine $

Nuisance abated by Sanitary Department

section 35

Expenses of abating $

OUT STANDING

::

Total...

:

429

8,941 8,941

Illegal cubicles

No dust bins

Choked wastepipe

M 18

Appendix C.

Illegal height of cubicles ...

Dirty condition of premises

Rat runs filled in

Obstruction of verandalı

Obstruction of windows and doors

No receptacles to latrines...

Accumulation of refuse

...

Defective ground floor surfaces repaired

Accumulation of stagnant water

The use of basements for habitation and as workshops

Illegal wooden partition in kitchen and verandahs

Mosquitoes...

No urinal accommodation...

Obstruction to light and ventilation

The use of room without windows opening for sleeping

2.418

2,098

985

342

265

222

194

194

193

183

143

118

110

106

93

85

purposes

No glass to windows......

Keeping of cattle

Accumulation of undergrowth..

Illegal bunks

The use of kitchen for sleeping purposes

39

Dirty barrels for storing drinking water

Choked eaves gutters

33

N ASSINA

77

53

49

44

42

Discharge of sullage water, urine and excreta

25

The exposing of vegetables and fruit for sale without

licences

22

Cooking in yards

18

Urine deposit in yard and kitchen

18

Illegal showcases

15

Offensive Trade (rag storing, soap boiling, etc.)

14

Open top bamboo fence filled in

Bake Houses without licences...

Enclosure of cockloft

The use of verandahs for cooking and sleeping purposes

Illegal urinal and latrine ...

Accumulation of excreta

Illegal wooden partitions above and under cockloft

Laundries without licences

Obstruction of yards...

Overcrowding

No cover to water tank and well

Dumping refuse...

No grease trap

Wooden cover over cubicles

13

11

10

10

6

6

Carried forward...

8,374

M 19

Brought forward...

Ground floor surfaces covered by boards

Missing grating...

Drying refuse on Crown Land

Failing to keep swing door (to latrine)

Defective wire netting over ventilating opening Illegal cockloft

8,374

1

1

1

I

1

Total...

8,381

Applications for S. B. Notices.. Applications for B. A. Notice Prosecutions

Ground Surfaces Concreted

Ground Surfaces Repaired

Rat Runs filled in (Buildings)...

Obstructions removed from open space...

Obstructions removed to Light and Ventilation

Water Closets installed in Private Buildings

Houses demolished and No. of floors (Domestic Buildings)

Houses erected and No. of floors (Domestic Buildings)

Houses erected and No. of floors (Non Domestic Buildings)

Houses Demolished and No. of floors (Non Domestic Buildings)

1

2

la & 2a

3

4

378

717

624

227

98:

55

139

147

63

២៦

28.

7

6

༡༠

2

Nil.

Nil.

1

Nil.

Nil.

23

46

61

Nil.

1!

27

19

11

3

6

12

Nil.

17

13

Nil.

20

20

25

80

15

Nil.

1

78

Nil.

21 houses

3 houses

1 house

17 house:

Nil.

53 floors.

10 floors

2 floors.

56 floors.

3 houses 6 floors.

14 houses 10 houses

13 houses

3 houses

59 floors.

40 floors.

21 floors.

9 floors.

4 houses

I house

1

1

Nil.

7 floors.

3 floors.

5 houses

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

14 floors.

1

2

la & 2a

4

5

M 21

Appendix. D.

HEALTH DISTRICTS.

7

9

10

378

717

624

227

55

139

147

7

6

២១

982

479

473

492

293

506

395

63

284

146

209

242

205

287

274

2

Nil.

4

2

1

Nil.

3

Nil.

1

Nil.

Nil.

3

6

Nil.

4

Nil.

23

46

61

Nil.

19

18

11

37

2

Nil.

Nil.

9

27

19

11

26

53

28

10

345

24

46

3

6

12

Nil.

25

5

5

17

13

Nil.

80

24

25

18

78

Nil.

5

23

9

35

15

Nil.

1

78

Nil.

Nil.

10

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

12

21 houses

3 houses

1 house

17 houses

1 house

1 house

48 houses

17 houses

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

53 floors.

10 floors

2 floors.

56 floors.

3 floors.

3 floors.

98 floors.

134 floors

3 houses

14 houses 10 houses

13 houses

3 houses

2 houses

5 houses

19

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

6 floors.

59 floors.

40 floors.

21 floors.

9 floors.

6 floors.

14 floors.

50

4 houses

1 house

1

1

1

Nil.

Nil.

1. house

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

5 houses.

7 floors.

3 floors.

5

5 houses

1 house

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

14 floors.

2 floors

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Shaukiwan. 6a & 7a

Total.

293

205

1882

506

395

658

802

1,048

474

18

234

141

8.941

287

274

345

434

491

96

31

42

109

3,599

1

Nil.

1

26

6

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

89

4

Nil.

Nil.

3

Nil.

Nil.

1

Nil.

Nil.

29

345

࿐དྡྷསྶ ;

Nil.

Nil.

28

24

46

1

Nil.

5

23

9

35

Nil.

12

KNUMA

42

46

14

2

11

Nil.

350

40

31

16

13

29

792

6

1

10

7

Nil.

99

23

22

Nil.

13

Nil.

315

42

Nil.

2

14

8

Nil.

184

se

48 houses 17 houses

1 house

18 houses

8 houses

6 houses

15 houses

141 houses

Nil.

Nil.

'S.

98 floors.

134 floors

2 floors.

72 floors.

16 floors.

9 floors.

14 floors.

370 floors..

5 houses

19 houses

123 houses

61 houses

97 houses

45 houses

54 houses

449 houses

Nil.

Nil.

14 floors.

50 floors.

301 floors.

139 floors.

263 floors.

117 floors

146 floors.

1171 floors

1 house.

2 houses

17 houses 15 houses

3 houses

53 houses

Nil.

5 houses.

4 houses.

Nil.

2 floors.

6 floors.

25 floors

22 floors.

5 floors.

70 floors.

6 houses

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

16 floors.

M.23

Appendix E.

House Cleansing Return, 1921.

Floors cleansed.

1919.

1920. 1921.

Eastern Districts (Shaukiwan, 1,

la & 2a. 2)

21,813 23,561

Central Districts (3, 4 & 5)

16,177 20,185

Western Central Districts (6, 6a &

7a, 7)

12,177 19,203

Western, Districts (8, 9 & 10),..

18,199 23,331

Totals,....

73,008

68,366 86,280

Kowloon (11, 12, 13, 14 & 15)

29,232

28,046 28,854

Districts Nos. 2, 5, 8, 9, 11, 14, & 15, were cleansed twice,

and the remainder three times.

1 storey.

2 storeys.

3 storeys.

Appendix F.

Table Showing Number of Chinese Houses and Floors, Victoria.

I storeys.

Shaukiwan,

370

365

298

1,033

1,994

1.93

1 H. D.

160

447

159

14

780

1,587

2:03

la, 2a H. 1).

43

149

430

1.59

Q

783

2,277

2.91

2 H. D.

167

493

218

886

2,593

2.92

3 H. D.

19

56

58

133

438

3.29

4 H. D.

13

78

667

472

29

2

1,166

3,979

3:41

5 H. D.

120

552

268

11

951

3,023

3:18

6 H. D.

47

25

324

363

33

792

2,686

3.3

6, 7a 11. D.

11

16

199

184

11

421

1,431

3:39

7 H. D.

7

14

301

364

· 28

688

2,442

3.69

S H. D.

1

-60

557

354

13

985

3,273

3:32

9 H. D.

21

304

637

152

:

1,104

3,061

2.77

10 H, D.

24.

157

547

69

797

2,255

2.83

Total.

705

1,921

5,220

2,675

127

10,519

31,077

2.99

5 storeys.

6 storeys.

M 24-

Houses.

Floors.

Average.

Appendix F.

Table Showing Number of Chinese Houses and Floors, Kowloon.

1 storey.

2 storeys. 3 storeys. 4 storeys. Houses.

Floors.

Average.

11 H. D.

154

291

123

571

1,676

2.93

12 H. D.

248

675

147

1,078

3,117

2.88

13 H. D.

132

103

836

8

1,079

2,878

2.67

14 H. D.

600

270

329

1,199

2,127

1.77

15 H. D.

1,545

342

106

1,993

2,547

1:28

2,288

1,117

2,237

278

5,920

12,345

23

M 25

--

Hom

M 26

Appendix G.

Limewashing 1921.

Houses limewashed by owners,

Victoria. Kowloon.

6,693

3,402

Houses limewashed by S. B, at owners' request,

150

94

Houses limewashed by S. B's Contractor owing

to owners' failure to comply with the By-law,...

Total, ...

238

87

7,081

3.583

Appendix H.

B. F.

Cannot

Had

New

Total

Vaccin-

Left

Registry.

Unvacc-

Dead.

be

births.

liable.

ated.

Colony.

Small- Insuscep-

Unfit.

tible.

Total

C. F.

Total.

inated.

found.

pox.

S. D. (Non-Chinese)

195

365

560

284

25

19

S. D. (Chinese) ...

548

1,227

1,775

442

28

230

140

Eastern Dispensary

320

984

1,304

374

96

91

253

Yaumati

do.

130

431

561

86

10

107

Western

do.

107

300

407

98

36

75

S. S. Po

do.

13

90

103

27

4

1

Shaukiwan

do.

23

61

84

16

15

K. City

do.

27

12

:

Hunghom

do.

41

46

12

Central

do.

14

59

73

32

Ι

I

21

20

22~

202

560

915

1,775

488

1,304

349

561

197

407

CO TO

58

103

40

84

20

33

31

46

38

73

M 27

Total

1,361

3,585 4,946

1,383

196

365

615

1

48

2,338

4,946

1. Salary of coolies

2. Salary of Drivers

Appendix I.

Table I.

Collection.

Hongkong A adjusted

66,734.82 | 56,734.82

Kowloon

A adjusted

Total

B

adjusted

| | 19,178.94 17,178.94 85,913.76 73,913.76

6,789.25

5,092.25 2,666.90

1,995,00

9,456.15 7,087.25

· M 28

3. Scavenging Gear

6,284.06

5,284.06 750.90

1,750.90 7,034.96

7,034.96 |

Maintenance of bullocks.

4,000.00

2,000.00 8,300.49

6,000.00

Maintenance of dust carts

1,334.00

666.00 2,937.71

2,000.00

Total...

79,808.13

72,445.13 | 22,596.74 | 23,590.84 113,643.07 | 96,035.97

(or $1.01

per ton).

Special Expenditure (new carts) $1,000 (approximately).

Salary of Bargemen

Repairs to Launches and Barges Stores of Launches and Barges

Coal

City Scavenging Kowloon Scavenging Removal

Total...

Table II.

Removal.

Hongkong

Kowloon

Total

15,160.87

3,822.94

18,983.81

17,074.46

4,719.06

13,939.13

15,160.87

Special Expenditure (new barges) $5,600.

Table III.

Comparative Table for 3 Years.

3,822.94

54,716.46

(or .60 per ton).

1919

1920

1921

62,904.17

69,183,79

79,808.13

16,391.93

18,205.83

22,596.74

29,372.11

34,948.35

43,715.04

M 29

སང་

M 30

Appendix J.

List of Ambulances and Dead Vans Stations.

Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town.

Western District Sanitary Office, Pokfulam Road. Government Civil Hospital.

Disinfecting Station, Hongkong.

New Western Market.

No. 6 Police Station. Central Police Station. New Post Office Building..

Pokfulam Police Station.

Seamen's Institute.

Eastern District Sanitary Office, Queen's Road East.

No. 1 Police Station.

Race Course.

Bay View Police Station.

Aberdeen Police Station. Stanley Police Station. Shaukiwan Police Station. Disinfecting Station, Kowloon. Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station. Sham Sui Po Police Station. Kowloon City Police Statton. Tai Po Police Station.

Sha Tau Kok.

Au Tau.

164 Magazine Gap Road.

Appendix K.

MARKETS.

The following statement shows the Revenue derived from Markets :-

Markets.

1908-1917 (average for

1918.

1919.

1920.

1921.

10 years).

M 31

$

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

Central Market Hung Hom Market

Mong Kok Tsui Market Sai Wan Ho Market

Sai Ying Pun Market Shaukiwan Market Shek Tong Tsui Market So Kon Po Market

58,192.22

60,493.50

60,640.50

60,792,00

62,213.20

3,944.08

4,247.70

4,294.50

4,524.20

4,333.20

1,131.06

1,258.80

1,258.80

1,258.80

1,520.40

1,988.74

2,348.00

2,389.00

2,402.30

2,439.30

14,779.80

16,428.10

16,496.70

16,520.40

16,491.60

1,834.76

2,104,80

2,085.60

2,085.60

2,085.60

806.09

942.00

942.00

942.00

942.00

1,429.08

1,+91.30

1,490.40

1,490.40

1,608.15

Tai Kok Tsui Market

618.08

645.60

676.60

796.10

845.50

Tsim Sha Tsui Market

877.64

4,443.00

4,502.90

4,553,40

4,556.40

Wan Chai Market

4,623.95

4,832.40

4,842.90

4,862.40

4,862.40

Western Market, (North Block)

15,108.22

19,224.60

19,220.20

19,171.70

19,239.60

Western Market, (South Block)

24,923.42

32,806.90

32,553.10

32,569.00 33,098.00

Yaumati Market

8,491.84

10,758.00

10,834.00

10,840.80

10,840.80

Aberdeen Market

479.78

462.00

463.20

458.70

430.90

516.00

477.27

2,795.23

919.33

1,143.47

Canal Road Market opened 1/4/13 Praya East Market opened 1/12/13... Reclamation Street Market opened 1/9/13 Staunton Street Market opened 1/10/12 Tai Hang Market opened 1/4/14 Sham Shui Po Market opened 1/6/18

Total,..

144,580.06 169,603.45 170,758.70 171,011.80 173,515.65

516.00

516.00

516.00

516.00

351.40

291.40

326.60

364.50

2,764.00

2,729.10

2,671.80

2,677.50

743.55

837.00

940.80

949.80

614.70

592.00

590.40

590.40

2,127.10

3,102.80

2,898.40

2,915.40

M 32

Appendix L.

List of Revenue from January to December, 1921.

Chinese Undertakers' Licences,

$

e.

660.00

Forfeitures,

70.83

Special Food Licences, ...

7,556.22

Ambulance and Cremation fees,

1,332.50

Births and Deaths Registration,

1,931.80

Chinese Cemetery Fees,

3,379.00

Use of Motor Vans,

2,019.64

Laundries,

2,400.00

Markets, ...

173,824.75

Slaughter House, Kennedy Town,

102,904.10

Slaughter House, Ma Tau Kok,

20,695.50

Interest,

33.63

Condemned Stores, &c.,

450.00

Scavenging City Villages & Hill District,

2.336.95

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

3.45

Total,...

$319,598.37

M 33

Appendix M.

List of Expenditure from January to December, 1921.

Personal Emoluments

Advertisements

Ambulances, Coffins, Dead Vans, &c....

Bath Houses, Fuel...

...

$ C. 378,451.66

542.21

550.53 2,078.76

91

Incidental Expenses

5.16

Light

25.58

Rent...

480.00

""

Bonus to Disp. Clerks for Regist. of Births

390.80

Burial of Infected Bodies

385.50

...

Cemeteries Incidental Expenses

Compensation for Damages by Disinfection

and Cleansing

33.35

55.12

Conveyance Allowances

...

7,344.14

Coolie Labour

1,831.08

Disinfectants ...

11.860.82

Disinfecting and Cleansing Apparatus

2,362.66

Disinfectors

1.670.30

Dust and Water Carts

2,937.71

Fuel for Blacksmith's Forges

468.00

General Cleansing Chinese New Year

433.50

Head Stones,

739.50

Incidental Expenses

1,921.09

Incidental Expenses, Markets

723.62

Launches, Steam Barges, &c., Coal

13,939.13

do.

Repairs

17,074.46

do.

Stores ...

4,719.06

Light, Bullock Stables at Victoria and

Kowloon ...

181.09

Light, Central Market

***

2,415.51

Light, D.S., Dist. San. Offices and Matsheds

751.11

Light, Public Latrines ...

582.62

Light, Smaller Markets

1,471.90

Light, Tsim Sha Tsui Market

827.13

Light, Western Market, N. & S. Blocks

1.410.72

Nightsoil Receptacles

1,361.80

Paint, Turpentine, &c. ...

1,586.27

Purchase and Maintenance of Bullocks

8,473.25

Rat Poison, Rat Traps, &c. ...

2,081.18

Carried forward,.....

$ 472,169.32

M 34

Brought forward,...

$ 472,169.32

Rent of Quarters for Insp. and San. Offices

913.54

Rent of Quarters for Scavenging Coolies

2,849.61

Scavenging City, Villages, &c.

1,282.90

Scavenging Gear ...

6,284.06

Scavenging Gear, Kowloon ...

750.90

Street Watering

818.52

Transport

836.80

Uniform for Staff

8,325.20

Workshop Apparatus

77.11

A. D. and S. H. Fuel

2,749.70

do.

Incidental Expenses

2,611.81

do.

Light

593.61

Cattle Crematorium and R. D.

478.55

Totals...

$ 500,741.63

M 35

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

The Colony of Hongkong consists of the Island of that name. the peninsula of Kowloon and the so called New Territories which are held on lease from the Chinese Government for a period of ninety-nine years from 1898.

The area of the Island is about 32 square miles, that of the Kowloon Peninsula about two and three quarter square miles and, that of the leased New Territories about 282 square miles.

Of the leased territory 266 square miles are without the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board.

The Colony is situate just within the limit of the northern tropic (22°5′).

The climate of the Colony is somewhat difficult of brief description. It may perhaps be said to vary from temperate in the winter months to tropical in the summer while it is sub- tropical in the early spring and late autumn.

Owing to the stabilising effect of the ocean extreme range of temperature does not occur. Between the mean monthly minimun and the mean monthly maximum temperatures as récorded by Standard thermometers there is a range of about 33 to 34 degrees Farenheit.

A much greater range of temperature has however to be borne by the inhabitants. Very slight frosts have occasionally been observed on the hills in winter and, within houses sometimes in summer, a temperature of nearly 100° F. is reached.

When such high temperatures are accompanied by a high Relative Humidity the effect is extremely depressing.

Although Hongkong is an island the climate cannot be described as insular; the huge bulk of China proper to the north. and east of the Colony in its effect on the local climate suggests the term maritime-continental as a suitable epithet to apply to the climate. During the winter months relatively cold winds from the north-eastw over the Colony from the mainland of China and compel European residents to wear thick clothing and to heat their houses artificially.

During the summer months the general direction of the wind varies from E. S. E. to S. and, it is during this period roughly from May to September that the greater portion of the annual rainfall occurs. The hot and wet seasons therefore synchronise.

The following table compiled from the monthly reports issued. from the Royal Observatory gives the monthly means of the various Meteorological phenomena recorded during the year.

M 36

METEOROLOGICAL RETURNS, 1921.

TEMPERA-

HUMI-

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TIRE.

DITY.

Max. Mean. Min.

Rel.

Abs.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Rain.

Direction. Vel.

ins.

о

O

p.c. ins.

p. c.

hours. ins.

points. miles p.h.

January, February.

30.21 64.2 | 58.8 541

66

0,84

53

183.8

March,

April,

May,

30.12 64.8 59.7 30.05 | 68.9 63.9 29.98 76.4! 71.9 68.7 29.80 81.3 77.1) 74.1

55.9

68

0.35

46

214.7

0.195NE by E 1.040 E by N

9.1

13.0

59.5

78 0.48

78

116.4 4.505 E by N

9.4

81 0.64

81

126.2| 2,820

E

10.6

88 | 0.82

88

89.9 33.785

ESE

9.7

June,.

29.72 85.2 81.0 77.8

84

0.89 80

155.914.740

SE

10.7

July,

29.79 | 86,2 | 81.6

77.8

81

0.88

258.2 (11,875

ESE

11.0

August,

29.69 87.4 82.2 78.6

82

0.90

249.0 15.445

8.5

September,... 29.86 84.4 80.0 76.8

75

0.78

201.0 12.100

11.3

October,

30.06 81.0 75.8 72.3

69

0.62

264.7 0.395

November, 30.10 75.5 69.8 : 65,6 . December, 30.16 69.3 64,5 61.3

58

0.42

182.1 0.220

ENE

12.5

70 0.43

164.5 0.220

E by N

11.6

Mean or

Total,...

29.96 77.0 72.3 68.5 74.9.0.63 65 220.64 97.340 E

10.7

POPULATION.

The estimated population of the Colony at the middle of 1921

was as follows;

Non-Chinese Civil Population,...........

Chinese Civil Population :-

14,100

City of Victoria (including The Peak); Villages of Hongkong,

360,000

18.360

Kowloon (including New Kowloon),

120,000

New Territories (land),..

100,800

Population afloat,

73,420

Total Chinese population,

672,580

Total Civil population,

686,680

The above figures were estimated at the end of 1920 and were used for calculating weekly and monthly death rates throughout the year and for the reason have also been used in calculating the annual death and birth rates appearing in this report.

A census of the Colony was taken on April 24th, 1921, but the figures therefrom were not available until near the end of the year.

A summary of the figures resulting from the census gives the total population then enumerated as 625,166 but this figure was. for reasons given by the census officer in his report, thought to be too low.

M 37

The census report gives the population of the Colony as

follows:-

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula, New Territories North,

New Territories South,.

Floating population,

Total,

347,401

123,448

66,114

17,049

71,154

625,166

The increase shown over the population at the previous census (1911) was 168,427.

The excess of males over females is very marked. At the census of 1911 there were 135,563 more males than females enumerated and in 1921 this difference had increased to 140,048.

The floating population (73,420) is distributed amongst the following classes of boats.

Lighters, cargo, and water boats,.

Passenger boats,

Fishing and other boats,

Hulks,

Boats (mostly fishing) in New Territories...

IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION.

1,619

1,850

7,647

73

7.065

There is a continual flow of the populace between this Colony and China and the population to a larger extent appears to be constantly changing, but it cannot be said to what extent arrivals in any year are of new comers or of people returning after having previously left the Colony.

The river steamers plying between Hongkong and China brought 444,044 and took away 459,571 persons.

The Kowloon-Canton Railway brought 462,379 persons and took away 435,933.

This gives a total of 906,423 immigrants and 895,504 emigrants by these routes alone but as there are other means of entering and leaving the Colony e.g. by junks and ocean going steamships these figures do not accurately show the interchange of population.

BIRTHS.

The Chinese are careless in the matter of registering births especially those of female children. It appears to be a Chinese custom not to register even the birth of a male child unless such child has survived for at least one month while female children frequently are not registered at all. This refers to the custom in China of enrolling the child's name at the ancestral temple and no doubt this custom prevents the registration in this Colony of births as required by the Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance which appears to have no counterpart in China proper.

w

M 38

During 1921 however there was a considerable improvement in the registration of Chinese births as shown by the following table :-

Births registered during 1921.

Male.

Female.

1920. 1921.

1920. 1921.

Total. 1920. 1921.

Chinese. Non-Chinese

1,386 1,978

154

727 1,275

2,113 3,253

194

153

171

307

365

Totals.........1,540

.1,540 2,172

880 1,446

2,420 3,618

This gives a general civil birth rate of 6·1 per 1,000 as com- pared with 4-36 in 1920.

The birth rate amongst the Non-Chinese Civil Community was 25.88 as compared with 19-78 in 1920.

The birth rate amongst the Chinese as calculated from the registered births, was 568 per 1,000 as compared with 3-96 per 1,000 in 1920.

The following table shows the birth rates (calculated from registered births) amongst the Non-Chinese and Chinese Civil Community for the last ten years.

Birth rates from 1912 to 1921.

Year.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

1912.

16-2

6'5

1913...

15.8

8.9

1914.

16.8

6.8

1915.

13.2

5.7

1916...

20:05

5.8

1917.

-20'08

4.9

1918.

22.07

3.6

1919.

20.6

3.9

1920.

19.78

3.96

1921..

25.88

5'68

The preponderance of male births over female has always been marked in this Colony but is much less for the year 1921 than in previous years.

There were 155 Chinese male births registered to every 100 Chinese female births. During the years 1920, 1919 and 1918 the proportions were 190 to 100, 215 to 100 and 194 to 100.

Amongst the Non-Chinese Community the proportion of male to female births for the year 1921 was 113 to 100.

The nationality of the Non-Chinese parents was as follows: British 166, Portuguese 78, Indian 75, American 8, Filipino 7, Japanese 6, French 4, Malay 3, Dutch, Italian, Jewish, Australian and Annamite 1 each, West Indian, Chilian, Brazilian, Eurasian, Spanish, Russian, Parsee, and Peruvian 1 each.

M 39

Deaths.

The total number of deaths in the Colony during 1921 was 11,880 (12,419 in 1920).

The general death rate was 20-27 per 1,000 (21-19 in 1920). The Chinese deaths numbered 11,604 (12,151 in 1920).

The Chinese death rate was 20-29 per 1,000 (22-78 in 1920). The Non-Chinese deaths numbered 276 including 21 from the Navy and Army.

The death rate for the Non-Chineses Civil Community was 18:08 per 1,000 (17′9 per 1,000 in 1920).

The Nationality of the Non-Chinese deaths was as follows:- British 72, Filipino 53, Indian 48, Japanese 33, Portuguese 30, Malay 12, American 5, French and Eurasian 4 each, Dutch and Annamite 3 each, Spanish and Russian 2 each, Swiss, German, Norwegian, Jewish and Siamese 1 each.

Age Distribution of Deaths.

The number of death of children under one year of age was 3,766 of which 3,728 were Chinese and 38 Non-Chinese.

Of these 1,065 Chinese and 15 Non-Chinese were under one month old.

The ratio of infants deaths to the total deaths registered was 31.7 per cent. For Chinese deaths alone the ratio was 32:11 per cent, while for the Non-Chinese it was 13-76 per cent.

A true infantile mortality rate cannot be calculated as it is not known how many children were born in the Colony owing to the habit of not registering births amongst the Chinese.

Owing also to the constant flow of Chinese between Hongkong and China the death rate cannot be corrected by distributing them according to the place of origin of their causes.

The deaths of children between one and five years of age numbered 1,954 of which 1,931 were Chinese.

The following table shows the death rate for the last ten years.

Death Rate.

Year.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

General.

1912....

26.33

14.51

25.67

1913..

21.75

10.9

21.16

1914.

23.88

12.99

23:34

1915....

19.00

9.4

18:59

*1916...

24.60

15.08

24.00

1917.

23.0

14:00

23.4

†1918..

24.5

19.50

24.4

1919....

23.3

21.90

23.2

1920..

22.78

17.90

21.19

1921..

20.29

18.08

20:27

* For Civil population only since 1916.

A conflagration killed 522 Chinese in 1918.

J

M 40

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The number of deaths from these causes other than pulmonary tuberculosis was 3,832 of which 80 were Non-Chinese.

Of these 1,761 occurred amongst children under one year of age.

The deaths ascribed to Lobar Pneumonia and Pneumonia (type not defined) were 304 and 207 respectively or a total of 511. Of this total 99 were of children under one year of age.

Broncho-pneumonia accounted for 1,625 death of which 22 were Non-Chinese. Of these 801 were infants under one year of age only 12 being Non-Chinese in this age group.

The total deaths amongst the Chinese from Respiratory diseases was 5,045 or 43:47 per cent of the total Chinese deaths giving a rate of 8.82 per 1,000 persons (9.8 in 1920 and 62 in 1919).

Tuberculosis.

Pulmonary Tuberculosis causd 1,318 Chinese and 25 Non- Chinese deaths.

Other forms of Tuberculosis caused 576 deaths 4 of which were Non-Chinese making a total of 1,894 deaths, a percentage of 15.9 of the total deaths registered.

Tetanus and Convulsions.

These diseases account for a considerable number of deaths of infants.

Thus out of 90 deaths ascribed to Tetanus 70 were those of children under one month old and 6 of children over one month and under one year.

Convulsions accounted for 137 deaths of children under five

years

of age. Of these 25 were under one month and 66 over one month but under one year of

age.

Malaria.

The deaths from this disease were 332 (the same number as for 1920). Of these 9 were Non-Chinese and 323 Chinese or a percentage of 2.79 of the total deaths.

The following table shows the distribution of deaths from Malaria in the Colony excluding the New Territories, the total cases, the percentage of these to the total deaths recorded during the last ten years and the number of deaths per 1,000 of the population for the same period.

TABLE OF DEATHS FROM MALARIA 1912 тo 1921.

Year.

Victoria.

Kowloon. Shaukiwan. Aberdeen. Stanley.

Total.

Percentage

of

total deaths.

Deaths per

1,000 of

Population.

1912,

214

80

34

44

375

3.88

1:05

1913,

110

47

33

53

9

252

2.99

0.66

1914,

73

58

19

47

20

211

2.26

0.55

1915,

157

66

27

46

32

328

4.14

0.78

1916,

182

75

25

36

19

337

3:19

0'78

1917,

205

98

29

68

11

411

3.93

0.92

1918,

189

71

16

106

10

388

2.93*

0.83

1919,

117

101

13

71

12

314

2.69

0.62

1920,

141

84.

13

82

12

332

2.67

0.59

1921,

159

86

13

56

9

332

2.79

0.55

* Allowance made for 522 deaths from conflagration.

M 41

M 42

Beri-beri.

There were 526 deaths from this disease during the year.

The following table shows the numbers of deaths from this disease for the last ten years and the percentage of such deaths of the total deaths for each such year.

DEATHS FROM BERI-BERI, 1912 To 1921.

1912.

1913,

1914,

1915,

1916,

1917,

*1918,

1919.

1920,

1921,

Year.

No. of deaths.

per cent of total deaths.

231

2.38

339

4:01

399

4:16

398

5:02

520

4.92

654

6.26

804

6:09

555

4.76

361

2.90

526

4.42

* Allowance made for 522 Chinese lives last through conflagration.

NOTIFIABLE INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The following cases of these Diseases were notified during

the year.

Disease.

Chinese. Non-Chinese.

Total.

Plague

149

1

150

Small-pox...

180

11

191

Cerebro-Spinal Fever

122

3

125

Enteric Fever

75

40

115

Paratyhoid Fever

39

40

79

Cholera

4

1

5

Diphtheria

48

37

85

Scarlet Fever

1

1

Puerperal Fever

3

11

Relapsing Fever

1

1

Typhus Fever

Yellow Fever

Total ...

625

138

763

M 43

Of the above there were imported the following cases :- Plague 7, Small-pox 15 including 7 of the Non-Chinese, Cerebro- Spinal Fever 6, Enteric Fever 17, Paratyphoid Fever 10, Cholera 1, Diphtheria 3, Scarlet Fever 1.

Cerebro-Spinal Fever.

This disease was first recognised in the Colony in February 1918.

The following table shows the monthly distribution of the cases which have occurred during the years 1918 to 1921 inclusive.

Monthly prevalence of Cerebro-Spinal Fever.

Month.

1918.

1919. 1920.

1921.

January,

February,

23

18

165

32

13

9

March,

454

71

40

59

April,

274

58

44

18

May, June,.

146

24

10

8

96

15

7

10

July,

52

13

4.

7

August,

14

12

6

3

September,

10

3

1

October,

5

1

November,

7

7

1

December,

9

3

Total,

1,232

267

158

125

This disease has shown progressive diminution since the first year of its appearance.

While the spread of this disease is greatly influenced by overcrowding it is noticeable that the greater number of cases occur in the cold season when there are frequently cold winds from North to East blowing over the Colony from the Mainland of China. Under these conditions it is the Chinese habit to close the windows of their houses thereby seriously interfering with their ventilation while in the hot weather it is customary for large numbers to sleep in the open air.

M 44

Plague.

The total number of plague cases notified in 1921 was 150.

The Colony has been free from any severe Epidemic of this disease since the year 1914.

The following table shows the monthly prevalence of plague during the last ten years.

Month.

1912. 1913. 1914. 1915, 1916. 1917. 1918. 1919. 1920. 1921.

5

28

64

24

6

། ༄ ཡ : ལྤ ཕྱ ཟླ ༤༠༠

January,

47

February,

24

42

72

-

March,

73

223

30

April,

317

29 637

1

2 94

May,

759 61 858

42

14

44

171

June,

508 79 248

31

10

84

132

July,

144

84 55

31

9

103

26

August,

19

62

25

16

23

September,.

4

10

4

6

1-18 |

9

28

56

20

14

October,

16

2

November,

3

1

December,

23

-H 30 3D

Total,

1,857 408 2,146 | 144 39 38 266 464 138

150

Small-poa.

Hongkong is never for long free from this disease which occurs principally in the cool season.

The Chinese are not adverse to vaccination but are very careless in protecting themselves by such means. It needs a panic caused by the unusual prevalence of the disease to induce the Chinese to come forward in large numbers to be vaccinated.

Owing to our changing population the number of susceptible persons tends constantly to increase. The last severe Epidemic of Small-pox occurred in the winter of 1916 to 1917 and a Special Vaccination Campaign resulted in some 300,000 Chinese being vaccinated.

Towards the end of the year under review an outbreak of Small-pox in Shanghai was the cause for organising another Vaccination Campaign in this Colony to begin early in the following year (1922).

The following table shows the monthly prevalence of Small- pox in Hongkong for the last ten years.

M 45

Monthly prevalence of Small-pox 1912 to 1921.

Month

1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920 1921

January. February March

April

May

June

July

August

September.

October,

November.. December

CHECK ONONT

163 26

254 23 156 27

10

RTBOHOLONCH

29

18 42

19

23HTROHHOOOO

1 358

34

176

6

38

18

16 22

68

PIOIUM-00000

ECOM OD #N00000-

203122HHOOO and

2000-HO-OCON

1

Ι

11

10 36

11

58

Total

709 111 110

34 712 595

32

27

34 191

Influenza.

Hongkong in common with the rest of the world has suffered from the pandemic of Influenza during recent years.

In the years 1916 and 1917 only one death from this disease was recorded each year. The disease appears to have become epidemic towards the middle of 1918.

The disease is not notifiable and so its prevalence can only be judged from the number of deaths due to it.

The following table shows the deaths registered as due to Influenza during the years 1918 to 1921 inclusive.

Month.

1918

1919

1920

1921

January

0

21

39

20

February

0

16

118

19

March

25

75

20

April....

0

41

38

22

May

1

75

32

27

June

108

137

61

26

July

53

77

22

54

August

10

30

14

30

September

1

30

28

October...

70

44

13

November

95

35

27

December

67

34

17

Total

405

449

542

303

M 46

Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever,

Paratyphoid Fever was not a notifiable disease in Hongkong prior to 1914.

During the early years of the Colony many deaths were ascribed to continued fever. This term gradually fell into disuse with more accurate means of diagnosis, but it is probable that many cases of Paratyphoid Fever were notified as Typhoid Fever and that the term Continued Fever covered both these groups.

The following table gives the cases of Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever notified during the years 1912 to 1921.

Month.

1912.

1913.

1914. 1915.

1916. 1917.

1918. 19.19.

1920.

1921.

- M 47

January,

14

11

1}

11

February,

15

23

8

7

18

13

19

March,

7

15

8

131

16

15

22

April,..

15

6

141

May,

June,

21

11

16

9

181

32

13

24

7

24

July,

182

18

7

156

14

30

211

August,

7

23

5

191

381

16

September,

12

32

22

27

13

121

October,

12

24

17

27

November,

21

8

10

28

10

23

17

101

December,.

11

12

9

18

201

5097244172676

11

10

10+

6

3

63

84

5

219

7

14

94

10

141

179

14

22

124

92

92

97

28

123

39

12

128

713

י7

5

71

510

14

44

83

Total,.

138

201

1408

198*

2201

1887

2472

1333

1181+

11579

T.

88

136

92

128

170

152

Chinese cases

182

101

P.

71

75

3

(

0

0

1

2

41

M 48

Upper figures in month groups indicate paratyphoid cases and lower figures Typhoid cases.

A study of the above table shows that while Typhoid Fever has in recent years not assumed serious epidemic proportions yet the disease is always with us.

It also shows that a large proportion of the cases notified are Chinese.

It is not to be supposed that all Chinese cases of Typhoid are diagnosed as such, as it is a common habit of the Chinese to leave the Colony for their native places when sick.

Many years ago it was thought that Chinese did not suffer much from Typhoid Fever owing to their having acquired more or less immunity to the disease by reason of their so called insani- tary habits.

Improved methods of diagnosis both post and ante mortem have however shown that this disease is common amongst the Chinese in the Colony.

During the last twenty years no outbreak of Typhoid has been definitely traced to contaminated water or milk.

The eating of raw vegetables grown by Chinese methods is a possible source of infection, but the Chinese are not in the habit of eating uncooked food and Europeans soon learn the danger of eating salads.

The more probable cause of the cases is the carrier who either spreads infection by handling food or indirectly through flies which can contaminate food by carrying infective material from the buckets of the dry privies which may have been used by

carriers.

Of the 115 cases of Typhoid which were notified in 1921, 9 Chinese and & Non-Chinese were imported.

Diphtheria.

This is a disease which is always with us but has not when the numbers of our population are considered assumed serious epidemic proportions.

In the year under review there were notified 85 cases, 47 of which were Chinese.

There were 38 deaths all Chinese and all but one were under the age of 15 years and of these 12 were between the ages of 1 and 5 years.

M 19

The table below which gives the number of Diphtheria cases notified during each month of the last ten years shows that re- cently the incidence of the disease has decreased.

Thus while according to census figures our population has increased 37 per cent. during the last ten years, during the last five years the total cases notified were 88.24 per cent. of the number notified in the previous five years.

The table also shows that the disease has its greater incidence in the cooler months of the year namely October to April.

The numbers of Chinese cases each year are shown below the annual total cases.

DIPHTHERIA CASES NOTIFIED dURING EACH MONTH OF THE YEARS 1912 To 1921 INCLUSIVE.

Month.

1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918

1919. 1920. 1921. Total.

— M 50 -

January

February

March

15

15 21

16

25

***

April

May

June

July

August

...

September

...

October

November

December

:2-237

14

17

Z COLON COLO #∞+7HQ

9

10

4

4

4

13

17

9

11

9

19

со

Total...

38

148

78

86 101

Chinese

24

75

47

70

80

62

109 39

13

12

a!! Eco co co co as as a haa

12

6

27

12

11

11

16

17

4

7

7

13

3

17

12 13 116

AES wi JoppoNE

EXONNA AUNGRE

132

97

10

11

69 118 50 76 85

849

42 47

595

M 51

CHOLERA.

The Colony is liable from time to time to cases of Cholera imported from the neighbouring ports of China especially from Canton and its district.

There can be no doubt that Hongkong is saved from epidemics of this disease by its very fine water supply.

In the year 1902 before the great increase in the capacity of the impounding reservoirs at Tytam an epidemic of Cholera occurred during a serious shortage of water.

The Chinese then obtained water from various questionable sources and nearly 600 cases of Cholera were known to have occurred.

The table below shows the numbers of cases of Cholera during the last ten years.

The following comments on this table will be of interest.

In 1913 the disease was prevalent in neighbouring coast ports and was introduced to the Colony by fishing vessels and Chinese cargo vessels mostly belonging to the villages of Shaukiwan.

In 1914 all the cases were imported.

In 1915 the disease was imported into the older portion of the Colony riz., the Island of Hongkong and the Kowloon peninsula, from the New Territory to which place it was presumably brought from Chinese Territory.

In 1916 of the ten cases notified seven were known to be imported.

In the year 1919 although only 46 cases were notified as Cholera it is highly probable that an epidemic of Gastro-Enteritis which caused 339 deaths was in reality one of true Cholera.

As the Colony had been free from any notified case of Cholera for two years it must be assumed that the infection in 1919 was imported.

During the summer of this year there were established depot- for the free distribution of congee owing to there being a shortage of rice.

It is probable that the spread of Cholera and Gastro-Enteritis was due to infection of the congee so distributed.

In one case it was found that a Chinese coolie engaged in the work of distributing congee was also employed as an attendant on Cholera patients.

In 1920 five cases were known to have been imported.

In 1921 one case was known to have been imported.

CHOLERA FROM 1912 TO 1921.

Month.

1912. 1913.| 1914.| 1915, 1916.

1917. 1918.

1919. 1920.

1920. 1921.

