Administrative Reports - 1920

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1920

Table of Contents

1 Finances

2 Shipping and Trade, industries, Fisheries, agriculture, and Land

3 Legislation

4 Education

5 Public Works

6 Government and aided institutions

7 Institutions Not Supported By Government

8 Criminal and Police

9 Vital Statistics

10 Postal and Telegraph Services

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

H Police Magistrates' Courts

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prison

M Medical and Sanitary

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 




2

The rice business of the colony also passed through a severe crisis during the year, due to a great extent to the failure of certain San Francisco buyers to honour their contracts, on the ground that buyers in Cuba, as a result of a considerable amount of overbuying, were repudiating their contracts.

The trade position was further embarassed by the unrest in the neighbouring provinces of Kwangtung and Kwangsi. The lawlessness which has unfortunately, so long been a feature of the situation, and which during 1919 was chiefly due to the presence throughout the province of the unpaid and uncontrolled soldiery of both factions, continued throughout the year to the grave detriment of trade in the two provinces.

Between August and October there were several minor out- breaks on the wharves and along the waterfront in Hongkong. caused by the arrival of numbers of Kwangsi soldiers on their way through the colony to or from Swatow. The bitterness engendered by the struggle between the rival parties of the two provinces was reflected in these attacks made on Kwangsi soldiers by the Kwangtung coolie element in Hongkong.

During the early portion of the year serious inconvenience was caused to business firms by the irregular arrivals of English mails. This was due to failure on several occasions to make the steamer connection at Nagapatam. The position was remedied later in the year by the provision of more fast vessels on the London-Bombay service and by an arrangement with the Straits Settlements Postal Administration for Hongkong letter mails to be sent by rail from Penang to Singapore.

The year was marked by a number of strikes among the workmen in various trades in the Colony. The most serious was the Fitters' strike in April, which was, however, amicably settled within 16 days. Other strikes were those of the Blackwood Furniture makers and the Chinese tailors' assistants.

A new valuation of the Colony was made during the year, by which the Rateable Value was increased from $17,408,959 to $18,696,660, an addition of 7.40 per cent.

I.-FINANCES,

The revenue for the year amounted to $14,689,672 being $625,128 less than the estimate and $1,835,303 less than the re- venue for the previous year.

Compared with the returns for 1919 there were increases under every head with the exception of Licences and Interest.

The expenditure amounted to a total of $14,489,594 inclusive of a sum of $2,555,878 spent on Public Works Extraordinary.

3

The detailed figures for 1920 are set out in the following

statements :-

Light Dues

HEADS OF REVENUE.

$

C.

94,225.44

Light Dues, Special Assessment -

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified

-

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific

purposes, and Reimbursements in Aid

102,609.57

10,325,918.57

1,126,566.51

Post Office -

541,295.01

Kowloon-Canton Railway

520,176.10

Rent of Government Property, Land, and

Houses

¡1,063,455.21

Interest

240,460.84

Miscellaneons Receipts

118,615.55

TOTAL, (Ordinary) -

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases) -

$14,133,322.80

556,349.13

TOTAL,

$14,689,671.93

The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $14,489,594 being $396,879 less than the estimate, and $3,426,331 less than the expenditure in 1919. Compared with the estimates there were increases under 15 heads as against 9 heads where there were decreases. The excess amounting to $742,979 under Miscel- laneous Services was due to the grant of $1,000,000 to Hongkong University and $378,104 in the case of the Police and Prison Departments due to increase of Staff and revision of Salaries. Military Expenditure was less than the estimate by $168,752 on account of the Revenue for 1919 having been over-estimated. The item Charitable Services was reponsible for an excess over the estimates of $104,339 due to a grant of $100,000 to the North China Famine Relief Fund. Decreases were mostly due to the sterling value of the dollar being higher than that on which the estimates were based, and to certain Public Works for which provision had been made not being proceeded with.

&

4

EXPENDITURE.

$

C.

Governor

90,526.45

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legis-

lature -

85,095.13

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

57,716.27

Audit Department

34,887.82

Treasury

74,222.34

Harbour Master's Department

231,146:38

Imports & Exports Department

502,114.66

Royal Observatory

25,965.53

Miscellaneous Services

1,410,230.36

Judicial and Legal Departments -

286,591.65

Police and Prison Departments

1,492,680.67

Medical Departments

331,020.81

Sanitary Department

463,759.44

Botanical and Forestry Department

55,975.49

Education

537,512.55

Military Expenditure -

2,789,206.68

Public Works Department

468,987.78

Do.

Recurrent

806,254.37

Do.

Extraordinary

2,555,877.69

Post Office -

268,713.85

Kowloon-Canton Railway

822,567.68

Charge on account of Public Debt

677,341.19

Pensions

252,081.83

Charitable Services

169,116.89

TOTAL,

- $14,489,593.52

The balance to the credit on the year's working was $200,078 and the assets and liabilities account showed on the 31st December a credit balance of $4,490,266.

The following is a statement of the revenue and expenditure of the Colony for the five years 1916-1920 :-

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

:

:

:

Revenue.

Expenditure.

$

$

13,833,387

11,079,915

15,058,105 14,090,828

18,665,248 16,252,172

16,524,975 17,915,925

14,689,672 14,489,594

6

1911. Coin to the face value of $23,235,459 has thus been redeemed. The total issue by the Hongkong Government was of the face value of about $44,000,000.

II.-SHIPPING AND TRADE, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES, AGRICULTURE, AND LAND.

(a.)-SHIPPING.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1920 amounted to 683,497 vessels of 40,122,527 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1919, shows an increase of 34,329 vessels, with an increase of 4,507,358 tons.

Of the above, 43,364 vessels of 24,194,022 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, as compared with 41,985 vessels of 21,072,129 tons in 1919 and were distributed as follows:-

1919. Numbers.

1920. Numbers.

1919.

Tonnage.

1920. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going Ships,

9.2%

9.6 %

32.4 %

34.5 %

Foreign Ocean-

going Ships, 126

12:5

36.2

38.1

British River

Steamers, ...

13.2

11.9

154

13.5

Foreign River

Steamers, ...

3.8

4:0

2.9

2.4

Steam Launches

(under 60

tons),

11.9

11.6

0.8

0.7

Trading Junks, 493

50.4

12.3

10.8

100'0

100·0

100'0

100'0

N.B.-The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in this Table.

Of vessels of European construction, 4,807 Ocean Steamers, 3,441 River Steamers, and 2,498 Steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year, giving a daily average of 29'4 ships, as compared with 29'1 in 1919 and 27.3 in 1918.

The average tonnage of individual Ocean Vessels entering the Port has increased from 1,5831 tons to 1,8310 tons, that of British ships has increased from 1,7226 tons to 2,002-3 tons while that of Foreign ships has also increased from 1,449.2 tons to 1,699-2

tons.

The average tonnage of individual River Steamers entering during the year has decreased from 448 8 tons to 425-8 tons.

That of British River Steamers has decreased from 529.8 tons to 5161 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers has decreased from 336 6 tons to 324 3 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1919 and 1920 is given in the following table :-

1919.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No.

Tonnage, No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British Ocean- ¡

3,865

going,

Foreign Ocean-

5,271

going,

British River

5,502

6,842,024|4,173| 8,351,084 308 1,509,060

7,625,823 | 5,418| 9,223,552 144 1,597,729

3,253,781 5,138 3,256,985

Steamers,

3,204364

Foreign River

1,599

591,679 1,741

577,270 142

14,409

Steamers.

Steamships un-

der 60 tons

(Foreign

5,035

161,689 | 5,028 167,248

Trade).

Trade,....

Total, Foreign Trade,..

Junks, Foreign 20,710 2,597,133 21,866 2,617,883 1,156

41,985 21,072,129 43,364 24,194,022 1,750 3,136,302 871

5,559

20,750

:

14,409

Steam-launches

plying in

Waters of Colony,.

586,188 13,366,602 619,068 | 14,636,848 32,880 1,270,246

Junks, Local

Trade,

*

* 20,095 1,176,438 21,065 † 1,291,657 70)

115,219

Grand Total, 649,168 | 35,615,169 683,197 40,122,527 34,700 4,521,767 371

Nett Increase,..

34,329 | 4,507,358

*Including 11.486 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 758,624 tons.

+

"

11,156

"

""

839.422

:

14.409

This table shows an increase in British Ocean-going shipping of 308 ships or 79 per cent. and an increase of 1,509,060 tons or 22.0 per cent.

This is due to vessels which were under Government control being released, and to newly built ships and Enemy ships which were sold or transferred to British ship-owners being put on the Eastern trade.

British River Steamers have decreased by 364 ships with an increase in tonnage of 3,204 tons or 66 per cent. in numbers and 01 per cent. in tonnage.

<<

11

The decrease in ships is due to the s.s. Chuen Chow" being laid up during the latter part of the year and to the s.s. "Hoi Ming' being transferred to the Chinese flag. The decrease in tonnage is due to the alteration in tonnage of the s.s. "Fatshan", "Kinshan' and "Heungshan."

Foreign Ocean-going vessels have increased by 144 ships with an increase of 1,597,729 tons or 2.7 per cent. in numbers and 20′9 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the large amount of American vessels frequenting the Port. Enemy vessels being sold or trans- ferred to Foreign ship-owners and also to several newly built Chinese and Norwegian vessels being put on the Coastal trade.

<

Foreign River Steamers show an increase of 142 ships with a decrease in tonnage of 14,409 tons or 8.9 per cent. in numbers and 24 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the s.s.

Hoi Ming formerly British owned being transferred to the Chinese flag being now named the s.s. "Tung Sing", also to two newly built steamers the s.s. Leung Kwong" and "Kong Chow" being put on the West River run.

<<

The decrease in tonnage is due to the s.s. "Tin Sing" being seized by the Cantonese Government and a number of Chinese vessels being unable to run frequently owing to Hostilities in the West River waters.

In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade, there is a

a decrease of 7 ships with an increase in tonnage of 5,559 tons or 0.1 per cent. in numbers and 34 per cent. in tonnage. The increase is most prominent in vessels trading to Macao due to the Steam-launches Hau Hoi 1" and "On Chai" running regularly for the best part of the year.

<<

Junks in Foreign Trade show an increase of 1,156 vessels and an increase of 20,750 tons or 5'6 per cent. in numbers and 0.8 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to more junks of smaller tonnage visiting this Port..

In Local Trade, (.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is an increase in Steam-launches of 32,880 and an increase of 1,270,246 tons or 5·6 per cent. in numbers and 95 per cent. in tonnage.

This is due to the decreasing cost of coal; Launches which had been laid up, were again employed.

Junks in Local Trade show an increase of 70 vessels and an increase of 115,219 tons or 0.3 per cent. in numbers and 9.8 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to a great number of junks being employed on reclamation work.

L.

9

Thus:

Steamers.

No. of times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1919. 1920. 1919. | 1920. 1919.

1920.

Steamers 299 330 1,938 2,090 3,436,6164,184,927

British

Sailing... 2

2

2,267,

Steamers 379

279 1,148

925 2,111,252 2,059,712

Japanese

Sailing..

1

1

89

Norwegian,

18

19

96

131

99,652 136,616

Chinese,

84

67 854

912

585,972 595,989

Danish,

6

Co

9

6

11

17,720 43,410

Dutch,

39

27

113

117

262,213 313,312

French,

17

34

159

156

204,494 276,962

Portuguese,...

5

6

85

78

51,459 38,269

Russian,

9

8

36

9,989

55,468

Siamese,

3

5

7

35

7,916

40,224

Sarawak,.....

1

1

892

Swedish,..

1

3

1

4

2,217 13,863

Steamers 90 129

150

286

415,859 953,443

U.S.A.,

Sailing..

1

3,000

Italian,..........

5

14

54,512

Inter Allied,

3

6

10 31,974

30,980

Brazilian,

1

1

3,041

Total,.... 957 927 4,575 4,807 |7,242,689 8,801,620

10

The Nationality of the Crews in British and in Foreign ships was as follows:-

AMERICANS

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREW.

AND

ASIATICS.

EUROPEANS.

1919. 1920.

1919. 1920. 1919. 1920. 1919. 1920.

British,. 301 330

Foreign,. 656 597

19,717 26,28 £ 674 1,214 134,307,140,882

1,359 1,750 11,725 24,542 150,517 150,617

Total,

957 927 21,076 28,034 12,399 25,756 284,824 291,499

Hence in British ships

And in Foreign ships: -

1919.

1920.

1919.

1920.

12.74 %

15.55 % of the crews were British.

0.83%

0·99 % of the crews were British.

0.45 %

0.72 % of the crews were other Europeans.

7.17%

13.81% of the crews

were other Europeans.

86.81% 83.66% of the crews

92.00 % 85.13% of the crews

were Asiatics.

were Asiatics.

TRADE.

Detailed and accurate statistics of imports and exports are now collected and published by the Imports and Exports Depart-

ment.

IMPORTS.

The number and tonnage of ships of European type con- struction carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1919, were as follows:-

Steamers,

1919.

No.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

4,571 | 7,237,333 | 4.807 8,801,620 236 (1,564,287) River Steamers, 3,550 1,917,236 | 3,441 | 1,918,064

Sailing Vessels,

4

5.356

828 109

5,356

5,356

Total,..... 8,125 9,159,925 8,248 10,719,684 | 236 1,565,115 113

Nett Increase......

123.1,559,759

$

i

?

11

EXPORTS.

The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal, are as follows:-

1919.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No. fonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

4,560 7,219,802 4,784 8,773,016 River Steamers, 3,551| 1,928,221 | 3,438

2241,553,214

44

1,916,191

:

Sailing Vessels,

5,356

13

12,030

5,356

Total,... 8,115 9,153,379 8,115 10,689,207

224 1,553,214)

17 17,386

Net Increase,

207 1,535,828

1919.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

Steamers,

4,560

River Steamers. 3,551

850,386 4,784

53,439 3,438

464,707 224

63,486

385,679

10,047 13

Total.... 8,111

903,825 8,222

528,193 224 10,047 13 385,679

¡

Net Increase.......................

211

375,632

The River Trade, compared with 1919, is shown in the following Table :-

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

1919,

323,536

328,369

1,373,947

1920, .

345,514

317,512

1,686,306

12

The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony for the years 1919 and 1920 :-

-

IMPORTS.

1919.

1920.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade, Local Trade,

.... ...

10,353 4,686

1,248,389

10,885

1,320,745

206,326

4,917

223,101

Total,

...

15,039

1,454,715

15,802

1,543,846

Imported 569,888 tons as under :-

Cattle, 1,914 head,

Swine, 18,397 head,

General,

Earth and Stones,

Tons.

224

1.082

547,747

20,835

Total,...................... 569,888

EXPORTS.

1919.

1920.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,..... 10,357

1,349,744

10,981

1,297,138

Local Trade,

4,823

211,483

4,992

229,134

Total,

15,180

1,561,232

15,983

1,526,272

Exported 709,961 tons as under :--

Kerosine, 1,128,477 cases,

Rice and Paddy,.............

Coal,......

General,

Tons.

40,604

59,769

236,799

372,589

Total,............ 709,761

-1

13

OPIUM.

Five hundred and twelve and a half (512) chests of Persian Opium and 112 chests of Turkish opium were imported during the year; 2 chests of Persian Opium were exported to London, 510 chests to Formosa, and 109 chests of Turkish opium to Formosa; 3 chests used for Medical purposes by A. S. Watson & Co., Ltd. of Hongkong.

Nine hundred and one (901) chests of uncertificated Indian Opium were imported; 576 chests for the Macao Opium Farmer, of which 226 chests exported by Tai Seng, the Old Farmer, and 350 chests by Lee Seng, the New Farmer, from July to December, 1920 ; 100 chests for Kobe; and the remaining 225 chests for the Govern- ment Opium Monopoly.

The table below shows the total imports and exports since 1912-

Stock in hand on

1st January,

Imported during

the year,

1920. 1919. 1918. 1917. 1916. 1915. 1914. 1913. 1912.

Chests. Chests Chests Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests Chests.

329 253 799 977 1,303) 2,2561|| 4,5801 5,560 7,587

1,525 1,290 1,2591,657 | 1,706 1,873 3,059 9,1081|12,361

Total,...... 1,854 1,543 2,058 2,634) 3,009 4,129 7.640 14,668119,9181

Boiled by Opium

Farmer,

-

36 667 1,113

Boiled by Govern-

ment,

225 877 539

352

365

340 413

Spurious

Opium

destroyed,

13

17

19

Used locally...

3

Missing or stolen,

Exported during

the year,

1,2971 837 1,265 1,469 | 1,667

2,469 4,911| 9,419 13,2641

2,826 5,383 10,088 14,3881

Total 1,525 1,214 1,805 1,835 2,032

Stock remaining on|

31st December... 329

329 253 7991

799 977 1,3034 2,256|| 4,580 5,560

Emigration and Immigration.

One hundred and five thousand two hundred and fifty-eight (105,258) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1920, (59,969 in 1919). Of these, 70,234 were carried in British ships, and 35,024 in Foreign ships.

One hundred and twenty-two thousand four hundred and thirty- eight (122,438) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had

14

emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 136,020 in 1919. Of these, 87,766 arrived in British ships, and 34,672 in Foreign ships.

Statement of Number of Emigrants to Straits Settlements, 1910 to 1920, compared with Total Chinese Emigration.

No. of Emigrants.

to

Straits Settlements.

Total No. of

Emigrants.

1910,...

76,705

111,058

1911,...

100,906

135,565

1912,...

84,024

122,657

1913,...

102,353

142,759

1914,...

44,974

76,296

1915,.

41.278

68,275

1916,..

82,797

117,653

1917,..

63,292

96,298

1918,...

8,019

43,830

1

1919..

11,638

59,969

1920,.....

43,935

105,258

(b.)-INDUSTRIES.

(i.)-Under European Management.

Engineering and Shipbuilding.-The figures are as follows for the years 1919 and 1920-

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng. Co., Ld.,... Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld.,. Kwong Tuck Cheong,

1919.

6 vessels of 22,311 gross tons and 14,450 I.H.P.

9

"

8

17,415 700 948

""

""

"

13,975 1,750 800

""

91

"

Total,..

25 vessels of 41,374 gross tons and 30,975 I.H.P.

1920.

Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., 5 vessels of 37,935 gross tons and 11,500 I.H.P.

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng. Co., Ld.,

W. S. Bailey & Co:, Ld.,

Kwong Hip Lung Co., Ld.,

Kwong Fat & Co.,.

5

"

22

"}

13,660 1,197

39

"1

9,700 1,336

"1

19

""

1

50

27

11

""

1

356

30

"}

11

1

85

""

2

48

وو

"

*

وو

.25

276

"

"

Total,.

Kwong Sang Loong,.

Hung Fat,

A King,

1,374 7 77

.62 vessels of 54,656 gross tons and 22,975 IH.P.

Prices of

Sugar Refineries.-1920 was a phenomenal year. Raw Sugar fluctuated but very little during the first few months - of the year, but in April news was received of a very large reduction in the estimate of the Cuban Crop, which caused a rapid rise in prices the world over, raws in Java rising from 40 to 75 Guilders per

15

picul between April and May, whilst Cubans which were quoted at about 9 cents previous to the revised estimate reached over 21 cents. After large quantities of Sugar had passed hands at these exceptional rates a slump took place, which was largely brought about by the over-anxiety of America to fill her shortages and prices fell away equally rapidly, the actual difference between the highest and lowest prices touched between the middle of May and December being 61 Guilders a picul.

The Refined markets follow the upward trend of prices to a certain extent in April and May and satisfactory sales were made to India, America and Europe both for prompt and forward deliveries.

Demand from China was consistent throughout the year but for the first six months prices were disappointing.

Yarn.-The Yarn trade during 1920 was very unsatisfactory and resulted in severe losses to native dealers, some of the smaller ones being forced to close down.

Trade was brisk until March but the Japanese financial crisis and the raising of the embargo on Japanese Yarn exports brought down prices with a run and so far there has not been any reasonable reaction from this collapse.

The total quantity of Indian Yarn imported into the Colony during the Year amounted to 120,000 bales and 17,000 bales were brought forward from the previous year.

bales.

Clearances totalled 112,000 bales leaving a carryover of 25,000

Cotton. Middling American Cotton in Liverpool was quoted in January at 28'50d. for spot, it declined to 27.38d. at the end of January, but then rose until on 18th February it reached the phenomenal height of 31 16d. It has since gradually fallen away, with an occasional setback, to 865d. at the end of the year (lowest since August, 1916).

The year opened with Exchange at 4/11 T/T. It advanced rapidly and reacted its topmost height of 6/2 T/T. on 10th February. It then reacted and declined steadily with one or two small setbacks until the close of the year, when T/Ts. on London were quoted at 3/2.

Rope Making, 1920.—The demand for Manila Cordage was not so good and the total turnover showed a falling off from that of the previous twelve months. The high rate of exchange which ruled throughout the year adversely affected our business with gold standard countries to a large extent.

Cement Manufacture.-Although exchange ruled very high throughout the year, there developed a very good demand from all markets and prices rose all round. The turnover was a record one.

16

(ii).—Under Chinese Management.

Tin.-During the year under review the volume of business transacted was large (about twice that of 1919) but, although the Sterling price was as high as £421 10s. in the early part of the year and as low as £205 10s. towards the close, there was little variation in local prices over the whole year owing entirely to the vagaries in exchange.

Imports and Exports for the year, in round figures, were :—

EXPORTS.

IMPORTS.

From Straits,.

300 Tons. To United Kingdom, 3,600 Tons.

China,

Neth. Indies,..

100 300

>

""

United States, 5,300 Sundry Ports,

...

300

"

""

Yunnan, Kwangsi,.

..10,100

""

China,

400

>>

"2

Japan,

2,900 1,500

""

11,200 Tons

13,600 Tons.

Rattan and Fibre Furniture.—In sympathy with practically all lines, 1920 was a bad year for these commodities. The value of Rattan and Fibre Furniture exported was about half of 1919. Seagrass declined to about the same percentage whilst Rattan core was worse, about 25% of 1919.

Native Tobacco.-Only a very small business was transacted during 1920 with declining prices.

Leather and Hides.-These showed a considerable decline; most dealers have lost money and are holding fairly large stocks.

Ginger and Preserves. This trade was one of the worst during 1920; exports decreased about 70% in comparison with 1919.

Soy. Only a small business was done and in small lots to regular centres.

Paper. Those interested in this line and who had stocks had a good year as prices rose about 25% in the beginning of this year, due to non-arrival of many orders. During the latter part of the year the market was plentifully stocked at lower prices, but, owing to exchange, local prices remained at the same high level with very little business.

Vermillion.

T

Very little done and much less than 1919.

Lard. The anticipated demand for 1920 did not materialise and business was bad; a great falling off compared with 1919, although, at one time, the trade looked like reviving owing to heavy purchase from a new source.

Tinned Goods.-Trade was not as good as 1919.

Shamshoo and Vinegar.-The same remarks as above apply. Knitted Vests and Socks.-These industries are progressing and with the addition of improved machinery will, in time, practi- cally control the Eastern trade. A good business, considering the

general slackness, was done; practically the same as in 1919 but the value for 1920 was about $2,500,000 as compared with $3,000,000 in 1919, the shrinkage being due to lower values.

(c.)-FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hongkong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shauki- wan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is in- ported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

(d.)-FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE, AND BOTANY.

About 16,000 pine tree seedlings were planted on the hills in the vicinity of the Fanling Golf Course and 6,450 on Cheung Chau Island.

E

On the hills east of the Fanling Golf Course, pine trees were sown in situ to produce 50,000 trees.

At Aberdeen, 5,960 pine tree seed sites were re-sown.

On the Fanling hills, 100 lbs. of pine tree seeds were sown broadcast, 50 lbs. on the upper part of the hills between Beacon Hill and Lion Rock on the south side, and 40 lbs. on the north side. Six and half pounds were sown on the new grassy banks of the Chinwan coastal road.

About 10,000 pine tree seedlings were raised in nurseries for planting in 1920.

Two thousand four hundred and fifty-five (2,455) broad-leaved trees were planted on the hills at Fanling, 3,493 on Cheung Chau Island, 718 near the new Pokfulam Filter Beds,.800 on Chinwan Police Station Hill, 60 on Mount Gough, and 48 in Kowloon Tong Cemetery.

Two hundred and twenty (220) Ficus creepers were also planted in Kowloon Tong Cemetery, 64 near Sukunpo New Recreation Ground, and 135 on Findlay Road.

In Hongkong and Kowloon, 632 flowering trees and shrubs were planted in the vicinity of roads.

Trees which had failed along the Taipo-Castle Peak Road were replaced by others.

Between Autau and Castle Peak, 1,450 Melaleuca were planted on the side of the road which had been recently widened.

Sixty-three (63) broad-leaved trees were planted along the completed portion of the Frontier Road.

The Lok Ma Chow Road, which was completed in 1918, was planted up with 172 Candle-nut trees.

19

In the New Territories the net amount received for premium on sales of land was $230,449.05 the principal item being $150,660 for New Kowloon Marine Lots Nos. 6 and 7. New Kowloon Marine Lot No. 8 was sold for $51,418 so that the figure for land sales in this part of the Colony was abnormal being over $218,000 in excess of the preceding year.

The number of Deeds registered in the Land Office was 3,405 and exceeded the total of any previous year by 384, the aggregate consideration set out in deeds registered was $67,493,394 as against $60,152,735.07 in 1919.

The Government resumed a large number of small areas for street improvements in the course of the year and Farm Lots Nos. 8, 22, 40 and 50 were surrendered, new areas being sold in lieu thereof for building purposes.

Development at Shamshuipo continues, sixty one new lots were placed on the Rent Rolls in the course of the year.

The total area of land sold or granted during the year was 277a. Or. 6p. of which 207a. 3r. 201p. were dealt with by the District Officers. The total area of land resumed was 75a. 2r.3033p.

In the New Territories the demand for land was steady.

III.-LEGISLATION.

Seventeen (17) Ordinances were passed during 1920 of which seven were amendments of previous Ordinances.

The most important matters with which these Ordinances dealt

were:

The Treaty of Peace Order, 1919, (No. 3).

The Treaty of Peace (Amendment) Order, 1920, (No. 15). The Treaty of Peace (Austria) Order 1920, (No. 16).

The Treaty of Peace (Bulgaria) Order, 1920, (No. 17).

These Ordinances were for the purpose of modifying certain provisions of the various Orders in Council, and of adapting the provisions of the said Orders to the circumstances of the Colony.

The Foreign Corporations (Execution of Instruments under Seal) (No. 1)-a measure for validating all instruments which have been executed, or will be executed by the agent of a foreign corpora- tion whose authority is not required to be under seal according to the laws of the State under which such corporation is incorporated.

The Volunteer (No. 2)-the object being to provide for the establishment of a new Volunteer Force to take the place of the existing Volunteer Corps and Volunteer Reserve.

20

The Societies (No. 8)-The object of this Ordinance was to repeal the Societies Ordinance, 1911, which had not proved satisfactory in practice, and to substitute a simpler system based on the Triad and Unlawful Societies Ordinance, 1887.

The Plants (No. 11)-the object of which is to enable the Governor in Council to make regulations for protecting trees, shrubs, and other plants from destruction, injury or removal. Its primary object was to protect the plant known as "Azalea."

The Criminal Intimidation (No. 13).-This enactment passed with a view to restrain a person from using threats of violence towards another person.

IV.-EDUCATION.

No important changes have taken place in the Education Department during the year under review. The Staff has been depleted by causes due to the war, but the deficiency has been met in part by the appointment of Mistresses resident in the Colony.

The total number of pupils at schools in the Colony excluding the Police School and the uncontrolled schools in the New Terri- tories are

Number of Pupils.

English

Total.

Vernacular

Schools.

Schools.

Government Schools,

2,929

2,929

Military Schools, -

145

145

ExcludedPrivateSchools,

121

26

147

Grant Schools,

2,330

3,409

5,739

Controlled Private

Schools,

3,679

13,719.

17,398

Controlled

Private

Schools, New Terri-

tories,

1,761

1,761

Technical Institute,

588

588

Total,

9,792

18,915

28,707

The most important schools, apart from the excluded schools, are Queen's College for Chinese, four District Schools its feeders, and the Belilios Public School for Chinese girls. There is an Indian School of growing importance now housed in a new building pre- sented to the Colony by Sir Ellis Kadoorie. Kowloon School and Victoria School for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 124. There is also a school for the children of

20

The Societies (No. 8)-The object of this Ordinance was to repeal the Societies Ordinance, 1911, which had not proved satisfactory in practice, and to substitute a simpler system based on the Triad and Unlawful Societies Ordinance, 1887.

The Plants (No. 11)-the object of which is to enable the Governor in Council to make regulations for protecting trees, shrubs, and other plants from destruction, injury or removal. Its primary object was to protect the plant known as "Azalea."

The Criminal Intimidation (No. 13).-This enactment passed with a view to restrain a person from using threats of violence towards another person.

IV.-EDUCATION.

No important changes have taken place in the Education Department during the year under review. The Staff has been depleted by causes due to the war, but the deficiency has been met in part by the appointment of Mistresses resident in the Colony.

The total number of pupils at schools in the Colony excluding the Police School and the uncontrolled schools in the New Terri- tories are

Number of Pupils.

English

Total.

Vernacular

Schools.

Schools.

Government Schools,

2,929

2,929

Military Schools, -

145

145

ExcludedPrivateSchools,

121

26

147

Grant Schools,

2,330

3,409

5,739

Controlled Private

Schools,

3,679

13,719.

17,398

Controlled

Private

Schools, New Terri-

tories,

1,761

1,761

Technical Institute,

588

588

Total,

9,792

18,915

28,707

The most important schools, apart from the excluded schools, are Queen's College for Chinese, four District Schools its feeders, and the Belilios Public School for Chinese girls. There is an Indian School of growing importance now housed in a new building pre- sented to the Colony by Sir Ellis Kadoorie. Kowloon School and Victoria School for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 124. There is also a school for the children of

22

The University is composed of three Faculties: 1.-Medical, which offers ample facilities for the practice of medicine. The medical laboratories were the gifts of various Hongkong Chinese residents. There is a large staff of instructors in medicine and all the principal medical practitioners in Hongkong give lectures at the University. Clinical work is carried on at the Government Civil and Tung Wah Hospitals. The degrees are recognised for registration in Great Britain by the General Medical Council. 2. Arts. The establishment of this Faculty was largely due to the munificence of a Chinese gentleman in the Straits Settlements (Mr. Cheung Pat-sze). Its special object is to provide training suitable to those who desire to enter the public service or the higher branches of mercantile life. The course of instruction com- prises English and Chinese literature, political and constitutional history, political economy, jurisprudence, international and com- mercial law, psychology, the school practice of education and history of educational theories. 3.-Engineering. This Faculty is divided into three branches--Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical. The University has an exceptionally large equipment of machinery and apparatus, and has a number of laboratories and workshops. There is practically no place in China where students have such an opportunity of seeing all kinds of machinery in actual working and of learning their practical management. Several graduates have obtained an Honour's Degree awarded by the Examiners of the London University.

The University insists upon all students having a proper knowledge of their own language although instruction at the University is carried out in English. Students are required to pass an examination in written Chinese before entering, and two Chinese Professors, both Hanlin graduates, give lectures on the classics and history of China.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The Central Police Station and the Harbour Office extensions were completed, and a commencement was made with the erection of two large blocks of Quarters for Scavenging Coolies, one block being situated in Belcher's Street and the other in Taipingshan.

Good progress was made with two blocks of Quarters for Government Servants at Happy Valley each containing 6 houses. A block of flats in Caine Road for married Police Officers, and three houses at the Peak designed for Quarters for Senior Officers were all well in hand at the close of the year.

A start was also made with the erection of two other houses at the Peak for the Puisne Judge and Mr. John Duncan respectively. The former is being built under arrangement with Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs, the latter being designed and constructed by Mr. Duncan personally.

23

In addition to these, two blocks of 4 houses each were under construction at Leighton Hill, and a scheme was approved for the erection of 5 detached, and one block of semi-detached houses, and a block containing 6 flats on the area known as the "Homestead Site," at the Peak; both of these works were placed in the hands of local firms of Architects, the Leighton Hill houses being carried out by Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs, whilst the work at the "Homestead Site" was entrusted to Messrs. Little, Adams & Wood.

Plans were also prepared by the Public Works Department for a large block of buildings on the area opposite the Central Market, comprising a New Fire Station, Offices for the Imports and Exports and Medical Departments and the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. In Kowloon, a Fire Station was completed in Salisbury Road, and other minor works were in progress.

With regard to communications in Hongkong, the following roads were completed :-Road from Gap Road to Bowen Road, and from Bowen Road to Wanchai Gap, also the Findlay Road extension.

Works commenced and in progress during the year were:- the first section of the road from Taitam Gap to Shek O, the road from Wanchai Gap to Magazine Gap, the road connecting Pokfulam and Victoria Roads contouring the Western side of Mount Davis, and the extension of Lugard Road, whilst extensive widening improve- ments were carried out to the Shaukiwan Road.

In Kowloon, considerable progress was made with the extension of Coronation Road, also with the road connecting Mongkoktsui with Kowloon City; and the road from the Kowloon City Road to the China Light & Power Company's new Station and the Hong- kong & Whampoa Dock Company's new houses at Tai Wan Bar was completed.

Advantage was taken of the large amount of filling obtained from the extension of Coronation Road referred to above to level up portions of the low-lying areas east of Shanghai Street near this point.

In the New Territories, the extensive improvements to that portion of the Taipo Road between the 9th and 18th milestones were nearly completed, whilst further improvements to this road between the 3rd and 5th mile-stones were begun. A considerable portion of the road between Castle Peak and Fanling was macadam- ized, the surface being finished with asphaltum.

Progress was made with the necessary resumptions of property required for widening Wanchai Road and Queen's Road East, and a considerable number of houses were, either by partial or complete re-erection, set back to the new alignment.

A commencement was made with a further section of the Shamshuipo Reclamation Scheme, and extensive building activity prevailed on the portion already reclaimed. The Kai Tak Land Investment Company made substantial progress with the recla- mation of an extensive area of foreshore in Kowloon City, as did also the Standard Oil Company of New York in extending their reclamation at Laichikok.

»

24

Upwards of 4,700 lineal feet of nullah were trained on the Island and mainland.

Plans were prepared for the construction of Filter Beds at the Eastern end of Bowen Road, and a portion of the 18" main, which will eventually connect these Filter Beds with the City, was laid from Wong Nei Chong Village to Morrison Gap Road. Plans were also prepared for additional Filter Beds at the Kowloon Water Works.

The laying of the new 18" supply main from the Kowloon Filter Beds to Yaumati was practically completed, and a general improvement was made to the distribution system of Kowloon by replacing the existing subsidiary mains with larger ones.

Small supply systems for Repulse Bay and Fanling Districts were started.

A re-inforced concrete pier opposite Queen Victoria Street for the Ferry Service was in progress, being the first of a series it is proposed to erect for the improvement of the Ferry service of the Colony.

The Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Company, Ltd., made considerable extensions to their Dockyard at Hunghom by laying down additional slipways, extending workshops, and providing houses for their staff.

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary was $2,555,877.69 and on annually recurrent works $825,493.70.

Railway.

The steelwork and roofing materials for the platform awnings at Kowloon arrived early in the year, when a Contract for the erection, including drainage, was entered into, and the work is now completed. The lighting arrangements for the platforms were carried out by the Public Works Department. The platform awnings are of steel frame construction, roofed with corrugated asbestos cement sheeting, and provide a very necessary shelter from the sun and rain to a considerable portion of the platforms, as well as to the east side of the concourse.

Good progress was made in the construction of the new wharf for Kowloon Station Yard which is built of reinforced concrete, the longest piles being 55 feet long. The wharf is 150 feet long and projects 50 feet from the sea-wall. There are six tiers of stairs which facilitate the transfer of cargo to and from local craft at any state of the tide.

With the exception of the cast iron stair treads, the wharf was completed at the end of the year.

The Electric Turret Clock for Kowloon Station Clock Tower arrived in the Autumn and the work of installing was at once begun. Unfortunately, however, progress has been seriously delayed owing to the non-arrival of necessary drawings and in- structions from the makers.

26

Sheklung and Shek Ha was damaged 4 days later, also on the 14th the track was broken in the neighbourhood of Shek Ha, and, as the unsettled conditions continued until the end of October, the morn- ing down and the afternoon up through expresses did not run from October the 6th, until the 2nd of November; and the afternoon down, and the morning up expresses were cancelled between the 24th of October and the 1st of November.

The running of the two slow through trains had to be discon- tinued for 10 days during this period; and it was not until the 2nd November, that the full train service was resumed.

The Local Traffic Earnings have improved. The receipts amounted to $194,041.14 against $179,434.14 or $14,607.00 more than the previous year, the increase being under passenger receipts. In May, it was decided that the Railway should discontinue its custom of debiting other departments for the transport of Govern- ment passengers travelling on duty and other services rendered, and accordingly the sum of $4,577.77 is not included in the Rail- way earnings.

Through and Joint Sectional Traffic Receipts were $318,345.37 an increase of $16,017.63 when compared with 1919.

The Gross Receipts for the year were $520,176.10 as against $490,092.77 for 1919 an increase of $30,083.33.

The balance after paying working expenses stands at $33,032.06. The Through and Joint Sectional Passengers carried were as follows:

Passangers booked by Stations in British Territory to Stations in China

1918. 1919. 1920.

307,491 344,716 365,665

Passengers booked by Stations

in China to Stations in British Territory

323,642 354,699 373,776

The Local Passengers carried were as follows:-

Main line...

Fanling Branch

1918. 1919. 1920. 296,379 345,314 392,206 45,187 48,917 47,787

VI.-GOVERNMENT AND AIDED INSTITUTIONS.

(a.)-HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital, to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, and the Kennedy Town Infectious Dis- eases Hospital. There is an Observation Station capable of accom- modating 1,500 persons in the event of an outbreak of infectious disease on board a ship arriving in the Harbour.

28

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives, which removal of Chinese plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital entailed, four District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony. These hospitals are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee.

The Kwong Wa Hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula was opened on the 9th October, 1911. It occupies a site having an area of three acres and provides accommodation for 210 patients. The existing buildings contain 70 beds and 4,067 patients were accommodated during 1920. The collection of sub- Scriptions and the supervision of the building were undertaken by a special committee under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The hospital receives a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Government.

As will be noticed from the remarks made under the heading Education the Hongkong University is also an Aided Institution.

VII. INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT. ·

One of the most important institutions in the Colony not sup- ported by the Government is the Matilda Hospital, which stands. on a commanding site of nearly three acres at Mount Kellet in the Hill District. An account of this hospital will be found in the report for 1917.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Pó Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The actual management is entrusted to a committee elected annually by the members of the Society. The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, and almost all women and girls detained by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under that Ordinance are sent to the Pó Leung Kuk. During 1920 the number of persons admitted was 405 and at the close of the year 47 remained under the care of the Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron, and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution, under mission auspices, founded for rescue work among the Chinese. It was housed in the Belilios Reformatory up to the outbreak of war, but

29

the work is at present carried on at Kowloon City. A small grant is made by the Government.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Govern- ment. It contains a theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, etc., a museum in which are some very fair specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent, the French Convent, (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and other chari- table institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of infectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence. The total cost of maintenance was $37,293 for the year 1920. The Government makes an annual grant of $7,000, and the rest of the cost is defrayed by voluntary subscription. The Dispen- saries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

VIII.

CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 11,912 being an increase of 1,370 or 13 per cent. as compared with 1919. There was in 1920 an increase in serious offences of 449 or 9·90 per cent. as compared with the previous year. The number of serious offences reported was 977 over the average of the quinquennial period com- mencing with the year 1916. The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 921 as compared with 1919 and was 589 over the average of the quinquennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force in 1920 was Europeans 178, Indians 477, Chinese 626, making a total of 1,281 exclusive of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the Railway and other Government Departments. Of this force 14 Europeans, 132 Indians, and 53 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

During the year 1920, 7 members of the Hongkong Police Force returned to the Colony from active service, and resumed their police duties. There is still one man who has not yet returned.

30

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 100, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 5,153 as compared with 5,212 in 1919. Of these 1,999 were committed for criminal offences against 2,552 in 1919. Of committals for non- criminal offences there were 64 more for hawking without a licence, and 5 more for unlawfully boarding steamers, than in 1919.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 755, the average for 1919 being 756, and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 0·12. The average percentage for the last ten years was 0.13. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Victoria Gaol has accommodation for 707 prisoners. The Branch Prison at Laichikok has accommodation for 200 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 0·99 as compared with 096 in 1919 and 105 in 1918.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including, printing, book-binding, tin-smithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, etc. The profit on the work done was $64,014 as against $67,735 in 1919. A sum of $3,598 was received and credited to Government for non-Government work as against $3,363 in 1919.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.)-POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, was 456,739, of whom 104,287 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories and of New Kowloon. The estimated total population at the middle of the year under review was 648,150, but this includes the New Territories; and, as the birth and death figures given below do not include those from this area (with the exception of New Kowloon), the population for the purposes of calculating these rates is estimated at 547,350, of whom 14,000 were Non-Chinese.

30

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 100, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 5,153 as compared with 5,212 in 1919. Of these 1,999 were committed for criminal offences against 2,552 in 1919. Of committals for non- criminal offences there were 64 more for hawking without a licence, and 5 more for unlawfully boarding steamers, than in 1919.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 755, the average for 1919 being 756, and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 0·12. The average percentage for the last ten years was 0.13. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Victoria Gaol has accommodation for 707 prisoners. The Branch Prison at Laichikok has accommodation for 200 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 0·99 as compared with 096 in 1919 and 105 in 1918.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including, printing, book-binding, tin-smithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, etc. The profit on the work done was $64,014 as against $67,735 in 1919. A sum of $3,598 was received and credited to Government for non-Government work as against $3,363 in 1919.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.)-POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, was 456,739, of whom 104,287 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories and of New Kowloon. The estimated total population at the middle of the year under review was 648,150, but this includes the New Territories; and, as the birth and death figures given below do not include those from this area (with the exception of New Kowloon), the population for the purposes of calculating these rates is estimated at 547,350, of whom 14,000 were Non-Chinese.

31

The distribution of population estimated to the middle of 1920 was as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,...

14,000

Chinese

Population

City of Victoria (including Peak),

342,000

Villages of Hongkong,

18,050

Kowloon (including New Kowloon),

104,000

New Territories,

100,800

Population afloat,

69,300

Total Chinese Population,

634,150

648,150

Total Civil Population,

(b.)-PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

The activity in building operations, which has been so notice- able a feature since 1912, has not abated, and the demand for housing accommodation by the Chinese continued to be greatly in excess of the supply, as many of those who fled with their families to Hongkong during 1911, 1912, and 1913 elected to remain in the Colony.

The birth-rate for the year was 3.96* per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 219 per 1,000 among the Non-Chinese community, as compared with 3'9 and 20'6 for 1919.

The death-rate for the year was 22.78 per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 179 among the Non-Chinese civil com- munity, as compared with 23:3 and 219 for 1919.

The number of deaths from Malaria (332) shows an increase on the previous year (319). The deaths of Chinese from this cause in the City of Victoria numbered 124 out of a population of 342,000 or a rate of 0.36 per 1,000 per annum.

The deaths from Plague numbered 120 as compared with 426 in 1919.

Small-pox deaths numbered 21, all Chinese.

There were 3,834 deaths from respiratory diseases other than Pulmonary Tuberculosis as compared with 3,049 in 1918, and 45 of these were among the Non-Chinese community. Pulmonary Tuber- culosis claimed 1,380 Chinese and 21 Non-Chinese victims whilst other forms of Tuberculosis represent an additional 681 deaths making a total of 2,082 or 167 per cent. of the total deaths among the community.

Beri-beri was responsible for 361 deaths, as compared with 555 during 1919 and 804 in 1918. During the past few years circulars have been distributed to all large employers of coolie labour calling their attention to the fact that Beri-beri is produced by the consumption of white rice as the staple article of diet with- out a sufficiency of other foods, and advising that beans should be supplied with the rice, when fresh meat or fresh fish cannot be afforded.

A tabular statement of the principal causes of death is appended. * This figure is wholly misleading as it is impossible to register more than a portion of the births.

2

33

from the NE monsoon in winter and enjoys the benefit of the SW monsoon in summer.

X.-POSTAL AND TELEGRAPH SERVICES.

The total Revenue from the Postal Service in 1920 amounted to $526,122.08 being $76,065.33 more than that collected in 1919. The net expenditure amounted to $229,378.70. The balance of revenue over expenditure amounted to $296,743.38.

The revenue collected in 1920 from radio-telegrams amounted to $14,591.73 being $4,241.70 more than that collected in 1919. Advices of vessels signalled at the Lighthouses yielded $581.20, making a total of $15,172.93 for the Telegraph Service. The expenditure amounted to $39,335.15. The number of radio- telegrams forwarded during the year was 1,965 consisting of 25,221 words, and 5,306 received consisting of 75,007 words.

28th October, 1921.

CLAUD SEVERN,

Colonial Secretary.

Light Dues ...

Appe

FINANCIAL RETURN:

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPE

Revenue for

HEADS OF REVENUE.

Estimates, 1920.

Actual Revenue to

same

31st Dec., 1920.

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

Light Dues, Special Assessment

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

Post Office...

...

Kowloon-Canton Railway

$9

80,000

94,225.44

74,545.18 19,680.26

90,000

102,609.57 83,973.11 18,636.46

11,573,280 10,325,918.57 12,865,534.22

967,780 1,126,566.51 1,013,207.61 113,358.90

440,000 541,295.01 460,892.58 80,402.43

482,000 520,176.10 490,092.77 30,083.33

2,539,615.6.

Rent of Government Property, Land, and Houses

1,058,080 1,063,455.21 1,041,431.01 22,024.20

?

Interest

Miscellaneous Receipts

:

TOTAL, (exclusive of Land Sales)

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net

:

:

:

:

:

320,000 240,460.84 112,798.43 127,662.41

103,660

118,615.55 118,539.76

75-79

15,114,800 14,133,322.80 16,261,014.67 411,923-78 2,539,615.65

200,000 556,349.13 263,960.23 292,388.90

15,314,800 14,689,671.93|16,524,974-90

:

:

E

:

:

:

704,312.68

2,539,615.65

704,312.68

$ 1,835,302.97

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1920.

Revenue for

Estimates, 1920.

Actual Revenue to 31st Dec.,

same

period of Increase. preceding

Decrease.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

1920.

Year.

Estimates, 1920.

Actual Expenditu:

to 31st Dec., 1920

$

thr

$

:

80,000 94,225.44

74,545.18

19,680.26

Governor

88,321.00

90,526.4:

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ...

81,914.00

85,095.1

90,000 102,609.57 83,973.11 18,636.46

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

_cified

11,573,280 10,325,918.57 12,865,534.22

Audit Department ..

2,539,615.65

purposes,

967,780 1,126,566.51 1,013,207.61 113,358.90

Treasury ...

Harbour Master's Department

Imports & Exports Department...

440,000 541,295.01 460,892.58 80,402.43

Royal Observatory

:

Miscellaneous Services...

482,000 520,176.10 490,092.77

30,083.33

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Prison Departments ...

1,058,080 1,063,455.21 1,041,431.01 22,024.20

Medical Departments

320,000 240,460.84 112,798.43 127,662.41

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

Education

103,660 118,615.55 118,539.76

-75-79

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department

Do.

Recurrent

Do.

Extraordinary

Post Office

15,114,800 14,133,322.80 16,261,014.67 411,923.78 | 2,539,615.65

200,000 556,349.13 263,960.23 292,388.90

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions

Charitable Services

:

:

:

:

F.:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

÷

:

:

:

:

:

57,836.00

57,716.2;

37,585.00

34,887.8

68,237.00

74,222.3-

204,698.00

231,146.3

557,675.00

502,114.60

23,671.00

25,965.5:

667,251.00 1,410,230.3

268,081.00

286,591.6:

1,114,577.00 1,492,680.6

295,439.00 331,020.8

437,101.00 463,759.4

55,091.00 55,975.4

477,048.00 537,512.53

2,957,959.00 2,789,206.6:

492,406.00

468,987.7

785,600.00

806,254.3

3,973,700.00 2,555,877.6.