M 52 -

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

1

1

6

5

16

1

...

...

I

7

53

9

9

1

29

1

1

1

27

October

26

8

3

...

November

...

1

1

4

December

1

1

...

Total

1

116

19

17

10

19

:::

46

6

Chinese cases

111

19

10

41.

6

4

M 53

HOUSING CONDITIONS AND DISEASE.

The urban population of the Colony is crowded into a small area. For the last twenty years it has become more and more difficult to find room for the ever increasing Chinese population. Old houses formerly occupied by Europeans and standing in their own gardens and old small Chinese houses have been demolished and replaced by many storeyed Chinese tenement dwellings.

The result is that overcrowding, always serious in the Colony, has increased.

The following figures will be of interest in this respect.

Health Districts 4 to 8 inclusive form the great central Chinese portion of Victoria. Their combined acreage is 200 practically all built over. The Chinese houses and population

therein as enumerated at the censuses of 1911 and 1921 can he compared by the following table.

Houses

Floors..

Population

Persons per house

Persons per acre

1911.

1921.

4,877

5.003

16,100

16,834

122.752

156,658

25.1

313

613-7

783.29

The census figures of 1921 are admittedly too low and, if the figures for persons per house and acre for 1921 be increased by ten per cent, a more accurate estimate will probably be obtained. This would bring the number of persons per house to 344 and per acre to 861.6.

Very many ground floors are used as shops and stores occupi- ed at night by the shops master and his fokis only.

Based on the above given figures the average number of persons per floor in these districts was in 1911 7-6 persons, while for 1921, using the estimated figure for persons per house, it was 10:17 or about 33 per cent. more.

Owing to the fact that shops and stores are not occupied to the same extent as are upper floors it follows that the number of persons per upper floor must exceed the above figures. Observa- tion indeed shows that this is the case and that the upper floors of tenement houses are greatly overcrowded.

Overcrowding has naturally an effect on the spread of

infectious diseases.

Some diseases e.g. Influenza and Cerebro-Spinal Fever, are spread by what is known as "Droplet Infection". The infected person, whether sufferer or carrier, discharges when he coughs or sneezes minute droplets liable to contain the specific infective parasite. In crowded rooms, streets, places of amusement, etc., those who, being in close proximity to such a person, breathe air thus often intensely contaminated are liable to direct infection,

M 54

Accomm

Bubonic Plagne, spread by the bites of rat fleas seeking blood and driven by hunger to bite human beings because their natural hosts the rats have died, will naturally be more prevalent in crowded than in uncrowded houses.

Tuberculosis is. par excellence, a disease whose spread is favoured by overcrowding combined with want of light and free

ventilation.

The Tubercle Bacillus is killed by dessication but the sputum of a Phthisical person can be dried to such a degree that it can be blown about in the form of dust without killing the baccilli.

Sunlight and bright diffused day light rapidly kill these parasites.

Unfortunately the Chinese houses of this Colony are not cons- tructed to permit the action of these natural disinfecting agents.

The present Public Health and Buildings Ordinance has effected a great improvement in the type of Chinese tenement houses. With regard to plague prevention we find now better paved ground surfaces, absence of hollow walls and ceilings in houses built since 1903. This means that rat infestation of houses 'is less likely than formerly.

The prevalence of this disease in the Colony since its first discovery here in 1894 suggests that the new building laws have had some good result. The following table shows the numbers of plague cases notified in the Colony since 1894.

Year.

Cases.

Year.

Cases.

1894,

5,000*

1908.

1,073

1895,

44

1909,.

135

1896,

1,204

1910.

25

1897,

21

1911,

269

1898,

1,320

1912,

1,857

1899,

1,486

1913,.

408

1900,

1,087

1914.

2,146

1901,.

1,651

1915.

144

1902,

572

1916,

39

1903,.

1,415

1917,

38

1904,.

510

1918.

266

1905,

272

1919,

464

1906,

893

1920.

138

1907,.

240

1921,

150

* This is an estimate and is probably much too low.

M 55

The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance became law on the 21st February 1903 but its effect was not immediate, indeed there was a marked tendency to have plans approved and buildings begun under the old Ordinance during 1902 to avoid the restrictions about to be introduced by the new law.

It is therefore fair to include the plague figures of 1903 as being conditioned by pre-existing regulations and if this be done it will appear that during the ten years of the old regime there were recorded 13,800 cases of plague while during the eighteen years 1904 to 1921 inclusive there were 9,067 cases.

The new law however has failed to produce a satisfactory type of Chinese house. Certainly the new houses are better provided with open spaces at their backs, they have better lighting and ventila- tion chiefly manifest when they are empty, but they are still narrow long tunnels. The Chinese family of the artisan class is too poor to rent a whole floor of an area of 500 to 600 square feet. He will have privacy and so he rents a small portion of a floor and builds thereon a cubicle of an area of about 60 to 70 square feet. (The law requires that no cubicle shall have a less area than 64 square feet).

The cubicle partitions act as baffle plates preventing free circulation of air. They also darken the cubicles and herein lies their danger.

The natural preventive agencies against Tuberculosis are not given fair play.

From the abstracts of the annual summary prepared by the Registrar of Births and Deaths the following figures are taken and show (1) the number of deaths recorded as due to general Tuberculosis, Phthisis and Pulmonary Tuberculosis, and (2) the percentage of deaths due to Tubercular infection of the total deaths registered during each year from 1912 to 1921 inclusive.

General Tuberculosis

Pulmonary

Year.

Tuberculosis and

Phthisis.

Percentage of deaths from Tuberculosis of Total deaths.

1912,

1,086

12.1

1913,

1,462

15.5

1914,

1,013

11.3

1915,

1,003

14:4

1916,

1,522

14.8

1917,

1,271

14.3

1918.

1,504

12.2

1919,

1,609

14:05

1920,

1,779

16.7

1921,

1,637

15.9

M 56

The total deaths in the Colony from Tubercular Diseases during 1921 amounted to 1894, while the total deaths from all the principal_Notifiable Infectious Diseases and including those from Malaria, Influenza, Measles and Dysentery which are not notifiable amounted to 1,280. This group of diseases includes, from those which are notifiable, Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fevers, Plague Small-pox, Cholera and Diphtheria.

The difference between these two totals shows 614 more deaths from Tuberculosis than from all the other dangerous Infectious Diseases from which the Colony suffers in Epidemic form either continuously as in the case of Malaria or from time to time as in the case of Plague, Cholera and Small-pox giving a ratio of 100 to 47.9. Tuberculosis takes its steady toll in deaths year by year and attracts no great notice.

W. W. PEARSE, M.D., D.P.H.,

Medical Officer of Health.

1

British and

Foreign Civil,.

Community,

Victoria and

Peak,

Harbour,

Kowloon,.....

Chinese

Community,

Shaukiwan,................!

Aberdeen, ..................

Stanley,....

Total, 1921,

1920,

— M 57 —

Table I.-DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING 1921.

:

3 2

Typhus Fever.

Haemoglobinuric

Fever. Paratyphoid Fever.

Influenza.

Small-pox.

Measles.

Typhoid Fever.

Diphtheria.

Cerebro-spinal

:

:

:

...

:

...

...

Meningitis.

Dysentery.

Plague.

Malarial Fever.

Cholera.

Puerperal Fever.

Septic Infections.

Syphilis.

Poisoning.

Injuries. Developmental Diseases.

Old Age.

General Tuberculosis.

Beri-beri.

Cancer.

Paralysis and Convulsions.

Heart Diseases.

Pneumonia.

Phthisis & Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

Enteritis and Gastro-

Enteritis.

Cirrhosis of Liver.

Peritonitis.

Nephritis.

Other causes.

Unknown.

All causes.

1

6

LO

5 142

66

8 28 29

53 | 142 | 126 | 142

CJ

24 7

2

1

4

18

2

1

...

:

2 128 85

1

20

8

14 53

I

1

+

2

2

...

1 7

:

2

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

1

1

8 [303 | 162

1 | 542

སྐྱ ས

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

9

142 1

14 39

2 4 9 4

15

72

26 7 1 3 10 53

276

29 261 24 128 282 151 253 314 60 | 162 97|| 1,557|760|316| 28

22 111 2374 17 7,694

6

1

15 45 2

888

4 92

61

4

6

10

101177 30 5

I

15 141 79

895

44 197

54 115 12

13 50

353 318208 | 15

10

83 569 86 2,665

:

:

:

:

:

:

D

1

:

7

w

19

2 26 3

1

46

34 15

1

2

5 44 1 241

...

:

...

:

:

:

:

...

...

12

7

5

24 1

:

:

...

3

:.

00

p

2

4

1

:

:

6

80 190 29

21 23 67 | 28 |103 | 259 | 120 | 332

73 228130 | 332

12 20

5

L

6

II

=

52 317 28 265 336 487 322 526|92|184 175 2,136 |1343 577 | 51

ོ ཚ

57 431 11|304|355 696 403361 | 81

178 184 2,179 1401 514 41

224 3185 186 | 11,880

24 287 8299, 198 | 12,419

M 58

Table II.-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES RECORDED IN EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR 1921.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total, 1921.

Total, 1920.

..

Paratyphoid Fever

Plague

..

Typhoid Fever

European

Chinese Others European Chinese Others European Chinese

Others

European

....

Cholera

Chinese

Others

European

1

...

Small-pox

Chinese

1

10

35

56

58

14

Others

1

1

2

European

3

2

1

I

Diphtheria

Chinese

6

3

5

4

1

Others

3

2

4

European

Puerperal Fever

Chinese

1

1

...

Others

..

Scarlet Fever

Relapsing Fever

Typhus Fever............

European Chinese Others

European Chinese Others

European Chinese Others European

Cerebro-Spinal Fever... Chinese

Yellow Fever

Others European Chinese Others

...

...

5

...

:

...

1

...

...

6

27

64

2

1

18

8

2

1

...

1

1

2

5

1

3

2

2

4

2

LAG i pai

0:00:

...

24

6

6

5

149

150

130

138

1

1

8

1

...

4

1

1

22

31

8

3

3

6

75

115

71

118

2

1

18

16

1

2

3

5

1

ة

9

5

12

14

8

41

79

2

14

4

2

2

2

24

1

2

:

:

:

:

ܡ:

:

:

:

:

:

2

1

2

4

...

1

*

:

5

6

6

3

6

9

1

180

191

24

34

1

5

1

I

20

19

1

15

47

888

85

42

76

1

2

18

15

1

1

1

1

1

8

11

10

10

2

...

1

1

2

...

1

3

...

1

1

1

Nil

4

сл

16

...

...

...

8

59

1

16 2

...

...

...

10

...

3

1

1

...

...

Nil

3

2

3

122

125

154

158

3

2

Nil

Nil

...

Total for 1921,

36

42

117

118

111

126

56

.......

Total for 1920,

40

24

74 78

61

86

52

335

3309

244

23

!

25

40

38

335

26

26

26

:.

:

763

:

:

560

No address.

Imported.

Total, 1921.

Total, 1920.

Table III.-The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases :---

City of Victoria: Health Districts.

1

2

3 4

10

6

7

8

CO

9

Peak.

10

99

13

3 12

13

1

:

2

23

25

1.1 1

10

10

:

:

9

7

150

138

17

115

118

:

:

:

1

3

:

:

2

8

ос

81

00

5 2 1

1

18

1

2

Co

10 79 14

- M 59 —

1

1

10

6

CO

47

15

191

34

1

Co

85

76

10

3

1

Nil.

Nil.

3

00

༣༤

8

125

158

O

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

Co

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

6

:

:

:

:

:

:

20

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:.

:

:

:

23

:

:

:

3

20

:

co

:

:

:

:

10

Plagne

15

25 1 16

11 12 21

Enteric Fever

7

14

LO

10

CO

C

Paratyphoid Fever.

8

13

-I

2

CO

Cholera

1

:

:

:

Small-pox

4

10

:

213 4

Diphtheria

6

CO

14

8 12

4

N

1 4

:

3

1

...

:

:..

...

:

:

:

Puerperal Fever.....

Scarlet Fever

Relapsing Fever........

Typhus Fever......

Cerebro-Spinal Fever........

Yellow Fever ·

7

14

:

:

:

:

4

...

91 9 3

:

:

M 60

Table IV.

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS

DURING THE YEAR 1921.

Mus Rattus,. Mus Decumanus,

Total Infected Rats,.

Human Cases

of Plague, ...

Local.... Import- ed,.

:

:

January.

February.

to

2 6

:

:

CITY OF VICTORIA.

:

::

e:

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

:-

1

1

1

10

5

1.

2

27

61

24

6

Co

3

1

3

:

:

3 Nil. 6 4 142

:

7

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF Plague-infected RATS

during the YEAR 1921.

Mus Rattus,

Mus Decumanus,

Total Infected Rats,..

Human Cases

of Plague,

Local,

Import-

eď,

January.

February,

March.

:

:

KOWLOON.

April.

May,

::

:

:

| June.

July.

August.

September.

November.

December.

October,

:

:

:

:

:

:

1 1

:

Total.

7

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

1. Enteric Fever

2. Paratyphoid Fever

3. (a) Relapsing Fever

() Malta Fever

4. Malaria...

Civil.

5. Small-pox (a) Vaccinated

Army.

Navy.

No. 1.

Troops.

Women &

Children.

camp followers.

9

1

FMS

?

:

(b) Not vaccinated...

(c) Doubtful

6. Measles............

No. 2.

3

No. 3.

No. 4.

RETURN S

No. 5.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTI

1

2

1

No. 6.

23

17

2

6

:

1

:

9

6

3

3

:

:

30

r-

7

18

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

N

:

8

:

:

ON

:

:

1

1

5

1

7. Scarlet Fever

8. Whooping Cough

9. (a) Diphtheria....

(b) Membranous laryngitis....

(e) Croup........

10. Influenza

11. Fever, (undefined)

12. Asiatic Cholera

13. Cholera Nostras

14. Dysentery....

15. Plague

16. Yellow Fever

17. Leprosy

18. Erysipelas

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

No.

7.

10

:

:

:

:

10

8

:

:

:

:

8

5

6

:

:

:

3

3

2

4

:

20

10

12

10

12

1

:

:

:

:

:

2223

10

5

30

:

:

:

:.

:

C

10

11

ཀ༽

:

:

1

:

11

12

17

:

:

:

:

11

12

:

:

:

:

:.

10

:

:

2

4

:

:

00

8

6

:

:

N

No. 6.

VICTORIA.

M 61

ETURN shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day o

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 7.

3

3

5

:

10

:

No. 8.

:

No. 9.

4

38

12

17

5

15

8

:

4

10

12

11

19

13

17

17

:

:

:

:

15

13

45

00

8

14

6

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

9

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

No. 10.

:

:

:

:

རར

:

:

8

Unknown.

D

:

:

Peak.

:

20

2

KOWLOON SHAUKIWAN

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

ABERDEEN DISTRICT.

STANLEY

Under 1

DISTRICT.

month.

Harbour.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

:

:

17

76

10

13

85

:

:

:

:

10 128

:

14

4

2

I

333

53

7

7

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

~

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

N

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

27

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

29

9

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

1 mont!

and under 1 months

day of

December, 1921.

1 month

hij

and under 12

months.

1 year and under 5

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

:..

Non-Chinese.

:

:

:

:

1

25

:

:

:

:

TOTAL AT

THE DIFFERENT AGE Periods.

5

years and under 15

years.

15 years and under 25

25 years and under 45

45 years

and.

60 years

under 60

and over.

Age Un- known.

GRAND TOTAL.

years.

years.

years.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

10

5

27

Chinese.

:

Non-Chinese.

6

:

:

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

2

14

6

20

3

1

1

4

2

:

44

3

13

92

25

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

12

:

:

25

:

...

54

:

16

:

لمصر

:

4

:

:

121

:

2

12

:..

:

:

:

-

:

6

17

29

60

2 101

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

2

:

:

6

15

:

:

:

37

:

:

:

:

:

:

12

41

:

:

...

3

...

:

:.

77

35

:

N

2

:

F.

45

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

Chinese.

:

:

:

:

60

:

:

1

2

:

68

:

:

Non-Chinese.

:

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Chinese.

:

:

:

27

:

:

:

39

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

!

:

:

:

61

30

8

332

:

:

:

162

:

6

38

303

4

5

...

228

130

6

9

I

من

8

1. Enteric Fever

2. Paratyphoid Fever

3. (4) Relapsing Fever

() Malta Fever

4. Malaria

5. Small-pox (a) Vaccinated

6. Measles.....

(b) Not vaccinated...

(c) Doubtful

7. Scarlet Fever

:

:

1

:

:

:

8. Whooping Cough

(b) Membranous laryngitis......

9. (a) Diphtheria...

(e) Croup.....

10. Influenza

11. Fever, (undefined)

12. Asiatic Cholera

13. Cholera Nostras

14. Dysentery

:

:. :.

23

1

:

:

17

Co

3

I

:

6

10

:

10

:

10

:

:

!

4

38

12

:

:

:

:

:..

:

3

8

5

6

5

15

8

:

4

1

:

:

:

2

1

I

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

3

3

:.

:

:

:

: :

10

12

10

12

11

19

13

:

:

1

15

13

8

14

1

:

: :

:

:

:

:

13

3

:

:

:

...

:

:

:.

:

: :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:. :

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

:

:

: : :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

6

:

:

:

: ;

9

7

6

18

20

1

:

72323

10

00

8

11

30

3

11

12

17

: :

:

:

: :

:

: :

:

:

1

:

1

1

: :

:

: :

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

: :

:

: :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

10

10

5

7

3

1

:

:

:.

:

:

: :

:

: :

72

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

الجميل

:

1

: :. :.

: : :

:

:

: : : :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

4:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

N

1

2

: :

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

1

:

:

5

:

:

:

:

:

:

15. Plague

16. Yellow Fever

17. Leprosy

18. Erysipelas

19. Other Epidemic diseases..

(b) German measles

(a) Mumps

(c) Varicella

(d)

20. (a) Pyaemia.

(6) Septicaemia

(e) Vaccinia

21. Glanders

22. Anthrax

23. Rabies-Hydrophobia

24. Tetanus

25. (a) Actinomycosis

(b) Other mycoses

26. Pellagra

27. Béri Beri

Carried forward,.

3

36

2

1

2

i

24

42

~

17

24

18

23

13

41

17

182

152

9

66

80

70

73

51

164

87

+

ここ

10

k

38

:

5

15

4

W

12

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

[1

19

17

1

:

20

20

:

:

N

4

15

13

45

6

8

14

6

:

!

:

:

:

13

76

85

:

:

1

3

A

:

:

:

:

10

:

:

10

13

27

29

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

:

10

128

14

4

:

2

6

:

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

N

:

:

:

53

7

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

7

2

:

:

2

15

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

: :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

: :

:

:

:

E

:

:

لسم

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: D.

:

F.

:

:

:.

:.

: :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

25

:

:

13

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

13

41

17

93

28

115

13

26

15

3

5

3

છે

12

164

87

184

78

516

50

57

21

32

25

14

:

2

:

:

:

6

2

...

:

:

:

9

...

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

12

:

:

:

:

2

:

1

:

:

:

:

12

:

:

:

...

:

:

ΤΟ

6

75

:

:

:

:

..་

67

2

. I

:

:

25

:

10

:

:

:

:

:

13

1

:

27

:

:

:

3

:

:

:

^

44

14

6

20

Co

:

:

:

92

25

:

:

4

:

6

12

:

.:

:

:

I

:

54

:

:

:

:

25

:

:

17

:

16

:

:

: :

:

:

121

:

ON

:

:

-

ลง

O

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

15

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

: :.

29

1

60

2

101

1

1

:

:

:

:

4

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

:

:

100

12

3

77

37

41

35

:

:

:

:

:

:

12

:

6

:

: :

IN

:

:

:

:

:

61

...

332

: :

:

:

:

:

:

60

:

:

J

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

67

E

:

:.

:

:

:

:

2

ลง

:

ลง

2

:

2

:

7

27

162

:

:

:

:

68

1

9

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

E

N

2

:

:

12

:

6

39

3

:

D

1

:

38

:

303

4

5

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :.

...

:

...

:

E

00

:

10

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

228

130

:

CO

...

:

:

6

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

: :

:

:

2

50

:

:

:

9

8

3

105

1

262

118

20

2

179

198

10

314

21

658

3

320

}

103

:

...

:.

:

:

:

90

526

1,957

CAUSES.

Civil.

BRITISHI

AND FOREIGN

COMMUNITY.

Troops.

Women &

Children.

Army.

camp

followers.

Navy.

No. 1.

Brought forward·

36 2

28. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis

(b) Phthisis

29. (a) Acute Phthisis

(b) Acute Miliary Tuberculosis

30. Tuberculous meningitis

31. (a) Abdominal Tuberculosis

(b) Other abdominal tubercle...

32. Tuberculosis of the Spine

33. Tuberculosis of Joints..

34. (a) Tuberculous abscess

(6) Scrofula

(c) Tuberculosis of other organs

35. Disseminated Tuberculosis....

36. (a) Rickets

(b) Osteomalacia

37. Syphilis

38. (a) Soft Chaucre.........

(b) Gonococens infection

(c) Purulent Ophthalmia

39. Cancer and other malignant tumours of the buccal cavity...

40. Cancer and other malignant

tumours of the stomach liver

41. Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum intestines, rectum..

No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

RETURN shewing

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

2

182

152

66

80

70

73

51 164

I

18

7

1

3

1:

47 101

1

47

51

36

50

30

238

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

4:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

17

O

1

N

:

:

:

6

6

10

3

27

49

3

I

2

1

1

9

8

4

54

1

:

70

:

15

72

9

2

3

1

1

:

:

:

}

2

CO

:

:

2

:

:

:

1

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

10

2

1

:

135 4

144

:

:

:

༣།

}

X

نت

:

ลง

2

135

1

:

N

10

1

со

10 144

12

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

* "O`T

No. 8.

'ORIA.

DISTRICT.

No. 9.

73

51

164

87 184

2

13

:

50

30 233

55

51

2

:

:

:

3

54

:

:

6

27

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

6

54

4

2

2

45

:

:

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:

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

- M 62 -

N shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day of Dece

No. 10.

:

Unknown.

Peak.

KOWLOON SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT. DISTRICT.

Harbour.

Population. Land

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

73

516

50

57

21

32

35

14

14

56

1.0

1

:

1

D.

55 262

38

33

14

24

51

CO

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9

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:

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:

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:

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:

:

:

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:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

96

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

132

:

:

:

60

:

Boat

STANLEY

Under 1

1 month and

DISTRICT.

month.

under 12

months.

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

75

2

:

16

:

Chinese.

67

11

71

...

:

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

1

:

:

:

132

:

:

:

:

60

122

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

17

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

16

20

28

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:

:

:

3

4:

:

:

ลง

2

:

36

:

238

Non-Chinese.

:

:

I month and under 12

months.

Chinese.

:

6

Non-Chinese.

:

:

day of December, 1921.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

1 year and muder 5

years.

5 years and under 15

years.

15 years and under 25

25 years and under 45

45 years

and

60 years

under 60

and over.

years.

years.

years.

Chinese.

Non-Chinesc.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

67

179

I

198

· 10

314

21 658

3 320

103

2

1,957

11

19

1

5

3

18

4

40

28

11

1

143

...

=

102

:

36

3

129

11

549

3

214

77

1,200

:

:

:

:

ON

2

:

N

74

20

N

:

3

:

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13

:

29

:

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16

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2

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18

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:

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:

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:

:

:

:

:

:

:

22

:

:

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3

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

317

:

:

322

2

2

:

10

...

72

121

87

84

Age Un-

known.

#

GRAND TOTAL.

Chinese.

17

^

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I

19

13

47

101

1

47

51

36

50

30 233

55

6

49

6

10

3

27

3

1

2

1

1

9

:

:

54

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

4:

:

:

:

:

:

28. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis

(b) Phthisis

29. (a) Acute Phthisis

(6) Acute Miliary Tuberculosis

30. Tuberculous meningitis

31. (a) Abdominal Tuberculosis

(b) Other abdominal tubercle.....

32. Tuberculosis of the Spine

33. Tuberculosis of Joints.....

34. (a) Tuberculous abscess

(b) Scrofula

(c) Tuberculosis of other

organs

35. Disseminated Tuberculosis....

36. (a) Rickets

(b) Osteomalacia

37. Syphilis

1

:

:

:

:

15

:

:

:

:

:

30

:

:

5

:

:

:

:

70

:

72

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

2

1

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

2

:

:

:

2

3

2

2

3

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

2

38. (a) Soft Chanere.....

(b) Gonococcus infection

(c) Purulent Ophthalmia

39. Cancer and other malignant

tumours of the buccal cavity

40. Cancer and other malignant

tumours of the stomach liver

41. Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum intestines, rectum..

42. Cancer and other malignant tum- ours of the female genital organs

43. Cancer and other malignant

tumours of the breast

44. Cancer and other malignant

tumours of the skin

45. Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs and of organs not specified

46. (a) Angioma

(b) Adenoma

(c) Other tumours

47. Rheumatic Fever.....

48. (7) Chronic Rheumatism

(b) Osteo-arthritis

19. Seurvy

50. Diabetes

51. Exophthalmic goitre

10

?

:

:

1

:

:

1

:

1

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

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135

1

:

8

10 144

4

:

:

1

5

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Curried forward.....

78

3

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:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

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:

:

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:

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~

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467 307

13 135 159 122 147 106

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55

262

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16

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:

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36

:

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12

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6

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~

10

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN

COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Navy.

No. 1.

Women & Children.

Army.

camp followers.

Troops.

No. 2.

RETURN shew

No. 3.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

467

307

13

135

159

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

: : : :

:

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:

:

:

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:

Brought forward.....

52. Addison's disease.............

53. (a) Leucocythaemia

(b) Lymphadenoma..

54. Anæmia-chlorosis

55. (a) Diabetes insipidus.

(b) Purpura

(c) Haemophilia

(d) Other General Diseases

56. Alcoholism

57. (a) Occupational lead poisoning

(b)

Non-occupational

poisoning

lead

58. Other chronic poisonings (occu-

pational)

59. Other chronic poisoning (not-

occupational)

60. Encephalitis....

78

:

1

61. (a) Cerebro-spinal Fever

1

:

:

:

:

:

I

:

No. 8.

:

:

:

1

1

122

147

106

:

:

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1

1

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I

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4

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34

4

:

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(b) Simple Meningitis

(c) Meningitis (nature unspe-

cified)

62. Locomotor Ataxy

63. Other diseases of spinal cord ...

(b)..........

64. (a) Apoplexy

(b) Serous apoplexy (oedema of

brain)

:

:

: :

:

:

2

: :

3

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

1

: :

:

-M 63 -

ETURN shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day o

VICTORIA.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

EALTH DISTRICT.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

Unknown.

No. 10.

122

147

:

:

KOWLOON

SHAUKIWAN

ABERDEEN

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

STANLEY DISTRICT.

Under 1

month.

1 month

and under 1: months.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

Population.

Boat

Population.

Harbour.

Population. Land

Boat

Population.

Land

Peak.

106

794

166

263

1

:

:

159

969

:

:

:

:.

:

:

10

2

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

:

107

97

39

58

86

19

:

10

17

:

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:

:

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J

13

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:

:

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:

2

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st day of December, 1921.

1 month and under 12

months.

Chinese.

15 years and under 25

25 years

and under 45

years.

years.

hit

45 years

and

60 years

1

under 60

and over.

Age Un- known.

GRAND TOTAL.

years.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

1 year and under 5

years.

Non-Chinese.

5 years and under 15

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

407

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

· Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Сл

538

:

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

:

19

501

37 1,372

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53. () Leucocythaemia

(b) Lymphadenoma.......

54. Anæmia-chlorosis

55. (a) Diabetes insipidus.......

(b) Purpura

(c) Haemophilia

(d) Other General Diseases

56. Alcoholism

57. (a) Occupational lead poisoning

(b)

Non-occupational

poisoning

lead

58. Other chronic poisonings (occu-

pational)

59. Other chronic poisoning (not-

occupational)

60. Encephalitis...

61. (a) Cerebro-spinal Fever

(6) Simple Meningitis

(c) Meningitis (nature unspe-

cified)

62. Locomotor Ataxy.

63. Other diseases of spinal cord....

(a)......

(b).......

(b) Serous apoplexy (oedema of

brain)

64. (a) Apoplexy

(c) Cerebral Congestion.........

ding atheroma with cerebral hæmorrhage)

(d) Cerebral Atheroma (inclu-

(e) Cerebral Hæmorrhage

65. Softening of the Brain

65. (a) Hemiplegia

(6) Paraplegia.....

(c) Other forms of paralysis

67. General Paralysis of the Insane

68. Other forms of Mental Aliena-

tion

69. Epilepsy

(b) Convulsions over 5 years...

71. Convulsions in children under

70. (a) Epileptiform Convulsions....

5 years.......

Carried forward.......

2

3333

93

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2

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640

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IFL'E

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BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN

COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

3

N

Troops.

Women

& Children.

Army.

camp followers.

RETURN shewing

No. 3.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 4.

No. 5.

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10

5

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72. Chorea

Brought forward.... 93

73. (a) Hysteria Neuralgiá Sciatica

(6) Neuritis

74. (a) Idiocy, Imbecility.

(b) Abscess of brain...

(c) Cerebral tumour.

(d)........

75. Diseases of the Eyes and their

annexa

76. (a) Mastoid disease......

(6) Other Ear diseases.....

77. Pericarditis

78. (a) Myocarditis

(b) Infective endocarditis

1

8

2

1

(c) Endocarditis acute

and

unqualified (under 60 years) 1

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(b) Other organic disease of

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1

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(c) Other diseases of Arteries...

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(b) Embolism and Thrombosis

other than cerebral.....................

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No. 7.

- M 64 -

RN shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day of Dec

CTORIA.

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No. 9.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

KOWLOON

DISTRICT.

SHAUKIWAN DISTRICT.

ABERDEEN

DISTRICT.

STANLEY DISTRICT.

AI

Harbour.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

838

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271

168 1,034

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TOTAL AT THE Different AGE PERIODS.

day of December, 1921.

1 month and .under 12

months.

1 year

years.

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and under 5

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bit

+ 15 years

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25 years and under 45

45 years

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12. Chorea

73. (a) Hysteria Neuralgiá Sciatica

(b) Neuritis

74. (a) Idiocy, Imbecility...

(b) Abscess of brain.............

(c) Cerebral tumour.

(d)........

75. Diseases of the Eyes and their

annexa

76. (a) Mastoid disease....

(b) Other Ear diseases.

and

1

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77. Pericarditis

(b) Infective endocarditis

78. (a) Myocarditis

acute

(c) Endocarditis

unqualified (under 60 years)

79. (a) Fatty degeneration of heart

(b) Other organic disease of

heart

80. Angina pectoris

Embolism

and

1

81. (a) Aneurysm

(b) Arteriosclerosis

(c) Other diseases of Arteries...

Thrombosis..

82. (a) Cerebral

(6) Embolism and Thrombosis

other than cerebral........

83. (a) Phlebitis

(b) Varicose Veins

...

...

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1107

(c) Pylephlebitis.

(d) Varicocele

(b) Otherd iseases of Lympha-

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phaticus

tie system

eases to Circulatory system)

85. (a) Hæmorrhage, (other dis-

(b) Stokes

Adams

disease

(Brady's and Tachy-cardia)

86. Diseases of the Nose

(c) Epistaxis

87. (a) Laryngismus stridulus

(b) Laryngitis...

Carried forward.....

(c) Other diseases of larynx

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:

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN

COMMUNITY.

No. 1.

:

:

107

5

10

Q

Troops.

Women & Children.)

camp followers.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Brought forward....

88. Diseases of the Thyroid body

89. (a) Bronchitis...

(b) Bronchiectasis

90. (a) Chronic Bronchitis

(b) Chronic Bronchiectasis....

91. Bronchopneumonia

21

92. (a) Lobar pneumonia

38

(b) Pneumonia (type not dis-

tinguished)....

11

93. (a) Empyaema..

(b) Other pleurisy

No. 2.

No. 3.

654

368

:

RETURN shewing

No. 4.

VICTORIA,

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

24 163 181

150 170

119

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94. (a) Pulmonary infarct

(b) Pulmonary oedema

hypostatic congestion

(c) Hypy static pneumonia

and

(d) Collapse of lung (over 3

months)

95. Gangrene of the lungs

96. Asthma..

97. Pulmoneary Emyhysema....

98. (a) Fibroid disease of lung.

(b) Other diseases of Respira-

tory system....

99. () Diseases of Teeth and Gums

(oral sepsis)

(b) Thrush aphthous Stoma-

titic and anhthr

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BRITISH

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COMMUNITY.

Troops.

Women & Children.

camp followers.

Army.

Navy.

No. 1.

10

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No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

RETURN shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Regi.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

7

654

368

24

163 181

150

370

:

285

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No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

No 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

KOWLOON SHAUKIW DISTRICT. DISTRIC

Harbour.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

119 865 190 277

179 1,093 116

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-M 65

NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1921

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

No. 9.

No 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

65 190

277

:

KOWLOON DISTRICT.

SHAUKIWAN

ABERDEEN

STANLEY

Under 1

1 month and

1 year and

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

month.

under 12

under 5

inonths.

years.

Harbour.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Beat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

:

179 1,093

116 101

39

58

86

20

00

28

2

17 189

12

30

34

7

1

1

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12

43

10

79

20

3

76

52

12

55

14

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:

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5

3

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6

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25

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24

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Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

2 214

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Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

4

507

Chinese.

6

·

623

86

3

674

241

2

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Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

KARAKAülder.

1 year and under 5

years.

5 years and under 15

years.

15 years and under 25.

25 years and under 45

45 years

and

60 years

under 60

and over.

Age Un- known.

GRAND TOTAL.

years.

years.

years.

day of December, 1921.

1 month and under 12

mouths.

Non-Chinese.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

507

9 623

:

3 674

:

:

2

1

Non-Chinese.

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3 397

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1 241

2

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:

:

1

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Non-Chinese.

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Non-Chinese.

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2223

24 559 47 1,511

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90. (a) Chronic Bronchitis

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:

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94. (a) Pulmonary infarct....

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95. Gangrene of the lungs

96. Asthma.

97. Pulmoneary Emyhysema...

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(b) Other diseases of Respira-

tory system.....

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(oral sepsis)

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titis and aphthoe....

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and annexa

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(b) Ludwig's Angina.......

(c) Other diseases of Pharynx

101. Diseases of the Oesophagus...

102. Gastric ulcer

103. (a) Gastritis

(b) Other diseases of the

stomach

104. and 105:-

(a). Choleraic diarrhoea

(b). Diarrhoea undefined.

(c). Enteritis

(d). Gastro-enteritis

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M (1)

P

MEDICAL REPORT

FOR THE YEAR

1921

M (1) 3

ANNUAL MEDICAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING

31st DECEMBER, 1921.

CONTENTS.

I.--Administrative :

(u.) Staff,

Leave of absence, Appointments, Resignations, etc., Changes in Staff, (.) Financial,

II.-General Remarks,

Vital Statistics,

III. Meteorology,...

IV.--Hospitals,

V.-Lunatic Asylum,

VI.-Kowloon and New Territories,

VII. The Bacteriological Institute,

The Chemical Laboratory,

The Office of the Health Officer of the Port,

VIII.--Chinese Midwives,

Chinese probationer nurses,

Medical Inspection of School children,

The University Clinics,

Buildings

Books added to the Libraries,.....

IX. RETURNS :-

Page.

5

6

7

9

9

9

12

12

13, 19

15

18, 60

20, 24

22, 31

22,37

21

21

22

14

23

23

Statistics of Diseases and Deaths (In-patients),

47

Statistics of Diseases, Kowloon Dispensary,...... Statistics of post-mortem examinations (Victoria),

60

63

Do.,

do.

(Kowloon),...

67

Statistics-Venereal Diseases,

Statistics from the Bacteriological Institute,......... 25, 27

45.

M (1) 5-

I.-ADMINISTRATIVE.

(a.) Staff:-

Principal Civil Medical Officer,

Medical Officers, Bacteriologist,

Health Officers of the Port and

1

5

1

Inspectors of Emigrants,... 2 Medical Officer, New Territories, Resident Surgeon, Tung Wah

Hospital,

Analyst,

Assistant Analysts,

Assistant Analyst (Temporary),

Nursing Staff :-

1

1

1

2

Matron,....

Nursing, Sisters,

1

16

Staff Nurses (Temporary), ..

Nurses,

Probationer Nurses (Chinese), Probationer Dressers (Chinese),

Wardmaster, European,

Co

2

9

8

Wardmasters Chinese,..

4

Female Attendant, (Asylum),...

1

Midwives, (Chinese),

Dispensers :--

Apothecary and Medical

Storekeeper,

Fifth Grade Apothecary's

Assistant,

Sixth Grade Apothecary's

Assistant.

Interpreter and Dispenser,

Clerical Staff :

Accountant,

Second Grade Clerk,

Fourth Grade Clerks,

1

1

1

1

1.

Fifth Grade Clerks,...

Sixth Grade Clerk,

Other Officers :—

Steward,

1

Sampler (Temporary),................

Third Grade

Laboratory

Assistant,

1

Fifth Grade

Laboratory

Assistant,

1

Linen Maid,

Wardboys, Amahs, Cooks and Others, 162

1

As the agreements of the Japanese nurses expired, Chinese nurses were appointed.

M (1) 6

LEAVE OF ABSENCE OF A MONTH OR MORE IN 1921.

Name

Appointment

From

To

H. A. Lawrence, Nursing Sister.

1st January.

14th March,

M. A. Lee,

Do.

7th January.

6th April.

L. Lace,

Do.

1st April.

J. O. Kille,..

Wardmaster.

24th May.

C. I. Watson,... Nurse.

E. A. Girling,... Nursing Sister. Ng Yuk,

First Clerk.

E. C. Maclaren, Nursing Sister. R. Tom,

Nurse. Bacteriologist.

H. H. Scott......

1st July. 5th August. 5th September.

1st December. 23rd October.

31st July.

16th October.

23rd October. 31st October. 5th December. 13th October. 25th November. 1st November. 30th November. 23rd November. 31st December.

Office.

M (1) 7

Appointments.

Name.

Date

Remarks.

1921.

Health Officer of the Port, F. T. Keyt,

1st January.

Medical Officer,

A R. Esler,

24th January.

On probation.

2nd Health Officer of the

Port,

B. H. Mellon,...... 28th September.

Do.

Nursing Sister,

H. E. Williams,... 24th January.

Do.

Do.,

M. E. Pipkin,.......

30th May.

Do.

Do.,

B. Thomason,

30th July.

Do.

Dó,,

E. M. Smith, ....

27th December.

Do.

Probationer Nurse,.

Do..

I. Anderson,

15th February.

M. Gomes,

1st May.

Do.,

G. Chan,

Do.

Do.,

J. Cheung,

Do.

Do.,

D. To,......

Do.

Do.,

L. Tsan,.

1st October.

Do,,

N. Pau,

Do.

Do..

H. Montinola, .....

Do.

Do.,

A. Anderson,......

Po.

Probationer Dresser, ...... Lo Fong Yu,......

16th December.

Interpreter and Dispenser,

Chung Kam So,...

27th July.

On probation.

Sixth Grade Apothecary's

Assistant,

Fok Chin Pang,... 17th November,

Do.

Female Attendant,.

A. Dawson,

Wardmaster,

W.R.C. Woods....

16th January.

24th May.

Lunatic Asylum.

Do.

Linen Maid,

C. Allen,

1st May.

(Temporary).

Assistant Analyst,

Tam Yam Yuek... 1st September.

Do.

Office.

M (1) 8

Resignations, etc..

Name.

Date

Remarks.

1921.

Medical Officer,

H. E. Murray,

17th January.

(Temporary appt.)

Do.,

To Ying Kwan,...

28th February.

Do.

Female Attendant,

Nursing Sister,

Do.,

Do.,

A. M. Taylor,......

M. H. Purves, ...!

M. A. Lee,

H. E. Williams,...

15th January.

Do.

29th March.

Resigned.

7th April.

Retired on Pension.

Do.,

Staff Nurse,

D. I. Dottridge,...

6th August.

15th December. 15th December.

Invalided.

Resigned.

I. Hemni,

30th September.

Expiry of agreement.

Do.,

I. Yamamoto,......

Do.

Do.

Do.,

S. Ebato,

Do.

Do.

Do.,

M. Yamaguchi,

Do.

Do.

Do.,

S. Kawamoto,

28th December.

Du.

Yeung Mo Kit,

M. Willis,

Cheng I. Kam, ...

Ho Iu Ting,

Chan To Wang,...

Midwife,

Linen Maid,

Assistant Analyst,

Sixth Grade Apothecary's

Assistant,

Probationer Dresser,

Interpreter and Dispenser, J. Muckerji, ......

30th September. Invalided.

15th December. 15th December.

26th July.

Appointment Ter-

minated.

31st July.

Resigned.

30th April.

(Temporary Appt.)

8th August.

Do.

Resigned.

- M (1) 9

CHANGES IN THE STAFF.

Dr. G. P. Jordan resigned the appointment of Health Officer of the Port and Inspector of Emigrants from the 31st December, 1920, and Dr. F. T. Keyt, the Second Health Officer of the Port, was promoted to the post.

Dr. J. T. Smalley, Medical Officer, Kowloon and the New Territories, returned from leave and resumed duty on the 17th January. The appointment of Captain H. E. Murray, I.M.S. as Acting Medical Officer, Kowloon, &c., terminated on the same date.

Dr. C. W. McKenny acted as Second Health Officer of the Port from January 1st to 24th.

Dr. A. R. Esler, Medical Officer, arrived in the Colony on 24th January and assumed duty as Acting Second Health Officer of the Port and Inspector of Emigrants until the arrival of Dr. B. H. Mellon on the 28th September.

Dr. To Ying-kwan resigned his appointment as a temporary medical officer on the 28th February.

Dr. H. H. Scott, the Bacteriologist, was granted leave of absence from the 23rd November and is still on leave. Professor C. Y. Wang was appointed to act in place of Dr. Scott.

The appointment of the Japanese Staff Nurses expired during the year and eight Chinese probationer nurses were appointed in their places.

(6.) FINANCIAL,

The amount sanctioned in the Estimates was $368,794 and the actual expenditure was $378,128.77 cts.

The Revenue received was as follows:

Medical Treatment,

Medical Certificates, .

Bacteriological Examinations,

Fees for Chemical Analyses,

Bills of Health,

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

II.—GENERAL REMARKS.

$ 45,726.32

30.00

2,640.50

22,143.50

11,340.00

104,605.00

In comparing the prevalence of certain of the infectious dis- eases in the last two years malaria, enteric fever, and small-pox seem to have been more frequent than they were the year before. The increase in the cases of malaria is reported from the Civil Hospital only. The number of typhoid cases is almost the same, 115, as that for the previous year; the increase in cases of para- typhoid reported being a definite one, possibly due to the fact that it is because of a more accurate diagnosis of the condition, rather than to any positive increase in the number of cases. Plague,

Year.

M (1) 10

cerebro-spinal fever, diptheria, and dysentery have not been more in evidence than they were in the earlier period. Influenza had been for many years before 1918 a comparatively slight cause of sickness, but since that year it has been a regular visitor, frequent- ly in epidemic form, and affecting all nationalities. It occurs at all times of the year and seems to be independent of the condition of the weather. The number of cases reported from the different institutions was 972 for the year. There were 1,328 in 1920. The number of deaths reported as due to influenza was 542 and 303, for the last two years respectively. Except in the case of small-pox and paratyphoid fever, the amount of infectious diseases in the year under review compares favourably with the years preceding; this is shown in tabular form :

:་

Plagne.

Small-pox.

Cerebro-spinal fever.

Cholera.

1917

38 595

0

0

69 188

1918

266

32

1,232

118

247

1919

464

27

269

46

50

133

1920

138

34

158

6

76

118

1921

150

191

125

5

85 115

*9

12849

3

Cerebro-spinal fever. This disease appeared in epidemic form in 1918; the number of deaths caused by it in each of the four years 1918-1921, being 968, 204,103 and 73, respectively. As usually happens where the exact conditions in which a disease originates are unknown, overcrowding and defects in sanitation are assumed to be the causes. But certain peculiarities in the distribution and extension of this disease seem to imply that al- though indifferent sanitation may be one of the factors concerned, it is not to be the governing factor in its causation. For cerebro- spinal meningitis is often distributed irregularly even amid conditions of overcrowding and squalor; and, it has broken out not infrequently among townspeople and soldiers, particularly in barracks, under circumstances in which insanitary conditions could be excluded, or, at all events, were not discoverable. Or it may be confined within narrow limits, although the defects of hygiene may be as great round about as in the areas affected. Epidemics have occurred which were confined to the inmates of one institution, to one regiment in a garrison, even to one block of houses. Overcrowding then seems to have no special significance in causing the disease, but only a general one of the same value that it has for many other infective diseases by providing suitable conditions for their development.

As to its contagiousness, the observation is commonly made that attendants on the sick, even those in close or continuous con-

Diptheria.

Typhoid.

Paratyphoid.

M (1) 11

tact with the sick, are seldom attacked.

On the other hand it has often been transported from one place to another by people, soldiers, for example, moving about. If these observations be accurate, it does not seem too far-fetched a notion, that we have to deal with a disease whose origin and dissemination appear to agree in many respects with those of typhus; and like typhus, many of its special characters may be best explained by supposing an insect to be the carrier of the organism which causes cerebro- spinal fever.

Venereal Diseases.-The evidence available goes to show that there has been an increase in the number of persons who apply for treatment. That there has been a real increase in the amount of venereal disease is uncertain. It seems to me probable that the larger number of cases returned is due to the fact that patients seek treatment more frequently than they used to do because of the greater attention which is paid to the subject today; and, also, to the fact that the modern methods of diagnosis are more commonly used. The returns from several hospitals and institutions for the last ten years are summarised and submitted in this report. They should be regarded as being only approximately accurate.

Tuberculosis. Dr. H. Scott, the Government Bacteriologist concluded an investigation into tuberculosis as a cause of death in Hongkong, especially with regard to the prevalence and character of the disease in children. He summarises the enquiry thus: "A very brief experience as medical officer in charge of the mortuary sufficed to show that tuberculosis is a frequent cause of death in Hongkong, and I deemed it an investigation well worth under- taking to determine the varieties of the disease as met with here, the portals of entry, the mode of spread, and, if possible, to determine the primal cause or causes responsible for the condition and those aiding its dissemination, with a view to elucidating measures for its prevention."

He is of opinion that the prevalence of the disease is closely connected with social and economic conditions; that the ingestion of tuberculous milk, has no influence here, for Chinese children do not drink it, nor does it arise from the use of tuberculous meat ; that the chief predisposing causes of the prevalence of tuberculosis are overcrowding and absence of sunlight from the living room; but the direct cause of this prevalence is the Chinese habit of expectorating at all times and places.

As to the portals of entry and mode of spread of tuberculosis, in a series of 300 examinations Dr. Scott estimates that in 72 per cent. the portal of entry appeared to be by the respiratory tract, and a little more than 12 per cent. was of alimentary origin; in the remainder of the cases the primary portal was not certainly ascertained; but cases of isolated primary tuberculosis of the intestine very rarely occur in Hongkong in his experience.

M (1) 12

VITAL STATISTICS.

The estimated population of the Colony amounts to:-

British and foreign civilians.........

Chinese civilians

Total number of births, Chinese

Total number of births, Non-Chinese ......

;-

14,100

571,780

3,253

365

The general civil birth rate is 6·1, and the Chinese birth rate, 5.68 per 1,000.

The total number of deaths was 11,880 and the general death rate was 20-27 per 1,000. Of these there were 11,604 Chinese and 276 non-Chinese civilians, and the death rate was respectively 20-29 and 18:08.

Infantile mortality.-15 non-Chinese and 1,065 Chinese infants died who were less than a month old, and 23 non-Chinese and 2,663 Chinese infants who were more than a month but less than a year old at the time of death. This makes the total number of deaths at these ages to be 38 non-Chinese and 3,728 Chinese. The registration of deaths is compulsory and the figures quoted are reliable. But this does not apply to the figures for the birth rate as the Chinese often do not register a child until it has lived for a certain time. (These statistics are derived from the

M. O. H's, report for the year.)

III. METEOROLOGICAL RETURNS, 1921.

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERA- TURE.

HUMI- DITY.

Max. Mean. Min.

Rel.

Abs.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Rain.

Direction. Vel.

ins.

p.c. ins.

p. c.

hours. ins.

points. miles p.h.

January,

February.

March,

30.21 64.2 58.8, 54.1 30.12 64.8 59.7 | 55.9 30.05 68.9 63.959.5| 78|0.48

66 0.34 53 68 0.35

183.8

214.7

0.195 NE by E: 9.1 1.040 E by N

13.0

118.4 4.505 E by N

9.4

April,

. 29.98, 76.4 71.9; 68.7

81

0.64

126.2 2.820 E

10.6

May,

June,..

29.80 81.3 77.1 | 74.1 29.72 85.2 81.0 77.8

88 0.82

89.9 33.785

ESE

9.7

84 0.89

155.9 14.740

SE

10.7

July,

August,

29.79 86.2 81.6 77.8 29.69 87.4 82.2 76.6

$1 0.88

258.2 11.875

ESE

11.0

82 0.90

249.0 15.445

8.5

September, 29.86 84.4 80,0, 76.8

75 0.78

201.0 12.100

11.3

October,

30.06 81.0 | 75,8: 72,3 |

69 0.62

264.70,395

11.4

November.

December,

30.10 75.5 69.8; 65.6 30.16. 69.3 64.5 61.3

58 0.42

61

182.1 0.220

ENE

12.5

70 ! 0.43

64

164.5 0.220

E by N

11.6

Mean or

- 29.96 | 77.0 72.3 | 68.574.9 0.63 65

!

220.64 97.340

E

10.7

Total,... J

M (1) 13

IV.-HOSPITALS; INSTITUTES, &c.

The Civil Hospital.--Drs. W.B.A. Moore and C.W. McKenny were the officers attached to this hospital for the year under review Dr. To Ying Kwan also acted as a medical officer, temporarily employed, in January and February. The nursing staff consisted of a matron, 13 nursing sisters; 2 nurses: 8 Chinese dressers, and 5 Japanese staff nurses. The Japanese were replaced later on in the year by Chinese probationer nurses.

In-patients.-4,815 were treated in hospital, the daily average being 1524; 63 were in the first class; 223 in the second; and 4,529 in the third class. In the previous year there were 4,701 in-patients, and the daily average was 152.

Out-patients.-27,322 persons attended the out-patient depart- ment; 857 persons were vaccinated. In 1920 there were 31,196 out-patients and 589 persons were vaccinated.

Nationalities of patients.

Europeans,

Indians,

Chinese and Others,.

688

943

.3,185

Of this number 3,944 were males and 871 females.

Deaths, -276 patients died, and 90 of these died within twenty

four hours after admission.

The death rate was 5.7 per cent.

188 males died, the death rate being 47 per cent.

88 females died, the

19 Europeans

20 Indians

237 Asiatics

10:1

"

2.7

;

""

"

>>

2-1

""

"

**

7.4

>"

>"

25

*

Operations.-905 were performed under general anaesthesia, including those of the University Clinic. The Xray apparatus was out of order for two months, but was put right eventually and 169 examinations were made with it; it continues to work satisfac- torily. The more important of the operations performed were :-

For the removal of benign tumours,

24

92

"

""

"

"

malignant cysts,

12

>>

13

"

לי

tuberculous glands,

35

Removal of sequestra,..

For varices,

The plating of fractures,..

Excision of superior maxilla,

For necrosis of lower jaw, Excision of the knee joint, Amputation through the arm,. Amputation

39

thigh, leg,

1

5

11

7

4

1

20

8

1

M (1) 14-

Trephining for intracranial haemorrhage,

depressed fractures of skull,

Excision of tongue, partial, Thyroidectomy,

Hernia, radical cure of,

1:ཀ སྐད

2

59

33

strangulated,

ventral,

..

Removal of breast,

Laparotomy (exploratory),.............

>>

Gastrotomy,

for wounds of viscera, for septic peritonitis,.

Gastro-enterostomy,

For abscess of liver,

Cholecystectomy,

Cholecystotomy, Abscess of spleen, Nephrolithotomy, Removal of spleen,

Suprapubic cystotomy,

Litholapaxy,

Prostatectomy,

44

Perineal section for rupture of urethra, Ovariotomy,

Caesarian section,

6

1

2

4

9

2

1

3

5

1

2

1

1

8

11

1

1

The Police Force. The number of admissions to hospital. in which are included cases admitted on more than one occasion, was 977; (in 1920 this number was 1,076); of these 154 were Europeans, 472 Indians, and 351 Chinese. The conditions for which treatment was sought were chiefly malaria, influenza, in- juries, and various diseases and disorders of the digestive and respiratory apparatus.

According to the returns, malaria was more prevalent than in the former year, 152 cases having been reported as compared with 109. Two Europeans, nine Indians, and one Chinese were found unfit for further service and were recommended to be in- valided. Three Chinese died in hospital, the causes of death being pneumonia, apoplexy and beri-beri.

The University Clinics.-The Surgical Clinic is under the direction of Mr. Kenelm H. Digby, M.B., F.R.C.S. The Ho Tung Professor of Clinical Surgery, 752 cases were under his care and 401 operations were performed. Clinical instruction is given in the wards daily, and a special clinic for out-patients is held every week. It is found of great value to the patients because it allows of the cases being followed up after they leave hospital. The average number attending was twenty-two.

The teaching of clinical medicine was performed by one of the lecturers on this subject, Dr. C. W. McKenny, the other lecturer, Dr. Aubrey, being on leave for most of the year. Dr.

M (1) 13

A

Moore was in charge of the teaching of practical obstetrics. house surgeon and a house physician were appointed for each half

year.

The Maternity Hospital.-699 patients were admitted, 278 of whom were treated as free patients. 326 male children and 254 female were born alive and 36 were stillborn. Six patients bore twins. The remainder of the patients were cases of false pains, miscarriage and abortion; amounting in all to 89 such cases.

Six of the mothers died; puerperal eclampsia, septicaemia. malaria, pneumonia, each caused the death of a patient, and acute nephritis caused two deaths. The nationalities of the patients were, Europeans 65, Japanese 17, Indians 48 and Chinese 568.

The Lunatic Asylum.--Drs. W. B. A. Moore and C. W. McKenny were the medical officers in charge of this institution 300 patients were admitted; 174 were brought by the police ; 229 were free patients. Eight patients died.

:

Table I.,

Nationality and Sex of Patients treated in 1921.

Nationality.

Remain-

ing at Admit- end of ted.

1920.

Total number treated.

Dis- charged.

Died.

Remain- ing at

!

end of 1921.

M. F. M F. M.

F. M. F. ML. F.

M.

F.

Europeans,..

Indians,

12

22

00

23

20

∞0

23

3 5

10

3

1

1

Chinese,

Japanese,

1 162 81

82 156 76

12

Malay,

Filipino.........

0

0

O

Total,

12

6 193 89 205

95 186

84 6 2 14

8

00

M (1) 16

Table II.

Return of Diseases and Deaths in 1921,

Remaining in

Yearly Total.

Total

Remaining

in

Diseases.

Hospital

Cases

at end of

1920.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Dis- charged.

Treated.

Hospital at end of

1921.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Epilepsy (major)

Mental Diseases

Errors of Development:-

Imbecility

Idiocy

Disorders of Function:-

Mania

Melancholia

Delusional Insanity Insanity of Toxemia... Infective and Other.

General Conditions:-

Dementia

Syphilitic Insanity :-

General paralysis of

the insane

Insanity due to Al-

cohol

Under Observation

43

2

::

::

རྩམའ::

108

99

112

12

12

15

13

11

14

254

9 000

9

3

2

1

::

31

1

29

35

5

10

3

95

Total 1921

18

1920.....

***

282

14

210

"

10

:

09.00

5

6

1

10

94

333

10

98

2

270

300

22

203

224

18

M (1) 17 -

The Victoria Hospital for Women and Children.-195 patients were admitted in 1921, and 213 in 1920. Two deaths occurred, one on account of tuberculosis of the lungs, and the other because of hyperpyrexia, the result of malaria.

The number of cases of whooping cough was ten, which was greater than usual, and there were fourteen cases of malaria as compared with eleven the year before. There were seven cases of influenza, while in the preceding year there were sixteen; no cases of dengue occurred although fifteen cases were treated a year earlier. Two cases of typhoid and four of paratyphoid were treated, as compared with seven cases of paratyphoid in the previous year. Cases of influenza, diptheria and dengue were much less frequent than in the previous year.

Malaria was slightly more prevalent than in the preceding year. The diarrhoea of infants, which is so apt to occur in the summer and autumn, was not so common. The fourth quarter of the year, the one in which much sickness usually occurs, was healthier than usual.

The Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Kennedy Town.-Dr. D. J. Valentine was the medical officer in charge; as occasion required nursing staff was supplied from the departinent. Twelve cases of small-pox were admitted and seven persons who had been in contact with patients affected with small-pox, were under observation; of the twelve patients, three died, none of whom had ever been vaccinated. Seven patients were admitted in December, all of whom came directly from Shanghai, where the disease was epidemic at the time.

Victoria Guol Hospital.-Dr. D. J. Valentine was in medical charge; the general health of the prisoners was satisfactory. 4,990 prisoners were admitted, of these 921 were physically unfit for hard labour.

The daily average number of prisoners was 600.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

Chinese (Male),..

Chinese (Female),..

1

7

548

41

The daily average of sick in hospital 6·6.

The daily average of out-patients, 25.2.

Thirteen prisoners died and four were released on medical grounds.

were

Among the more important diseases and ailments treated

Pulmonary tuberculosis, 22 cases with 3 deaths. Malaria,

25

1

>>

Dysentery, (Protozoal),

9

1

**

>>

Enteric fever,

5

""

Scabies,

223

Gonorrhoea,.

121

Venereal sores,.

53

Opium habit,

100

M (1) 18

Lai-chi Kok Gaol.-Dr. Smalley was in medical charge of these prisoners, the daily average number of whom was 153. There was a fair amount of malaria among the staff and prisoners, and quinine parades were in force throughout the year.

An epidemic of influenza occurred but was of short duration. The Medical Officer remarks that the boys reformatory has filled a long felt want and the improvement in their appearance after a short stay at Lai-chi Kok has been very evident.

VI. KOWLOON AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

Captain H. E. Murray 1.M.S. continued to perform the duties of Medical Officer in charge of the work in this district until Dr. Smalley returned from leave on the 18th January. Dr. Luk Chuen-hsuen was stationed at Tai Po Market and worked in the New Territories under the supervision of Dr. Smalley.

The Dispensary, Kowloon.-15,838 persons attended this year, and 11,317 attended last year. These numbers include people who visited the dispensary on more than one occasion. Included in the total are 510 patients who were vaccinated.

The general health of the police force has been good and so has that of the staff of the railway, both European and Chinese Those members of the Chinese staff of the railway whose work requires them to be free from defects of vision were examined twice during the year in order to exclude those who did not attain to the proper standard.

The stretcher cots in the trains and the medical chests and stores were maintained. Twelve of the employees on the railway passed the examinations in First Aid work.

The Medical Officer reports that the infectious diseases which he treated were :-

Cholera, Typhoid, Paratyphoid,

Puerperal fever,..

Small-pox, Plague,

.....

Cerebro-spinal ferer,

1 case.

32

15

2

31

101

""

1

25

9

3,055 patients attended as out-patients at the Tai Po Market Dispensary, which is a slight increase of the number in the previous year. The people in the territory are becoming more favourably inclined to modern methods.

The Tung Wa Hospital.-The new wing of this hospital was completed during the year; it provides accommodation for one hundred and twenty patients.

- M (1) 19

The Chinese staff consists of G. H. Thomas M.D.. B. S., Fok Wing Tai, M.B., B.S., Chiu Chu San, M.B., B.S.; all of whom are graduates of the University of Hongkong. The Directors sane- tioned the appointment of a third medical officer. Dr. C. W. McKenny continued to act as the Visiting Medical Officer on be- half of Government.

A résumé of the work done is given in the statement which follows:-

1921.

1920.

Cases remaining in hospital from 1920, Admitted,

330

262

6,881

7,129

Total number of in-patients treated,

7,211

7.391

Deaths,

1,813

1.819

Remaining in hospital,

257

330

Under Chinese treatment,

3,329

3.362

Under Western treatment,

3,882

4,029

Deaths (Chinese treatment)-(305)

moribund),

1.028

1,099

(Western treatment)-(mori-

bund, 197),

785

720

Males,

4.592

4,928

Females,

2,289

2,201

Bodies brought to hospital mortuary.........

1,363

1,532

Bodies sent to Public Mortuary for

autopsy,

549

760

Free burials,

4.895

5.228

Destitutes sheltered,

2,014

901

Out-patients (Chinese treatment),

98,763 125,946

Eye Clinic Western treatment),

(Western treatment),

24,238 22,643

2,792 2.423

2,865

1,256

805

789

292

311

Eye Operations,

93

98

Number of vaccinations performed, Confinements,

Operations performed under general

anaesthesia,

The two diseases beri-beri and tuberculosis, more particularly as this affects the lungs, together account for a quarter of the total number of patients, and this has been the case for many years. The number of cases of plague has been much the same in each of the last two years, between seventy and eighty cases being treated each year.

The same applies to cerebro-spinal fever, sixty to seventy patients having been treated in each period.

A considerable number-2,792-attended for affections of the eye, and 93 operations were performed in this department. Dr. Harston, and during his absence, Dr. Thomas, was in charge.

The teaching of clinical medicine. One of the University lecturers in clinical medicine teaches this.

M (1) 20

The extension of the building, which is of a more modern nature than the older part of the hospital, will make the place more useful for the training of students.

The maternity department is conducted on European lines and 805 patients were treated.

The branch of the Tung Wa Hospital at Kennedy Town is used for Chinese suffering from small-pox and 32 patients were admitted with this disease, of whom 18 died,

The Board of Directors have made many improvements in recent years by providing a new operation theatre, a midwifery department with a special operation room, an improved dietary scale, and more attention is paid to the cleansing of the hospital.

The Directors have also decided to build a new out-patient department in 1922. The provision of a well trained nursing staff will probably come in due time.

The Kwong Wa Hospital.-Dr. Smalley was the Visiting Medical Officer during the year, except for a few days in January. when Captain H. E. Murray, L.M.S. acted in this capacity. The Chinese Medical Officers attached to the hospital were B. C. Wong M.B., B.S.; and S. C. Woo, M.B., B.S.; for the first quarter; K. W. Ip, M.B., B.S.; and K. K. Wong, M.B., B.S.; for the remainder of the year. A beginning has been made to improve the nursing by the appointment of six Chinese probationer nurses.

Number of patients treated,

deaths,

Under Chinese treatment

European treatment,

4,291

1,026

28 per cent.

72 per cent.

Number of out-patients,

Under Chinese treatment,

European treatment,

Casualty cases,.

Number of confinements,

Operations performed under general

anaesthesia,

36,160

27 per cent. 73 per cent.

352

644

176

VII. THE BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

The work for the year consisted in the routine examination of clinical material for diagnostic purposes, and of the preparation of various vaccines; the making of calf lymph, and of the vaccine for the treatment of rabies, and the preparation of serum for the treatment of cerebro-spinal fever. The various water supplies of the Colony were examined every month. Dr. Scott being on leave since November, the report is by the Acting Bacteriologist, Professor C. Wang.

THE PUBLIC MORTUARIES.

In Victoria.--3,471 post-mortem examinations were conducted here. In addition upwards of 77,000 rats were examined to ascertain the presence or absence of plague amongst them: in seven only was plague found.

M (1) 21 -

In Yaumati.-1,368 bodies were examined at this mortuary. Of 32,710 rats which were examined, none were found to be infected with plague. In 1920 this was also the case.

In Kow-

loon the number of rats affected with plague has diminished gradually during the last eight or nine years. The statistics of the post-mortem examinations is appended.

VIII.-THE EMPLOYMENT OF CHINESE MIDWIVES.

Seven Chinese women trained in midwifery are employed in different districts of the Colony to attend the poorer classes of Chinese. In order to supply these women there are always six pupils under-going training in midwifery. The pupils during their course of training and the seven midwives employed in district work are paid for by Government. The number of cases attended by these midwives was as follows :—

Number of Confinements attended by Government Midwives in 1921.

1921.

Shaukiwan.

Yaumati.

Tai Po.

January

30

21

3

1

February

21

16

1

March

30

21

April

21

16

May

26

22

June

28

17

July....

32

23

August

19

23

September

32

21

1

October

26

24

November

31

15

December

30

13

Yun Long.

Tsun Wan.

Cheung Chau.

66 52

66

52

58

55

63

51

58

55

58

54

∞∞∞∞ TOOO7

N+N+N-OON-00

ONNNNO

Total

326

232

26

15

18

71

688

THE TRAINING OF CHINESE PROBATIONER NURSES.

During the year the training of Chinese as nurses was com- menced. Attempts to do this had not been successful hitherto, However, on the termination of the agreement of the Japanese staff nurses it was found that Chinese were willing to be trained and eight were appointed for the purpose.

Total.

- M (1) 22

THE MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.

For many years the children in certain of the schools have been inspected medically, and for the last three or four years this has been extended to other schools. The inspection is a thorough one and great benefit to the health of the children has resulted from it. The daily average number of scholars attending these schools is just over 2,500. The schools inspected are:-

Queen's College.

The Ellis Kadoorie School.

29

وو

Yaumati School.

Saiyingpun School.

Wantsai School.

Belilios Public School.

"

Praya East School.

""

Peak School.

39

Victoria British School.

""

School for Indians.

"

وو

two Kowloon British Schools.

THE WORK OF THE HEALTH OFFICERS OF THE PORT.

This consisted in the inspection of ships on their arrival; the medical examination of emigrants; and the attention necessary to passengers and ships placed in quarantine or under observation. 3,778 ships arrived last year, and 4,807 in the previous year, ex- cluding those from Canton and Macao. The numbers of emigrants for the last three years are 59,969; 105,258; and 155,994 respec- tively. Eight ships were detained because of the presence on board of patients suffering from infectious diseases. On seven of these small-pox existed, and 1,302 of the passengers and crew were vaccinated.

The Chemical Laboratory.

The staff of the laboratory consists of Mr. E. R. Dovey, Dr. Lubatti, and Mr. K. W. Lane. Mr. Tam Yam-yuek was appointed as a temporary assistant analyst on the 1st September.

The work included examination of articles for legal purposes; the examination of dangerous goods and of food and drugs; public water supplies; building materials; minerals; oils; and a miscellaneous list. The total number of analyses conducted was 1,311, nearly two hundred less than in the previous year. Special reports have been made on matters of practical importance, and experiments were carried on with the working of a septic tank. Investigations were undertaken to ascertain the quantity of tin in the deposits of wolfram in China, and to improve upon the tests for morphine, wood oils, and camphor. Samples of the water supply in many portions of the New Territory were examined and found to be of good quality for drinking purposes and to be suitable for use in industrial processes.

M (1) 23

Buildings.-A new building for the outpatient department at the Civil Hospital, and the addition of a wing for maternity cases at the Victoria Hospital, were begun. A new Chemical Laboratory and offices for the Principal Civil Medical Officer, and the Health Officer of the Port, received approval, as well as a new medical store. Sanction was given for the building of a hospital in Kowloon, and the question of the provision of further hospital accommodation in Victoria was discussed.

All of the buildings of the department have been maintained in good condition.

LIST OF BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARIES DURING THE YEAR. ·

Medical Library.-Taylor's Medical Jurisprudence; The Diagnosis of Nervous Diseases, by Sir Purves Stewart; Eden and Lockyer's Gynecology; Operations of Surgery; Rowlands and Turner's (Jacobson's); The Journal of Surgery, Gynecology and Obstetrics.

Bacteriological Institute.-The Journal of Infectious Diseases; The Journal of Experimental Medicine; The Journal of Hygiene; Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology; The Review of Applied Entomology, Series A.; The Review of Applied Entomology, Series B.; Bulletin of Entomological Research; Tropical Diseases Bulletin ; Tropical Veterinary Bulletin; Medical Science; Abstracts and Reviews; The Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology; Centralblatt für Bakteriologie (Referate); The British Journal of Experimental Pathology; Annales De L'Institute Pasteur; Archiv für Schiff und Tropen Hygiene; The Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine.

Chemical Laboratory.-Standard Methods of Chemical Analysis, by W. Scott; The Analysis of Minerals and Ores of the Rarer Elements by W. R. Schoeller and A. R. Powell; “Alcohol by Charles Simmonds; "Legal Chemistry and Scientific Criminal Investigation" by A. Lucas; Tables of Logarithms and Anti- logarithms" by E. Erskine Scott; Practical Organic and Bio- chemistry, by R. H. A. Plimmer; "The Sampling and Assay of the Precious Metals," by E. A. Smith; "Cement," by Bertram Blount; Microscopic Analysis of Metals, by Floris Osmund and J. E. Stead; Oils, Fat, Butter and Waxes," by Alder Wright and C. A. Mitchell; A Treatise on Inorganic Analysis, by J. W. Meller; Flesh Foods; Chemical, Microscopical and Bacteriological Examination; Production and Treatment of Vegetable oils, T. W. Chalmers; Theory and Use of Indicators, E. B. R. Prideaux ; Modern Steel Analysis by Pickard, (J. and A. Churchill); Analysis of Brass, Price and Mead, (J. Wiley & Co).

66

J. T. C. JOHNSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer,

M (1) 24-

BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

Report by C. Y. WANG M.D., B.SC., D.T.M. & H., D.P.H., M.R.C.P., Acting Government Bacteriologist.

PREPARATION OF CALF LYMPH.

Twenty calves were inoculated during the year. The total number of tubes of lymph issued was 24,389, as against 18,738 in the previous year. The value of the lymph according to Govern- ment Notification No. 380 of 1910 was $8,535.50 which exceeds that of last year by $4,446. The difficulty in obtaining buffalo calves for inoculation which had arisen owing to the prohibition of exportation of these calves from Kwong Chow Wan has been

overcome.

PREPARATION OF ANTI-MENINGOCOCCAL SERUM,

This is being steadily maintained. There were 64 litres of the serum in stock at the end of the year,

PREPARATION OF CONTAGIOUS ABORTION VACCINE.

The vaccine is regularly prepared and supplied on demand from the Dairy Farm Company.

PREPARATION OF TYPHOID, PARATYPHOID A. PARATYPHOID B. AND OTHER VACCINES.

As in the previous year, typhoid, paratyphoid A, paratyphoid B, and cholera vaccines have been prepared in large quantities in order that there be no delay in supplying them on demand from the medical practitioners.

PREPARATION OF RABIES VACCINE.

The steps for the preparation of this vaccine were taken in May, 1920, the original strain of virus is being obtained from Saigon by the kindness of the Director of the Pasteur Institute there. The virus is being steadily maintained by passage through

the rabbit.

EXAMINATIONS IN CONNECTION WITH CLINICAL WORK.

The appended table (Table I) gives the various materials dealt with, the number of each, month by month, and the total. It will be seen that the number of examinations exceeds that of the previous year by 983. Under the heading "Miscellaneous" are included the preparation of autogenous vaccines, examinations for leprosy, Rideal-Walker test of Disinfectants and the like, which are only occasionally asked for.

M (1) 25

EXAMINATION OF RATS FOR PLAGUE.

The examination is conducted at the Victoria Mortuary daily. Its results are embodied in Table II. It will be noted that the number found infected with plague was remarkably small.

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER SAMPLES.

The three sources of water supply of the Colony are Tytam, Pokfulam and Kowloon and samples from each-both the filtered and unfiltered-are submitted to examination monthly. The results of the examination are given in Tables III, IV & V.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATIONS AT THE VICTORIA MORTUARY.

These are treated of in detail in a separate report (Annexe 0).

Nature of Examination.

Jan.

Table I.

Special

Total | Total

for

gations.

1921.

1920.

| | Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Investi- for

M (1) 26 -

Widals.

æces for Cultivation

for

"Carrier” investigations,

Morbid Tissues for Section,

Sputa,

Pus,

Urine,

With B. Typhosus,

B. Paratyphosus A.,...

12

B.

222

12 17 20

17

12 17 20

""

For "Carrier" investigations,

Blood for Malaria, filaria,

counts, etc.,..

Wassermann reactions, Bacillus Diphtheriæ,

Meningococcus, .......... Typhosus, Paratyphosus,

Cholera, etc., Helminth ova,.

Amabæ of Dysentery,

CEE: 8220

20

For Medico-legal purposes,

Bacterial Analyses of Water,

Miscellaneous,.

+--- F650: UNN

:

79

50

9

16

15

17

16

11

12

6 11 10

888888

525 226

13I9

:

: co co co

37 37

37

53

37

53

37 37

53

888

:

28

36

28

36

28 36

59 71 129 169 163 164 137 122 123 116

17 29

33 38

19

31

9

ལུཿསྶཝཱ:༤སེ།

35

080000265

26

11

222 222

39

39

39

19

46

888 299

381

285

381

274

381

285

101

1,382

856

270

202

237

218

12

9

2

8

72

212

1

142

39 29

35

8

11

6

1

134

285

299

11 16

17

26

17

21

19

19

16

190

103

11

6

14

11

20

19

9

14

7

134

60

2

7

2

2

11

2

42

40

16

20

18

7

11

1

85

196

209

10

13

33

45

35

38

35

21

22

25

345

215

2

6

13

19

13

12

1

1

2

8

18

:

:

99

85

67

65

:

32

35

6

8

10

4

10

9

12

67

6

79

88

112

72

Total,

271

250 303 337 413 503

445

446 389 394 326 389

219 4,6853,702

- M (1) 27

Table II.

The Examination (post-mortem) of Rats.

Month.

Total. Male, Female.

Plague- Preg- infected. nant.

Strychnine

poisoning.

Newly

born and

not

classified.

January

5,958 2,899

3,054

739

384

February

5,058 2,479

2,579

596

295

March

6,178 3,108

3,070

716

328

April

6,095 3,062

3,033

753

:

340

May...

6,424 3,157

3,267

1

825

337

June

6,623 3,336

3,287

1

786

:

:

406

July....

6,762 3,468

3,294

5

852

397

August

6,835 3,383

3,452

912

:

:

378

September.

6,710 3,281 3,429

910

:

:

326

October

7,142 3,449 3,693

971

371

November

6,894: 3,383 3,511

902

359

December.

6,800 3,331 3,469

:

:

859

411

Total......77,474 38,336 39,138

10,021

4,332

Table III.

Results of the Bacteriological Examination of the Kowloon Water Supplies for the year 1921.

Coliform Organisms.

Rate

Total

Colonies

of

Sample.

Date.

on Agar

Filtra-

in lec at

tion.

37° C.

20 c.c. 10 e.c.

5 c.c.

1 c.c. O'lc.c.

Enteritidis sporo-enes.

Streptococci.

Presence of the Coli group.

Unfiltered, 3-1-21.

:

Filtered,

3-1-21.

Bottle broken in transit.

12 Group II only present in 5 c.c.

Unfiltered,

1-2-21.

57

Group III present in 60 c.c.

Filtered,

1-2-21.

53

Absent from 60 c.c.

Unfiltered,

7-3-21.

33

Filtered,

7-3-21.

15

Unfiltered,

4-4-21.

132

Filtered,

4-4-21.

9

Unfiltered,

2-5-21.

290

Filtered,

2-5-21.

22

Unfiltered,

6-6-21.

151

Filtered,

6-6-21.

11

Unfiltered,

4-7-21.

uncountable.

Filtered,

4-7-21.

18

Unfiltered,

8-8-21.

880

Filtered,

8-8-21.

14

Unfiltered,

5-9-21.

730

Filtered,

5-9-21.

15

Unfiltered,

3-10-21.

57

Filtered,

3-10-21.

12

Unfiltered,

7-11-21.

97

Filtered,

7-11-21.

22

Unfiltered,

5-12-21.

900

Filtered,

5-12-21.

85

++11 +1 +1 +++

+1 +1 +1 +1 +

+1+1

Group I.

Group IV.

Group IV.

M (1) 28 -

All samples were taken either immediately before or immediately after filtration.

Group III.

Group III.

The rate of filtration is given by the Water Authority in gallons per square yard per day. Classification of the Coli group is that of MacConkey, + Acid and Gas. L Acid only, - No Change.

Table IV.

Results of the Bacteriological Examination of the Tytam Water Supplies for the year 1921.

Rate.

Coliform Organisms.

Total

Colonies

of

Sample.

Date.

filtra-

tion.

on Agar

in lee at

37° C.

20 c.c. 10 c.c. 5 e.e.

1 c.c. 0.1 c.c.

Enteritidis sporogenes.

Streptococci.

Presence of the Coli group.

+1 +1

Unfiltered,

3-1-21.

57

Group IV type in 5 c.c.

Filtered,

3-1-21.

4

Absent from 60 c.c.

Unfiltered,

1-2-21.

60

Group II present in 10 c.c.

Filtered,

1-2-21.

6

Group II and III present in

c.c.

Unfiltered,

7-3-21.

30

Filtered,

7-3-21.

13

Unfiltered,

4-4-21.

63

Filtered,

4-4-21.

12

Unfiltered,

2-5-21.

63

Filtered,

2-5-21.

11

Unfiltered,

6-6-21.

90

Filtered,

6-6-21.

10

Unfiltered,

4-7-21.

330

Filtered,

4-7-21,

19

Unfiltered,

8-8-21.

203

Filtered, ...

8-8-21.

19

Unfiltered,

5-9-21.

965

Filtered,

5-9-21.

17

Unfiltered, 3-10-21.

33

Filtered,

3-10-21.

9

Unfiltered,

7-11-21.

193

Filtered,

7-11-21.

17

Unfiltered,

5-12-21.

257

Filtered,

47

+++++++ 1 + 1 + + +1 +1 +1 +

+

++++ | +++++

[ [ + ] + !+ + !+ !

Group IV.

Group I.

Group 11.

Group II.

Group IV.

M (1) 29.

5-12-21.

Group 2 and 3. Group 2 and 3.

All samples were taken either immediately before or immediately after filtration. The rate of filtration is given by the Water Authority in gallons per square yard per day. Classification of the Coli group is that of MacConkey, +

Acid and Gas. 1. = Acid only,

No Change.

Table V.

Results of the Bacteriological Examination of the Pokfulam Water Supplies for the year 1921.

Rate

Coliform Organisms.

Total

Colonies

of

Sample.

Date.

filtra-

tion.

on Agar

in lee

at 37° C.

20 c.c.] 10 c.c. 5 e.c. 1 c.e. 0·1 c.c.

Unfiltered,

3-1-21.

Filtered,

3-1-21.

Unfiltere·1.

1-2-21.

45

Filtered,

1-2-21.

1

Unfiltered,

7-3-21.

90

Filtered,

7-8-21.

8

Unfiltered,

4-4-21.

133

Filtered,

4-4-21.

23

Unfiltered,

2-5-21.

105

Filtered,

2-5-21.

7

Unfiltered,

6-6-21.

866

Filtered,

6-6-21.

12

Unfiltered,

4-7-21.

936

Filtered,

4-7-21.

35

Unfiltered,

8-8-21.

1,760

Filtered,

8-8-21.

111

Unfiltered,

5-9-21.

946

Filtered,

5-9-21.

38

Unfiltered,

3-10-21.

uncountable,

Filtered,

3-10-21.

28

Unfiltered,

7-11-21.

117

Filtered, ...

7-11-21.

14

Unfiltered,

Filtered,

5-12-21.

5-12-21.

113

11

Group IV type in 5 c.c.

Absent from 60 c.c.

Group II and III present in 5 c.c.

Absent from 60 e.c.

1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + + + 1 + 1 + 1│}

1+1+++ | +++ 1 + 1 + ! ++

T+ + + + + + + T

++ 1 +

Enteritidis -porogenies.

Streptococci.

Presence of the Coli group.

Group II.

Group IV.

Group IV.

Group II and III.

Group III.

Group I.

Group 3.

All samples were taken either immediately before

or immediately after filtration. The rate of filtration is given by the Water Authority in gallons per square yard per day. Classfication of the Coli group is that of MacConkey, + Acid and Gas. 1 Acid only, -No Change.