291,345.00 268,713.8

793,071.00

822,567.6

826,769.00

677,341.1

266,320.00

252,081.8

64,778.00

169,116.8.

:

:

15,314,800 14,689,671.93|16,524,974.90 704,312.68 2,539,615.65

704,312.68

...$ 1,835,302.97

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net ...

$14,886,473.00 14,489,593-

T!

ppendix A.

JRNS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1920.

crease.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

Estimates, 1920.

Actual Expenditure to 31st Dec., 1920.

Expenditure for same

period of

Increase.

Decrease.

preceding

Year.

$3

Governor

$

$

$

$

$

RF-

88,321.00

90,526.45 77,198.15 13,328.30

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ...

81,914.00

85,095.13 68,197.84 16,897.29

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

57,836.00

57,716.27 52,634-57 5,081.70

,615.65

Audit Department ..

Treasury ...

Harbour Master's Department

Imports & Exports Department ...

Royal Observatory

37,585.00

Miscellaneous Services...

615.65

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Prison Departments..

Medical Departments

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

Education

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department

Do.

Recurrent

Do. Extraordinary

Post Office

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions

Charitable Services

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

34,887.83

35,625.67

737.84

68,237.00

74,222.34

63,076.94

11,145.40

204,698.00 231,146.38

235,411.10

4,264.72

557,675.00

502,114.66 809,627.24

307,512.58

23,671.00

25,965.53 23,450.57

2,514.96

667,251.00 1,410,230.36 | 5,532,810.60

4,122,580.24

268,081.00

286,591.65 251,434.95

35,156.70

4

1,114,577.00 1,492,680.67 1,066,820.94

425,859.73

295,439.00

331,020.81

264,524,75

66,496.06

:

437,101.00

384,873.00 463,759.44

78,886.44

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

FO.

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

55,091.00 55,975.49 51,457.65 4,517.84

477,048.00 537,512.55 357,806.43 179,706.12

2,957,959.00 2,789,206.68 3,580,463.81

791,257.13

492,406.00 468,987.78 391,382.64 77,605.14

785,600.00 806,254.37 822,509.87

16,255.50

3,973,700.00 2,555,877.69 2,235,002.95

320,874.74

291,345.00 268,713.85 138,224.68 130,489.17

793,071.00 822,567.68

384,975.23

826,769.00

437,592.45

677,341.19 749,649.66

72,308.47

266,320.00 252,081.83 217,510.30

34,571.53

64,778.00 169,116.89 68,638.60 100,478.29

615.65

312.68

302.97

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net...

$14,886,473.00 14,489,593-52 17,915,925.36 1,888,584.64 5,314,916.48

:

$1,888,584.64

$3.426,331.84

*

Light Dues ...

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

Revenue for

Estimates,

Actual Revenue to

same

HEADS OF REVENUE.

1920.

31st Dec., 1920.

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

Light Dues, Special Assessment

:

f

$

$/

80,000

94,225.44 74,545.18 19,680.26

Gover

Colon

90,000 102,609.57 83,973.11 18,636.46

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

11,573,280 10,325,918.57 12,865,534.22

Secret

Audit

2,539,615.65

Treasu

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

Harbo

...

967,780 | 1,126,566.51 | 1,013,207.61

113,358.90

Impor

Post Office

:

440,000 541,295.01 460,892.58

80,402.43

Royal

Miscel

Kowloon-Canton Railway

482,000 $20,176.10 490,092.77 30,083.33

Judicia

Police

Rent of Government Property, Land, and Houses

1,058,080 1,063,455.21

1,041,431.01

22,024.20

Medic

Interest

320,000

240,460.84

112,798.43

127,662.41

Sanita

Botan

Educa

Miscellaneous Receipts

...

:

103,660 118,615-55 118,539.76

75-79

Militar

Public

I

I

Post (

TOTAL, (exclusive of Land Sales)

15,114,800 14,133,322.80 16,261,014.67

411,923.78 2,539,615.65

Kowlo

Charg

Pensio

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

200,000 556,349.13 263,960.23

292,388.90

Charit

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net

:

:

:

:

:

15,314,800 14,689,671.93 16,524,974-90 704,312.68 2,539,615.65

:

$ 704,312.68

..$ 1,835,302.97

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

TEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1920.

Actual Revenue to 31st Dec.,

1920.

Revenue for

same

period of

Increase.

Decrease.

preceding

Year.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

Estimates, 1920.

Actual Expenditure to 31st Dec., 1920.

Expenditure for same

period of preceding Year.

Increase

$

$

$

€A-

94,225.44 74,545.18

19,680.26

Governor

88,321.00

90,526.45

77,198.15 13,328.

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ...

81,914.00

85,095.13

16,897. 68,197.84

102,609.57 83,973.11

18,636.46

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

57,836.00 57,716.27 52,634-57 5,081.

Audit Department ..

0,325,918.57 12,865,534.22

2,539,615.65

Treasury ...

:

:

Harbour Master's Department

1,126,566.51 1,013,207.61 113,358.90

Imports

Exports Department..

541,295.01 460,892.58 80,402.43

Royal Observatory

Miscellaneous Services...

:

:

:

:.

:

:

37,585.00 34,887.83 35,625.67

68,237.00

74,222.34 63,076.94 11,145

204,698.00

231,146.38 235,411.10

557,675.00

502,114.66

809,627.24

23,671.00

25,965-53

23,450.57

2,514

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

520,176.10 490,092.77

30,083.33

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Prison Departments

1,063,455.21 1,041,431.01 22,024.20

Medical Departments

240,460,84

112,798.43

127,662.41

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

Education

118,615.55 118,539.76

75.79

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department ..

Do.

Recurrent

Do.

Post Office

Extraordinary

14,133,322.80 16,261,014.67 411,923.78 2,539,615.65

556,349.13 263,960.23 292,388.90

:

667,251.00 1,410,230.36 | 5,532,810.60

268,081.00

286,591.65

251,434.95

35,15

1,114,577.00 1,492,680.67 1,066,820.94 425,85

295,439.00

331,020.81

264,524.75

66,496

437,101.00

463,759.44

384,873.00

78,88

4,51

$5,091.00 55,975.49 51,457.65

477,048.00 537,512.55 357,806.43 179,70

2,957,959.00 2,789,206.68 3,580,463.81

492,406.00 468,987-78 391,382.64 77,60

785,600.00

806,254.37 822,509.87

3,973,700.00 2,555,877.69 2,235,002.95

291,345.00 268,713.85

793,071.00 822,567.68

138,224.68

437,592.45

320,874

130,48

384,97

826,769.00 677,341.19 749,649.66

266,320.00

252,081.83 217,510.30 34,57

64,778.00 169,116.89 68,638.60 100,47

:..

:

:

...

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Kowloon-Canton Railway '.....

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions ...

Charitable Services

14,689,671.93 16,524,974.90 704,312.68 2,539,615.65

:

$ 704,312.68

..$ 1,835,302.97

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net...

:

$14,886,473.00 14,489,593-52 17,915,925.36 1,888,58

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Appendix A (1).

REPORT ON THE FINANCES FOR THE YEAR 1920.

REVENUE.

The total revenue for the year amounted to $14,689,672 being $625,128 less than the estimate and $1,835,303 less than the revenue in 1919. Compared with that year there were decreases under the heads Licences and Interest, the former head showing at drop of $2,539,616. All other heads showed increases.

2. The principal sub-heads showing excess over the estimate are as follows:-

(a) Assessed Taxes,

$

49,542

(b) Liquor Duties,

49,795

Stamps,

292,821

(d) Tobacco Duties,

31,877

(e) China Companies Fees,

31,608

(f) Water Excess Supply and Meter

Rents,

57,834

Postage,

101,122

(h) Land Sales,

356,349

The increases are due (a) to new assessment, (b) more con- sumption, (e) to more Probate Duty, (d) to increased sales, (e) to new flotations, (f) more metered service, (g) to increase of business, and (h) to more lands being disposed of.

3. The principal deficit compared with the Estimates was :--

Opium Monopoly, $1,682.029 owing to decreased sales.

EXPENDITURE.

4. The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $14,489,594 being $396,899 less than the estimate, and $3,426,331 less than the expenditure in 1919.

Compared with the estimates there were savings under nine

heads.

Miscellaneous expenditure exceeded the estimate by $742,979 mainly on account of the Grant to the University of Hongkong and Police and Prison Departments exceeded the estimate by $378,104.

There was a decrease in Pensions ($14,238), and Public Debt ($149,428), due to the rising exchange.

5. The revenue for the year exceeded the expenditure by a sum of $200,078; with the result that the surplus balance increased to $4,490,266.

÷

· A (1) 2 →

6. The following statement shows the Liabilities and Assets on the 31st December, 1920 :-

-

LIABILITIES.

$

ASSETS..

$.

C.

Deposits not Available, 907,860.72

Subsidiary Coins,

662,327.99

Advances,

445,032.30

Crown Agents'

Advances,

Postal Agencies,.........

Building Loans,

296,500.00

164,970.96

Imprest,

13,933.24

House Service A/c.,

6,680.09

9,751.29

Unallocated Stores,

(P. W. D.),.........................

298,721.29

Shipping Control A/c., 2,231,204.11

Unallocated Stores,

(Railway),

230,279.63

Suspense Account,......

15.00

Coal Account,

339,830.74

Investment Account, Balance Bank,

4,932,833.56

575,074.03

Crown Agents' Cur-

rent Account,

2,855.52

Total Liabilities,... 3,313,802.08

Balance,

|4,490,266.31

Total .$7,804,068.39

Total,.....$ 7,804,068.39

7. The following table shows the Revenue and Expenditure during the last five years :---

1916.

1917.

$

$

1918. $

1919. $8

1920.

$

Revenue,..

13,833,386

15,058,105

Expenditure,

11,079,914

14,090,828

18,665,248 16,524,975

14,689,672 16,252,172 17,915,925 14,489,594

Surplus,

2,753,472 967,277

Deficit,

2,413,076

1,390,950

200,078

2

PUBLIC DEBT.

8. The Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amount to £1,485,732 and the Sinking Fund now stands at £338,687 being £28,218 more than the amount at credit of that fund at the end of 1919.

The local Loan (under Ordinance No. 12 of 1916) stands at $3,000,000 with a Sinking Fund of $438,203 and £84,751 sterling.

GENERAL REMARKS.

9. There was no alteration of importance in taxation during 1920.

10. The total receipts and payments in the Treasury books during the year were $24,179,649 and $23,601,719 respectively.

>

À (1) 3

The figures not accounted for under revenue and expenditure relate to transactions under various heads such as Deposits, Advances, Subsidiary Coin, Unallocated Stores, etc.

11. Subsidiary coins in stock on the 31st December were as follows:-

50 cents,

20

10

""

5 Copper,

$ 2,334

4,590

559,611

76,908

18,884

662,327

The nominal amount of coins in circulation is $20,764,370, and the market value is now practically par.

12. The local circulation in December of notes of the three Banks having authorized issues was as follows:-

Hongkong & Shangkai Banking Corporation, $26,397,580 Chartered Bank of India, Australia & China, Mercantile Bank of India, Limited,

The specie in Reserve came to

10,061,863

1,000,009

$37,459,452

$24,550,000

13. The rate of exchange for the Estimates was taken at 3/- whereas the average rate for purposes of conversion in the Treasury books was 4/5.

28th July, 1921.

C. McI. MESSER,

Treasurer.

Appendix. B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1921-1922.

1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor in Council a new valuation of the whole Colony has been made and the Rateable Value has thereby been increased from $17,408,959 to $18,696,660, an addition of $1,287,701 or 7.40 per cent.

2. The following Table gives a comparison of the Assessments for 1920-1921 and 1921-1922 :-

DISTRICT.

VALUATION 1920-1921.

VALUATION 1921-1922.

INCREASE.

PER CENT.

$

%

The City of Victoria..

14,030,330

14,030,330

Hill District,...

344,315

14,902,870 14,902,870

352,465

872,540 6.22

...

Shaukiwan, Saiwanho

and Quarry Bay,

415,550

425,250

Hongkong Villages,

315,980

1,075,845

352,904

1,130,619

54,771

5,09

Kowloon Point,

733,815

858,430

Yaumati,

490,585

577,290

Mongkoktsui,

385,515

465,145

Hunghom & Hokun,

394,290

434,575

Kowloon Villages,

138,909

154,515

New Territories,

159,670

2,302,784

173,216 2,663,171

360,387 15.65

Total,.........

· 17,408,959

18,696,660 1,287,701 7.40

3. The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 79 monthly, as compared with 80 last year.

4. During the year ending 30th April, 1921, 693 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

CITY OF VICTORIA.

REST OF COLONY.

No.

Rateable Value.

No.

Rateable Value,

$

$

New or rebuilt tenements and tenements structurally altered ........

170

233,670

338

288,880

Assessments cancelled, tenements resumed, pulled down or being in other respects not rateable......

107

132,405

78

44,969

Number and increase

277

$101,265

416

$243,911

B 2

5. The following comparative statement shows the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each of the ten years from 1912-1913 to 1921-1922 inclusive :-

Year.

Rateable Value.

$

1912-13

12,312,306 1,150,916

1913-14

12,435,812 123,506

1914-15

14,410,103 1,974,291

Increase Decrease as compared as compared

with pre-

with pre- vious year. vious year.

Percentage of

Increase or Decrease in Rateable Value

as compared with previous year.

%

10.31 Increase.

1.03 do. 15.87 do.

1915-16

14,287,285

122,818

0.85 Decrease.

1916-17

14,282,186

5,099

0:03 do.

1917-18

1918-19

1919-20

14,410,153 127,967 15,638,736 1,228,583 16,304,801

0.89 Increase.

8.52 do.

666,065

...

4.25

do.

1920-21

1921-22

17,408,959 1,104,158 18,696,660 1,287,701

6.77

do.

7.40 do.

6. In the ten years 1912-1913 to 1921-1922 the Rateable Value of the Colony has increased by $6,384,354 or 51.85 per cent.

C. McI. MESSER, Treasurer & Assessor.

THE TREASURY,

30th April, 1921.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I and II.)

REVENUE.

1. The revenue derived from all sources during the year was $18,007; less than that for 1919 by $3,423. The decrease was due to the smaller issue of Chinese Boarding House Licences and Passage Broker's Licences and to less Registration of Societies.

There were two items which showed increases, viz., Marriage Licences, and Certificates to Chinese entering the United States of America.

EXPENDITURE.

2. The total expenditure was $57,716 as compared with $52,634 in 1919 and fell short of the estimate by $120. The increase as compared with 1919 was due to the introduction of the new scheme of salaries.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Table III.)

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance No. 4 of 1897. Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance No. 6 of 1893.

3. The number of persons detained under warrant and sent direct to the Po Leung Kuk during the year was 85 as compared with 167 in 1919; the action taken in each case (as also in those cases not decided at the end of 1919) is shown in Table III. The number of women whose detention was found unnecessary and who were allowed to leave after investigation was 56 or 65.8%, as compared with 81 or 48.5% in 1919; 14 were sent to their native places; 3 were restored to their relatives; I married and 2 were sent to Charitable institutions in China; while 9 cases were still under consideration on December 31st.

4. Three names were added to the list of girls under bond to report themselves annually, half-yearly or quarterly to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, a precaution taken to guard against their being forced into prostitution. The names of three girls were struck off the list; one of them was married and the other two were sent back to their relatives. The number of names on the list on December 31st was 13.

5. The number of persons reported by Hongkong residents to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was 80, of whom 33

C 2

were found, as compared with 84 and 38 in 1919. The total number of persons reported missing, including reports from China and Macao, was 103, of whom 24 were found, as compared with 42 out of 117 in 1919.

EMIGRATION.

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

(i.)-EMIGRATION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN, (FREE). (Table IV.)

6. The number of female and minor passengers examined and allowed to proceed abroad was 20,690 (women 13,002, girls 1,734, and boys 5,954) as compared with 8,550 in 1919.

During the year one ship carrying women and children left for South Africa and three for Mauritius.

Emigrants to Bangkok are not now brought to this office for examination.

7. The record of the occupations of the female emigrants over 16 years of age shows that out of a total of 13,002, 4,286 were going to join relatives, 2,839 with relatives, or husbands, 732 as tailoresses, 1,198 as prostitutes, 2,833 as maidservants or nurses, 633 as cooks, 366 to work in tin mines or on plantations. There were also 1 teacher, 4 actresses, 54 hairdressers, 5 nuns and 1 repatriated by Government.

8. Five out of the total number of women were detained for enquiries as against 44 in 1919. Of these two were restored to their relatives, one was sent to her native place, one was married, and one sent to a Convent.

9. Repatriation of Women and Girls.—

(a.) From Singapore.-Thirty-six (36) prostitutes who went to Singapore were sent back on the ground that they were too young to practise prostitution. They were all seen off to their destinations.

Sixteen (16) prostitutes were sent back from Singapore at their own request.

Four applications were received for the recovery of women who had emigrated to Singapore. Two were found to be based on false information; the others were applications for the recovery of girls who had emigrated as prostitutes. Both these latter were recovered and handed back to their relatives.

Six girls were repatriated from Singapore in connection with "trafficking" cases. Of these girls one was given in adoption as a daughter to a family in Hongkong, and the others were sent away to their homes in the country.

Four women

were repatriated by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, Singapore, because on various grounds they were unable to make a living in the country.

3

(b.) From Penang.-Five prostitutes were repatriated from Penang on the ground that they were too young to practise pro- stitution there.

One prostitute found in Penang in a destitute condition was repatriated to China.

One woman whose husband was killed in a motor car accident was repatriated.

(c.) From Bangkok.-Three women who had emigrated to Bangkok, were enticed to proceed to the Straits, and there forced to become prostitutes. They were recovered and repatriated by the Straits Government.

(d.) From Java.-One woman who was unable to earn her living in Java was repatriated, and arrangements were made by this office to have her returned to her native place.

(e.) British North Borneo.-A woman was repatriated from Jesselton, because in the opinion of the Chinese Consul and the Chinese Community she was undesirable. As all efforts to trace through the Committee of the Po Leung Kuk the whereabouts of her relatives failed she was allowed to proceed to her home unaccompanied.

10. Prosecutions under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance undertaken by this office numbered 12 with 10 convictions as compared with 7 cases and 3 convictions in 1919.

(ii)-MALE EMIGRATION, (ASSISTED).

(Table V.)

11.-(a.) The Assisted Emigration to Banca continued through- out the year, and the figures show an increase on those of 1919.

(b.) The Billiton Emigration ceased entirely after the month of July, and the figures show a considerable reduction on those of 1919.

(c.) There was a great increase in the emigration to the petroleum depôt at Balik Papan, the men passed including both artisans and unskilled labourers.

12. The assisted emigration to British North Borneo was continuous throughout the year and also showed an increase as compared with 1919.

13. The year 1920 has seen a considerable extension of assisted emigration.

-

(a.) Christmas Island (viâ Singapore).-Several small parties have been sent there to work for the Christmas Island Phosphate Company. An early difficulty over the terms of repatriation was satisfactorily adjusted through the good offices of the Singapore Government.

(b.) Nauru, Western Samoa and Ocean Island.-An application from the New Zealand Government as mandatory power to ship assisted emigrants to these territories to work for the Pacific Phosphate Company led to several batches leaving the Colony in Spring of the year.

A noteworthy feature of this Emigration is the extremely favourable terms granted to the labourer.

An effort to induce the labourers to take their wives met with little or no response.

(c.) British Solomon Islands.--A few carpenters were recruited to work in these territories for Messrs. Lever's Pacific Plantations Ltd.

(d.) Makatea.--An application from the (French) Government of Tahiti for Chinese assisted labourers to work for the Compagnie Francaise des Phosphates de L'Oceanie was approved. One ship- ment left in the month of May.

The whole of this South Sea Island emigration has been carried out through the agency of Messrs. Gibb, Livingston & Co., to whom is due an acknowledgment of their courtesy and readiness to meet the requirements of the Asiatic Emigration Ordinance.

(e.) Deli, Sumatra.-As the result of an application from the Deli Planters Association arrangements have been made for a regular flow of assisted labour to this port. This emigration, which, until his regrettable decease, was managed by Mr. Van Yzeren, promises in every way to uphold the good traditions of assisted emigration to the Dutch East Indies. The men are recruit- ed from the Hoklo districts round Swatow, and efforts have been made, with considerable success, to induce wives to follow their husbands abroad. The first shipment for Deli left in the late

autumn.

Owing to the scarcity of direct ships from Hongkong to Deli, these men are sometimes sent in British ships as far as Singapore, where, arrangements have been made for their transhipment.

(f.) Cuba.-The relaxation of the restriction on Chinese im- migration into Cuba, so as to enable the Cuban Government to discharge its obligations under the International Sugar Convention led to a rush of Chinese emigrants to Cuba. The Secretary of State has ruled that apart from old emigrants returning to Cuba, such emigration could not be permitted without the sanction of the Governments of China and Cuba. In the absence of any efforts on the part of the Government of Cuba to put the emigration on a regular footing the position is still unsatisfactory.

14. The total number of free emigrants to the Fiji Islands, who passed through this office was 42. They went in small parties at irregular intervals.

15. Fifteen (15) decrepits were returned from Singapore, one died at sea: the rest were sent back to their homes by the Tung Wah Hospital. Two of these men were blind, and had to be sent away under escort. An arrangement has now been made by which the expenses of sending these repatriates to their homes are paid through the Singapore Advance Account with the Treasury in Hongkong.

(b.) Twenty-three (23) decrepits, of whom three died on the voyage were sent back to Hongkong from Penang. 14 of these were provided with through tickets to Amoy and Swatow and were seen off to their destinations. Of the remainder one died in the Tung Wah Hospital, and 5 were sent to their homes by the Tung Wah Hospital. The expenses incurred were debited to the account of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, Penang, with this office.

16. One hundred and seventy-eight (178) decrepits and destitutes were repatriated from British North Borneo as compared with 189 in 1919. Of these two died on the voyage, while the remainder were sent to their homes by the Tung Wah Hospital. The expenses incurred were refunded by Messrs. Gibb, Livingston & Co., the agents in Hongkong of the British North Borneo Co.

17.-(a.) Two hundred and seventy four (274) assisted emigrants, rejected by the Medical Officer, were repatriated from Banca, as compared with 108 in 1919. Five of these went away unassisted, while the remainder were sent to their homes by the Tung Wah Hospital at the expense of the Holland China Trading Company by whom they were recruited.

(b). Sixty-two (62) assisted emigrants, rejected by the Medical Officer, were repatriated from Balik Papan. With the exception of eight (8) who went away unassisted all were sent to their homes by the Tung Wah Hospital at the expense of the Holland China Trad- ing Company by whom they had been recruited.

(c). Three decrepits who had returned from Deli (Sumatra) appeared at this office in a destitute condition, and requested passages to their homes. They were dealt with by the Tung Wah Hospital and the expenses incurred refunded by the Consul- General for the Netherlands Indies in Hongkong, with whom an arrangement has since been made to repatriate such men on a regular system.

Owing to increases in the cost of living and to troubles in the interior, amounts paid in respect of these repatriated persons have in some cases been increased.

18. Ten (10) applications for the redemption of assisted coolies were received as compared with six (6) in 1919.

(a.) Banka.-Three (3) applications were received, and all the men were repatriated and handed back to their relatives.

A request was received to forward a letter to an assisted emigrant in Banka, asking him to return to China at the expiration of his contract. The man was traced and the letter delivered.

(b.) Balik Papan.--Two (2) applications were received, one of the men concerned has returned, and the other case was still under consideration at the end of the year. These are the first applica- tions received for redemption from Balik Papan.

The assisted Emigration to Banca and Balik Papan is managed by the Holland China Trading Company, to whose prompt action the parties concerned in these cases are indebted.

C 6

(c) Billiton-Two applications were .received and both the men concerned repatriated. In the second case, owing to a mistake in the indentification of the photographs, the wrong man was recovered. He was sent to his home and the expenses of redemp- tion were paid by the applicants.

These cases are the first applications for redemption from Billiton, and the dispatch with which they were dealt by the Netherlands India Commercial Bank should assist in strengthening the existing good reputation of the Billiton Emigration.

The

(d) British North Borneo.--Two (2) applications were received. One man was repatriated and handed back to his relatives. second case was still under consideration at the end of the year.

(e) Christmas Island.-One application was received and the man concerned repatriated. The general question of expenses of redemption from this port has not yet been settled.

19. Eight passage brokers' licences at $200 each were issued under the Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

20. Classification of Assisted Emigrants by the language spoken gives the following figures:-

Cantonese,

Hakka,

Hoklo,

Southern Mandarin (mostly from

Kwong Sai and Hunan)

Total

8,807

6,035

679

1,082

16,699

THE BOARDING HOUSE ORDINANCE.

No 23 of 1917.

21. Under this Ordinance Chinese Boarding Houses are divided into seven classes for the purpose of licensing and regulation.

22. Class I, Chinese Hotels.-These are run very much on the lines of European Hotels; and are licensed for the sale of alcohol. There are only two houses of this class in the Colony the Great Eastern and the Stag. Both applied for and were granted fresh licenses after October 31st.

23. Class II, First Class Hak U.-These are large boarding houses, which cater principally for independent emigration and interport passenger business. During the year only one new house of this class, the Nam King, was opened. At the end of the year there were 18 houses, all of which had renewed their licenses. The lawful accommodation provided by these 18 houses is 2,850, as against the figure 2,688 for the 17 houses of the year 1919.

24 Class III; Second Class Hak U-These are small boarding houses for independent emigrants. During the year one boarding house of this class was closed and two new houses were opened.

C 7

At the end of the year there were 21 of these houses with lawful accommodation for 1,396 persons, as compared with the figure 1,349 provided by the 20 houses of 1919. All the old boarding houses had renewed their licenses before the end of the year.

These three classes of houses have done good business during the year owing to the great increase in emigration. This increase is to be accounted for y the reduced passage rates, the fall in the rate of exchange and the internal troubles of the Kwongtung Province.

25. Class IV, Boarding Houses for Assisted Emigrants.— These are mainly used by assisted emigrants, who may not, while staying in Hongkong, be lodged in any other place. During the year nine houses of this class were closed, and seven newly opened. These latter were not opened as houses for assisted emigrants in general, but to deal with assisted emigration to particular places. When the emigration in question was finished these houses were closed. At the end of the year there were 12 houses with accom- modation for 673 persons, as compared with 14 houses with accommodation for 1,055 persons at the end of 1919. All the 12 existing houses had taken out new licences before the end of the year.

During the year 6 licenses for the transfer of names of licensees, for the removal of premises and for additions to floors were issued to Boarding Houses of Classes II, III, and IV.

26. Class V, Ku Li Kun. (lodging houses for coolies).---407 licences were issued as against 764 in 1919; of these 364 were renewed at the end of the year as against 619 in 1919.

27. Class VI, Ku Kung Ngoi U (lodging houses for em- ployees of firms).--349 licences were issued as against 398 in 1919; of these 259 were renewed at the end of the year as against 294 in 1919. Five licences were issued for transfer of name of licensee or for removal of premises; the figure was also five in 1919. 23 houses were closed as against 18 in 1919. No Convictions were obtained against houses of this class (in 1919 there were two).

28. Class VII, Hang Shun Kun (residential clubs for seamen).-107 licences were issued as against 111 in 1919; of these 106 were renewed at the end of the year as against 103 in 1919. 11 licences were issued for transfer of name of licensee or for removal of premises as against 8 in 1919. 8 houses were closed (there were none in 1919). One conviction was obtained against houses of this class (in 1919 there were none).

REGULATION OF CHINESE.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

(i.) -REGISTRATION OF HOUSEHOLDERS.

29. One thousand four hundred and thirty (1,430) householders were registered as against 1,394 in 1919; of these 297 were first registration as against 187 in 1919. 9,545 changes of tenancy were also notified for registration as against 8,957 in 1919.

1

C 8

30. The number of Chinese business men in Victoria and Kow- loon offering themselves as sureties to Government Departments and reported on by this office was 1,176 as against 1,410 in 1919.

31. Two non-resident householders were required to enter into a bond; as against one in 1919. 39 certified extracts from the Registers were issued as against 48 in 1919. One duplicate Householder's Certificate was issued as against two in 1919; while 24 Householders' Removal Certificates were issued as against 18 in 1919.

(ii)-DISTRICT WATCHMEN.

(Table VI.)

32. The District Watchmen Committee met on 12 occasions the average attendance being 12. The loyal advice and assistance of this important Committee (which deals with every kind of question affecting the Chinese Community) continues to be of the greatest value to the Government.

Sir Boshan Wei Yuk was appointed adviser (Ku Mán).

33. Messrs Tong Lai-chun and Chau Siu-ki's terms of 5 years expired and they were reappointed by His Excellency the Governor for a further period of 5 years.

The two vacancies caused by the resignation of Mr. Chan Lok- chun and the death of Mr. Chan Kai-ming were filled by the appointment of Messrs. Fung Ping-shan and Tse Yam-chi.

During 1920 the two members selected from the retiring Committees of the Tung Wah Hospital and the Po Leung Kuk, who hold their appointments for one year, were Messrs. To Sz-tun and Wong Iu-tung, vice Messrs. Fung Ping-shan and Choy Hing whose terms had expired.

34. The balance to the credit of the District Watchmen Fund at the end of the year was $28,875 as compared with $34,208 on January 1st, the expenditure thus exceeding the income by $5,333. $28,000 of the balance is invested in Hongkong 6% War Loan, and the remainder $875 deposited in the Colonial Treasury.

35. The total strength of the District Watchmen Force at the end of the year was 102: the same number as on January 1st. The approved strength is 102. There were 17 vacancies during the

year; of which 7 were caused by dismissals or desertions.

36. The number of convictions secured by members of the force was 426 as compared with 164 in 1919 and 172 in 1918.

37. The Detective Staff now numbers 20 as compared with 23 in 1919. Police Sub-Inspector Murphy was in charge of the District Watchmen detective staff. His work has had the effect of inspiring the men to greater energy, and of fostering co-operation with the Regular detectives; and its value is only in part reflected in the very marked increase in convictions secured during the year.

C 9

(iii.)-PERMITS.

38. Seven hundred and thirty-one (731) permits to fire crackers were issued as against 691 in 1919 and of these 537 were on the occasion of marriage.

39. Other permits issued were 23 for religious ceremonies and 5 for processions. 247 permits were issued for theatricals, 210 of which performances were held in permanent, and 37 in tempor- ary buildings.

MARRIAGES.

Ordinance No. 7 of 1875 and No. 6 of 1903.

40. The number of marriages solemnised during the year was 160 as compared with 142 in 1919. The number contracted at the Registrar's Office was 28. In 1919 it was 15.

CERTIFICATES OF IDENTITY TO CHINESE ENTERING

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

41. 17 certificates were issued to Chinese to enter the United States of America as against 13 in 1919 and 1 to enter the Philippine Islands (there were none in 1919).

These certificates are limited to Chinese British Subject resident in Hongkong.

BRITISH BORN SUBJECT CERTIFICATES.

42. There were sixteen applications for these certificates, eight of which were granted and certificates issued; six were refused and in two cases where the applicants were away from the Colony, the certificates were not yet issued although the applications had been granted.

There were three applications for naturalisation; all of which 、 · were refused.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

43. Thirty-five books were registered during the year as com- pared with twenty-nine in 1919.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

Ordinance No. 1 of 1870 No. 9 of 1904 and No. 10 of 1908. (Man Mo Temple.)

(Tables VII to XII.)

44. The following gentlemen were elected to form the Com- mittee for 1921 :-

Li Yik-mui,

Wong Kwong-tin, Li Sing-kui, Wong Wood-chuen, Chan Ping-ue, Li Ying-cho, Chu Yik-tung,

Ma Yuk-chun, Li Cho-shan, Lam Tak-chau, Li Shiu-ching, Chan Shu-kai, Kwok Mok-yuen, Tong Shiu-lun.

C 10

K

45. During the year the Tung Wah Hospital celebrated the 50th anniversary of its foundation. It is no exaggeration to say that the Tung Wah Hospital of Hongkong is now well known in every part of the world in which there is a Chinese community and during the year the Committee under the able Chairmanship of Mr. Li Wing-kwong raised a large sum of money to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Hospital.

On October 4 His Excellency the Governor laid the foundation stone of the new wing to the Hospital which the Committee had decided to build to celebrate the occasion.

The extension of the free school accommodation referred to in the last Annual Report has now been carried out and on December 1st the new school was opened by the Governor under the title of the Chung Wa School." It is this building which accounts for the large increase in the expenditure of the Man Mo Temple during the year.

46. The expenditure was $201,775 as compared with $180,482 in 1919 and $99,126 in 1918. Last year's figure includes special items of $17.002 for the purchase of property and $20,000 for the construction of a new wing to the Hospital. The rise in the cost of living has also been responsible for increases in other items, such as salaries and wages.

The daily average of expenditure was thus $552.81 as against $470.00 in 1919.

The total income was $177,491 as against $179,909 in 1919; and the year's working shewed a loss of $24,284.

47. The following items on the receipt side show increases: ---

Rent of Hospital property,

Interest,

Payment for medicines, sale of kitchen refuse,

and rent of mortuary and sundries, ...

Increases.

$5,759

2,874

2,828

48. The total number of in-patients admitted during 1920 was 7,129 as compared with 6,726 in 1919 and 6,239 in 1918. Of these 3,649 or 5118% as against 43.8% in 1919 elected to be treated by European methods.

The out-patients numbered 148,589 as against 140,271 in 1919 (129,769 in 1918) and of these 22,643 or 15·24% (as against 15% in 1919) chose European treatment.

49. The number of surgical operations performed was 311 as compared with 226 in 1919. There were also 98 eye operations performed as against 109 in 1919.

50. The number of destitutes temporarily housed and then sent to their homes was 901 (718 in 1919), most of whom were sent to the Hospital from this office.

51. Of the Charitable Funds managed by the Hospital the Man Mo Temple Fund (Table XI) shows an excess of expenditure over receipts of $12,930.99.

C 11

52. The balance sheet of the Brewin Charity as set out in (Table XII) shows that the income for the year exceeded the expenditure by $1,291.

The amount spent in gratuities and pensions was $4,028 as compared with $3,022 in 1919 and $2,177 in 1918.

$6,000 is invested in Hongkong 6% War Bonds.

KWONG WA HOSPITAL.

(Tables XIII and XIV.)

53. The work of the Hospital again shewed an increase during 1920. In all 4,104 patients were admitted (as against 3,212 in 1919) of whom 2,549 or 62% (as against 58% in 1919 and 48% in 1918) came under European treatment, while 1,555 elected to be treated by Chinese methods.

54. The total number of out-patients treated was 36,353 as against 35,392 in 1919 of these 28,518 elected to receive European treatment. This gives a percentage of 78'4 as against 70'6 in 1919 and 65.3 in 1918.

55. The total net expenditure of the Hospital for 1920 was $63,242 as against $42,663 in the previous Chinese year. Salaries and wages and food for patients show increases and the construction of the wards alone cost $17,160.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES AND PLAGUE HOSPITAL.

(Tables XV to XX.)

56. The total number of cases treated at the Dispensaries during the year was 137,891 compared with 124,586 in 1919. Of this total 75,449 were new, and 62,442 return cases.

57. The number of vaccinations performed was 6,121 as against 6,367 in 1919.

58. The total expenditure on the Dispensaries was $37,293 as compared with $36,806 in 1919.

59. The revenue of the Dispensaries, excluding the balance of $74,281 from 1919 and a grant of $4,000 by Government, amounted to $38,131 as compared with $38,278 in 1919.

60. Of the two Kowloon Dispensaries at Hunghom and Sham- shuipo the first shows an excess of expenditure over receipts of $399 and a decline in credit balance from $4,052 in 1919 to $3,654. The second shows an increase in its credit balance from $208 in 1919 to $4,240, due to the sale of new Kowloon Inland Lot No. 141, which realised $3,456.

61. The number of dead and dying infants brought to the Dispensaries was 1,340 as compared with 1,356 in 1919.

62. The number of infants under the age of five years brought in to be treated again shows a considerable increase, 18,843 being treated as against 16,238 in 1919.

63. 1,163 corpses were removed to hospital or mortuary as against 1,178 in 1919; 501 applications for coffins were received as against 528 in 1919; and there were 156 attendances at the cleans. ing of infected premises as against 572 in 1919.

Ċ 12

64. The Plague Hospitals in the Eastern and Western Districts and at Kowloon City report that no cases of any kind were admitted, whether plague or ordinary cases.

The Dispensaries Committee are again indebted to the authori- ties of the Alice Memorial Hospital for assistance in the mätter of the issue of medicines and drugs, and the regulations of the consumption.

65. The number of bodies considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the year was 685 as compared with 604 in 1919. The monthly figures varied from 56 in June to 43 in August. The percentage of these "dumpings" to the total number of Chinese deaths was 5'63, (Table XIX).

Of the 685 bodies abandoned 17 were taken to the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

66. Table XVIII compiled from statistics in the Sanitary Department shows the number of death certificates issued in propor- tion to the total number of Chinese deaths, and the number of cases in which post-mortem examination, were held.

67. The percentage of cases in which death was certified was 41 as compared with 48 in 1919.

The Maternity Hospital at Wanchai has dealt with 477 cases as against 194 in 1919.

The Committee wish to record their appreciation of the invalu- able assistance again given by Mrs. Hickling in this connection. To general advice and direction, Mrs. Hickling has added close personal supervision; and besides being available at emergencies has taken tours of duty during temporary shortages in the staff.

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY. (Table XXI.)

68. The balance increased from $10,282 in 1919 to $16,344. In 1918 the figure was $1,449.

69. TRANSLATION WORK DONE IN THE SECRETARIAT FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS DURING THE YEAR 1920.

Translation from Chinese

into English.

Translation from English into Chinese.

Petitions,

207

Ordinances,

0

Letters,..

... 118

Regulations,

60

Newspaper articles and

Government notices,... 146

30

items of news,

Minutes,

5

Unspecified,

229

Unspecified,

28

Total,

584

Total,

239

Grand total,

.....823

C 14-

75. The allocation of the Anual Grant of $25,000 to Local Chinese Charities was the same as last year viz :

Kwong Wa Hospital,

Sham Shui Po Chinese Public Dispensary, Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary,...

$20,000

3,000

2,000

$25,000

76. One of the most interesting and important developments of the year has been the rapid increase in the number of working men's societies, avowedly run on Western trade union lines, copy- ing trade union methods and using trade union phraseology. This increase is only partly due to the greater liberty given to such societies by the new ordinance, No. 8 of 1920: the chief encourage- ment came from the great fitters' and engineers' strike in April, conducted by the Chinese Engineers' Institute, whereby the men gained an increase of 32% on their former wages. This office throughout the strike acted as the intermediary between the employers and the men. A noteworthy feature was the almost entire absence of disorder and sabotage, or attempts at them.

Concurrently with this trade union development there has been a series of trade disputes, often developing into strikes. Fortunately most of them proved capable of settlement by agreement, and were undoubtedly due to a levelling up of wages resulting from the engineers' success. Generally the men demanded increased wages; in one or two cases shorter hours as well. In one case, in which the masters ended the strike by importing fresh men from up country, the dissatisfied men took the novel step of opening a shop and working on their own account.

The total number of new trade societies reported to this office since the repeal of the old Societies Ordinance up to the end of the year is as follows:-

Masters' Societies,

Men's societies (trade unions),

Masters' and men's joint societies (guilds),

STAFF.

Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

11

.. 31

.... 20

77. Mr. S. B. B. McElderry acted as Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs from 1st January to 11th August and Mr. W. Schofield acted from 12th August to 31st December. Third Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

78. No acting appointment was made during the year.

Higher Grade Clerk.

79. Mr. Leung Ping-fai retired on pension on 1st November. ·

S. B. C. Ross,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

14th May, 1921.

C 13 -

The total number of translations done by the Translator was thus 823 as against 715 in 1919, 617 in 1918, and 607 in 1917.

70. In addition, a large number of translations made in other Government Departments are sent to this office for revision. Much translation work is done by members of the staff other than the translator, but of this no record is kept.

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND. (Table XXII.)

71. The income from the stalls has decreased slightly, $3,223 as against $3,542 in 1919, and the balance has decreased from $13,164 to $4,479, due to the subscription $10,000 towards the cost of the construction of the Western Maternity Hospital.

PASSAGE MONEY FUND. (Table XXIII.)

72. The net income of the Fund was $477 and the total expenditure $916 compared with $345 and $679 last year.

NEW ORDINANCES.

73. The following Ordinances passed during the year has special reference to the Chinese :—

No. 8 of 1920: this repeals the Societies Ordinance No. 47 of 1911, which was found to be cumbrous and of very little use for the effective control of disorder by guilds and societies. It abolishes the registration system, and instead gives full discretion to the Governor in Council to declare any society unlawful which is used, or may be used for unlawful purposes, or purposes incompatible with peace and good order, or for promoting crime or disorder in China. It further gives the powers necessary for detection and suppression of such societies.

No. 12 of 1920: this further amends No. 4 of 1897 by the throwing upon defendants accused of harbouring girls under 21 the onus of proving their right to harbour such girls.

No. 13 of 1920: this is complementary to No. 8 of 1920, and aims at restraining acts of intimidation such as are commonly used by disorderly and illegal societies, especially threats of violence.

GENERAL.

74. Under the terms of the Deportation Ordinance (No. 25 of 1917) reports were furnished on 274 suspects arrested by the Police under warrants of detention. Of these suspects 52 were released and 222 banished. The number of reports furnished in 1919 was 366.

-.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1919 and 1920.

C 15

Heads of Revenue.

Details of Revenue.

Ordinance under which received.

Revenue in

1919.

Revenue in

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

$

C.

c.

$

Licences and Internal Revenue not other- wise specified,

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for Specific Purposes, and Reimburse- ments-in-aid,..

Interest,

Chinese Boarding House Licences, Marriage Licences,

Emigration Passage Brokers' Licences, Forfeitures,

Certificates to Chinese entering U.S.A., Householders' Registration,

};

Bond by Non-resident Householders,

Official Signatures,

Registration of Societies,

Interest accrued on official account,

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908. No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902.

12,583

*

11,723

*

860

*

No. 30 of 1915.

860

1,800

1.245.

385

1:450

350

No. 3 of 1898.

650

$75

225

No. 3 of 1888.

10

5

"

No. 14 of 1913.

128

100

28

"

No. 47 of 1911.

120

25

95.

.14

34

19

Miscellaneous,

Refunds, etc..

Other Miscellaneous

Receipts,

Permits for Firework Displays.

Total,.........$

21.430.72

4,949

2,253

2,695

320

290

30

18,007.65

635.90

4,058.97

635.90

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

Deduct Increase,

Total Decrease in 1920,

3,423.07

J

:

€ 16

Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

since 1911.

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Year.

Total.

Decrease. Increase. Total.

Decrease. Increase.

Percent- age of Expen- diture to Revenue.

C.

C.

0.

es

C.

et

%

1911,

1912,

1913,

.....

14,518.19 973.93

14,257.54 260.65

10,645.58 3,611.96

49,217.74

:

6,754.93 339.01

45,521.01 3,696.53

41,674.04 3.846.97

319-28

391.47

1914,

7,258.10 3.387.48

51,178.04

9,504.00 705-12

-

1915, ..

5,072.07 2,186.03

53,188.73

2,010.69 1,048.66

1916,

9,236.95

4,164.88

54.966.19

1.777.46 595-07

1917,

11,370.52

*

2,133.57 | 51,867.18 3,099.01

456'15

1918,

26,678.50

15,307.98 50,117.67

1,749.51

187.86

1019,

21,430.72

5,247.78

52,634.57

2,516.90 245-60

1920,... 18,007.65

635.90 57,716.27

5,081.70 320-51

Table III.

— °C 17 -

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

Permitted to leave,

Permitted to leave under bond,

Under Detention on 1st January, 1920.

Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants.

2

Detained during 1920.

Total.

Total.

Restored to husband,

Restored to relatives,

2

~::~

56

56

58

...

1

1

1

2

2

2

4

Sent to native place,

$

13

1

14

14

...

Married,..

...

1

1

1

1

2

Adopted,

...

Sent to Refuge or Convent,.. Died,

1

2

1

1

...

4

...

...

Awaiting marriage,

1

Cases under consideration,

...

Total,

5

2

1

8

80

5

85

92

Cases brought forward, 7.

Cases dealt with during the year, 83.

Cases carried forward, 9.

Table IV.

Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under "The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1913," during the year 1920.

0.18

Women and Children, 1920.

Total

Women

Whither Bound.

and

Children,

Women.

Girls.

Boys.

Total.

1919.

Burmah,

Japan,

35

4

14

53

71

22

20

113

78

Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States,

11,391

1,440

3,431

16,262

5,232

Dutch Indies,

837

134

616

1,587

1,279

Borneo,

289

72

164

525

462

Honolulu,

37

13

38

88

46

Central America,

21

6

27

14

Canada,

7

1

1,001

1,009

275

United States of America,

49

9

311

369

323

Mexico,

9

14

9

South America,

24

Mauritius,

135

Australia,

31

India,

65

23

Africa,..

3

24782

52

78

76

112

252

65

108

146

41

27

115

53

9

14

33

Cuba,

36

36

37

Samoa,

2

2

Fiji Islands,

6.

Siam,

516

Total, 1920,..

13,002

1,734

5,954

20,690

Total, 1919,

5,442

650

2,458

8,550

8,550

Ċ 19

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Year. Examined. Passed.

Un- willing. S.C.A.

Rejected at

Rejected by

Total

Percentage

of

rejected. Doctor.

as unfit.

rejection.

1918,

9,433 6,667

277

10

37

324

343

1919,

1920,

13,875 12,236

89

32

124

.89

16,699 14,753

104

12

45

161

.96

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1920.

Sent home through Tung Wah Hospital at expense

of Boarding Houses,.

Sent away without help,........

Sent back to boarding houses to be cured out of the

number rejected by doctor,.......

145

Total rejected,...........................................

161

Native Districts of Assisted Emigrants.

West River,

East River,.

North River,

Cauton,....

Delta,

Kwong Sai,

Southern Districts,

1,549

5,722

271

2,569

1,360

1,857

876

Mandarin, (Hunan, Kwong Sai and Kiang Si),

549

Total,..........................

.... 14,753

}

:

Ć 20

Table V,-Continued.

Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.

Whither bound.

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1919.

1920.

Straits Settlements and F.M.S.,

470

British North Borneo,

1,353

1,784

Dutch Indies :-

Banka,...

4,660

5,170

Billiton,

5,786

3,551

Balikpapan,

356

1,847

Australia,.

81

Deli,

216

British Solomon Island,.

3

...

India,..

46

...

Samoa,..

539

Ocean Island,

369

Nauru,...

414

Makatea,

344

Total,

12,236

14,753

·

1.

1

*

-C 21

Table VI.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hongkong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1920.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

*

#f

To Balance,

34,208

By Wages and Salaries :-

Contributions,

30,094

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

2,721

men,

2,167

Detectives,

5,902

Grant by Government,.

2,000

1st Class District Watchmen,...10,080

Payment for District Watchmen for

Special Services,.....

2nd 3rd

33

""

3,267

""

"

...

1,111

25,250

501

""

Fines,.....

11

Miscellaneous :--

Cooks,..

Interest on Hongkong Government

6% War Loan,

Coolies,

Messengers,

1,680

768

600

79

1,447

Interest on Current Account,

57

>>

Office Staff:-

Manager,

90

وو

Rent from Mr. Lo Sau-shan for per- mission to erect the iron gate on I. L. No. 680, for 1920,......

Writer,

132

Interpreters, Clerk.

714

33

Collector,

576

1,545

Condemned Store,

27

">

Total,.

28,243

"

Advanced from Passage Money Fund

for Expenses,

500

"

Other Charges:-

Allowance to Detectives,

1,602

Medal Allowance,

1,225

Instructor Allowance,

96

Oil Allowance,

128

Kerosine Allowance,

130

Conservancy Allowance,.

55

Coolie Hire and Conveyance

Allowance,.

639

Clothing Allowance for Detec-

tives,

110

Uniform and Equipment,

1,565

Rice Allowance to D.W. etc.,

642

Stationery and Printing,

289

Furniture,

554

Repairs and Fittings to D.W.

Stations,

1,946

Premium on Fire Policies,

268

Rent of Telephone,

190

Crown Rent,

16

Gratuity and Reward,

755

Electricity,..

74

Photographs for District Watch-

men,.

Sundries,

9

258

10,556

Pensions :-

4 Ex. Chief District Watchmen, and 3

others,......

1,405

Total Expenditure,......

40,205.08

Balance,

28,875.82

Total,

69,080.90

Total,....... .$ 69,080.90

Balance in Colonial Treasury :-

In Hongkong Government 6% War Loan,.. $28,000.00 Cash,....

Total,.......

875.82

.$28,875.82

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

*

Patients.

Table VII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1920.

Admitted.

Out-patients.

Total.

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought

to Hospital Mortuary

for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

Male,

Female,

191 2,681 2,247 4,928 5,119 3,585 1,297 237 78,352 13,013 91,365 1,256 986 71 799 1,402 2,201 2,272 1,657 522 93 47,594 9,630| 57,224

901

546

...

:

Total,....

262 3,480 3,649 7,129 7,391 5,242 1,819

330 125,946 22,643 148,589 1,256 1,532 901

Total for 1919,

276 3,770 2,956 6,726 7,002 4,838 1,903

262 119,322 20,949 140,271 1511,494 718

-C 22-

C 23

Table VIII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wa Hospital for the Year 1920.

Amount.

Payments.

Receipts.

Amount.

2,163

28,392

8,000

*

**

$

*

Balance brought forward from account

1919,

To rent of Hospital property,

To Subscriptions:-

By Food for Staff,

65,226

""

Salaries and wages,

10,429 24,938

,,

Sick room expenses,.

6,978

:

56,406

"

Patients' food, etc.,

16,639

"}

Chinese drugs,

20,559

European drugs,

8,952

Light,....

3,761

>>

1. Annual Subscriptions of Hongs,

11,239

""

Passage money

to patients and

destitutes,

400

2. Subscriptions collected on Steamers,

3,126,

33

Repairs,..

5,865

""

Repairs to Hospital property,

1,361

3.

and Donations,

3,286

Insurance,

705

"

"

Crown Rent, rates and taxes,

7,857

1.

5.

99

from wealthy persons,

6,160

29

from

Directors, and

""

past Directors,

2,416

6.

"

for the supply of

medicines, quilted clothing, coffins,

and shrouds,

To Government Grant,

པསྤུ:;:

Stationery, Telegrams, Stamps, and

Advertisements,

Sundries and bonus,

Expenses for Small-pox Hospital, for Mortuary,

">

Construction of the New Wing, Purchase of Hospital Property, Subscription to the Kwong Wa

Hospital and the Fong Pin Hospital,

,, Burial of bodies from Government

Mortuary, (Victoria),

::

1,406

3,065

1,411

...

446 20,000 17,002

3,000

3,227

"

Grant from Man Mo Temple,

Interest,

**

2,500

Coffins for bodies from Government

Mortuary, (Victoria),.

4,148

22,061

Burial of bodies by Tung Wa Hos-

pital,

2,319

Contribution towards Mortuary ex-

penses,...

""

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung

2,252

Wa Hospital, and coffins sup- plied to steamers,

3,960

""

"

from Hung Shing Temple,

:

14,356

13,654

77

29

from Kwong Fuk Temple,

18,338

""

Surgical instruments,

735

Premium on notes, and discount on

**

""

Erection of the "Chung Wa School'

32,600

goods purchased,

719

Payment for medicines, sale of kitchen

refuse, and rent of Mortuary and Sundries,

Total,...

201,775

16,279

Fees from Patients,

1,666

Interest yielded by Hongkong War

Loan Bonds,

3,000

""

Balance,..

:

40,942

Contribution from the Ko Shing and

Kau U Fong Theatres,

3,519

Grand Total,..

$ 242,717.74

Grand Total,...

$242,717.74

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

-C24

Table IX.

Statement of Assets of the Tung Wa Hospital on the 31st December, 1920.

Assets.

Amount.

$

By Balance...

22

40,942

House Property (original value)

2 houses in Bonham Strand and

Jervois Street,

10,400

1 house in Wing Lok Street (includ-

ing cost of additions to building),. 10 houses in Aberdeen Street and Tung Wa Lane (including cost of additions to buildings),

8,108

14,900

3 houses in Connaught Road and

Des Voeux Road,

17,386

7 houses in Queen's Road West

(including cost of additions to building),

30,363

2 houses in Bonham Strand West,

26,000

3 houses in Bonham Strand,

15,000

10 houses in Po Yan Street and New

Street (at present used as Plague Hospital),

54,697

1 house in Des Voeux Road West,... 32,859

Total.....

209,713

$250,655.47

Subscriptions not yet paid :-

From Hongs,............

$2,000

Individuals,

1,000

>>

$3,000

Cents omitted except in the totals.

і

Receipts.

Table X.

Emergency Fund Account, 1920.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

*

140

30

15

57,193

Total,.

57,378.72

Balance from account 1919.

€6,033

Boat-hire to 63 destitutes, Gratuity to Ko Wo,.....

Interest,

1,344

Gratuity to Leung Cheung, Balance,

Total,.

57,378.72

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

Č 25

-*

Receipts.

Table XI.

Man Mo Temple Fund Account, 1920.

Amount.

$

Payments.

Amount.

*

Balance from 1919.

9,449

Tung Wa Hospital,

2,500

Temple Keeper,..

5,686

Free Schools and sundries,

9,752

Rent of Temple property,

9,758

Repairs to Temple property and free schools,

1,108

Refund of Police rates for the free schools,

109

Police Rates, Crown Rent, and Insurance

Refund of Crown Rent,

19

Premium,

1,487

Deposits by Kwai Kee,

100

Refund of Deposits,

50

Grant in Aid from the Education Department,..

2,228

Refund by Tung Wa Hospital,.

32,600

Repair to water taps in front of Temple,... Construction of the Chung Wa School,

27

48,433

Loan from Tung Wa Hospital,

3,481

Advertisement,

Balance,

75

Total,...

$

63,433

Total,.....

..$

63,433

* Cents omitted

except in the totals.

Ở 26

Table XII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity during the year 1920.

Revenue.

Amount

Expenditure.

Amount.

*

$

To Balance from 1919,

15,896

>>

By Charity given to widows and orphans, Photographs,

Rent from shop property in Temple Street,.

5,182

"}

Police rates paid for Temple. Street property,.

4,028

4

560

" Subscriptions,

685

"

>>

Crown Rent for Temple Street property, Insurance for the above property,

103

525

Interest on deposits with H. & S. B. C.,

54

""

Salary of rent collector Mr. Leung Fuk- chi from January to November,

220

""

War Bonds purchased from

the above bank,

360

>>

A

??

Commission on Insurance for Temple Street property,

262

""

""

Interest on War Bonds through Union Insurance Society,

""

Salary of accountant Mr. Chan Yik-wan, Repairs to Temple Street property,.. Fares for launch and tram car for rent collector,...

Stamps, receipts, and printed matters, and court fees,

Sundries,

100

104

4

20

4

247

Lime washing Temple Street property,

125

Balance,

17,188

""

,, Deposit by girl Lau Biu of Po Leung Kuk,

300

22,989.20

Grand Total,

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

22,989.20

Grand Total,..

† By Deposits with Tung Wa Hospital,. .$ 194.92

>>

19

""

H. & S. B. C.,.

"}

War Bonds,..

"}

""

99

bought from Union Insur-

3,000.00

6,000.00

ance Society of Canton, Ltd.,................................ 5,000.00 Current account with H. & S. B. C................. 2,993.34

$17,188.26

C 27-

Patients.

Male, .

Table XIII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wa Hospital during the year 1920.

on 31st December, 1919.

Remaining in Hospital

Chinese Treatment.

European Treatment.

Total.

Admitted.

Total Number of pa-

tients under treatment.

Discharged.

Deaths.

Remaining in Hospital | on 31st December, 1919.]

Chinese Treatment.

European Treatment.

Total.

Out-patients.

134 1,191 1,487 2,678 2,812 1,953

733

126

66 364 1,062 1,426 1,492 | 1,040

383

69

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

5,216 13,681 18,897

2,619 14,837 17,456

:

:

148

94

Total,..

200

1,555 2,549 4,104 4,304 2,993 1,116 195

7,835 28,518 36,353

242

Female,

Total for 1918, 156

1,348 | 1,864 | 3,212 3,308 2,210 958 200

10,392 10,392 25,000 35,392

245

:

:..

-C 28-mont

...

C 29

Table XIV.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Kwong Wa Hospital for 1920.

Receipts.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

Balance brought forward from

1919,

706

Refund of loan to Tung Wa

Hospital,

47,872

Government Grant,

8,500

Salaries and wages,

11,332

""

Special Donation,...

20,000

Food supply to staff,

3,836

Loan from Tung Wa Hospital,..

54,557

Sundries,

Subscriptions from charitable

Patients' food, &c.,

773 10,014

persous,

1,952

Sick room expenses,,

3,121

Subscriptions from Ko Shing

Charcoal,

374

and Tai Ping Theatres,

1,950

Chinese drugs,

2,837

Contribution from Mr. Chau

Western drugs,

8,199

Kang U,

6,036

Lights,

902

Contributions from Wa Fong and

Stationery, stamps, and adver-

Tai Wo, photographers,...

600

tisements,

867

Contributions from Tung Wa

Repairs and furniture,

275

Hospital,

2,000

Water Rates,.

15

Contributions from Chinese

Telephone,

45

Public Dispensaries,

5,389

Coffins,

2,618

Contributions from Po Hing

Grave stones,

141

Theatre,.

858

Burial of bodies,

379

Contributions Temple,

from Tin Hau

from Yaumati

??

""

7,113

Mortuary,

322

Refund from in-patients for treat-

Construction of wards,

17,160

ment and medicine,........................

1,148

Sundries of the Small-Pox

Refund from sale of medicine to

out-patients,

212

Hospital, Cash in hand,

509

6299

22

Premium on notes,

161

Sale of kitchen refuse and

sundries,

287

Rent of Small Pox Hospital,..

150

Grand Total,.....

..$111,624.18

Grand Total,...$111,624.18

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 30

Table XV.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan, and Kowloon Peninsula.

Description.

Grand Grand

Total.

Total

Total

1920.

1919.

New Cases,.....

Return Cases,

75,449 62,442

...

Total,........

137,891 124,586

Certificates of nature of disease issued,

""

cause of death,..

Patients removed to hospital by ambulance,... Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,...... Attendances at cleansing of infected premises, Compensation claims sent in,

Applications received for coffins,

27

for midwives,

Confinement cases in Maternity Hospital,

Infants brought to Dispensaries, (alive),

29

342

342

407

510

1,163

1,178

156

572

9

37

501

528

226

189

477

194

29

""

""

"

(dead),.

1,311

...

Total,..

1,340

1,356

Vaccinations at private houses,

""

Dispensaries,

79 6,042

Total,.

6,121

6,367

¿

· Table XVI.

Chinese Public Dispensaries: Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1920.

Receipts.

*9

$

Expenditure.

To Balance,

77

Grant from the Government,

74,281

Maintenance of Dispensaries, Victoria, 23,505

4,000

""

>>

Dispensary, Harbour

and Yaumati, 5,309

Donation from :-

Tai Ping Theatre,

4,350

>>

"

Shaukiwan, 4,527

99

"?

*

71

Wo Ping Theatre,

San Theatre,

Ko Shing Theatre,..

Subscriptions, Land,..

1,975

1,349

"

225

[17,743

Harbour,

8,729

,, Kowloon City, 3,950

Crown Rent, Printing, etc., for Proposed Maternity Hospital, Western ......

37,293

Shankiwan,

2,406

Kowloon City,

1,353

Balance in Colonial Treasury :--

38,131

77

Fees from Maternity Hospital in C.P.D. at Wanchai (for 1919)

343

7)

Fees from Maternity Hospital in C.P.D. at Wanchai (for 1920)

903

1,247

Interest,

99

448

On Hongkong Government 6% War Loan,

In Cash,

Advance to :

51,000.

|33,520

Interest on Hongkong Government

6% War Loan

3,060

Dispensaries Clerks,

120

9)

Rent of house No. 3 Aberdeen Street,

1,272

Alice Memorial Hospital for purchase of drugs,

500;

85,140

Total,......

122,440. 05

Total,.

$122,440. 05

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

*

C 31

Ć 32

Table XVII.

Hunghom and Shamshuipo Dispensaries.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1920.

Description.

Hung- hom.

Sham- shuipo.

Receipts :-

Balance,....

4,052

208

Subscriptions, etc.,

2,552

887

Donations from :-

Po Hing Theatre,

Kún Yam Temple,

:

Scavenging Contractor at Hunghom,

Sale of New Kowloon I. L. No. 141,....

Grant from Government,.

Expenditure:-

Total,

*

442

600

550

3,456

3,000

$8,196.97 7,552.02

Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,

1,914

2,220

By Local Committee,

2,629 1,092

Total,

.$ 4,543.43 3,312.48

Balance :-

At Colonial Treasury,

With Local Committee,

Overdrawn by Local Committee.............

Total,

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

1,151

4,257

2,502

17

3,653.544,239.54

M

Number of deaths.

Number certified.

Table XVIII.

Deaths of Chinese in Hongkong and Kowloon during 1920 showing number in which the cause of death was duly certified and number in which a post-mortem examination was held.

1

2

CO

7

uncertified.

Number

Victoria,

8,192

3,464

4,728

42.3

712

8.7

3,840

46.1

Harbour,

900

271

629

30.1

78

8.7

132

14.7

Kowloon,.

2,728

1,202

1,526

44.1

114

4.2

1,110

40.7

Shaukiwan,

208

28

180

13.5

25

12:0

49

23.5

Other Villages in Hongkong,

123

23

100

18.6

2

1.6

14

11.4

Total,....

12,151

4,988

7,163

41.0

931

7.7

5,145

42.3

Percentage of

3 to 2.

Number examined after death and not

sent to mortuary.

Percentage of

6 to 2.

mortuary.

Number sent to

Percentage of

8 to 2.

C 33

9

..

Table XIX.

Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the yeaàr 1920.

Victoria.

Month.

Harbour. Kowloon.

West.

Central. East. Total.

Hongkong outside Victoria.

New Territories.

Grand

Total.

Total.

Ĉ 34 -

14

14

10

16.

8

18

16

9

15

6

6

13

...

10

6

4

7

6

VOPLÝNT GATE

38

42

17

40

5

18

22

67139

17

1

24

62

34

2

53

95

40

4

51

91

15

1

19

3.7

22

2

33

55

29

8

18

27

56

10

10

16

3

29

39

17

6

18

2

26

43

13

12

21

33

46

13

10

21

4

35

48

21

5

21

4

30

51

17

5

28

12

45

62

94

82

104

280

98

271

35

I

405

685 *

84

6,1

86

231

115

218.

40

:

373

604 †

January,

February,

March,..

April,

May,

Jume,

July,

August,

September,

Oetober,

November,

December,

Grand Total,

Total for 1919,

* In 1920, of 685, 17 were taken to. Chinese Public Dispensaries. † In 1919, of 604, 30 were taken to Chinese. Public Dispensaries.

C 35

Table XX.

Return of Bodies abandoned during the years 1918, 1919, and 1920.

(Figures supplied by the Police Department.)

Male.

1918.

Female.

Unknown.

Victoria,

Kowloon,.... Harbour, Elsewhere,

Over

15 years.

15 years

7696

and under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

and under.

and under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

192

170

214

2

156

55

}

41

28

22

:610-

Total.

369

380

111

57

Total,

23

489

3

389

1

12

917

1919.

Victoria,

1

108

89

Kowloon,.....

120

92

Harbour,

4

58

Elsewhere,

24

****

48

14

Total,

10

5

310

2

243

1920.

Victoria,

1

140

115

Kowloon,..

142

126

Harbour,

2

54

37

Elsewhere,

20

16

Total,

:

6 3 10

:

201

217

115

38

14

574

734

263

271

98

36

فت

3

356

1

294

14

668

Receipts.

Table XXI.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1920.

C.

Payments.

$

To Balance,

Interest from Shanghai Bank,

43.53

"

""

Tai San Bank,...)

193.20

""

H. K. War Loan

"

35

"

""

Bonds,

480.00

>>

37

">

War Savings

""

Bonds,

6.16

99

10,282.67 | By Rent of Telephone,

""

Flowers and trees,..

Wages of Hui Yung & Ma Shu Hoi,

Flower Pots from Tsun Lung Shang, Hoes & scythes from Ki Lee,

Fences & drains by Hui Lit,

90.70

29.00

851.00

Brooms by Hui Yung,

3.00

19.90

6.75

75.60

55

War Savings Bonds,

Charges for filling up graves from Messrs. Ip Lan Tsun & S. W. Tso,

114.54

19

50 Stone slabs,

20.00

39

3,000 catties of pond-earth from Tsui Kun,

30.00

""

Rain hats, bamboo wares, etc., by A Kwan,

19.80

.....

160.00

""

Construction of water fountain by I Shun Hin Kee,.

2,000.00

Balance for the erection of Water Fountain,.

??

1,453.95

""

Fee for Mr. Little for the plan of water fountain,.. 3 water cans & repairs from Lan Yau Kee,

546.00

1

6.50

Subscription by the H. K.

""

Oiled coats, hats, etc.

16.90

36

Whampoa Dock Co. for the

""

Labour for cutting grass,

102.30

erection of the Water

""

Manure, etc.,

9.75

Fountain,

";

Sale of 104 lots,

Stone Embankment,

1,500.00

4,480.00

1,540.00

""

2 water cases & labour for removing earth, etc.,

36.82

Stamps & fees for re-assignment of War Savings Bonds,.. Printed matters from Shing Fat, Hung Wo Po & Wo Shing,

5.20

8.30

37

"1

Stamps,

9.00

Crown Rent & Wharf rent,

2.00

"

Rates for getting water from river,

1.00

"" Balance,

16,344.53

>>

*Total,

.$ 20,254.05

Total,.

$20,254.05

By deposits with Hongkong & Shanghai Bank,

$3,830.43

""

"" Cash,

""

"J

Tai San Bank,

4,000.00

War Bonds,...

8,000.00

514,10

$16,344.53

To Balance,

>>

Rent of Stalls,

Table XXII.

Chinese Recreation Ground: Receipts and Expenditure, 1920.

Receipts.

Total,

•$

Payments.

13,104

By Wages of Watchmen, &c.,...

""

Water Account,

3,223

""

Consumption of Gas,

""

Repair to roof, walls, and stalls,

""

Rice Allowance,

877

127

270

514

26

""

Balance,

19

16,327,91

Subscription to Western Maternity Hospital, 10,000

Miscellaneous,

Total,...

33

4,479

16,327.91

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 37

Table XXIII.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund.

Receipts.

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,

..$4,250

>>

"} in Colonial Treasury,

3,358

7,608

"

Passage Money received,

$ 379

>7

"

>>

Less Refunds,

Refund of balance of advance to Pak Tai Temple, Wanchai,...

376

""

2

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,

""

Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,...... Small Gifts to destitutes,

Advance to District Watchmen's Fund,

""

Miscellaneous,....

170

A

Balance on Fixed Deposit,

""

in Colonial Treasury,

""

Interest on Fixed Deposit,

$ 170

Payments.

By Gifts to 8 women on being married,

17

,,

Annual Charitable Allowance to two per- sons,

72

50

...

170

22

45

- C 38

500

i

39

.$4,250

2,922

7,172

7}

on money deposited in Treasury,

83

253

Miscellaneous,

""

52

Total,

$

8,088.45

Total,

$8,088.45

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

?

Convicted.

Discharged.

No. of

Cases.

Male. Female.

Male.

Female.

...

5

!

Table XXIV.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 30 of 1915, and No. 4 of 1897..

Offence.

123

98

20

2

2

::

:.

:

..

:

1

...

:

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

Bills,-Posting without permission,

Fireworks,--Discharged without permission,

Drums and Gongs,--Night noises by beating,

Processions,-Organising in the public streets

without permission,

Householders' Registration,-Failing to register,

Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

Decoying men or boys into or out of the Colony,.. Emigration House offences,...

Personating emigrants,..

Sending assisted emigrants out of the Colony with- out notifying the Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Abduction of girls under 21,

Decoying women and girls into or away from the Colony,

Detaining, barbouring, or receiving women or girls,...] Pr Proenting women or girls to be common prostitutes,. Procuring girls under age to have carnal con-

nection,

Deriving profits from prostitution and trading in

women,

Remarks.

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

4:

462

1

2

:

:

1

93

48

42

5

:

1

C 39

- C 40

Annexe A.

Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1920.

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hongkong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women." The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since, by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.

There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, amahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing Committee. This Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m.: the principal meeting of the week is held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory Committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs in all cases affect- ing women and children, and Chinese family life generally, which are often extremely difficult and tedious. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institutions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children or ill-treated muitsais, and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents or relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as concubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent to either adoption or marriage.

In addition to the annual Committee appointment by co-option, there is a Permanent Committee, which serves to maintain con- tinuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.

The buildings and their inmates are visited every month by two unofficial Justices of the Peace, one English and one Chinese.

The following gentlemen were elected in March to serve as Managing Committee for the year:-

Kwok Siu-lau, Tam Pak-shiu,

Chag Tin-san,

Tse Ka-po,

Lam Hon-ping,

Leung Shu-tong,

Sham Chak-chiu,

Leung Tin-kwai,

Wong Kwong-tin,

Ma Wing-chan.

Twelve is the usual number of gentlemen on this Committee, but Mr. Wong Kwok-sun resigned after being elected and the vacancy was not filled.

C 4

The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on January 1st, 1920, was 62 and during the year 343 persons were admitted as against 476 in 1919. The circumstances of the admission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

85 women and girls were committed under warrant and 174 were admitted without warrant. Of the remainder 33 were lost children, 8 were accompanied by parents or guardians, and 43 were runaway maid-servants or "muitsai."

On leaving the Kuk 126 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, 36 were sent to charitable institutions in China. 23 were given in adoption, 10 married, and 18 released under bond, 9 sent to the Italian Convent. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was 47.

The income and expenditure during the year and the assets and liabilities of the institution are set out in Tables B and C attached.

The accounts of the Managing Committee in the customary form have been audited by Messrs. Sham Chak-chiu and Wong Kwong-tin. The balance to the credit of the Society at the end of the year was $23,987 as compared with $23,305 at the end of 1919.

Mr. A. Mackenzie resigned the post of Visiting Justice of the Peace to the Po Leung Kuk and his place was taken up by Mr. A. G. Coppin.

The institution was visited monthly by Justices of Peace, Messrs. A. Mackenzie, A. G. Coppin, and Chau Siu-ki, who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment. The average monthly number of inmates was 52.

The matron reports favourably on the conduct, health, and industry of the inmates during the year. There were 80 cases of sickness of which 43 were sent to the Tung Wa Hospital for treatment, and of these 1 died.

14th June, 1921.

S. B. C. Ross,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs, President.

2

Table A.

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1920 and the

arrangements made regarding them.

00

8

5

2

16

62

7

3

نت

14

co

30

རྱ

H

62

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

Committed under Warrant from

the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs Sent with their own consent from Singapore. Manila. and Swatow. Sent with their own consent

by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

Total.

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of husband. Placed in charge of parents and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institutions

in China.

Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

January, 1920, ............ In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st {

3

4

Admitted during the year, ...

80

510

82

Total,

Kuk on the 31st Decem-

Remaining in the Po Leung

ber, 1920,

6

73 33

Co

43

343

128 15

10

95 | 28

613

34

ST 14

90 10

92 38

10 | 59

405

135 18 17 109 36

6

-

11

1

6

5

:.

14

47

9

41

23

10

147

343

405

42

O 43 -

RECEIPTS.

Balance from previous year :—

On Fixed Deposit,

21,000

Table B.

Po LEUNG KUK.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1920.

*

EXPENDITURE.

By the Elected Committee:- (see Table C),

9,959

At Current Account,

2,305

23,305

Balance:

Subscriptions:-

By Mortgage,

21,000

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,...] Elected Committee,

342

At Current Account,

2,987

300

23,987

Guilds,

4,799

Man Mo Temple,

1,128

Theatres,

2,000

Hongkong Citizen,

52

Boy adoptions,

Interest :-

60

8,681

On Deposit,

On Current Account,

Total,.

1,900

57

1,957

.

33,946.58

Total,..

.$ 33,946.58

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

Table C.

רייון

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from 1st January to 31st December, 1920.

RECEIPTS.

Balance from previous year,

Received from Permanent Board,.

Miscellaneous Receipts,....

Premium on bank notes,

$

EXPENDITure.

9

Decorations,

9,959

Food,

31

Light and Fire,

20

Total,.........$

Miscellaneous,

Passage Money,

Petty Expenditure,

Printing,

Repairs,..

Stationery,

Telephone,

Insurance,

Wages,

Balance,

10,021.02

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

Total,...

47

3,333

808

521

97

1,555

107

13

106

49

396

2,927

9,959

55

10,021.02

@ 44 -

}

-

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER

FOR THE YEAR 1920.

1.-Shipping.

2.-Trade.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

4. Steam-launches.

REPORT.

9.

5.-Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping. 7.-Marine Magistrate's Court. 8.-Marine Court.

TABLES.

Examination of Masters,

Mates, and Engineers. 10. Examination of Pilots. 11.-Sunday Cargo Working. 12.-New Territories. 13.-Lighthouses.

14. Commercial Intelligence,

Board of Trade.

I.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessel's entered. II.-Number, Tonnage,, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared. III.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered

at each Port.

IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared

at each Port.

V. Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI. Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VII.-Junks entered from China and Macao. VIII.-Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

X.-Licensed Steam-launches entered. XI.-Licensed Steam-launches cleared. XII.-Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII. Statement of Revenue.

XIV.-Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary).

XV.—Return of Emigration.

XVI.--Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

XVII.-Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary).

XVIII.

Return of Immigration.

XIX. Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

XX. Vessels registered.

XXI.-Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII.-Comparison in Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign

Trade entered and cleared since 1909.

XXIII.-Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. XXIV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

D 2

ANNEXES.

4.-Report on the Mercantile Marine Office. B.-Report on the Marine Surveyor's Office. C. Report on the Gunpowder Depôt.

1.-Shipping.

1. The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1920 amounted to 683,497 vessels of 40,122,527 tons, which, compared with the figures of 1919 shows an increase of 34,329 vessels with an increase of 4,507,358 tons.

Of the above 43,364 vessels of 24,194,022 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 41,985 vessels of 21,072,129 tons in 1919 and were distributed as follows:-

1919.

1920. Numbers. Numbers.

1919. Tonnage.

1920. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going Ships,

9.2%

9.6%

32.4 %

34.5%

Foreign Ocean-

going Ships,

12.6

12.5

36.2

38.1

British River

Steamers, ...

13.2

11.9

154

13.5

Foreign River

Steamers, ...

3.8

4.0

2.9

24

Steam Launches

(under 60

tons),

11.9

116

0.8

0.7

Trading Junks,

49.3

50.4

12:3

10.8

100.0

100·0

100-0

100-0

N.B. The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in this Table.

2. Of vessels of European construction 4,807 Ocean Steamers 3,441 River Steamers and 2,498 Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, entered during the year giving a daily average of 29 4 ships as compared with 29-1 ships in 1919 and 27-3 in 1918.

3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean Vessels entering the Port has increased from 1,583 1 tons to 1,8310 tons, that of British Ships has increased from 1,7226 to 2,002-3 while that of Foreign Ships has also increased from 1,449-2 tons to 1,699 2 tons.

The average tonnage of individual River Steamers entering during the year has decreased from 448 8 tons to 425'8 tons.

That of British River Steamers has decreased from 529'8 tons to 516'1 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers has decreased from 336 6 tons to 324:3 tons.

D 3

4. A comparison between the years 1919 and 1920 is given in the following table:-

1919.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage, No. Tonnage

British Ocean-

going,

3,865

ForeignOcean-

going,

British River

Steamers,

5,502

Foreign River

Steamers,

1,599

5,274 | 7,625,823

3,253,781

591,679 1,741

6,842,024 4,173 8,351,084

5,418 9,223,552

5,138 3,256,985

577,270 142

308 1,509,060|

144 1,597,729

...

3,204 364

14,409

Steamships un-

der 60 tons

(Foreign

5,035 161,689

5,028 167,248

5,559

:

Trade),

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

Total, Foreign

Trade,

Steam Laun- ches plying in Waters of Colony,

Junks, Local

Trade,

20,710 2,597,133 21,866|| 2,617,883 1,156 20,750

41,985 21,072,129 43,364 24,194,022 1,750 3,136,302 371 14,409

586,188 13,366,602 619,068 14,636,848 32,880 1,270,246

*20,995 1,176,438 †21,065 1,291,657 70 115,219

:

:

Grand Total,... 649,168 35,615,16 9 683,497 40,122,527 34,700 4,521.767 371

14,409

*

Net Increase,....

(34,329 | 4,507,358

Including 11,486 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 758,624 tons.

11,156

""

"

11

of 839,422

In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons' employed in Foreign trade, there is a decrease of 7 ships with an increase in tonnage of 5,559 tons or 0.1 per cent. in numbers and 3-4 per cent. in tonnage. The increase is most prominent in vessels trading to Macao due to the S.L. Hau Hoi 1 and On Chai running regularly for the best part of the year.

Junks in Foreign trade show an increase of 1,156 vessels and an increase of 20,750 tons or 56 per cent. in numbers and 0.8 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to more junks of smaller tonnage visiting

this Port.

In Local trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is an increase in Steam-Launches of 32,880 or an increase of 1,270,246 tons or 56 per cent. in numbers and 9.5 per cent. in tonnage.

D 4

This is due to the decreasing cost of coal, as a result of which launches which had been laid up were again employed.

Junks in Local trade show an increase of 70 vessels and an increase of 115,219 tons or 0.3 per cent. in numbers and 9-8 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to a great number of Junks being employed on reclamation work.

6. The actual number of Individual Ocean-going vessels of European construction during the year 1920 was 927 of which 330 were British and 597 Foreign. In 1919 the corresponding figures were 957 of which 301 were British and 656 Foreign.

These 927 Ships measured 2,522,888 tons. They entered 4,807 times and gave a collective tonnage of 8,801,620 tons.

Thus 30 more Ships entered 232 more times and gave a collective tonnage greater by 1,558,931 tons an average of 67,195 tons per entry.

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean-going ship- ping of 308 ships or 7.9 per cent, and an increase of 1,509,060 tons or 22.0 per cent. This is due to Vessels, which were under Govern- ment control being released, newly-built ships and Enemy ships which were sold or transferred to British Ship Owners being put on the Eastern trade.

British River Steamers have decreased by 364 ships with an increase in tonnage of 3,204 tons or 6'6 per cent. in numbers and 0.1 per cent. in tonnage. The decrease in ships is due to the s.s. Chuen Chow being laid up during the latter part of the year and to the s.s. Hoi Ming being transferred to the Chinese flag. The increase in tonnage is due to the alteration in tonnage of the s.s. Fat Shan, Kin Shan, and Heung Shan.

Foreign Ocean-going Vessels have increased by 144 ships with an increase of 1,597,729 tons or 2.7 per cent. in numbers and 20-9 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the large amount of American vessels frequenting the Port to enemy vessels being sold or transfer- red to Foreign Ship Owners and also to several newly-built Chinese and Norwegian vessels being put on the Coastal trade.

Foreign River Steamers show an increase of 142 ships with a decrease in tonnage of 14,097 tons or 8.9 per cent. in numbers and 24 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the s.s. Hoi Ming formerly British owned being transferred to the Chinese flag, being now named the s.s. Ting Sing, also to two newly-built steamers the s.s. Leung Kwong and Kong Chow being put on the West River run. The decrease in tonnage is due to the s.s. Ting Sing being laid up for the best part of the year, also to the s.s. Wah On being seized by the Cantonese Government and a number of Chinese vessels being unable to run frequently owing to hostilities in the West River waters.

-

:

-

D 5

Thus:-

Steamers.

No. of times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1919. 1920. | 1919. 1920.

1919. 1920.

Steamers 299

330 1,938 2,090 3,436,6164,184,927

British

Sailing...

2

2

2,267

Steamers

379

279 1,148

925 2,111,252 2,059,712

Japanese

Sailing..

1

1

Norwegian,

18

19

96

131

89 99,652 136,616

Chinese,

84

67

854

912

585,972 595,989

Danish,

9

6

11

17,720 43,410

Dutch,

39

27

113

117

262,213 313,312

French,

17

34

159

156

204,494 276,962

Portuguese,

5

85 78

51,459

38.269

Russian,

9

8

36

9.989

55,468

Siamese,

3

5

7

35

7,916

40,224

Sarawak,

1

892

Swedish,

1

3

1

4

2,217

13,863

Steamers

90

129

150

286

415,859

953,443

U.S.A.,

Sailing..

1.

3,000

Italian,...

Inter Allied,

3

Brazilian,

10 30 1

5

14

54,512

6

10 31,974

30,980

1

1

3,041

Total,

957

....

927 4,575 4,807 7,242,689 8,801,620

7. The Nationality of the Crews in British and in Foreign Ships was as follows:-

AMERICANS

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREW.

AND EUROPEANS.

ASIATICS.

1919. 1920. 1919. 1920.

1919. 1920. 1919. 1920.

Foreign,. 656 597

British,. 301 330 19,717 26,284 674 1,214 134,307 140,882

1,359 1,750 11,725 24,542 150,517 150,617

Total,

957

927 21,076 28,034 12,399 25,756 284,824 291,499

3

Hence in British ships:

D 6

And in Foreign ships :-

1919.

1920.

1919.

1920.

12.74 %

15.55 % of the crews were British.

0.83 %

0.99% of the crews

were British.

0.45 %

0.72% of the crews were other Europeans.

86.81 % 83.66% of the crews 92.00 %

were Asiatics.

13.81% of the crews were other Europeans.

85.13% of the crews

were Asiatics.

7.17%

2.-Trade.

8. Detailed and accurate statistics of Imports and Exports are now collected and published by the Imports and Exports Depart-

ment.

9. The number and tonnage of ships of European type con- struction carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1919 were as follows:

1919.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,..... 4,571 7,237,333 4,807 8,801,620

River Steamers, 3,550 1,917,236 3,441 1,918,064

Sailing Vessels, 4

5,356

236 1,564,287

1

828 109

5,356

Total,... 8,125 9,159,925 8,248 | 10,719,684 236 1,565,115 113 5,356

Nett Increase,.

123 1,559,759

S

10. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal, are as follows

EXPORTS.

1919.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

4,560 | 7,219,802| 4,784|| 8,778,016 3,551 1,928,221 3,438 | 1,916,191

224 1,553,214

13 12,030

4

5,356

4

5,356

Total,

8,115 9,153,379 8,222 10,689,207

224 1,553,214

17

17,386

Nett Increase,.

207 1,535,828

Steamers,

River Steamers, Sailing Vessels,

D 7

1919.

1920.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

Bunker

No.

Coal.

Steamers,

4,560

850,386 4,784

464,707 224

385,679

River Steamers,

3,551

53,439 | 3,438 63,486

10,047

13

Total,..

8,111

903,825 8,222

528,193

224

10,047

13

385,679

Nett Increase,.

211

375,632

D 8

11. The River Trade, compared with 1919 is shown in the following Table:-

Year.

1919..

1920.......

Imports.

Exports. Passengers.

323,536

328,369 1,373,947

345,514

317,512

1,686,306

12. The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony for the year 1919 and 1920 :-

IMPORTS.

1919.

1920.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,................10,353

1,248,389

10,885

1,320,745

Local Trade.......... 4,686

206,326

4,917

223,101

Total,.....15,039

1,454,715

15,802

1,543,846

Tons.

Cattle, 1,914 hea,

Swine, 18,397 head,

Earth and Stones,

224

1,082

General,

20,835

...547,747

Total

...569,888

EXPORTS.

1919.

1920.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,......10,357

1,349,744

10,981

1,297,138

Local Trade,......... 4,823

211,488

4,992

229,134

Total,15,180

1,561,232

15,973

1,526,272

Exported 709,761 tons as under :--

Kerosine, 1,128,477 cases,

Rice and Paddy.............

Coal,

General,

Tons.

40,604

59,769

...236,799

..372,589

Total,......

...709,761

J

13. Summary of the Shipping of the Port for the year 1920:-

Registered.

Passengers.

Nó, of

Ships.

Emigrants.

Tonnage.

Bunker Coal. Arrived.

Departed.

British Ocean-going,

4,173

8,351,084

231,872

188,946

135,729

70,234

Foreign Ocean-going,

5,418

9,223,552

232,835

122,527

115,230

35,024

British River Steamers,

5,138

3,256,985

47,558

727,136

779.179

Foreign River Steamers,·

1,741

577,270

15,928

88,856

91,135

Total,..

16,470

21,408,891

528,193

1,127,465

1,121,273

105,258

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade...........

5,028

167,248

14.794

Junks, Foreign Trade,...

21,866

2,617,883

12.739

74,384

12,412

72,417

Total, Foreign Trade,

43,364

24,194,022 |

542,987

1,214,588

1,206,102

105,258

Steam-launches, Local Trade,

619,068

14,636,848

44,914

6,549,484

Junks, Local Trade,

20,995

1,176,438

8,121

6,557,717

8,218

Total, Local Trade,

640,063

15,813,286

44,914

6,557,605

6,565,935

Grand Total,..

683,427

40,007,308

587,901

7,772,193

7,772,037

105,258

- D 9-

D 10

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

14. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $701,493.26 as against $633,794.25 collected in the previous year showing an increase of $67,699.01.

1919.

1920.

Increase. Decrease.

Light Dues,

Light Dues, Special Assessment.. Licences and Internal Revenue,. Fees of Court and Office, Miscellaneous Receipts,

$ 74,545.18 $ 94,225.44 $ 19,680.26

83,973,11 102,609,57

18,636.46

156,353,24

152,139.46

$ 4,213.78

318,632.72

352,459.72

33,827.00

290.00

59.07

230,93

$633,794.25 $701,493.26 $ 72,143.72 $ 4,444.71

The principal increases are under Light Dues $19,680.26, Light Dues Special Assessments $18,636.46, Junk Licences $1,449.75, Fees for use of Government Buoys $6,012, Medical Examination of Emigrants $28,157, (due to Emigrant Ships having again taken up their usual run) and Sunday Cargo Working Permits $6,450.

The principal decreases are under Boat Licences $1,932.45, Fines $2,246.29, Junk Licences from New Territory $1,180, Gunpowder Storage $4,745.30, Survey of Steam-ships $3,368.

The Expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1920 was $230,033.12 as against $191,850.96 expended in 1919 showing an increase of $38,182.16. This increase is principally due to revised scale of salary to European Officers of this Department.

Under Special Expenditure a sum of $350 was expended in Planimeter and Steam Test Gauges for Marine Surveyor's Office.

}

#

17. The Amount of Light Dues collected during the year 1920 was as follows :—

Special Assessment.

No. of

Class of Vessels.

Trips.

Tonnage.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Total Fees

Collected.

C.

$

C.

Ocean Vessels,..

4,812

9,011,100 | 1 cent.

90,111.00

1 cent.

90,111.00

180,222.00

Steam-launches,

2,156

76,386 1

763.86

1

763.86

1,527.72

>>

>>

River Steamers, (Night Boats),..

1,974

1,005,174

3,350.58

5,025.87

8,376.45

"

Do.,

(Day Boats),

1,016

805,060

Nil.

.....

&

6,708.84

6,708.84

Total,..

9,958

10,897,720

$94,225.44

$102,609.57

$196,835.01

D. 12

4. Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, 1920, there were 362 steam-launches (including licensed motor boats) employed in the harbour. Of these, 316 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, etc. 24 were the property of the Colonial Government, and 22 belonged to the Imperial Government, comprising 4 Military and 18 Naval. In addition to the above there were 33 motor boats privately owned for pleasure and private purposes.

Four coxswains' certificates were suspended for incompetence or negligence in the performance of their duties; one for four months and two for one month each; the holders of these three, were required to pass a further examination after the expiration of the period of their suspension, before their certificates were returned, and one was suspended until the holder should pass a further examination.

Four hundred and ninety-two (492) engagements and four hundred and eighty-eight (488) discharges of Masters and Eng- ineers were made during the year.

Seven (7) steam-launches were permitted to carry arms for their protection against pirates.

5.-Emigration and. Immigration.

19. One hundred and five thousand two hundred and fifty-eight (105,258) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1920, (59,969 in 1919). Of these, 70,234 were carried in British ships, and 35,024 in Foreign ships.

One hundred and twenty-two thousand four hundred and thirty-eight (122,438) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 136,020 in 1919. Of these, 87,766 arrived in British ships and 34,672 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, etc., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 23 ships were registered under the provi- sions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 10 Certificates of Registry cancelled. 282 documents, etc., were dealt with in con- nection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to 1,757.00 as compared with $1,351.00.in 1919.

7-Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. Two hundred cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court (167 in 1919). Breach of Harbour Regulations, Boarding ships without permission, Failing to observe the Rule of the Road, Making fast to steamers while under way, Neglecting to exhibit the Regulation lights, Being in Causeway Bay Harbour of Refuge with- out permit, Being within 100 yards from low water mark during prohibited hours without permit and Carrying passengers in excess were the principal offences.

J

8.

D 13

Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899.)

22. During the year 1920 four courts were held, viz.:-

On the 7th day of February, 1920, to enquire into the circumstances of the stranding of the British Steamship Kaifong, Official No. 95430 of London, Mr. Ernest Beresford Jones, certificate of competency as Master No. 031087 Liverpool, was Master.

On the 19th day of February, 1920, to enquire into the circumstances of the stranding of the British Steamship Hong Wan 1, Official No. 73866 of Singapore, Mr. Harold Percy Robinson, certificate of competency as Master No. 3701 Singapore, was Master.

On the 31st day of March, 1920, to enquire into the charge of absence without leave on the part of C. J. Kirkpatrick, whose certificate of competency as Second Class Engineer was No. 4690 of Canada, Second Engineer of the British Steamship Fau Sang, Official No. 105800 of London, Mr. Frederic Joseph Gill, certificate of competency as Master No. 040042 of Dublin, was Master.

On the 15th day of June, 1920, to enquire into the circumstances of the stranding of the British Steamship Fau Sang, Official No. 105800 of London, Mr. Frederic Joseph Gill, certificate of competency as Master No. 040042 of Dublin, was Master.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers. (Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance No. 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Compe- tency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed:-

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

25

7

Master, River Steamers,

1

0

First Mate,

34

18

Only Mate,

1.

2

Second Mate,

14

9

Mate, River Steamers,...

1

Total,...

78

37

First Class Engineer, ...

1

7

Second Class Engineer,

29

15

Total,...

30

22

22

D 14

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899:-

Candidates.

Passed. Failed.

For Master,

79

2

T

:

For Engineer,

84

0

Total,...

163

2

10. Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

24. There were three (3) candidates examined during the year. Nineteen (19) licences were renewed.

11.

Sunday Cargo-Working.

25. There were 1,010 permits issued during the year under Ordinance No. 1 of 1891, as compared with 1,122 in 1919. Of these, 342 were not used as the ships did not arrive up to time, and in some cases it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $115,350 as against $108,900 in 1919 showing an increase of $6,450.

12. New Territories.

(Twenty-second year of British Administration.)

26. The Out-stations attached to the Harbour Department con- tinued to perform the work allotted to them and during the year Licences, etc., were issued by them as follows:-

1919.

1920.

Cheung Chau, opened 1899..

2,532

2,233

Tai 0,

1899.

2,177

2,072

35

Tai Po,

1900...

2,330

2,217

""

Sai Kung,

1902....

808

746

""

Long Ket, Deep Bay, Lantao,

1905...

1.455

1,156

""

1911.

1,114

912

1912...

1,515

970

""

11,931

10,306

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Territories during the year was $27,978.95 as compared with $30,625.30 in 1919.

T

D 15

13.-Lighthouses.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

27. During 1920, seven hundred and ten (710) vessels were reported by telegraph as passing this station and one hundred and forty (140) were not reported owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted.

Three thousand and eighteen (3,018) messages including meteorological observations for the Observatory were sent and four hundred and forty-five (445) messages were received.

Telegraphic communication was interrupted on seventy nine (79) days during the year.

There were ninety three (93) hours of fog and the fog-signal was fired five hundred and eighty-three (583) times.

The fortnightly reliefs were delayed twelve (12) times during the year owing to bad weather.

WAGLAN LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1920, two thousand five hundred and thirty-nine (2,539) vessels were reported by telegraph from this station. Of this number, 491 were signalled by Morse Lamp.

Two hundred and thirteen (213) vessels were not reported owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted.

Two thousand two hundred and sixty-two (2,262) telegraphic messages were sent including meteorological observations for the Royal Observatory, and 521 messages were received.

There were 353 hours and 22 minutes of fog during the year, and the fog signal was fired 6,232 times.

Commencing on the 1st of January the interval between successive pairs of explosions was reduced from 12 minutes to 5 minutes, and, that between the explosions of each pair from 15 seconds to 5 seconds. From the 15th of March the order was reverted to the former interval between successive pairs of explosions of 12 minutes, and between each pair of explosions of 15 seconds: 94 hours, 30 minutes continuous firing in one spell of fog is the longest on record for this station.

Telegraphic communication was maintained throughout the year with the exception of 15 complete days when the cable was broken, and 6 complete days owing to faults in cables, and a few short interruptions caused by the land line being in contact with telephone wires.

On two occasions the relief was delayed by rough sea.

D 16

GREEN ISLAND.

During the year 1920, one thousand four hundred and twenty- one (1,421) vessels were signalled and reported. In addition three hundred and fifty-seven (357) messages were sent and forty-six received.

Owing to telephonic communication being interrupted during the year, thirty-two (32) vessels were not reported.

Kap Sing Lighthouse has been regularly inspected and has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

The eleven (11) Aga Lights (flash) have been attended to from this station, namely Cape Collinson, Ma Wan Island, Signal Hill Lighthouse, the Fairway and Cust Rock Buoys, and Harbour of Refuge and Cheung Chow Channel Beacon which was connected to an Aga Flash Light and first exhibited as such on May 29th, 1920.

These have been burning continuously, accurately and satis- factorily during the year.

SIGNAL STATION.

The Peak Signal Station re-opened again in full working order since the 22nd day of June, 1920.

For the period ending the 31st day of December, 1920, one thousand nine hundred and thirty-two (1,932) ships were reported by signals.

The Gun Signal denoting the arrival of mail steamers was resumed on the 14th day of August, 1920, and has been fired thirty- nine (39) times.

14. Government Harbour Moorings,

There are at present laid down in the harbour for the use of Shipping frequenting the Port fifty (50) sets of Government Moorings and are classed as follows.

A. Class Moorings 11

B.

C.

وو

15

24

Total 50

No new moorings were laid down during the year or new Buoys contracted for, but a further demand for the 3 classes is anticipated, which will have to be provided for later.

During the year 1920 twenty-two (22) moorings were lifted and relaid after necessary repairs had been effected.

Extensive repairs were carried out on eleven (11) mooring

buoys.

D 17

Twenty-eight (28) mooring buoys were disconnected from their moorings, thoroughly scaled, painted and re-connected to moorings.

The total expenditure on upkeep of Government Moorings and Buoys for the year was $18,191.74.

The Gross Revenue for the year 1916 was $51,916.

1

""

23

25

1917

""

61,156.

1918

""

59,594.

1919

""

69,440.

""

1920

""

75,448.

C. W. BECKWITH, Commander R.N.,

Harbour Master.

1

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VES

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

BRITISH.

WITH CARGoes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

47

81,613

12

:

22,153

:

48

266,740

187,617

9,851

2,872 2,557,916

:..

Australia and New Zealand,

47 81,613 3,832

British North Borneo,.......

Canada,

Coast of China, Ships,.....

48

12 22,153 1,193

266,740 12,243

...

2,728 2,370,299 | 151,406

144

وو

Steamships under 60 tons....