M (1) 30 -

+

M (1) 31

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY.

REPORT BY MR. E. R. DOVEY, F.C.S., A.R.C.sc., A.1.C., Government Analyst.

The number of analyses performed during the year was 1,311 as against 1,502 in 1920.

The following classification shows the nature of the work done :-

Chemico-legal.

Food and Drugs Ordinance,-Contd.

1921. 1920.

1921. 1920.

Toxicological examinations

(including 22 stomachs),

65

48

Port wine,

Articles for stains,

2

7

Pea Juice,

Corrosive liquids,

0

1

Rum,

6

Powders,

11

1

Sausage,

Explosives,

I

Sherry,

2

Damaged mail bags,

0

Sugar,

18

Herbs and roots,

4

Tonic wine,

0

1

Half sovereigns,

Vinegar,.

1

Liquids,

Whisky,

6

10

Fragments,

Materials from Fire enquiries,

6

Waters.

Dust from face,.....

Public supplies,.

36

36

Hypodermie syringes,

Distilled,

1

Wells,,

42

22

Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Sewage effluents,

2

Crackers,

Septic tank effluents,

124

Ingredients for explosives,

2

Seawater,

35

Liquid fuel,

40

74

Petroleum oil,

95

124

Building Materials.

Ships for inflammable vapour,

36

29

Asphalts,

Cement,

Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Paint,

Aerated waters,

2

Pigment,

Beef suet,

}

Varnish,..

Beer,

12

9

Wood Preservative,

2 $0 -O==

3

0

1

1

ཁ༢༤༤

≈ 2 2 ∞ ——

3

Brandy,

4

10

Burgundy,

0

Pharmacy Ordinance.

Champagne,

Chinese sauce,

Chinese wine,

Antimony oxide.

0

Cantharides,

1

Cinchona tincture,

1

Flour,

Cocaine,..

0

Fruit syrup,

Chinese ointment,

Fruit wine,

Glycerine,

1

Gin,

Medicine for poison,

0

3

Infants' Food,

1

0

Morphine,

{)

14

Jam,

0

Neoarsaminol,

1

Lard,

30

46

Nux Vomica Seeds,

1

Lemon juice,

0

Pills,

Ι

Liqueur,..

()

I

Potassium cyanide,

(

Meat, (Dried),

Quinine sulphate,

1

Milk, fresh,

80

61

Tincture of Opium,

1

0

Milk, condensed,

4

Zinc Sulphate,

1

Mineralogical.

M (1) 32

Miscellaneous,—Continued.

1921. 1920.

Coal,

52

26

Rattan,

Coke,

0

3

Prussian blue,

Metals,

100

206

Liquors,...

Ores,

158

216

Wattle Bark,

1921. 1920.

0

3

0

1

()

22

2

Soy,

Oils.

Rust,

Anise,

Camphor,

Camphor oil,

Cassia oil,

ོ ུ༤ ༥

54

45

Peanut cake,

19

45

Peanuts,..

.0

2

Perilla seeds,

24

44

Paraffin wax,...

Castor,

()

1

Renal Stones,

Linseed,

Lubricating,

Mineral grease,

Mineral oil,

Peanut,

Perilla,

Soya Beau,

Teaseed..

Wood,

75

NON-NOOR

Ampules,

0

i

Millet spirit,

0

Hemp,

Saltpetre,

Rat poison,..

0

I

0

4

Cattle food,

Ι

1

Carbolic soap,

10

28

Battery acid,

12

119

Battery plates,

3

Synthetic indigo,

Miscellaneous.

Crystals,

Coal tar disinfectants,

6

Indigo paste,

0

Urine,

Switchboard cable,

0

Sulphuric acid,

Dog biscuits,

4

0

Fertilizer,

Residue,.

3

0

Ammonium sulphate,

Fluid from ovarian cyst,

1

0

Acetic acid,

Copra,

2

0

Nitric acid,

Wood pulp,

0

Hydrochloric acid,

(

Chinese cakes,

Sodium sulphite,

0

Scale,

0

Sodium sulphide,

Lead arsenite,

1

0

Sodium carbonate,

0

Froth....

0

Sodium hydroxide,

3

Hydrometers,

Soda solution,

I

Stomach of dog,

Printing ink,

0

Soap,

Alcohol,

Arrack,

Bleaching powder, Borneol,

3

1

Total,................ 1,311 1,502

0

M (1) 33

TOXICOLOGICAL,

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations made during the year, were 40 cases of suspected human poisoning. The results of the

examinations are tabulated below

Results of Analysis.

No poison foumi

Opium found

Morphine found

Alcohol found

Arsenic found

Oxalic acid and Opium

Gelsemine

Strychnine

Atropine

Tuber of Arisaema Species

Total,

No. of Cases.

17

212-

3

1

1

1

I

1

40

PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES.

3. The monthly examinations of the Pokfulum, Tytam and Kowloon supplies have been carried out as usual and the results showed that the excellent quality of the water was being maintained.

The examination of the New Territory waters, more fully referred to in Par. XI. has shown that these well waters are in most cases exceedingly good, in many instances, being not inferior to the Hongkong supplies.

DANGEROUS Goods.

4. Of petroleum oil and liquid fuel 135 samples were tested during the year, The tanks of 36 steamers were tested with the Clowes-Redwood apparatus.

FOOD AND Drugs.

5. The following table gives the results of 90 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Department :-

Description.

No. of Samples Examined,

No. found Genuine.

No, found Adulterated.

Beer....

0

Brandy

3

3

0

Gin

3

3

0

Milk.

61

60

1

Port Wine..

4

0

Rum.....

3

3

0

Sherry

2

2

0

Whisky

6

6

M (1) 34

MINERALOGICAL.

6. The 258 samples of metals and ores examined during the year comprised the following:

Metals.

Ores.

Description.

1921.

1920. Description. 1921. 1920.

Antimony

4

Antimony

14

Brass

0

Arsenic

(

Copper

I

Barium.

1

Gold

0 Bismuth

2

18

Iron

Copper..

1

Lead

2

Graphite

3

Nickel

1

Iron

1

6

Silver..

10

28

Lead

1

2

Tungsten

0

Manganese

15

37

Tim

168

Molybdenum

0

Steel

0

Silica.

Zine

I

Silver

3

Shale

0

Tungsten...

105

124

Other Ores

Total,...... 100

206

Total,................

158

216

SAMPLING.

7. The amount of sampling done during the year is shown

in the following table :-

Anise Oil .................

Bismuth Ore.

3,300 cases. Saltpetre

38 tons.

Silver

100 cases.

Soy

865

Sugar...

"

4,000 tons.

7,292 bags. Tea Oil

Sulphuric acid

6,260 bags.

10 bars. 146 jars. 1,000 bags.

Camphor

Cassia Oil

Coal...

497 cases.

Copra.

Lard

15,000 cases. Tin

2,900 48,670 slabs.

Manganese Ore....

11,555 tons.

Wolfram

Peanut Oil..........

540 cases. Wood Oil

24 tons. 22.943 cases,

REVENUE.

8. The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $22,143.50 as against $33,415.00 in 1920.

The value of the year's work as determined from the Tariff of Fees (Government Notification No. 439 of 1918) is $31,083.50 as against $37,445.00 in 1920.

LIBRARY.

9. Several standard works of reference have been added.

66

- M (1) 35

SPECIAL REPORTS,

10. Special reports have been subjects: Lard Essential Oils Benzene storage", "Tin in Wolfram

>

66

supplied on the following "Crackers ", "Naphtha and Dyes Cocoanut Oil",

60

"Scale from Fuel Oil", "Bleaching Powder ", "The sampling of Ores ".

RESEARCH.

Septic Tank Operation.-A very considerable amount of work was done with the experimental septic tank built at the Bacteriolo- gical Institute. For a period of about three months this tank was operated under conditions as nearly normal as possible, and analyses made of the water entering and sewage leaving the tank each day. The construction of the tank was modified in several respects as a result of the analytical work and a design for an improved tank worked out. Altogether 161 analyses of effluents, sewage and seawater were carried out.

The results showed that in its improved form the tank gave a degree of purification somewhat greater than that usually obtained in the English sewage works, the percentage purification, calculat- ed from the amount of oxygen absorbed from permanganate being 81% as against 60% to 80% in the Home works.

Tin in Chinese Wolfram.-It has been found that some of the standard methods for determining the amount of tin in wolfram do not give accurate results when applied to certain Chinese wolframs. Dr. Lubatti has been testing the various methods of making this determination on a considerable number of specimens and has worked out a modified form of one process which vields very accurate results. This work is the subject of a paper which will shortly be published in the Journal of the Society of Chemical Industry.

New Territory Waters.-An investigation is in progress into the purity and constituents of the waters from the police stations and village wells of the New Territory. Twenty samples from all parts of the Territory have been obtained through the courtesy of the Police Department and subjected to complete analysis, the mineral constituents present being specially determined.

The results have shown that not only are the police stations supplies excellent but that the water from the village wells is in most cases surprisingly good. Not only is the water good for potable purposes but owing to its softness and low mineral content, is very suitable for manufacturing and industrial uses, should it ever be required for such purposes. It is proposed to examine in all from 60 to 80 samples.

Morphine Poisoning.-A certain amount of work has been done on the reduction of dioxymorphine to morphine by processes suitable for use in toxicological cases.

M (1) 36

Where potassium permanganate is administered in cases of morphine poisoning, the greater part of the morphine taken is converted into dioxymorphine, which does not give the reactions of morphine. The object of the investigation is to find a suitable process for re-constituting the morphine so that it may be separated and recognised by the usual methods.

Wood Oil.-An attempt was made by Mr. Lane to reach a definitive test for pure wood oil. The Insoluble Bromide Value was found useless for the purpose and work on the Titer Test is still proceeding. The influence of oxidation on the fatty acids during separation has to be solved.

Camphor. The Specific Rotation in alcohol has been tested and found valueless as an exact measure of the Camphor content.

A new method has been worked out by Mr. Lane for the estimation of small quantities of camphor oil in camphor by the iodine value and found of use as a confirmatory method.

12. STAFF.

Mr. I Cheng resigned on the 9th August last and Mr. Tam Yam-yeuk joined the staff as temporary Assistant on the 1st September, 1921.

10th January, 1922.

E. R. DOVEY, Government Analyst.

M (1) 37

THE OFFICE OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE PORT.

REPORT BY DR. F. T. KEYT, Health Officer of the Port.

During the year the work of the port was carried on by Dr. Keyt, assisted by Drs. McKenny, Esler, and Mellon,

Dr. McKenny was relieved by Dr. Esler on January 24th. Dr. Mellon arrived in the Colony on September 28th relieving Dr. Esler, and entering upon his duties as Second Health Officer of the Port.

The work of this office in Hongkong may be described under three headings viz :-

(a) The inspection of ships arriving in port.

(b) The medical examination of emigrants.

() Quarantine duty.

(a). THE INSPECTION OF SHIPS ARRIVING IN PORT.

During the year 3,778 ships arrived and were boarded by the health officers; the particulars of the voyage, names of the ports of call, dates of sailing, and any cases of sickness or deaths which occurred during the voyage were noted in the prescribed forms and attested by the master and the surgeon.

Of this number 2,783 were on the British, and 905 foreign register.

The river steamers from Canton, Wuchow and Macao are not visited, these as well as junks and smaller craft are only boarded in the event of any infectious disease occurring on them, they are then, as infected vessels, placed in quarantine and treated as such, under Section 23 Table L of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance of 1899.

(6). THE MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF EMIGRANTS.

During the year there was a great increase in emigration, vis: -155,994, as compared with 105,258 in 1920, and 59,969 in 1919.

M (1) 38

As usual the greatest number was for the Straits Settlements riz:-85,908, while 24,288 left for Java and 12,915 for British Columbia.

Table I gives the numbers of emigrants passed and rejected, and their ports of destination.

Table II shows the numbers of emigrants and of the crews dealt with month by month.

The wave of emigration reached its maximum in March when 22,730 were passed, while in February only 4,398 were passed, because of the disinclination to emigrate about the time of the Chinese New Year.

The total number rejected was 1,383, mainly for trachoma. parasitic diseases of the skin, and fevers. The reasons of their rejection are stated in Table III.

(c.)—QUARANTINE DUTY.

This involves the special examination of all vessels arriving from ports which have been declared infected, and vessels arriving with infectious cases on board. Such vessels flying the Q" flag proceed to the quarantine anchorage for Medical examination and the treatment necessary.

During the year 415 ships arrived in the quarantine anchorage; all passengers and crews were examined before they were allowed to go ashore. Of this number eight were detained, seven for small-pox and one for cholera.

Bangkok was declared an infected port on April 26th, 1919, on account of cholera, the restrictions were removed on April 23rd, 1921.

Formosan ports were declared infected by cholera on May 21st 1920, and remained so till April 29th 1921.

Saigon was declared infected by cholera on August 28th, 1920, and Shanghai by small-pox on December 10th, 1921.

Table IV gives the number of ships detained in quarantine, with the causes, dates and periods of detention.

Table V gives the total number of ships examined in quarantine, and the numbers of passengers and crews.

M (1) 39

The following is a summary of the total number examined.

during the year.

(1) Asiatic emigrants

.155,994

(2) Asiatic crews

51,990

(3) Arrivals from infected ports (including

crews),

55,843

The total number 263,827 is equivalent to 772 examinations

for each day of the year.

F. T. KEYT,

Health Officer of the Port.

M (1) 40

Table I.

The Examination of Emigrants aud Crews in 1921.

Ports of Destination.

Passed.

Crews.

Rejected.

Straits Settlements

85,908

13,861

742

Calcutta and Bombay

2,479

732

25

United States of America

6,997

13,311

57

Honolulu

6,963

19

...

Japan

455

British Columbia

12,915

12,383

59

Australia

1,792

2,555

42

Java Ports

24,288

1,221

228

%

British Borneo

3,576

1,927

34

Mauritius

1,479

356

5

Mexico

724

37

South America

1,324

1,218 -

15

South Sea Islands

1,216

115

9

Belawau Deli

5,071

917

108

South Africa

185

298

Jamaica

352

93

Havana and Panama

270

January

February

March

April May June July

August

September

October

November

December

Total

155,994

51,990

1,383

Table II.

The Examination of Emigrants and Crews.

Months.

Emigrants. Crews.

Rejections.

12,254

4,110

154

4,398

2,985

56.

22,730

4,357

286

17,856

4432

108

17,983

4,685

94

12,351

4,352

89

11,208

4,135

156

10,719

4,500

110

14,442

4,522

85

11,963

4,447

107

10,689

5,282

63

9,401

4,183

75

Total

155,994

51,990

1,383

Skin Diseases

Scabies..

Tinea

Favus

-M (1) 41–

Table III.

The Causes for Rejection.

Diseases.

Rejected.

274

32

1

Ichthyosis

Eczema

Other forms.

11

3

7

Eye Diseases :---

Trachoma

458

Conjunctivitis

7

Other eye Conditions...

1

Fevers

500

Jaundice

6

Anæmia and Debility

21

Deformities...

13

Enlarged Spleen..

18

Syphilis

13

Phthisis

3

Ulcer

Leprosy

Enlarged Glands.....

1

Other Causes

Total

1,383

Name of Vessel.

Table IV.

The names of ships and the reasons for their detention.

Port.

Cases.

Causes.

"Kanowna

66

'Huichow

"Ningchow

"Hyson

19

>>

Date.

Period of

Detention.

Kobeand Moji.

I

Small-pox.

14th Feb., 1921.

24 hours.

Bangkok.

1

́ Do.

24th Feb.. 1921.

Do.

Shanghai.

1.

Cholera.

11th Sept., 1921.

5 days.

Singapore.

3

Small-pox.

12th Oct., 1921.

25 hours.

"}

Shanghai & Manila.

1

Do.

5th Dec., 1921.

29

Shanghai.

1

Do.

11th Dec., 1921.

41

Do.

1

Do.

17th Dec., 1921.

27

Shanghai & Dalny.

Do.

18th Dec., 1921. :

30

"Golden State

“Mylie

>>

« Chenan

"Hoihow

M (1) 42

M (1) 43

Table V.

The examination of passengers and infected ports.

crews arriving from

Number of Number of

Number of

Month.

passengers.

Crew.

Ships.

January,

1.586

3,538

57

February,

913

3,731

64

March,

3,881

4,266

64

April,

2,637

4.258

68

May, June.

1,997 i

1,715

25

2,602

1,077

18

July,

2,022

675

11

August,

2,306

748

12

September,

2,253

493

6

October,

2.344

944

15

November,

1,572

1,023

18

December,...

4,813

4,449

57

Total,........

28.926

26,917

415

T

Number and Class of patients admitted during the past ten years with deaths. (Civil Hospital).

Class of Patients.

1912.

1913.

1914. 1915.

1916.

1917.

1918.

1919.

1920.

1921.

M (1) 44

Police,

657

771

728

731

552

550

695

981

1,076

977

Paying Patients,

735

667

723

749

775

795

1,037

1,503

1,803

1,623

Government Servants,.

219

257

312

274

325

329

358

168

196

350

Police Cases,..

380

370

283

352

344

401

416

430

537

477

Free,

710

728

696

979

1,062

1,217

1,171

844

1,089

1,388

Total,

2,731

2,793 2,742

3,085

3,058

3,292

3,677

3,926

4,701.

4,815

Total Deaths,

Percentage,

194

178

194

155

195

167

244

219

251

276

7·1

64

7.1

5:0

6.4

5:07

6.6

5.5

5.3

6.7

!

A. Statement showing the number of cases of Syphilis and Gonorrhoea reported from certain Hospitals

and Institutions during the last ten years:

Civil

Hospital.

Gaol

Hospital.

Kowloon Tung Wa Dispensary. Hospital.

Victoria Kowloon Mortuary. Mortuary.

Total.

- M (1) 45

1912.

Syphilis.

79

Gonorrhoea.

51

1913.

Syphilis.

76

Gonorrhoea.

56

1914.

Syphilis.

10

Gonorrhoea.

60

1915.

Syphilis.

Gonorrhoea.

53

1916.

Syphilis.

105

Gonorrhoea.

46

1917. Syphilis.

133

Gonorrhoea.

56

1918.

Syphilis.

89

ko mi co co on TO AN ICON O

74

203

21

389

138

8

198

70

157

141

2

454

80

84

223

97

160

101

1

444

102

53

217

290

104

234

716

230

36

421

222

139

296

284

21

190

117

251

10

N

769

352

696

353

38

449

252

108

357

816

Gonorrhoea.

66

202

48

316

1919.

Syphilis.

125

216

74

119

547

Gonorrhoea.

125

260

18

403

1920.

Syphilis.

148

Gonorrhoea.:

184

1921.

Syphilis,

181

Gonorrhoea.

140

121

=སྐ

10

205

161

317

9

850

2

249

29

464

53

221

249

152

14

718

160

42

463

Nomenclature,

M (1) 47

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

CIVIL HOSPITAL,

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain-

ing in Hospital on 31st Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total Cases

Admis- sions.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths, Treated.

on 31st

on 31st

Admis-

Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

-Deaths. sions.

Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st on 31st Dec., 1921, Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Admis- sions.

Deaths, Treated.

on 31st Dec., 1921.

INFECTIVE DISEASES.

Chicken-pox

Diphtheria

Dysentery :-

2

22

**

24

**

2

:

5

11

--

1

1

11

2

2:

24:7

:-

(a) Protozoal

(6) Bacillary

Enteric Fever :-

(a) Typhoid fever

(b) Paratyphoid fever

Erysipelas

Gonococcal infection

Influenza.

Leprosy :-

(a) Nodulor

(b) Auæsthetic

Madura Disease

Malaria:

(a) Benign tertian

(b) Sub-tertiau

(e) Malarial Cachexia

Measles

Meningococcal Infection :-

(a) Cerebro-Spinal Fever

Mumps

Plague...

Pyogenic Infection-Abscess

(a) Osteomyelitis..

10:00

co:

::

59

1

26

34

2

149

108

22228

157

108

1

00.00

3

3

:

7

338

56

: *

341

56

3

1

16

11

10

11

*=

16

I

1

3

3

Pyrexia of uncertain Origin

86

Relapsing fever

Rheumatic fever.

1

Septicemia

1

(b) Pyæmia..

10

:

5

::

Small-pox

Syphilis :-

(a) Acquired

:

(b) Congenital

Tetanus

Tuberculosis

210

3

214

7

1

7

2:

10

3

3

:

3

32

1222

35

6

Whooping cough

Carried forward...... 31

1,188

55

1,219

31

:

4

:

i ori

:

!

3

2

-

4

31

1

- CO

2

2

10

10

61

61

....

2 ++

31

....

.

16

16

:

1-

:.

83

2

83

Nomenclature.

M (1) 48

Table I,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st Dec., 1920.1

Yearly Total. Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Deaths. Treated.

Remain- Remain-

ing in

ing in Hospital Hospital

on 31st

on 31st Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total. Total ing in

Admis- sions.

Deaths,

Cases Treated.

Hospital

Remain- Remain-

ing in Hospital. on 31st

on 31st Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Total Cases Treated.i

Remain- ing in Hospital

-

on 31st

Dec., 1921.

Brought forward......

31

1,188 55

1,219

31

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM.

Diseases of the Nerves :--

Inflammation :-

(a) Localised

(6) Multiple

Diseases of the Spinal Cord :—

Inflammation (Myelitis).

Softening (Tabes dorsalis)...

(Disseminated Sclerosis)

""

Concussion

Diseases of the Cerebral Meninges :-

Inflammation

Tuberculosis

Diseases of the Brain :-

Inflammation

Concussion

Apoplexy

Paralysis.

Choren

Neuralgia

Epilepsy

Migraine

Neurasthenia

Hysteria

Ophthalmoplegia interna

Mental Diseases :-

Mania

Idiocy

Melancholia......

Dementia..........

Delusional Insanity..

1

::

5

1

2

~

2

12

12

12

15

23

2

2 -

24

15

21 2

1

61

1

61

1

1

6

6

6

12

1

11

4301

Carried forward..............

36 1,294 77

1,330

1

33333

35

:

:

72

72

83

2

83

:

Ι

::

:

89

:

::

ลง

2

2

:

89

7

Nomenclature.

M (1) 49 -

Table I,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

~

89

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain-

ing in Hospital on 31st Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total. Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st on 31st |Dec., 1921.Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total. Total

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Cases Treated

¡ Remain- Remain-

ing in

ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st on 31st Dec., 1921, Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total. Total

Remain-

Total

ing in

Cases

Admis-

Deaths, Treated. sions.

Hospital on 31st

Dec., 1991.

Brought forward

36

1,294

77

1,330

35

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM,-Continued,

Diseases of the Eye :-

Conjunctivitis.

Keratitis

Iritis

Glaucoma

ལ:::

Staphyloma.

Pterygium

Panophthalmitis

Diseases of the Ear:-

Inflammation of Ext. And. Meatus

Otitis Media (Acute).

Mastoiditis

Chronic Catarrh of middle ear

""

Suppuration

Diseases of the Nose :-

>>

Epistaxis.

28

30

13

13

7

7

Polypus

Diseases of the Circulatory System:-

Endocarditis

Myocarditis....

Valvular-Mitral

Aortic

Dilatation

Aneurysm Varix

Thrombosis of Veins

Diseases of the Blood:-

Anaemia

14

15

}

1

:

:

3

2

::

2

72

1

72

18

5

102 2∞

7

10 N N N

::

:

1

3

3

1

1

:

::

**

::

::

3

89

1

1

2

1

1

:

:

Co

Carried forward......

42

1,439

86

1,481 37

85

1

86

Chlorosis.

Pernicious Anaemia Leukaemia

:

1

1

1

1

2

96

3

98

:

Diseases.

M (1) 50

Table 1,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- !

ing in Hospital

Yearly Total. Total

on 31st

Dec., 1920.

Admis- sions,

Cases Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in

ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st on 31st Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

Remain Yearly Total,

Total

Cases

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated

Dec.,

Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st

1921. Decy

Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st

1920.

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain-

ing in

Cases

Admis- istons.

Deaths. Treated.

Hospital on 31st ¡Dec., 1921

Brought forward......

42

1,439

86

1,481

37

I

85

1

86

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM.-Continued.

Diseases of the Spleen :-

Splenomegaly.

Diseases of the Lymphatic System:- Inflammation of LymphaticGlands

Suppuration of

1

30

31

2

**

"

50

52

1

"

"J

52

53

3

Tuberculosis of

Elephantiasis

Diseases of Endogrine Glands Thyroid

Gland:-

(a) Exophthalmic Goitie

(b) Cysts......

Diseases of the Respiratory Systero:—

Laryngitis

Laryngismus Stridulus

:

:

:

1

Tracheitis

1

Bronchitis (Acute).

133

137

3

4

Asthma

34

34

Pneumonia (Lobar)

53

20

53

1

""

(Lobular)

20

10

20

Pulmonary Tuberculosis

103! 22

106

2

3

3

Atelectasis

1

Pleurisy

176

2

6

1

Empyema

Diseases of the Teeth and Gums:-

Dental caries

Gum-boil...

Pyorrhoea alveolaris

Ging

rivitis

Camerun Oris

Alveolar Abscess

5

3

4

17

17

Carried forward........ 55

1,969 145

2,024

53

1

7

94

N

2

96

3

98

3

2

to co

:

:

: a

95

4

120

:

10 00:

:.

:

1

10

LO

5

124

3

M (1) 51

Table I,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Diseases.

Remain-

ing in Hospital

on 3 st Admis- Dec., 1920.

sions.

Yearly Total. Total

Cases Deaths. Treated.;

Remain- Remain-

ing in

ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st

on 31st *Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total.

Total Cases

Remain- in: in Hospital

Remuin- ing in

Yearly Total. Total

Remain- ing in

Hospital

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated.

on 1st

on 31st Amis- 'Dec., 1921 4Dec., 1920. sions.

Cases Deaths. Treated

Hospital on 31st Dec., 1921

Brought forward......

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM,-Continued.

Diseases of the Digestive System:-

Stomatitis

11545

1,969

145

2,024

53

1

94

2

95

120

5 124

1

2

5

Necrosis of Jaw

16

16

Tonsillitis

46

48

10 to 20

1

Pori-tonsillar abscess

1

Pharyngitis

1

Gastritis

1

34

2

Gastric Ulcer

9

Haematemesis

1

1

Indigestion

Enteritis

Appendicitis

Colitis

Gall stones

Sprue

16

18

2

47

3

47

1

18

18

7

6

4

21

22

7642

1

3

103

106

2

44

48

24

Hernia

Diarrhoea..

Constipation

Colic

Ischio-rectal abscess

Liver abscess

Hypertrophy of the tonsils

Vomiting of pregnancy

Fissure of the anus

5

6

Fistula in ano

24

25

Haemorrhoids

27

28

Hepatitis

Cirrhosis

Jaundice

Cholecystitis

Peritonitis-Acute general

Prolapse of rectum....

Ascites

2

00

:

Q

2

6

2

2

Carried forward....... 762,460

159 2,536 76

1 137

1

2

...

10

2

138

5 141

7

146

4

M (1) 52

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

Nou enclature,

Remain- Yearly Total. Total

ing in

Hospital on 31st Dec., 1920

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Admis-

sions. Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospita! on 31st

on 31st Dec., 1921, Dec., 1920,

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain- ing in

Cases

Hospital

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st

on 31st Dec., 1921, Dec., 1920!

Yearly Total. Total

Rem ain-

ing in

Admis- sions.

Cases Deaths. Treated.

Hospital on 31st [Dec., 1921.

Brought forward................

76 2,460

159

2,536

76

1

137

2 138

:

5 141

7 146

1

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM,—Continued.

Diseases due to Disorders of Nutrition

or of Metabolism :-

Inanition

Rickets

Scurvy.

Beri-beri

Gout

Diseases of the Male Organs of

Generation :—

Phimosis

Balanitis

Soft Sore

Periurethral abscess

:

2

2

1

80

82

:

18

19

N

2

2

сл.

5

31

36

4

11

11

Q

1

: :

Prostatic hypertrophy

Inflammation of Scrotum

Hydrocele

3

Orchitis

Epididymitis

Diseases of the Female Organs of

Generation :-

Inflammation of the Ovary

Salpingitis

Endometritis

Erosion of the Cervix

133

2

I

:

:

:

Vaginitis

....

9

10

Vaginal fisulac

Amenorrhoea

Dysmenorrhoea

Menorrhogia

Abortion

Puerperal Eclampsia

Puerperal Septicaemia

AND

...

::

:

Mastitis

Prolapse of uterus

1

Post partum hæmorrhage.

2-272-

3.

Retroversion of uterus

Premature birth

3

3

3

:

Accidental ha-morrhage.

Carried forward...... 90 2,676

175 2,766

84

1 150

2 151

1

6

10

111

9 150

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Ha

1

:

Nomenclature.

M (1) 53 -

Table I.-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st Admis- Dec., 1920.

sions.

Yearly Total.

Deaths.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total. Total

on 31st

on 31st Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

Admis- sions,

Cases Deaths, Treated.

Remain-

ing in Hospital

Remain- ing in Hospital on Bist

on 31st Dec, 1921.Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

ing in

Cases

Hospital

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated

on 31st

'Dec., 1921.

Brought forward........

90 2,676

175 2,766

84

1

150

2

151

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM,-Continued.

Diseases of the Organs of

Locomotion :-

Osteitis

Osteo-Myelitis.

Synovitis..

Myositis

Myalgia

Lumbago....

Rheumatoid arthritis

Diseases of the Areolar tissue:-

Cellulitis

Abscess

Carbuncle

Diseases of the Skin:-

Boil

Urticaria

Eczema

Impetigo

Tinea

Scabies

Corns

Herpes..

Pemphigus

Pellagra

Erythema

1

6

6

42

60

co 8 or

120

6

162

21

so so so

43

6

61

4

1

:

123

168 22

492

38

39

I

6

6

2

23

25

22

23

9

10

56

56

I

...

3

4

1

00

:

3

:

6

144

9 150

co co

3

1

22:

12

10

22:

12

10

:

:

Diseases of the Urinary Organs :

Nephritis, Acute....

Chronic

""

Concretion

Cystitis

Haematuria

6

1

21

1

36

:

725

22

37

3

1

:

: 21

2

Enuresis

1

Carried forward...... 1113,381

191 3,442

109

1

167

2

168

Ι

6

180

9

286

10

5

Nomenclature.

M (1) 54

Table I,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain-

ing in Hospital on 31st

Yearly Total. Total

Dec., 1920.

Admis- sions.

Cases Deaths. Treated

Remain- Remain- ing in ing in Hospital Hospital

on 31st on 31st Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in

Remain- ing in

Yearly Total. Total

Hospital on 31st Dec., 1921 Dec., 1920.

Hospital

Cases

on 31st

Admis-

sions,

Deaths. Treated.

Remain-

ing in Hospital on 31st Dec., 1921

Brought forward........

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM,-Continued.

General Injuries:-

Burns

Scalds

Multiple Injuries...

Local Injuries:-

A brasion

Wounds, Incised.........

111

3,331

1913,442

109

I

167

2

168

1

6

180

9

286

N

22

32

228

23

5

33

1

25 11

27

65

69

2

297

302

قسم

1

Contused

195

195

>>

Lacerated

184

187

">

Stab.

34

34

""

Gun shot

21

21

وو

Contusions

6

61

67

Cut Throat

4

Dog bite

Snake bite

Sprain

Fracture-Skull

11

1

2

6

1

29

26

39

Jaw

"

Spine...

Ribs

142

"

Clavicle..

}}

Scapula

Humerus

Radius

">

Ulna

Pelvis

19

Femur

""

""

""

""

Tibia Fibula

Metatarsals

Os Calcis

Dislocations

Tumours and Cysts Malformations..

1

10

1

5

5

3

1

3

19

22

2

13

1

2

251

9

11

105

11

110

26

27

:::

:

:

::

Carried forward......

151 4,533

265 4,693

131

1

172

2

173

6

Co

نت

3

:::

3

:

186

9

292

5

I

M (1) 55 -

Table I,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total. Total

on 31st Admis- Dec., 1920. sions.

Cases Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain. !

ing in Hospital on 31st

Admis- on 31st 'Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920. sions.

Yearly Total. Total

Remain- Remain-

ing in

ing in C'ases Hospital Hospital

on 31st Deaths. Treated,

on 31st Dec., 1921. Dec., 1920.

Yearly Total. Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Deaths. Treated,_on 31st

Remain- ing in Hospita!

Dec,, 1921

Brought forward........

151 4,533

2654,693

131

1 172

2

173

1

6 186

292

5

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM,-Continued.

Local Injuries,-Contd.

Poisons-Opium

Alcohol

1

28

20

20

65

1

66

>>

19

Carbon Monoxide Arsenic

5

Miscellaneous

Animal Parasites-Taenia

""

Immersion

Ascaris Ankylostoma

Malingering,

In attendance

Under Observation....

12

1

38

38

1

2

60

62

2

:

TOTAL....

155 4,759 276 4,923

134

194

N

17

37

59:

37

195

1

6

230

9

336

5

M (1) 56

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Tung Wah Hospital.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1920.

Remain-

Yearly Total.

Total

ing in

Cases

Hospital

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated. at end of

1921.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Measles....

Mumps

Lobar Pneumonia..

Diphtheria

Typhoid Fever

Septicæmia

Tetanus

Influenza

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis

Small-pox.......

Plague

Dysentery.

Beri-beri

Leprosy

Malarial Fever :----

(a) Benign Tertian

(b) Malignant

(c) Malarial Cachexia...

Syphilis :-

Acquired

Tuberculosis:-

(a) Phthisis Pulmonalis. (b) Generalised

Gonorrhoea

Rheumatism

New Growths :-

Malignant....

13

13

1

1

180

86

187

6

9

9

9

15

11

15

7

4

7

13

5

13

545

86

548

15

74

37

74

4

4

80

64

80

3

290

122

293

5

41

727

294

768

29

10

2

10

3

3

21

244

56

265

17

30

2

30

...

6

249

22

255

4

43

心路

669

314

712

92

34

42

82

2

19

21

2

111

72

122

113

ོས

39

94

1

42

83

2

21

1

21

1

Anemia

Senile Debility

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System

I.—Organic :—

Disenses of the Nerves, Meninges,

Brain and Cord

18

389

154

407

13

Carried forward,,

149

3,919

1,384 4,068

133

M (1) 57

Table 1,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1921 at the Tung Wah Hospital.

Remain-

ing in

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

DISEASES.

Hospital

Cases

ing in Hospital

at end of

1920.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Treated. at end of

1921.

Brought forward,.....

149

3,919

1,384

4,068

133

LOCAL DISEASES,—Continued.

II. Functional :--

Mental Diseases

Diseases of the Eye

"2

Ear, Nose and Throat

Diseases of the Circulatory System :-

(a) Diseases of the Heart

""

Arteries

Diseases of the Respiratory System:- (a) Diseases of the Bronchi

(b)

*

13

(c)

""

Pleure

Lungs

:

14

91

97

14

10

10

+

23 24

14

14

26

427

231

453

27

Diseases of the Digestive System:-

(a) Diseases of the Gastro-intesti-

nal tract....

(b) Diseases of the Liver

Diseases of the Urinary System:-

(a) Diseases of the Kidney....

293

106

314

12

25

1

27

19

190

72

209

11

(b)

>

22

Urinary pas-

sages

6

(a) Male

Diseases of the Thyroid Gland,.

Diseases of the Generative System

(b) Female

Diseases of Bones and Joints..

Diseases of the Cellular Tissue

Skin

""

Injuries

Effects of heat or cold.

Poisons:-

(a) Acute Poisoning

(b) Opium Habit....

Parasites:

Intestinal

Labour

1

18

31

3

2

58

566

2

1

28

378

1

N

24

སོསྶམྦྷཨྠ དྡྷསྶ

34

2

624

406

26

1

58

63

12

796

805

-3 28

12

1

20

1

: : : 1:

2

...

14

Total...

330

6,881

1,813

7,211

257

- M (1) 58

Table II.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1921, with the proportion of cases treated by Western and Chinese methods respectively.

DISEASES.

GENERAL DISEASES.

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT.

Admis- sions.

Admis-

Deaths.

Deaths.

sions.

Measles

1

9

N

Mumps....

1

Lobar Pneumonia

34

106

52

Diphtheria

Typhoid Fever

00 10

7

9

Septicæmia

5

Tetanus

9

1

Influenza

216

29

332

57

Cérebro-Spinal Meningitis.

46

28

18

Small-pox

4

3

Plague....

23

Dysentery

117

Beri-beri

441

Leprosy

10

:།

19

57

45

39

176

83

140

327

154

Malarial Fever :—

(a) Benign Tertian

1

2

(6) Malignant

103

14

162

42

(c) Malarial Cachexia

19

I

Syphilis :-

Acquired

161

13

94

9

Tuberculosis :-

(a) Phthisis Pulmonalis

419

178

293

136

(b) Generalised

29

11

65

23

Gonorrhoea

19

23

Rheumatism

24

59

1

New Growths:-

Malignant

Anæmia

16

49

6*!

1

5

4

17

2

37

64

35

Senile Debility

LOCAL DISEASES,

Diseases of the Nervous System

I.-Organic -

Diseases of the Nerves, Meninges, Brain

and Cord...

184

69

223

85

Curried forward...........

1,972

614

2.096

770

M (1) 59-

Table II,-(Continued).

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1921, with the proportion of cases treated by Western and Chinese methods respectively.

DISEASES.

Brought forward,...

LOCAL DISEASES,- Continued.

II. Functional:

Mental Diseases

Diseases of the Eye

""

Ear, Nose and Throat

Diseases of the Circulatory System (a) Diseases of the Heart

(b)

27

Arteries

Diseases of the Respiratory System: (a) Diseases of the Bronchi

(b) (c)

""

""

""

27

Pleuræ

Lungs

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT.

Admis- sions.

Admis-

Deaths.

Deaths.

sions.

1,972

614

2,096

770

#15

14

97

00.00

7

1

198

92

255

139

(b)

Diseases of the Digestive System :--

(a) Diseases of the Gastro-intestinal tract

(b)

""

22

Liver

Diseases of the Urinary System :- (a) Diseases of the Kidney

>>

27

Diseases of the Thyroid Gland................

Diseases of the Generative System

(a) Male

(b) Female

Diseases of the Bones and Joints

Diseases of the Cellular Tissue...

133

41

181

65

21

6

94

25

115

47

Urinary passages

5

1

:

---

286

ཊ:ཚོ

14

Skin.....

""

Injuries

131

23

༢༤༠༠ ༠༠ ཆ

1

2

338

1

275

:

Effects of heat or cold

Poisons:-

(a) Acute Poisoning (b) Opium Habit

Parasites:-

Intestinal

Labour

49

14

5

7

805

Total,........

3,882

785 3,329

1,028

M (1) 60

TABLE OF CASES TREATED AT GOVERNMEnt Dispensary, KOWLOON.

DISEASES.

1921

Number

1920

Number

of Deaths. of Deaths. Patients.

Patients.

DISEASES CAUSED BY INFECTION.

Chicken-pox

Dysentery :-

Protozoal

Malaria :-

(a) Benign Tertian

30

:

61

26

66

20

17

(6) Malignant Tertian...

208

234

Enteric Fever

Typhoid

3

1

Erysipelas....

1

Gonococcal Infection

160

249

Influenza

201

283

Leprosy :-

(a) Anaesthetic

1

2

(b) Nodular

1

Measles

23

Meningococcal Infection :-

Cerebro-spinal Fever

3

1

Mumps

51

:

Pyogenic Infection :—

Pyrexia of uncertain origin

23

:.

Syphilis :-

(a) Acquired

218.

195

(b) Congenital

3

10

Tuberculosis....

109

68

Whooping Cough....

12

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM.

Inflammation of Nerve :-

Localised

DISEASES OF THE BRAIN.

Neuralgia

Hysteria

45

48

31

52

2

Carried forward......... 1,161

:

1,251

:

:

M (1) 61

TABLE OF CASES TREATED AT THE GOVERNMENT DISPENSARY,

KOWLOON,-Continued.

1921

1920

DISEASES.

Number

Number

of | Deaths. of Patients.

Patients.

Deaths.

Brought forward......... 1,161

1,251

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM.-Continued.

Diseases of the Eye........