Junks,

:

Cochin China

83

108,276 5,744

Dutch East Indies,

33

60,118

2,208

Europe, Mediterranean Ports,

2

5,780

153

Atlantic Ports,

3

9,642

188

59

Baltic Ports,

22

Formosa,

Great Britain,

India,

Japan,

Kwong-chau-wan,

Macao, Ships,

34

Steamships under 60 tons,

:

:

:

:

83

108,276

33

60,118

2

5,780

3

9,642

:

:

:

2

2,039

151

648,713

12,418

215

89

253,922

141

484,484

29

11,105

616

459,996

:

:

¦

:

2

2,039

192

151

648,713 14,938

86

241,504 10,951

141

484,484 14,266

29

11,105

1,162

646

459,996

25,793

:

:

1

1,288

10

12,085

700

93

137,889

CU

3

2,639

195

167

175,436

5,135

78

99,930

Junks,

19

Mauritius,

1

1,288

80

Philippine Islands,

83

125,804 5,862

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

164

172,797 10,972

Russia in Asia,

1

5,136

225

Siam,

78

99,930 6,212

South America,

:

:

8,008

111

80

158,384

15

19,124

:

64

239,559

4,563

TOTAL,

4,197 5,591,038 | 278,909

162

222,767 11,072 4,659 5,813,805

Straits Settlements,

Tsingtau,

78

150,376 6,607

15

19,124

126

United States of America,

Wei-hai-wei,

2

4,563

64 239,559 4,489

130

D 19

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY

ENCE ARRIVED.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons.

Or

land,

47

$1,613

3,832

47 81,613

3,832

27

62.365 2,386

12

22,153 1.193

12

48

266,740 12,243

48

2,728

2,370,299 151,406

144

187,617

9,851

22,153 1,193

266,740 12,243

2,872 2,557,916 161,257

4,911

124

I

hips under 60 tons.......

625

:

8,161

5,993

1.377 891,195 78,902

19,271 8,847

890,717 131,011

110

:

:

177 186.771

1,583 48.741 17

2,272 365,949 33

$3

108,276 5,744

33 60,118

2,208

in Ports,

t.s,

2

5,780

153

9,642

188

83

108,276

5,744

160

300,586 10,884

:

33

60,118

2,208

45

B

107,708 2,535

2

5,780

153

37

160,622 6.714

1

3,041

00

2

2,039

192

151

648,713 14,938

86

241,504 10,951

141

484,484 14,266

29

11,105 1,162

646

459,996 25,793

ler 60 tons,

:

:

9,642

188

24

97,047

1.670

:

13

50,801

551

:

:

:

2,039

129

205

211,287

10,622

1

1,070

:

151

648,713 14,938

41

168,526 4,428

:

12,418

215

89

68

253,922 11,166

72

172,481 3,960

:

141

484,481 14,266

354

29

11,105 1,162

616 459,996 25,793

121

:

938,799 27,318

185 58,144 9,346

19,602 1,572

286 15,187 5,219

188 32,695

7.787

11

8.342

+

77

2,186

264

31.384

+

}

1,288

80

1

1,288

80

1

1,115

85

83

125,804 5,862

10

12,085

700

93 137,889 6,562

14

ulf of Tonkin,

164

172,797 10,972

3

2,639

195.

167

175,436 11,167

369

19,533 -628

200,103 18,176

6

13,442

2,582

1

5,136

225

1

5,135

225

78

99.930

6,219

78

99,930 6,212

29

2,986

33,789 2,016

120

5

23,483

434

78

Sca,

64

150,376 6,607

15. 19,124 126

239,559 4.489

4,563

130

8,008

111

80

158,384 6,718

43

73,146 2,412

15

19,124

126

11

64

239,559

4,489

239

13,340

1,029,543 22,462

425

4,563

130

6

5,789

302

:

:

CAL,

1,197

5,591,038278,909

162 222,767 11,072 4,659 5,813,805 | 289,9 1

12,643 5,640,764 355,446 1.329

669,136

64

D 19

T PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1920.

GOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

10

2,386

:

27

62,365

2,386

74

143,978 6,218

74

143,978 6,218

1

124

4,911

124

14 27,064

1,317

14

27,064 1,317

3

110

5,993

110

5

78,902

177

1

8,847

1,583

7131,011

186,771

48,741 17,079

365.949 2,272

8,788

2,208

1,554 : 1,077,966

68,012

87,690

25,926

33,200 10,433 1,256,666 |164,211

49 272,733

321 4,105 | 3,261,494 230,308

625 19,271 8,847 1,583

8,161 890,717 131,0H 2,272

12,353

19

874,388 18,639

17,079 48,741

365,949 33,200

272,733 12,353

4,426 3.635,882 |248,947

68,012 2,208

25,926

10,433 1,256,666 | 164,211

6

10,884

160

300,586

10,884

243

408,862 16,628

243

408,862 16,628

3

2,535

45

107,708

2.535

78

167,826

4,743

:

:

78

167,826 4,743

2

6,714

3,041

70

38

163,663

6,784

39

166,402

:

6,867

3,041

70

39

169,443 6,937

7

1,670

:

24 i

97,047

1,670

27

106,689

1,858

27

:

106,689 1,858

551

13

50,801

551

13

50,801

551

13

50,801

551

;

10,622

4,428

3,960

1

1,070

37

206

212,357

10,659

207

213,326

10,751

1,070

37

208

214,396 10,788

:

41

168,526

4,428

192

817,239

19,366

192

$17,239

19,366

:

72

172,481

3,960

158

413,985 14,911

3

12,418

215

161

426,403 15,126

27,318

3

7,737

143

357

946,536 27,461

495

1,423,283

41,584

3

7,737

143

498

1,431,020 41,727

9,346

185:

58,144

9,346

214

69,249 10,508

214

69,249 10,508

1,572

11

8.342

691

135

27,944

2,264

767

479,598

27,366

14

8,342

691

781

487,940 28,057

5,219

77

34

290

15,264

5,253

286

15,187

5,219

4

77

34

290

15,264 5,253

2,186

264

31,384

4,363

452

64,079

6,549

188

32,695 2,186

264

-31,384

4,363

452

61,079 6,549

85

1

1,115

85

2

2,403

165

2

2,403

165

628

13,442

257

20

62,975 885

97

175,337 6,490

16

25,527

957

113

200,864 7,447

1

18,176

120

2,016

434

2,412

425

22,462

302

2,582

86

373

202,685

18,262

533

372,900 29,148

7

5,221

281

540

378,121 29,429

:

:

2,986

120

3

8,121

345

3

8,121

345

:

:

29

33,789

2,016

107

133,719 8,228

107

133,719

:

8,228

5

23,483 434

23,483

434

5

23,483

434

43

73,146

2,412

121

223,522 9,019

s

8,008

111

123

231,530

9,130

:

11

13,340

425

239

1,029,543 22,462

302 5,789

26 32,464

303 1,269,102

10,352

551

26

26,951

303

32, 64

1,269,102

551

26,951

432

8

10.352

132

355,446

4,329 669,136 64,748

16,972 | 6,309,900 | 420,194 17,140 11,231,802 | 634,355

4,491

891,903 75,820

21,631 12,123,705 | 710,175

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Table II.-NUMBER, T

BRITISHI.

IN BALLAST.

Ί

SHIPPED.

¡ Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Bunker Cargoes. Coal.

WITH CARGOES.

:

Australia,

British North Borneo,....

Canada,

Coast of China, Ships,

33

58,674 2,837

3,000

33

58,674

11

20,268

1,160

1,300

14

37,796

677

3,200

25

68,064

36

210,213

10,963

1,200

36 210,213

2,806 2,642,509 | 169,653

89,200

64

80,785

4,367

7,700

2,870 2,723,294

Steamships under 60 tons,...]

"1

Junks,

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Cochin China,........

58

77,054

3,911

12,300

17

18,725

1,238

4,300

75 95,779

Dutch East Indies,

21

32,654 1,628

7,100

11

31,348

626

3,300

32

61,002

Europe,--Mediterranean Ports,

3

10,413

145

200

1

5,116

182

600

15,529

݂ܕ

Atlantic Ports,

2

7,840

142

1,000

7,840

Baltic Ports,

3

11,214

341

1,100

1

2,469

78

200

13,683

Formosa,

5,500

3,210

60

500

104

469,165

15,700

8,744

117

1,600

113

273,924

20,900

4

12,459

247 1,000

165

557,743

1,000

:

31

7,595

9,000

1,001

159

100

648

319,318

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1,400

2

2.625

1

2,583

13,100

4

$7,343.

250

2,600

106

177,869

5,500

73

86,513

4.447 7,000

161

178,039

200

I

4,811

152

:

2

7,506

20,800

2.543

149

S00

71

90,355

300

1

451

29

200

2

3,038

:

:

:

Great Britain,....

103

465,955 11,788

India,

109 265,180 12,638

Japan,

161

545,284 16,980

Kwong-chau-wan,

31

7,595 1,242

Macao, Ships,

645

318,317 25,764

دو

Steamships under 60 tons,

:

:

Junks,.

Mauritius,

2

2,625

155

North and South Pacific Islands,

2,583

65

Philippine Islands,

102

170,526

6,885

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

88

86,526 5,984

Russia in Asia,

1

2,695

58

Siam,

69

87,812 5,504

South Africa,

1

2,587

46

South America,

:

:

Straits Settlements,

74

133,717 5,976

20,200

13

17,532

874

2,600

.67

151,249

Tsingtau.

9

United States of America,

· 49

Wei-hai-wei,

29,898 757

214,048 4,434

5. 12,145

2,200

2

4,500

13

10,860

44,226

280

800 { 11

688 5,800

62

40,758

258,274

286

500

5

12,145

TOTAL,

4,423 5,418,332 | 289,342

237,200

229

375,932 14,920 42,300

4,652 5,794,264

HICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

¡ Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessel

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

33

58.674 2,837

11

20,268 1,160

36

210,213

10,963

2,806 2,642,509 | 169,653

3,000

33

58.674 2.837

3,000

2

:

1,300

14

37,796

677

3,200

25

68,064 1,837

4,500

1,200

36

210,213 10,963

1,200

89,200

64 80,785

4,367

7,700

2,870 2,723,294 174,020

96,900

1,41

ships under 60 tons....

:

:

46

7,47

58

77,054

3,911

12,300

17

18,725

1,238

4,300

75

95,779 5,149

16,600

21

32,654

1,628

7,100

11

31,348

626

3,300

32

64,002 2.254

10,400

ean Ports,

10,413

145

200

1

5,116

182

600

15,529

327

800

rts,

2

7,840

142

1,000

2

7,840

142

:

1,000

11,214

341

1,100

2,469

78

200

13,683

419

:

1,300

..:

15

103

465,955 11,788

5,500

1

3,210

60

500

104

469,165 11,848

109

265,180 12,638

15,700

8,744

417

1,600

113

273,924 13.055

161

545,284 16,980

20,900

12,459

247

1,000

165

557,743 17,227

31

7,595 1,242

1,000

31

7,595 1,242

645

318,317

25,764

9,000

1,001

159

100

618 319,318 25,923

der 60 tons,

6,000

:

:

1,400

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

17,300

21,900

2:

1,000

18

9,100

12

21

32

:

1,400

2,625

155

2

2.625

155

ific Islands,

1

2,583

65

1

2.583

65

102

170,526

6,885

13,100

Gulf of Tonkin,

88

86,526

5,984

:

:

4. 17,343.

5,500

73

86,513 4,447

250 2,600

7,000

106

177,869 7,135

15,700

161 173,039 10,431

12,500

30

1

2,695

58

200

1

4,811

152

:

2

7,506

210

200

69

87,812

5,504

20,800

2.543

149

800

71

90,355

5,653

21,600

1

2,587

46

300

1

451

29

200

*

3,038

75

500

1

:

71

133,717

5,976

20,200

13

9 29,898 757

2,200

17,532

10,860

erica,

49

214,048 4,434

4,500

13

41,226

688

874 2,600

280 800

5,800

$7 151,249 6,850

22,800

3

5* 12,145

286

500

:

:..

5

11 40,758 1,037

62 258,274 5,122

12,145

286

3,000

10,300

25

500

'OTAL,

4,423 5,418,332 | 289,342

237,200

229 375,932 14,920 42,300

4,652 5,794,264 | 304,262

279,500

11,67

TOTAL.

D 20

E, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS CLEARED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKÔNG TO EACH COUNTRY

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

SHIPPED.

SHIPPED.

SHIPPED.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. T

Bunker

argoes.

Cargoes.

Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Burker

Cargoes.

Coal.

WITH CARGOES.

3,000

25

70,837 2,639

4,500

1,333

120

1,200

1

6,145

300

96,900

1,418 936,993 82,066

1,200

200

:

:

25

70,837 2,639

:

4,200

58

12

2

:

:

1,399

61

200

4

5,732

181

400

13

300

1

6,145

300

300

37

21

48,200

144

162,173 6,394

14,000

468

15,280 7,143

:

8,100

1,766

53,220 18,945

10,050

7,176

991,191 124,137

3,080

246,390 42,445

1,562 1,099,166 88,460

2,234 68,500

10,556 | 1,237,581 166,582

62,200

4,224 3,57

26,088

13,150

468: 1

7,476

99

16,600

78

97,820 4,572

15,300

35

41,409 1,923

5,700

113

139,229 6.495

21,000

136

17

10,400

57

155,187 4,113

13,900

10

18,672

547

1,800

67

173,859

4,660

15,700

78

18

800

33

136,797

5,989

9,100

1

215

20

400

34

137,012

6,009

9,500

36

14

1,000

17,987

219

1,300

13

50,420

958

:

1,800

4:

:

17,987

219

6

to

13

50.420

958

1,800

16

6

133

159,001 8,372

6,000

124

138,960

4,994

4,700

257

297,961 13,366

10,700

133 15

6,000

39

154,188 4,232

2,700

39

154,188 4,292

2,700

142 62

17,300

$1

193,775 4,721

11,000

4

11,802

185

2,600

85

205,577 4.906

13,600

190 45

21,900

231

741,908 20,847

31,700

37

50,790

1,564

3,500

268

792,698 22,411

35,200

392

1,28

1,000

183

56,476 9,171

6,600

3

1,647

138

100

186

58,123 9,309

6,700

214

C

9,100

127

25,820 1,877

600

6,093

536

300

136

31,913 2,413

900

772

34

287

15,218 5,245

1,600

9

254

88

50

296

15,472

5,333

1,650

287

356

:

47,993 5,030

69

:

11,555

744

425

59,548 5,774

356

1,400

1

1,115

174

600

:.

:

1

1,115

174

600

در

3

4,300 204

1,800

1

4,446

49

300

8,746

253

2,100

5

15,700

23

79,350 1,112

2,200

2

4,163

92

100

25 83,813

1,204

2,300

125

24

12,500

306 149,072 15,030

17,100

87

73,282

3,304

11,500

393

222,354 18,334

28,600

394

28

200

1

1,511

54

200

1

4,740

143

6,251

197

200

2

21,600

21 23,795

1,639

3,900

4,290

321

700

25

28,085

1,960

4,600

00

90

11

500

2

4,871

128

:

19 78,336

1,754

600

1,600

4,871

128

600

3

19

78,336

1,754

1,600

19

7

22,800

30

58,358

2,221

5,600

со

6,762

366

1,200

38

65,120

2,587

6,800

101

1:

3,000

10,770

387

500

10

3,252

86

200

7

14,022

473

700

14

1

10,300

251 1,110,274 22,823

14,400

31,109

368

200

259

1,141,383 23,191

14,600

300 1,32

500

5

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

279,500

11,675 5,399,121 | 337,337

201,800 5,406

876,923 83,313 57,600

17,081 6,276,044 | 420,650

262,400

16,098 10,8

!

KONG TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR. 1920.

TOTAL. A

OTAL.

Crews.

SHIPPED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

IN BALLAST

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.. Tons. Crews.

Bunker

Burker

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

Cargoes. Coal.

Cargoes. Coal.

2,639

4,200

58

129,511

5,476

7,200

5S 129,511 5,176

7,200

181

400

13

24,601 1,280

1,500

16

39,195

738 3,400

300

300

37

216,358

11,263

1,500

37

38,460

62,200

4,221

3,579,502 | 251,719

157,400

208

26,088

13,150

468

15,280

7,143

3,100

1,766

36,582

7,476

991,191 | 124,137

3,080

242,958 10.761 $1,700

53,220 18,945 19,050

246,390 42,445

29 63,796 2,018

216.358 11,263

4,432 3,822,460 | 262.480

2,234 68,500

10,550 | 1,237,581 | 166,582

4,900

1,500

159,100

26,088

13,150

6,195

21,000

136

174,874

8,483

27,600

52

4,660

15,700

78

187,841

5,741

21,000

21

6,009

9,500

36

147,210

6,134

9,300

60,134 3,161 10:000

50,020 1,173

5,120

5,331

188

235,008

11,644

37,600

99

237,861 6,914

26,100

202 10,00

38

152,541

6,336

10,300

219

6 25,827 361

1,000

25.827 361

1,000

958

1,800

16

61,634 1,299

2,900

1

2,469

78

20)

17

61,103

1.377

3,100

3,366

10,700

133

159,001 8,372

6,000

124

4,292

2,700

142

620,143 16,080

8,200

3,210

138,960 4,994

60

4,700

257

297,961 13,366

10,700

500

143

623,353 16,140

8,700

4,906

13,600

190 458,955 17,359

26,700

8

20,546

602 4,200

198 479,501

17,961

30,900

2,411

35,200

392

1,287,192 37,827

52,000

41

63,249

1,811

4,500

433

1.350,441

39,638

57,100

9,309

6,700

2,413

·

5,333

5,774

174

:

:

...

287

356

900

1,650

214 64,071 10,413

772 344,137 27,641

15,218 5,245

17,993 5,030

600

3,740

329

253

2,100

5

6,883

269

:

:

:

:

7,600

3

1,647

138

100

217 65,718 10,551

7,700

9,600

12

7,094

695

400

784

351,231 28,336

10,000

1,600

9

254

88

50

296

15,472 5,333

1,650

:

69

11,555

744

425

59,548

5,771

2,000

3

3,740

329

2,000

1,800

1

4,446

49

300

1,204

2,300

125

249,876 7,997

15,300

6

11,806

8,334

28,600

394 235,598 21,014

22,600

160

159,795

342 2.700

7,751 18,500

197

200

2

4,206

112

400

2

9,551

295

1,960

4,600

90

111,607

7,143

24,700

6,833

470

1,500

96

128

600

3

7,458

174

900

451

29

200

6 11,320

131 261,682

554 395.393

13.757

118,440

7,909

2,100

8,339

18,000

28,765

41,100

407

7,613

203

:

:

400

26,200

1,100

1,754

1,600

19

78,336 1,754

1,600

19

78,336 1,754

1,600

2,587

6,800

101

473

700

14

3,191

14,600

5

12,145

192,075 8,197

40,668 1,144

300 1,324,322 27,257

286

25,800

21

2,700

18,900

24,294

14,112

21 75,335 1,056 6,000

1,240

366

3,800

125

216,369 9.437

29,600

1,000

18.

51,780 1,510

3,700

321 1,399,657 28,313

24,900

500

12,145

286

500

0,650

262,400

16,098 10,817,453 | 626,679

442,000

5,635 1,252,855 98,233 99,900

21,733 12,070,308 | 724,912

541,900

Table III.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and C

BRITISH.

Names of Ports.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,.

Saikung,

Shaukiwan,

Stanley,

Tai 0,.......

Yaumati,..

Victoria,

:

:

:

:

4,497 5,591,038 | 278,909

162 222,767 11,072

4,659 5,813,805 289,981

Total,

4,497 5,591,038 | 278,909

162 222,767 11,072

4,659 5,813,805 289,981

1

D 21

e III.—TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED at EACH PORT in the COLONY

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Ve

GOES.

:

92

5,610

865

22

299

130

114

5,909

995

1

10

4

1

10

125

3,353

794

10

233

65

135

3,586

859

8

103

41

30

14

11

133

55

47

544

266

47

544

266

5

203

42

43

3,604

601

48

3,807 643

38 278,909 162 222,767 11,072

4,659 5,813,805 | 289,981 12,365 | 5,630,941353,434

4,251 664,970 | 63,938

16,616 6,295,911 417,372 16

38 278,909

162 222,767❘ 11,072 4,659 5,813,805 289,981 12,643 5,640,764355,446

4,329 669,136 | 64,748

16,972 6,309,900 | 420,194 17

H PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1920.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

114

5,909

995

92

5,610 865

1

10

4

1

10

4

22

22

299

130

114

5,909

995

1

10

4

135

3,586

859

125

3,353

794

10

233

65

135

3,586

859

11

133

55

8

103

41

3

3339

30

14

11

133

55

47

544

266

47

544

266

47

544

266

48

3,807

643

5

203

42

43 3,604

601

48

3,807

643

16,616 6,295,911 |417,372

16,862 11,221,979 632,343

4,413 887,737

75,010 21,275 12,109,716 707,353

16,972 6,309,900 | 420,194 17,140 11,231,802 | 634,355 4,491 891,903 75,820 | 21,631 12,123,705 710,175

Names of Ports.

Table IV.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CAR

BRITISH.

F.

:

:

54

2,01

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tous.

Crews.

Bunker Coal,

Vessels. Tons.

53

:

:

:

:

2,31

1

1.

:

:

:

:

Stanley,

4:

:

Tai 0,

:

:

Yaumatí,

2

:..

F...

7

Victoria,...

4,4235,418,332 289,342 | 237,200

229 376,932

14,920

42,300

4,652 5,794,264 |304,262 | 279,500

11,561 5,394,661

Total,

4,4235,418,332 289,342 237,200

229 375,932

14,920 42,300 4,652 5,794,264 304,262 279,500

11,675 | 5,399,121

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,

Saikung,....

Shaukiwan,

FOREIGN.

D 22

'able IV.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED at EACH PORT in the COLO

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels,

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

53

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

2,313

362

55 3,301

588

1

10

4

108

5,614

10

:

:

:

:

:

:

54

2,016

378

76

1,596

453

43

18

7

90

30

47

544

266

:

2

75

16

:

40 3,139

544

6,932

14,920 42,300 4,652 5,794,264 304,262 279,500

11,561 5,394,664 336,559 204,800

:

:

:

130

3,612

11

133

47

514

42

3.214

6,262,917417

5,181,868,253 81,432 57,600 16,742

5,932 14,920 42,300 4,652 | 5,794,264 304,262 279,500

11,675 5,399,121 237,337 | 204,800

5,406 876,923 83,313 57,600

17,081 6,276,044 | 420

CH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1920.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

unker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons, Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

108

5,614

950

53

2,313

362

55

3.301

588

108

5,614

950

1

10

4

1

10

:

1

10

4

130

3,612

831

54

11

133

48

2,016

43

378

76

:

1,596

453

130

3,612

831

18

7

· 90

30

11

133

48

47

544

266

47

544

266

47

544

266

42

3,214

560

2

75

16

40

3,139

544

42

3,214

560

7,600 16,742

6,262,917 | 417,991 | 262,400 15,984 10,812,996 625,901 | 442,000

5,410 1,244,185

96,352 99,900

21,394 12,057,181|722,253 | 541,900

7,600

17,081 | 6,276,044 |420,650 |262,400 16,098 10,817,453626,679|442,000

5,635 1,252,855 98,233 99,900

21,735 12,070,308 724,912 541,900

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1920.

D 23

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

ENTERED.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

British,

4,497 5,591,038 278,909

162 222,767

11,072

American,

275

913,424 16,650

11 40,019

496

4,659 5,813,805 289,981 286

Brazilian,

1

3,041

70

Ι

Chinese,

1,585

806,932 90,017

78

58,641

4,367

""

Junks,

8,349

923,412 133,197

2,536

397,333

37,563

10,885

953,443 17,146

70 1,663 865,573 94,384

1,320,745 170,760

3,041

Danish,

10

42,683 383

1

727

71

11

Dutch,

101

295,984 8,250

16

17,328

574

117

43,410

313,312 8,824

454

French,

149

259,339 13,585

7

17,623

348

156

276,962 13,933

Inter-Allied,..

10

30,980 1,503

10

30,980 1,503

Italian,

13 51,739 1,977

1

2,773

34

14

54,512

Japanese,

880 2,018,706 61,604

45

41,006

1,780

Norwegian,

100 109,703 4,707

31

26,913

1,393

2,011 925 2,059,712 63,384 131 136,616 6,100

Portuguese,

192

53,734 5,202

7

4,137

364

199

57,871 5,566

Russian,

31

47,949 1,741

5 7,519

356

36

Swedish,.

55,468 2,097

13,863 203

4

13,863 203

Siamese,

32

36,966 2,311

3

3,258

219

35

40,224 2,530

Steamships

under 60

tons trading to ports

911

34,458 14,066 1,587 48,818

17,113

2,498

83,276 81,179

outside the Colony,

Sarawak,

1

892

50

1

892

50

TOTAL,

17,140 | 11,231,802) 634,355

4,491 891,903

75,820

21,631

12,123,705 710,175

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1920.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

D 24

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

American,..

4,423 5,418,832 289,342 267

896,735 15,085

Brazilianu,

Chinese,

1,590

813,941| 90,428

Junks,

7,832 1,039,184 129,167

229 375,932 16 52,684

1 3,041 67 47,805 3,149257,945

14,920

4,652 (5,794,264 304,262

760

70

1

3,505

1,657

283 949,419 15,845

70

3,041

861,746 93,933

43,189

10,981

1,297,129) 172,356

Danish,

10

Dutch,

92

42,640| 271,251 7,631

389

1

770

79

11

43,410

468

22 37,301

1,195

114

308,552 8,826

French,

149

266,124 13,598

5

9,366

310

154

275,490

13,908

Greek,

3 6,860

105

3

6,860

105

Inter-Allied,

10

Italian,

Japanese,

Norwegian,

30,980) 1,800 14 54,512 2,835 643 1,745,883 51,046 72 81,322 3,928

10

30,980

1,800

14 54,512

2,835

280 318,352

10,372

923 2,064,235 61,418

59 55,253

2,802

131

136,575 6,730

Portuguese,

191

52,461 5,244

7 4,477

374

198

56,938 5,618

Russian,

24

33,924 1,841

9

16,561

585

33

50,485

2,426

Swedish,

4

13,863 162

4

13,863

162

No Flag,

21

24,911 1,742

12

13,034

934

33

37,945

2,675

Steamships under 60 tons

trading to ports outside

755

30,498 12,388

1,775 53,474 19,033

2,530

83,972 31,421

the Colony,

Sarawak,

1

892

54

1

892

54

TOTAL,....

16,098 10,817,453 626,679

5,635 1,252,855 98,233

21,733 |12,070.308 724,912

:

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1920.

D 25

Cargo.

Ballast.

Total.

Vessels. Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Ves- gers. tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels, Tons. Crew.

Passen- Cargo,

gers. tons.

Canton,

West River,

975 167,216 18,954

121,810 701 181,641 10,825

1,676

348,857 29,779

121,810

5,189

593,488 93,358

70,714 280,950 |1,387 | 172,127

20,486

3,603

6,576

765,615 113,844

74,317 280,950

Macao,

188

32,695 2,186

15,545 264 31,384

4,363

452

64,079 6,549

15,545

East Coast,...

1,863

119,342 17,079

50 82,086 146 6,836 1,147

2,009

West Coast,

134

10,671 1,620

47 3,850 38 5,345

742

126,178 18,226

172 16,016 2,362

50

82,086

47

3,850

Total 1920,

8,349

923,412|133,197 70,811 504,241 |2,536 |397,333

37,563

3,603 10,885 1,320,745| 170,760

74,414504,241

Total 1919,

8,101

897,533 133,535 | 102,499 505,436 | 2,252 | 350,856

32,689

1,296 | 10,353 [1,248,389| 166,224

103,795 505,436

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1920.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Ves-

sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

Tons.

D 26

Canton,..

West River,

Macao,

2,602 433,445 45,685 3,345 480,075 64,752 68,930 356 47,993 5,030

390,259 54 6,688 858

2,656

205,679 2,387 | 176,157 28,186 69 11,555

34,868

3,457

440,133

5,732 656,232 99,620 72,387

46,543

390,259

205,679

744

East Coast,

1,435

68,445 12.194

26,113 556 56,276

5,786

:

:

425 59,548

5,774

28,168

1,991 124,721

17,980

26,113

West Coast,

94

9,226 1,506

3,767 83 7,273

933

30

177

16,504 2,439

30

3,767

Total, 1920,

7,832 1,039,184 |129,167

68,930

654,004 3,149 | 257,954

43,189

3,487

10,981 1,297,138 | 172,356 || 72,417

651,004

Total, 1919,

7,137

1,052,324119,783

83,060

745,516 | 3,220 |297,420

17,009

171

10,357 | 1,349,744 | 166,792 | 83,231

745,516

FOREIGN TRADE.

D 27

Table IX.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

1919.

1920.

NO. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

No. of VESSELS.

Toys.

CREW.

British Ships cntered with Cargoes,

4,486

4,773,896

263,335

Do.

do. in Ballast,

205

291,506

14,814

4,497 162

5,591,038

278,909

222,767

11,072

Total,

4,691

4,065,402

278,149

4,659

5,813,805

289,981

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

4,429

4,651,003

261,172

4,423

5.418.332

289,342

do. in Ballast,

247

379,400

15,453

229

875,932

14,920

Total,

4,676

5,030,403

276,625

4,652

5,794,264

304,262

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

3,206

3,870,353

190,249

3,383

4,682,894

208,183

Do.

do. in Ballast,

228

224,170

10,521

206

222,985

10,072

Total,

3,434

4,094,523

200,770

3,589

4,905,879

218,255

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,905

3,496,969

178,786

3,088

4,329,439

195,782

Do.

do. in Ballast,

534

626,007

23,102

482

565,504

21,091

Total,

3,439

4,122,976

201,888

3,570 4,894,943

216,873

do.

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,

Do.

793

29,043

15,142

911

34,458

14,066

do.

in Ba'ast,.

1,716

51,757

17,973

1,587

45,818

17,113

Total,

2,509

80,800

33,115

2,498

.83,276

31,179

do.

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

581

23,686

13,003

*55

30,498

12,388

do.

in Ballast,

Total,

1,945

57,503

20,918

1,775

53,474

19,033

2,526

81,189

33,921

2,530

83,972

31,421

Junks entered with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

8,101

897,533

133,535

8,349

923.412

133,197

2,252

350,856

32,689

2,536

397,333

37,563

Total,

10,353

1,248,389

166,224

10,885

1,320,745

170,760

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

Total,

7,137 3,220

10,357

1,052,324

119,783

7,832

1,039,184

129,167

297,420

47,009

3,149

257,945

43,189

1,349,744

166,792

10,981

1,297,129

172,356

Total of all Vessels entered,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

20,987 10,489,114 20,998 10,584,312

678,258 679,226

21,631 12,123,705 21,733 12,070,308

710,175

724,912

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, iu

Foreign Trade

41,985

21,073,426 1,357,484

43,864 24,194,013

1,435,087

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

4,686

Do.

cleared,

4,823

206,326 211,488

47,052

4,917

223,101

52,293

49,779

4,992

229,134

52,554

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

9,509

417,814

96,831

9,909

452,235

104,847

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Totr Local Trade entered and cleared,

Grand Total,

41.985 9,509

51,494

21,073,426 417,814

21,491,240

1,357,484 96,831

1,454,315

43,364 9,909

53,273 24,646,248

24,194,013 452,235

1,435,087

104,847

1,539,934

PLACES.

Vessels.

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1920.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1919,

Do.,

1920, ...

204,887 4,056,626 1,810,0091 217,196 4,412,180 1,984,562

88,707

2,611,675 955,010 | 6,270,741

4,183

92,338 | 2,905,914 998,395 6,549,484

5,918

293,094 | 6,668,301| 2,765,019 | 6,270,741 4,183 309,534 7,318,424 | 2,982,357 | 6,549,484

5,918

Outside the Waters of the Colony

Canton,.

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

595 14,539 6,073

28411,079 3,380

4 77

34

66 1,903 661

:

180 4,658 1,844

:

53 1,400 509

16

775 19,197 7,917

337 12,479 3,889 16

...

286 15,187 5,219 7,990 3,782 215 8,043 4,573 2,374 125

Other places,

638 21,220 6,965 1,254

177 5,170 | 1,921| 1,105

270

290 15,264 5,253 7,990 3,782 281 9,946 5,234 2,374 125 815 26,390 8,886 2,359 270

Total,.

1,587 48,818 17,113 1,254

911 34,458 14,066 11,485 4,177 2,498 83,276 31,179 12,739 4,177

47323

י, ་י

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

- D 28

Table XI.

Statement of Licensed. Stcam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1920.

D 29

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING,

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews. Passen- Vessels. Ton- Crews.

gers.

nage.

Passen- Cargo, Vessels. Ton- gers. Tons.

Crews. Passen- Cargo,

nage.

gers.

Tons.

Bunker

Coal,

Tons

Within the Waters of the Colony 1919, Do., 1920,

204,170 4,050,277 | 1,808,827 216,980 4,406,197 1,982,893

88,024 | 2,618,024 956,692 6,265,695 92,554 2,012,227 1,000,064 6,557,717

3,731

6,118

293,094 6,668,301 | 2,765,019 | 6,265,695 309,534 | 7,318,424 | 2,982,957 6,557,717

3,731

46,207

6,118

44,914

Outside the Waters of the Colony

Canton,

714 17,458 7,286

:

:

West River,..

289 11,211 3,456

65 1,601 599

2

779 19,059 7,885 2

6,091

51 1,333 501 115

23

340 12,544 3,957

115

23

3,323

Macao,

East Coast,

9 254

108 3,117 1,074

88

:..

287 15,218 5,245 7,433 5,657

296 15,472 5,333 7,433 5,657 | 1,148

183 7,151 4,211 2,439

106

291 10,268 5,285 2,439

106 1,500

Other places,

655 21,434 7,129 1,178

169 5,195 1,832 1,245

177

824 26,629 8,961| 2,423

177 2,732

Total,

1,775 53,474 19,033 1,178

755 30,498 12,388 11,234 5,963 2,530 83,972 31,421 12,412 5,963 14,794

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and Fees collected during the year 1920.

(Under Table UT, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

Licence Book, $1.00 each,.

$2.00

""

Repainting,

.25

>>

Special Permits, .25

11

LICENCE.

LICENCE DUPLICATE RE- SPECIAL Books. LICENCE. PAINTING. PERMITS.

FEES.

:

2,469

...

Passenger Boats, Classes A & B,

1,259

Lighters, Cargo and Water Boats,

1,751

Other Boats,

10,789

Fish Drying Hulks,

64

:

:

Duplicate Licences,

TOTAL,

13,863

2,470

:

:

:

3,565

:

:

:

:

1,739

:

:

$ 2,469.00

2.00

891.25

434.75

7,883.75

44,604.50

35,599.75

564.25

3.00

A

3,565

1,739 $92,452.25

D 31

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour Department during the years 1919 and 1920.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount

Amount

1919.

1920.

1. Light Dues,................

>>

Special Assessment,

2. Licences, Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified :-

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

$ C.

C.

74,545.18 94,225.44

83,973.11102,609.57

94,387.45 92,455.00

1,450.00 1,635.00

5,854.10

3,607.81

27.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,

82.80

66.70

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, do.,

from the New Territories,

2,331.80

2,074.70

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

32,795.25

34,245.00

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

9,795.00

8,615.00

100.00

185.00.

9,556.84

9,228.25

from the New Territories,

Pilots Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements- in-Aid -

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Fees for use of Government Buoys,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.... Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,

'Official Signatures, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Printed Forms, Sale of, Ord. of 1889, Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...........

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899,......

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,.....................

4. Miscellaneous Receipts

33,411.80 34,273.60

260.00

246.00

2,747.50

3,192.50

69,436.00 75,448.00 12,002.42 7,257.12

*44,506.50 †72,663.50 4,944.00 3,946.00 205.50 314.00

1,349.00

1,757.00

7,455.00 7,965.00

33,415.00 30,047.00

108,900.00 115,350.00.

200 90

59.07

..$ 633,794.25 701,493.26

*

† See next page.

Sale of condemned stores, Sale of condemned cargo,

Total,....

Revenue collected by.

Harbour Department,...... $ 44,506.50

Office of Secretary for

Chinese Affairs,

8,800.00

D 32

† Statement of Emigration Fecs, 1919-

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

3,303.82

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,......

10,170.50

17,468.28

$ 63,477.50

$ 24,972.10

Net Revenue..

.$38,505.40

Revenue collected by.

Harbour Department,...... $ 72,663.50

* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1920 :-

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

Office of Secretary for

Chinese Affairs,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,............

8,430.00

5,102.20

9,840.00

24,776.00

$ 90,933.50

$ 34,078.20

Net Revenue...$ 56,855.30

Table XIV.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1920.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Total.

- D 33

Australia,..

1,932

78

2,011

345

00

7

386 2,277

9

85

2,371

British Borneo,

2,977 299 164

84 3,524

2,977

299

164

84

3,524

Calcutta,

1,482 95

46

21 1,614

1,482

95

46

21

1,644

Canada,

12,634

949

4 13,591

233

Co

241 12,867

7

954

13,832

Delagoa Bay,

133

21

32

2 188

133

21

32

188

Dutch Indies,

3,185

100

84

19 3,388 13,427

713

529

118 14,787 16,612

813

613 137

18,175

Fiji,..

21

4.

26

21

མྦྷ

26

Honolulu,

20

20| 3,564

278

125

594,026 3,584

278 125

59

4,046

Havanah,

1,805

6

1,811 1,805

:

1,811

Islands in South Pacific Ocean,..

545

545

172

172 717

:

717

Japan,...

462

75

19

19

575

462

75

19

19

576

Mauritius,

166

28

22

217

467

87

64

3

621

633 115 86

4

838

Mexico,

170

5

9

184 170

...

184

South America,.

827

45

57

2

931 827

45

57

2

931

Society Island,

321

:

321

321

321

Samoa Island,

502

2

504

502

504

Straits Settlements,..

|25,981|11,843 | 3,872 1,668 43,364

456

81

21

13

Tahiti,

26

15

4

2

47

Timor,

44

11

9

68

.....

United States of America,

1,533

59

3 1,601 9,544

471 319

Total 1920,

Total 1919,

|50,679 |12,424 | 5,323

|19,417 | 4,057 | 1,300

1,808 70,234 |32,295 | 1,344| 1,161 469 25,303 31,468 1,714 1,223

Total Passengers by British Ships, Total Passengers by Foreign Shij §,

571 26,437 11,924| 3,893| 1,681 | 43,935

109,920|11,077

224 |35,024 (82,974|13,768 | 6,484|2,032 (105,258 261 34,666 50,885 | 5,771| 2,583 730 59,909

Excess of Passengers by British Ships,.

(50,679 12,4245,323 1,808 70,234 |32,295| 1,344| 1,161 224 35,021 18,384 11,080 4,162 1,584 35,210

***

26

15

4

2

47

44

11

9

4

68

53 378

13 11,521

Table XV.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1885 to 1920 inclusive.

1885. 1890, 63,138 66,706

1895.

60,360

1900. 1905. 1910. 66,961 73,105 88,452

1915.

109,110

1920.

84,602

Table XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1911 to 1920 inclusive.

Whither bound.

1911.

1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918.

1919.

1920.

Straits Settlements, Males,

83,875

Straits Settlements, Females,

17,031

68,809 85,099 36,764 15,215 17,254 8,210

32,440 66,965 53,250 5,914 7,424 30,330 8,838 15,832 10,042 2,105 4,214 13,605

Total,

100,906

84,024 102,353 44,971

41,278 82,797

63,292

8,019 11,638

43,935

Other Ports, Males,

Other Ports, Females,

33,935

724

37,791

812

39,001

1,405

30,358

964

25,811 33,182 31,078 1,186 1,674

1,928

34,096

1,715

46,044 59,128

2,287 2,195

Total,

34,659 38,633 40,406

31,322 26,997 34,856 33,006 35,811

48,331 61,323

Grand Total,

135,565 | 122,657 | 142,759 76,296 68,275 117,653 96,298

43,830

59,969 | 105,258

>

D 34

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the year 1920.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

- D 35

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M:

F.

M.

J.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Australia,

1,505

81

142

11 1,772

344

31

60

1+

449

1,849

115

202

55

2,221

Bangkok,

1,526

99 153

47

1,825

88

19

2

102

1,614

104 160

19

1.927

British Borneo,.

911

67 107

24

1,109

911

67 107

24

:

1,109

Canada,

7,402

365

673 193

8,623

130

12

4

154

7,532

363 685 197

8,777

Dutch Indics,

199

20

44

11

274

12,331

611 | 1,109

318

14,369

12,530

6311,153

329

14,643

Great, Britain,

4,281

4,281

125

125

4,406

4,406

Honolulu,

141

11

162

824

53

85

25

987

965

61

Japan,

1,855

88

149

41

2,133

1,815

113

171

56

2,155

3,670

201

320

:ཚསྶོ

96

27

1,149

97

4,288

Marseilles,

1,035

:

1,035

4,065

4,065

5,100

5,100

Mauritius,

81

B

4

South America,..

20

2

B

2

22

90

102

9

21

137

183

12

25

7

227

27

201

10

17

235

221

12

20

262

Straits Settlements,..

56,762

United States of America,

781

2,732 4,770 | 1,282 80 60

65,546

6,013

406

771

190

7,380

62,775

3,138 | 5,541 |1,472

72,926

18

889

3,781

217 402

111

4,514

4,565

247 462 129

5,403

Total Passengers, 1920,.....

Do.,

76,499

1919, . 85,528

3,488 6,116 | 1,663

87,766

2,139 | 3,646 1,072

29,822

92,385 39,495

1,463 2,655

732

34,672 | 106,321

4,951 8,771 2,395 122,138

1,255 |2,213

072

43,635 |125,023

3,394 | 5,859|1,744 | 136,020

Total Passengers by British Ships,

76,499

3,488 |6,116 | 1,663

11

Foreign

29,822

1,463 | 2,655

732

Excess of

British 11

4,677

2,0253,461

931

Table XVIII.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1885 to 1920 inclusive.

1885.

68,830

1890. 1895. 1900. 1905. 96,068 104,118 109,534 137,814

1915.

1910. 1920. 146,585 151,728 100,641

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for

Where from.

Ten Years, from 1911 to 1920 inclusive.

1911. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918. 1919.

1920.

D 36

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,.

114,069 | 123,594|123,363 136,753 5,688 7,869 10,381 4,605 119,757 | 131,463|133,744 | 141,358

79,349 46,451 65,539 36,662 60,812 1,482 1,201 6,896

68,316

80,831

47,655

2,534 2,871

72,435 39,196 63,683

4,610

72,926

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

28,816

Total,

1,321

30,137

30,335 31,756 26,462 27,953 1,450 1,421 1,007 969 31,785 33,177 27,469 28,922

23,933 23,827 817 1,970

24,750 | 25,797

32,014 70,070 46,776 2,899 2,267

2,736

34,913

72,337

49,512

Grand Total,

|149,891 |163,248 | 166,921 |168,827 |109,753

72,405 98,232

74,109 | 136,020 | 122,438

{

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong during the year 1920.

Official

Name of Vessel.

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Rig.

Build.

Power.

Where and when built.

Remarks.

W

1. Rupara,

123,662

786

2. Hailoong,

132,642

1,108

148, N.H.P.

344,

Fore & Aft Schooner

3. Malate,

142,227

147

4. St. Monance,

142,228

44

142, N.H.P.

5. Poet Langland,

142,229

84

104,

Fore & Aft

None

Schooner

Nil

39

Clencher | Hebburn, Patrick,

1906 | Transferred from Sydney. 1911

"3

Shanghai, Unknown Purchased from French. Hongkong,

..1919 First Registry.

.1919

6. Poet Chaucer,.

142,230

84

104, "

1919

""

לי

7. Azuma,

142,231

6

Cutter

Carvel

Yokohama,

1915

"}

8. Union,.

142,232

24

10.6, N.H.P.

Nil

"}

Hongkong,

1913

9. Taikoo Lam,.

142,233

7

30, B.H.P.

1920

"""

10. Allinga,

105,578

1,406

300, N.H.P.

Schooner

11. Ladye Jean,

142,234

17

15, B.H.P.

Lorcha

Clencher Greenock, Carvel

1897

Hongkong,

.1903

Transferred from Sydney. First Registry.

12. Taikoo Ching,

142,235

6

30,

13. Szechuen,

151,411

1,594

195.3, N.II.P.

Nil

Schooner

1920

13

";

Clencher

1920

"

14. Burrumbeet,.

91,487

,566

180, Estimated

Wallsend,

1884

""

Transferred from Shanghai,

15. Stathis,

151,412 3,293

341, N.H.P.

Nil

Hongkong,

1920

First Registry.

16. Hydrangea,

151,413

561

232,

Fore & Aft Schooner

"

Glasgow,

1916

17. Changsha,

91,952

1,463

400, Combined

Schooner

33

Greenock,

.1886

Transferred from Sydney.

18. Taiyuan,

91,968

1,459

400,

1886

"

19. Indo-China,

151,414

12

24, N.H.P.

""

Nil

"

""

""

>>

Hongkong,

1920

First Registry.

20. Penelope I,..

151,415

6

30, B.H.P.

21. La Cigale,

151,416

15

22. Victoria,

110,996 1,870

275, N.H.P.

None

Cutter

Schooner

Carvel

1920

}}

}}

1896

""

23. Gabo,

79,541

1,246

300,

29

"}

Clencher Dundee,

Fife,.

1902 Transferred from Melbourne. .1883

- D 37 -

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hongkong during the year 1920.

1. Lien Shing,

98,078

2. David Gillies,

126,986

1,049 10. 2.17 9211. 3.08

Schooner

Clencher

In & out

***

Sonan, Glasgow, Hongkong,

.1890

1908

Totally lost at sea. Do.

plating

3. Hock Lee,

123,898

233

4. 1.18

4. Sun On,

120,984

134

1.11.05

5. Hauroto,

84,479

1,276

3.11.15

Schooner

None

Schooner

Clencher

Faisley,

.1908 Sold to Foreigners.

Carvel

Clencher

Hongkong,

1885

Do.

Dumbarton,

.1882

Totally lost at sea.

6. Wollowra,

104,811

1,678 21.12.15

Newcastle-on-Tyne,

.1891

Sold to Foreigners.

51

"1

7. Sing Sing,

137,697

7 27. 7.16

8. Logam,

128,714 |

9. Brisbane,.

87,040

10. Wa Sun,

133,247

10 12. 2.12 716 14. 6.15 245 24. 1.14

None

Nil

Schooner

Carvel

Hongkong,

.1915

Broken up by owner.

1901

Do.

"

13

Clencher Grangemouth,

1883 Totally lost at sea.

Nil

"}

Hongkong,

.1914

Sold to Foreigners.

4

Rig.

Build,

Where and when built,

Reason of Cancellation.

D 38

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS

AND EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

STAFF.

1. Commander C. W. Beckwith, R.N., Harbour Master, acted as Superintendent in addition to his other duties throughout the

year.

Mr. H. A. Taylor, Monopoly Analyst, was on leave from 22nd January to 30th December, during which period Mr. O. F. Lubatti acted as Monopoly Analyst.

Mr. C. J. Roe was appointed Supervisor and Accountant on 1st January.

Chief Preventive Officer J. C. Wilden died on 23rd December and was succeeded by Mr. S. J. Clarke.

LIQUORS CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE.

2. The net revenue collected from Duties and Licensed Ware- houses during 1920 was $779,795.85 as compared with $739,786.25 for 1919.

The general details are as follows :-

Duties on European Liquors,

1920. .$241,544.70

1919.

$215,552.78

Duties on Chinese Liquors,

530,928.49

Licensed Warehouse Fees,

6,729.16

517,678.47 6,500.00

Licensed Warehouse Overtime

Fees,

593.50

55.00

Total.

$779,795.85

$739,786.25

OPIUM MONOPOLY.

3. The revenue for 1920 was $4,317,970.90 as compared with $6,803,034.65 for 1919. The figure for 1918 was almost exactly double that for 1920. The price of $14.50 per tael was maintained throughout the year.

E 2

As is shown in Table IV the number of seizures of illicit opium shows a slight increase over 1919, as does also that of convictions obtained. The total amount of prepared opium seized was nearly three times as great as in 1919.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF RAW OPIUM.

4. The movements of Raw Opium are shown in Tables V to VII.

TOBACCO ORDINANCE.