2,061

1,110

Ear

767

520

}:

Nose

54

14

>>

19

"

Circulatory System

25

3

Blood

43

45

>>

"

""

Lymphatic System..

146

82

Digestive System.... 1,016

767

Diseases of the Respiratory System Diseases of the Organs of Locomo-

1,133

1,303

tion

Diseases of the Urinary Orgaus......

110

16

36

30

""

""

Male Organ of

generation..

21

10

Skin

";

Parturition

Diseases of the Female Organ of

generation

Diseases due to Disorders of Nutri-

tion or Metabolism ....

Diseases of the Areolar Tissue

Injuries, General

Local

Malformation

Poisons.

58

20

:.

146

176

3,469

660

2,173

2,455

2

3

1,879

1,917

23

3

6

2

2

Animal Parasites...

535

318

Vegetable Parasites..

137

36

Inmersion

2

Not Diagnosed....

192

213

Physical Examinations (for K'loon,

Canton Railway)...

131

145

Vaccinations

510

218

:

Total...

15,838

11,317

:

::

:

- M (1) 62 -

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA.

REPORT BY ACTING GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST.

Report on post mortem examinations.

1921.

1920.

Male bodies examined,

1,710

1.943

Female bodies examined,..

1,760

1,898

Placenta,

1

1

Total,

3,471

3,842

3,385

422

457

3,471

3,842

Claimed bodies sent from hospitals and other places, 3,049 Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned,

Total.

Epitome of Causes of Death.

I.-General Diseases,

1,302

1,413

II.-Local Diseases :--

(a) of the Nervous Systein,

33

57

(b)

Circulatory System,

79

97

37

(c)

Respiratory System,

1,721

1,792

(d)

>>

Digestive System,

226

290

(e)

Genito-Urinary System,...

19

48

(f)

Osseous System,

4

7

III.-Deaths from Violence :-

(a) General,

(b) Local,

Total,

:

58

85

29

53

3,471 3,842

M (1) 63

M

General Diseases.

1921. 1920.

Small-pox

Plague

48

47

Cholera...

Diphtheria

Enteric fever

6

3

10 28

Measles

Influenza

Cerebro-spinal fever

18

24

Malaria ...

81

76

Beri-beri

24

13

General Diseases,-Continued.

1921. 1920.

Brought forward, ...1,285 1,408

Myelogenous leukæmia Purpura hæmorrhagica Cellulitis

Splenomegaly

Heat stroke,

Cancer of breast

Cleft palate Inanition

Malnutrition

262

ستان دن

1

1

Septicæmia

7

Pyæmia...

1

Boils

2

2

Total ...

.1,302 1,413

Tuberculosis

243

265

Syphilis, congenital

150

299

"

acquired

2

18

Rickets ...

Pernicious anæmia

1

Splenic anæmia

2

Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System :-

Cerebral hæmorrhage.

1

Prematurity

33

4

12

Marasmus

164

145

15

concussion

syphilis

Still-born

40

51

Atelectasis

197 232

Icterus

5

neonatorum

11

13

Noma

Eczema

1

Debility at birth,......

147

113

Hydrocephalus

Tuberculous meningitis

Cerebral tumour

Meningitis other than C. S. F.

& Tuberculous...

Cyst of brain

Cerebral abscess,...

115 100

CD — OD 1-—-

1

3

18 24

3

وو

Lymphosarcoma, ...

Decomposed bodies (no dia-

gnosis possible)

2

(neck)

1

Total

33

57

11

24

Skeleton only, (no diagnosis

possible)

1

2

(b.) Of the Circulatory System:-

Placenta only, (no diagnosis

possible)

1

1

Pericarditis, acute dry

4

Foetus only, (no diagnosis

with effusion, serous 3

possible)

"J

purulent 5

Taken for use in school of

"

Anatomy, Hongkong Uni-

versity

25

26

Status lymphaticus

I

多多

Acute ulcerative endocarditis

Malignant endocarditis

chronic septic

Lymphadenoma

1

Congenital heart disease

10

Anencephaly...

2

Aortitis...

3

Spina bifida

1

Syphilitic aortitis,

10 3

Imperforated anus

1

Valvular disease of heart

24

34

Leprosy...

Gumma of heart

Lymphatic leukæmia

Fatty heart

Carried forward, ...1,285 1,408

Carried forward,

56

72

Circulatory System,-Continued.

M (1) 64

Digestive System,-Continued.

1921. 1920.

Brought forward .....

56 72

Brought forward ...

Myocarditis

2

Diarrhoea

1921. 1920.

131

198

3

Atheroma

Acute gastro-enteritis

Hæmopericardium

Gastric hæmorrhage

Rupture of aneurysm of aorta

abdominal aorta

6

Perforated pyloric ulcer,

1

Cancer of liver

Aneurysm of thoracic aorta

9

16

..

"

tongue...

21531

2000 | 10 |

stomach

if

>>

Total

79

97

pharynx

1

Carcinoma of rectum,

1

Hepatitis

2

Bronchiectasis

Empyema

(c.) Of the Respiratory System:-

Broncho-pneumonia and

bronchitis

Pneumonia

...

Tubercular broncho-pneumonia

Chronic interstitial pneumonia 1 4

Chronic pleurisy...

Pleurisy

with effusion,

Pulmonary tuberculosis

Abscess of lungs

New growth in lungs

Hydatid of liver

2

Cirrhosis of liver...

18

20

1921. 1920.

Abscess of liver

5

6

Cholelithiasis,

I

3

Abscess of spleen...

...1,163 1,160

Cyst of abdomen ...

1

134 59

Suppurative cholangitis

1

m.com

7

Colitis

5

Dysentery

16

2

Intestinal hemorrhage

8 22

Mesenteric hæmorrhage

2

1010510

2

29

239 382

Hæmorrhage from oesophageal

varix,......

1

1

16 12

Multiple abscess of liver

1

12

8

cysts of liver

110 123

5

Acute Pancreatitis,

Strangulated umbilical

+2

Infarct of lungs

hernia

3

Hæmothorax...

1

2

Acute intestinal obstruction

6

පෘවිය.

Hydrothorax...

1

Intussusception

1

Pneumothorax

1

Suppuration in anterior

mediastinum

1

Ascariasis

Diaphragmatic hernia...

Ankylostomiasis

Retropharyngeal abscess,

2

1

2

1

Total

...1,721 1,792

Total ...

226 290

(d) Of the Digestive System:--

(e) Of the Genito-Urinary System:-

1921. 1920.

Tabes mesenterica

Peritonitis

22

52 104

22

26

Acute nephritis

Enteritis

48

51

tuberculous

4

17

Chronic nephritis...

interstitial nephritis

1921. 1920.

5

11 41

>

Gastritis

5

Cystic kidney

Carried forward .....

131 198

Carried forward...

17

46

Genito-Urinary System,-Continued.

M (1) 65

Death from Violence.-Continued.

1921. 1920.

1921. 1920.

(a) General,--Continued.

Brought forward

17 46

Brought forward

54 71

Tumour of kidney

ture of

Hydronephrosis

Hamorrhage following rup-

extra-uterine

Barns and scalds...

Shock from blow on kidney Lightning stroke...

gestation

Hæmosalpinx

1

Total...

19 48

Total...

58

85

(b.) Local:-

1921. 1920.

(f.). Of the Osseous System:----

Bullet wound of brain...

1

"

27

heart and lung 1

1921. 1920,

neck ...

1

21

abdomen

2

15

>>

Osteomyelitis

Tuberculons caries of spine..

N N

2

1

""

""

spine..

2

6

Stab wound of heart

aorta

33

Total...

4

7

thorax

17

"

throat

,,

''

lung

Deaths from Violence.

Wound of neck

1921. 1920.

scalp.. throat

1

(a.) General:—

Cut-throat

1

Multiple injuries

21 34

13

stab wounds

1

""

Hanging and asphyxia by

ligature

Fracture of skull .....

Rupture of spleen...

19

"

and arm

rib

2

14

9

stomach

Asphyxia and suffocation

1 17

aorta

1

""

Drowning

14

11

intestine

>>

Opium poisoning..

aneurysm of coeliac

Oxalic poisoning

Narcotic

"

1

:

Carried forward .....

54

74

axis...

3

Total...

29

53

J

M (1) 66

Total plague cases Total small-pox cases

47

42 claimed.

5 unclaimed.

48

5 claimed.

43 unclaimed.

Number of bodies sent to Public Mortuary (Victoria) during 1921.

Victoria.

Chinese

3,463 3,313

43

Indian

English

Filipino

Japanese.

Portuguese

Spanish

Total.

3.471 3,318 44

TO

Harbour.

Old Kowloon.

2

59 48

New Kowloon.

Shaukiwan.

Other Villages.

59

46

:

:

Appendix N.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT HONGKONG FOR THE YEAR 1921.

GENERAL REMARKS.

Typhoon signals were hoisted six times during the year, but fortunately the damage resulting from the proximity of typhoons and rainstorms was very slight in comparison with many previous

years.

During the first quarter of the year, rain fell on 21 days amounting to 6'22 inches.

In the second quarter, the rainfall amounted to 53:10 inches on 51 days. This delayed a considerable amount of gardening work and spoiled a large amount of flowering plants, but was favourable to forestry operations generally.

During the third quarter of the year the rainfall was moderate and in 42 days, amounted to 45'60 inches.

The last quarter was exceptionally dry, the rainfall being 2.91 inches only.

Botanic Gardens. During the first quarter a few young plants of Magnolia conspicuus and Magnolia obovata were planted in suitable places in both gardens, these if successful should make a good show of white and purple flowers.

Owing to the long period of wet weather in the second quarter, the planting of summer annuals on the lower terrace had to be delayed till much later than usual.

On a grass bank at the west end of the Old Garden, several improved varieties of Hydrangea were planted amongst the red Azaleas.

A very large number of herbaceous plants and flowering shrubs, which are not ordinarily watered by artificial means, had to be watered almost every day during the last two months of the year.

In the early part of the year, the two iron gates which formerly stood some distance inside the upper and lower entrances to the New Garden from Glenealy were taken down and reerected at the extreme ends of the entrances, this has had the effect of checking petty thefts and damage to plants which formerly had to be protected by other and more expensive means.

All Orchids in the plant houses in the Old Garden were re-arranged and a large number of them relabelled.

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N 2

Cuttings of various. kinds of shrubs and creepers were made and layers of Roses and Bauhinia Blakeana were also taken for departmental use and for sale.

The potting of ferns in the plant houses and the division of Bamboo Palms (Chrysalidocarpus lutescens) in the Loan Plant Compound was totally completed in May.

There is still a great demand for Bamboo Palms and as many as could be spared from stock were sold.

The Hongkong Horticultural Show was held for one day only on March 2nd in the Botanic Gardens. Exhibits of both flowers and vegetables were good but less than those of the previous year.

In connection with road alterations the wall at the south-east corner of the Old Garden was pulled down and reerected by the Public Works Department.

A small area of garden was accordingly lost and a fine specimen of Ficus elastica had to be sacrificed.

A fine hedge of Chrysalidocarpus standing at the top of the wall had to be removed and planted elsewhere, another hedge of the same palm was planted immediately after the reerection of the wall.

Cammas in beds and shrubberries were rooted up, divided, manured and replanted as usual.

All growths of Alpinias, which had finished flowering, were cut out from rockeries and numerous shady banks.

Two young trees of Poinciana regia were planted in the Loan Plant Compound to replace the one which was blown down in the precceding year and which always afforded a very beneficial partial shade to the pot plants stored there.

The turf on a plot below the aviary, which had become very uneven owing to a slight subsidence, was taken up and relaid after the ground had been properly levelled.

16

The Upper and Lower Terraces in the Old Garden were treated. with Cha Chai" on rainy days several times during the year, large quantities of earthworms which were damaging the turf were collected and destroyed.

All the Rose bushes were given a heavy dressing of old stable manure in October.

At the request of the Hongkong Horticultural Society, notes on general gardening works were supplied to editors of local newspapers for publication in September and October,

During the year numerous permits were issued to artist to sketch or paint and to photographers to take photographs in the Botanic Gardens.

Collectors' permits were issued to a number of visiting botanists to enable them to collect wild plant specimens in the Colony.

¿

N 3

The specimen trees of Spathodea nilotica, which were raised from seeds in 1909 and planted in the following year, flowered for the first time in the Gardens.

The seed of this tree was introduced from East Africa, and for some years the young trees suffered badly from the cold weather; they now appear to have become acclimatised.

"Grass Caterpillars" did not make their appearance on any of the lawns during the year, very probably owing to the weather conditions being unsuitable to the moth which is said to be responsible for this most destructive pest.

Three persons were arrested and fined at the Police Court for damaging plants in the Gardens.

The total number of plants sold during the year was 1,589, a large proportion of this number being Adiantum cuneatum (Maidenhair Fern). There is a constant demand for Chrysalidocarpus lutescens, (Bamboo Palms) but the number available for sale each year is now small owing to the extensive use by this Department of this Palm in hedges and general planting in various parts of the Colony.

Government House Grounds.--In connection with the building alterations and additions to the house the tennis lawn and two large clumps of Bamboo Palms on the north-west side of the ground were entirely removed; a very fine specimen of the Traveller's Tree (Ravenala_madagascariensis) which was too large for removal had to be cut down.

The whole of the creeper fence, which formerly screened part- of the house, was removed and a number of small specimens of Camellia japonica were taken up and transplanted elsewhere.

A small area of ground not occupied by the new building was relaid with turf.

The decomposed granite walks in front of the house, which were formerly maintained by this Department, were taken over by the Public Works Department.

All lawns were treated with "Cha Chai” and large quantities of earthworms collected and destroyed.

A large bed of flowering shrubs near the stable block was removed to allow of the erection of other buildings.

(6

'Grass Caterpillars" did not appear on either of the grass lawns during the year.

Undergrowth on the north bank was cleared twice during

the year.

The pruning of shrubs and replanting of Cannas was proceeded with throughout the year.

A specimen tree Spathodea nilotica, which was planted in the grounds about twelve years ago, produced a fine show of flowers for the first time.

N 4

The interior of the house was decorated with pot plants, Banian festoons. Adiantums and hanging baskets of flowers on the occasion of H. M. The King's Birthday on June 3rd and the visit of H. I. H. the Crown Prince of Japan on March 31st.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-Undergrowth in the valley and elsewhere was cleared as usual.

In the month of May, the Hydrangeas which are the largest in the Colony, made a very fine show of varying shades of pink and blue flowers.

All grass lawns were regularly cut, rolled, weeded and dressed with "Cha Chai" at intervals, the usual heavy dressing of fine stable manure was given in February.

All Cannas in beds were taken up, heavily manured and replanted.

Iris tectorum flowered well in the valley adjoining the stream during January.

Blake Garden. Patches of blue grass, which had died out in the preceeding year, were repaired with fresh plants.

All the Agaves, which formed a hedge on the east side of the garden, were rooted out and a strong barbed wire fence put up in their place.

Other Agaves, which had finished flowering, were cut out and destroyed.

Long grass on banks was cut regularly and the garden kept in order generally.

Creepers planted on the wire fences inside the garden have now become well established and made a good show while in flower.

All the flowering shrubs were pruned and the soil about them loosened.

King's Park-Long grass, Mimosa and Lantana seedlings were cut by gangs of women working under the supervision of the park-keeper. This work was again completed without cost to this Department, a large proportion of the grass cut which is suitable for cattle fodder being given to the gangs in lieu of cash payment.

Throughout the whole year, all the trees which have been planted at various times since the Park was formed were re-tied and re-staked.

One person was prosecuted and convicted for allowing cattle to graze and do damage in the park.

Colonial Cemetery.-A site above the plant house was cleared and the building of the new gardeners' quarters was commenced during the latter part of the year by the Public Works Department.

Long grass in various parts of the cemetery was cut regularly during the summer months.

N 5

Seeds of summer and winter annuals were sown for growing in pots and planting in beds.

A newly levelled terrace on the south side of the cemetery was covered with turf and the steep bank above it planted with flower- ing shrubs and creepers.

A large plot above the fountain was opened up by the Public Works Department and the boulders removed, a number of flower- ing trees had to be removed to allow this work to proceed, when completed the plot was levelled and turfed.

The flowering trees and shrubs and foliage plants were pruned as required and others planted on various grass plots and banks.

Thefts of branches of Biota orientalis, which were very prevalent last year, have now ceased.

Other Grounds. To make room for the additional building near the lower entrance to the Government Civil Hospital, several large Aleurites and Banian trees were cut out and a large area of Blue Grass removed.

At the beginning of October, small number of caterpillars made their appearance on the two grass lawns; these were immediately treated with a solution of Jeye's Fluid and soon disappeared, the damage being very slight.

Earthworms, which usually are very numerous, did not give much trouble this year.

Bare patches on banks were repaired with Blue Grass from time to time.

Ficus on walls and Bamboo hedges were clipped several times during the year.

Seedling annuals and other plants were regularly supplied from the Botanic Gardens for use in pots and beds in various parts of the grounds.

year.

The Lunatic Asylum grounds were kept tidy throughout the

Pot plants were supplied for use on the verandahs of the Sisters' Quarters.

Cannas and Hedychiums in the Albany Nurseries were taken up, divided and replanted after the ground had been well manured.

The iron railings of the Upper Albany Nursery along Garden Road were damaged by motor-cars on May 23rd and December 16th. On both occasions they were repaired at the expense of this Department.

In the Victoria Hospital Ficus creepers growing on the balus- trades were cut away to enable the Public Works Department to proceed with general repairs.

N 6

Part of the tennis lawn being required by the Public Works Department in connection with the building of the new wing, the best of the turf was removed and many flowering shrubs had to be transplanted.

The laying out of the old irregularly shaped beds in the Sukunpo Vegetable Garden was proceeded with.

A constant supply of winter and summer vegetables was grown and supplied to Government House daily.

The Honolulu creepers (Antigonon leptopus) and the Cleroden- dron splendens grown on the barbed wire fences surrounding the vegetable garden produced large mass of flowers, which were cut during the season and used in the decoration of the interior of Government House.

On the cricket pitch of the Hongkong Cricket Ground, portions of the turf, which had been badly damaged during the cricket matches were removed and renewed after every match, at the conclusion of the season, the whole of the actual playing pitches was returfed, the whole of the work being carried out at the expense of the Cricket Club.

Several patches of worn-out turf on the two lawns at the Indian School Grounds were repaired, the trees in the grounds pruned and a supply of pot plants maintained.

On the grass bank of the Children's Playground on the Peak, a number of flowering shrubs were planted to replace those which had died from various causes.

Grass plots in the Government Pavilions and Villas were cut and kept in good order generally, and the soil round the plants on the banks loosened.

The spare soil from an adjoining block of Government build- ing was dumped in the Peak Garden which until the completion of dumping will not be available for public use.

The Hydrangeas on the banks and other parts of the garden were removed and transplanted elsewhere. The turf was removed by the contractor in charge of the soil dump and will later be re- newed at his expense.

Grass lawns in the Subordinate Officers' Quarters, Breezy Point, were regularly cut and kept in order generally. Turf in the shady parts of the front lawn was renewed as required.

The privet hedge and the grass plot in the Volunteer Parade Ground were kept in good order generally throughout the year.

Rockeries and Blue Grass plots at the St. John's Cathedral Compound were planted up in February and small repairs carried out from time to time. This work was paid for by the Church Body. In the Royal Observatory Grounds, a small area of Blue Grass, west of the main building was cleared to make room for the quarters which are being erected.

:

:

N 7

A regular supply of seedling annuals and other plants from the Botanic Gardens was maintained throughout the year.

Trees near the plant compound were thinned as required.

At the completion of the British School playground extension, Kowloon, several flowering shrubs were planted to replace those which had been destroyed in the Royal Observatory Grounds during the progress of the work.

Grass plots in the Children's Playground, Kowloon, were cut and weeded.

Caterpillars in small numbers made their appearance on the grass plots in the Statue Square Garden in the month of October, but disappeared a few days later. The lawns were cut and weeded. as required.

Grass bank and plot and flowering shrubs at the Helena May Institute were regularly inspected and attended to as required.

In West End Park the long grass was regularly cut and Mimosa seedling rooted out.

A large number of Agaves were planted, these will ultimately replace the barbed wire fences which are at present very necessary but do not improve the general appearance of the Park.

The plot in front of the Hongkong Club was required for use as a site for a reception pavilion to be used on the occasion of the visit of H. R. H. the Prince of Wales, consequently all the turf, flowering shrubs and trees had to be removed.

These trees and shrubs were replanted alongside the roads in various parts of the Colony.

The grounds of the District Officer's Quarters at Taipo were placed under this Department during the year.

All the trees and shrubs which required it were pruned, stak- ed and tied, a line of Camphor and Eucalyptus was planted near the entrance gate.

Undergrowth on the banks was cleared twice during the year.

The lawns were regularly machined, rolled, weeded and top-dressed.

At the Rest House, Taipo, the turf on the old lawn, which had deteriorated, was removed, the soil was levelled and the whole area relaid with good turf.

HERBARIUM.

The number of plant specimens mounted during the year amounted to 797, of these 641 were from Kwang Tung Province, 54 from Kwai Chau and 102 from Australia.

N 8

100 Australian specimens were presented by Mr. H. M. Maiden, L.S.O., F.R.S., F.L.S. of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney.

All specimens in cabinets were sun-dried, brushed and re-poisoned.

Eighteen new books were added to the Library and these and all others were regularly inspected and re-poisoned as required.

Parts of plants sent in by the Government Analyst were identified, also many local specimens of medicinal herbs and other plants were named for local and other collectors.

FORESTRY.

Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.—At Kowloon Tsai 2,500 one year old trees of Pinus Pinus Massoniana were planted.

On the hills between Cheung Sha Wan and the Taipo Road, 50,000 sites were sown with Pine seeds.

All sites in which seeds had failed to germinate at Cheung Chau and Fan Ling were re-sown with Pine seeds: altogether 45 lbs, of seeds were used.

294 lbs. of Pine seed was sown broadcast on grass bank above and below roads at the following places, Taipo Road, Tsin Wan Road, Chai Wan Gap to Tytam, Tytam to Stanley, Stanley Road, Findlay Road, Lugard Road, Saikung Gap to Ha Chau Gap and roads on Cheung Chau.

On the grass slopes below Severn Road 394 one year old trees of Pinus Massoniana were planted.

Broad-leaved Trees Planted. In the vicinity of Aberdeen Reservoir, 186 young trees of "Jak" (Artocarpus integrifolia) were planted.

185 Tristania and 45 Eucalyptus were planted on grass banks below Severn Road.

The trees used for roadside planting were principally Cam- phor, Tristania, Albizzia, Melaleuca, Poinciana, Ficus, Aleurites and Bauhinia, these were used at the following places, Tytam Road 20, Shaukiwan Road 12, Shaukiwan to Tytam 59, Bowen Road 2, Pokfulam Road 2, Barker Road 6, Plantation Road 13, Conduit Road 2, Albany Road 2, Nathan Road 46, Mody Road 3, Taipo Road 422, Tsin Wan Road 738, and 24 near the market on the Shum-Shui-Po reclamation.

Trees Removed.--In connection with general improvements to and widening of roads in various parts of the Colony, large shade trees had to be felled at the following places Queen's Road, East 9; Arsenal Street 2; Caine Road 4; Eastern Street 2; Pokfulam Road 1.

At Taipo Police Station a number of large specimens of Tristania, which were entirely shutting out the view of the railway station and the adjoining public road, were removed.

K

N 9

In connection with extensions at Kowloon and Yaumati Reser- voirs and the formation of the site for new cemeteries at Fo Pang Hang numbers of Pinus Massoniana had to be removed from the adjoining plantations.

At the top of the earth banks of the reclamation at Aplichau a large number of Camphors, Pines and Tristania had to be felled to allow for the removal of earth and to prevent landslides.

Very large numbers of Pine and other trees were removed from building sites in all parts of the Colony.

Care of Trees in Plantations.-Insect pests were fortunately much less troublesome than during the preceding year; the Pine Tree Caterpillar made its appearance in small numbers only at Fan Ling, these were immediately collected and destroyed.

Creepers on Pine and other trees in Hongkong and the New Territories were continuously cut and removed.

Pine seedlings in pits, which are raised from seed sown in sufficient numbers to allow of the germination of 5 seeds to one pit, were regularly inspected and where found to be too thick the weakest were cut out.

White Ants, which attack Camphor and other trees during the dry season, were as fast as possible removed and large numbers of trees which had been attacked treated with Carbolineum.

Dead trees were removed from plantations in all parts of the Colony.

Damage done to plantations by persons cutting wood for fuel and by grass-cutters who destroy the seedling Pines was most noticeable in the vicinity of Cheung Sha Wan, Shaukiwan, Pok- fulam and Kowloon City, the Forest Guards arrested a large number of the offenders.

Protection from Fire.-The Tsing Ming Festival was on April 5th, and the Tsung Yeung on October 9th. As usual the whole of the outdoor staff of the Department assisted by 150 extra coolies, were engaged in watching for fires caused by various ceremonies at the graves in which sacrificial paper and fire-crackers are used.

Eight fires occurred on the day of the first and 8 on the day of the second festival mentioned, these were dealt with as quickly as possible and the damage to plantations was slight.

The thanks of the Department are due to the Honourable the Secretary for Chinese Affairs for lending District Watchmen to assist the forestry staff to watch for and deal with fires on both days.

10 fires occurred in plantations during the first quarter, 12 in the second, 2 in the third and 43 in the fourth, making a total of 67 for the year compared with 47 during the previous year.

The most serious of these occurred at Stanley Gap, where. before the fire could be checked, 500 Pines were killed and about 1,000 badly damaged.

N 10

To the Captain Superintendent of Police the thanks of the Department are due for allowing officers in charge of stations to engage gangs of coolies to beat out fires which would otherwise have done serious damage before foresters could be transported to the affected areas.

About 20 miles of old fire barriers were cleared in Kowloon, 17 miles in Hongkong and 5 miles at Fan Ling, these barriers proved most useful in confining fires to comparatively small areas during the year.

Forest Guards' Service.-The total number of persons arrested or proceeded against by summons for forestry offences during the year was 287, of these 252 were convicted, 20 cautioned, 5 dis- charged, 8 had their bail estreated and two were required to find a personal bond.

Particulars of these cases are given in Tables II and III.

Owing to the damage done to Pine Plantations in the vicinity of the village of Kau Pui Shek, an enquiry authorised by Ordin- ance No. 6 of 1917 was held by the Honourable the Secretary for Chinese Affairs and the Superintendent and resulted in a fine of $50 being imposed on the village.

A similar inquiry into the cutting of certain wild trees near Tung Kok Wai was held by the District Officer, North, and the Superintendent and resulted in five persons being fined a total sum of $17.

Claims amounting to $128.50 were made against 4 building contractors who were responsible for damage to roadside trees or plantations, this sum was deducted from their securities by the Public Works Department and credited to Timber Sales.

Miscellaneous Planting.--In Stanley Military Cemetery the following flowering shrubs and trees were planted, 22 Allamanda, 29 Hibiscus Lambertianus, 6 Archontophoenix, 2 Bougainvillea, 6 Poinciana and 1 Bauhinia Blakeana. The cemetery was recently placed under our care and a small annual fee is paid by Military Authorities for its upkeep.

Sixteen mixed flowering shrubs were planted on a waste space immediately in front of Aberdeen Police Station.

On a grass plot above Mount Austin Barracks, Peak Road, one Bauhinia Blakeana and 56 flowering shrubs were planted.

On a bare bank above the Disinfecting Station, Caine Road, 20 flowering shrubs were planted.

Seventy-nine native Azaleas which were growing in the line of proposed new roads in the Wong Nei Chong district were taken up and replanted elsewhere.

Ficus creepers and flowering shrubs were planted on the banks and grass plot by the side of the Police Station at Hung Hom.

New trees, creepers and flowering shrubs were planted in the grounds of the Water Police Station, Kowloon, and the d and shrubs pruned and put into good order generally.

;T , ' ...

£

N 11

At Cheung Chau the following trees were planted in various prominent parts of the island by the forester who is now per- manently stationed there, Rhus 50, Poinciana 50, Celtis 50, Paulownia 25, Bischofia 100, Camphor 50, Albizzia 100, Tristania 238, Ficus 50, Eucalyptus 30, and Melia 4.

The shape of rockery at the junction of Garden and Lower Albert Roads was altered to conform with adjoining road alterations and was entirely replanted.

Eight hundred and seventy Ficus creepers were planted at the base of cuttings on either side of the new motor road to the Peak.

In order to give the owner of an adjoining building lot access to his property the rockery at Seymour Road had to be re-construct- ed and was afterwards replanted.

Forestry Service Paths. The paths are still made great use of by pedestrians: also many times during the year they were found to be of great use for the forestry staff in getting to the scene of forest fires in the shortest possible time.

Both those in Hongkong and Kowloon were repaired during the dry season.

Two new paths, one 4,090 and the other 430 feet long were made in the vicinity of Aberdeen Reservoir in order to give easy access to the newly planted young trees of "Jak" (Artocarpus integrifolia).

Clearing Undergrowth around Houses.--Clearing in connection with anti-malarial measures was maintained throughout the whole year, the total area cleared amounted to 3,400,000 square feet.

Clearing for Survey Purposes.- This clearing is done in con- nection with surveys by the Public Works Department of proposed building sites and the lines of new roads, the total area cleared amounted to 3,990,000 square feet.

Forestry Licences, New Territories.--The total amount of fees collected during the year amounted to $4,880.47 compared with $4,926.47 in 1920.

NURSERIES, AGRICULTURE, &C.

Beacon Hill Nursery.—The whole of the stock of young trees not required for roadside or other planting was lifted, replanted, labelled and put into good order generally.

Seeds of the following were planted in beds to raise stock for next year, Pinus Massoniana, Cinnamomum Champhora, Bauhinia variegata, Tristania conferta and Albizzia Lebbek.

use

In Plantation 9A in the vicinity of Beacon Hill Nursery an area half an acre in extent was broken up, manured and sown with seeds of Castor-Oil (Ricinus communis), the seed of which was obtained locally and from Honolulu, all germinated well and those plants on the dryer parts of the ground yielded a very fair crop of seed of good quality.

N 12

This experiment was made as a result of many inquiries from persons wishing to take up the growing of this plant to obtain Castor-Oil seed, for which there is said to be an increasing demand in Europe, where the seed is crushed, and the oil extracted and used as a lubricant, while the residue is made use of as a fertilizer,

The Castor-Oil plant is to be seen growing wild in and about almost every village in the New Territories, where the seeds are gathered and sold to the herb shops in Hongkong, and are used for mixing with other medicines.

Three hundred and eighty pounds of seed of Pinus Massoniana were collected for sowing in pits, broadcast and in nurseries, the crop of seed this year was very poor and great difficulty was ex- perienced in obtaining the amount mentioned.

Camphor seeds collected amounted to 81 pounds.

A new nursery was formed at the back of Little Hongkong Old Village for the raising of seedling Camphors to be used in the replanting of the adjoining area of natural forest.

This area is one of the largest pieces of natural forest now remaining on the island, many of the largest trees are showing signs of decay and almost every tree is covered or partly covered with creepers; with the exception of those lining the banks of streams or giving shade to the adjoining road all trees are now being felled by a contractor who is bound to replant one Camphor for every tree felled by him.

Fan Ling Experimental Garden.--The tobacco crop was again very good, but did not mature in time to enable it to be harvested before being damaged by heavy rainstorms: the whole crop was sent to the Botanical Gardens and there made use of as an insecticide.

Onion seed was again obtained from Teneriffe and sown and resulted in a heavy crop of large and well-shaped onions.

One farmer at Ping Kong has as a result of this object lesson, commenced to grow onions on ground formerly taken up by other

crops.

When visited this man stated that he made a better profit on his one onion crop than on two crops of rice.

The improved variety of Papaya fruited well, small quantities, of seed of this fruit were distributed to local farmers and gardeners.

Thirty trees of the Custard Apple (Anona reticulata) were purchased from near Macao and planted in the garden. In spite of the rough treatment received during the transport into Macao and from there to the garden, these trees produced about 50 large fruits of good quality.

This fruit, which always commands a good price in the local market, is very seldom grown in the New Territories, although the trees which may be procured at small cost, need little attention and the fruit is very popular among the natives.

N 13

The Bananas are now well established and produced some

· very fine bunches of fruits.

Twelve trees of Citrus medica, var. cherocarpus were planted. These were procured with great difficulty from near Wat Nam, Shiu Hing district. The peculiarly shaped fruits produced by these trees are treated with sugar and sold by natives as a dry preserved fruit.

A small area of heavily manured ground was sown with seeds of Castor-Oil (Ricinus communis) and the resulting plants grew in most cases to a height of eight to ten feet, each one bearing from half to one pound of seed of good quality.

Several consignments of the "Figs" of Ficus retusa, contain- ing insects were sent to the Entomologist of the Forestry Depart- ment, Honolulu, where the insects were to be liberated with the object of assisting in the fertilization of the fruits of varieties of Ficus growing wild or planted in the reservoir catchment areas.

All bulbs of Narcissus Tazetta intended for export to United States of America were again inspected and certified by an officer of this Department.

Between July 16th and October 28th, 9,835 cases in 84 lots, the whole containing 951,605 bulbs were dealt with in godowns and on junks.

The bulbs were generally cleaner than those dealt with during the preceding year and only a small portion of the consignments were detained for reconditioning.

HAY FEVER.

Flowers of Privet (Ligustrum sinense) were removed from plants growing in the Peak district.

Complaints continue to be received from many householders to the effect that the pollen from this plant is the cause of severe Hay Fever.

The plants in the Peak district appear to benefit by the removal of the flowers and there is no doubt that the gradual ex- termination of Privet will have to be commenced in the near future.

EXCHANGE OF SEEDS, &c.

The Department in indebted to the following donors of seeds, plants and Herbarium Specimens:-Director, Horticultural Section, (Mudiriya) Egypt; Professor Rock, Washington; Father Robert, Procure des Missions Etrangères; Board of Commissioner of Agri- culture and Forestry, Honolulu, Hawai; and Messrs. H. W. Buckbee, Rockford; K. H. Aumuller; H. Humphreys; Lam Yin; H. M. Maiden, Botanic Gardens, Sydney, and Sir Robert Ho Tung.

The following were the principal recipients:Dr. W. M. Docters Van Leeuwen, Director of the Botanical Gardens, Bui- tenzorg, Java; Messrs. H. B. C. Hill, Upper Assam; C. A. Backer,

N 14

Buitenzorg, Java; E. I. Wynne-Jones, H. B. M. Yamen, Canton; M. L. Bird, Assistant Inspector, Department of Agriculture, Court- House, Vancouver, B. C.; G. W. Kynock; B. F. Cavanagh, Director, State Gardens, Gwalior, W. I.; L. Gibbs; Tsui Yuet Oi, Tsun Wan, N. T.; Tsang Hin Lam, Kang Hau, N. T.; Chan Wing Ou, Tsun Wan, N. T.; Lam Yin Chau, Sha Au, X. T.; Chan Kam Tong, Shui Lau Tin, N. T.; Lo Hang Shek, Ping Kong, N. T.; J. H. Kerr, Sheung Shui, N. T.; R. A. Fox, Dawson, Y. T., Canada ; · H. L. Chapman, Horticultural Section (Mudiriya), Egypt; U. A. Farrell; Colonel Greer; J. O. Shepherd; W. L. Funkhauser, Canton Christian College, Canton; Wu Shun, N. T.; D. Burling- ham; Giannetti, Jr., Cagliari, Italy; Inspector Mcdonald; the Head-Master, Wan Tsai School and Officers in charge of Kowloon, Aberdeen, Hung Hom and No. 2 Police Stations.

STAFF.

The Acting Superintendent Mr. H. Green was appointed Superintendent on April 6th, 1920, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the late Superintendent, Mr. W. J. Tutcher.

Mr. B. E. G. Spinks was appointed to the new post of Super- visor in this Department on May 1st.

The Assistant Head Forester Mr. Lam Kun-yau resigned on August 8th and Mr. Chan Pui was appointed to fill the vacancy on October 1st.

May, 1922.

H. GREEN, Superintendent.

?

Table I.

RAINFALL, 1921.

Botanic Gardens.

N 15-

DATE.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept.

Oct. Nov.

Dec.

inch. inch.

inch.inch,

inch. inch.

inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch.

inch.

صرفي في هر

1,

2,

.04

2.14

1.44

.17

.87

3,

583

.06

1.12

.20

.04 .33 .16

5.73

7.75

.12

.45

.32

.09

2.05

2.22

.07

4.05

6,

.09

1.65

.78 .52

.55

.03

.05

.02

.41 2.23

1.75

.11

:

8,

9,

10,

11,

12,

13,

14,

15,

16,

.18

.02

3.40

.20

.16

2.15

.18

.05

6.31

.06

.65

.11

.51

1.49

22

.15

.04

15

.17

.15

.05

.08

.05

.10

.16 1.06

1.17

1.73

.42

Table I,-Continued.

- N 16

==

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. April May

June July Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov. Dec.

inch.

inch. inch.

inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch.

inch. inch.

inch. inch.

17,

.35 .70 .91 .11 .25

.04

.10

18,

19,

20,

21,

22,

23,

24,

25,

26,

27,

28,

29,

30,

31,

Total,

1.07

1.35

:

.12

::: 825-588

3.40

.49 .10

1.20

.04

.06 1.51

.06

.02

.27

1.03

.09

.11

.08

.02

1.48

.06

2.54

.05

.19.

.19

4.21

.18 1.04

.14

2.56

.05. .63

4.15

.96 .01 .07

1.56

.03

1.91

.37

.68

2.26

.88 .21

.65

1.02

.60

.02

.15 .10

.04

1.19

1.35

.31

2.93

.28

1.20 4.74

3.01 33.50 16.59 13.88 15.95 15.77 .15

2.43

.33

Total for the year 107.83 inches. Average for the last ten years at the Botanic Gardens -92.82 inches. Total rainfall registered at the Hongkong Observatory for the year--97.34 inches,

Village or District. | Block. Compartment.

Pine trees

stealing.

Table II.

FOREST GUARDS' SERVICE: OFFENCES.

Pine tree Pine tree! Brush- branches needles wood stealing, stealing. stealing.

Victoria,

Wongneichong,

A.B.C.E.G.

A.B.C.D.G.

1

Shaukiwan,..

Tytam,.

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

A.F.

రాజన

Stanley,

A.D.F.

Aberdeen,

A.B.C.D.E.F.

Pokfulam,

C.B.E.F.G.

1

Kowloon,..

8

A.B.

1

2

Harbour Belt,..

A.B.C.D.

16

41

21

Cheungshawan,

10

2

Kanghau,

11

New Territories,

12

3

PORTOK2-4-12

19

10

25

6

11

Grass

cutting.

flower Wild

stealing. Wild fruit

742

stealing.

1

REPORT OF

Cattle

grazing in plantation.

Fern

stealing.

1

Setting

fire to

plantation.

Assault

on Forest Guard.

Earth

cutting in

plantation.

Releasing

prisoner from custody of Forest Guard.

Total for 1921,

33

70

27

93

35

17

2

3

4

3

Total for 1920,

920,..

60

73

17

216

57

29

1

7

2

1

2

3

N 17-

F

My

N 18

Table III.

POLICE COURT RESULTS.

Cases.

50 cents to $1 fine,

$1.50 to $2

""

$2.50

to $3

$4

to $5

$6

to $10

$11

to $25

"

$50

$120

1 to 4 days' imprisonment,

5 to 7

"

8 to 14

3 weeks'

>

1921.

1920.

45

103

43

68

32

11

41

25.

7

16

1

5

1

1

18

57

38

69

19

44

2

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

Total,

:

:

:

:

...

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

"

1 month's

6 weeks'

Discharges,

Cautions,

Forfeiture of Bail,

Personal Bond, ...

Strokes with the birch,

Withdrawal,

2

2

1

15

20

27

X

10

2

1

1

1

287

465

:

Locality.

Kowloon Tsai,...

Fanling,

East Point,

N 19

Table IV.

NURSERIES.

Expenses.

$1,133.60 789.80

Little Hongkong Old Village,...

Total,

Table V.

REVENUE.

REVENUE.

2.40

60.00

$1,985.80

1921.

1920.

C.

$

C.

Timber Sales,...

3,677.25

1,891.42

Sale of Plants,

708.00

682.10

Loan of Plants,

579.24

405.72

Forestry Licences,.

4,800.47

4.926.47

Inspection of Nursery Stock,

850.00

610.00

Interest on Current Accounts,

2.13

Miscellaneous Receipts,..

13.56

5.62 15.77

:

Fine Fund,

27.21

10.66

Total,

10,657.86

8,547.76

Table VI.

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for the years 1912-1921.

Year. Total Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

% of Revenue to Expenditure.

$

C.

1912

$ 39,865.18

C.

$

C.

2,304.91

5.78

1913

48,745.88

8,352.06

17.13

1914

49,095.97

6,934.21

14.12

1915

49,404.56

6,871.67

13.19

1916

47,325.89

7,034.67

1486

1917

51,253.82

7,294.49

14.23

· 1918

51,967.08

6,282.45

12.09

1919

51.457.65

8,307.77

16.16

1920

55,975.49

8,547.76

15.27

1921

61,428.11

10,657.86

17.35

Appendix O.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION FOR THE YEAR 1921.

SUMMARY OF CONTENTS:

Revenue and Expenditure.

Staff.

Number of pupils: the Census. Education in English.

The British Schools. Vernacular Education. Normal Schools.

The University.

Excluded Schools.

Medical Inspections.

Board of Education.

Buildings.

ANNEXES.

A.-Report of the Inspector of English Schools.

B.- C.--

39

D.-

33

E.-

"

33

""

""

Director, Technical Institute. Inspectors of Vernacular Schools.

on the Military Educational Establishment.

25

Boy Scouts Association.

TABLES.

I.-Government Schools.

II.-Grant Schools.

III.-Subsidized Schools in the Colony.

IV.

""

""

"

New Territories.

V.-Chart shewing numbers in Schools, 1901-1920. VI.-University. External Examinations.

VII. Fees remitted to Free Scholars.

VIII.--Technical Institute.

IX-XIV. Scholarship Accounts.

:

:

:

- 0 2

REPORT ON THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

1921.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I, II, III, IV, VII, & VIII).

1. After deducting the school fees received, the total nett expenditure on education was $478,583.07 ($444,150.05 in 1920).

2. School and Technical Institute fees amounting to $104,063 were collected ($103,032 in 1920). In addition $5,496.50 fees were remitted to free scholars ($4,781.00 in 1920).

STAFF.

3. The Estimated British Staff was 24 men and 26 women. At the close of the year it was 3 men and 8 women short (5 and 16 in 1920). On the other hand there were employed 14 tem- porary British teachers. These had on an average nearly 2 years service in the Department, and most of them were either certificated or had had experience outside the Colony. Their work is of great value. When it is remembered what havoc is made by marriage in the ranks of the so-called permanent women teachers, the advant- age is obvious of a reserve of these more or less permanent temporary teachers.

4. The decision to give all future Chinese Masters a training at the University has led to temporary difficulties in maintaining the Staffs of schools. The first Student in Training to graduate was Mr. Tang Shu-sham in June. Annually henceforward this source should produce an increasing supply of masters who have graduated in Arts and taken the special course in teaching. At the end of the year there were in residence at the University 23 Students in Training for Government Schools, besides one holding a Government Scholarship and being trained for the Ying Wa College, and one who was awarded a Government Scholarship of $1,000 a year on the results of the December Matriculation Examination. This scholarship was won by A. G. Prew of the Diocesan Boys' School.

5. The death of Mr. Kong Ki-fai, one of the ablest and most valuable of the Chinese Masters, is deeply regretted.

NUMBER OF PUPILS: THE CENSUS.

:

6. The total numbers of pupils at schools in the Colony are:-

0 3

Number of Pupils in

Total

English Vernacular

Schools.

Schools.

* Government Schools

3,386

19

3,405

*

Military Schools ......

140

140

......

* Excluded Private Schools

281

12

293

*Grant Schools

2,401

3,736

6,137

† Controlled Private Schools

4,882

15,854

20,736

† Controlled Private Schools,

New Territories

3,989

3,989

Technical Institute

582

582

Total...

11,672

23,610

35.282

*

Average Attendance.

Total enrolment.

:

7. This is an increase of 6,575 over 1920, the increase in pupils in English Schools being 1,880 and in the Vernacular Schools, 4,695. 8. The increase in English pupils appears in every class but principally in the Private Schools. Of these, rather less than half are night schools, some of the pupils in which may be in attendance at other schools during the day time. None of the Private English Schools receive any assistance from Government.

9. The increase in Vernacular Education is equally widely spread, one half of it occurring in the Private Schools of the Colony. The increase in the New Territories is apparent rather than real, and corresponds with the registration of a number of schools which in former years had been uncontrolled.

10. A Census of the Colony was taken in April. The following figures derived therefrom are of interest.

11. The total number of children and young persons of both sexes and all nationalities between the ages of six and eighteen inclusive is 155,427. This includes the floating population and the New Territories, and represents the maximum catch which the broadest educational net could be expected to cover in any country. Of this number 35,282 are registered in our schools, or nearly 23%.

12. Excluding the floating population, the Chinese boys in Hongkong and Kowloon between the ages of six and sixteen number 38,988. Of these, 11,789 are in Vernacular schools and at least 6,000 in English schools or 17,789 altogether. But it is certain that the average child does not remain at school for as long as 11 years i.e. from the sixth to the sixteenth year. If the average school life be taken at 5 years out of a possible 11, the

A

0 4

number of boys between six and sixteen who are or who have been at school is between 35,000 and 36,000 out of a possible 38,988. This is in accordance with the best opinion that very few Chinese males in Hongkong are totally illiterate.

13. The total population in the New Territories is given at 83,163 of these, 3,989 or nearly 5% are in attendance at schools. The corresponding figure for the United States of America is 20%, and that for the Philippine Islands is 10%. The lowness of our figure in comparison with the Philippines is due to the almost entire absence of girls from the schools of the New Territories.

EDUCATION IN ENGLISH.

14. In the last 10 years the number of pupils learning English has increased by over 100% (Table V.) The Census gives an increase in the total population of only 36-87% for the same period. Thus it is obvious that the study of English is being widely extended. Further, a greater proportion of the pupils are continuing their studies into the highest Classes. This is shewn by the University Examination results as explained in paragraph 29. Another proof is given by the figures shewing the admittances from the District Schools into the Upper School at Queen's College. These numbered 44 in 1911 and 150 in 1921 an increase of 340%, or nearly ten times the increase in the population.

THE BRITISH SCHOOLS.

(Table I)

15. The growth of these schools has been remarkable. The average attendance has increased from 163 to 209 and the maximum enrolment from 233 to 345. The increase among the smaller children has been evenly distributed, but in the higher Classes is confined to Kowloon School. Indeed the small number in the higher Classes at Victoria School has made it necessary to close them as explained by the Inspector of English Schools in his report, Annexe A. There is now what there has never been before, a numerically strong Upper School at Kowloon, and it becomes possible to compare the progress of the British children with those of other nationalities.

16. The School has many inherent difficulties. Of 26 pupils who sat for the University Examinations all but six had been at the School less than 2 years. Sometimes too a child will go home. for a year and drop all his work during that time. No one perhaps is to blame, but the results are saddening.

17. Only one pupil passed the Matriculation, though 5 passed the Senior (.e. fell short in Mathematics) and 11 the Junior Examinations. As a further test and for purposes of comparison, I had an essay written by the Classes preparing for the Junior Local at Kowloon School and at a good school for Chinese boys and another for Portuguese girls. The Kowloon School was

0 5

inferior to the other two in all respects: Subject matter, Com- position, Writing, and Spelling.

18. The School has now a very strong staff. By next year it ought to be possible to ascertain whether there are just grounds for the disconcerting suggestion, that British children in the Far East are so handicapped by environment and circumstances that they cannot hold their own in their Mother tongue against foreigners.

19. Perhaps regular attendance and some good hard work under the stimulus of healthy competition and a little wholesome driving from teachers and parents may lead to an improvement. The medical report shews that the health of the children is excellent, and contains no suggestion of overwork or brainfag.

20. The first and second places in the Ladies Harbour Race (Open) were won by girls at the Kowloon School, the first of whom is also the Champion lady swimmer of the Colony.

VERNACULAR EDUCATION.

21. In the report for 1920 reference was made to the parallel methods of assisting Vernacular Education, by Grant and by Subsidy, and attention was drawn to the advantages and superior attractions of the Subsidy system. During the year under re- view it was decided to abandon the Grant system except in the case of five schools under British teachers.

22. The Education Ordinance, which provides for the com- pulsory registration of schools, was in 1921 applied for the first time to the New Territories, where previously Subsidized Schools only had been inspected. Certificates were accordingly issued to about 100 Non-Subsidized schools.

23. This work and the anticipation of a great increase in the number of Subsidized Schools in the Colony rendered an increase of the Inspectorial Staff necessary. An additional Inspector, a Cadet Officer, was provided from the end of the year.

24. The Inspectors in their report (Annexe C) draw attention to the growing interest in Vernacular Education, as evidenced by the building and maintenance of schools by the villagers at Pat Heung, Kau Wa Kang and Cheung Chau. The Tung Wa and Confucian Societies continue to maintain schools; but it is to be wished that they received more supervision from the managing bodies. It can not be said that as a whole they are particularly efficient. Mention should be made of the Pan Man and Chung Shing Free Schools which are financed to a great extent by Mr. Tsang Foo and are now 7 in number.

NORMAL SCHOOLS.

25. The system of normal Education was fully described in last year's report. It is being carried on with success.

THE UNIVERSITY.

(Table. VI.)

26. The following Table shews the successes at the University Matriculation and External Examinations during recent years.

Government Schools Queen's College &

Belilios School.

Other Schools in the Colony.

External Schools & students at University.

Total.

Matric. &

Matric. &

Matric. &

Junior

Junior

Senior

Senior

Junior

Senior

Matric. & Senior

Junior

1914...

11

24

1915...

30

1916...

15

1917.

16

1918..

26

1919...

23

1920...

22

1921...

33

***NE

22

57

46

71

16

92

99

54

93

33

1

102

129

65

90

38

16

119

153

60

84

82

28

29

138

171

22

45

89

25

32

93

143

69

84

127

51

37

157

233

66

99

156

52

53

184

275

176

322

301

708

265

173

942 1,203

27. The popularity of these examinations is apparent in the results obtained by the schools external to the Colony, which in- creasingly enter for them.

28. In the schools of the Colony these examinations are compulsory; and the rapid increase in the number of successes points to a corresponding improvement in higher education.

:

29. In the last seven years the increase in attendance at the English Schools of the Colony is 52%, and the increase in the successes at the Junior University Local Examination is 137%. This promises well for the future.

30. St. Joseph's College is to be congratulated on being very easily first in the number of its passes.

EXCLUDED SCHOOLS.

THE POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.

31. The Police Training School is entirely under the control of the Police Department.

32. Of the non-Government schools which at the coming in force of the Education Ordinance were excluded from its operation there now remain two only: St. Stephen's Colleges for Boys and for Girls. They had an average attendance of 125 and 156 re- spectively (139 and 86 in 1920).

0 7

MEDICAL INSPECTIONS.

33. The British schools were inspected as usual. The general health of the children at Kowloon School, Junior, and at the Peak School was "very good". At the Victoria School "the teeth on the whole were good. The vision was very good". At Kowloon School, Senior, the health was "unusually good", all the children putting on weight in the hot weather.

34. The Government Schools for Chinese were tested for eyesight in the same way as last year. At the District Schools and the Belilios Public School 1,458 children were examined of whom 184 were supplied with glasses (nearly 13%). Of 615 pupils at Queen's College only 23 required glasses. But many of them had been previously treated.

35. The principal Grant Schools were inspected by their own doctors, whose reports were satisfactory.

BOARD OF EDUCATION.

36. The Board continues to do a great deal of useful work. The full Board met on five occasions and gave valuable advice, which was accepted by the Government, with regard to the development of Vernacular Education, and the creation of a Government Educational Scholarship at the University, besides dealing with a number of other questions, such as the price of school books and the allocation of playing grounds.

37. But by far the greater part of the Board's work was done in Committee: in particular the principal Government and Grant Schools were inspected, and the resultant reports were forwarded to the Heads of Schools for their consideration and guidance. The authorities of one school raised the question whether the Board had any legal right to undertake such inspections. There appears to be some doubt on the point, and pending its solution the visits of Members of the Board are being confined to schools where their welcome is assured.

BUILDINGS.

38. $50,000 appeared in the Estimates for 1921 as provision for a new building for Saiyingpun School, but the erection had not been begun by the end of the year. Plans were considered during the year for a new building for Queen's College at Caroline Hill.

39. Further Building Grants of $20,000 and $9,000 respec- tively were made in respect of St. Joseph's College and the annexe to the French Convent School.

40. A well equipped chemistry laboratory at Queen's College was begun and completed in the year under review.

41. A new building for Praya East School is in course of erection on Morrison Hill.

42. Several new Class rooms were added to the Belilios School.

BOY SCOUTS AND GIRL GUIDES.

43. A report on the Boy Scouts Association is given is Annexe E. It now numbers 300.

44. The Girl Guide movement was started in February, with Lady Stubbs as Commissioner. It has now about 130 members, 100 Guides enrolled in 5 Companies, and one Pack of 30 Brownies.

EDUCATION OFFICE,

19th April, 1922.

E. IRVING, Director of Education.

O 9

Annexe A.

REPORT BY THE INSPECTOR OF ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS. (Table I.)

Queen's College.-The Maximum Enrolment was 887 (656 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 542 (571 in 1920). The Head Master, Mr. Tanner, was on leave until 31st August. During his absence Mr. R. E. O. Bird acted as Head Master. During the year the English Staff was strengthened, so that it is now possible to give greater attention to English, especially in the Lower School. Careful attention continues to be given to Vernacular Studies. The following extracts from the Head Master's Report are of interest :-

"That we might come into line with University arrangements, it has been decided that in future the School Year shall begin on January 1st and end on the 31st December. As a result of this change our Annual and Admission Examinations were held, and Promotions for the New Year made in December.

"Another very important development of the school organiza- tion has been the formation, with Sir Robert Ho Tung as First President of the Old Boys' Association, a body of distinguished and enthusiastic old boys whose numbers continue steadily to increase.

"As a result of the change of the School Year, an additional term of 4 months was available for preparation for University and Annual Class Examinations. This, although very useful in the case of backward students, was not quite an unmixed blessing so far as the brighter boys and members of the Staff were concerned.

"A total of 22 boys sat for the Matriculation Examination of the University. Of these 13 Matriculated while 2 were awarded a Senior Local pass, and 2 obtained honours."

"The whole of our Class 2 boys, numbering 56, sat for the Junior Local examination and of these 49 passed while 7 failed; of these failures 2 were Chinese out of 48 who sat, 4 were Indians out of 6, and 1 Japanese out of 2.

"In this section 29 Distinctions were gained; one boy, Lo Tung-fan, obtaining no less than 5. Although these Junior results are very gratifying there is a feeling among masters responsible that the University Authorities perhaps allow boys to get through this examination somewhat too easily, and that it would be better for all concerned if greater numbers of them were kept back at this stage.”

"Sport continues to flourish and football, cricket, tennis, volley-ball, basket-ball, running, swimming, boxing and even base-

O 10

ball and ping-pong-each under the direction of a specially interest ed master-all possess a keenly enthusiastic following.

"Throughout the Lower School-classes 4 to 8--instructions in Physical Drill and Gymnastics is given daily by specially qualified instructors at the Chinese Y.M.C.A., where our boys also have the use of the very excellent swimming-pool."

"A few years ago we complained of the lack of interest taken in games. Now, the difficulty is to arrange so that games shall not interfere with regular school work.”

District Schools for Chinese Boys:—Ellis Kadoorie, Saiying- pun, Yaumati and Wantsai.-In order to insure uniformity of standard in Class 4 in Queen's College and the District Schools a common examination for this Class was held in December, the examination being conducted by the Inspector of English Schools and the Head-masters of the Schools concerned. This arrange- ment was found to be useful and will be continued ;

among other advantages it obviates the necessity for boys having to pass an additional examination on proceeding from a District School to Queen's College.

The District Schools are now more fully carrying out their function as Feeders to Queen's College, 153 boys from these schools having proceeded to Queen's College during the year, the largest number on record.

Ellis Kadoorie School.--The Maximum Enrolment was 593 (736 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 527 (607 in 1920).

Mr. Mycock acted as Head Master until August when Mr. R.E.O. Bird resumed his post.

The school has made satisfactory progress, and has not only kept up its old activities but even added to them, especially in the formation of a boy-scout troop.

Systematised art teaching was introduced in October upon the arrival of Miss Hall, a specialist in this branch of instruction. Great importance continues to be attached to the teaching of colloquial English.

The Library has again been increased by over 300 Volumes. Volley Ball and Swimming continue to be popular; Boxing continues, but progress is somewhat handicapped by irregular

attendance.

Saiyingpun School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 368 (340 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 319 (314 in 1920),

O 11

my.com

The School was full throughout the entire year, and several hundred applicants were unable to secure admission.

The attendance was excellent, several Classes maintaining an unbroken record for a period of six consecutive weeks, while fifty-five boys-one sixth of the entire School-made full attendances for the year.

The discipline and tone of the School continue excellent.

The general standard of efficiency has been maintained; Map Drawing, English Conversation and Composition are particularly well taught. As in preceding years Handwriting continues to merit special praise. At the Vere Forster's International Writing Competition five Copy Books which were entered won special mention; all were awarded Certificates of Merit and three earned prizes in addition.

During the Summer Vacation a well-attended Class in Mandarin was conducted by Mr. Yin Chung-yu, an undergraduate at the University. Good work was done and interest maintained to the end of the course.

The School is used regularly as a Training School by the University Education undergraduates.

In sports the School has done well; Volley Ball and Football were played and during the summer season swimming was enjoyed regularly by the whole school.

A Troop of Boy Scouts--numbering 50-has been formed, the uniform and equipment being provided by the generosity of Mr. Ho Kom-tong. The Troop spent a week at Cheung Chau during August and although the weather was wet the boys put in some useful training.

Scout Master Leung Yuk-tong has given much time and thought to the movement, and the high state of efficiency which has been attained, as shewn at the Inauguration Ceremony in October and in the subsequent Report of the Commission, is due to his assiduous care and attention. One of the Patrol Leaders has been awarded the Gilt-Cross and a Certificate from the Head Quarters in London, for gallantry displayed in saving a boy from drowning. This is the first honour of the kind to reach the Colony. In December two of the Scouts were given a trip as Cadets to British North Borneo and were able to supplement the knowledge of seamanship gained on H.M.S. Tamar earlier in the

year.

-

Past Pupils. One former pupil has secured a Scholarship given by the Namyeung Tobacco Co.: and is now studying at the Chicago University. Twelve others-now at Queen's College— recently passed the University Junior Local Examination; one of these, the "Alan Morris Scholar", obtained five distinctions. The "Old Boys' Ambulance Division" (St. John Ambulance

·

- O 12

Brigade) continues to do useful work, and in the recent Vaccination Compaign vaccinated 4,507 persons.

Yaumati School.—The Maximum Enrolment was 268 (311 in

1920).

The Average Attendance was 237 (263 in 1920).

The attendance improved in the last Term. The losses from Classes 4 and 5—caused by boys leaving at the end of the old school year—were not made good after the summer holidays. The result is that the higher Classes are now small while the lower are overflowing. This will however remedy itself in course of time.

The school continues to do successful work.

Discipline is excellent.

Sports are flourishing, and the school now holds its own Sports Meeting annually.

1920.

Wantsai School.--The Maximum Enrolment was 206 (233 in

The Average Attendance was 180 (207 in 1920).

Satisfactory work is done throughout.

During the year a room has been set apart and fitted up as a Library, with the result that the boys are taking an increased interest in private reading.

The school is very successful in sports-notwithstanding that there is no playing ground attached-and won the Hongkong Schools' Junior Football League Competition, the Wolfe Cup (or first place in the District Schools' Football Competition) and took the 2nd place in the District Schools' Sports.

Discipline is excellent.

Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians.-The Maximum Enrolment was 116 (115 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 90 (101 in 1920).

The attendance in Classes 2 and 3 being small-unavoidably the boys in these Classes were transferred to Queen's College. Urdu is taught in all Classes.

The school gardens are again in a very flourishing condition, flowers and vegetables being successfully grown.

The general tone of the school is excellent. Prefects have been appointed and they have materially assisted in raising the tone of the School and in promoting a spirit of good comradeship among the boys-boys of many races and creeds, and from all parts of Southern Asia.

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Praya East School. The Maximum Enrolment was 114 (116 in 1920).

The average attendance was 98 (95 in 1920).

Owing to structural defects in the old school premises, which were at best unsuitable, the school was in May housed temporarily in the Indian School, pending the erection of a new building, now approaching completion.

The school was inspected by a Committee of the Board of Education; the following extract from the Report of this Com- mittee is of interest :-

"We would like to congratulate the Head Master (Mr. Lo Yuk-lun) on the excellent tone, discipline and cleanliness apparent in the school in spite of the many obvious difficulties under which he is working, and in spite of the fact that our visit was paid entirely by surprise. Each class-room was found to be scrupulously clean, while the discipline, keenness and good manners of the students were very pleasant to watch, and compared very favourably with many other schools in far more fortanate circumstances. The school appears to be a triumph of efficiency under adverse conditions.'

It is satisfactory to note that boys who have passed from this school to the District Schools and later to Queen's College, con- tinue to take high places in their various classes.

BRITISH SCHOOLS.

As last year, French is taught in all these schools, under the supervision of Madame Moussion.

Drawing is taught according to the methods recommended by the Royal Drawing Society, under the supervision of Mrs. McPherson. All the pupils were presented for the Examinations of the Society, with the result that a surprisingly formidable array of Certificates (Honours, and Pass) was earned. It should be noted, however, that only the Junior Sections of the Examinations were entered for. It is not proposed to take this examination in future. Miss Macdonald continues to take the games in all these schools.

Victoria School.-The Maximum Eurolment was 65 (49 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 42 (38 in 1920).

It has been decided that boys at this School shall be trans- ferred to the Kowloon British School when they attain the age of 12 years. The girls who were in the higher Classes have also been transferred to the Kowloon School, and Messrs. Butterfield and Swire have kindly arranged for a steam launch to convey the children to and from Kowloon daily.

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The School has been placed under a Head Mistress, instead of a Head Master as heretofore.

The work of the School shews a steady improvement, except in Geography which is still weak. Spelling also needs attention. History is distinctly good.

Kowloon School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 111 (122 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 76 (86 in 1920).

In consequence of the increase in the number of children (155) attending the School early in the year, it was found necessa- ry to divide the School into two sections, the Senior School, con- sisting of Classes 1-6 and the Junior School. Classes 7, 8 and Kindergarten. These Junior Classes, containing 60 pupils, were in February transferred to the Garrison School building, then unoccupied, by arrangement with the Military Authorities.

The School is now well staffed, a trained English Mistress and an English Master having been added to the Staff during the year, and is very liberally equipped in the matter of school apparatus. Manual training has been started, and by the generosity of the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company a room has been fitted up for "woodwork", and furnished with carpenter's benches and a cabinet containing complete sets of tools. Good work is being done. The Dock Company has further helped the school by the gift of a complete set of gymnastic apparatus. Physical education is thus carried on under the best conditions.

The result is already apparent in the upright carriage and healthy appearance of the pupils. An extract from the Medical Officer who inspected the School in October may be given here:- "The general standard of health seems to me to be unusually good. In spite of the hot weather every child except 3 (2 of whom had just been in hospital) had increased in weight, the smallest increase being 3 lbs and the largest 15 lbs, since the School was last examined in May,"

All pupils in Class 1 were presented for the Matriculation or the Senior Local Examination (Hongkong University) and all in Class 2 for the Junior Local Examination. The results were: Matriculation, 2 entered and 1 passed (the first to matriculate direct from this School); Senior, 6 entered and 5 passed; Junior. 12 entered and 11 passed.

The work generally is good throughout the School, especially in Class 5, but greater attention to Mathematics is necessary.

Cookery has been successful and singing, now taught according to the best methods, is rapidly improving.

The study of Chinese continues to progress.

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The athletic side of the school has been developed and both boys and girls now play and enjoy the games commonly played in Home Schools. Swimming continues to be very popular; with one or two exceptions all the pupils swim,-and swim well.

The Boxing classes are well attended and the boys are develop- ing considerable skill.

Kowloon School, Junior.-The Maximum Enrolment was 106.

The Average Attendance was 54.

The circumstances under which this school was opened have already been detailed in the Report on the Kowloon School.

The Average Attendance, as compared with the Enrolment, is low but may be explained by the fact that all the pupils are of very tender age, and cannot attend on days when the weather is not good.

The Medical Officer reports that the health of the children is satisfactory.

The school is now well equipped and progressing satisfactorily.

Peak School. The Maximum Enrolment was 60 (62 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 52 (39 in 1920).

The attendance, usually unsatisfactory, has been better except during the months of May and June.

The school work shews some improvement.

Drawing, French and Physical Training are important features. Practically all the girls in attendance belong to the Brownies or Girl Guides.

A Committee of the Board of Education visited the school in November; the following is extracted from their Report:-

66

Impressions generally pleasing were received throughout inspection, especially in the attention given to discipline, order and physical drill.

There has been further improvement in the regular attendance

of pupils."

Belilios Public School for Girls.-The Maximum Enrolment was 558 (577 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 521 (508 in 1920).

A Normal School has been opened to train women as Verna- cular Teachers, a two years' course being given. There were twenty-six applicants for the twenty seats in the Class on its formation. Practical teaching forms an important part of the course and criticism lessons are given regularly. The Training given is already proving to be of value.

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In the school a new transitional class—the Remove-has been established, between the Vernacular Side, where English is taught for an hour daily, and the English Side where it is taught for four hours a day. In the Remove Class English is taken for two hours daily, Chinese for three. The experiment has been entirely successful.

The work throughout the school is highly satisfactory.

Cookery continues to flourish; a new kitchen has been built, and is much appreciated.

In the higher Classes eleven girls entered for the Senior Local Examination of the Hongkong University and nine passed, one with Honours; there were two "Distinctions" in Needlework and one in Arithmetic. Seven girls entered for the Junior Examination and all passed.

For the first time, the school has been medically examined under the scheme recently established.

In the Technical Institute Teachers Examination, English Section, five former pupils passed, one with Distinction.

In the Chinese Section three passed. All these are now Mistresses on the Staff of the school.

First Aid to the Injured is taught, and the Victoria Nursing Division of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, attached to the school, comprises thirty-one members of the Staff and senior pupils.

The charitable work for which the school is well known con- tinues unabated.

The school was visited in October by a Committee of the Board of Education. The members reported in high terms their satisfaction with the school, finally observing:---

"The Committee would express marked approval of the place taken by the Belilios Public School in Girls' Education in Hongkong."

OUTLYING DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

Taipo School.―The Maximum Enrolment was 78 (70 in 1920). The Average Attendance was 71 (53 in 1920).

The School has moved into new and more suitable premises.

A trained Chinese Master has been transferred from the Praya East School as Head Master and the school placed under the personal supervision of Mr. de Martin, Headmaster of the Yaumati School.

Un Long School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 39 (36 in 1920).

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The Average Attendance was 28 (33 in 1920).

As evidence of the influence of the school on the scholars it may be noted that six past pupils have recently been presented by Government with certificates in recognition of their valuable services as Special Police in the district during the War.

Cheung Chau School-The Maximum Enrolment was 29 (27 in 1920).

The Average Attendance was 20 (20 in 1920).

It is proposed to transfer a trained Chinese Master to this School, as in the case of the Taipo School.

GRANT SCHOOLS.

(Table II)

As in the previous year there are 10 English Grant Schools, all of which were visited and inspected during the year.

At all visits, Classes were seen at work. All exercises written during Term have been examined by me, papers worked and Classes examined orally; questions of method and organization were discussed in all schools with the Principals concerned. In addition, the Diocesan Boys' School and St. Joseph's College were visited and reported on by a Sub-Committee of the Board of Education. These visits are of great assistance to me and are likely to prove of benefit to the Schools concerned. Steady progress is being made in these schools. All pupils in Classes 1 and 2-the highest Classes are required to enter for the Hongkong University Matriculation (or Senior) and Junior Examination respectively and the results are generally very satisfactory (Table VI). Special attention is devoted to the teaching of English, written and spoken, and in the latter connexion to correct pronunciation.

ENGLISH PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

During the year 26 Boys' Schools (4 Day and 22 Night) were closed; 31 new Boys' Schools (5 Day and 26 Night) and 1 new Girls' Day School were opened.

The total number of Schools open was:-Day Schools,-2 Girls' and 30 Boys'; Night Schools-80 Boys'; with a maximum enrolment of 62 girls and 2,741 boys in the Day Schools, and 2,079 boys in the Night Schools, making a total of 4,882 pupils, an increase of 1,203 upon 1920.

In addition there were 2 Exempted Schools, the Catholic Seminary, a Day School with 23 Students training for the priest- hood, and a Night School maintained by the Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company for the instruction of some of their Chinese. employees, with 50 in attendance.

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The work done in most of the schools is still of a very ele- mentary character. Pronunciation of English is often poor, the teachers themselves being in many cases not free from faults in this direction.

Discipline is generally good.

Monthly Attendance Reports are furnished by all the Schools, and the Regulations are carefully observed.

12th April, 1922.

t

E. RALPHS,

Inspector of English Schools.

O 19

Annexe B.

REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF THE TECHNICAL

INSTITUTE,

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

(Table VIII.)

The Institute was open as usual during 8 months of the year.

The number of students in attendance during the Session ending June 30th was 583 as against 588 in 1920.

At the end of the Session Examinations were conducted as in previous years by independent examiners. 207 students were examined; 104 passed in one subject, 3 in two subjects, 1 in three subjects; a total of 108 students or 52%, passed. The low percent- age of passes is due in part to the high standard required in the Teachers' Classes; the standard is raised gradually year by year in these Classes, the benefits being apparent eventually in the improved teaching in the schools to which the members belong. At the June Examination referred to 59 Teachers' Certificates including 3 with Distinction, were awarded (77 in 1920). Of these, 5 were given for Third Year work in English and 8 for the same in Chinese, and were in the nature of final Certificates, marking the completion of the Course. The average attendance at the English Teachers' Classes was 31, and at the Vernacular Teachers' Classes 109.

The Vernacular Teachers' Classes are under the direct supervision of Mr. Y. P. Law, B.A., who reports as follows:--

"The school year has been changed, and, from 1922, will being and end with the Chinese year.

There were 64 men and 87 women in attendance in the 1st term, but in the 2nd term, the number of men was only 54, and of women, 74, some of the 3rd year students having passed out and few new pupils being admitted owing to the change of the school year.

At the June Examination, 6 men and 2 women passed the final examination.

Mr. Au's lectures on Chinese Classics and Literature con- tinue to flourish: 16 passed students have returned to attend them. The 1st year Women's Class has been full, and at the beginning of each term, for the past 2 years, we have had to turn away 10 to 15 applicants for admission. It should, however, be pointed out that the girls who come to this class are not all teachers; many are private students who wish to further their Chinese studies, and it is only these that have been refused admission, when the class is full. The Men's Classes are, on the other hand,

O 20

not as encouraging. The attendance of the first year Class has been very irregular, notwithstanding that a number of students were not allowed to sit for the last Annual Examination for not attending regularly.'

In addition to the Classes already referred to, Classes were held in Building Construction, Chemistry (Practical and Theoretical), Physics, Electricity, English, Shorthand, Bookkeeping and Cookery.

31st December, 1921.

E. RALPHS, Director, Technical Institute.

1

1

0 21

Annexe C.

REPORT ON VERNACULAR SCHOOLS IN THE

COLONY, 1921.

During the year 73 new Private Day Schools were registered, a decrease of 16 from the numbers for the previous year, and 4 Schools South of the Kowloon Hills had their permits exchanged for certificates. 77 Day Schools closed: 21 of these disappeared without notification. 1 Private School was transferred to the Grant List and one Grant School was taken off the list and con- tinued as a Private School. The number of existing. Private Day Schools is thus the same as at the end of last year, viz., 359. Of these 1 is exempted (The Chamber of Commerce Language School), 1 is a School for training Coxswains, 3 are in Class A, 271 in Class B and 83 in Class C.

Certificates were also issued to 8 New Night Schools. Of these 2 have closed already, in addition to 6 old Schools. The number of Night Schools now existing is also the same as for the previous year, viz., 16.

.

Of Grant Schools School No. 104 (Hunghom) was added to the list, and School No. 37 closed at the end of September owing to the Totsai Chapel being no longer available. School No. 83, managed by the Confucian Society, was struck off the list as being inefficient, bringing the total number of Grant Schools down to 53. 57 Schools have been subsidised during the year, as compared with 66 in 1920. The reason for the decrease is that 1920 being the first year of the Subsidies scheme, new schools received subsidies only from the beginning of the school term, thereby effecting a saving of two months' subsidy which was sufficient to help 9 more schools. The award of Subsidies has helped to keep Schools settled and there have been comparatively few changes among the Subsidised ones: this all helps towards efficiency. The payment of subsidies has also meant that fees have been kept down, which in several cases has led to a large increase in the attendance, the average attendance for the 57 Schools being practically the same as for 66 Schools in the preceding year.

The Scholarships from Vernacular Grant Schools to District Schools were increased from 10 to 12, and similar scholarships to the Belilios Public School were awarded to Girls' Schools, to the number of 8.

An Industrial School started by the Wesleyan Mission at 19c. High Street has done well, and there is reason to think that there will soon be further developments in this direction.

A. R. CAVALIER,

Y. P. LAW,

Inspectors of Vernacular Schools.

9th February, 1922.

-

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REPORT ON VERNACULAR SCHOOLS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES, 1921.

Of the 80 Schools on the list at the end of 1920 15 closed and 20 new schools were put on the list, bringing the total up to 85.

Of these 9 are up to Class A standard, 61 Class B and 15 Class C. A further subsidy of $120 was awarded in the case of 7 Class A Schools and of $60 each in the case of 21 Schools of Class B which were above the average.

An up-to-date school built by the people of the Pat Heung district at their own expense was at last completed in October and H. E. the Governor performed the opening ceremony. It is situated right in the centre of the plain and will serve as a central school for the whole district. It has already had the effect of depleting the upper classes of some of the neighbouring village schools. The school is being run on modern lines, under a trained and capable Headmaster, and promises to do well. Apart from the cost of building the running expenses of such a school are much greater than those of the ordinary village school, and subsidy was consequently granted at an unusually high rate, viz., $20 per mensem, which was subsequently raised to $25.

New and up-to-date premises for the school at Kau Wa Kang, which is also run on modern lines, were completed early in the year and opened by the Hon. the Director of Education.

At Cheung Chau the Kai-fong started a Free School for which they applied for subsidy. It was decided to give them a year's trial, and the school having proved satisfactory it will now be placed on the subsidy list.

Previous to this year only subsidised schools were inspected, and this year a beginning was made of the inspection and registra- tion of all schools, whether subsidised or not.

Certificates were issued to 85 subsidised and 103 non- subsidised schools. Of the latter 4 closed, leaving a total of 184 schools on the list.

The number of pupils in subsidised schools is 2,129, including 145 girls, and the average attendance 1,796; in non-subsidised schools 1,860 and the average attendance 1,300. The percentage of pupils who continue beyond the third year standard is still about the same as last year.

Applications were received very late in the year in some cases and in the case of 10 schools the teachers had already gone else- where before a certificate was even issued. At Wang Chau and Mong Tseng Wai the existence of a second school was reported after we had already been to see those that were duly registered

O 23

and there was no time to make a second journey. All other schools we have personally inspected, at least once, and in some cases several times. The subsidised schools have been visited by Sub-Inspectors once a month during term, and the non-subsidised from time to time, but, owing to the great amount of extra work entailed by registering so many new schools for the first time it was not possible to arrange for regular and systematic inspection of each individual school. The experiment was made of trying to get pupils to take an interest in botanical work, and the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department sent out 12 specimens of various plants, mostly bananas, papayas and pineapples, to half a dozen selected schools-at Shui Lau Tin, Lam Tsuen, Pak Sha Au, Kau Wa Kang and two at Tsuen Wan.

The experiment has not proved much of a success, and pupils do not appear to take a personal interest in the gardens. At Shui Lau Tin bananas did not flourish though the other plants did, and in the Tsuen Wan district strange to say it was the pineapples that failed to flourish.

9th February, 1922.

A. R. CAVALIER,

Y. P. LAW,

Inspectors of Vernacular Schools,

O 24

Annexe D.

REPORT ON THE MILITARY EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS, HONGKONG,

By the Inspector of Educational Training, China, Straits Settlements, and Ceylon Commands.

According to the most recent returns the number of children on the books of the Garrison Schools, Garden Road, was 140, a decrease of 5 on the corresponding numbers at the date of my last report. The average attendance has, however, risen to 95 per cent. The schools have been conducted with zeal and efficiency and the results of the last inspection reflected credit on the teach- ing staff. At the examination for entrance to the Royal Naval Dockyard the first two places were taken by boys from the Garrison School. Another boy was among the successful candidates at the Junior Local Examination of the University of Hongkong.

A War Office decision that "soldier-assistants" should no longer be employed in children's schools created a temporary difficulty with regard to the staffing of the schools but this was surmounted by the transfer of a trained teacher from the Infants' to the Elder Children's School, and the appointment of an additional pupil teacher to the former school. In the course of these rearrangements it became necessarry to close a small Detachment School at Lyemun. The military children from that station now attend the Victoria British School.

Additional sports gear has been obtained during the year and many successes have been gained at various athletic competitions. The elder children have derived much benefit from their active association with the Murray Troop of Boy Scouts (under Mr. A. White as Scout Master), the Wolf Cubs (under Sergeant Major Williams, R. G. A.), and the Murray Troop of Girl Guides (under Miss Kirkpatrick). Great interest was shown in the varied activities of these organisations and awards were gained in swimming and in other forms of scout-craft.

The new system of adult education to which reference was made in my last report has been extended and regulations have now come into force which raise very considerably the standard of education required for the various army certificates of education, the standard of the papers set for the First Class and Special Examinations having been defined by the Army Council as equivalent to the Matriculation standard of a recognised University.

The arrangements by which selected military students were given financial assistance to enable them to attend classes at the Hongkong Technical Institute are still in operation but the grant from which the expenses incurred were defrayed has been seriously

O 25

reduced, a measure which may have the effect of lessening the number of military students availing themselves of the facilities afforded by the Technical Institute. This possibility is regrettable although the need for economy in expenditure is understood.

Another result of the insistent need for economy is the withdrawal from the Far East of the Inspector of Educational Training in the China, Straits Settlements, and Ceylon Commands. The educational system will, however, continue as before, with the guidance and assistance of the officers, etc., of the Army Educational Corps attached to the various units, and under the control and inspection of the General Officer Commanding, assisted by the General Staff.

H. S. MILLS, Captain, A. E. C.

I. E. T., China, Straits Settlements and Ceylon Cds.

Hongkong, 20th January, 1922.

:

O 26

Annexe E.

:

REPORT ON THE HONGKONG BOY SCOUTS

ASSOCIATION.

The total number of youths and boys in the Colony of Hongkong now receiving Scout training is approximately 300. Since October steady progression has been shewn in all Troops, the junior branch, Wolf Cubs, in particular making great headway. All troops have been steadily improving their positions by insisting that only such boys as attend troop parades and meetings regularly shall be kept on the Troop Rolls. This has had the effect of making it possible to give the training more in accordance with the principles of the movement, which aim at placing the main responsibility of discipline and instruction in scoutcraft on the leading boys.

an

Apparently when the Association was first restarted in the Colony there was a tendency to aim at numbers, but the weakness of this policy quickly became apparent, as there was comparatively early decrease in attendances. The result has been that in the case of at least two troops the number of the boys on the Roll has been halved, and other troops have also suffered in a similar way.

Hence the course taken as stated above, with wholesome and beneficial consequences.

A great source of weakness has been lack of training for officers, and it is now the aim of the Association to get in motion a scheme of training for officers and senior scouts by courses of lectures, and practical lessons in training camps, so soon as a satisfactory site and equipment have been acquired. Instruction is also given by combined "Rallies", and by means of the official organ the "Silver Wolf".