5. The net revenue collected under the Tobacco Ordinance was $631,877.66 as compared with $618,905.55 for 1919, an increase of $12,972.11. Tobacco duties remained the Details are given in Tables VIII to XII.

TRADE STATISTICS.

6. Table XIII shows the number of permits, etc., issued during the year under the provisions of the Importation and Exportation Ordinance of 1915 and gives some indication of the amount of labour involved in the collection of accurate Trade Statistics where no Customs House machinery is in existence. The figures show on the whole a slight increase over 1919.

The working of the Ordinance in question-in its origin purely a war measure--has been modified so as to cause the least possible inconvenience and delay to shippers and importers. The results are consolidated in Quarterly and Annual Trade Returns which are of undoubted value to traders not only in this Colony but also in other parts of the Empire.

The total trade (excluding Treasure) for 1920 amounted to £212,302,539 as compared with £194,594,642 for 1919. Of this Imports were valued at £103,932,602 (as against £90,651,708 for 1919), and Exports at £108,369,937 (as against £103,942,934 for 1919).

The Imports of Treasure for the year totalled £31,754,334, including £18,994,688 of gold and £12,658,538 of silver.

The Exports of Treasure for the year were £45,292,645 including £31,956,844 of gold and £12,870,841 of silver.

E 3

Complete figures will be found in the Annual Trade Return for 1920, from which the following items will perhaps be of chief interest:

Imports.

Exports.

£

£

Camphor

624,380

Cement

802,359

Chinese Medicines, Miscellaneous

2,181,794

2,073,920

Coal.

3,540,507

728,656

Cigarettes

1,765,174

Cotton Yarn

.12,600,842 10,373,588

Firecrackers

677,394

Fish and Fishery Products

2,586,923

2,759,250

Flour, Wheat

1,968,777

1,847,948

Fruits, Dried

541,691

Gunny Bags

1,167,451

1,038,255

Ginseng

919,453

Hosiery

638,386

Hides, Cow....

651,014

Italians, Plain, Black.

929,201

Kerosene

4,285,827

3,504,193

Leather, Sole

1,251,963

1,355,175

I

Liquid Fuel

696,196

Matches

679,055

728,773

Paperware

522,295

Peanuts

1,009,880

766,402

Peanut Oil

655,448

791,304

Rattans

748,439

Rice, Broken

1,383,945

995,697

White

.12,378,083

""

10,870,491

22

Sugar Candy

""

Raw Refined

Shirtings, Grey

White

""

Silk, Piece Goods

Tea

Raw...

Tinplates.....

.10,211,773

529,855

4,496,448

1,969,102 14,206,301

1,159,403

3,505,942 1,652,021

1,728,605 2,278,799

624,511

817,264

749,900

Tin Slabs and Ingots

3,060,316

3,856,625

Tobacco, Native, Prepared

746,041

Raw...

628,570

595,598

""

Vermicelli

684,437

Venetians, Plain, Black..

707.336

E 4

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

7. The net revenue collected by this Department during the year was $5,729,644.41 a decrease of $2,434,656.33 as compared with 1919. The decrease in opium sales specified above accounts for all of this reduction.

The actual expenditure of this Department for the year was $502,114.66 as against $809,627.24 for 1919 showing a decrease of $307,512.58.

22nd March, 1921.

N. L. SMITH,

Superintendent of Imports and Exports.

!

Table I.

European Liquors.

E 5

Balance in

Bond on

Class of Liquor.

31st

Exported

ex Ship

to Ship

Arrivals.

Ship's

Stores.

Denatured.

Consumed

Locally.

December,

or ex

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1920.

1919.

Bond.

In H.K. & K.

Wharf & Godown Co.'s General Bonded Warehouses.

In Holt's

Wharf

General

In Licensed

Total.

Bonded

Warehouses. in Bond

Warehouses,

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallens. Gullons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons. Gallons.

Ale, Beer, and Stout,

65,156

470,923

166,164

24,804

232,396

28,556

26,778

57,381112,715

Bitters,

596

505

350

46

242

2

15

446

463

Brandy,

15,029

69,073

60,631

1,291

3,600

5,161

2,318

11,098

18,580

California Wine,.......

50

3,600

3,300

350

350

Champagne,

2,235

10,654

6,293

549

2,356

850

4

2,887

3,691

Cider,

234

130

101

Claret,

10,045

26,864

17,979

779 (d) 1,117

7,542

2,022

164

7,306

9,492

Cocktail,

22

237

80

84

90

5

95

Gin,

11,994

16,936

12,397

3,734

4,664

1,260

48

6,827

8,135

Ginger Wine,

159

403

21

262

50

:

229

279

Liqueurs,..

5,061

6,429

5,517

798

1,278

1,145

20

2,732

3,897

Madeira,

57

478

106

35

136

258

258

Malaga,

6

2

4

Marsala,

133

163

16

54

226

226

Medicated Wine,

47

352

318

...

81

81

Muscatel,..

34

1,263

1,124

163

4

4

Port,

7,355

16,163

9,421

1,062

4,016

1,386

236

7,397

9,019

Prune Wine,

160

35

...

35

...

160

160

Rum,

2,336

27,022

12,637

170

(a) (b) (c)

(a)

12,924

(b) (d)

191

1,310

2,126

3,436

(c)

(a) Includes 3,032 gallons distilled locally.

"}

12,924

1,155

"

""

""

>>

(d) Used in manufacture of tobacco.

Table I,—Continued.

European Liquors,—Continued.

Balance in

Exported

Bond on

ex Ship

Class of Liquor.

31st

December,

1919.

Arrivals.

to Ship

Ship's

Stores.

Denatured.

Consumed

Locally.

or ex

Bond.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1920.

In H,K, & K.

In Holt's

Wharf &

Godown Co.'s General Bonded Warehouse,

Wharf

General

Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Total.

Warehouse.

E

6

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons. Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Sake,

346

9,697

2,771

104

6,984

184

...

184

Sherry,.

2,301

5,619

1,650

752

1,820

222

10

Sparkling Wine,.

236

660

152

38

404

4

Spirits of Wine & Arrack,

186,349

894,147

817,226

49 (a) 168,785

175

16,828

3,466

298

77,433

3,698

302

94,261

Still Wine, (not specially

mentioned),

2,117

7,091

2,366

616

3,390

346

94

2,396

2,826

Tonic Wine,

15

ن

Vermouth,

10,359

7,835

11,550

760

2,794

1,125

225

1,740

3,090

Vibrona,

5

74

Whisky,

29,492

79,612

65,316

11,821

70

16,104

9

9

372 2,246

13,245

15,863

Wincarnis,

46

859

542

305

58

58

Wine and Spirits, (Un-

classified),

8,803 (b) 96,605 (b) 93,211 |(b) 393

Note.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

(a) For burning, and manufacture of perfumery, vinegar, etc.

(b) 8,404 (b) 142 | (b) 3,258

(4) Transhipment cargo. Details not available.

:

11,804

(b)

Table II.

Chinese Liquors.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1919.

Consumed.

Arrivals.

Locally

Exported.

Denatured and used for

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1920.

Vinegar, etc.

Imported

Liquors

Dis-

Bonded

Ware- Im- Distilled Im- Distilled houses. tilleries. ported. Locally. ported. Locally.

Liquors. Distilled Locally.

[ex Bond or

ex Ship

ex Dis.

tilleries.

to Ship.

ex Bonded

Ware-

houses.

In H.K. and Im- Liquors K. Wharf and Licensed In Dis- ported Distilled Godown Co.'s Warc- tilleries.

Liquors. Locally. Bonded houses.

In

Total

in

Bond.

Warehouses.

Not more than 25%

of alcohol by weight,

6,986

21,944 925,921

Gallons, Gallons. Gallons.Gallons, Gallons. Gallons, Gallons| Gallons. Gallons. Gallons.) Gallons.] Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. 303,047 649,090 625,233 278,037 87,096 8,237

133 85,083

83

5,564 22,342 27,989 1

35%

665

£5%

11

#

50%

69,479

1,996

93 66,280

352446,869

2,125

42,305| 10,935 36,810 54,638 3,911 44,647 42,431

1,348

288

1,372 1,389 2,761

611 397,318

1,885

2,652

1,368

40,356

14,223

62,376

12

76,611

154

1,234

1,388

Above 50%

Total,

934

934

31

79,126

25,389 |1,442,129 889,999 704,738 662,654731,378 | 93,659

9,893

133 | 125,439

14,460 70,546

23,743 |108,749

Note.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

Table III.

Return of Distilleries for the year 1920.

Stock on 31st Dec.,

1919.

Output,

1920.

Consumed

locally.

Sold into Bond.

Exported.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Hongkong and New Kowloon

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,

11,119 | 442,044 | 303,379

Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. 7,164 53,081

Gallons. Gallons.

Gallons.

78,739

10,800

27

35%

45%

52

16,038

11,495

288 3,911

396

E

346

44,041

527

1,368

2,130

40,356

6

00

>>

"

Rum,

289

16,822

3,032 12,924

1,155

(1) Total,

11,806 518,945| 315,401

8,820 62,154 12,924

40,356

78,739

12,357

Manufactured in New Territories Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,j for consumption in Hongkong.

13,825 | 262,817| 223,668

1,073 34,015

35%

41 26,267 25,315

"

";

45%

578

56

11

}}

(2) Total,

13,872 289,662 | 249,039 1,073 34,537

6,344

11,542

993

522

6

6,344

12,541

Denatured

Denatured

for

for making preserving Tobacco.

Bean-curd.

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1920.

Territories.

2

Table III,-Continued.

Return of Distilleries for the year 1920,—Continued.

Manufactured in New Territories Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight, for consumption in

New

35%

"

45%

"}

"}

(3) Total,

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1919.

Output,

1920.

Consumed

locally.

Bond. Sold into

Exported.

Gallons, Gallons. |

Gallons. Gallons. Gallons, Gallons.

98,186

98,186

1

28

28

98,214 98,214

Denatured Denatured

for making

for

preserving

Tobacco. Bean-curd.

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1920.

Gallons. Gallons.) Gallons.

(1) Hongkong and New Kowloon,

(2) Manufactured in New Territories for consumption in Hongkong, (3) Manufactured in New Territories for consumption in New Territories,]

...

11,806 518,945 | 315,401 13,872 289,662 249,039

98,214 98,214

8,820 62,154 12,924

40,356 78,739 12,357

1,073 34,537

6,344

12,541

Grand Total,.

25,678| 906,821 | 662,654 9,893 96,691

12,924

40,356

85,083

24,898

NOTE.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

E 9 -

Number

Number

Month.

of

Seizures.

of

Convictions.

Raw Opium.

Table IV.

Seizures of Illicit Opium during 1920.

Amount of Prepared Opium and Opium Dross Confiscated during the year.

Prepared Opium. Opium Dross. Dross Opium.

1920.

Taels.

Taels.

Taels.

Taels.

January,

28

11

310.50

1,850.23

155.00

February,

21

8

1,232.50

1,194.60

•12

.

March,

15

8

253.00

400'05

18.50

April,

35

18

1,464.50

5,322.29

104.00

*273*14

May,

39

15

4,504.50

499.32

30.14

1.95

June,

32

19

5,028.00

13,613.49

52.00

•81

July,

30

14

138.00

4,675.10

126.00

1.04

August,

42

24

294.00

6,847.38

50.60

·12

September,

40

28

575.00

29,182.41

12.55

65'04

October,

43

28

489.00

22,579.90

28.61

·10

November,

63

42

3,979.45

4.980.39

41.82

2.60

December,

56

35

987-20

15,031.23

47.06

1.045

Total,

444

250

19,255.65

106,176.39

666.28

*345.965

Total for 1919,

379

223

20,824.5

* Includes 273 taels opium Skin.

28,262.08

1,000.8

2.11

E 10

Table V.

Varieties of Certificated and Uncertificated Raw Opium Imported and Exported during the year 1920.

CERTIFICATED.

UNCERTIFICATED.

Grand

Total.

Malwa.

Patna. Benares. Total. Turkish. Persian. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Total

Patna. Benares. Total.

chests.

chests.

chests. chests.

chests.

chests.

Stock on 1st January, 1920, Imported during the year 1920,.......

Total,...

Exported during the year 1920,.....|

Used locally....

Deduct quantity boiled by Govern- ment Opium Monopoly dur- gin the year 1920,

Total,..

Balance on the evening of the

:

:

:

E 11

15

4

19

15

15

112

512

...

6241

A

15

4

19

112

527

6391

:

:

109

...

:

:

:

:

:

5123

6213

:

295

295

329

* 901

901

1,525

1,196

1,196

1,854

† 676

676

1,297

‡ 3

3

:..

225

225

225

112

512

6241/

901

901

1,525

15

15

295

295

329

† 576 chests for Macao Opium Farmer of which 226 chests exported for Tai Seng the Old Farmer and 350 chests for Lee Seng the New Farmer from July to December, 1920.

31st December, 1920,..

15

4

19

* For Hongkong Government Mofiopoly, Macao Opium Farmer and for Kobe.

† 100 chests for Kobe.

3 chests used for Medical purposes by A. S. Watson & Co. of Hongkong,

Table VI.

Destination of Opium Exported during the year 1920.

By Steamers to China :—

By Steamers to Non-Chinese Ports:-

London,

Macao,

Keelung,.

Kobe,

Total for Non-Chinese Ports,

Total for Chinese Ports,

Grand Total,

Malwa. Turkish. Benares. Persian. Total.

Total

in lbs.

chests.

chests. chests. chests. chests.

lbs.

:

:

:

:

109

576

100

2

2

274

576

92,160

510/

6192

84,435

:.

100

16,000

- E 12 -

109

676

512 1,297

192,8691/

109

676

512

1,2971

192,8691

E 13

accom

Table VI,-Continued.

Destination of Raw Opium other than Uncertificated Bengal Opium exported during the year 1920.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. Persian, Turkish. Chinese. Total. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests.

Keelung

(Formosa)

London

Total

:

5102 109

619

:

2

5124

109

621

Opium Prepared in Hongkong during 1920 by Government

Monopoly.

Patna. Chests.

Benares. Chests.

Persian Chests.

Total.

Chests.

Boiled by Government

Monopoly

2

223

3*

228

* Confiscated Opium.

Sales of Prepared Opium, etc. during the year 1920.

Local Consumption :-

Bengal Prepared Opium

Persian

"

Dross Opium.....

.288,082.5 taels.

5,190.0

"2

1,104.0

""

.་་་

E 14

Table VII.

Imports and Exports of Raw Opium during the year 1920 Exclusive of Uncertificated Bengal Opium.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. | Persian, Turkish. Chinese. Total.

chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Imports,

Exports,

512

†112

512

109

6242

621

† 3 chests were used locally by A. S. Watson & Co., for medicinal purposes.

Imports and Exports of Uncertificated Bengal Opium

during the year 1920.

Imports,

Exports,

Patna. chests.

Benares. chests.

Total.

chests.

*901

901

†676

676

† 226 chests for Macao Old Opium Farmer.

† 350 † 100 * 225

11

""

"1

""

"

New Kobe.

"

imported by Government Monopoly on 1919 and

1920 Contracts.

Origin of Raw Opium (all kinds) imported during 1920.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. Persian. Turkish. Chinese. Total. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Bombay,.....

Turkey,

Calcutta,........

Total,......

:

:

901

5123

5123

:

112

112

901

901

512

112

1,5251

1

- E 15

Table VIII.

Licences and Internal Revenue :-Duties on Tobacco.

Opening Licensed Warehouse Overtime Fees, $

78.00

Manufacturers' Licences Fees,

772.00

Importers' Licences Fees,

112.00

Retailers' Licences Fees,

7,692.00

Licensed Warehouses Licences Fees,...

1,993.75

Duties on Tobacco,.

621,229.91

Total,

$ 631,877.66

E 16 -

MONTH.

1st

Quality

$1.50

4th

Quality

5th

Quality

per lb.

70 c.

per lb.

30 c.

20 c.

10 €.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

Table IX.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Manufactured Locally during the year 1920.

2nd

Quality

CIGARS.

3rd

Quality

CIGARETTES.

4th

Quality

10 c.

per lb.

1st

2nd

Quality

Quality

3rd

Quality

70 c.

per lb.

30 e.

per lb.

20 c.

per lb.

Chinese

Tobacco

10 c.

Amount

of

per Ib.

Duty

Collected,

mille

mille

mille

mille

1920

mille

mille

mille

mille

mille.

lb.

0.

January,

February,

March,

to 00 10

112

157

282

3,461

19,524

12.210

2,060

65,663

34,169.86

62

194

385

3,382

20,775

11,245

2,182

55,125

33,540.29

69

182

487

3,898

20,260

11,575

1,782

April,

62,845

34,926.70

55

113

390

2,853

17,835

11,095

2,830

59,619

May,

30,681.48

60

141

488

2,853

18,780

12,845

6,206

June,

64,727 33,555.62

65

127

485

2,725

19,268

July,

9,765

13,610

66,905

34,296,44

12

39

128

411

2,893

18,480

7,280

18,018

August,

61,393

33,336.63

15

52

153

473

2,654

16,990

6,600

19,355

September,.

60,952

31,966.17

5

46

155

505

3,015

16,980

7,245

20,507

October,

57,966

32,630.93

41

197

559

3,378

18,600

November,

7,260

17,490

59,433

34,105.92

15

4

60

210

173

3,109

18,420

December,

7,815

18,580

58,878 34,124.53

28

17

75

243

642

2,843

20,050

8,370

18,895

54,762 35,619.41

Total,

118

73

736

2,000

5,560

37,064

225,962 113,305

141,515

728,29 8 402,954.28

Note

Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

Table X.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Imported during the year 1920.

E 17 -

CIGARS.

CIGARETTES.

TOBACCO.

Chinese

Tobacco

Amount

MONTH.

Ist

2nd

3rd

30 e.

Quality Quality Quality Quality | Quality $1.50 70 c.

per lb. per lb. per lb. per lb.

4th

Tobacco

Leaf

Snuff

5th

1st

Quality

2nd

Quality

3rd

Quality

4th

Quality

1st

Quality

2nd

Quality

20 0.

10 6.

70 6.

30 c.

20 c.

10 c.

70 c.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

30 c.

per lb.

3rd

Quality

20 c.

per lb.

4th

Quality

10 c.

per lb.

10 c.

per lb.

10 c.

$1.50

per lb.

per lb.

of

Duty

Collected.

1920.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Ib.

lb.

lb.

lb.

G.

January,

62

25

115

17

1

2,258

2,783

10,017

8,215

659

192

173

19,098

2,724

February,

49

23

141

12

2,490

1,126

8,235

7,973

985

290

175

10

16,613

1,475

March,

91

43

175

63

18

3,005

2,972

6,123

9.454

1,115

145

306

4,400

16,829

3,757

April,

92

22

91

33

2,918

3,673

4,979

4,854

1,318

111

2,576

16,009

4,968

18,556.87

18,877,87

20,647,37

18,686.64

May,

62

14

68

3

3,691

3,084

4,872

9,330

750

279

19

25

17,793

4,167

19,415.22

June,

63

13

89

33

2,916

4,458

4,602

1,811

652

35

10

1,764

18,358

1,616

16,587.16

July,

79

$1

2,246

4,999

3,753

831

386

32

15

196

17,980

3,370

14,743,59

August..

68

100

B

3,211

4,101

3.131

4,362

759

130

10

451

17,854

5,205

17,251.75

September,...

77

49

77

2,842

5.190

3,649

4,871

1,039

93

10

687

17,389

3,920

1

17,562.00

October,

4<

47

30

3,577

6,613

2,558

4,019

859

95

1,572

907

19,206

1,033

18,679.56

November,

76

57

14

11

3,335

4,910

2,312

3,607

682

513

260

1,188 19,592

1,654

17,073.27

December,

121

78

17

3,771

6,968

2,691

2,715

1,172

173

149

856

17,353

3,458

4

20,879.49

Total,......

888

182

1,091

802

88

36,260 53,877

56,922

62,042

10,376

2,088

2,703

13,060

214,074 (1)37,347

17

218,960.79

(1) Used in manufacture of Chinese Pipe Tobacco consumed in the New Territories.

Note.-Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

Table XI.

Tobacco Local Factories for the year 1920,

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1919.

Issued

for

Produced.

Exported.

Ships' Stores

Removed

to other

Factories.

Consumed locally.į

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1920.

manu-

Class of Tobacco.

facture.

Mille.

lb.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Cigars 1. Valued at not less than $2.20 per lb.

83

2.

}}

""

$1.60

152

3.

""

$1.10

988

"}

4.

"S

"

$ .60

965

15

5. Valued at less than

$.60

""

1,840

Total,..

4,028

Cigarettes 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per 1b..

6,289

11

2.

3.

"

$1.10

1,050

19

"}

19

$ .60

34,396

4. Valued at less than

$ .60

832

"J

Total,.

42,567

:

1,777

1,604

1,278

1,520

5,934

5,439

2,869

1,206

6,327

1,644

18,185

F.

11,413

17

783,126

692,218

726,521

498,720

847,241

742,136

157,882

11,491

2,164,770

1,944,565

Note.

Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

*

:

17

118

92

73

91

27

736

472

33

No!

2,000

499

28

5,560

984

L

105

:

8,187

2,138

37,064

9,862

225,962

5,475

113,305

15,369

141,515

5,113

517,846

35,819

- E 18

Removed

Balance in Bond

Exported.

Ships' Stores.

to other Consumed locally. Factories.

on 31st Dec.,

1920.

Table XI,-Continued.

Tobacco Local Factories for the year 1920.

420

Mille.

lb.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille. lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

Ib.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1919.

Issued

for

Class of Tobacco.

manu-

facture.

Pipe Tobacco (non-Chinese) valued at not less than

$1.60 per lb

""

at less than 60c. per lb...

Total,..

Pipe Tobacco (Chinese) valued at less than

610

610

...

:

Produced.

125

125

:

:

:

60c. per lb...

Total,.

14,023

1,073,921

328,088

:

14,023

1,073,021

328,088

American and Manila Tobacco Leaf,

449,760

7,729,828

3,721

""

Clean

""

"}

112,488

6,948,779

44,827

Total,.

562,248

7,729,828

6,948,779

48,048

(a) (b)

(c)

Asiatic Tobacco Leaf,

306.327

1,709,217

15,660

Clean

9.183

989.929

י:

Total.

815,510

1,709,217

989,029

15,660

""

"}

Note.-Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table. (a) Includes 87,347 lbs. consumed in the New Territories.

(1)

13

(c)

"}

5,755

1,822

25,140

grown

"}

"1

...

:

420

:

- E 19

728,298

17,535

728,298

17,535

:

32,350

41,619

73,969

(d)

25,140

25,140

:

:

:

502,782

95,330

598,112

336,380

9,818

:

346,198

CLASS OF TOBACCO.

Cigars 1. Valued at not less than $2.20 per lb.

2.

""

"1

""

3.

$1.60 $1.10

21

""

14

}}

4.

$ .60

19

5.

less than

$ .60

55

>>

(Unclassified),

Total,..

BALANCE IN BOND ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1919.

TOBACCO

MAN

Issu

ARRIVALS.

M

FAC

88

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

Cases.Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

195

1,528

23

183

86

1,198

5

327

76

20

76

20

:

:

::

309

:

2,028

2,028 86

888888

86

:

:

3,324

Cigarettes 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per lb.

19,192

105,435

2.

,

*

"

፡፡

3.

"

"

"}

$1.10 $.60

13

8,242

76,176

11

22,710

$9,769

4.

>>

>>

less than $.60

21

8,053

72,093

11

(Unclassified),

35 249

10,319

Total,...

35

249

58.197

10,319

353,473

*1

$1.10 $.60

(Non Chinese)

Pipe Tobacco 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per 1b.

21

"

less than $.60

(Unclassified),

2.

2:

17

ཋཱ་

>>

Total,....

(Unclassified),

Total,........

(Chinese)

Pipe Tobacco, Valued at less than $ .60 per lb.

"

Snuff,

(Unclassified),

12

Total,..

10

280

2 280

:

51

184

51 184

:

:

:

3,709

14,530

700

4,052

661

3:002

23,148

588

75

5,070

588

75

44,732

...

118,660

|67,901| 2,550

:

118,660 67,901 2,550

8,729

8,729

:

+

::

:

:

1,745,505

1,745,505

:

:

American and Manila Leaf,...

84,598

"}

(Unclassified),

Total,....

42 11 2,865

113 4,903

42 11 2,865

84,598

113 4,983

:

Asiatic Leaf,

1,175,637

(Unclassified),

2,438 | 3,376

7148,342 21.430

""

Total,..

2,438 3,376

1,175,637

71 18,342 21,130

17

17

8,304,119

8,304,119

5,763,433

5,763,433

Note.-Fract

E 21

Table XII.

TOBACCO RETURN FOR THE YEAR 1920.

General Table.

MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.

ISSUED FOR

ARRIVALS.

MANU-

EXPORTED EX SHIP TO SHIP OR EX BOND.

SHIPS' STORES

FACTURE.

68.711

3,503

24,253

2,190

49,866

2,565

8,201

13

151,034

:

8,271

S. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

lb.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

Mille.

Ib.

195

23

86

1,528

183

1,198

327 88

528

10

114

10

15

58

ON

:

Co

6

20

20

2,028 86

:

309

:

:

2,028 86

19,192

:

:

:

3,324

105,435

:

2,065 78

2,065 78

:

667

70

:

BALANCE IN BOND ON 31ST

DECEMBER, 1919.

10

10

249

249

to

:

2

280

8,242

22,710

8,053

10,319

58,197

10.319

280

3,709 700

:

::

::

:

1 184

1 184

::

:

76,176

99,769

72,093

¡10,062

30

353,473

10,062

3

:

:

::

:

:

::

14,530

4,052

3;002

23,148

562

355

44,732

562 355

:

:

:

661

588

75

5,070 588

75

:

118,660

|67,901| 2,550

118,660 67,901| 2,550

8,729

8,729

::

:

medi

::

:

1,745,505

67,949 2,726

67,949 2,726

1,745,505

17

17

4

1,629

1,51

1,366

1,201

110 8,147

9

1,091

14,252

3,908

:

:

1,564,401

1,561,104

. 5,371

5,371

:

:

RAW TOBACCO.

84,598

8,304,119

7,729,828

638,465

42

42

11 2,865

112,865

:

84,598

:..

113 4,903

113) 4,903

155 4,914

17

:

:

8,304,119

7,729,828

155 4,914

17

638,465

1,175,637

5,763,433) 1,709,217

2,438 3,376

71 48,342 21,430

71 46;667

::

4,079,295

2,438 [.3,376

1,175,637

71 48,342 21,130

5,763,433 1,709,217

71,46,667

1,079,295

:

:

::

:

Note.-Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE ROYAL

OBSERVATORY, HONGKONG, FOR THE YEAR 1920.

1.-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.

The grounds were kept in order by the Botanical and Forestry Department with the assistance of the Observatory coolies.

Concreting the paths round the servants quarters was com- pleted in the month of October.

II.-METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

Barometers.-A Marvin compensated syphon barometer was received on July 3. The tube was satisfactorily filled with mer- cury, but unfortunately it was broken in fitting it to its U tube and support. Two new tubes were ordered in August but have not yet been received.

Beckley Anemograph.-This instrument was oiled once a month, and the orientation of the head checked.

Dines-Baxendell Anemograph.-The head was oiled once a month, and the spindle of the float cleaned and oiled once a week. The orientation of the head was checked monthly.

The mean monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph from 1910-1919 are given in the following table, together with the results for 1920-

Factor for converting the actual run of the Beckley Anemo- graph cups to velocities recorded by the Dines Pressure Tube Anemograph.

Factor (Dines Beckley),

Month.

Mean 1910-1919.

1920.

January,

2:10

1·67

February,

2.15

1*70

March,

2'17

1.67

April,

2.16

I'77

May,

2.19

198

June,

2.18

2*40

July,

2*29

2'09

August,

2:29

158

September,

2.29

153

October,

2.22

I'43

November,

2.14

1.36

December,

2:07

1.50

Year,.

2.19

1.72

F 2

The scale value of the Dines-Baxendell instrument was deter- mined in the month of May, 1918, by means of a gauge constructed at the Observatory. It appeared to be correct within the probable error of observation, which was about 1 mile at a velocity of 80 m.p.h. increasing to 3 miles at 10 m.p.h.

Gap Rock Anemograph.-In the month of July a Dines-Baxendell anemograph was erected at Gap Rock. The records indicate defects in the instrument which it is hoped it will be possible to remedy shortly.

Thermometers.-All thermometers in use were compared with the Kew Standard in winter and summer.

Richard Thermograph.-The base lines laid down on the Richard thermograms from the hourly readings of dry and wet bulb rotating thermometers show irregularities which it is difficult to attribute to the exposure, the thermograph being placed in a well ventilated double-thatched shed, 25 feet long by 20 feet wide, with gabled roof sloping from a height of 9 feet at the ridgepole to 3 feet at the eaves.

The thermograph is aspirated by a 12-inch fan distant 23 feet, which draws in the external air through a 14 inch pipe. The fan is operated by a contact on one of the electric dials closed from the 58th to the 60th minute of each hour. Prior to 1920, January 5, the contact was closed from the 59th to the 60th minute only, but it was found that one minute was not sufficient; on occasions the wet bulb pen was still falling at the 60th minute.

The registers are time-scaled electrically. An electro-magnet, operated by the hourly time signal, lifts the pens from the paper and clock work apparatus, adapted by Mr Evans in January, locks them until the 3rd minute when they are released and fall back on to the paper.

Sunshine Recorder.-In view of the interruption to the sunshine records caused by the Observatory wireless mast, a new sunshine recorder was obtained from Messrs J. Hicks and mounted on the south-west corner of the Main Building on January 6, 1921. Its records furnish the necessary corrections to those of the old instrument.

Peak Anemograph.-Signalman Osborne was in charge of this instrument from March 9 until May 31 when he resigned on account of ill health. He was replaced by Signalman McGrann on June 28. In the interval the sheets were changed daily by a computer from the Observatory.

It has not been possible to send an European Assistant to inspect the instrument as often as necessary, with result that the records have not always been satisfactory.

-

"

F 3

It is hoped that the meteorological observations at the Peak Signal Station, to which reference was made in last year's report, will be commenced shortly.

III.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT THE OBSERVATORY.

Automatic records of the temperature of the air and evaporation were obtained with a Richard dry and wet bulb thermograph, and of the direction and velocity of the wind with a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph, modified as described in the report for 1912. The amount of rain is recorded automatically by a Nakamura pluviograph, the amount of sunshine by a Campbell- Stokes universal sunshine recorder, and the relative humidity of the air by a small Richard hair hygrograph. Eye observations of baro- metric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation and the amount of cloud are made at each hour of HongKong Standard time. The character and direction of the motion of the clouds are observed every three hours. Daily readings are taken of self- registering maximum and minimum thermometers.

Principal Features of the Weather.--The principal features of the weather in 1920 were :-

(a) Barometric pressure below normal from the beginning

of May to the beginning of August.

(b) Rainfall much above normal in May, July and November.

Barometric pressure was considerably below normal in May, June, July, November and December and inoderately above in January. The mean pressure for the year at station level was 29ins. 814 as against 29ius. 842 in 1919 and 29. 843 for the past 37 years. The highest pressure was 30 374 on January 4th as against 30. 398 in 1919 and 30s. 509 for the past 37 years. The lowest pressure was 291208 on July 19th as against 29ins. 287 in 1919 and 28ins. 735 for the past 37 years.

'ns.

The temperature of the air was moderately below normal in April and considerably above normal in November and December. The mean temperature for the year was 72°0 as against 72° 2 in 1919 and 71°8 for the past 37 years. The highest temperature was 93°.1 on July 25th as against 92-2 in 1919 and 97°0 for the past 37 years. The lowest temperature was 45°1 on January 5th as against 39°4 in 1919 and 32°0 for the past 37 years.

The rainfall was considerably above normal in May, July and November. The total for the year was 107ins 880 as against 76ins. *140 in 1919, and 84ins. 276 for the past 37 years. The greatest fall in one civil day was 8tus 235 on July 19th and the greatest in one hour was 1ins. 435 between 8.30 p.m. and 9.30 p.m. on September 12th.

F 4

The wind velocity was considerably below normal in January and October and moderately below in February, June and Septem- ber. It was moderately above normal in May and July. The mean velocity for the year was 120 m.p.h. as against 11'4 m.p.h. in 1919 and 12.7 m.p.h. for the past 37 years. The maximum velocity for one hour, as recorded by the Beckley Anemograph, was 51 miles at 2 a.m. on July 31st as against 60 miles in 1919 and 108 for the past 37 years. The maximum squall velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell Anemograph, was at the rate of 61 m.p.h. at 10h. 58m. p.m. on July 30th as against 84 m.p.h. in 1919 and 105 m.p.h. for the past 11 years.

Rainfall at Four Stations.-In the following table the monthly rainfall for the year 1920 at the Observatory is compared with the fall at the Police Station, Taipo, the Botanical Gardens, and the Matilda Hospital, Mount Kellet :-

Botanical

Matilda

Months.

Observatory Police Station!

(Kowloon). (Taipo).

Gardens

Hospital

(Hongkong). (Hongkong).

inches.

inches.

inches.

inches.

January,

0.065

ΟΙΙ

0'04

February,

2'640

5'44

3°10

2.66

March,

1.390

2'15

1'50

I'20

April,

8.265

7:03

7.88

7'43

May,

18.155

13°44

17.68

14'44

June,

15.555

18.82

17'90

13.78

July,

24'040

2455

27.28

20.65

August,

10*975

28°35

14'74

8.93

September,...

11.750

7.90

17.22

12'40

October,

6.190

4.68

8.66

8.11

November,

7'045

7'50

7.16

7-78

December,...

1,810

0*59

0'92

0*55

Year,... 107.880

120'56

124'04

97'97

Floods. The heaviest rainfall occurred at the Observatory as

follows:-

Period.

Amount.

d. h.

d. h. inches. hours. May 28 4 to June... 2 16 10:330 76 June

to June... 12 18 10:00 43 July...... 18 7 to July... 21

12.695 49 July...... 30 16 to Aug.... 4

8.275 31 Sept...... 10 22 to Sept... 13

8.420 36 Nov....... 17 8 to Nov.... 18

4.860 19

Greatest. Duration. fall in

1 hour.

inches.

d. h. 117 May......28 13 1:20 June ...12 8 1.12 July. .19 10 101 July. .31 16

Time,

14 9

1:43

0.64

Sept.. 12 21 Nov.......17 17

F 5

Typhoons. The tracks of 16 typhoons and 4 of the principal depressions which occurred in the Far East in 1920 are given in two plates in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December, 1920. The most noteworthy, as affecting Hongkong, were those of July 10-23 and July 29-31. The former apparently formed to the east of Luzon on July 10th, moved slowly NNW till the 13th, then more rapidly in a northerly direction until the 15th when it curved to westward and entered the coast near Wenchow on the morning of the 16th. It finally filled up in the Gulf of Tong King on the 23rd. Strong SW winds occurred at Hongkong from the 16th to 19th.

This storm was remarkable as being the only typhoon to enter the Eastern Sea in 1920, and for its long duration over the land.

The typhoon of July 29-31 formed in about latitude 17° N and longitude 115° E. Moving in a NNW direction it entered the coast about 70 miles to the west of Macao at about noon on the 31st. It caused a strong easterly gale at Hongkong.

A violent typhoon, of small diameter and abnormal track, formed to the west of Manila in the forenoon of August 31 and passed a few miles to the north of the Manila Observatory between 7 and 8 p.m. For the track of this typhoon I am indebted to the courtesy of the Director of the Philippines Weather Bureau, who states that it was the worst typhoon experienced in Manila since September, 1905.

IV.-PUBLICATIONS.

Daily Weather Report and Map.-A weather map of the Far East for 6 a.m. of the 120th meridian, and the Daily Weather Report (containing meteorological observations, usually at 6h. and 14h., from about 40 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, the Philippines, and Borneo) and daily weather forecasts for Hongkong to Gap Rock, the Formosa Channel, the south coast of China between Hongkong and Lamocks, and between Hongkong and Hainan, were issued as in former years. Copies of the map were exhibited on notice boards at the Hongkong Ferry Piers, Blake Pier, and the Harbour Office. One copy was sent daily to the Director of the Meteorological Observatory, Macao. Forty copies of the Daily Weather Report were distributed to various offices, etc., in the Colony, and a copy was sent daily to the Director of the Meteorolo- gical Observatory, Macao. Copies were sent every week to the Hydrographic Office, Bangkok.

A charge of $10 a year is made for supplying private firms and individuals with the Daily Weather Report, and $36 for the Weather Map. No maps were published on February 1, 4, March 7, 10, 13, April 15, 18, June 6, 8, July 18, September 5, and October 10, owing to the late arrival of the weather telegrams. On many other occasions the map, though published, contained but meagre information.

F 6

The weather forecast is telegraphed daily to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless Station in time for distribution at 1 p.m. It is broad- casted again at 5 p.m.

Monthly Meteorological Bulletin.--The Monthly Meteorological Bulletin, which includes the Daily Weather Report, was published as usual, and distributed to the principal observatories and scien- tific institutions in different parts of the world.

Miscellaneous Returns.-A monthly abstract of observations made at the Observatory is published in the Government Gazette, and daily, monthly, and yearly results are published in the Blue Book in the form suggested by the London Meteorological Office for the British Colonies.

The monthly departures from normal of the barometric pressure at four China Coast Ports are communicated to the Commonwealth Meteorologist, Melbourne, in connection with long range weather forecasts. Monthly meteorological returns are forwarded to the Meteorological Magazine, and annual returns to the Stock Exchange Official Intelligence, and the Colonial Office List.

V.-WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS, AND STORM WARNINGS.

Daily Weather Telegrams-In the month of June representa- tions were made to the Superintendent of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Co. on the subject of delays in the transmission of daily weather telegrams. Mr Airey took up the matter energetically, with the result that now observations from the Philippines are received in time for insertion in the Daily Weather Map. The Vladivostock and Indo-China observations also arrive in time fairly regularly, and the Japanese observations occasionally.

Occasionally belated weather telegrams are received from Central and South China, but as a rule the observations from these districts are posted in batches to Hongkong.

Extra Weather Telegrams.-The following stations send extra weather telegrams at half rates during typhoons, on receipt of certain code words from Hongkong:-Amoy, Canton, Macao, Phulien, Sharp Peak, and Taihoku. The Director of the Philippines Weather Bureau also sends extra telegrams, at his discretion, from Aparri or some other station nearer the typhoon centre.

The extra 9 p.m. telegram, from Swatow, kindly sanctioned by the Chinese Telegraph Administration during the typhoon season, was frequently not received.

Wireless Weather Telegrams.-There has been but a poor response to the Marconi Company's circular and the Observatory Notice to Mariners respecting wireless weather telegrams referred to in last year's report.

F 7

The following table gives the monthly number of ships, of different nationalities, from which wireless meteorological messages have been received, and the number of messages received, (each arrival and departure is counted separately).

British (including

Dutch.

Japanese.

Other National ties.

H.M. Ships).

Month.

No. of

No. of

No. of

No. of

mes-

ships:

ships.

sages.

mes-

sages.

No. of ships.

No. of

mes-

sages.

No. of

ships.

No. of

mes-

sages.

January,

February, March, April,...

May,

June,

July,

August, September, October,.. November,.... December,

Totals 1920...

7

I I

I I

2

5

WHO TO 01-0001-0060

#MN MENN to in in

I 2

5

17

4

64

...

4.8

Totals 1919,...! 17

Totals 1918,...

Totals 1917,···

Totals 1916,...

36

41

93

95

3

I I

14

5

:

3

I

MION M

3

25

6

14

37

60

7

I

6

10

:

:

3

2

I

Results of Weather Forecasts.-The results of the comparison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather subsequently experienced are given below, with the results of the previous five

years

Year.

Complete Partial Partial Success. Success. Failure.

Total Failure.

/%

%

%

%

1915

37

1916

29

1917

67

29

1918

26

1919

27

1920

64

30

5

F 8

No forecasts were issued on February 4 and March 13, owing to lack of telegraphic information.

The forecast comprises wind direction, wind force, and weather.

Complete success means correct in three elements. Partial success means correct in only two elements. Partial failure means correct in only one element. Total failure means correct in no element.

The method of analysis is described in the 1918 Report.

Storm Warnings.-At the request of the Chamber of Com- merce the Hongkong government adopted the China Seas Storm Signal Code from 1920, June 1, in place of the Hongkong Non- Local Code introduced in 1917.

The following Ports are warned by a telegraphic adaptation of this code:-Sharp Peak, Swatow, Amoy, Santuao, Macao, Canton, Wuchow, Pakhoi, Hoihow, Phulien, Taihoku, Manila, Labuan, and Singapore.

As the China Seas Code includes a time signal at the mast head which formerly was reserved for the Local Typhoon Signals, it became necessary to select a new site for the Local Signals.

A Committee composed of the Colonial Secretary, the Harbour Master, the Director of the Observatory, the President of the Cham- ber of Commerce and representatives of Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ltd. and Messrs. Butterfield & Swire was therefore appointed by His Excellency the Governor to consider the matter. At the sug- gestion of the Director of the Observatory the Committee recom- mended that the Local Typhoon Signals should be transferred to the Observatory wireless mast. This was approved and the necessary gibbet and hoisting gear were installed by the Public Works Department. The Old Equatorial Dome was enlarged to accom- modate the Local Typhoon symbols.

As the Observatory is farther from the town than the Signal Hill the height of the symbols was increased to 8 feet and the other dimensions increased in proportion.

The local day signals are repeated at the Harbour Office, H.M.S. Tamar, Green Island, the Godown Company (Kowloon), Lyemun, and Lai Chi Kok.

The local night signals are exhibited on the Observatory Wireless Mast and repeated on the tower of the Kowloon Railway Station, on H.M.S. Tamar, and at the Harbour Office.

A translation of the non-local and local storm warnings is exhibited at the Harbour Office, the General Post Office and the Star Ferry Piers, and also sent to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless station

F 9

which broadcasts the message at about noon and repeats it every two hours until midnight. If a second warning is issued during the day, the later warning is substituted.

When a local storm warning is displayed at the Observatory a cone is exhibited at several outlying stations for the beuefit of native · craft and passing ocean vessels.

In the following table is given the number of hours the local signals were hoisted in each of the years 1912-1920 :-

Red Signals.

Black Signals.

Bombs. *

Year.

Number of hours hoisted.

Number of times fired.

1912

151

164

...

1913

146

189

1914

146

178

1915

64

1916

70

1917

102

120

201

36

1

1918

33

102

I

1919

78

105

1920

107

156

The figures in the above table included the number of hours that night signals, corresponding to the day signals, were hoisted.

The red signals indicate that a depression exists which may cause a gale at Hongkong within 24 hours. The black signals indicate that a gale is expected at Hongkong.

Prior to July, 1917, the red signals indicated that the centre of the typhoon was believed to be more than 300 miles distant, and the black less than 300 miles; the returns for 1912-1916 are therefore not strictly comparable with those for 1917-1920.

VI.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS, TREATY PORTS, &c.

Logs received.-In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 170 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, representing 5,872 days' observations, have been utilised for verifying typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for the years 1919 were 81 and 2,587.

* Three bombs fired at intervals of 10 seconds indicate that wind of typhoon force is anticipated.

F 10

Comparison of Barometers.-During the year 170 compari- sons of ships' barometer have been made by means of observations taken when in harbour. Several direct comparisons of barometers for shipmasters and various persons in the Colony have been made at the Observatory.

VII. MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

The mean values of the magnetic elements for the years 1919 and 1920 were as follows:

1919.

Declination (west)

Dip (north)

1920.

0 / 1

0 19 50

30 47 30

0 20 45 30 46 22 0.37191

Horizontal Force (C. G. S. unit) 0:37171 Vertical Force (C. G. S. unit).. 022151 Total Force (C. G. S. unit) 0:43270

0 22146 0.43286

The series of magnetic observations made in the old magnetic hut since 1884 terminated in December, the site having been taken over by Government for European Assistants' Quarters. Obser- vations in the new hut cannot be made until the building operations are finished.

Comparisons between Magnetometers Elliott 55 and 83 and Dip Circle Dover 71, in the old and new huts, were made between 1919 August and 1920 June, as opportunity offered.

The mean results of the observations are given below:

Horizontal Force.

Elliott 55 and vibration

magnet 55A in old hut.

(a).

Elliott 83 and vibration magnet 83 in new hut.

(a)—(b).

Number of observations.

(b). 0.37216

- 0.00054

18

0.37162

Elliott 55 and vibration magnet 55A.

in old hut.

(a). 0:37201

in new hut.

(b). 0.37200

+ 0·00001

5

7 Comparisons made in the year 1916 in the old hut gave :

Elliott 55 and

vibration magnet 55A.

Elliott 83 and vibration magnet 83.

= +227

It should be mentioned that prior to the comparisons in 1919-1920 the lens and scale of magnet 83 were transposed, for convenience of observing. The lens was originally at the north end of the magnet.

F 11

After this alteration the value of log 2K at 0°c was found to be 3 4461100004 as against 3:44643 determined at Kew in 1915 and used in the 1916 comparisons The value of P from the 18 observations in 1919 1920 was + 7:58+07; whereas the value used in 1916, as derived from 7 observations was +778

Declination.

08.

Elliott 55 and vibration magnet 55、 in old hut.

(a)

20' 6" W.

Elliott 83 and vibration magnet 83 in new hut.

(a) --(b)

Number of observations.

(b)

19' 35"

+ 30"

22

Elliott 83 and vibration magnet 83 in old hut.

(a) 20' 22" W.

Elliott 55 and vibration magnet 55 in new hut.

(b) 20' 54"

32"

6

Dip.

Dover 71

in old hut.

in new hut,

(a) 30° 46' 48" N.

(b)

30° 47' 75" N.

-1' 27"

16

VIII.

TIME SERVICE.

Time Ball.-Prior to 1920, January 1, the Time Ball on Kow- loon Signal Hill was dropped daily at 1 p.m. (120th Meridian Time) It is now dropped at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily, except on Saturdays when it is dropped at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., and on Sundays and Holi- days when it is dropped at 10 a.m. only.

The Ball is hoisted half mast at the 5th minute and full mast at the 57th minute. If the ball fails to drop at the correct time it is lowered at 5 minutes past the hour and the ordinary routine repeated at the following hour, if possible.

When the Time Ball is out of order the above routine is carried out with the flag "z", on the Storm Signal mast.

From

Time Signals are also given at night by means of three white lamps mounted vertically on the Observatory wireless mast. 8h. 56m. Os. to 9h. Om. Os. p.m. the lamps are extinguished momen- tarily at the even seconds, except at the 2nd, 28th, 50th, 52nd, and 54th of each minute. The hours refer to Hongkong Standard Time (8 hours East of Greenwich).

The ball was dropped successfully 651 times. There were 6 failures attributable to electrical and mechanical defects or to the negligence of the computers in charge at the tower.

The days on which the ball failed to drop were:-February 19, March 9, April 26, May 16 and September 20 (twice).

F 12

The ball was not raised on January 18 (10h), February 18 (10h), March 12 (10h), May 19 (10h), July 30 (16h), 31 (10h & 16h), and September 27 (10h), owing to repairs, or the prevalence of high winds.

The ball fell with an error of 0-3 sec. or less on 562 occasions, and with an error of 04 sec. or 05 sec on 76 occasions. Errors of 06 sec. occurred 10 times, of 0·9, 10 and 15 sec. once each. The mean probable error of the Time Ball was ± 0·18 sec. The monthly values for the past 5 years are given below:-

Probable Error of the Time Ball.

Month.

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

January,

±0.15

+0'17

10'11

±0°24

±0.17

February,

*28

*10

*13

*20

*30

March....

*17

'I I

*15

*12

*21

April..

*18

18

10

*19

*15

May,

*10

17

'12

*14

*17

June,

*17

*10

*14

*14

13

July,

*10

'21

II

*13

*22

August..

*10

'I I

*26

*15

*II

September,

*10

'16

*10

*24

October,

*J3

'10

'12

*15

*15

November,

*13

'10

*12

*14

*19

December,

II

*10

*14

*12

*13

Means,.