Various troops have taken the opportunity of going to camp at week ends and during holidays, and all would have done so but for the non-arrival of camp equipment from England owing to shipping strike.

The feeling of Brotherhood has been encouraged by troops visiting troops in their respective headquarters, and the exchange of ideas has been correspondingly beneficial.

The Commissioner cannot but speak with admiration of those men who spending all the week in schools and other educational establishments give up their spare time as well to running scout troops.

He is also surprised at the extremely able way in which the Chinese Scoutmasters have grasped the main idea of a system entirely novel to them, and at the keenness which they are succeed- ing in implanting it in their scouts.

Ò 27

At the same time there is no doubt that very careful guidance is necessary to enable them to give and to get full value out of the training not only in the Scoutcraft side of the work but also from the more important moral point of view.

It is to be hoped that many men now in offices will soon see their way clear to assisting with the movement, and thus enable the Association to spread its influence still further.

On October 1st last, the Summer Sea Scout Troop came to an end. It was formed in order to give temporary sea training to a few scouts from each troop during the summer, and was to close at the date above stated. In spite of a keen desire of the Instru- ctor and scouts to continue, it was felt better to keep to the original plan, as when Troops restarted work after the hot weather, Scoutmasters found themselves handicapped by the absence of their smartest scouts with the Sea Scouts. The intention since then has been to organise a permanent Sea Scout Troop, and this will be done so soon as a suitable scoutmaster has been discovered. Meanwhile the thanks of the Association are due to Lt. Beau- champ, R.N. and certain petty officers from H.M.S. Tamar, who with the kind support and consent of Commodore W. Bowden-Smith, C.B.E., R.N. most ably undertook the training of the Sea Scout Patrols last summer.

The thanks of the Association are also due to those kind friends without whose practical help in money few troops could have been started.

Mr. A. J. S. Weyman as Honorary Secretary has carried outmost valuable work, and his advice as an old Scout of many years experience is most helpful and greatly appreciated.

G. T. WALDEGRAVE, Commissioner.

Table I.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

STAFF.

NAME AND NATURE. (1)

Certificated 'Passed Student'

Teachers.

(2)

and Student' Teachers

Vernacular.

(3)

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

Kowloon, Kowloon Junior, Victoria, and Peak Schools-for children of European British Parentage. Primary and Secondary

Queen's College-mainly for Chinese and Indians. Pre- pares for Hongkong University Matriculation and for Commercial Examinations

17

1 French

Mistress,

1 Games

Mistress.

1 Drawing

Mistress.

13

1 Shorthand

Teacher.

Rate of

Fees

Fecs

Collected.

Maximum Average At- Monthly Enrolment. tendance. per mensem.

$

C.

1 Chinese

Teacher.

345

209

$5-$15

9,523.00

12

9

672

541

$5

32,750.00

Ellis Kadoorie, Saiyingpun, Wantsai, and Yaumati Schools -for Chinese. Prepare for Upper School at Queen's College

12

44

16

1,435

1,264

$3

42,750.00

16

Belilios Public School for Girls-mainly for Chinese. Primary and Secondary.

2 Needlework

6

12

Teachers

558

518

$2

10,828.00

1 Drawing Mistress

2 Pupil Teachers

1

114

...

92

$2

2,086.00

Fraya East-mainly for Chinese. Primary

Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians-prepares for Upper School, Queen's College

Tai Po, Un Long, and Cheung Chau Schools-Elemen- tary English for Chinese.

Vernacular Normal School.......

Primary

116

93

2,123,00

146

110

50 cents.

682.00

19

17

$12 p. a.

228.00

3

(1) For boys unless otherwise stated.

3,405

2,844

(2) Certificated or with the degree of a British University. (3) Student Teachers or Passed Student Teachers (local).

$100,970,00

AUTOUNchi.

O 29

TABLE II.

N RECEIPT OF A GRANT A GRANT UNDER THE GRANT CODE OF 1910.

Average

Attendance.

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

CAPITATION GRANT.

Higher Classes.

Remove Classes.

Lower Classes.

A

Total

Capitation

UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION GRANT.

B

Grand

Total

Total

Local

Senior.

Junior.

Honours.

Refund

Grants

Grants

Grants

of

of

of

of Fees.

Columns

·Average:

1

Rate.

Attend-

ance.

Average

Attend- Total.

2

Rate.

Average

Total. Attend-

Rate.

3

Total.

Columns

1, 2 & 3.

ance.

ance.

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

5

Total.

6

7

Columns

No. of Rate.

Total.

Pupils.

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

A & B.

Total.

5, 6, 7, & 8.

42

$

$

$

*

$

$

548 94

417

20

75

149

16

138

13

297

49

162

165

70

146

18

309

49

PRRRRR12 11212

75 7,050 299

45

13,455

1,500 137

45

6,165

1,200

59 45

975

54

45

2,430

3,675

164

45

155 30

260 30 2,655 74 30 71 30 7,380 84 30

4,650 25,155 7,800 15,465 2,220 6,075

50

30

30

2,130

5,535

30

2,520

450* 47 45

2,115 109

30

3,270

39

13,575

5,835

150

30 45

1,350

133 30

3,990 5,490

70 45

3,150

9t

30

60

1,350

67

45

3,015

61

30

1,830

3,675

217❘ 45

43

9,765

30

1,290

3,210

6,195

14,730 12

20

~~::: ~~*~*

30 1,500 119

15 1,785

100 100

1,690

5,075

30,230

240 12

15

180

1

100 100

240

760

16,225

210

9

15

135

2

100

200

195

740

6,815

240

16

15

240

280

760

6,295

...

30

1,170 45

15

675

1

100

100

925

2,870

16,445

5

15

75

50

125

5,960

5,490

3,210

30

600

32

15

480

560

1,6-10

7,835

30

360 34

15

510

520

1,390

16,120

2,401

267

20,025 1,144

51,480

999

29,760

101,265

144

4,320 | 272

4,080

500

4,460

13,360

114,625

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

Monthly

Enrolment.

Attendance.

*

ENGLISH

1

SCHOOLS.

CAPITATION GRANT.

A

UNIVERSITEXAMINATION GRANT,

B

00

Grand

Total

Total

Higher Classes.

Remove Classes.

Lower Classes.

Capitation

Local

Senior.

Junior.

Honours.

Refund

Total

Grants

Grants

Grants

of

of Fees.

Average

Attend-

Rate.

Total.

ance.

I Average Attend-

ance.

2

Rate.

Avera Total. Attend-

ge

3

Columns

3

6

7

of

Columns

of

Columns

Rate.

Total.

1, 2 & 3.

ance.

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

of Rate.

Total.

Total.

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

A & B.

Total.

5, 6, 7, & 8.

634

548

94

75

510

417 20

193

149 16

75

132

138 13

75

360

297 49

75

203

162

190

165

91

70

175

146

18

375

309 49

21:209

75

75

75

RRRRRR12 1121

7,050 299 45 13,455 155 30

4,650

25,155 50

3,675

75 1,500 137 45 1,200 59 45 975 54 45 164 45 450* 47 45 150 30 45

6,165 260 30

7,800 15,465

8

30

2,655 74 30

2,220 6,075

2,430 71 30

$4

7,380

2,115 109 30

2,130 5,535

8

30

2,520

39

13,575

3,270

5,835

1,350 133 30

3,990

5,490

70 45 1,350 67 45 3,675 217 45

3,150

91 30

60

3,210

3,015

61

9,765 43 30

30

1,830

6,195

20

1,290 14,730 12

~~::: *****

30

1,500

15

1,785

100 100

1,690

5,075

30,230

240

15

180

1

100 100

240

760

16,225

30

210

15

135

2

100 200

195

740

6,815

30

240

15

240

280

760

6,295

30

1,170

15

675

1

100

100

925

2,870

16,445

15

75

50

125

5,960

30

600

15

30

360

15

56:

5,490

3,210

480

560

1,640

7,835

510

520

1,390

16,120

913 2,401 267

20,025 1,144

51,480 999

29,760 101,265 144

4,320

4,080

5

10

Maximum

Average Monthly Attendance.

Enrolment.

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

(Upper Grade.)

48

27

11

229

204

11

155

141

11

279

239

11

931

206

9

Rate.

Total

Capitation

Grant.

L

$

*

500

4,460

13,360

114,625

297

2,244

297

480

2,724

1,551

1,551

2,629

2,629

1,854

1.120

2.974

Grand.

Rent

Grant.

of

Total

Grants

297

297

48

27

229

204

11

2,244

480

2,724

155

141

11

1,551

1,551

279

239

11

2,629

2,629

251

206

9

1,854

1,120

2,974

962

817

8,575

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

(Lower Grade.)

1,600

10,175

300

300

85

75

336

336

99

84

93

93

37

31

90

200

290

35

30

276

240

516

84

69

147

192

339

58

49

252

252

77

63

135

135

50

45

595

80

675

124

119

5

384

218

602

102

96

108

180

288

38

36

132

132

36

33

89

75

55

43

51

47

61

54

65

55

43

36

56

42

49

40

155

140

54

46

or 00 00 00 do on co do ID OF

375

375

172

136

308

141

141

162

162

275

108

116

391

72

180

129

280

409

120

90

210

420

120

540

230

136

366

1,503

1,309

53

28

98

70

92

76

79

62

50

37

135 3 co

4,980

2,060

7,040

112

112

210

210

380

380

186

of the total deducted.

155

111

111

!

53

28

112

98

70

210

112

92

76

5

380

210

79

62

186

380

of the total deducted.

50

37

155

111

50

34

111

106

86

44

41

4

164

93

68

3

204

164

48

35

1

140

204

69

31

140

93

االله

41

123

93

56

41

164

123

79

46

138

164

74

138

56

...

80

64

320

320

51

37

. 111

111

50

42

126

126

42

32

96

137

114

456

96

36

33

456

165

49

44

132

165

44

42

3

132

126

$5 deducted from total.

121

33

31

5

155

36

34

3

155

102

36

29

50

30

38

102

87

87

120

120

1,730

1,314

7,108

5,841

* Less $150.00.

† For 4 months.

4,021

118,841

3,660

3,985

3,660

135,825

O 29

TABLE II.

CONTROLLED SCHOOLS IN RECEIPT OF A GRANT UNDE

No.

Name and Nature of School,

Mission.

Number of

Classes.

School Meetings.

Number of

Maximum Monthly

Enrolment.

Attendance.

Average

ENGLISH SCHOOLS

CAPITATION GRANT.

Α.

Total

Higher Classes.

Remove Classes.

Lower Classes.

Capitati

Grant

of

Average

Attend.

ance.

Ι

Rate.

Total.

Average

Attend-

2

Rate.

Average!

Total. Attend-

Rate.

3

Total.

Colum

1, 2 &

ance.

ance.

$

off

**

*A

SA

St. Joseph's College,

R. C. M.

17

549

634

548

94

75

Italian Convent,

12

563

510

417 20

75

French Convent,

516

193

149

16

75

12132

7,050

1,500

299

137 45

45

13,455 155 30

1,200 59 45

6,165

2,655 74

260

ON IN C

4,650

25,15.

30

1,800 15,46.

Diocesan Girls' School,

C. of E.

551

182

138 13

975

Diocesan Boys' School,

564

360

297

49

9

St. Mary's School,

R. C. M.

565

203

162

6

75

3,675.

450*

54 45

164 45

47 45

B

St. Francis' School,

559

190

165

75

>>

14

St. Joseph's Branch,

553

91

70

"}

15

Ying Wa College,........

L. M. S.

644

175

146

18

16

St Paul's College,

C. M. S.

534

375

309 49

:00

75

12:12122

150

30

45

2,430

7,380

2,115 109

1,350 133

71 30

$4

30 2,220

2,130

30 2,520

6,07.

5,53.

13.57.

30

70 45

3,150

30

1,350 67 45

3,015 61

30

3,675 217 45

9,765) 43

30

88888

30 8,270

5,83

3,990

5,49

60

3,21

1,830

6,19

1,290

14,73

10

7

2,913

2,401 267

20,025 20,025 1,144

51,480 999

29,760

101,26

SCHOO

VERNACULAR

(Upper Grade.)

15

16

199

St. Joseph's branen,

Ying Wa College,..

St Paul's College,

L. M. S.

C. M. S.

15

0 00 10

10

UUD

644

175

146

18

75

1,350

67 45

3,015

61

30

1,830

6,195

20

534

375

309 49

75

3,675

217

45

9,765

43

30

1,290

14,730

12

22243

2,913 2,401 267

20,025 1,144

51,480 999

29,760 101,265

144

VERNACULAR

No.

Name and Nature,

Mission.

Number

of

Standards.

Number Maximum

Average of School Monthly Attendance. Days. Enrolment.

Rate.

SCHOOLS.

(Upper Grade.)

Total

Capitation

Graut.

17

Foundling Home, (G.)

C. M. S.

230

48

27

11

297

18

Fairlea, (G.)

7

231

229

204

11

2,244

55

19

Victoria Home (G.)

7

233

155

141

11

1,551

""

20

Ying Wa Girls' School

L. M. S.

10

228

279

239

11

2,629

21

St. Paul's Girls' School,

C. M. S.

11

222

251

206

9

1,854

วา

5

962

817

8,575

VERNACULAR

(Lower Grade.)

SCHOOLS.

22

26 Caine Road, (G.)

R. C. M.

24

Holy Infancy, (M.)..

28

Aberdeen, (M.)

30

2 Taipingshan Street, (G.)

"}

"5"

L. M. S.

33

199 Queen's Road East, (G.)

>>

35

35 Pottinger Street, (G.)

"3

36

Wanchai Chapel, (B.)

}}

37

Totsai Chapel, (B.)

IA OF C7 CA IN DO - O

227

85

75

231

99

84

232

37

31

225

35

30

3

219

84

69

240

58

49

212

77

63

152

50

45

">

38

43

65 & 67 Battery Street, (G.) 158 Reclamation Street, (G.)

241

124

119

>>

228

102

96

">

44

20A Aberdeen Street, (G.)

4

247

38

36

45

46

Tanglungchau Chapel, (G.) Wanchai Chapel, (G.)

3

221

36

33

4

""

4

228

89

75

"

- CTIA 30 IAL OR 00 IA COA CO 30 A 1

4

300

336

93

90

276

147

252

135

595

384

108

132

375

179

46

57

A augungenau Chapel, (tr.)

Wanchai Chapel, (G.)

341 Queen's Road West, (G.)

59

Yaumati Chapel, (G.)

60

232 Hollywood Road, (G.)

61

20 Pokfulam Road, (G.)

62

44 Shaukiwan East (G.)

68

17 Elgin Street, (G.)

70

Kowloon City, (G.)

103

71 Battery Street, (B.)

L. M. S.

104

1 Chatham Road, (G.)

22

75

126 Aberdeen, (B.).

76

12 Tai Hang, (B.)

C. S.

,,

77

6 Bridges Street, (B.)

}}

78

52

>>

(B.)

2

>>

79

111 Canton Road, (B.)

2

>>

80

61 Cook Street, (B.)

2

81

Chung Wa School Building, (B.)

6

"

82

27 Western Street, (B.).

81

Lung On Street, (B.)......

""

85

Lung On Street Guild Room, (B.)

>>

86

98 Nathan Road, (B.)

"}

87

208 Queen's Road East, (B.).

11

88

373

""

West, (B.)

"}

89

32 & 34 Fook Tsuen Heung, (B).

90

17 Star Street, (B.)

91

12 Tai Hang, (B.)

3

"}

92

88A Wanchai Road, (B.)

"}

93

25 Water Street, (B.)

}}

94

30 Western Street, (B.)

"}

95

Chung Wa School Building, (B.).

T. W. H.

96

184 Queen's Road East, (B.).

39

97

148 Des Voeux Road West, (B.)

"

98

14 Tai Yuen Street, (B.)

"}

99

3 Centre Street, (B.)

>>

100

2 Ladder Street, Ground Floor, (B.).

>>

101

2

ܕ,

1st Floor, (B.)

>>

102

18A Stanley Street, (B.)

GO 1O 1O 10 CO

∞ ∞ ∞ NNNON 20 N 2 – 2 2 2 2 ONNINNAN~~~

3

221

36

33

77

4

228

89

75

C. M. S.

3

249

55

43

235

51

47

}}

""

L. M. S.

250

61

54

240

65

55

C. M. S.

W. M.

C. M. S.

233

43

36

253

56

42

247

49

40

238

155

140

225

54

46

LLO ECO SO KO SO OD OD CO LO

132

375

172

141

162

275

108

129

120

420

230

1,503

1,309

4,980

230

53

· 28

252

98

70

243

92

76

248

79

62

249

50

37

112

210

380

186

111

247

50

34

...

250

106

86

237

44

41

...

4

164

246

93

68

3

204

229

48

35

4

140

243

69

31

225

50

41

248

56

41

257

79

46

242

71

56

243

80

64

2

242

51

37

234

50

42

258

42

32

223

137

114

205

36

33

244

49

44

247

44

42

235

33

31

242

36

84

236

36

29

235

50

30

A co co or co co cr A co co co on i co co co

3

93

3

123

4

164

3

138

5

320

3

111

3

126

96

4

456

165

132

3

126

155

102

3

87

120

"

27 |

Total Number of Schools 64.

1,730

1,314

Grand Total,

7,108

5,841

4,021

118,841

112

()

10

12 Tai Hang, (B.). 6 Bridges Street, (B.)

2

2

}}

78

52

>>

(B.)

"}

79

111 Canton Road, (B.)

"1

80

61 Cook Street, (B.)

""

81

Chung Wa School Building, (B.)

"}

82

27 Western Street, (B.).

>>

84

Lung On Street, (B.)...

}}

85

Lung On Street Guild Room, (B.)

""

86

98 Nathan Road, (B.)

87

208 Queen's Road East, (B.)

88

373

>>

West, (B.)

2

""

89

32 & 34 Fook Tsuen Heung, (B)

"}

90

17 Star Street, (B.)

"}

91

12 Tai Hang, (B.)

"}

92

88A Wanchai Road, (B.)

93

25 Water Street, (B.)

""

94

30 Western Street, (B.)

95

Chung Wa School Building, (B.).

T. W. H.

96

184 Queen's Road East, (B.).

>>

97

148 Des Vœux Road West, (B.)

>>

98

14 Tai Yuen Street, (B.)

}}

99

3 Centre Street, (B.)

19

100

2 Ladder Street, Ground Floor, (B.).

""

101

2

""

1st Floor, (B.)

102

18A Stanley Street, (B.)

NNNN NONDON – NAONA ∞ ∞ NENN~~~~∞

252

98

70

243

92

76

248

79

62

249

50

37

2 50 10 00 co

210

5

380

186

111

247

50

34

250

106

86

237

44

41

164

246

93

68

204

229

48

35

140

243

69

31

93

1

225

50

41

3

123

248

56

41

4

164

257

79

46

3

138

242

74

56

243

80

64

242

51

37

234

50

42

258

42

32

223

137

114

205

36

33

244

49

44

247

44

42

235

33

31

242

36

84

2

236

36

29

3

235

50

30

+ ∞ ∞ or ∞ ∞ er A co co co of:

320

3

111

3

126

3

96

456

165

132

126

155

102

87

120

32

27

Total Number of Schools 64.

1,730

1,314

Grand Total,

7,108

5,841

NOTE.-R. C. M.=Roman Catholic Mission.

C. of E.

Church of England.

C. M. S.

Church Missionary Society.

L. M. S.

==London Missionary Society.

W. M.

-Wesleyan Mission.

B.

-Boys.

Gi.

M.

!

(. S.

-Girls.

--Mixed.

Confucian Socisty.

* Less $150.00. † For 4 months.

4,021

118,841

O 31

Table III.

Subsidised Schools, 1921.

Average Attendance

No.

Address

Total Subsidy

Paid

Boys

Girls

1

25 Canton Road

2

Little Hongkong

116 Aplichau

24 Eastern Street

5

40

$ 240

14

4

240

4

29

240

55

Yaumati Temple (North).

(South)

""

St. Paul's Junior School,..

8

55 Battery Street

9

3 Gresson Street

10

17 Warren Street

11

29 Shaukiwan Road

12

114 Sha Po

13

Stanley

14

11 Bridge Row

15

Kowloon City C.M.S. School

16

38 Bridges Street

17

6 Aberdeen

10

18

154 Reclamation Street

111

19

2 Dundas Street

49

20

186 Shanghai Street

21

301 Canton Road....

28

32804 3 15255 PERTA

35

240

52

240

33

...

240

93

240

240

31

240

25

240

44

240

37

240

240

37

240

67

240

42

240

5

220

210

180

4

52

180

180

22 92 Portland Street..

30

180

23

19c High Street

28

180

24

16 Second Street

47

180

25

43 Sai Street

50

180

26

72 Second Street

29

180

27

95 High Street

12

19

180

28

Lai Yin Girls' School

16

30

180

29

22 Western Street....

31

180.

30

61 High Street

7

19

180

31

Tokwawan, C.M.S. School

37

180

32

3 Tin Lok Lane

23

180

33

265 Des Vœux Road C.

36

165

34

533 Shanghai Street

29

160

35 71 Belchers Street (boys).

26

120

36

114 Aplichau

20

120

...

37

Kaulungtong..

40

6

120

38

3 Suitor Street...

35

4

120

39

3 Foochow Street

24

50

120

40

104 Third Street

39

120

41

62 Catchick Street..

2

120

O 32

Table III,--Continued.

Subsidised Schools, 1921,-Continued.

Average Attendance

Total

No.

Address

Subsidy

Paid.

Boys

Girls

42

330 Shanghai Street

6

18

120

43

5 Causeway Bay

30

120

11

42A Sai Tau, Kowloon City

56

120

45

33 Kowloon City Road

56

120

46

8 Kaulungtsai

12

100

47

Holy Cross Church, Shaukiwan

19

100

48

67 High Street

43

100

49

68 Lai Chi Kok Road

54

6

90

50

Tokwawan Village School

27

60

51

13 Heard Street

26

...

60

52

44 Queen's Road East

40

60

...

53

124

43

60

54 190

36

60

>>

"

55

137 Shaukiwan E.

33

60

56

Shek O

27

60

57

232 Hollywood Road

26

200

Total......

1,644

552

9,445

No.

O 33

Table IV.

Subsidised Schools in the New Territories, 1921.

Address.

Total

Average

Roll

Subsidy

Attendance

Paid

1

Shui Lau Tin

28

22

$ 212.50

2

Tai Hang

17

16

180.00

Ho Sheung Heung

16

13

180.00

4 Mang Kung Uk

51 (3 G.)

46

180.00

Pak Tam Chung

45 (2 G.)

41

180.00

Kau Wa Kang

43 (5 G.)

40

180.00

7

Shui Tseng Tin...

34

26

180.00

8

Tsing Yi

40

37

180.00

9 Lung Yeuk Tau

24

24

120.00

10 Taipo Market Girls' School....

31 (25 G.)

24

120.00

11

Chung Uk Tsuen

31

26

120.00

12

Chung Am Tong

17 (1 G.)

14

120.00

13

Sheung Shui, (Lui Hee Tin)

35 (4 G.)

33

120.00

14 Saikung R.C. Church

36

30

120.00

15

Tai Wan

38

34

120.00

16

Tai No

19

16

120.00

17

Cheung Kwan Au

20

18

120.00

18

Tsuen Wan Boys' School.

60

53

120.00

19

Ma Wam

19

18

120.00

20

Cheung Chau (Lo Mo To)

37

36

120.00

22

21 Lamma, Tai Ping Village

Cheung Chau Girls' School....

36

33

120.00

34 (3 B.)

28

120.00

23 Ying Lung Wai

26

23

120.00

24

Shek Kong Wai

16

14

120.00

25

San Tin, Tung Chan Wai

23

21

120.00

26

Sheung Tsuen

26

23

120.00

27

Un Long, Sai Pin Wai

38.

33

120.00

28

Un Long Girls' School.

26 (4 B.)

23

100.00

29

Ping Shan, (Wong Kat Wan)

25 (2 G.)

18

100.00

30 Ping Long

27 (2 G.)

22

60.00

31 San Tong

22

17

60.00

32 Lung Tong Tsuen..

20

13

60.00

33

Tai Wai...

36 (2 G.)

31

60.00

34 Kak Tin

23 (1 G.)

18

60.00

35

36

Wo Hang Fanling

19

14

60.00

28

23

60.00

37 | Chung Pak Long,

17 (1 G.)

15

60.00

38

Tai Tau Ling.

18

14

60.00

39

Sha Kok Mie

22

19

60.00

40

Tseng Lan Shu

22

18

60.00

41 Taipo Chai

15 (2 G.)

15

60.00

42

Pak Kong.

21

15

60.00

43

Chik Kang

11

10

60.00

44

Sha Lo Wan.

28 (1 G.)

20

60.00

No.

O 34

Table IV,-Continued.

Subsidised Schools in the New Territories, 1921,-Continued.

Address.

Total

Roll

Attendance

Average Subsidy

Paid

15

Cheung Chau, (Fung Sam Kei)

33

22

$60.00

46

Un Long, (Ng Lo Ping)

32 (4 G.)

27

60.00

47

Un Long, Nam Pin Wai

22 (1 G.)

20

60.00

48

Un Long, Tai Kiu,

22 (3 G.)

17

60.00

49

Cheung Uk Tsuen, Ping Shan

15

12

60.00

50 To Ka Tsz.....

18

16

60.00

51

Ping Shan, (Tang King Nam)

18

16

60.00

52

Shan Pui Wai

22

17

60.00

53

San Tin, (Man Yun Kwong)

22

18

60.00

54

Pak Sha

16

15

60.00

55

Wong Toi Shan

28

23

60.00

56

Shui Tau, Kam Tin

25

21

60.00

57

Pok Wai..

18

13

60.00

58

Tin Liu

18

15

60.00

59

Chau Tau

19 (2 G.)

16

60.00

60

Muk Kiu

15

13

60.00

61

Tai O

35 (9 G.)

27

60.00

62

Taipo Market Boys' School..........

46

39

60.00

63 Tsing Fai Tong...

19

17

60.00

64 Wai Tau Tsuen..

17

13

60.00

65

Wo Mie....

21 (1 G.)

19

55.00

66

Kow To......

22

15

50.00

67 Tung Lo Wan

15

13

50.00

68 Ping Yeung

16

14

50.00

69 Sheung Shui, (Liu Kwok Chuen)

18

14

50.00

70

Kwai Tau Ling..

14

10

50.00

71 Fanling Lau

17

12

50.00

72 Saikung, (Wan Lap Sam)

31

27

50.00

73

Ho Chung

43

36

50.00

74 Pak Sha Au

19 (2 G.)

16

50.00

75 Nam Wai

24

20

50.00

76

Tai Wan Tau

19

17

50.00

77

Tsuen Wan, L.M.S.

28 (13 B.)

24

50.00

78 | Kwai Chung..

27

26

50,00

79

San Wai, Ha Tsuen

16

14

50.00

80

San Tin, (Man Ying Fu)..

23

21

50.00

81

Un Kong

18

13

50.00

82

Ngau Hom

16

15

50.00

83

Tai Long

21

18

50.00

84

San Ha Wai......

23 (3 G.)

18

35.00

85

Luk Keng...

18 (1 G.)

10

20.00

Total........

2,129 (145 G.)

1,796

$7,062.50

O 35

Table V.

nce in all Government and Grant Schools, and total enrolment at Private Schools and the al Institute, which was opened in 1908.

s prior to 1913 are not very trustworthy, as there was no right of entry into private schools

t year.

> New Territories were included in 1913 for the first time.

d Police School were not included.

-Red.

s-Black.

907. 1908. | 1909. 1910. 1911. 1912. 1913. 1914.

1915. 1916. 1917. 1918. | 1919. 1920. 1921.

10,327

9,863

12,989

12,092

11,919

13,230

15,461

16,582 16,641

18,915

9,792:

23,610

11,672

6,785

8,140

9,863

10,327

12,989

6,442

065 6,100

5,752

5,582

5,527

5,096

4,610

,490

12,092

11,919

13,230

15,461

16,582 16,641

8,962

8,474

7,873

7,764

7,462

9,145

18,915

9,792

11,672...

!

25,000

24,000

23,000

22,000

21,000

20.000

19,000.

18,000

17,000.

16,000

15,000

14,000

13,000

12,000

11,000

1901.

O 35

Table V.

Average Attendance in all Government and Grant Schools, and total enrolment

Technical Institute, which was opened in 1908.

Note. The figures prior to 1913 are not very trustworthy, as there was no right o

until that year.

The figures for the New Territories were included in 1913 for the first time.

The University and Police School were not included.

English Schools :--Red.

Vernacular Schools :-Black.

1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906.1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911. 1912. 1913.

191

10,327

10,000

9,863

12,989

Appendix Q.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS FOR THE YEAR 1921.

Expenditure.

1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings, were a follows:--

Amount voted.

Actual

In Estimates.

Supplemen- tary Votes.

Expenditure.

Total.

$

(i) Personal Emoluments

and Other Charges,... 632,060.00

46,099.55 678,159.55

8

650.900.00

(A) Special Expenditure; Typewriters, etc................

(ii) Annually Recurrent

Works,

450.00

295.00

745.00

699.00

840,600.00

(iii) Extraordinary Works,... 4,967,400.00

141,328.08 981,928.08 938,582.38

746,784.02 | 5,714,184.02 |3.053,525.11

Total,...

6,440,510.00

934,506.65 |7,375,016.65 4,643,706,49

Detailed statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B.

With regard to (i), the saving is due to refunds on account of supervision of work executed by the Department for various Companies.

In the case of (ii), savings occurred on the following sub-heads as set forth below:

Maintenance of Buildings,..

Hongkong. Buildings.

Maintenance of Lighthouses,

$3,663.56 71.79

Communications.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City, Improvements to Roads and Bridges in City,

1,944.86

944.83

Expenditure.

Q 2

Drainage.

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahıs, &c.,

.$1,974.63

Miscellaneous.

Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

2,086.89

Maintenance of Public Cemetery,

1,079.43

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.

161.96

Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds,

332.32

Cr. Stores Depreciation,

4.176.83

Water Works.

Maintenance of Aberdeen,

901.09

Kowloon.

Communications.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges,.

399.31

Improvements to Roads and Bridges,

92.87

Drainage.

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

1.828.99

Lighting.

Gas Lighting,.......

Electric Lighting,

94.50

111.82

Miscellaneous.

Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

28.93

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,

140.00

Maintenance of Recreation Grounds,

303.18

New Territories.

Buildings.

Improvements to Buildings,

48.85

Communications.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges,

1,056.51

Improvements to Roads and Bridges,

117.50

Maintenance of Telephones, ......

1,174.08

Drainage.

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, etc.,

129.11

Lighting.

Electric Lighting, Shamshuipo,

361.63

Water Works.

Maintenance of Laichikok,

443.80

Q 3

Expenditure

The savings were far more than counterbalanced by excesses on other sub-heads, the principal of which were the following :

Improvements to Buildings,

Hongkong. Buildings.

Communications.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City, Improvements to Roads and Bridges outside City, Maintenance of Telephones including all cables,

Lighting.

Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and Hill District,

538.44

......$ 8,824.98

1,425.57

19.251.34

Electric Lighting, City, Hill District and Shaukiwan, ...

1,037.18

158.00

Miscellaneous.

Dredging Foreshores,

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

3,182.50

5.715.71

Water Works.

Maintenance of City and Hill District,

37,342.33

Maintenance of Shaukiwan,

638.77

Water Account, (Meters, etc.),

8.687.70

Kowloon.

Buildings.

Maintenance of Buildings,

363.94

Improvements to Buildings,

1.002.27

Communications.

Maintenance of Telephones,

6,297.28

Miscellaneous.

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

9,130.26

Water Works.

Maintenance of Water Works,....

477.72

Water Account, (Meters, etc.),

7,572.09

New Territories.

Buildings.

Maintenance of Buildings,

2,568.25

Miscellaneous.

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

7,006.07

Water Works.

Water Account, (Meters, etc.),...

631.25

Expenditure.

(iii) The considerable saving under this head is due, in some cases, to the works for which substantial sums were allocated not being proceeded with during the year; in other cases, to less progress being made than was anticipated.

The former include:

:--

Saiyingpun School-possession of the site for which

could not be obtained.

Eastern District Filter Beds.

Fire Brigade Station.

Taitam Tuk Pumping Scheme. Hill District-Extensions of Pumping Plant at Pokfulam Road.

The latter category include :-

Officers' Quarters,

drawings for which were The preparation of the

not sufficiently advanced to invite tenders.

The details of which could not be settled by the end of the year.

Quarters for Coolies, Belchers Street, &c., &c.

Comparison of Expenditure, 1920 and 1921.

2. The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1921 as compared with that of the previous year :-

(i) Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges,

(IA) Special Expenditure;

Typewriters, etc.,

(ii) Annually Recurrent

Works,

1920.

1921.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

C.

C.

C.

468,371.82

650,900.00

182,528.18

615.96

699.00

83.04

825,493.70 938,582.38

113,088.68

(iii) Extraordinary Works,... 2,555,877.69 3,053,525.11 497,647.42

Total, $ 3,850,359.17 | 4,643,706.49

793,347.32

Item (i). The increase is due to the increase of clerical salaries under the revised scales and increase of staff. The average rate of exchange for 1921 was 2/8 as compared with 4/5 during 1920.

Item (ii).-The increase is due to

(a.) an excess of $46,000.00 in the cost of the Maintenance and Improvement of Roads and Bridges, the result of the increased cost of labour, materials, and ad- ditional mileage.

Expenditure.

.) an excess of over $26,000.00 on the Vote -Maintenance of Telephones owing to the very heavy repairs to the Gap Rock cable and to laying a new underground cable to replace the aerial wires between Tsim-sha- tsui and Hung Hom.

(c.) an increase of 431′86 million gallons in the number of gallons of water pumped as compared with 1920 and the additional cost involved in supplying an unusual number of water meters owing to the abnormal build- ing development.

Item (iii).As regards Hongkong alone, the increase on build- ings amounts to over $167,000; Drainage $17,000; Miscellaneous $152,000; Compensation and Resumption $98,000; and Water Works $31.000. In addition to these increases, the expenditure on Praya East Reclamation Scheme is $325,798.90 whilst there was no expenditure under this head in 1920. The total of these in- creases comes up to over $790,000 but at the same time there is a decrease of about $273,000 on Communications". Taken as a whole the Expenditure on Hongkong alone shows an increase of $517,000.

66

The expenditure on Kowloon shows a decrease of about $9,000 and that of the New Territories is $455,593.10 against $494,036.95 in 1920 representing a decrease of about $37,000. The expenditure on votes not appearing in the Estimates is $61,525.41 as compared with $37,093.83 in 1920-an increase of $24,431.58.

Revenue from Water Works.

3. Water Works Revenue.-The following is a statement of the revenue derived from Water Works during 1921, the figures for 1920 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison :-

City including Wongnei-

chong Village and

1921.

Excess Con- sumption.

Rates 2%.

$ C.

C.

Total.

1920 Total.

C.

C.

properties bordering

Shaukiwan Road,

171,531.40

Hill District,

9,617.33

292,368.46 6,988.66

Pokfulam District,

6,837.35

163,899.86 16.605.99 6,337.35

418,008.91

13.853.30

5.385.30

Kowloon: including Sham-

shuipo and Kowloon

City,

79,493.60

Aberdeen,

3,576.75

Kepulse Bay.

103.78

Shaukiwan,..

3,108.53

51,365.54 570.16

4,054.67

130,859.14

111,093.68

4,146.91

3,635.22

103.78

7,163.20

6,544.70

Laichikok,

39,931.83

39.931.83

30,809.02

Fan Ling,

Total,

368.00

368.00

314,068.57

355,347.49

669,416.06

589,330.13

The figures-which include for the first time the Districts of Repulse Bay and Fan Ling-show an increase in all cases amount- ing in the aggregate to $80,085.93.

Land Sales, &c.

-

Land Sales and Surveys.

4. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, etc. -The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $1,634,097.55, or nearly six times the amount of the Estimate which amounted to $300,000.00.

The following is a comparative statement of the Revenue derived from Land Sales, etc., for the years 1919-1921 :-

Sales by Auction

Sales without Auction

Extensions granted

Grants on Nominal Terms

Grants on Short Leases...

:

:

1919.

1920.

1921.

$

C,

$ C.

C.

159,365.37

390,567.50 | 2,754,372.00

257.00

15,402.64

36,656.50

93,279.30

80.785.56

76,151.01

361.00

Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75

years

207.50

*1,868.20

3,316.70

Premia derived from sale of rights to

erect piers

4,043,51

7,860.46

10,930.57

Fees for Boundary Stones to define lots

1,454.59

3,109.25

4.180.25

Conversions and Exchanges

6,861.59

59.066.60 32,635.04

Total,

265,468.86

558,660.21 2,918.606.07

Actual amount of premium paid into

the Treasury

265,468.86

558,660.21 1,634,097.55

The difference between the above two totals for 1921 is accounted for by :-(1) Inland Lots 2316, 2317, 2318, 2319 (Old Post Office and Old Land Office sites) which were sold for a total of $1,502,310.00; but of this amount $218,000.00 only was paid into the Treasury during the year: (2) Refunds, i.e. various deficient areas, amounted to $999.40; and (3) Readjustments, i.e. various excess areas, amounted to $800.88.

5. Sales by Auction.-Fifty-eight lots were sold in Hongkong, fifteen in Kowloon, and eight in New Kowloon which realised $2,397,021.00; $294,330.00, and $34,000.00 respectively. A sum of $20,000 in respect of the construction of a pier from N.K.I.Ls. 190 and 191 was transferred to Vote "Land Sales" from "Deposits not Available."

The District Officer at Taipo sold 142 small lots which realised $4,781.00, and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 13 lots which realised $4,240,00.

T

Land Sales, die.

6. Sales without Auction.-Ten lots were sold under this heading in Hongkong and realised $31,875.00. In Kowloon, ne lot was sold which realised $3,086.40. There were no sales in New Kowloon, but the District Officer at Taipo sold 135 lots which realised $1,112.00, and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 17 lots for a total sum of $583.10.

7. Extensions Granted.---The extensions granted in Hongkong Comprised additional areas to Inland Lots 1946, 2302, 1619, 2296, 2205, 1460 Sec. F, 2090, 2328, 2205, 2261, 2326, 2139, 1969, 2139, 1523, 114 R.P., 114 Sec. C, 2302, 1969 and 1911, and 2289; Rural Building Lots 151, 57, 163, 142 (2 extensions), 163, 192, 145, 147, 169, 142, 163 and 152; Shaukiwan Inland Lots 393, 458 and 456.

In Kowloon, extensions were granted to Kowloon Inland Lots 1393, 1394, 1256, 1409, 745, 924, 925, 1218 and 1397; to Kowloon Marine Lots 11 and 51; and to Hung Hom Inland Lots 24 and 256.

In New Kowloon and the New Territories, extensions were granted to New Kowloon Inland Lots 63, 166, 167 and 168, and 46; and to Sheung Shui Lot 2.

Only one extension was granted by the District Officer at Taipo, viz:--Lot 2010 Sec. F, D.D. 132. The Assistant District Officer at Hongkong granted extensions to Cheung Chau Inland Lots 1A and 5; Lot 76, D.D. 441; Lot 74, D.D. 441; Lot 284, Ping Chau; and Lot 316, D.D. 302.

8. Conversions and Exchanges.

Areas leased and payment made by Government.

Description of Property.

Area in Amount sq. ft.

paid.

Areas surrendered to and premium received by Government.

Amount

Arca in

Description of Property.

sq. ft.

of pre-

mium.

Land Sales, &c.

Hongkong.

$

-

Shaukiwan Inland Lot 459

750

in exchange for

House No. 20, Shan Pin Ter.

9.00

460

750

do.

19,

122.00

"}

""

""

461

750

do.

18,

127.00

"

"

>>

462

750

do.

11,

209.00

99

>

>>

00

464

825

15,

>>

do.

"

534.00

465

825

14,

11

""

463

16,

31

""

""

466

825

471.50*

do.

7.

"

>>

467

825

"

17,

严爷

""

""

"

468

750

10,

"}

>>

""

}}

469

750

do.

9,

593.00

"

""

""

470

750

8,

A

>"

471

2,790

do.

Shaukiwan Inland Lot 299

>>

""

472

1,800

do.

300

1,149.25

>>

35

473

900

do.

309

352.32

""

""

474

2,370

do.

310

869.68

>>

**

>>

475

1,800

do.

313

448.47

""

476

757

do.

306

73.25

"

13

77

Aplichau Marine Lot 23

840

do.

Aplichau Marine Lot 7, R.P.

* This sum was debited to Vote P'. W. E 36/1921, "Compensation and Resumptions,”

8. Conversions and Exchanges,--Continued.

Areas leased and payments made by Government.

Areas surrendered to and premium received by Government.

Description of Property.

Area in

sq. ft.

Amount

paid.

$

Amount

Description of Property.

Area in

sq. ft.

of pre-

mium.

Inland Lot 2340.

27.000

1,350,00

2341

10,500

525.00

>>

2342.

7,900

Conversion

Farm Lots 49 and 51

178,550

395.00

11

2343.

38,000

1,900.00

2344.

30,000

1,500,00

Shaukiwan Inland Lot 485

757

in exchange for

Rural Building Lot 166

Conversion

Portion of Shaukiwan Inland Lot 304 together with the buildings thereon. Farm Lots 60 and 61

85,500

Kowloon.

Kowloon Inland Lot 1406.

1,502

in exchange for

Hunghom Inland Lot 164 & the buildings thereon...

1421..

""

37,425

do.

1422.

Kowloon Farm Lot No. 3 Section A.

3,742.50

1433.

1,972

"}

1434..

17,752

do.

>>

Lots 387, 388, 411, 412, 413, S.D. I.

1,591.15

1435.

10,849

"

1431.

218

do.

Portion of K.I.L. 499.

130.80

""

1437.

1,500

1,300*

do.

Old Temple at Ma Tau Wei.

* This sum was debited to Vote P. W. E 66/1921, **Compensation and Resumptions.”

Land Sales, &+

Areas surrendered to and premium received by Government.

8. Conversions and Exchanges,-Continued.

Areas leased and payments made by Government.

Description of Property.

Area in Amount sq. ft. paid.

New Kowloon.

New Kowloon Inland Lot 275

2,160

in exchange for

316

862

do.

250

3,651

do.

317 92,957

>:

do.

318 49,833

319

""

4,320

320 3,240

""

do.

321

2,587

322 6,038.

35

}}

324 3,450

""

325

1,785

,,

""

326

9,305

do.

>>

>>

327

1,785)

>>

328 27,750

>>

do.

329 19,500

19

99

Description of Property.

Area in

sq. ft.

Amount

of Pre.

mium.

Land Sales, &c.

Lots 2362, 2385, and 2410, S.D. IV, together with buildings thereon. Lot 2580, S.D. IV, together with buildings thereon... Lot 2495, S.D. IV, together with buildings thereon.... Lots 540, 541, 543, 545, 551, 702, 709, 806 and 807, S.D. IV.

Lot 2328, S.D. IV, together with buildings thereon.

Lots 2273-2279, S.D. IV together with buildings thereon.

Lots 912, Secs. B,C,D,E and R.P., S.D. IV.

111.75

9,295.70

4,983.30

i

Areas surrendered to and premium received by Government.

$

Description of Property.

Area in

Amount

sq. ft.

of Pre-

mium.

8. Conversions and Exchanges,-Continued.

Areas leased and payment made

by Government.

Description of Property.

Area in Amount sq. ft.

paid.

11

New Kowloon,-Contd..

New Kowloon Inland Lot 330

3,720

331

""

1,860 ƒ

in exchange for

335

2,661

do.

336

1,080 J

","

77

334

5,400

do.

>>

>>

Agricultural Lots 755, 756, 759,760, 761 and 762, S.D. I... Lot 2435, S.D. IV, together with buildings thereon..

Lot 2365, S.D. IV, together with buildings thereon...

111.80

332

1,224

do.

Lot 896, S.D. IV

350.64

>>

342

930

Lots 889, 895 and 892 (Sec.

"}

>>

343

930 f

do.

A), S.D. IV..

}}

**

345

1,525

do.

Lots 1801 and 2701, S.D. IV.

161.56

"}

""

346

930

do.

Lot 2425, S.D. IV.

47.20

""

347

1,860

do.

Lot 2797, S.D. IV, together

>>

with buildings thereon....

114.05

348

5,228

do.

Lot 5235, S.D. I.

349

2,902

do.

""

Lots 2793 and 2833, S.D. IV, together with buil- dings thereon.

17.00

New Territories.

Land Sales, &c.

The District Officer at Taipo arranged the exchange or conversion of 12 lots, and 16 lots were arranged by the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong, particulars of which will be found in the Land Officer's Report.

Land Sales, &c.

Q 12

9. Grants on Nominal Terms.--An area of 20,830 sq. ft. known as Inland Lot 2325 was granted to the Canossian Institute for an extension to Wanchai Hospital without premium.

There were no grants under this heading in Kowloon. The Assistant District Officer in Hongkong arranged grants of Lot 1911, S. D. II, (area 14 acres; premium $138.00; Crown Rent $276.00) and Lot 36, D. D. 442, (area 80 acres; premium $80.00 ; Crown Rent $160.00) for Camphor Tree Plantations.

10. Grants on Short Leases.-An area of 6,000 sq. ft. known as Inland Lot 2323 situated on the South side of the Harbour Office was granted at a monthly rental of $3,555.00 from 1st February, 1921. The Old Land Office was let at a monthly rental of $1,200.00 and portions of the Old Supreme Court were let for varying periods to various lessees during the year.

There is nothing to report under this heading in Kowloon nor in the New Territories.

11. Permits to occupy lands, etc., for short periods. These were of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of in- dividual mention; most of them were for small areas to be held on half-yearly permits.

12. Extensions of Short Period Leases.-The lease of Garden Lot No. 4 was extended for 21 years, the premium paid being $448.

The leases of Kowloon Inland Lots 773, 787, 788, 780 and 781 were extended to 75 years, commencing from 1st January, 1897, the premium charged being $390.00, $503.75, $511.55, $487.50, $487.50 and $487.50, respectively.

There were no extensions of Short Period Leases in the New Territories.

13. Prospecting and Mining Licences.-One Mining Licence and three Prospecting Licences for areas in the New Territories were issued.

*་

Amount paid.

Description of Property.

Area in

sq. ft.

Q 13

14. Resumptions.

Purpose of Resumption.

Voto to which debited.

Land Sales, &c.

Hongkong.

Inland Lot 358 (at Caroline Hill) Buildings on Shankiwan Inland Lot No. 305

200,500 160,000.00

Rebuilding of Queen's College

...

190,00

307

50.00

"3

""

466

26.50

Public Purpose

463

172.50.

>>

467

272.50

+3

Old Cinema Shed at Wanchai

2,000.00

Temporary Fire Station

...

:

Portion of Sec. B of Inland Lot No. 291A | No. 4 Queen's Rd. Central. Portion of S. S. 5 of Sec. B of Inland Lot No. 834 Marine Lot 65 R. P. and buildings ("Blue Buildings ").. Marine Rights of Marine Lot 65 R. P. and Sec. B.

}

189

4,650.00

135

3,375.00 J

>>

770

4,620.00

190,000.00

104,800.00 j

...

Corinthian Yacht Club (Buildings only)

2,247.08

...

Shaukiwan Lot 224

100.00

...

Inland Lot 1464

76,770

8,000.00

...

Widening Queen's Road Central Improvement of Chun Sing Street (Dealt with by Buildings Ordinance Office). Praya East Reclamation Scheme Praya East Reclamation Scheme Public Purpose

...

Provision of additional recreation ground at

P.W.E. 36/21, "Compensation & Resumptions", H'kong.

Do.

Special Vote, "Conversion of Old Cinema Shed at Wanchai into a Fire Brigade Sub-Station ".

P.W.E. 36/21, “Compensation & Resumptions", H'kong.

Do.

P.W.E. 46/21, "Road Improvement at Arsenal Street- Resumption and alterations of Buildings".

Advance Account-"Praya East Reclamation Scheme ". P.W.E. 36/21, “Compensation & Resumptions", H'kong.

Sookunpoo Valley

Shaukiwan Village Lot 233

214.00

Public Purpose

...

Do.

Do.

Inland Lot 1460, Sec. F.

612.50

Road Improvement

...

Portion of Shan Pin Terrace

236.67

132.00

Public Purpose

Public Purpose (compensation paid for demolition) .......

Do.

Do.

Do.

فغ

Various Squatters' holdings at Tung Lo Wan

Kowloon.

Hung Hom Inland Lot 226 and buildings..

Buildings on Kowloon Inland Lots 1109 and 1094

66,765

40,000.00

735.10

Improvement to Railway Yards (compensa- tion paid was chiefly for buildings; Kowloon Marine Lot 92 was given in exchange). Road Improvement

...

...

...

...

P.W.E. 66,21, "Compensation & Resumptions", Kowloon. Do.

Land Sales, &c.

Q 14

14. Resumptions,-Continued.

Amount Paid.

Description of Property.

Purpose of Resumption.

Area in

$

sq.

ft.

Kowloon,-Continued.

Kowloon Inland Lot 211

Portion of Kowloon Inland Lot 216, Sec. B.

Building on Kowloon Farm Lot No. 9

Building on Hung Hom Inland Lot 164 Certain Land at Kau Pui Shek

...

New Kowloon and New Territories.

Various Squatters' Holdings at Ilok Ün

Kau Pui Shek (52 lots)...

Portion of Lot 5412, S. D. I.......

Lot 2842, S. D. IV.

Lot 3075, S. D. IV.

Lots 2273 and 2279, S. D. IV.

Lots 889, 895, and 892 Sec. A, S. D. IV. Removal of graves at Fanling

Lot 1187 R. P., S. D. IV.

Lot 1802, S. D. IV.

Lot 1188, S. D. IV.

Lots 527B, 528B and 529B, D. D. 6

...

Northern District, New Territories 12 Lots

17

194

non-payment of Crown Rent.

::

Southern District, New Territories, 39 Lots

:

:

:

:

:

Southern District, New Territories, 64 Lots re-entered for non-payment of Crown Rent, and one lot for breach of Conditions of Sale

4,025 100

8,050.00 100.00

Road Improvement

Do.

848.69 1,000,00 7.25

Public Purpose...

Do

...

:::

Public Purpose (compensation paid for crops) ...

Vote to which debited.

P.W.E 66/21, "Compensation & Resumptions", Kowloon.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

198.00

15 Mows

808.50

Tsui to Kowloon City

...

5,440

299.20

Do.

Road Improvement ...

Construction of New Road from Mong Kok

P.W.E. 87/21, "Compensation and Resumptions", New Territories.

Do.

Do.

390.82

192.27

308.77

Public Purpose...

Do.

40.00

76.60

287.48

551.04

Nullah Training

Do.

...

119.79

15.23

Pathway from Taipo Police Station to the Railways

Do.

2/3 Acre

217.03

Various reasons

Do.

...

:

re-entered for

82 Acres

3,861.90

Do.

Do.

:

:

:

Q 15

Land Sales, &c.

15. Lease Plans.--Plans and Particulars (in duplicate) of 118 lots were prepared and forwarded to the Land Officer in connection with the issue of leases.

16. Boundary Stones.-Boundary stones were fixed to 59 lots in Hongkong, 49 in Kowloon and 178 in New Kowloon and the New Territories.

17. Surveys. So numerous were the applications for land-by far greater than in any previous year-that the Staff was very fully employed on the requisite surveys for sale plans, and on the pre- paration of Lease Plans.

Severn and Lugard Roads, and the road from Gap Road to Wanchai Gap were surveyed and plotted on the Ordnance Sheets.

In view of the pressure mentioned above, it was considered desirable to form a sub-division of the office, administered by the Principal Land Surveyor, and under the direct charge of an Assis- tant Land Surveyor, for dealing with the Ordnance Survey work only. In order to secure the necessary assistance for carrying out the details of this survey, Chinese youths having sufficient mathe- matical qualification are being trained as Surveyors. This ar- rangement was nearly accomplished by the end of the year and appeared to be working satisfactorily.

Marine Lots Nos. 430 and 431, which were sold during the year, were set out, and the various boundary marks valued. area contained in these lots is about 17 acres.

The

A number of proposed main roads in the Kowloon City and Ma Tau Chung Districts were set out and defined by monuments. Setting out plans of the following roads were prepared, and pickets, boxes, &c., fixed to define the centre lines:-Kowloon_City-Mong Kok Tsui Road, Coronation Road (from Soy Street to Ivy Street), Argyle Street, and Shanghai Street (from Waterloo Road to Taipo Road).

Valuations were made, and schedules and plans prepared, of numerous lots and buildings at Shamshuipo, Cheung Sha Wan, Kau Lung Tong, and To Kwa Wan and Mong Kok Villages, for purposes of resumption or exchanges. The boundaries of the Kowloon-Canton Railway (from the South Face of the Tunnel to the Terminus) were defined on the ground, and plans prepared. Surveys were made of Kowloon Farm Lots Nos. 3, 4 and 6, and of Kowloon Inland Lots 1308 to 1348, Ho Mun Tin, in addition to numerous surveys for lease plans, setting out new lots, and in con- nection with applications for sales, &c.

18. Naval and Military Lands.—In connection with the Praya East Reclamation Scheme, Kellett's Island and a portion of the Arsenal Yard, Queen's Road East, were transferred by the War Department to Government, the Admiralty who occupy the area retaining the right of user in the meanwhile.

Land Sales, &c.

Q 16

19. Piers.-There were no grants under long lease in Hong- kong. In Kowloon, an extension of 10,670 square feet was granted to Kowloon Permanent Pier No. 51, opposite Kowloon Marine Lot No. 40, for a premium of $1,067.00, and an extension of 6,975 square feet was granted to Kowloon Permanent Pier No. 6, opposite Kowloon Marine Lot 11, for a premium of $8,370.00.

In New Kowloon, there was one grant under long lease, riz:- New Kowloon Permanent Pier No. 5, opposite Lot 122, D.D. 448, Gin Drinkers Bay. This pier contained an area of 900 square feet and the premium paid was $90.00.

Licences for the following temporary piers were issued or renewed -21 in Hongkong, 15 in Kowloon, and 12 in the New Territories.

Licences were also issued or renewed for 17 slipways in Hongkong, 3 in Kowloon, and 2 in the New Territories, the total fees of which amounted to $6,315.00.

The premia derived in respect of temporary piers amounted to $1,403.57.

20. Cemeteries.-In Kowloon, several old Chinese Cemeteries were closed, and an area of about 100 acres near Ho Mun Tin was made ready for opening as a Chinese burial ground.

Work under the Buildings Ordinance.

21. By-laws and Regulations.-Some important amendments to Sections 175, 179, 180 and 181 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance were under consideration during the year, but the amending Ordinance was withdrawn for re-drafting before the end thereof.

21a. Administration.-Owing to the great increase of work, it was decided to form a separate sub-department to deal with Resumptions and Valuations which had hitherto been dealt with by the Executive Engineer in charge of the Buildings Ordinance Office. It was not, however, until the arrival of Mr. A. Kirk, Assistant Engineer, in September that it was found possible to put this into effect.

In order to cope with the greatly increased clerical work, Mr. J. Wattie was appointed Office Assistant and commenced duties on June 1st.

As the large number of notifications of nuisances received from the Sanitary Department has been continually increasing, it was arranged that for the future those of a minor nature should not be notified to this office but should be dealt with direct by that Department.

22. Plans.-The year under review was, owing to the unpre- cedented boom in the building trade, the busiest in the history of the Buildings Ordinance Office, and its outstanding feature was the very large number of domestic buildings dealt with.

17

B. O. Work.

The following is a tabulated statement showing the number of buildings, etc., for which plans were deposited during the year, the figures for 1920 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison :-

1920.

1921. Increase. Decrease.

European houses,

B

100

133

33

Chinese houses,

580

988

408

Buildings and structures other than

the above,

164

171

7

Alterations and additions to exist-

ing buildings,

2,101

2.575

474

Verandahs,

300

644

344

Balconies.

247

236

Sunshades.

9

29

20

Areas.

Piers,

Total.

3,506

4.783

1.288

!

The number of plans approved during the year was 2,594, an increase of 526 over 1920.

23. Certificates.-The following certificates for new buildings were issued :

166 under Section 204 of Ordinance 1 of 1903, for 575 domestic buildings, of which 86 were European, and 489 Chinese dwellings.

78 for 102 non-domestic buildings.

These figures show increases of 174 and 10 in the case of domestic" and "non-domestic" buildings respectively.

24. Notices and Permits.-The following is a tabulated state- ment of the notices served and permits issued during the year, the figures for 1920 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison :-

1920.

1921.

Increase. Decrease.

Dangerous Structure Notices,

185

280

655 5595

Miscellaneous Notices,.

127

70

Private Street Improvement

Notices,

532

468

Nuisances reported by Officers of

the Sanitary Department,

4.340

3,858

Signboards,

484 *

317

Permits.

2,472

2.369

57

64

482

167

103

Fees collected on account of the

issue of permits to obtain sand and stone from Crown land,

Fees for issue of new permits....

614

$ 1,737

$1,123

82

7+

*

During the year, steps were taken to cope with the numerous illegal sign- boards in certain steeets in which they were most evident.

B. O. Work.

Q 18

The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to failure to obtain per- mits, the number of convictions obtained, and the amount of fines imposed :---

Nature of Offence.

Removal of stone, &c., from Crown land or

foreshore without permission,

No. of Cases.

No. of Convictions.

Amount of Fines.

$

1

25.00

Depositing materials on Crown land with-

out permission,

Erecting or maintaining matsheds without

permission,

i

25.00

:

25. Resumptions for Scavenging Lanes, &c.-A statement of the work done will be found under the heading "Public Works Extraordinary.

25

26. Private Streets.-Re-surfacing and other repairs under the provisions of Section 186 were carried out by this Department at the cost of the frontagers in five streets.

27. Improvements, &c., of Public Streets.-The policy of re- quiring houses, when undergoing re-construction, to be built at a higher level where necessary in order to provide for the future raising of certain low-lying areas in Hongkong and Kowloon has been continued. In some cases, arrangements are made with owners whereby the ground floors of their houses are retained at their former levels upon their giving an undertaking to raise such floors when the raising of the street is carried out.

28. Footways. Attention has been given to footways under balconies and verandahs, notices having been served upon owners to repair such footways.

29. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The exceptionally heavy rainfalls in May caused several landslips both to sites in process of formation and to existing lots.

Inland Lot 2267, May Road, where a boulder became dislodged causing the death of one woman, is however the only one worthy of notice,

A statement of landslips-as affecting other than private lots- lots— will be found under the heading "Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages", paragraphs 57, 73 & 83.

30. Collapses. There were several collapses attended with fatal results:-

Nos. 9, and 11, Old Bailey, causing the death of 9 persons. Nos. 313, and 315, Queen's Road West, causing the death

of 6 persons.

No. 11, Ham U Street, causing the death of 1 person.

An old village house at Saiwanho, causing the death of 6

persons.

19

Amongst other collapses were those of :-

Nos. 1, and 5, Wongueichong Village.

No. 90, Connaught Road West.

B. O. Works.

Verandahs of Nos. 164, and 165, Queen's Road West, and No. 129, Queen's Road East.

Several others of a minor nature which do not call for special

comment.

31. Tests of Mortar-Attention was given to the testing of mortar, 73 samples being taken from works in progress, but in no case was the mortar found to be below the accepted standard.

32. Prosecutions.-The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to illegal works and other nuisances, the number of convictions obtained and the amount of fines imposed :-

Nature of Offence.

No. of Cases.

No. of Convictions.

Amount

of Fines.

legal works (ie., divergence from approv

ed plans, non-submission of plans before commencing building opera- tions, construction of illegal works and occupation of matsheds. xc., with- out permission),

Other nuisances (ie., non-compliance with notices issued in connection with nui- sances reported by Officers of the Sanitary Department),

13

10

695.00

41

37

$25.00

33. Testing Drains.-Fees, amounting to $40.00, were collect- ed on account of additional inspections necessitated by carelessness or negligence on the part of the parties concerned in the carrying out of the work. 149 drainage inspections were made during the

year.

34. Modifications.--Written modifications of various Sections of the Ordinance were granted in 81 cases under the powers con- ferred by Section 264 b. This shows an increase of 23 as compared with 1920.

35. Applications and Appeals to the Governor-in-Council under Section 265.-Applications for modifications of various Sections of the Ordinance were made to the Governor-in-Council in 17 cases, 16 of which were granted, (2 conditionally), the other being refused.

Appeals to the Governor-in-Council were made in 2 cases, both being granted.

B. O. Works.

20

36. Cemeteries.-Work in connection with forming new ter- races, etc. to afford additional grave spaces was carried out in the following cemeteries :--

Mount Caroline (Sections A & C).

Kai Lung Wan (Section A).

Kai Lung Wan East (Plague Section),

Hau Pai Loong (Section A and Plague Section).

Sai Yu Shek (Section A).

Aberdeen (Section A).

Kowloon Cemeteries (Sections A, B, & C and Plague

Section).

In addition, various paths were surfaced, roads formed and general repairs executed at Mount Caroline Cemetery, Hau Pui Loong, and the Kowloon Cemeteries.

The Chinese portion of the Kowloon Cemeteries referred to above and in last year's Report were prepared for use during the year, the requisite paths and bridges formed, terraces being provided in Sections A, B and C, and trenches being dug in the Plague or free burial Section, and arrangements were made for its opening on the first of January, 1922.

The two cemeteries at Hau Pui Loong and Kowloon Tong were in use during the year, after the expiration of which all burials will be diverted to the Kowloon Cemeteries. The notices in respect of closing these cemeteries were gazetted on 22nd December, 1921.

37. Places of Public Entertainment Regulation Ordinance.-- The Captain Superintendent of Police having now been appointed the Licensing Authority, this item will not appear in future Reports.

38. Fires.-The only fires attended by loss of life were two, both of which occurred in February at the Fire Cracker Factory, K.I.L. 1264, Tai Shek Ku. In each case, the fire was due to an explosion; in the former, 2 persons lost their lives, and, in the latter, 29 persons were killed or lost their lives in consequence of injuries received. In addition, a considerable number of other employees were injured. As a result of these explosions, new Regulations for the controlling of such factories were prepared, but they had not, at the end of the year, received formal approval.

The following buildings were seriously injured by fire, some of them being damaged to such an extent as to require re-construc- .tion:--

No. 292, Queen's Road Central.

"

>>

293, Queen's Road Central.

10, Des Voeux Road West.

وو

6, Ko Shing Street.

35, New Market Street.

22

Nos. 143 and 145, Bonham Strand.

">

72, Queen's Road West.

35

193, Queen's Road West.

Q 21

No. 160, Connaught Road West.

270, Des Vœux Road West.

Nos. 7, 8, 9, 9a, 12, 13 and 14, Third Lane.

50 and 52, Catchick Street.

>"

No. 61, Reclamation Street.

76, Reclamation Street.

Oil-cake Factory, N.K.I.L. 26, Shamshuipo.

B. O. Work.

A number of buildings at Messrs. W. S. Bailey and Coy's. Shipbuilding Works, K.M.L's 52 and 67 and K.IL. 1150, To Kwa Wan.

39. Reclamations.-The following is a statement of the private reclamations which were completed or in progress during the year :-

Area in sq. ft.

N.K.I.L's. 190, and 191, Laichikok, (in

progress),

618,000

Aberdeen I.L's. 81 to 88, Aberdeen, (com-

pleted),

165,000

M.L's. 277 and 281, (additions to), North

Point, (in progress),.

134,200

K.I.L. 1382, To Kwa Wan, (completed),

87,110

K.M.L. 52, (additions to), To Kwa Wan,

(completed),

138,150

Q.B.M.L. 1, (additions to), Quarry Bay,

(in progress),.

33,600

S.I.L's. 446, 447, 448 and 449, Shaukiwan,

(in progress),.

30,764

62,271

K.I.L. 1358, To Kwa Wan, (in progress),

The areas stated are those of the lots, which in some cases extend further inland than old high water mark and are therefore not exclusively reclaimed from the sea.

In addition to the above, a little progress was made with the works in connection with the reclamation of about 215 acres of foreshore and sea-bed at the head of Kowloon Bay referred to in previous years' Reports.

40. Principal Works of a Private Nature. The additional residential wing and the large two-storeyed garage at the Repulse Bay Hotel on R.B.L. 142 referred to in last year's Report were completed, and a large block of servants' quarters was erected.

The power-house, offices, and staff quarters for the China Light and Power Company on K.M.L. 93, Hunghom, referred to in last year's Report were completed and an extensive building for accommodating 6 coalbins with a garage attached was also erected.

Of the large block of offices for the Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company on K.M.L. 11 referred to in last year's Report, one-half was completed and the remainder was nearing completion.

B. O. Work.

22

At Ho Mun Tin, (K.I.L's. 1308 to 1348), the 4 new houses referred to in last year's Report were completed.

Within the premises of the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company at Hunghom, a block of European quarters was completed; the formation of sites for other buildings was in progress; several buildings and extensions to existing buildings were completed; and the erection of a large block of offices and a pump house was commenced.

The reclamation of N.K.I.L's. 190 and 191, Laichikok, for the Standard Oil Company progressed throughout the year; the erec- tion of 12 large Oil Tanks was proceeded with, 3 being completed. A Welding Shed and some additions to the Filling House on N.K.M.L. 2 were completed and the erection of other buildings was commenced.

The reclamation at Aberdeen and the erection of 26 Chinese houses on A.I L's. 84 to 87 referred to in last year's Report were completed and the erection of some other buildings was commenced.

The large extension to St. Joseph's College on I.L. 1642 was nearing completion at the end of the year.

The Cigarette Factory on I.L. 1315 referred to in last year's Report was completed.

The extensive addition to the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, 4, Des Vœux Road Central, referred to in last year's Report was nearing completion at the end of the year; No. 4 Queen's Road Central was completed; and the erection of a large block of offices on M.L. 381, Des Voeux Road Central, and at No. 6, Queen's Road Central, was commenced.

Additional godowns at Kennedy Town were crected, others were commenced and some of those referred to in last year's Report were completed.

The erection of a number of factories and godowns in various parts of Kowloon was commenced, several of these and of the se referred to in last year's Report were completed.

The large Sweet Factory on I.L. 2234, Whitfeild, referred to in last year's Report, was completed.

The block of 18 flats on K,I.L. 574, Hanoi Road, referred to in last year's Report was completed; a considerable number of blocks of flats in Nathan and Coronation Roads were completed, and progress was made with a large block of flats in Kimberley Road; a block of flats in Prat Avenue was erected and the erection of other blocks was commenced.

The blocks of flats on I.L's 2139 & 471 referred to in last year's Report were completed; progress was made with a large block of flats on I.L. 2267, and the erection of other blocks of flats,

23

B. O. Work.

including one of 51 flats on I.L. 2293, Wongneichong, was com- menced.

The reclamation of an area of about 134,200 sq. ft. for the Asiatic Petroleum Company on M.L's 277 & 281, North Point, referred to in last year's Report, was completed.

The site formation, I.L. 2273, Whitfeild, was completed. Three large fuel tanks were completed and a building for staff quarters was erected.

At Quarry Bay, the erection of a block of 4 houses on Q.B.I.L. 7, and 14 Chinese houses on S.M.L's. 3 and 4 were completed,

Cinema theatres on II. 2323, Des Voeux Road Central, and K.I.L. 535, Kimberley Road, were erected, and the erection of one on K.I.L. 526, Pekin Road, was commenced.

The erection of 3 pairs of semi-detached European houses for the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company on L.L's 2308, 2309 and 2310, Magazine Gap Road, was commenced.

The erection of a large Knitting Factory on K.IL. 1388,

· Coronation Road, was commenced.

The erection of an extensive Dust-collecting plant on the premises of the Green Island Cement Company was commenced.

The "Jubilee Ward", Tung Wah Hospital, I.L. 835, was erected.

The erection of a large club-house for the Lusitano Club on I.L. 339 R.P., Ice House Street, was commenced and was nearing completion at the end of the year.

The following is a summary of the smaller works which have been completed or commenced during the year in addition to the larger ones specifically mentioned above:-

Works Completed.

22 European houses in Hongkong, including 4 in the Peak

9

District, Kowloon,

41 Chinese houses in Victoria,

42

29

.

Hongkong Villages,

175

8

121

དྷྭ,

}

Yaumati and Mongkoktsui, Taikoktsui,

"

Shamshuipo,

""

12

77

32

Kowloon Villages, and

50

:>

""

Kowloon Bay Reclamation,

besides numerous buildings of a non-domestic character in Hong- kong and Kowloon,

B. O. Work.

Q 24

Works Commenced.

33 European houses in Hongkong, including 6 in the Peak

27

District, Kowloon,

S1 Chinese houses in Victoria,

15

>>

""

""

156

Hongkong Villages,

Yauinati and Mongkoktsui, Taikoktsui,

Shamshuipo,

**

91

12

27

"7

Kowloon Village, and

Kowloon Bay Reclamation,

96 i 51

besides numerous buildings of a non-domestic character in Hong- kong and Kowloon,

Work in connection with Resumptions for Street Widening Purposes, &c.

41. The necessity for the inauguration of a new sub-department has previously been referred to in paragraph 21a. It is intended primarily to deal with:-

(.) Street Improvement Schemes :—

(i.) Setting out and checking alignments.

(ii.) Valuations of the properties affected. (iii.) Preparation of particulars for completion of surrender of properties referred to in (ii).

(b.) Valuation and resumption of all other properties that may be required by Government other than purely agricultural areas or land in rural districts.

(c.) Miscellaneous valuations required by Government from

time to time of properties in urban districts.

A portion of the work has hitherto been carried out in the sub-department dealing with work under the Buildings Ordinance, the remainder, more especially street improvement schemes, by the one responsible for the maintenance and improvement of roads and bridges. The former portion of the work was taken over by the new sub-department in September, but it was not possible to transfer the latter before the end of the year. The increasing volume of the more legitimate work of both the above-mentioned existing sub-departinents rendered it imperative that this work should be grouped together and relegated to a new sub-department in this way.

The appended table shows the resumptions completed, and those for which terms have already been agreed with the owners but not yet carried into effect, which have been carried through by the Resumptions Office since its inception.

25

Resumptions.

In addition to the above work, valuations have been made by this Office for the Registrar, Supreme Court, the Estate Duty Commissioner, and in connection with properties offered by con- tractors as contract securities totalling $443,892.

A considerable amount of preliminary work has also been done in collecting and collating information concerning resumptions already carried out by other sub-departments with a view to the preparation of special registers and plans containing complete records of same.

Scheme and vote debited.

Resumptions in connection with Street Widening Schemes, &c.

Properties resumed.

Amount

paid.

Arca in

sq. ft.

Rate per

sq. ft.

Remarks.

Hongkong.

Wanchai Road Widening to 42 ft. Vote P.W.F. 16/21 (c).

Terms agreed for the surrender of areas re- quired when rebuilding completed at:-

No. 73, Wanchai Road;

$

Particulars will be supplied on completion

of surrender.

Resumptions.

Q 26

75,

do.

77,

do.

81,

do.

">

Queen's Road East Widening to 60 ft. Vote P.W.E. 16/21 (d).

·No. 116, Queen's Road

2,800

675

4.15

[East

{

Riding floor demolished.

Terms agreed for

surrender of areas

re-

quired when rebuilding completed at:--

No. 181, Queen's Road

[East

183, do,

193,

do.

">

104,

do.

110,

do.

Particulars will be supplied on completion

of surrender.

Resumptions in connection with Street Widening Schemes, &c.,-Continued.

Scheme and vote debited.

Hongkong,-Continued.

Properties resumed.

Amount

paid.

Area in

sq. ft.

Rate per

sq. ft.

Remarks.

Queen's Road East Widening to 60 ft. Vote P.W.E, 16/21 (d.)

No. 194, Queen's Road

[East

196,

do.

198,

do.

""

200,

do.

202,

do.

204,

do.

""

206,

do.

Other Street Widening Schemes- debited to Vote P.W.E. 36/21- Compensation and Resumptions.

Des Voeux Road, Central.

Particulars will be supplied on completion

of surrender.

No. 138, Des Vœux Road, Central.

7,500

885

8.45

Riding floor demolished.

Queen's Road Central Widening.

Terms agreed for sur- render of areas required when rebuilding com- pleted.

Particulars will be supplied on completion.

of surrender.

Q 27

Resumptions.

Resumptions in connection with Street Widening Schemes, &c.,-Continued.

Scheme and vote debited.

Properties resumed.

Amount

paid.

Area in

Rate per

sq. ft.

Remarks.

sq. ft.

Hongkong,--Continued,

Queen's Road Central Widening.

No. 6, Queen's Road, Central and Site for new A.P.C. Building (LL. 619).

Bonham Strand Widening.

No. 26, Bonham Strand

New Peak Motor Road

Wanchai Gap to Victoria Gap.

from

}

Terms agreed for the resumption of all areas required.

Surrenders

will be effected on com- pletion of road.

-39

Particulars will be supplied on completion

of surrender.

Resumptions.

28

Resumptions in connection with Street Widening Schemes, &c.,—Continued.

Scheme and vote debited.

:

Properties resumed.

Amount

paid.

Area in

Rate per

sq.

ft.

sq. ft.

Remarks.

Kowloon.

Other Street Widening Schemes- debited to Vote P.W.E. 66/21- Compensation and Resumptions :----

Shanghai Street Widening.

Terms agreed for the surrender of the areas required at:-

No. 349, Shanghai St.

ن

Particulars will be supplied on completion

of surrender.

""

351,

353,

>>

""

"}

""

355,

35

357,

""

363,

وو

"1

>"

77

365,

367,

29

Resumptions.

Resumptions.

Q 30

Improvements of Public Streets.

42. In addition to the widening schemes included in the above schedule, plans have been prepared and approved for widen- ing numerous other streets.

The general policy adopted is to acquire the land required for widening purposes when rebuilding takes place. Queen's Road Central and Des Voeux Road Central are being dealt with in this

way.

A list of the principal streets for which widening schemes have been approved during the year is given below:

Queen's Road Central from Hongkong and Shanghai Bank

to Central Market (amended line).

Queen's Road Central from Jubilee Street to Bonham

Strand.

Bonham Strand.

Catchick Street.

Kowloon City Road.

Salisbury Road.

Hankow Road.

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

HONGKONG.

43. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings generally were kept in a good state of repair, a number of them being renovated throughout in accordance with the recurring programme. The expenditure amounted to $96,336.44.

44. Improvements to Buildings.—The principal improvements to buildings carried out under this heading comprised the construc- tion of carriage-way to Government House, conversion of a class room at Queen's College into a practical Chemical Laboratory, improvements to the Quarters of the Deputy Superintendent of Police at Central Police Station, installation of trough closets at the No. 7 Police Station, constructing boundary wall and renewing cement concrete surfacing at the Kennedy Town Cattle Depot, white glazed tiling to walls of meat cooling rooms at the Kennedy Town Slaughter Houses, constructing reinforced concrete verandahs to "B" Block, Government Civil Hospital, new floors at Victoria British School to class rooms and room for Head Mistress' Quarters, also constructing vegetable stall in reinforced concrete to South Block, Western Market.

Numerous other improvements of a smaller nature were effected in various buildings. The total expenditure under the Vote amounted to $15,838.44.

31

P.W.R. Hongkong.

45. Maintenance of Lighthouses.—The lighthouses were paint- ed and colour-washed according to programme and otherwise maintained in good order at a cost of $5,928.21.

46. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City.

Approximate

Mileage, 61.—The road surfaces were maintained generally in a satisfactory condition. The asphaltum treatment of carriageways was still further extended throughout the City, and granite setts laid in the carriageways in those portions of the City where the increasing traffic rendered such paving desirable.

Improvements to Roads and Bridges in City. (

The following figures show the extent of the operations carried out at the Government Quarry during the year :-

Stone. Various grades passed through crushers :--

A total quantity of 19,639 cubic yards of which 3,456 cubic yards were made into tar macadam, 1,400 cubic yards into sand carpeting and 14,783 cubic yards were delivered to various works as the material came from the crushers. Further, 44,648 granolithic paving slabs for use in footways and 3,618 lineal feet of reinforced concrete piles, varying between 26 and 63 feet in length, were made.

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year :—

Substitution of granite setts for macadam or

concrete

Substitution of 2" asphaltum sand carpeting laid on cement concrete bed for macadam... Substitution of asphaltum sand carpeting laid

on macadam for ordinary macadam Tarring and sanding.....

2" granolithic paving slabs laid in footways...

sq. yds.

262

3,490

11,522

42,295

10,668

47. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges Outside City. Approx-

Improvements to Roads and Bridges Outside City.

imate Mileage, 60.—The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner.

Severn Road, Repulse Bay Lower Road and a portion of Aber- deen Old and New Roads were surfaced with macadam tar painted, kerbed and channelled.

Fence walls in rubble masonry were erected to dangerous bends on the road around the Island.

The following are particulars of the improved surfacing in- troduced on a number of roads in addition to those mentioned in previous Reports:-

sq, yds.

Tarring and sanding...

2" granolithic paving slabs laid in footways.

42,133 356

P.W.R. Hongkong.

32

48. Maintenance of Telephones including all Cables.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order. Several diversions of the telephone lines had to be made on account of road improvements and alterations to buildings.

Telephones were installed in Police Head Quarters Store Room, and in Wanchai Temporary Fire Station and connected to Central Police Station Exchange and the Central Fire Station respectively. Electric bell services were installed in the following build-

ings:

Imports and Exports Quarters, No. 2 Police Station, Aberdeen Police Station,

Mountain Lodge (Boys Room).

The undermentioned new buildings were wired throughout for electric light, bells and fans :—

(a.) Senior Officers' Quarters

(b.) Puisne Judge's Quarters... (c.) New Quarters

(d.) "Lyemun

""

(e.) No. 1 Motor House Extension... (f.) Harbour View Quarters...

(g.) Wanchai Temporary Fire Station.

Severn Road.

""

"

Barker Road

(Garden Road).

(Old Berlin Foundling).

All the electric services in Government Buildings were main- tained in good order.

Work executed in electrical workshops comprised the making of bell-pushes, special fittings for electrical requirements, blocks for mounting electric light and bell fittings, bronzing new and old fittings, cleaning fans, making battery and fuse boxes and a large amount of repair work in connection with the above services and telephones.

49. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.-The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs generally were cleaned and maintained in good condition, the open nullahs and channels in the City of Victoria and in the Shaukiwan District being cleaned by the Sanitary Department. The automatic flushing tanks were kept working continuously and the manual flushing tanks were operated during the period of low tides. Sand deposits were cleared as they occurred.

The sedimentation tanks at Wanchai Gap and near R.B.L. 137, Pokfulam Road, were periodically sludged.

All metal work in connection with the various drainage systems was inspected, and, where found necessary, was repaired and tarred.

Repairs were effected to sewers, nullahs, storm-water drains and channels, the most important being to sewers in :-Des Voeux Road Central between Pedder and Jubilee Streets; Garden Road

33

P.W.R. Hongkong.

opposite Kennedy Road; Davis Street between Catchick Street and Praya West; Ship Street opposite No. 2 Ship Street; Lyttelton Road at the junction of Babington Path; Praya West near Beach Street; May Road west of Inland Lot No. 2139; Kennedy Road opposite No. 15 Kennedy Road; sewer outfalls at Percival Street and Heard Street: to storm-water drains in Stone Nullah Lane : Praya East opposite No. 135 Praya East: and to nullahs at Cause- way Bay opposite the French Convent; Pokfulam Road below No. 6 Bridge; and at Pokfulam above No. 8 Bridge.

A considerable number of defective traps were renewed and a number of old disused drains of various sizes and types were destroyed and filled in.

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:

Labour for cleansing operations Repairs

...

Tools for cleansing operations... General incidental expenditure

$13,548.57

2,913.52

400.03

163.25

:

$17,025,37

as against $17,869.27 in the previous year.

50, Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and Hill District.—The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City and its precincts was 1225, an increase of 8 over the previous year, and in the Hill District 140, an increase of 5 as compared with the pre- vious year.

51. Electric Lighting, City, Hill District and Shaukiwan.—The number and positions of incandescent lamps in