±0.14

+0.13 ±0.14 ±0.15

+0.18

Time Signals by Wireless Telegraphy.—In addition to the time signals given by the Time Ball, signals are sent at noon and at 21h. by wireless telegraphy viâ Cape d'Aguilar. Particulars of the programme are given in the 1918 Report. The service has been interrupted rather frequently by circumstances over which the Observatory has no control. It is to be transferred to Stonecutters when the necessary cable between this Station and the Observatory is laid.

Wireless Receiving Set.-A receiving set was installed at the Observatory by the Naval Authorities in November, and wireless Time Signals have since been regularly observed from Manila and Funabashi (Tokio), though the observations have frequently been spoilt by other stations working, in contravention of paragraph 3 of Article 45 of the Service Regulations appended to the International Radiotelegraph Convention of 1912. The Shanghai signals are still not heard.

It is hoped that the Director may soon have an opportunity of discussing details of a uniform scheme of Wireless Time Signals with the Directors of other Observatories in the Far East.

1

F 13

Transit Instrument.-Observations for time' were made daily with the 3-inch transit instrument and the Hipp tape chronograph by the Chinese computers, weather permitting.

The number of observations in the years 1919 and 1920 were as follows:-

K

Transits,...

Level determination,

Azimuth,...

Collimation,

1919

1920

1,321

985

676

557

23

20

22

20

Transits of the Sun were utilized occasionally during 1920. The azimuth and collimation determinations were made by the Chief and First Assistants from observations of the old south mark.

Clocks. The losing rate of the Standard Sidereal clock, Dent No. 39741, varied from -0.23 sec. on July 9 (Barometer 20ins. ·63 Temperature 84° 3) to-076 sec. on November 11 (Barometer 29ins -82 Temperature 78°.3).

The rate during cloudy periods was usually derived from the formula:

r=-0s 792 +0s'575 (b-29ins) + Os.00021 (t-50°) where r is the computed losing rate, and b and t the mean barometric pressure and temperature, respectively, for the preceding 24 hours.

In the following table is given the excess of the observed over the computed error after cloudy periods during 1920 :-

Date 1920.

-

Interval without Excess of observed

observations. over computed error.

February 16,

22 days

March

18,

30

""

24,

3

secs.

+ 1'01

0°29 + 0.28

39

April

2,

16,

12

>

May June

10,

18

2,

7

16,

"

"2

27,

July

5,

"

23,

August

6,

""

12,

15

20,

September 1,

""

22

October November 8, December 2,

2,

""

>>

14, 24,

3

""

3

>>

9,

A 2

3200 NO 5 46 ∞ + $∞o to re +++

0.32

>>

+ 0.31

""

+ 0.58

""

A

0'51

>>

37

39

0*09

0*26

""

""

3

+ 049

0.42 + 0.35 4. O'IQ

0'05 + 0.04 0'19

+ 0'43

0.36

F 14

The clock tripped two seconds on September 15. It was cleaned and the contact springs re-adjusted on September 24.

The Dent Mean Time clock (No. 39740) was used throughout the year for dropping the Time Ball, maintaining the electric time service in the Observatory, and sending hourly signals to the Railway, the Post Office, the Telephone Co., and the Eastern Extension Telegraph Co. The clock is corrected daily before 10 a.m. by the electric regulating apparatus, and its daily rate kept below 0'5 sec. by the addition or removal of weights from the pendulum.

Chronometer Dent No. 40917 is on loan to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless Station, and chronometer Dent No. 39946 to the Peak Signal Station. Chronometer Woolf No. 5232 was forwarded for safekeeping to the Observatory by the Hon. Colonial Treasurer in August, 1920, and has been kept wound and rated since.

Batteries, Power Supply, &e.-The necessary current for the Time Service has been supplied by accumulator batteries, charged as found necessary from the alternating mains of the China Light and Power Co., Ld., by a rotary converter. Two batteries of 10 Hart cells of the S. G. 9-plate pattern were set up in May to replace the old Tudor Battery, all the cells of which had become unservi- ceable except two. These were used for the filament of the valve of the wireless receiving set. A battery of 30 Pritchett cells was set up at the same time to supply high tension current to the valve.

Since the re-wiring mentioned last year, and the acquisition of sufficient battery power, the internal Time Service has been extremely satisfactory.

The occasional trouble with the Time Ball, arising from earth. leakage or want of adjustment of the releasing trigger, also appears to have been overcome. There has been no failure since September 27.

IX.-UPPER AIR RESEARCH.

When on leave of absence in England the Director was requested to confer with the Air Ministry with a view to advising the Hong- kong Government what it was necessary to do on the meteorological side to assist aviation in the Colony.

The Director visited the upper air research stations at Benson and South Farnborough, and also conferred with the Director of the London Meteorological Office and the Superintendent of Instruments several times.

were

Facilities for obtaining the necessary information courteously accorded by Sir Napier Shaw and the Superintendents of the above Departments, to whom the thanks of this government are due.

F 15

As result of his enquiries the Director recommended the purchase of the following outfit:-

Two theodolites.

Ten Dines Meteorographs.

One Microscope for measuring meteorograms.

Ten hygrometers.

400 Pilot balloons.

Two Manheim slide rules.

Calibrating outfit for meteorographs.

The Hongkong Government however were unable to sanction the appointment of the Professional Assistant and Mechanic neces- sary for carrying out a programme of upper air research with the above instruments, and requested the Director to amend his recom- mendations accordingly. This was done by omitting the meteoro- graphs, microscope and calibrating outfit. The remaining items were sanctioned, and ordered through the London Meteorological Office in August. They have not yet been received.

Sir Napier Shaw wrote to the Director as follows :-

I cannot find that there is any immediate prospect of developing air routes on the line of which Hongkong will lie. It is quite clear that if routes were to be developed between Japan and Australia or between India and Japan, Hongkong would be a centre of information of the most vital importance, but I am not aware that projects of that kind are being actively prosecuted. We have therefore to deal with the general meteorological importance of the position of Hongkong and of that there can be no question, and what will be useful for aviation when it materialises will be in the meantime useful for the study of cy- clones and other atmospheric visitations of Hongkong. While therefore I cannot say that aviators will forthwith claim your assistance, meteorologists will look to you as the natural centre of information for the region between Calcutta and the Philippines and between the equator and latitude 50°.

It is very desirable that you should be equipped with means of exploration of the upper air and provided with facilities for acquifing information from a network of stations in the region specified.

X-MISCELLANEOUS.

Seismograph Installation. When on leave of absence the Director visited the Oxford University Observatory to confer with Professor Turner, Chairman of the Seismological Committee of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, on the subject of a seismograph outfit for Hongkong.

·

F 16

A Milne-Shaw machine with North and East components, and a smoked paper machine for visual observations were decided upon. The latter arrived in Hongkong on January 25, 1921.

The Director visited Mr. J. J. Shaw's Seismological Observatory at Birmingham and had the opportunity of seeing one of his seismographs dismounted and re-assembled. He also discussed several points in connection with the construction and maintenance of a two component outfit for Hongkong.

Mr. Shaw has improved the Milne Seismograph by electromagne- tic damping and by magnifying the movements of the boom (shorter than the Standard Milne boom) by reflecting a beam of light from an exceedingly light, finely pivoted mirror of half-metre focus, coupled to the end of the boom by an equally light, ingenious, and almost frictionless device. Improved calibrating and adjusting arrangements are also provided.

Staff. No change occurred in the European Staff during the year. During the absence on leave of the Director, from March 2 to December 4, Mr. C. W. Jeffries, the Chief Assistant, acted as Director and Mr. B. D. Evans, First Assistant, acted as Chief Assistant.

Leong Kwok Hoon, 5th grade telegraphist, resigned on May 31, and was replaced by Ko Chuck Shan, who, being found unsuited to the post, was superseded by Ip Chun Woo on August 1.

Chan Iu Fong was promoted to the post of IVth grade telegra- phist at the Post Office on December 9 and was replaced by Ng Hung Kui on December 24.

Expenditure.-The annual expenditure on the Observatory for the past ten years is as follows :—-

Year.

Total

· Expenditure.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

1911

23,353.02

1,565.47

1912

22,595.08

757.94

1913

24,255.49

1,660.41

1914

25.398.31

1,142.82

1915

23.233.12

2,165.19

1916

21,977.78

1,255.34

1917

26,890.50

4,192.72

1918

20,028.24

6,862.26

1919

23,450.57

3.422.33

1920

25,965.66

2,515.09

F 17

Acknowledgements.-Acknowledgements are here made to the Directors of Weather Services in the Far East, and the Chinese Maritime Customs authorities, for daily observations and extra observations during typhoon weather, to the Telegraph Companies for transmitting the observations free of charge, to the Commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological observations by post and by wireless telegraphy, to the Directors of the various Ob- servatories and Institutions, and private persons, who have pre- sented their publications to the Library, and to the Observatory staff for the manner in which they have carried out their respective duties.

1921, February 18.

T. F. CLAXTON, Director.

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1920.

1. ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

Two hundred and forty nine (249) actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1920, as against 231 in 1919. One hundred and thirty six (136) were disposed of during the year, 46 being settled or withdrawn before trial, as against 138 and 51 respectively in 1919. Of the 56 cases which had been set down for trial, 28 were disposed of during the year.

Two injunctions were granted during the year.

Piasters 3,749

The amounts involved were $5,310,722,91, Indo China Currency, $311,457.66 Gold U.S.A. Currency, 5,200 Taels and 121,800 Francs, against $2,259,725, Pesos 2,005.68 and $14,869.49 Gold U.S.A. Currency.

The debts and damages recovered amount to $588,102.94 and $24,263.29 U.S. Currency as against $604,792.68 in 1919.

The fees collected amounted to $12,699.25 as against $12,811.65 in 1919.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages 0 1, O 2, Y 2, and Y 3 of the Blue Book for the year 1920.

1A. IN PRIZE.

No action was instituted under the above head during the year.

Cargo and proceeds of sale of cargo brought to the Colony by the following vessels were condemned during the year:-S.S. "Yuen Sang", "Loong Sang", "Demodocus", Stentor "Pyrrhus",

Peleus Nagoya ",

", 'Glengyle", "Tjimanock”,

66

Glaucus

""

"Castlefield" and "Malay Maru

66

66

2.--SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

1

One thousand six hundred and ninety nine (1,699) actions were instituted during the year as against 1,808 in 1919.

The cases were disposed of as follows :-Settled or withdrawn 621, Judgment for the Plaintiff 677, Judgment for the Defendant 36, Struck off, Dismissed, or Lapsed 44, and Pending 321 as against 733, 698, 18, 7, 25 and 327 respectively in 1919.

The claims amounted to $308,807.66 as against $246,107.68 and G$290.00 in 1919 and the amounts recovered were $120,490.35 as against $158,223.93 in 1919.

- G 2

The number of Rent Distress Warrants issued was 678, representing unpaid rents amounting to $50,702.74, of which $17,211.59 was recovereed, as against 782, $54,190.14 and $24,165.29 respectively in 1919.

Four hundred and eighty seven (487) Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties as against 565 in 1919.

The fees collected amounted to $3,727.00 as against $4,171.00 in 1919.

3.-CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 71 cases and 102 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 65 and 96 respectively in 1919.

The number of persons actually indicted was 100, of whom 81 were convicted and 19 were acquitted. Against 2 persons the case was abandoned. In 1919 the figures were respectively 94, 78, 16 and 2.

4. APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

Four appeals were lodged during the year, two from the decisions of the Police Magistrates and two from the decision of the Chief Justice.

Of the two appeals from the decisions of the Police Magistrates both were dismissed. The appeals from the decision of the Chief Justice were also dismissed.

Leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted in two actions, viz-The Attorney General of Hongkong and the Castlefield Steam- ship Company, Limited v. Toong Yue (0. J. No. 33 of 1919); and Wong Lan-sang and Chan Tso-hing v. Fong Yeung-chau (O. J. No. 193 of 1919), and also in the Matter of the Tai Sun Insurance and Banking Company Limited (in Liquidation) (M. P. No. 33 of 1918).

Privy Council judgments in the following actions were received during the year, viz., Li Hong-mi v. The Attorney General of Hong- kong and others (O. J. No. 172 of 1917), and The Kin Tye Loong v. The Wing Hang Hong and others (O. J. No. 89 of 1913). In the first case the appeal was allowed without costs and in the other the appeal was dismissed with costs.

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Four actions were instituted during the year. One was settled and the others are pending.

The fees collected amounted to $438.95 as against $588.30 in 1919.

6.-BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

Thirty (30) petitions were filed, 18 being creditors' petitions and 12 debtors' petitions. The figures for 1919 were respectively 22, 11, and 11.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 20, being 11 on creditors' petitions and 9 on debtors' petitions. The figures for 1919 were respectively 14, 5, and 9.

The number of Public Examinations held was 4 as against 13 in 1919. There were 9 Adjudications as against 10 in 1919.

One Scheme of Arrangement was put through. Four petitions were withdrawn, 4 bankrupts obtained their discharge, and 6 Receiving Orders were rescinded.

The estimated assets, in cases where Receiving Orders were made and not subsequently rescinded, were $300,467.29 and the estimated liabilities $613,633.07 as against $47,272.44 and $96,275.22 respectively in 1919.

The fees collected amounted to $2,760.45 as against $6,340.70 in 1919 and the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee, where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors, was $4,625.00 as against $7,126.32 in 1919.

7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

Two hundred and seventy-five (275) grants were made by the Court being:--

Probate.

Letters of Administration.

126

149

275

The figures in 1919 were respectively 100 and 99, total 199. The aggregate value of the estates was $7,065,247.00 as against $4,538,965.00 in 1919.

Probate and Estate Duties amounted to $367,958.25, Court Fees to $14,238.80, and Official Administrator's Commission to $979.90. The figures in 1919 were respectively $157,543.00, $10,295.15, and $1,157.38.

There were 80 Estates vested in or administered by the Official Administrator during the year, respresenting an aggregate value of $127,514.87. The figures for 1919 were respectively 82 and $132,860.85.

Twenty-eight (28) were wound up during the year, of the total value of $18,732.16 as against 10 in 1919 of the total value of $23,245.94.

Twenty-six (26) new accounts were opened during the year amounting to $13,386.18.

8.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustees at the end of 1920 was 19 with Trust Funds amounting to $86,461.58, as against 18 Estates aggregating $85,830.33 plus certain house property, in 1919. None was wound up during the year. Trust was opened.

One new

The amount of Commission collected was $85.77 as against $52.96 in 1919.

9.-REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

On the 31st December there were 357 companies on the Hong- kong Register, of which 22 were in course of liquidation. During the year 50 new companies were put on the Register and 16 struck off.

The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amounted to $121,608.68 and those in respect of other companies to $11,132.90.

Two firms were registered under the Chinese Limited Partnership Ordinance, 1911, and no firm was registered under the Limited Partnership Ordinance, No. 18 of 1912.

Deposits of the total value of $4,310,000.00 have been made by Insurance Companies under the Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.

10.-FEES AND COMMISSION.

The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $59,957.31 as against $61,305.87 in the previous year.

11.- STAFF.

Sir William Rees-Davies, Chief Justice, proceeded on leave of absence on 28th February. Mr. Justice Gompertz, Puisne Judge. and Mr. J. R. Wood, Second Police Magistrate, acted as Chief Justice and Puisne Judge respectively.

I returned from leave of absence on 21st September.

Mr. C. D. Melbourne, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, acted as Registrar during my absence on leave.

Mr. G. R. Sayer, Passed Cadet, acted as Deputy Registrar and Appraiser from 23rd January to 16th March.

Mr. Leo Longinotto, Assistant Crown Solicitor, acted as Deputy Registrar and Accountant from 1st to 31st January in addition to his other duties.

Mr. P. Burn was appointed to act as Deputy Registrar and Appraiser from 17th March.

Mr. M. Akbar, 2nd Grade Clerk of Court & Clerk to Puisne Judge, proceeded on leave of absence on full pay on 31st March and returned on 7th December. During his absence Mr. Fateh Mohamed, Clerk in the Police Office, acted for him.

Mr. N. G. Nolan, Chief Interpreter, died on 23rd January.

Mr. Khawas Khan, 3rd Grade Clerk, returned from leave of absence on 26th July. During his absence Mr. Natha Singh, Clerk in the Magistracy, acted for him.

G 5

Mr. T. F. O'Sullivan, 2nd Bailiff, returned from leave of absence on 9th February.

Mr. I. F. do Rozario, 3rd Grade Bailiff, died on 10th March. Mr. John Rus Castilho, Water Meter Reader, in the Public Works Department, was appointed 3rd Grade Bailiff and assumed duties on 10 July.

Mr. E. L. Stainfield, Clerk & Usher, proceeded on leave of absence on 5th February and returned on 12th November. Mr. W. W. Cooper, a Sub-Inspector of Police, acted for him.

28th February, 1921.

.

HUGH A. NISBET, Registrar, Supreme Court.

%

Table showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.

(From 1911 to 1920.)

Year.

Total

Number of

cases dealt

Expenditure.

Revenue.

with.

Total.

Increase. Decrease,

Total.

Increase. Decrease

Percentage of Revenue to Expenditure.

C.

1911

1,963

86,702.10

(.

5,087.05

$

S

C.

ር.

*48,342.49

17,185.31

55.75

1912

1,263

88,346.36

1,644.26

*60,544.30 12,201.81

68.53

1913

898

98.351.02

10,004.66

*63,303.78

2,759.48

64.36

1914

1,091

107,780.92

9,429.90

*73,422.69 10,118.91

68.12

1915

832

110,667.68 2,886.76

*63,382.63

10,040.06

57.27

1916

753

105,252.44

5,415.24

*56,719.68

6,662.95

53.88

-1917

764

99,662.88

5,589.56

*48,334.81

8,384.81

48.48

1918

931

98,281.40

1,381.48

*68,032.72 19,697.91

69.22

1919

982

98,844.23

1920

872

113,082.79

562.83

14,238.56

*61,305.87

6,726.85

62.02

*58,957.31

5,348.56

49.48

* Not including amounts paid direct to Treasury for fees in respect of Licences to keep Local Registers by the Registrar of Companies under the Companies Ordinance. 1911.

G

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe acted as Captain Superintendent of Police throughout the year.

Mr. J. R. Wood acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from 1st January to 29th February and as Puisne Judge from the 1st March.

Mr. E. A. Irving acted as First Police Magistrate from March 1st to 21st.

Mr. R. O). Hutchison acted as First Police Magistrate from 22nd March to 12th September.

Mr. G. N. Orme acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from 13th September.

Mr. N. L. Smith acted as Second Police Magistrate from 1st January to 10th September and from the 15th October to the end. of the year.

Mr. A. Dyer Ball acted as Second Police Magistrate from 10th September to 15th October.

Mr. G. A. Woodcock, First Clerk, retired on pension on the 8th April and Major C. Willson, O.B.E., was appointed in his place.

The number of cases was 15,304 as compared with 12,998 in 1919 and the Revenue was $103,132.51 as compared with $90,851 in 1919.

Table I shows the total number of cases tried and the Revenue and Expenditure of the Magistracy for the years 1911-1920.

Table II shows the List of Offences tried during the year.

Table III gives an Abstract of Cases under Cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the year.

Table IV gives a return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain classes of offence during the year.

Table V gives an Abstract of Cases brought under Cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during a period of the last ten

years.

16th March, 1921.

G. N. ORME,

Police Magistrate.

Table I.

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the

Magistracy for the years 1911 to 1920.

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE.

YEAR.

Total. Increase. Decrease. Total. Increase. Decrease.

Total

Number

of Cases

tried.

Percentage of Ex-

penditure to Revenue.

H 2

$

C.

C.

C.

*

%

1911

43,298.26

4,870.23

52,464.87

23,505.89

10,471

82.53

1912

41,590.98

1,707.28 | 99,253.10 | 46,788.23

13,450

41.90

1913

42,867.21* 1,276.23

158,451.56 59,198.46

13,954

27.05

1914

42,807.15*

60.06 92,109.34*

66,342.22

11,034

46.47

1915

44,041.33* 1,234.18

75,130.13*

16,979.21

12,263

58.62

1916

40,642.43*

3,398.90 109,664.82*| 34,534.69

15,057

37.06

1917

38,510 07*

3,132.36

75,391.17*.

34,273.65

11,922

51.08

1918

40,804.18*

2,294.11

69,603.39*

5,787.78

10,051

58.62

1919

40,774.23*|

1920

45,539.94

4,765.71

29.95 90,851.36*` 21,247.97 103,132.51* 12,281.15

...

12,998

44.77

15,304

44.15

*Tai Po District not included.

7

OFFENCES.

Table II.

POLICE COURTS.

LIST of OFFENCES TRIED during the year 1920.

NUMBER No. of

OF PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

OFFENCES.

NUMBER No. of

PRI-

OF CASES. SONERS.

Brought forward,.

235

262

Accessories and Abettors Ordinance-3 of 1865,

N

4 Common Law Offences,

63

70

Advertisement Regulation Ordinance-19 of 1912,

2

2 Copyright Ordinance---11 of 1918,

3

Arms and Ammunition Ordinance-2 of 1900,- Contraventions of,

Cremation Ordinance-5 of 1914,

1

183

206

Criminal Intimidation Ordinance-13 of 1920,

Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance-7 of 1896,- Contraventions of,

1

1 Dangerous Goods Ordinance-1 of 1873,- Contraventions of,

Boarding House Ordinance-23 of 1917,

00

Deportation Ordinance-25 of 1917,

34

87

107

107

Boycott Prevention Ordinance-41 of 1912,

1

1

Dogs Ordinance—5 of 1893,-

Chinese Extradition Ordinance-7 of 1889,— Proceedings under,

Contraventions of,

669

70

10

Electricity Supply Ordinance—18 of 1911,

3

3

Chinese Marriage Preservation Ordinance--42′of 1912,

90

Coinage Offences Ordinance-7 of 1865.-

Employers and Servants Ordinance-45 of 1902,- Offences under,

13

33

Offences relating to the King's gold and silver coin, (Sections 3-12),

19

19

Evidence Ordinance-2 of 1889,-

Offences Relating to foreign coin, (Sections 15—20),

11

11

Contraventions of and Offences under,

1

:

Carried forward,

235

262

Carried forward,.

531

589

H 3

Table II,-Continued.

List of Offences, ETC.,—Continued.

OFFENCES.

No. OF

CASES.

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS.

Brought forward,

531 589

4

Extradition Acts-1870-1906,-

Proceedings under,

Fisheries (Dynamite) Ordinance-4 of 1911,

Forgery Ordinance-4 of 1865,-

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,.

Larceny Ordinance-5 of 1865,—

Simple Larceny,

Larceny of cattle and other animals, (Sections 9-17),

Larceny of things attached to or growing on land,

NO. OF

No. of

PRI-

CASES. SONE RS

1,125|2,446

1,155 1,203

10

Forgery of Transfers of stock. &c, (Sections 4-8),.. Forgery of Deeds, Wills, Bills of Exchange, (Sections

2

22-28),

11

12

Demanding

property upon forged instruments,

(Section 39),

2

Gambling Ordinance-2 of 1891,—

(Sections 22-28),. from the person (Sections 29-37),.

81

109

and similar Offences,

406 458

爷爷

Sacrilege Burglary and house breaking, (Sections 38-47),

Larceny in dwelling houses, (Sections 48-49),

ships, wharves, &c., (Sections 50–53),

Contraventions of and Offences under,

Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co.'s

Ordinance-6 of 1908,

Contraventions of By-laws made thereunder,

413 1,668

}}

or embezzlement by clerks, servants, &c., (Sections 54-60),

Indecent Exhibition Ordinance-3 of 1918,

Licensing Ordinance-8 of 1887,—

Importation and Exportation Ordinance-32 of 1915,

151

155

Contraventions of and Offences under,

Interpretation Ordinance-31 of 1911,

2

Frauds by bankers, agents, &c., (Sections 62—74),

Obtaining property by false pretences, (Sections

75-78),

Receiving stolen property, (Sectious 79--87),

Regulations made thereunder,

28 N NIG

66

51

20

27

- H 4-

8** * **

69

89

79

113

30

1,647 | 1,612

224

231

Curried forward,

1,125 |2,446

Carried forward,.

4,962 | 6,497

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,--Continued.

No. of

PRI-

NO. OF CASES. SONERS.

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,..

Merchant Shipping Ordinance-1 of 1899,-

Contraventions of and Offences under Part III,

(Sections 10-12),

Contraventions of and Offences under Part VI, (Sections 21-30),

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-4 of 1890,— Contraventions of and Offences under,

379 Military Stores Prohibition of Exportation Ordinance- 23 of 1913,-

Contraventions of,

1 Misdemeanour Punishment Ordinance-1 of 1898,- Offences under,.

NO OF

CASES.

No. of

PRI-

SONERS,

5,299 6,953

A

co

2

2

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,

4,962 | 6,497

Liquors Licence Ordinance-9 of 1911,-

Contraventions of and Offences under Part 1,

(Sections 3-40),.

18

20

Contraventions of and Offences under Part II,

(Sections 41-73),

Contraventions of and Offences under Part III, (Sections 74-96),

11

11

Offences under,..

Magistrates Ordinance-3 of 1890,-

Malicious Damage Ordinance-6 of 1865,-

264

Injuries by fire to buildings and goods therein,

(Sections 2-9),

(Sections 16-23),

Injuries to crops, trees and vegetable productions,

Injuries to cattle and other animals, (Sections 31–32), Miscellaneous injuries, (Sections 42—44),

Marine Store Protection Ordinance-13 of 1919,

Married Women (Maintenance in case of desertion)

Ordinance-10 of 1905,- Proceedings under,.

12

H 5

57

57

24

26

Offences against the Person Ordinance-2 of 1865,- Homicide, (Sections 2-9),.

15

Attempt to murder, (Sections 10-14),

7

2

Acts causing or tending to cause danger to life, etc. (Sections 16-31),

31

Assaults, (Sections 32—43),

351

853

Forcible taking or detention of persons, (Sections

6

44-45),

17

མཎྜལོ༴ ཚེ

22

16

33

Abominable offences, (50–54),

......

I

Carried forward,

|5,299 |6,953

Carried forward,

5,791 | 7,485

OFFENCES.

Brought forward.......

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,--Continued.

Offences against the Person (Amendment) Ordinance—

NO. OF

PRI-

No. of

CASES. 80NERS.

OFFENCES.

5,791 7,485

Brought forward,

Prison Ordinance-4 of 1899,-

3

زن

Offences under,.

No. of

CASES.

9 of 1913,

Opium Ordinance-14 of 1914,—

Contraventions of Part I, (Sections 5-18),

23

25

Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance-4 of 1897,- Offences under,

II, (

III, (

35

19-34),

417

952

35-62),

1

1

51

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance-1 of 1903,- Contraventions of Part II, (Sections

Opium Ordinance-27 of 1917,

11

12

"

Pawnbrokers Ordinance-1 of 1860,- Contraventions of,

Pharmacy Ordinance-9 of 1916,

Piracy Prevention Ordinance-23 of 1914,

Police Force Ordinance-11 of 1900,—

Offences under,

Post Office Ordinance-6 of 1900,- Contraventions of and Offences under,

Printers and Publishers Ordinance-4 of 1886,- Contraventions of and Offences under,

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS.

6,342 8.568

3

60

3

96

102

"

III, (

8-95),

96-235), Failure to comply with S. B. Notice under the Bye- laws made thereunder..

Public Places Regulation Ordinance—2 of 1870,- Offences under,.

2 Railway Ordinance-21 of 1909,

128

137

187

188

00

10

10

1

1

Registration of Person Ordinance-6 of 1916,

10

13

18

55

42

23

28

2

1

- H 6-

Regulation of Chinese Ordinance-3 of 1888,- Offences under Part III, (Sections 7-17),

"}

"

V, (

;;

22-28).

124

124

118 129

Rogue and Vagabond-5 Geo. IV, c. 83,

Carried forward,

6,342 |8,568

Carried forward,..

7,023 9,279

Table II,—Continued.

List of OFFENCES, ETC.,-Continued.

NO. OF

NO OF

- H 7

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,...

No. of PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

OFFENCES.

Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance-8 of 1896,- Offences under,..............................

Seditious Publications Ordinance-15 of 1907,

7,023 9,279

Brought forward,.

Theatres and

Public Performances

11

11

Ordinance-18 of 1908,

No. of

PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

|11,038 |13,651

Regulation

Servants Quarters Ordinance-11 of 1903,- Offences under,.

Societies Ordinance-47 of 1911,

Stamp Ordinance-16 of 1901. —

Offences under.........................

Stowaways Ordinance-5 of 1903,— Offences under,.

Summary Offences Ordinance-1 of 1845,-

9

14

Vaccination Ordinance-2 of 1890,--

15

55

Tobacco Ordinance--10 of 1916,

Traveller's Restriction Ordinance-19 of 1915,

Contraventions of and Offences under,

Vagrancy Ordinance-9 of 1897,-

58

58

Proceedings under,

4

·

38

39

1

15

16

13

21

58

Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance-40 of 1912,— Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder

4,0784,200

Volunteer Ordinance-4 of 1893,—

Nuisances, Trespasses,

and similar offences,

Offences under,....................

1

(Sections 3-21),

Possession of stolen goods, (

Offences against good order, (Sections 22-35),

Proceedings under Miscellaneous Provisions,

(Sections 42-41),

36—11).

3,277 3,416

217

400 441

312

Weights and Measures Ordinance-2 of 1885,- Contraventions of and Offences under,

89

89

6

Wild Birds and Game Preservation Ordinance-6 of 1885,-Contraventions of and Offences under,

I

I

Undecided Cases,

37

37

Carried forward,.

|11,038 |13,651

Total,

15,304 18,041

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENCES.

Assaults and other offences

offences

against the person, Malicious injuries to property, Gambling,

Offences against property other

than malicious injuries to property or predial larceny, Offences against Revenue Acts, Highway Acts, Health Acts,

and other Acts relating to the social economy of the Colony,

Offences against Masters and Servants Acts, including Acts relating to indentured coo- lies,

Other offences,

Table III.

ABSTRACT of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during the Year 1920.

CASES, HOW disposed of, AND THE NUMBER OF Male and FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR.

Warrants.

TOTAL NUMBER

OF CASES.

TOTAL NUMBER OF

PRISONERS.

Convicted and

Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial

at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained pending Orders of H.E. the Governor.

To keep the

Peace.

To be of Good

Behaviour.

To answer

any Charge.

Witnesses punished for preferring False Charge or giving wilful False Testimony.

Undecided.

M. 1. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M.

F.

ང་

463

571

28

33

241 66

14

140

16 47

393 1,668 1,579

18

1,956| 2,226| 1,689

**

10 6

64

3

7

43 409

20

ོ་ :

56

2,523 3,107 2,659|173

234

Ivvvvv

34

:

N

2

:.

:

13

35

29

:

9,891 10,401 | 9,334 | 217 655

36 30

1

4

Total,

15,520

15,267 18,041 |15,520|517 | 1,541|119 | 136

R

:

:

11

2

37

3333

:

:

::

:

:

:

:

L

~

M. 1.

:

M. F. M.

2

Total Number of

Prisoners.

I.

Summons for Defendants.

Summons for Witnesses.

Notices of Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For entering Gambling Houses.

Magistrates' Orders.

TOTAL.

93| 5,889 | 12 10194

C3

2

478

27

...

6

1,643

25

2,161

65

207

2,900

465

311

00

6,889

:

:

26

4 107 10 10

37

6147

16

12

23

35

35

35

:.

10,136 265

2 17,380

661 5,889

12 10 194

465

311

6,889

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

18,041

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

- H 8-

296

Table IV.

RETURN of PUNISHMENTS awarded in respect of CERTAIN CLASSES of OFFENCES, during the Year 1920.

PUNISHMENTS.

Assaults

and other

offences

Number of

Description.

each kind

inflicted.

against

the

person.

Malicious

injuries to

property.

Gam-

bling.

Offences against property other than malicious injuries to pro- perty or predial larceny.

Offences against Revenue Acts, Highway Acts, Health Acts, and

other Acts relating to the social economy of the colony.

2,408

Offences against Masters and Servants Acts,

Other

including Acts

offen-

relating to

ces.

indentured

coolies.

8,915

:

:

411

H 9-

16

7

2

9,647

Fines,

13,335

213

16

1,641

138

Imprisonment in lieu

of fine or security,

879

34

1.0

34

70

440

Peremptory Imprison.

ment,

1,920

2

Whipping, .......

147

1

1,406

90

20

20

49

Solitary Confinement,.

Exposed in Stocks,

42

42

Sentenced to House of

Detention,

23

:

:

7

Bound over with or

without Sureties,

85

73

:

Juvenile

Offenders'

Prison,

27

:

:

:.

TOTAL..

16,458 |

402

24

1,682

22

1,779

2,920

H 10

Table V.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during a period of ten years 1911-1920.

CASES, HOW disposed of, and the Number of Male and FemaLE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

absconded.

Did not appear and

Committed to prison or detained pending or- der of His

Supreme Excellency

Court.

the

Governor.

Ordered to find security

To keep the

peace, to be of

good beha- viour, and to answer any charge.

Year.

Total number of

cases.

Convicted and punished.

Discharged.

Commit- ted for trial at

Escaped

before being

brought

for trialat

the Ma-

gistracy.

Escaped.

Punished for preferring false charge

Undecided.

Total number

or giving false testimony.

of defendants.

14 15

16

17

18

19

20

21

M.

31. F. M. M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1

2

3

4

5

6 7

8

9

10 11 12 13

M.

F.

M.

F.

AL F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1911,

10,471 11,000 -482

2,832

217 187 23

23

391 59 1

1

1912,

13,450 15,945 877

3,027

329157.

5

451

119

1918.

14,218 19,856 641

2,559

181 169 24

25

00

8

415

97

1914.

11.192 12,890 267

2,401

115 116 2

18

296

22

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

1915.

12,263 12,788 305

2,056

111 149 10

and

272

20

:

Total,.. 61,594 72,479 2,572

12,875

953 778 65

78

9 1,825 317 |

3

LAN

Average

per |12,3188 14,4958 (5144

2,575 1906 1556 13

15.6 1.8

365 163.4

÷

1.

Year,

1916, 15,657 14,881 455

1917.... 11,922 11,727 441

2,283

2,168

96 116 4

10

813 40

92 119 3

248

34

1

1918,

1919. 12,961 18,788 364

1920, 15,267 15,520 517

9,805 9.359 373

1,947

127

117 10

1,662

1,541

108 146

19

2

A

:

:

197

41

76

~

119 186

10

143

19

Total,.. 65,012

65,275 2,150

9,551

542 534 24

22

:

977 141

Average

per 13,062.4 13,055 430 1,910-2 Year,

108.4 108 8 4.8 4-4

:

195.4 28.2

:

N

:

15

6

14,482 787

16

19,612 1,332

22

22

23,046 952

3

63

15,789

406

48

15,320 446

:

:

:

12

194

7

88,249 3,928

2-4

38.8

1:4

17,649-8 | 784-6

:

:

:

:

:

.2

:

:

re

17,625 595

...

42

14,311 570

49

11,665

545

$83

39

2

13,673 475

35

17,380 662

1

237

4

14,654 2,847

~

:

47.4

.8

14,930 8 569-4

425

11

162,903 6,770

1.3

42.5

1.1

16,290-3 677

Grand

Total

for the

126,606 | 187,754 | 4,722

22,426

1,495 1,312 89

100 92,802 458

3 6

13

10 Years,

Average

per Year,

|12,660-6 18,7754472-2 | 2,2126

149.5 1312 8.9

10 .9 280-2 45-8 +3 .6

:

Appendix I.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1920.

1.-REGISTRATION.

During the year three thousand four hundred and five (3,405) Deeds and Documents were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844, affecting four thousand five hundred and twenty (4,520) lots of land. The total money consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous documents amounted to $67,493,394.47 particulars of which are shown in Table I. The total number of documents registered in the Land Office under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 up to the end of 1920 was 73,665. The number of Deeds registered each year for the last ten years is shown in Table III.

2.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The total area of land sold and granted on lease during the year was 277 acres O rood 62% poles of which 207 acres 3 roods 20 poles was in respect of lands dealt with by the District Land Officers, the total area resumed was 75 acres 2 roods 30% poles being an excess of 201 acres 1 rood 16% poles of land granted over land resumed during the year. This is exclusive of quarries and lands let on short temporary permits by the Public Works Department. Particulars of the grants are shown on page W 1 of the Blue Book for 1920.

3.-GRANTS OF LEASES.

The number of Crown Leases granted during the year was 74 particulars of which are specified in Table II. The number of Crown Leases issued each year for the last ten years is shown in Table III.

4.-FEES.

The total amount of fees collected by Stamps, exclusive of the New Territories, during the year amounted to $59,288.75 being $6,803.85 more than the previous year. The amount of land registration fees in the New Territories amounted to $4,829.50.

The amounts of fees collected under the different headings for the years 1911 to 1920 are shown in Table IV.

I 2

5. CROWN RENT ROLL.

The total Crown Rent due in respect of leased lands in Hong- kong and Kowloon (excluding certain Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon entered in the Village Rent Roll) amounted for the year ending 25th December to $449,379.24 an increase of $24,513.25 on the previous year. The total amount due in respect of leased lands in the Villages of Hongkong and Kowloon appearing in the Village Rent Roll for the year ending 30th September was $3,526.45 a decrease of $121.40 on the previous year due mainly to the resumptions at Kowloon Tong. The total number of lots of Crown Land appearing in the Rent Rolls with the Total Rents is shown in Table V.

6. SCAVENGING LANES.

Areas for Scavenging Lanes were, in the case of seven proper- ties, either resumed by the Crown for money payments or dedicated by the Crown Lessees as Scavenging Lanes in consideration of their being granted by the Building Authority modifications or exemptions from certain provisions of the Public Health and Build- ings Ordinance, 1903, and the necessary documents were completed and registered.

7.-NOISY AND OFFENSIVE TRADES.

Twenty-nine licences were granted to Crown Lessees under the provisions of the Crown Leases to carry on Offensive trades on their premises in cases where such licences were recommended by the Sanitary Department.

8.-BUILDING COVENANTS.

In three cases applications were made by Crown Lessees for an extension of time in which to comply with the Building covenant in their Crown Leases or grants. The applications were granted on payment of penalties and the agreements completed and registered.

9.-NAVAL AND MILITARY LANDS.

The Peak Signal Station was taken over from the Admiralty by the Colonial Government. The Admiralty also transferred to the Colonial Government a strip of land adjoining Morrison Gap Road for the purpose of road construction. Murray Battery (area 46,677 square feet) and Victoria Battery (area 71,329 square feet) were transferred to the Colonial Government by the War Depart- ment for which the sums of $118,423.25 and $26,565.80 were credited to the War Department in the Colonial Military Lands account.

:

I 3

A portion of North Point Battery containing 90,288 square feet was acquired from the War Department for the purpose of road improvements and a sum of $21,184.56 credited to the War Department in the said account.

A portion of Elliott Battery was taken by Colonial Govern- ment for road improvements, other land being given in exchange, and the Colonial Government credited with $1,680.60 in the said account by way of equality of exchange.

A small strip containing 3,750 square feet along the North Western side of Belchers Battery was resumed in connection with the erection of some public buildings for which the War Depart- ment received a credit in the above mentioned account of $913. ·

10.-MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS.

In addition to the above seventy-four Crown Leases, one hundred and thirty-four miscellaneous documents were drawn and completed, the latter including agreements to secure Government Contracts and Purchase Deeds on the resumption of properties by the Crown.

11. STAMP DUTY.

The amount of Stamp Duty paid on registered documents exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration amounted to $144,818.75. The amount of Stamp Duty on Probates and Letters of Administration registered amounted to $435,574.85.

12. STAFF.

There has been no change in the Staff during the year.

2nd March, 1921.

*

PHILIP JACKS,

Land Officer.

-14

Table I.

Particulars of Deeds and Documents registered in the Land Office.

No. of Lots

Description of Documents.

Number Registered.

or portions

of Lots affected.

Total Consideration.

c.

Assignments

1,044

1,212

24,363,918.75

Mortgages and Transfers of

Mortgages

1,028

1,413

24,773,641.20

Reassignments and Satis-

factions

958

1,224

17,636,927.42

Surrenders....

58

69

398,684.37

Judgments and Orders of

Court

27

59

33,157.00

Probates and Letters of

Administration

Miscellaneous Documents,

197

86

93

298

245

287,065.73

Total,......

3,405

4,520

$67,493,394.47

Table II.

Crown Leases granted during the year 1920.

Hongkong.

Kowloon.

New Kowloon.

New

Territories.

23

7

2

1

1

5

22

13

74

Total.

15

Table III.

Number of Deeds registered and Crown Leases issued during the years from 1911 to 1920.

Year.

Deeds Registered.

Crown Leases Issued.

1911

2,142

99

1912

2,353

57

1913

2,814

118

1914

2,433

66

1915

2,154

166

1916

2,670

118

1917

2,824

135

1918

2,922

117

1919

3,021

114

1920

3,405

74

Table IV.

Fees collected during the years from 1911 to 1920.

Registration Searches and

Grants

Year.

of Deeds.

Copies of Documents.

of Leases.

Total.

C.

c.

$ c.

$ C.

1911

33,871.00

2,827.20

2,925.00

39.623.20

1912.

37,528.00

2,805.75

1,820.00

42,153.75

1913.

45,018.00

3,530.50

3.670.00

52,218.50

1914..

38,362.00

3,200.25

2,450.00

44,012.25

1915.

32,305.00

2,719.00

5 455.00

40,479.00

1916.

42,070.00

3,368.25

3,960.00

49,398.25

1917.

43,478.00

3,199.75

4,370.00

51,047.75

1918....

45,225.00

3,399.35

3,505.00

52,129.35

1919

45,896.00

3,486.90

3,102.00

52,484.90

1920..

52,569.00

3,849.75

2,870.00

59,288.75

-16

Table V.

Crown Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

C.

Victoria Marine Lot

Praya Reclamation Marine Lot

Victoria Inland Lot

332

68,235.53

81

9,987.84

1,871

171,048.72

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

Inland Lot

Farm Lot

2

18,334.00

11

3,306.00

38

2,427.53

Garden Lot..

48

1,221.00

Rural Building Lot

128

12,567.84

Aberdeen Marine Lot

5

579.16

Inland Lot......

71

2,229.16

""

Aplichau Marine Lot

39

Inland Lot..

Shaukiwan Marine Lot..

""

Inland Lot

Stanley Inland Lot

Kowloon Marine Lot

21

150.64

22

172.64

10

1,928.00

159

2,693.40

4

4.00

56

43,434.13

Inland Lot

>>

Farm Lot

19

Garden Lot

>>

907

55,043.16

4

109.49

:ཨ

Hung Hom Marine Lot

""

Inland Lot.....

Shek O Inland Lot Tai Tam Inland Lot

197 2

6,140.00 10,034.50

5.00

1

1.00

Tong Po Inland Lot

1

1.00

New Kowloon Marine Lot

8

20,442.00

Inland Lot

233

12,533.00

"

Farm Lot

"}

1,083.00

""

Rural Building Lot

1

42.00

Tai Po Inland Lot......

7

438.00

Fan Ling Lot.............

2

1,192.00

Sheung Shui Lot

2

408.00

Sai Kung Marine Lot

1

Inland Lot

Ping Chau Farm Lot Mining Lot....

500.00

1

225.00

3

2,862.00

Total.......

4,237 $449,379.24

-17

Village Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

C.

Wongneichung,

128

224.50

Aberdeen

23

83.50

Pokfulam

24

28.25

Tai Hang

163

641.50

Ah Kung Ngam.

25

18.25

Shaukiwan

53-

35.50

Tai Kok Tsui

10

16.00

Mong Kok

45

98.50

Hok Un Tokwawan Shek Shan

Sun Shan....

Mataukok

94

276.00

187

328.00

31

69.00

18

59.50

31

44.50

Mati.....

2

5.50

Ho Mun Tin

6

17.50

Ma Tau Chung

35

91.00

Ma Tau Wei

98

186.00

Kau Pui Shek.

31

112.00

Hau Pui Loong

15

53.50

Tung Lo Wan......

5

23.00

Wong Tsuk Hang

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

18

77.00

Little Hongkong

3.00

Tong Po

3.50

Stanley

10

19.50

Tytam

Tytam Tuk

1

3.50

3

2.50

W

Wong

Ma Kok

2.00

Chai Wan

15.00

Shek O

Hok Tsui

Chung Hom Bay

Aplichau

Tsat Tsz Mui

23.00

1

1.50

1

3.00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road, Victoria...

1

3.00

Kowloon Tong

Telegraph Bay Hung Hom West Little Hongkong Shek O Hok Tsui

Nã: 88

68

287.00

35

99.00

13

43.50 6.00

1,590

280.65

1,064 181

173.20

34.60

Total.....

4,034

$3,526.45

Į

*

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1920.

A.-NORTHERN DISTRICT.

I.-STAFF.

Mr. A. E. Wood was in charge of the district from the 1st January till the 13th December, when he went on long leave and Mr. D. W. Tratman took over charge.

11.MAGISTRACY.

Table A shews the number of cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

C

As in the previous year money-loan-associations or "wui's formed by far the greater proportion of the Small Debts Court work. The worst offenders were the people of Shün Wan and the neighbouring villages round Plover Cove, where liabilities in one "wui" appear to have been met by the most reckless bidding in others and even by the formation of new 'wui's" of a correspond- ingly increased fragility. Under such circumstances neither the promoters nor the members of the associations are at any pains to ascertain each other's financial status, all concerned being satisfied with the prospect of some ready money with which they may tide over their more pressing liabilities. This type of case is particular- ly vexatious on account of the strain which it imposes on the European Police who serve the Court as bailiffs. The assistance of the Court is rarely sought until the defalcations are both large and wilful and once the Court has set its hand to a irui" it is expected to bring the defaulters to book at each successive drawing, with the result that quarter after quarter the police have to be called upon to execute fresh judgments against the same group of a dozen or more elusive debtors scattered over many miles of country, often at a very considerable distance from the Station. It would almost seem preferable to treat “ wui's' as gambling transact- ions not allowing of legal remedy: but on the other hand the whole life of the Territory is so deeply permeated by this type of finance that the general course of administration would at times be seriously obstructed by such a rule. An occasional application of the rule would be inequitable for the same reason, the sinner in one case being often sinned against in another and entitled to claim there the exercise of the pressure applied to himself and so on indefinitely.

III-LAND Office.

"

The number of sales of land and other transactions affecting land which took place during the year are set out in Table B.

The number of memorials registered was 3,607 as against 3,181 in 1919. The fees received as stamp duty amounted to $2,435.60 as against $1,964.90 in the previous year.

J 2

The erection of new houses and shops on the fish-pond reclam- ation at Tai Po proceeded steadily and the demand for sites was found sufficiently strong to justify a further reclamation between the N. W. end of the Market and the stream. A large portion of this new ground is to be reserved for a public market.

The success of the Mong Tseng-Ping Shan reclamation revived the old scheme for a similar, but far larger, reclamation stretching from Shan Pui to Mai Po, roughly parallel with the San Tin-Au Tau road. Negociations were well advanced when the objections of the Kam Tin villages to the arrangements for a supply of fresh water brought matters again to a standstill. Kam Tin suffers con- siderably from floods under present conditions and, not unreason- ably, objects to the construction of any dam which would form even the smallest obstruction to the off-flow of storm water.

It was finally agreed between the parties that a dam might be constructed in the river above the long bridge provided its top was not above the level of the surrounding marshland: but it is extremely doubt- ful whether such a dam can furnish the necessary supply of water and the whole project is therefore again postponed indefinitely.

One of the most remarkable features of the year has been the rapid growth of "chai t'ong" or "vegetarian halls".

vegetarian halls". Five years ago these religious or quasi-religious establishments had practically no foothold in this district: now they are everywhere in parts within reasonable reach of the railway and main roads, Sha Tin, Tai Po, Fan Ling and Pat Heung each have several and are asking for more. Their promoters or managers are extremely secretive as to the objects of these enterprises, but it is sufficiently clear that they are designed chiefly to attract the well-to-do of Hongkong, particularly the womenfolk, and that the believer is not expected to come empty-handed. Pending a straightforward explanation of the sudden "boom" in these "halls" permission is being refused for all new establishments as well as for extensions to existing ones.

IV. REVENUE.

The total revenue collected in this office is set out under the various heads in Table C the total being $115,865.45. Table D. gives the revenue collected each year since 1911. To the figure in Table C should be added the following amounts paid by the district, but not through this office :-

Liquor duties, Sai Kung,..

$ C.

1,247.73

Harbour Dues

2.305.00

No. 2 Launch,

2,714.05

No. 3

5,928.20

No. 4

3,492.95

""

Crown rent paid in Land Office,

5,342.74

Mining Licences,

176.00

Prospecting Licences,

4,000.00

Tobacco Duties....

3,734.70

Licences,

168.00

""

Total,

:

$29,109.37

J 3

The total revenue received from the Northern District during 1920 was therefore $144,974.82 as against $148,583.71 in 1919. The chief falling-off was in respect of native liquors and is to be attributed to the high cost of the raw materials of distillation.

The cost of the District Office for the year was $34,675.65.-

V.--GENERAL.

Crops.-The two rice crops were fairly good, being estimated at 80%. The potato crop was very poor owing to frost at the end of the previous year. The sugar-cane crop on the other hand was exceptionally good.

Rice control. The price of rice fell steadily and by the end of the year had returned to normal. The restrictions on the exporta- tion of rice from the Territory were removed in September.

Crime.--The more serious crimes reported included 1 case of murder and armed robbery, 11 cases of armed robbery on land, one accompanied by kidnapping of children, 3 armed robberies on water and 2 attempts at armed robbery. Of organised crimes such as these a considerable proportion are undoubtedly planned within our own borders, although after the crime the gang usually makes for Chinese territory, and the chief factor in this unpleasant state of things is the large body of brick-makers, stone-workers and similar labourers attracted from Wai Chau and other unsavoury parts by recent road-making and building activities. These men moving about from job to job, acquire a knowledge of likely victims which, as well as their active personal cooperation is always at the service of resident criminals who would otherwise be obliged to confine their efforts to much smaller enterprises. The difficulty of protecting the scattered villages of the Territory has been further increased by the general sophistication arising out of the War and the continual faction-fighting in the neighbouring parts of China. Not only are firearms very plentiful across the border, but large numbers of men have been trained to use them and realise their efficacy with the result that the repressive force of the individual policeman is greatly reduced.

Fires. One serious fire occurred during the year at Sai Kung in a house occupied by a member of the Chinese police force. The fire spread with such speed that it was impossible to save an un- fortunate girl aged 7 who was in the house at the time.

Rainfall.-Table E gives the rainfall for the year at Tai Po and the average for the preceding 5 years.

Forestry, etc.-The results of our efforts to promote afforest- ation were not encouraging, heavy casualties being reported from The nurseries at Tai Lam and Wang Shan Keuk. In the latter case the damage was due to the ravages of deer, which despite care- ful fencing of cultivation and countless traps, are undoubtedly a

!

J 4

serious nuisance in the more hilly parts of the district. Consider- able damage was also done to crops near Ping Kong by a herd of wild pig. An attempt was made to shoot some of these but they succeeded in escaping from their lair just ahead of the guns, fresh tracks being found on the crest of the ridge towards Wo Hop Shek. The herd was afterwards sighted near Wai Tau and is now probab- ly in the ravines of Tai Mo Shan.

April 1921.

D. W. TRATMAN, District Officer, North.

T

J 5

Table A.

POLICE COURT.

1920. Average from 1915-1919.

Cases heard.

281

239

Persons brought before the

484

399

Police Magistrate,......... I

Persons convicted & punished,

376

267

Persons bound over,

26

49

Persons discharged,

80

95

Persons committed,

2

6

Persons imprisoned,

133

93

Fines inflicted,

$1,927.00

$1,462.93

Warrants executed,

46

42

Cases heard.

Writs, of Execution,

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

285

200

299

164

Heading.

Permits, etc. No. of Sales,

No. of Lots,

Table B.

Arca.

Increase of

Annual Rent.

Decrease of Annual Rent.

Amount of Premia, Fees,

etc.

Amount paid

for Resump- tion of Land.

Term of Years.

80

Sp

Sales of Land for Agriculture

Brick-kiln

Building

Fruit Growing

56

2

2,144,219 s. f.

15,853

52.80

1.10

ל,

164

11

182,501

307,533

269.50

2.962.00

120.00

3,593.50

"

7.60

534.00

"3

"."

203

Grave

1

3,200

7.00

32.00

RDC

"---

Lime-kiln

2,550

3.00

26.00

>>

""

Threshing Floor

7,774

90

80.00

75

""

"

Garden

65,901,,

16.16

429.15

75

Exchanges

97

Conversions,

Permits to occupy Land for Agriculture,

Stone Quarry Leases

13,406

19.18

120.43

75

26

158,026

33.03

25

42

1,393,563

93.04

มษ

144

267

2,804,664

238.40

รา

""

Building, etc.

6

480,652

24.02

"}

Surrenders

SN

2

76·00 acres.

600.00

89

292,721 s. f.

92.72

J 6-

Heading.

No. of Sales, Permits, etc.

No. of Lots.

Resumptions

Re-entries,

100

28

12

Stone Quarry Permits

65

Permits to cut Earth, ete..

100

Matshed Permits

92

Forestry Licences-

480

Pineapple Land Leases

18

Ferry Licences

Water Wheel Licences

2

Grave Certificates

121

Deeds Registered and Fees

3,607

Table B,-Continued.

Area.

22,207 s. f.

144,078

55,854

29,808-80 acres. 9:31

Increase of

Annual Rent.

v

Decrease of Annual Rent.

Amount of Premia, Fees,

etc.

Amount paid for Resump-

tion of Land.

Term of Years.

C.

$

10.03

1,342.37

15.87

162.00

132.00

218.00

3,174.83

27.93

9.00

2.00

55.00

2,435.60

— J 7 —

J

Table C.

Rovenne for 1920.

Average of Revenue for 1915-1919.

$ (.

C.

Crown Rent, Leased Lands, Kerosene Oil Licences.... Chinese Wines & Spirits,

82.190.93

80.882.76

275.00

305.00

3.368.75

3,891.65

Distillery Licences,

2,140,75

2.671.65

Pawnbrokers' Licences,

800,00

1.200.00

Money Changers' Licences,

500.00

704.00

Fines,...

1,927.00

1,462.93

Forfeitures,

1.802.72

359.04

(Land Sales),

40.00

39.80

Distress Warrants,

217.00

101.60

(Crown Rent),

22.00

32.60

House Rent,

105.00

726.63

Liquor Duties,

6.184.97

8,458.31

Reward Fund, (Opium),

508.00

86.00

Arms Fine Fund.

Nil.

87.40

Arrears of Revenue.

1.00

10.21

Rent of Government Eurniture,

Nu.

17.20

Debts & Bankrupt Estate in Court

Nil.

13.03

Unclaimed Compensation.......

Nil.

7.94

Forestry Licences...

3.174.83

3.107.55

Permits to cut Earth, etc.,

132.00

116.40

Mining Licences,

Nit.

50.00

Grave Certificates,.

55.00

75.90

Pineapple Land Leases,

27.98

39-51

Matshed Permits,

218.00

115-30

Permits to occupy Land,

518.89

438-68

Stone Quarry Permits.

162.00

169-40

Stone Quarry Leases,.

600.00

696.95

Water Wheel Licences,

2.00

5.80

Ferry Licences, ...

9.00

9.60

Certified Extracts....

128.00

91.00

Sunprints, ...

85.00

62.00

Premia on Land Sales,

7,897,08

20.491.46

Stamps for Deeds..

2.435.60

1,399.00

Boundary Stones,

160.00

Deposit not Available,

147.00

16.00 574.00

Crown Lenses,

30.00

Nil.

Total,............ $115,865.45

$128,516.30

J 9

Table D.

1911..

Revenue Collected from 1911-1920.

..............$102,960.60

1912................................ 106,607.67 1913.......... 111,301.72

1914......

108,455.14

1915...... ..... 112,075.71

1916....

1917.

$174,153.77

117,095.84

1918. ........... 120,244.93 1919............ 117,174.51

1920...... ..... 115,865,45

Table E.

Rainfall at Tai Po Police Station.

1920.

Arerage 1915-1919.

Inches.

Inches.

January

11.

January

1.34

February

5.44

February.

1:07

March

2:05

March

2.02

April

7.03

April

6.55

May June

13:44 May

12.71

18.82 June

21.31

July

24.55

July.

24.09

August...

28.35

August......

18.73

September

7-90

September

7.28

October

4.68

October

3:18

November

7:30

November

2.67

December

•59

December

·97

Total Rainfall 120.46

Average... 101.92

J 10

B.-SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

I.-STAFF.

Mr. R. A .C. North had charge of the office until February 9th and I acted from that date until the end of the year.

The title of the post has been changed during the year to "District Officer".

Mr. Chan Kai-man, 5th Grade Clerk and Shroff, was dismissed in May and Mr. Tsoi Kam-tat was transferred from the Sanitary Department on 4th of June to fill his post.

II.-MAGISTRACY.

The District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate heard during the year 115 cases affecting 172 persons. 108 persons convicted or bound over, 26 were discharged and 38 imprisoned.

were

The following Table gives a comparison with 1918 and 1919 :—

1918.

1919.

1920.

No. of cases

168

194

115

No. of persons affected

294

282

172

No. of persons convicted or

bound over

219

177

108

No. of persons discharged......

40

42

26

No. of persons imprisoned................. 35

63

38

Fines

$641.19

$724.30

$724.30

$459.17

Arms Fines.. Forfeitures

$447.00

$50.00 $275.00

$118.34 $82.08 $61.30

III.-SMALL DEBTS COURT.

115 cases were instituted during the year as compared with 176 in 1919 and 108 in 1918. Courts were held as usual in the District during the year. I find many of these cases are brought rather to secure official record of the debt than to obtain immediate payment.

IV.-LAND OFFICE.

The number of sales of land and other transactions affecting land which took place during 1920 are set forth in Table A.

2,329 deeds were registered during the year as compared with 1,804 in 1919. This is again the highest number. on record. Registration fees for 1920 were $2,393.90 as compared with $2,681.30 in 1919.

4

J 11

V.-REVENUE.

The total revenue collected by the District Officer is shown in Table B. The increase in the total of rates is due to the rapid development of Sham Shui Po.

Table C gives details of revenue collected in Licence Fees by the Police in 1919 and 1920.

Table D shows the revenue collected in 1919 and 1920 in the District by all Departments other than the District Office and includes the totals of Table C.

Table E shows comparatively the total revenue collected from the Southern District by all Departments during the last three

years.

J

VI. LIQUOR.

Liquor duties were collected in the Southern District during 1920 amounting to $122,498.99. The total for 1919 $102,994.07.

was

The chief sources of this revenue are given in the following Table which shows comparatively the totals of the last two years.

District.

No. of Distilleries

Revenue Revenue Revenue

1918.

1919.

1920.

in 1920.

$

$

$

Sham Shui Po...

2

42,652

53,444

23,335

Kowloon City...

12,073

11,286

15,010

Tsun Wan

11

60,031

764

60,266

Kwai Chung

26,062

26,926

17.461

Kap Shui Mun...

426

165

70

Cheung Chau

18,668

8,241

4,419

Tai (

2,077

1,473

1,626

Hang Hau

6

346

289

244

Po Toi

1

129

320

Tsing I

1

132

80

63

VII-GENERAL.

Crops were very fair during the year under review.

Trade varied considerably in different localities, but, as the number of small debts cases fell from 176.in 1919 to 115 in this year, it may be regarded as on the upward grade.

J 12

wwwwwww..com

Tai 0.-I am glad at last to be able to report a good fishing season. Considerably larger catches were reported and were disposed of at a slightly enhanced figure. The crops which are grown for local consumption, were also better than those of 1919. The Police Court cases showed a diminution, as did those in the Small Debts Court. In the market, the stalls were reasonably well let, and it seems to have found its economic level. As regards the salt-pans, production decreased by some 8,000 piculs.

Cheung Chau.-The fishing season was bad and the salt fish business and all trade suffered in consequence. The distilleries also had a very bad year, and revenue from them decreased by $3,800. On the other hand, the development of the European Reservation brought a good deal of money into the island. The Quarry was let on more favourable terms, owing to building activities. Three more bungalows were built and the popularity of the place as a summer and week end resort increases. The health of the island showed a great improvement, 66 deaths only being recorded as against 128 in 1919. I have again to cou- gratulate the Kai Fong on their excellent work in the island's interest. They and it suffered a great loss in the death of Mr. Chu Fuk, which took place during the year.

Tsun Wan. The crops of padi were almost as good as last year, but the average price fell from $5.75 to $3.90 per picul. This however is higher than the average of earlier years. Pine- apples fetched 80 cents more per picul this year, and a good deal of land was opened for the growing of this fruit. When the new plants begin to bear, there should be a large increase in the crop. The production of nut oil fell and its price dropped by no less than $9.00 a picul. The price of lime rose, and at Ping Chau, a kiln re-opened and several applications have been made for land. to enlarge existing premises. The Castle Peak Road has proved extremely popular with motorists, but I would urge those who use cars to insist upon reasonable speeds.

Lamma.-The people pursue their usual quiet and prosperous

course.

23rd March, 1921.

E. W. HAMILTON, District Officer, South.

Headings.

Table A.

No. of

Amount

Increase

Decrease

Amount

Sales,

No.

Area

of

of

of

Permits, of

Crown

Crown

Licences,

Lots.

Acres.

Rent.

Rent.

Premia,

Fees, &c.

paid for

Resump-

tion of

Term

of

years.

&c.

Land.

J 13 -

Land Sale for Buildings

NEW KOWLOON

C.

A

$

""

"}

}}

Threshing floor

11

9

*09

9.00

1

*03

.20

ISLANDS:

Land Sale for Buildings

29

4.73

378.00

342.00

90.00

3,348.33

75

Agriculture.

21

2.90

3.20

329.00

75

15

""

>>

"

"

Threshing floor

'02

Conversions (New Kowloon)

33

Stone Quarry Permits

Permit to occupy Land Matshed Permits

Earth Permits

4

•11

34.42

148.00

ગયા નાની

75

(Islands)

6

1:30

131.07

75

30:00

250.00

1,071.60

890.75

309.00

Water Wheel Licences

Grave Certificates

Forestry Licences

32.00

6.25

1,749.14

Pineapple Land Leases

Deeds Registered

1,046.12

2,393.90

Resumption

150

25.88

524.14

55,597.05

Surrender

Re-entry

10

1.24

7.09

52

1·15

26.01

J 14

Table B.

Revenue collected by the District Officer, Southern District,

New Territories.

1919.

1920.

C.

Land Sales..

1.457.65

$ C.

4,273.33

Crown Rent

28,376.12 25,438.28

Special War Rates

1,894.00

Assessed Taxes

12,291.08

15,161.96

Lease of Stone Quarries

861.84

955.00

Forestry Licences

1,693.84

1,749.14

Earth Permits

52.50

309.00

Matshed Permits

778.25

890.75

Permit to occupy Land

1,013.29

1,071.60

Pineapple Licences

846.74

1,046.12

Registration Fees

2,681.30

2,393.90

Crown Leases,

150.00

Distress Warrants, (Crown Rent)

67.00

35.00

(Small Debts)

35.00

32.00

Writs of Summons

209.00

152.00

Fines, (Police Court)

724.30

459.17

Forfeitures.....

82.08

61.33

Certified Extracts

26.00

21.00

Grave Certificates

4.05

6.25

Miscellaneous Receipts

57.21

D.O./S Deposit Interest

219.69

131.72

Legal Costs

17.00

Sunprint Plans

45.00

25.00

Boundary Stones

170.90

539.50

Water Wheel Licences...

24.00.

32.00

Arms Fine Fund

50.00

185.00

Market Fees,

780.61 1,232.46

Total.......

$57,458.45 $56,351.51

--

Table C.

Licence Fees collected by the Police Department.

Money

Station.

Distilleries.

Wine and

Spirit.

Eating

Pawn

Kerosine.

Dogs.

Chan-

Total.

House.

Brokers.

gers.

C.

C.

$

€9-

*A

1919

Kowloon City

2,800.00

53

234

1,500

1920

400.00

2,800.00

54

201

3,000

4,612.00

6,475.00

Sham Shui Pc

( 1919

800.00

4,800.00

50

1,200

4,000

10,905.00

1920

800.00

4,000.00

42

35

372

4,000

9,249.00

1919

75.00

650.00

66

Tai O

50

841.00

1920

50.00

525.00

56

.400

1,071.00

Cheung Chau

1919

137.00

975.00

74

800

2,036.00

1920

112.00

787.50

74

800

40

1,813,50

1919

057.00

Tsun Wan

475.00

28

10

1,070.00

1920

484,00

437.50

18

939.50

Yung Shu Wan,

1919

75.00

40

115.00

Lamma Island

1920

400.00

75.00

30

1,500

2,005.00

Total 1920 $2,246.00

1919 $1,569.00

9,775.00

271

120

1,434

6,300

110

19,579.00

8,625.00 244

85

573

9,700

80

21,553,00

J 15 -

J 16

Table D.

Revenue collected through Other Departments from the New Territories, Southern District.

1919.

1920.

C.

$

C.

""

Treasury, (Crown Rent for Inland Lots)....

(Quarries in New Kowloon)

18,065.19

9,562.67

10,349.98

10,645.10

Harbour Office, (Harbour Dues, Stake Nets,

&c.)

22,428.85

19,373.00

Police, (Licence Fees)...

19,579.00*

21,553.00*

Imports and Exports Office, (Liquor Duties) 102,994.07 122,498.99

Total,...

$173,417.09 $183,632.76

* See Table C.

Table E.

Total Revenue collected from Southern District, New Territories, during the last three years.

By District Office,

By Other Departments,

X

See Table D.

Total,

1918.

1919.

1930.

$ e.

$ P.

S

¿.

58,291,05

57,458.45

233,267.68

173,417.09

56,351.51 183,632.76

$291,558.73 $230,875.54 $239,984.27

-

!

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF

POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1920.

SUMMARY OF CRIME FOR 1920.

The total of all cases reported to the Police during the year 1920 was 11,912 as against 10,542 in 1919 being an increase of 1,370 or 13 per cent. The average for the last five years is 10, 346.

In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences, there appears an increase, as compared with 1919, of 449 cases or 9.90 per cent. in the former and an increase of 921 cases or 15:34 per cent. in the latter.

The increase and decrease as compared with 1919 in Serious Offences are shown as follows :-

Increase.

Burglary and Larceny from dwelling... Larceny

144

371

Other Felonies

1

-516

Decrease.

Murder

Robbery

Kidnapping

Protection of Women and Children

Unlawful Possession

:

Nett increase ..

:

00

14

1

12

32

67

449

2. Table I shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during 1919 and 1920 and number of persons convicted and discharged in connection with these offences.

MURDER.

3. Twenty-three murders were reported to the Police during the year as against 31 in 1919.

K 2

In connection with 14 of these reports, no arrest was made, and in the remaining 9 cases, arrests were made. There were 2 cases in which convictions were obtained (4 persons of whom 3 were convicted and 1 discharged). In seven cases there was

no conviction (9 persons).

MANSLAUGHTER.

4. Ten manslaughters were reported to the Police during the year as against 4 in 1919.

In all of these cases, arrests were made. There were 3 cases in which convictions were obtained (3 persons). In 7 cases there was no conviction (9 persons).

GANG ROBBERIES.

5. Forty gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 70 in 1919.

In 31 cases, no arrest was made; in the remaining 9 cases, arrests were made. There were 8 cases in which convictions were obtained (23 persons of whom 20 were convicted and 3 discharged). In one case there was no conviction (one person).

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

6. Thirty-one Street and Highway Robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 19 in 1919.

In 23 cases, no arrest was made; in the remaining 8 cases arrests were made. There were 7 cases in which convictions were obtained (14 persons of whom 8 were convicted and 6 discharged). In one case there was no conviction (one person).

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND JUNKS.

7. Fourteen cases of robbery on boats and junks were reported to the Police during the year as against 8 in 1919.

In 12 cases, no arrest was made; in the remaining two cases, arrests were made. In all of these two cases, convictions were obtained (4 persons all of whom were convicted).

ROBBERIES WITH VIOLENCE.

8. Sixteen cases of robbery with violence were reported to the Police during the year as against 18 in 1919.

1

K 3

In 14 cases, no arrest was made; in the remaining two cases, arrests were made. In all of these two cases, convictions were obtained (4 persons all of whom were convicted).

OTHES FELONIES.

9. Under this heading are comprised the following:-

Cutting and wounding

1920. 1919.

30 31

Demanding money or goods with menaces

21 26

Embezzlement

45

34

Forgery

16 13

House-breaking...

65

65

Receiving stolen property

59

69

Child-stealing

15

17

Rape

L

2

Throwing corrosive fluid

3

1

Falsification of accounts

1

Attempted arson

2

1

Shooting with intent to maim

1

Shooting with intent to kill

10

5

Shooting with intent to prevent lawful appre-

hension

Attempting to shoot with intent to prevent

lawful apprehension ...

Wounding with intent to murder

Attempting to murder

Attempted robbery

Accessory after the fact of murder

Wounding and causing grievous bodily harm.

Uttering forged bank notes

Attempting to administer poison with intent

to injure

Indecent assault...

Seditious publication

...

1

1

3

1

2

3

1

270

275

The number of cases in which convictions were obtained was

108 as against 125 in 1919.

GAMBLING.

10. One hundred and fifty-three Gambling Warrants were executed during the year as against 143 in 1919. There were 5, cases in which no conviction was obtained.

Eleven were lottery cases, compared with 17 in 1919.

K 4

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

11. The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $537,567.20 as against $370,719.17 in 1919, an increase of $166,848.03.

The average for the last five years is $351,778.43 an increase on the average report in 1919 of $68,063.06.

The value of property recovered during the year was $66,929.74 as against $36,089.51 in 1919, an increase over property recovered in the previous year of $30,840.23.

LOST PROPERTY.

12. The following is a return showing property lost or recovered :-

-----

Articles re-

covered and

Articles

articles

Value

Year.

reported Value lost. found which

found.

lost.

were not

reported lost.

1920 ...

419 $19,776.20

139

$5,689.16

1919

361 $16,483.38

102 $2,978.13

THE PIRACY ORDINANCE.

13. Number of searchers employed under the Prevention of Piracy Ordinance, 1914:-

European and Chinese Searchers :-

European Sergeants

Chinese Constables

Female Searchers (Chinese)

... 5

...31

7

1

Female Searchers. (Private)

Number of Guards employed up to. 31st December, 1920:-

One European Sergeant in charge.

Steamer Guards

Steam Launch Guards,

Shore Guards

214

22

208

Number of vessels which have entered into bond up to 31st December, 1920:-

Steamers

Steam Launches.

186

36

K 5

14.-WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Weights and Measures

examined during the year 1920.

Correct. Incorrect.

Total.

Foreign Scales...

479

6

485

Chinese Scales ...

9,164

108

9,272

Yard Measures.......

679

26

705

$

Chek Measures...

1,043

15

1,058

Total ...

11,365

155

11,520

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance :

Number of Cases.

88

Convictions.

87

Fines.

$934.00

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

15. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dan- gerous Goods Ordinance :-

Number of Cases.

Convictions.

Fines.

23

23

$778.00

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

16. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance :--

Number of Cases.

Convictions.

10

Fines.

$70.00

K 6

Samples purchased and sent to the Government Analyst :-

:

Brandy Rum Beer Gin Whisky Sherry Port

Milk

6

6

2

8

2

4

All the above samples were certified to be genuine with the exception of samples of Brandy purchased from the Sincere Company, the Sun Company and Chin Cheong, No. 168 Des Vœux Road Central; and three samples of Rum purchased from Nam Hing Loong, No. 77-79 Queen's Road Central, Sang Tai, No. 112 Queen's Road Central, and Kwan Tye, No. 102 Queen's Road Central, respectively.

Prosecutions were instituted in all six cases and convictions were recorded in each case with exception of the Sincere Company's, which was dismissed; the Magistrate remarking that the sample of Brandy purchased from this firm was proved to his (the Magistrate's) satisfaction to be 70 years old and therefore liable, during that time, to lose some of the analytical properties required by the Liquor Consolidation Ordinance and usually found in Brandies, but, however, not necessarily impairing the quality of the Brandy as a beverage in any way.

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.

17. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations (Notification No. 231 published in the Gazette April 1920):-

Prosecu- tions.

Convictions.

With Remand- Dis- drawn. ed. charged.

Fines.

3,492

3,396

39

5

52

$13,282.50

MENDICANTS.

18. During the year 1920, thirty-eight beggars were dealt with by the Magistrate, and ten were sick and sent to the Tung Wah Hospital. Two were sent to Macao, and 590 were sent to Canton as follows:-

K 7

How often sent away.

Once,

Twice,

Three times,

Four times,

Five times,

Thirteen times,

Fourteen times,

:

:

:

Total,

:

:

Canton.

525

45

11

3

4

1

1

590

DEAD BODIES.

19. Table II shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year.

DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS.

20. 923 persons were banished from Hongkong.

857 persons deported from Straits Settlements were sent on

by the Police.

260 vagrants were received from Straits Settlements and

sent on by the Police.

590 vagrants were received from the Dutch East Indies

and sent on by the Police.

1,775 vagrants were received from Saigon and sent on by

the Police.

4 coolies were received from the Straits Settlements and

sent on by the Police.

1,928 persons were discharged from Victoria Gaol and enter-

ed in the Police Criminal Records.

LICENCES.

21. The following licences were issued during 1920 :—

1,150 Hongkong Public jinrikishas.

1,251

,,

Private

700 Kowloon Public

54 Sze Ka Che

800 Hongkong Public Chairs.

K 8

16 Upper Level jinrikishas. 15 Peak jinrikishas.

287 Hongkong Private Chairs.

60 Hill District Chairs.

16,400 Drivers and Bearers.

1,326 Truck Licences.

105 Motor Car (Livery).

276

501

""

""

(Private).

Drivers.

244 Motor Cycle Drivers.

244

Licences.

207 Money Changers.

121 Pawn-brokers Licences.

10 Licences to store Petroleum in Bulk.

5

>"

""

""

7

""

31

""

Phosphorous. Rockets.

fuel.

Poisons (wholesale).

273 Chinese Wine and Spirits (Old Territories).

82

""

(New

Territories).

>>

28 Licences to store Sulphuric Acid and Nitric Acid.

2 Auctioneer Licences.

5 Licences to store Acetylene.

5 Billiard Tables or Bowling Alleys.

23 Licences to store Calcium Carbide.

2

3

26

"

""

2)

""

""

24

""

وو

Chlorate Mixture.

of Potassium and other

[Chlorates.

Compressed Oxygen.

Dissolved Acetylene.

10 Distillery Licences (Old Territories).

22

""

"

(New

93 Licences to store Dynamite.

70

""

300

"2

10

16

1,108

74

""

32

Ether and Alcoholic Liquids.

to shoot and take Game.

to store Gunpowder.

Kerosine Oil (in godown).

>>

""

>>

(ordinary).

"}

,, (New Territories).

3 Marine Stores.

30 Licences to store Naphtha and Benzine.

43

99

""

2

""

8,716 Hawkers.

(in Garage).

Nitrobenzine or Oil of Nirbane.

DOGS ORDINANCE.

22. 2,772 dogs were licenced during 1920.

9 watch dogs were licenced free of charge.

185 stray dogs were impounded. 108 were destroyed.

37 claimed.

32 sold leaving 8 in Home for the year 1920. 17 dogs were destroyed by request of owners.

1

K 9

ARMS ORDINANCE.

23. Three licences to import and deal in Arms and Ammuni- tion and one licence to deal in sporting Arms and Ammunition were issued in 1920.

The following Arms and Ammunition were seized and con- fiscated during the year :-

Winchester Rifles

12

Revolvers

439

Automatic Pistols

39

Mauser Pistols

3

Shot-Guns

nil

Winchester Rifle Ammunition

8,126 rounds.

Revolver Ammunition

73,037

Automatic Pistol Ammunition

3,467

Mauser Pistol Ammunition

57,691

""

Shot Gun Ammunition

118

EDUCATION.

24. During the year

8 Europeans obtained 1st Certificates in Cantonese. 29 Indians

>

45

1st 2nd

55

"

+

""

35

3rd

"?

"

""

35

1st

""

""

in English.

"

4. Chinese

1st

""

"

>>

1

2nd

""

>>

"

وو

4

MUSKETRY.

25. One hundred and nineteen Europeans fired their Musketry Course. Of these 5 were classified as Marksmen.

A.P.S. A90 Carpenter obtained the highest score viz., 126 points out of a possible 164 points.

Three hundred and fifty-six Indians fired theiy Musketry Course. Of these 5 were classified as Marksmen.

I.P.C. B373 Teja Singh obtained the highest score viz., 69 points out of a possible 100 points.

161 Indians fired a revolver course.

275 Chinese

"

22

""

The course was 6 rounds at 15 yards and 6 rounds at 25 yards.

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

26. Number of searches 4,076-a decrease of 1,060 compared with 1919.

Number of persons identified by finger prints 1,469-an in- crease of 91 over 1919.

K 10

Number of finger prints filed 4,862--a decrease of 183 com- pared with 1919.

Number of persons convicted for Breach of the Banishment Ordinance 98-an increase of 4 over 1919.

Number of persons identified by finger prints for breach of Market Ordinance 172-a decrease of 33 compared with 1919.

Number of Hawkers' finger prints received at this office have been much less during the year.

CONDUCT.

27. The conduct of the European: Contingent (average strength 178) was good. The total number of reports against them was 50 as against 45 in 1919. There were 8 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 3 in 1919. Two men were reported for sleeping on duty as against 4 and 4 for neglect of duty as against 5 in 1919.

The conduct of the Indian Contingent (average strength 477) was fairly good. There were 324 reports as against 230 for the preceding year. For drunkenness there were 9 as against 5, for disorderly conduct 41 as against 32, for neglect of duty 25 as against 33, for absence from duty 84 as against 75, for gossiping and idling on duty 39 as against 30 and for sleeping on duty 21 as against.15.

159 men had no report.

Three Indian Constables were convicted by the Police Magis- trate, 1 for accepting a bribe, 1 for demanding money with menaces, 1 for larceny, (dismissed from the Force).

The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (average strength 445) was fair. There were altogether 845 reports against 1,056 in 1919. For drunkenness, there was one as against none, 71 for sleeping on duty as against 81, 18 for disorderly conduct as against 38 and 359 for minor offences as against 476.

221 men had no report.

8 Chinese Constables were, convicted by the Police Magistrate (dismissed from the Force). 3 for larceny, 2 for gambling, 1 for accepting a bribe, 1 for demanding money with menaces and 1 for gross neglect of duty.

The seamen, coxswains, engineers and stokers (average strength 181) had 142 reports as compared with 114 for last year. For drunkenness there was none as against none in 1919, and 106 for absence from station and late for duty as against 89 in the previous

year.

103 men had no report recorded against them.

One seaman was convicted by the Police Magistrate for violation of duty (dismissed from the Force).

- K11-

HEALTH.

28. Admissions to Hospital during the last three years were

as follows:

----

1918.

1919.

1920.

Nationality,

Establish- ment of the Force.

Establish-

Establish-

Admis-

Admis-

Admis-

sions.

ment of the Force.

sions.

ment of the Force.

sious.

Europeans,... 159

72

159

100

178

170

Indians,.

481

369

477

485

477

546

Chinese,..

588

254

592

281

626

322

Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever during the year 1920 :--

Old Territories.

New Territories.

Nationality.

Establishment! of

Establishment'

Treated.

the Force.

of. the Force.

Treated.

Europeans,

Indians,

Chinese,

164

15

14

1

345

33

132

40

573

22

53

11

}

In addition to cases treated in Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever the cases treated for Fever in the various stations in the New Territories without being removed to Hospital were :-

Europeans-5, Indians 97, Chinese 12.

SPECIAL EVENTS.

29. At 11.30 p.m. on: February 3rd a fire broke out at 26 Praya, Kennedy Town, in use as a godown. The fire spread and enveloped the whole block of eight four-storied houses. During the rush of the occupants of two houses to escape a staircase collapsed, causing a large number of heavy rice bags to fall. 34 persons were killed and many injured through this collapse.

At 3 a.m. on February 21st a fire broke out at 54A Main Street, Aberdeen, used as a store for storing bamboo wares. The fire quickly spread to the adjoining houses in spite of the efforts of the Fire Brigade and 27 houses were completely destroyed and 3 partly destroyed.

On April 25th Convict No. 791 Li Chung who escaped from Victoria Gaol on December 15th, 1919, was captured; he was committed for trial at the May Criminal Sessions, and was sentenced to death and subsequently executed. (Note: On February 24th, 1921, Convict No. 1785 Yeung Po who escaped from Victoria

K 12

Gaol on December 15th, 1919, was captured. At April 1921 Criminal Sessions he was sentenced to death. All four convicts who com- mitted murder in and escaped from Victoria Gaol on December 15th, 1919, have now been recaptured and executed).

Owing to the political disputes between the rival Kwong Tung and Kwong Sai forces in South China, spasmodic outbreaks of disorder occurred between August and October at the wharves and along Praya in Hongkong. They were occasioned by the arrival of Kwong Sai partisans in Hongkong. The Kwong Sai men were peaceable passengers but their arrival was the signal for the Cantonese hooligan element in Hongkong to assemble and mob the new-comers. Police took effective measures and the outbreaks were nipped in the bud.

On December 27th at 9.30 p.m. an attempted armed robbery. occurred at 315 Reclamation Street, Yaumati. Police had inform- ation of the intended robbery and were in hiding in the premises. A rush and struggle occurred. L.S. AI R. C. Gardiner was shot dead by a stray bullet. L.S. AI25 J. R. McWalters received a flesh wound in the left arm.

REWARDS.

30. A Despatch was received from the Secretary of State for the Colonies announcing that His Majesty the King has been pleased to grant the King's Police Medal to Chief Inspector James Kerr and Chief Detective Inspector William Murison for most excellent work throughout the War, and for ability and untiring zeal in the performance of the onerous duties of their appointments.

His Majesty the King has also been pleased to grant the King's Police Medal to Station Officer Arthur Lane and Inspector Hau Hang for exceptionally valuable services.

Second Class Medal was granted to Inspector R. Macdonald for long and faithful service and for zeal and courage in the perform- ance of his duties in a difficult district and for bravery in following up armed robbers.

Second Class Medal was granted to Acting Inspector T. Murphy for skill and untiring energy in searching for and tracing criminals in a dangerous locality.

Third Class Medal was granted to Sub-Inspector J. Ingham for hard work and perseverance in performing the duties of supervi- sing officer of pawnshops leading to valuable results.

Third Class Medals was granted to Sub-Inspector W. Pincott for hard and skilful work during the War, particularly in connection with the supervision of passenger steamers.

}

K 13

Fourth Class Medals were granted to the following European Police Officers for long and faithful service:-

Inspector M. Earner.

"

F. Appleton.

R. Moore.

Acting Inspector A. Floyd.

C. Aris.

"

"

""

J. Caygill.

W. Blackman.

""

Sub-Inspector

G. Jackson.

>>

J. Davis (who died on 17. 2. 21.)

Fourth Class Medal was granted to Sergeant Major Fatteh Singh for being a hard working and energetic officer who has done very good work in the New Territory.

Fourth Class Medals were granted to I. P. S. B359 Kirpa Singh, I. P. S. B23 Nand Singh, I. P. S. 246 Nabbi Bux and I. L. S. 354 Lall Khan for specially good work.

Fourth Class Medals were granted to the following Indian Police officers for long and faithful service :-

I. P. S. 91 Kishen Singh.

257 Alli Bahadar Khan.

codec.com

280 Fazal Ahmed.

"

}}

53 Chanda Singh.

""

328 Jaggat Singh.

285 Dhanna Singh.

"}

290 Iman Din.

""

""

322 Ram Singh.

""

287 Tara Singh.

I. L. S. 210 Wadawa Singh.

>>

229 Ali Mahomed.

296 Jelal Deen.

234 Ahmed Khan.

298 Abday Khan.

""

""

281 Keemy Khan.

264 Sayad Mahomed.

"3

248 Sultan Baxsh.

I. P. C. 240 Buty Khan.

Third Class Medal was granted to P.S. C70 Ho Tim and Fourth Class Medals to the following Chinese Police Officers for long and faithful service :-

P. S. 39 Li Yee.

31

"}

83 Lam Ki.

128 Kwong Keung.

73 Wong Kui.

157 Lo Hoi,

K 14.

Engineer Yung Wing Chun, stokers Lai Fuk and Chan Sai and Coxswain 475 Cheung Tsun were also awarded Fourth Class- Medals for long and faithful service.

A reward for $10.00 was awarded to C.C. 519 Un Yuet for vigilance and pluck shown by him in the arrest of an ex-convict, who attempted to break into No. 51 Queen's Road Central in the early morning of the 4th March, 1920.

A reward of $25.00 was given to C.C. 184 Cheung Kai for alertness and pluck shown by him in the arrest of a man, who, along with others, committed an attempted armed robbery at No. 10, Po Hing Fong, 1st floor, on the 25th November, 1919.

A reward of $20.00 was granted to C.C. 310 Tong. Shun for pluck displayed by him in connection with an armed robbery at No. 3 Percival Street on the 22nd March, 1920.

A reward of $20.00 was granted to P.S. C185 Tang Sang for intelligence and pluck on 23rd December, 1920, in securing the arrest of a man, who was subsequently sentenced to 5 years' Hard Labour for robbery with violence.

A reward of $10.00 was awarded to I.P.C. B268 Atta Moham- ed for alertness and zeal on duty on 23rd December, 1920, in assisting P.S. C185 Tang Sang to secure the arrest of a man, who was subsequently sentenced to 5 years' Hard Labour for robbery with violence.

E. D. C. WOLFE,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

---

K 15

Annexe A,

REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.

I have the honour to report that the strength of the Water Police as it now stands (Dec. 31st) is 1 Inspector, 2 European Sergeants, 15 European Lance Sergeants, 22 Chinese Coxswains, 4 Boatswains, 77 Seamen, 1 Motor Mechanic, 22 Engineers, 19 Stokers, 3 Barrack Sergeants, 2 Station Sergeants, 5 Station Orderlies, 2 Carpenters, 2 Painters, 1 Sailmaker, 4 Sigualmen, 12 Detectives, 17 Boatmen, and 6 Coolies making a total of 216. This is the actual strength as on December 31st, 1920, and includes all the detectives stationed here and those under the Piracy Preven-· tion Ordinance as well.

Yearly return of Resignations, Dismissals and Enlistment, etc., during the year 1920 :--

Resignations

Dismissals

...

...

Deceased

Desertions

Transferred to Land Force

Total

...

Enlistments

5

...

4

2

1

...

14 18

One extra coxswain and three extra seamen have been em- ployed during the year. One extra Barrack Sergeant, (P.S.C 39 Li Yee) is nominally in Central.

2. The four large patrol launches have been thoroughly overhauled. During the year white auts were discovered in No. 2 Launch, but an extensive overhaul and the continuous applica- tion of "Atlas A" has got rid of them. These launches are all running and in good order, excepting No. 3 Launch, which is worn out and should be replaced by a larger launch, at an early date.

The Harbour Patrol Launches Nos. 5 and 7 have run contin- uously during the year. No. 6 launch which is a new boat fitted with the engines of the "Hapag", was built by Kwong Hip Loong and taken over for Police duty on February 11th, 1920. She is in excellent condition and is a fine substantial Sea Boat and has done good Police work during the year.

3. Motor Boats 8 and 9 are in good condition, being engaged continuously on passport work. No. 10 Motor Boat is at present in Taikoo Dockyard with a broken tail shaft. The fleet was strengthened during the year by the addition of a shallow draught Motor Boat (No. 11) for special service in Deep Bay. It is pleas- ing to report that there has not been a single case of raiding from

K 16

Chinese Territory since she was stationed there, except one or two oyster boats which were lying above low water mark on the Chinese side.

4. All pulling boats and gear are in good order and condition.

5. During the year No. 2 Police Launch has done most of her night patrols in Deep Bay. This launch has also kept the buoys marking the the Sham Chun Channel in good order, which makes the navigation of this difficult Channel a simple matter.

6. Rifle and Maxim gun practice has been carried out on a modified scale by Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 launches during the year,

7. On the 26th November, I inspected Nos. 1, 2 and 4 Patrol launches also Nos. 5, 6 and 7 Harbour launches, and found them in excellent order.

10th February, 1921.

C. W. BECKWITH, Commander R.N., Deputy Superintendent of Water Police.

J

!

"

K 17 -

Annexe B.

POLICE TRANING SCHOOL REPORT FOR 1920.

Date of Opening.-The Police Training School, as at present constituted, was opened on the 1st March, 1920.

Principal

...Inspector W. G. Gerrard Indian Teacher & Interpreter...Mr. Sohan Singh Chinese Teacher & Interpreter...Mr. Pun Yau-tong Chinese Vernacular Teacher ... Mr. Li Man-wan

1 Indian Sergeant Major

1 Chinese Sergeant Major

1 European Drill Instructor

Ali Bahadur Khan ...Kwong Tin-kan

...A. S. Inspector Clark

1 European Physical Drill Instructor...L. S. 114 Condon 5 Indian Drill Instructors

2 Chinese Physical Drill Instructors

Note: The Drill Instructors (European, Indian and Chinese) do not form part of the permanent staff of the School. They are regular duty men and receive extra pay for their services.

Recruiting Table from Ist March, 1920 to 31st December, 1920.

Eur-

opean.

Indian. Chinese.

D. W. Watch-

men.

Number Recruited

21

Passed

19

"}

38

63

5.2

48

Resigned

1

""

Gaol Staff

""

Dismissed

Transferred to

Continuing In-

1

12

2

struction

6

CO

1827

8888

79

11

8

1

:

:

28

2

K 18

Europeans.

Police Regulations and General Instructions. Ordinances--all those that apply to Police. Police Code. Sections and Beats. Local Knowledge. Educational Subjects. Police Court Routine. Observation Lessons. Jiu Jitsu-Police Holds. Physical Drill. Squad Drill.

Musketry and Revolver Course.

Indians.

Police Regulations and

General Instructions. Ordinances--selected. Sections and Beats. Local Knowledge. Police Court Routine. Observation Lessons. Jiu Jitsu Police Holds. Physical Drill. Squad Drill. Musketry and Revolver Course.

Urdu Gurmukhi

and

or

and

or

English.

Curriculum.

Chinese.

Police Regulations and General Instructions. Ordinances--selected. Sections and Beats. Local Knowledge. Police Court Routine. Observation Lessons. | Jiu Jitsu-Police Holds. Physical Drill. Squad Drill. Revolver Course. English and Arithmetic--

elementary.

f

District Watchmen Recruits.

Police Regulation Book selected portions and General Instructions. Ordinances--selected. Local Knowledge. Squad drill.

District Watchmen. Regulars.

W.

Two Classes are held weekly-Thursday & Friday for D. Regulars. They are also drilled weekly Tuesday

Wednesday.

on

and

Note :--

Defaulters sent to School (Indians and Chinese) receive special instructions according to the subject in which they are reported to be inefficient.

K 19

In addition to the English Classes for Recruits classes are also held on 3 days a week for Indians and Chinese Regulars. The following English and Chinese Certificates were granted to Recruits and Regulars during 1920.

English and Chinese Certificates.

English Certificates.

Chinese Certificates.

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

1st

2nd

1st 2nd

3rd

00

35

29

45

35

4

1

Conduct and Discipline.-The conduct and discipline of all recruits was, on the whole, satisfactory. Four were dismised, viz.

1 European-Drunkenness.

2 Indians-Inefficiency.

1 Chinese-Larceny in Barracks.

Year.

K 21

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE B

Serious Offences.

Robbery with Violence and

Larcenies and

Larcenies in

Burglaries.

Murder Manslaughter

Assault with

intent to rob.

Dwelling-

Houses.

and Other

Felonies.

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance.

Unlawful

Possession.

1919.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

Chinese,

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

122 48 11

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged,

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

99 20

20

83

Total......... 122

122 48 11 99 20

1920.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

Chinese,

2 2

6

:..

3

:

2 3

... 3,403 1,500 265|304| 162 | 103 | 123|107

:

:

:

:

:

28 472

130

89

3,408

1,503 268 310 168 106 125 110

28472

430 89

108 45

:

:

8: 89

...

CO

3

:

1

I

1

1

1

:

:

:

:.

:

:

14 132 20

20

2

28,885 1,527 263 300 137

90 112 106

12 440

390 117

Total,.

108: 45 14 133 23

23,889

1,532 263 303 138

92113107

12440

390 117

K 21

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1919 AND 1920.

Burglaries.

Larcenies and Larcenies in

Dwelling-

Houses.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases..

:

:

:

:

:.

Serious Offences.

Mino

Murder Manslaughter

and Other

Women and Girls Protection

Unlawful

Possession.

Kidnapping.

Assault and Disorderly Conduct.

Gambling.

Drunken

Felonies.

Ordinance.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

3

2

1

6

2

2

:

2

3

00

:

69.9

99 20 ... |3,403

1,500 265 304| 162 | 103 | 123|107 28 472

99 20

3,408

1,503 268 310 168 106 125 110 28 472

CO

1

1

2

1

1

:

:

:

132 20

20

23,885

1

:

:

1,527 | 263 | 300 | 137 90112 106 12 440

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

430

89

1

1

430 89

1

:

390 117

:

:

:

10

10

12 14

Cases,

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

:

14

14

6 6

343 526 89 380 1,889

79 15 15

365 550 90 380 1,889 79 35

35

29

27

53 53

9

ここ

12

=

11

417 498 90 436 2,129 86, 15

15

133 23

23,889

1,532 263 303 138

92 113 107 12440 390 | 117

455 534 104 | 437| 2,141

86 79

79

t

K ́21

Table I.

REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1919 AND 1920.

Minor Offences.

28472 130 89 1

343 526 89|380 1,889 79 15

:

:

:

:

:

:

TO..

10

10

12 14

1

:

Discharged. →

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

:

14

14

6

6

...

15

:.

...

:

12

12

45

3

2 1

25

664 664

4,546 5,039 | 433

10,472

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases...

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Total of

all cases.

Unlawful

Possession.

Kidnapping.

Assault and Disorderly

Miscellaneous

Gambling.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

Offences.

Conduct.

28 472 430 89

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

390117

:

:

::.

2

12440

12 440 390117

365 550 90 380 1,889 79 35

29

209

27

11

9 9

3

1

12

:

35

53

53

11

15

417 498 90436 2,129 86 15

:

:

664 664

:

:

:

2

2

1,264 1,264

4,561 5,053 | 434

10,542

2 23

29

48

4

117

12

11

4.

38

4,648 5,339 465

11,757

455 534 104 437 2,141 86 79

79

1,266 1,266

4,689 5,398 473

11,912

VICTORIA.

KOWLOON.

1 month

Under

one month.

1 year.

and under

1 year and under

5 years

and

15 years

and

Under

one

5 years.

under 15 years.

over.

month.

1 month and under 1 year.

m.

i

f.

sex

lunk.

26 20

25

1 year and under 5 years.

K 22

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES,

and under 15 years.

years 15 years

and

Under

over.

one month.

m.

f.

sex junk.

m.

f.

sex unk.

n.

f.

ni.

f.

m.

f.

sex junk.

m.

f.

sex unk.

m.

f.

sex unk.

m.

10

5

10 16

71 62

1

10

12

:

22

2223

3

50

35

54

56

35

со

شده

S.

11. f.

m.

:

4

Year.

Victoria,

Kowloon, Harbour.Elsewhere.)

Total.

M

1915,

75

174

56

29

1916,

250

183

101

36

1917,

349

233

142

1918,

335

330

182

1919,

220

144

139

1920,

235

257

126

8888

331

570

74

798

88

935

77

580

38

656

.........

CTORIA.

KOWLOON.

K 22

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1920.

HARBOUR.

1 year and under

and

5 years 15 years

1 month

Under

5 years.

under 15 years.

and

over.

one month.

and under

1 year and

5

years

1 month

under

and under

5

1 year.

years.

15 years and

over.

Under

one

and under

month.

15 years.

1 year.

1 year and under 5 years.

5 years and under

15 years.

15 years

and

over.

C

Sex

m.

f.

unk.

n. f.

sex

sex

sex

sex

sex

ni. f.

m.

f.

m. f.

m.

f.

unk..

unk.

unk.

f. m.

in. f.

f. m.

f. m.

m.

f.

sex

f. m.

m.

f.

junk.

junk.

Jank.!

m.

71 62

10 12

22

22

22 3 50 35

54 56 1

Co

8

6

4

6 1 14 11

16

26 2 13

3

Year.

Victoria. Kowloon. Harbour. Elsewhere. Total.

Males.

Females. Unknown. | Children.

Adults.

1915,

75

174

56

29

334

184

139

11

274

60

1916,

250

183

101

36

570

321

239

10

470

100

1917,

349

233

142

74

798

397

386

15

751

47

1918,

335

330

182

88

935

509

405

21

902

1919.

220

144

139

77

580

312

252

16

574

1920,

235

257

126

38

656

295

347

14

650

6

K 22

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1920.

HARBOUR.

ELSEWHERE.

5 years 15 years

and under

15 years.

and

over.

Under

one month.

1 month and under 1 year.

1 year and under 5 years.

5 years

I month

and

under 15 years.

15 years and

Under

one

and under

over.

montb.

1 year.

1 year and under 5 years.

under 15 years.

years

and

15 years

Total.

and

over.

sex

sex

sex

sex

sex

sex

m.

8 6

whi

co

10.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

f. m.

junk..

unk.

junk.!

m.

f.

m.

f.

f. m.

m.

ni.

unk.

unk.

junk.

n). f.

m.

f.

4

10

1 14 11

16

26 2 13

9

3

1

4

1

7

3

11

3:

656

our. Elsewhere.

Total.

Males. Females. Unknown. Children.

Adults.

56

29

351

184

139

11

274

60

101

36

570

321

239

10

470

100

142

74

798

397

386

15

751

47

182

88

935

509

405

21

902

33

139

77

580

312

252

16

574

126

38

656

295

347

14

650

6

K 24

POLICE ON ACTIVE SERVICE.

During the year 1920 seven members of the Hongkong Police Force returned to the Colony from Active Service and resumed their police duties. There is still one man (P.C. 131 W. J. Harron who has not yet returned. The following are the names of the seven men who returned to the Force from Active Service during the year:--

Sub-Inspector H. J. Paterson.

Acting Sub-Inspector F. E. E. Booker.

C. McNab Wilson.

P. S. 131 R. S. R. Swan.

Acting P. S. 90 E. Carpenter.

139 M. H. Hourihan.

P. C. 21 E. Williams.

EXECUTIVE STAFF.

From the 27th April, 1920. to the 26th February, 1921, when Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe was on leave, Mr. P. P. J. Wodehouse acted as Captain Superintendent of Police and Mr. T. H. King acted as Deputy Superintendent of Police. During the above period Mr. D. Burlingham was Assistant Superintendent.

Table ÏV.

Table showing the Total Strength, Expenditure, and Revenue of the Police and Fire Brigade Departments for the years 1911 to 1923 :

Total Strength.

Revenue

Expenditure.

Collected

Year.

by the

Police

!

Fire

Police

Fire

Police

Force.

Brigade.

Force.

Brigade.

Force.

1911.....

1,102

103

586,985

32,421

162,026

1912.

1,196

105

591,076

41,263 172,397

1913..

1,247

105

756,663

35.319 185,250

1914......

1,304

106

789,100

35,913

193,915

1915.....

1,289

106

765,911

34,922 185,589

1916......

1,215

106

703,743

36,574

192,796

1917......

1,229

104

694,115

32,621 210,071

1918......

1,228

104

727,233

37,979 219,012

1919.....

1,228

104

840,977

75,798 225,031

1920......

1,281

127

1,165,084

63,811

229,122

NOTE,-No revenue is collected by the Fire Brigade.

:

K 23

Table III.

Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1920:-

Nationality.

Establishment

of the Force.

Enlistment.

Deaths.

Resignations

through

sickness.

Resignations through expiry of terms of service or otherwise.

Dismissals or Desertions.

Total Number

of Casualties.

Europeans,

178

23

Indians,

477

17

Chinese,

626

92

00 00 30

17

3

36

22

8

32

29 71 2

لاة

Total, 1,281 132

10

24

61

57

152

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments, also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers, etc., but it is exclusive

of :-

} -

1 Captain Superintendent.

1 Deputy Superintendent.

3 Assistant Superintendents. 1 Probationer.

1 Accountant.

11 Clerks.

7 Telephone Clerks.

106 Messengers and Coolies.

2 Indians and 2 Chinese who are employed by private firms.

Present,

Strength on the 31st December, 1920.

Sick or Absent ou

leave,

Excess over Estimates

Vacancies,

Total

Europeans.

Indians. Chinese.

Total.

133

365

592

1,090

27

69

34

130

:

89

80

18

43

61

178

477

706

1,361

-

ī

K 25

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE

FIRE BRIGADE.

1. The sub-joined report of the Assistant Engineer and Station Officer gives details of the working of the Fire Brigade during the

year.

2. During the year a number of old firemen returned from leave and rejoined the Brigade. Throughout the year the number of applications to join the Brigade has been in excess of the vacancies,

3. The Volunteer Fire Brigade (European) ceased to exist on February 24th. This section had attained a high degree of efficiency and performed very valuable service during the War. It was no longer required after the return of the European Firemen who had been on War Service.

4. A report on the working of the Motor Ambulance is attached. This vehicle has proved a constant source of expense during the year, owing to the chassis not being equal to the work required of it. Two new Motor Ambulances are on order from England.

5. The conduct of the Brigade has been satisfactory.

6. Towards the end of the year the Chamber of Commerce made representations to the Government on the question of the efficiency of the Brigade to safeguard property in the Colony and the matter of re-organizing the Brigade is under consideration.

7. I also enclose copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of the Fire Brigade.

E. D. C. WOLFE,

Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

Annexe C.

Sir, I submit the following report on the general working of the Fire Brigade for the year ending 31st December, 1920:-

Fires.

1920.

1919.

Increase..

Fires,

Small Fires,

Chimney Fires,

7

Harbour Fires,

49

59

65

11

6

75124

22

O

False Alarms,

Actual number of calls

.125

108

17

Total Estimated

damage...

Decrease.

$1,199,465 $157,897 $1,041,568

There were two serious fires:-

One at Aberdeen on 21st February, 1920.

One at Kennedy Town on 3rd February, 1920,

:

<<

K 26

The details of those two fires are given under the heading 'Special Events" in the Annual Police Report.

A fire occurred in No. 8 hold of the s.s. Ixion on 7th May, 1920. Though the fire was first observed at 3 a.m. the Fire Brigade was not called till 4.30 a.m., a factor which increased the difficulty of coping with the outbreak and consequently the amount of the ultimate damage.

Personnel:-

The Staff of the Fire Frigade consists of:-

Rank.

1920

1910

European. Chinese. European. Chinese.

Superintendent,

1

1

Assistant Superintendent,

4

3

Engineer,

Assistant Engineer and

Station Officer,...

1

1

Assistant Station Officer,

3

Foremen,

Assistant Foremen,

Foremen & Engine Drivers

(Fire Floats),

Engine Drivers (Motors), Assistant Engine Drivers, Firemen,

Engineer of Floats,

Stokers,...

Chauffeurs,

Fitter,

Blacksmith,

Carpenter,

Painter,

Sailmaker,

Interpreters,..

Coxswains,

:

6

::

Assistant Coxswain,

Seamen,

Caretaker,

Overseer of Water Works,.

Inspector of Dangerous

Goods, Assistant to

1

Do.

Clerk,

...

24*2:

4

28

8888888

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

2131

:

5

1.

1

D

57

70

48

55

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for the year 1919 were as follows:-

1920.

1919.

Convicted by Ordinary Courts,

...4,254

4,336

Convicted by Court Martial,

9

12

Supreme Court for China & Korea,

2

5

Debtors,

67

51

On remand or in default of finding

surety,

821

808

Total,....

5,153

5,212

There was a decrease of 59 on the total number of admissions as compared with the year 1919. There was an increase of prisoners convicted for larceny during the year under review, the number being 1,179 against 1,048 for the previous year.

2. The number of Revenue Grade prisoners admitted to prisons was 2,266 made up as follows:-

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

367

"

Gambling Ordinance,

186

Arms and Ammunition Ord.

63

21

Vehicles Ordinance,

91

Sanitary By-laws,

7

>>

>1

-

Harbour Regulations,

9

>>

Post Office Ordinance,

Stowaway Ordinance,

18

>>

Servants Quarters Ordinance,

6

Marine Hawkers Ordinance,

42

"}

99

Dangerous Goods Ordinance,...

2.

,,

Chinese Wine & Spirit Ord. Eating House Ordinance,

26

>>

""

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, Society Ordinance,

7

""

Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance,

51

Truck Ordinance,

20

وو

""

5)

Counterfeit Coins Ordinance,

Women and Girls (Protection)

Ordinance,

Pawnbrokers Ordinance....

Importation and Exportation

Ördinance,

Carried forward,

2

12

26

20

947

L 2

Brought forward,

Convicted under the Boarding & Lodging House

>>

دو

Ordinance,

Pharmacy & Poisons Ordinance,

Tobacco Ordinance,...

Indecent Exhibition Ordinance, Railway Ordinance,...

Convicted of committing nuisance in the street,

947

1

8

18

1

1

12

"}

unlawfully boarding steamers,

36

"

hawking without a licence, ...

434

""

cruelty to animals,

3

keeping houses for prostitution,

56

""

depositing rubbish in the street,..

7

""

illegal Pawning,

11

,,

travelling on river steamer without

""

paying legal fares,

17

drunkenness,...

22

trespass,..

120

""

,,

disorderly conduct,

42

assault,

31

obstruction,

46

""

cutting trees,

45

15

Fighting,...

6

mendicancy,

62

31

"

causing malicious damage,

1

>>

unlawful possession of lottery tickets,

65

unlawful possession,

116

>>

stealing,

57

possession of implement fit for unlawful

purpose,

15

>"

offering bribe,

15

""

obtaining by false pretences,

>>

blasting stone in dangerous manner,..

6

soliciting in a public thoroughfare for

the purpose of prostitution

13

""

conveying pigwash during prohibited

hours

unlawful receiving,

16

possession of false scale,

>>

avoiding payment of Tram Car fare,

♡ ♡ONO

3

2

removing

dead

body without

permission

""

adultery,

12

1

2

demanding money with menaces,

1

>>

sleeping on duty,

1

>>

possession of dagger without licence,.

12

""

using indecent languages,

1

being absent without leave,.

neglect of duty,

2

A

as Rogue and Vagabond,

Total.

..2,266

Ì 3

3. The above figures show that 53 per cent. of the total admission to prison were Revenue Grade prisoners.

The following table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine

In default of payment of fine.

Year

Without option of fine

served the

Total.

imprison-

Paid full Paid part

fine

fine

ment

1919

2,552

1,424

181

196

4,353

1920

1,999

1,931

147

188

4,265

4. One hundred and sixty five (165) juveniles were admitted during the year. In 58 cases corporal punishment was awarded. All these juveniles in addition to whipping, received sentences varying from 48 hours detention to 12 months hard labour.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 141 as compared with 12.7 for 1919.

6. There were 125 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Police Court in the New Territories against 153 for the previous year (98 in 1918).

7. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past 10 years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hongkong:-

Year.

Estimated Number of population. convicts.

Percentage

of

Daily average number of

Percentage

to

population.

prisoners.

population.

1911

464,277

241

052

595

128

1912 467.777

222

047

701

149

1913 489,114

253

052

702

144

1914

501,304

216

044

600

120

1915 516,870

213

041

594

115

1916 528,010

203

038

638

121

1917 535,100

209

038

600

112

1918 558,000

224

040

601

108

1919 598,100

259

043

756

126

1920

648,150

275

043

755

117

བར ད 3 ''པྤཱ

8. There were 750 punishments awarded for breach of prison dicipline as compared with 723 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in one case for a prison offence.

9. One hundred and seventy-four (174) prisoners were whipped by order of Courts.

10. There was no escape or attempt to escape.

11. There were 20 deaths (11 natural causes and 9 executions). 12. Long-sentence prisoners of good conduct are employed at industrial labour.

13. 7,006,540 forms were printed and issued to various Govern- ment Departments and 32,880 books bound and repaired.

14. The buildings are in good repair.

15. The conduct of both the European and Indian Staff has been very good.

16. The appliances for use in case of fire are in good condition and the water supply adequate.

17. A Branch Prison was opened at Lai Chi Kok on the 17th March, 1920. The daily average at this prison was 126. A Hall at Lai Chi Kok has been set apart for Juvenile offenders.

18. Major C. Willson, O.B.E., acted as Assistant Superintend- ent, during the absence of Mr. J. W. Franks on leave, from 26th March to 30th December, 1920.

19. The Department wes separated from the Police Department and Mr. J. W. Franks appointed Superintendent of Prisons, as from the 31st December, 1920.

20. The increase in expenditure is due to (A) general increase in salaries. (B) increase in staff (C) opening of Lai Chi Kok (D) increase in prices.

21. The rules laid down for the Government at the prisons have been complied with,

22. I append the usual returns.

8th June, 1921.

J. W. Franks,

Superintendent.

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1920.

EXPENDITURE.

Pay and allowance of officers including Uni-

form, etc.

Victualling of prisoners

Fuel, light, soap, and dry earth

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, and furniture

Total.

1919.

༤༤

INCOME.

ЄA

33

Wei-Hai-Wei prisoners' subsistence

Earning of prisoners

145,623

62

Debtors' subsistence

55,559

41

Vagrants

do.

27,007

45

30,418 69

Shanghai

Military

Naval

Canton

do.

do.

do.

do.

Subsistence of prisoners sentenced by Marine

64,014

11

669 75 1

84

128

55

10

630 60

་ྲ རུ་ྲ རུ ཌ

532 15

85 65

121 00

– L 5

Magistrate....

Waste Food sold.

To Balance

$258,609

17

$135,550 16

201 20

77

192,061 | 56

50

Total..

$258,609 17

Average annual cost per prisoner $254.37, in 1919 $87.66, and in 1918 $63.07.

1

- L 6

Table II.

Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Actual cost

Year.

Expenditure.

Income.

of prisoners' maintenance.

Average cost per

prisoner.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

$ c.

1911

93,458.23

58,889.26

39,568.97

66.50

1912

97,577.82

62,348.80

35,229.02

50.25

1913

106,275.20

61,298.50

44,976.70

64.07

1914

108,143.24

70,597.22

37,546.02

62.58

1915

109,369.95

65,544.33

43,825 62

73.78

1916

112,615.70

70,019.18

42,596.52

66.77

1917

108,212.43

68,815.01

39,397.42 65.66

1918

108,651.95

70,747.97

37,903.98 63.07

1919

135,550.16

69,277.07

66,273,09 87.66

1920

258,609.17

66,547.61

192,031.56 254.37

.

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1920.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Value of

Value of

Value of

stock on

Value of

Value of

articles

articles

Nature of Industry..

manufactur-

Stock on

hand

January 1st

1920.

materials

purchased.

Total Dr.manufactur-

ed or work

hand

Total Cr.

ed or work

done for

December

done for

payment.

Gaol or other 31st, 1920.

Departments,

8

Value of

earnings.

(Difference between

columns

3 and 7.)

$

C.

$

..

C.

C.

C.

C.

C.

Oakum,

· Coir,..

Net-making,

Tailoring,

393.20

393.20

1.98

220.14

1,435.18

3.50

3,833.91

104.80

5,269.09

3,058.26

1,419.96

108.30

209.10

171.44

2,265.50

1.05

393.56

6,743.72

.36

1,474.63

210.15

101.85

306.80

11,563.92

11,870.72

81.15

10,960.83

2,363.30

13,405.28

1,534.56

Rattan,

Tin-smithing,

Carpentering,

Grass-matting,

Shoe-making,

Laundry,

Photography,

2.36

206.87

209.23

18.20

260.92

60.25

339.37

180.14

71.24

1,082.34

1,153,58

57.75

2,004.49

4.12

2,066.36

912.78

48.15

1,705.32

1,753.47

146.00

1,722.72

709.38

2,578.10

$24.63

1.16

42.50

43.66

108.00

1.78

109.78

66.12

362.82

2,588.33

2,951.15

236.60

2,206.42

1,138.55

3,581.57

630.42

3,999.23

3,999.23

14.45

10,591.65

10,606.10

6,606.87

Printing and Bookbinding,

41,950.48

41,254.54

83,205.02

162.72

79,472.40

55,201.18 134,836.30

51,631.28

12.55

664.55

677.10

15.85

751.26

10.46

777.57

100.47

Total,....

...$

44,587.44 67,046.31 111,633.75

4,002.06 109,718.79 61,927.01 175,647.86 | 64,014.11 109,7

Paid into Bank during 1920, which sum includes $286.35 for work executed in 1919, $3,598.21. Value of work executed during 1920 for which payment was deferred to 1921, $1,130.78.

L 7

Appendix M.

MEDICAL AND SANITARY REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

TABLE OF CONTENTS :

ANNEXE A.-Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department,...

Page.

3

ANNEXE B.-Joint Report of the Principal Civil Medical Officer

and the Medical Officer of Health, .

9

ANNEXE C.--Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon,

27

32

ANNEXE D-Report of the Superintendent, Civil Hospital,

ANNEXE E-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the

Victoria Hospital for Women and Children,... 46

ANNEXE F.-Report on the Lunatic Asylum,

ANNEXE G.--Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the Infectious Diseases Hospitals, Kennedy Town,

ANNEXE H.-Report of the Medical Officer to Victoria Gaol,...

ANNEXE I-Report of the Medical Officer for Kowloon and the

New Territories,

46

19

50

52

ANNEXE J.-Number of Confinements attended by Government

Midwives in 1920,

55

ANNEXE K.-Report of the Visiting Medical Officer to the

Tung Wa Hospital,

56

ANNEXE L-Report of the Visiting Medical Officer to the

Kwong Wah Hospital,

63

ANNEXE M.-Report on the Alice Memorial and Affiliated

Hospitals,

ANNEXE N.-Report of the Government Bacteriologist,

64

65

ANNEXE O. Report on the Public Mortuary, Victoria,

73

ANNEXE P.-Report on the Public Mortuary, Kowloon,

ANNEXE Q-Report of the Government Analyst, ANNEXE R.--Report of the Health Officer of the Port,

77

80

85

M 3

ANNEXE A.

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY

DEPARTMENT.

The following were members of the Sanitary Board during the year:

President, the Head of the Sanitary Department, Mr. Adam

Gibson, M.R.C.V.s., from 1st January to 16th March. Mr. G. R. Sayer assumed the duties on 17th March, Vice-President, the Director of Public Works, the Honourable Mr. W. Chatham, C.M.G., for whom Mr. A. H. Hollingsworth acted from 15th June to 22nd September.

The Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Honourable Mr.

E. R. Hallifax, O.B.E.

The Medical Officer of Health, Mr. W. W. Pearse, M.D., D.P.H., for whom Dr. A. D. Hickling, M.B.E., acted from 24th January to 10th February.

Lieutenant-Colonel G. B. Crisp, D.D.M.S., China Command resigned and Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet-Colonel L. Humphry, C.M.G., D.D.M.S., was appointed as from 12th March.

Mr. F. B. L. Bowley resigned, and Dr. W. V. M. Koch

was appointed as from 1st March.

Mr. Seen Wan-tso.

Mr. Chow Shou-son was appointed on 12th January.

Dr. F. M. Graça Ozorio.

Mr. C. G. Alabaster, 0.B.E.

STAFF.

Mr. Adam Gibson, M.R.C.V.S., Colonial Veterinary Surgeon, retired on pension on 26th September; Mr. Walter J. F. Macken- zie, M.C., M.R.C.V.s., was appointed to succeed him.

INSPECTORS.

1. Two additional Sanitary Inspectors were authorised to enable the Department to extend its activities to Sham Shui Po and Kowloon City.

2. The establishment of Inspectors was fixed for the year :-

Two Senior Inspectors.

14 First Class Inspectors.

18 Second Class Inspectors.

Rural Inspectors (Police) at Aberdeen, Stanley and

Shaukiwan.

M 4

3. The two Senior Inspectorships were created as from 1st January. Inspector Lamble being appointed in charge of Personnel and Inspector Lyon in charge of Stores and Construction.

4. Arrivals:-

From Military Service Inspector Davies (May 1st).

From leave

On probation

Seconded from R. A. M. C.

5. Departures:---

On pension

On transfer

Inspector Leigh (May 25th). Inspector Roylance (August 6th). Inspector Knight (October 2nd). Inspector Hudson (December

29th).

Inspector Peplow (January 1st). Inspector Eccleshall (August 9th). Inspector Beesley (November

20th).

Inspector Strange (May 10th).

Senior Inspector Fisher (October

14th).

Inspector

Coysh (November

20th).

On leave

Inspector Wood (June 3rd).

Inspector Duncan (June 3rd).

CLERICAL AND OUTDOOR SUBORDINATE STAFF,

6. No important additions were made to the clerical or outdoor subordinate staff.

GENERAL.

New Health Districts 14 and 15 to correspond roughly with the new districts Shamshuipo and Kowloon City were defined, The work done in these districts was largely educational, it being the policy only to enforce the Public Health regulations gradually as these districts are converted from villages to towns. Although Shaukiwan has not yet been made a Health District the ordinary work of limewashing and general cleansing has been extended to include this neighbourhood and an Inspector detailed to take charge of sanitary matters either separately or in conjunction with Health District 1.

LEGISLATION.

Amendments to the following By-laws were made by the Board :-

(i) By-laws 2 and 3 of the Offensive Trades By-laws were amended so as to accelerate the issue of Offensive Trade Licences by avoiding the necessity for applicants producing in advance a licence under the Crown Lease.

(ii) By-law 4 of Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation By-laws was amended so as to enable the Board to cleanse and limewash premises at owners' expenses (after due notice) immediately on receipt of notice by the owner claiming to have limewashed where it

M 5

appears that such claim is not justified by the facts. Hitherto it was necessary to wait until the expiry of the limewashing season.

(iii) By-law 1 of the Disinfection of Infected Premises, By-law 5 of the Removal of Patients By-laws and By-law 1 of the Notification of Infectious Disease By-laws were amended so as to include Yellow Fever in the list of epidemic, endemic, contagious or infectious disease.

(iv.) By-law 1 of the Offensive Trades By-laws was amended so as to include Pig-roasting in the list of Offensive Trades.

(v.) By-law 6 of the Offensive Trades By-laws was amended in order to give the Board power to order the thorough cleansing and limewashing of the entire walls upon the premises so licensed.

(vi.) By-law 14 of the Offensive Trades By-laws was amended so as to enable the Board in the case of the trade of rag-picking, rag-storing, hair cleaning, feather-storing or feather-cleaning to require the adoption of special measures for disinfecting materials and destroying vermin.

Cemeteries and Crematoria.

No new cemeteries were opened in 1920.

During the year 1,370 private exhumations were carried out as follows:-Mount Caroline 299, Kai Lung Wan 418, Kai Lung Wan East 150, Ma Tau Wai 74, Sai Yu Shek 97, Mount Davis 22, Tai Shek Ku 2, Roman Catholic Cemetery 12, Colonial Cemetery 2, Chinese Christian Cemetery 1, Kowloon Tong 49, Sham Shui Po 33, Chai Wan 180, Aberdeen 4, Cheung Sha Wan 3, Hau Pui Lung 1 and from places other than authorised cemeteries 23.

5,167 exhumations were carried out at the expense of the Government, as follows:-Mount Caroline 1,921, Kai Lung Wan 97, Kai Lung Wan East 1,952, and Chai Wan 1,197.

The number of exhumations in 1919 was 550.

There were 62 cremations, 41 at the Japanese Crematorium, So Kon Po, and 21 at the Sikh Temple.

Interments.

The following numbers of burials took place in the various cemeteries during the year :—

Colonial....

General Cemeteries.

Roman Catholic (Wong Nei Chung)..... Mohammedan

84

167

70

Parsee

2

Japanese Crematorium

41

Sikh Crematorium

21

Jewish

1

Malay

0

Roman Catholic (So Kon Po)..

1,485

Total..

1,871

M 6

Chinese Cemeteries.

Mount Caroline

Kai Lung Wan

Tung Wah Hospital.

Protestant.

Eurasian

Aberdeen

Stanley

Shek Ö

Chinese Permanent (Aberdeen)

Lamma Island

Hau Pui Lung

Sai Yu Shek..

Sai Yu Shek (Christian)

Kowloon Tong

Chai Wan.

Tai Shek Ku..

Total.......

DISEASES.

777

955

5,702

67

1.

191

44

1

51

3

2.830

111

22

154

154

2

11,065

Details of diseases will be found in Annexe B attached.

POPULATION.

Details of Population will be found in Annexe B attached.

HOUSE CLEANSING.

The routine work of house-cleansing under the Prevention and Mitigation of Epidemic disease by-laws was carried out as, usual during the year.

The total number of floors cleansed was 68,366 for Hongkong and 28,046 for Kowloon.

The drop in the numbers, as compared with those of 1919, is due to the abnormally wet season which necessitated the suspension of house cleansing on a great number of days.

LIMEWASHING.

The usual limewashing required hy the Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation By-laws was carried out during the year. The Board approved of a scheme allowing owners the option of doing the work themselves or putting it into the hands of the Department on payment in advance of a fixed charge. A short trial only was given during the year, and a small number of owners only left the work to the Department. It is, however, hoped gradually to reduce the charge and to attract more owners.

The total number of houses limewashed was 4,199. Of these 202 were done by the Board at the owners' cost owing to the owners' failure to comply with the requirements of the By-law.

:

- M

MARKETS AND SPECIAL FOOD LICENCES.

No new markets were opened during the year.

A comparative table of the market rents for the past four years will be found in the report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

There is an increase in revenue of $300 over the total for 1919. Twenty-seven special food licences under section 78 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance were issued.

CONSERVANCY.

The contractors continued to carry out their work satisfac- torily. During the year the following trough closets and latrines were erected, riz. :—

Trough Closet in Conduit Road.

Trough Closet at junction of Peak and Barker Roads. Trough Closet in Wong Nei Chung.

Latrine in Woosung Street.

Latrine in Market Street.

SCAVENGING AND REFUSE DISPOSAL.

No change was made in the refuse disposal system.

The cost of scavenging the City of Victoria was $69,183.79 and Kowloon $18,205.83.

A comparative table of the cost of scavenging for the last three years is appended

1918

1919.

1920. $69,183.79

18,205.83

(a) City Scavenging,....$57,114.16 $62,904.17 (b) Kowloon Scavenging, 15,454.45 (c) Refuse Disposal, .... 27,910.53

16,391.93 29,372.11 34.948.35

Total,$100,479.14 $108,668.21 $122,337.97

The barges were delayed by typhoon signals on seven occasions. The steam barge S.D. 1 broke down on three occasions.

The cost of repairs to the barges was as follows :—

Steam Barge S.D. 1,

Steam Barge S.D. 2, Other Barges,

...

... 3.081.10 2.437.00 2, 90.34 5,057.00

* Other Barges, Special Expenditure,..

+ Paint, Turps, &c.,

‡ Junk Hire,

549.12 840.00

Total,

...

...$14,554.56

M 8

The first item includes $1,090 for hired towage while S.D. 1 was under repairs, and the second item includes $547.50 for towage while S.D. 2 was under repair.

* No special expenditure during 1919.

† This item was not charged to 'Barges Repairs' in 1918.

No Junk hire in previous years.

The total cost of the service for the year was $34,948.35.

Owing to the sinking of refuse barge S.D. 'D' off Kau I Chow in July it was decided to expedite the construction pro- gramme for 1921. A new barge S.D. 'G' was accordingly built at the cost of $14,000.00 and launched on 25th November.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The total expenditure during 1920 was $440,357.30 as com- pared with $368,372.76 in 1919; the estimate for the year was $411,741.00.

The higher expenditure is largely due to a new scale of salaries which came into operation as from January 1st in the case of European, and from October 1st in the case of subordinate out- door staff.

The total revenue was $302,854.54 as compared with $296,798.34 in 1919.

No new head of Revenue was opened during the year. Details of Slaughter House fees and market rents which are 'the main source of revenue will be found annexed to the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon's report.

Other details of the working of the Department will be found in the reports of the Medical Officer of Health and the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

January, 1921.

G. R. SAYER,

Head of the Sanitary Department.

M 9

Annexe B.

JOINT REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH,

AREA.

The Sanitary Board's control extends over the island of Hongkong which has an area of about 32 square miles, and to that portion of the mainland between the shore and the range of Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay on the East to the village of Kau Pa Kang on the West, with a seaboard of about 13 miles and an area of about 16 square miles.

This area includes "Old Kowloon" which has been British since 1861 and has an area of about 24 square miles and a portion of the New Territories leased to this Government in 1898.

The remainder of the New Territories, about 266 square miles is outside the Board's jurisdiction.

The City of Victoria situated on the northern side of the island has a frontage on the sea of nearly five miles, and is separated by the harbour from the Kowloon portion of the Colony.

The domestic buildings in Victoria number 10,039 (exclusive of barracks and police stations) of which 805 are non-Chinese; there are also 187 dwellings in the Hill District. The number of houses completed during the year was as follows:--Victoria 154, Kowloon 219, Outlying Districts and Peak 28, making a total of 401 as compared with 419 in 1919. There were also erected 92 miscellaneous buildings such as godowns, offices, etc.

ADMINISTRATION.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten principal Health Districts, and Old Kowloon into five such with an inspector in charge of each.

In addition four inspectors are engaged in supervising scavenging and conservancy, and the upkeep of the dust carts, boats, etc., used on this work.

In the outlying districts sanitary work is supervised by the police officers of the districts except in Shaukiwan where the work is done in connection with that of No. 1 Health District.

The Inspectors in Hongkong work under the direction of the Medical Officer of Health, and in Kowloon under that of the Assistant Medical Officer of Health.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITIONS.

The demand for more houses has been as apparent during 1920 as in former recent years, and there is obviously still a deal of surface crowding.

M 10

The census to be taken in 1921-the first since 1911-will give data for estimating the extent of the overcrowding, which is probably due to some extent to the unsettled state of the neigh- bouring provinces of China.

In connection with anti-plague measures directed against rat infestation of houses, 174 ground surfaces have been cemented in Victoria and 148 in Kowloon. (307 and 55 in 1919) while 198 buildings have had rat holes filled with cement in Victoria and 101 in Kowloon (928 and 726 in 1919).

Obstructions have been removed from backyards in 50 houses in Victoria and 21 in Kowloon (153 and 46 in 1919).

Sanitary nuisances were dealt with by notice to the number of 6,197 in Victoria and 2,193 in Kowloon (9,617 and 3,610 in 1919), and buildings nuisances were dealt with to the number of 1,612 in Victoria and 1,860 in Kowloon (2,922 and 377 in 1919).

Notices to cease permitting mosquitoes to breed on premises were served to the number of 121 in Victoria and 63 in Kowloon,

During the year 4 public water flushed latrines have been provided and 213 water closets installed in private dwellings.

By the Public Works Department additional training of nullahs has been carried out to the extent of 4,708 feet, and scavenging lanes have been provided to the extent of 3,883 feet.

METEOROLOGICAL RETURNS.

The rainfall for the year was remarkably high there being 107.88 inches as compared with 76 inches in 1919, 101-6 inches ín 1918 and 81.48 in 1917.

The following table gives the meteorological data recorded by the Royal Observatory during the year,

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERA-

TURE.

HUMI-

DITY.

Max. Mean. Min. Rel.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Month.

Rain.

Abs.

Direction. Vel.

о

ins.

о

p.c. ins. p. c.

hours. ins.

points. miles p.h.

January,

February.

March,

30.19 64.9 59.1 54.3 55 0.29 30.14 62.4 58.8 | 55.9 30.08 66.7 | 62.4 59.3

34

228.1 0.065 E N

10.3

84 0.42

98

24.6 2.640

12.8

84

0.49

90

82.6 1.390

15.1

April,

29.97 73.3 | 69.3 | 66.5

81 0.61

90

78.6 8.265

14.0

May,

June,..

July,

August,

29.79 80.1 76.178.1 29.71 | 85.0 | 81.0 77.9 29.62 87.0 82.6 79.1 29.72 $5.4 81.7 78.5 September,... 29.79 85.6 81,2 | 77,6 October, 29.98 | 80.6| 76,1 | 72.5 November, 30.06 75.0 | 70,9 | 67.4 75 0.57 December, 30.10 68.7 64,8 | 61,3 74 0.47

88 0.79

79

135.118.155 E by

14.0

83 0.88

79

148.1 15.555

10.4

I

83

0.92 74

203.0 24.040 SE-by

12.6

85 0.92

137.5 10.975

9.8

8] 0.86

208.1 11.750 E

10.4

70 0.64

241.0 6.190 E by N

10.3

105.8 7.045 ENE 105.1 1.810 ENE

12.0

12.0

Mean or

Total,...

29.93 76.2 72.0 68.6 78.3 0.65 74.4

|1695.6 |107.88

E

11.97

M 11

POPULATION.

The estimated population at the middle of 1920 was as

follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil population,

Chinese Civil population :---

City of Victoria (including Peak), Villages of Hongkong,...

...14,000

342,000

...

18,050 104,000

...

...

...

...

100,800

69,300

634,150

648,150

Kowloon (including New Kowloon), New Territories (land), Population afloat, ...

Total Chinese population,

Total Civil population, ...

The last census was taken in 1911 since when the population of the Colony has been subject to great fluctuation caused by political disturbances in China with consequent migration to and from Hongkong. This has made it difficult to estimate the population of the Colony. A new census is to be taken in 1921 when errors in recent estimates will be corrected.

The Chinese population at previous censuses has always shown a preponderance of Chinese adult males, but it is probable that recent immigration of refugee families has raised the proportion of Chinese females.

The boat population is estimated at 69,300, and the registered boats belonging to the port and villages of Hongkong are as follows:

Passenger boats, class A and B,

1,259

Lighters, cargo and water boats, Fishing and other boats,...

...

1.751

...

6,774

Hulks,

64

Total,

...

9,848

The licensed boats in the New Territories numbered 6,284.

IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION.

During the year the river steamers plying between the Colony and the mainland of China brought here 727,136 persons and took away 779,179.

The Kowloon-Canton Railway brought 373,776 persons and took away 365,665,

:

M 12

This gives a total of 1,100,912 immigrants and 1,144,844 emigrants by these routes. The difference does not show a certain decrease of the population as there are other ways by which people may enter and leave the Colony, but it suggests that this number 43,932, of people have returned to South China in consequence of the recent more settled condition of affairs there.

·

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors in the City of Victoria for the year 1920 :-

I

IA and 2A

2

3

456789

10

Health Districts.

One-storey

Dwellings.

Two-storey

Dwellings.

Three-storey

Dwellings,

Four-storey

Dwellings.

Five-storey

Dwellings.

Six-storey Dwellings.

Total Dwellings,

Total Floors.

Average number of floors per dwelling.

137

219

129

13

43

165

433

155

8

167

495

209

9

36

58

13

78

667

472

29

0

120

552

268

11

51

37

389

'449

36

13

17

397

462

35

1

60

557

354

13

21

352

637

152

0

24

157

545

69

0

OOOONOOMOOO

498

1,014

2.03

799

2,307

2.89

879

2,563

2.91

· 103

368 3.57

1,183

4,034

3.4

951

3,023 3.18

962

3,278

3.4

927

3,279

3.05

985

3,273

3.32

1,152

3,174

2.75

795

2,239 2.81

Total

311

1,381

4,837

2,661

1.27

9,234

28,552

3.02

M 13 -

*

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors in Kowloon for the year 1920 :--

Average

One-storey Two-storey

Three-storey

Four-storey

Dwellings. Dwellings. Dwellings. Dwellings.

Total

Dwellings.

Total Floors.

number of

floors per

dwelling.

Health District 11,

09.

154

285

123

565

1,658

2.8

12,

00

248

621

111

988

2,811

2.8

13,

123

97

752

9

981

2,609

2.6

""

""

14,

629

255

225

1,109

1,814

1.6

15,

1,545

309

83

1,937

2,412

1.3

Total,

2,308

1,063

1,966

243

5,580

11,304

2.0

– M 14 —

M 15

BIRTHS.

The births registered during the year were as follows:-

Male. Female. Total.

Chinese,

Non-Chinese,

Total 1920,

Total 1919,

1,386

***

727 2.113

154

153

307

1,540 880 2,420

1,462

732 2,194

This gives a general civil birth rate of 4.36 per 1,000 as com- pared with 43 in 1919 and 4'1 in 1918.

The birth rate among the non-Chinese civil community was 19.78 per 1,000 as compared with 20.6 in 1919 and 22.07 in 1918.

The nationality of the non-Chinese civilian parents was as follows:-British 104, Portuguese 71, Indians 43, American 14, Malay 13, Japanese, Dutch and Filipino 6 each, Spanish and French 3 each, Siamese, Brazilian, Arabian, Mauritian, Russian, Danish, Parsee and Persian 1 each.

The birth rate amongst the Chinese as calculated from the registered births was 3.96 per 1,000 as compared with 3-9 per 1,000 in 1919.

An accurate calculation of the Chinese birth rate is impossible as many Chinese births are not registered owing to a native custom of not registering children unless they have survived for at least one month, and also owing to the constant flow of people to and from the mainland of China.

Many children of about one month of age and less are left sick at the various convents or abandoned dead in the streets, on the hillsides and in the harbour.

The number of such during 1920 was 1,746.

If it be assumed that all those children were born in the Colony but not registered, this would bring the total births to 4,166 and the general birth rate to 7·61 per 1,000, while it would bring the Chinese birth rate to 7·23 instead of 3·96 per 1,000.

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked among the Chinese, there being for the year 1920 190 males to every 100 females (215 to 100 in 1919 and 194 to 100 in 1918).

In the non-Chinese population the proportion of male to female births during 1920 was 100·6 to 100 (120 to 130 in 1919 and 102 to 100 in 1918).

M 16

DEATHS.

The total number of deaths registered during the year was 12,419 (11,647 in 1919 and 13,714 in 1918).

The general death rate was 21.19 per 1,000 as compared with 23-2 in 1919 and 244 in 1918.

The Chinese deaths numbered 12,151 which gives a death rate for Chinese of 22-78 per 1,000 as compared with 23′3 per 1,000 in 1919 and 24.5 per 1,000 in 1918.

The deaths of non-Chinese civilians numbered 251 giving a death rate of 17.9 per 1,000 (21·9 in 1919 and 19.5 in 1918).

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 61, Indian 55, Portuguese 52, Japanese 41, Filipino 10, Malay 7, American 5, Eurasian 4, Polish 3, French 3, Dutch and Norwegian 2 each, Czecko-Slovak, Siamese, Parsee, Swiss, Spanish, and Italian 1 each.

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The total number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 3,872 being 31.1 per cent. of the total number of deaths as compared with 29.8 per cent. in 1919.

The deaths of children between one and five years of age were 2,449 (1,807 in 1919).

There were 40 deaths of children under one year of age amongst the non-Chinese community (25 in 1919 and 40 in 1918).

Among the Chinese population the deaths of infants numbered 3,842 (3,449 in 1919 and 4,219 in 1918) while only 2,113 births were registered.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from diseases of this nature other than pulmonary tuberculosis was 3.834 (3,049 in 1919) of which 45 were among the non-Chinese population (74 in 1919). Of those 1,662 occurred in infants under one year of age.

Pneumonia was the cause of 554 deaths (549 in 1919) 14 of which were non-Chinese, and 104 of which occurred in infauts under one year of age (133 in 1919).

Broncho-pneumonia caused 1,625 deaths (1,494 in 1919) 21 of which were non-Chinese, and 745 of which occurred in infants under one year (881 in 1919).

L.

1

.

¿

M 17

The death rate amongst the Chinese from diseases of the respiratory system was 9.8 per 1,000 as compared with 6-2 in 1919.

Tuberculosis.

The number of deaths from tubercular diseases was 2,082 and 32 of these occurred in non-Chinese. There were 1,401 deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis, 1,380 Chinese and 21 non-Chinese, and 53 deaths from tubercular meningitis.

The percentage of deaths from tuberculosis was 16'7 compared with 14.05 in 1919.

+

Nervous Diseases.

Excluding the two infectious diseases, tetanus and cerebro- spinal-meningitis, the number of deaths from these was 335 as com- pared with 516 in 1919. The deaths of Chinese infants from tetanus and convulsions were 198 and from meningitis undefined 28 as compared with 270 and 11 in 1919,

Malaria.

The number of deaths from malaria during the year was 332 (319 in 1919) of which all but 9 occurred among Chinese.

The following tables show the distribution of these deaths in the Colony and the police admissions to hospital for malaria during the last ten and eleven years respectively :-

Table of Deaths from Malaria.

Year.

Non- Chinese.

Shauk

Victoria. Kowloon.

wan.

Aber- deen.

Stanley.

1911.......

8

176

26

54

43

1912..

18

214

80

34

44

1913....

8

110

47

33

53

1914..

7

73

58

19

47

20

1915.

4

157

66

27

46

32

1916..

9

182

75

25

36

19

1917.

205

98

29

68

11

1918..

189

71

16

106

10

ADONDO

1919.

117

101

13

71

12

1920.

141

84

13

82

12

The 141 deaths in 1920 under Victoria include 8 from the harbour,

M 18

Police admitted to hospital on account of malaria during the past 12

years:

Average Percent-

Year.

From the City.

From rest of

Strength

Total.

age of

the

Colony.

Force.

of Police Strength.

1909.....

37

1910.....

66

1911.

30

888

50

87

1,050

8

69

135

1,039

13

లు

83

113.

1,031

11

1912...

37

51

88

1,120

8

1913.

68

95

163

1,170

14

1914....

101

81

182

1,206

15

1915...

116

92

208

1,289

16

1916..

63

99

162

1,057

13

1917.

51

84

135

1,192

11

1918.

40

49

89

1,228

7

1919..

13

74

87

1,228

7

1920..

27

60

87

1,281

6.7

Beri-beri.

There were 361 deaths from this disease during the year (555 in 1919). All were Chinese except 3 Japanese and 1 Indian.

Infectious Diseases. ·

The number of cases of infectious diseases notified during the. year was 560 (1,011 in 1919 and 1,013 in 1918).

Of these 138 were plague, 34 small-pox, and 158 cerebro- spinal-meningitis (269 in 1919).

Tables II and III show the nature and distribution of these diseases.

Plague.

There were 138 cases of this disease as compared with 464 in 1919, 266 in 1918, and 38 in 1917. Eighteen cases were imported. All but 9 were of Chinese nationality, and of these eight were Japanese-all imported. The deaths numbered 120.

The numbers of rats caught and sent to the public mortuaries for examination for signs of plague were, for Victoria 78,244 and for Kowloon 29,023, total 107,267 (104,104 in 1919).

In Victoria 19 were found to be plague infected and in Kowloon none.

Table IV shows the monthly distribution of plague infected rats during the year.

!

9

M 19

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis.

There were 158 cases notified as compared with 269 in 1919 and 1,232 in 1918. Of these cases four occurred amongst the non- Chinese community and the remainder (154) amongst the Chinese. There were 103 deaths as compared with 204 in 1919 and 968 in

1918.

Enteric Fever.

There were notified during the year 118 cases as compared with 133 in 1919 and 247 in 1918. The cases of European and American nationality were 32 (20 in 1919 and 33 in 1918), of other non- Chinese nationality 15 (12 in 1919 and 32 in 1918). The remainder were Chinese. Twenty two cases were imported.

Paratyphoid Fever.

Fourteen cases were notified (4 imported). Ten of the cases were European and American, two of other non-Chinese nationality and two were Chinese cases.

Scarlet Fever.

Three cases were notified, two British (one imported) and one Portuguese.

Small-pox.

During the year 34 cases were notified (27 in 1919 and 32 in 1918), twelve cases were imported, six of these being Russians from Vladivostock.

Nine cases were of European and American nationality and one Indian. The remainder were Chinese.

Cholera.

Of these five cases

Six cases were notified during the year. were imported and the other case probably so as the patient was a vagrant. There was no continuance into the year of the epidemic of gastro-enteritis of 1918. It is probable that during the year the Colony was free from this disease except for the imported cases.

Typhus.

Three cases were imported into the Colony amongst Serbian troops returning from Siberia.

The immediate recognition of this disease by the Port Health Officer and the consequent measures of disinfection successfully prevented the spread of the disease in the Colony.

Diphtheria.

Seventy six cases were notified (50 in 1919). Of these 19 were of European and American nationality, 14 of other non-Chinese race, and the remainder were Chinese. Three cases were imported.

2

י

M 20

Puerperal Fever.

Ten cases were notified. They were all Chinese. One case was imported.

Seven Government midwives attended at 625 confinements (550 in 1919).

CEMETERIES AND CREMATORIA.

No new cemeteries were opened in 1920.

During the year 1,370 private exhumations were carried out as follows:-Mount Caroline 299, Kai Lung Wan 418, Kai Lang Wan East 150, Ma Tau Wai 74, Sai Yu Shek 97, Mount Davis 22, Tai Shek Ku 2, Roman Catholic Cemetery 12, Colonial Cemetery 2, Chinese Christian Cemetery 1, Kowloon Tong 49, Sham Shui Po 33, Chai Wan 180, Aberdeen 4, Cheung Sha Wan 3, Hau Pui Lung I and from places other than authorised cemeteries 23.

5,167 exhumations were carried out at the expense of the Government, as follows:-Mount Caroline 1,921, Kai Lung Wan 97, Kai Lung Wan East 1,952, and Chai Wan 1,197.

The number of exhumations in 1910 was 550.

There were 62 cremations, 41 at the Japenese Crematorium, So Kon Po, and 21 at the Sikh Temple.

DISINFECTING STATIONS.

At these stations in Victoria and Kowloon 19,380 articles of clothing, bedding, etc., were disinfected during the year (39,924 in 1919).

The disinfecting apparatus was in use in Victoria on 156 days and in Kowloon on 81 days.

In addition 17,543 articles were washed and 19 public vehicles disinfected,

PUBLIC BATH HOUSES.

The following table shows the number of persons who have used the four public bath houses during the year :—~

District.

1919. 1920.

Wanchai (men only)

123,741

133,331

Pound Lane (men and women)

431,654

426,553

Second Street (men only)

64.212

89,706

Sheung Fung Lane (women & children)

49,131

41,764

Total...............

.668,738 691,354

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

Ambulances are procurable at any time of the day or night from the disinfecting stations at Tai Ping Shan in Victoria and

M 21

.

Yaumati in Kowloon (telephone numbers 363 in Victoria and K. 44 in Kowloon).

Ambulances are also obtainable in Victoria from the Eastern and Western District Sanitary Offices.

At the above mentioned stations coolies for ambulance work are available at any time.

There are many other places from which ambulances may be obtained in emergencies, but as there are no coolies of the Sanitary Department stationed at these, it is necessary for the police to obtain volunteers or engage street coolies for these ambulances when required.

The following is a list of such places:

1. In the City of Victoria :-

No. 1 Police Station.

The Recreation Ground, Happy Valley.

The Seamen's Institute, Gresson Street. The Post Office.

The Supreme Court.

The Central Police Station.

The New Western Market.

The Tung Wah Hospital.

The Government Civil Hospital.

The Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town. No. 6 Police Station, Peak.

2. In Hongkong outside the City limits:-

Bay View Police Station. Shaukiwan Police Station. Aberdeen Police Station. Stanley Police Station. Pokfulam Police Station.

3. In Kowloon:-

---

Water Police Station, Tsim Sha Tsui. Sham Shui Po Police Station. Kowloon City Police Station.

4. In the New Territories at Tai Po.

A motor ambulance belonging to the Saint John's Ambulance Society is kept at the Fire Brigade Station (telephone No. 600). Driver and attendants are available.

During the year ambulances were used 692 times in Hongkong and 296 times in Kowloon.

M.22

ADULTERATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS.

The following table shows the number and results of analysis

made during the year:-

No. of Samples. Genuine. Adulterated.

Milk

60

56

+

Beer

Brandy

Gin

Port Wine....

Rum

Sherry

Whisky

OUNT 20

6

0

6

3

2

0

4

نا

1

The milk samples were submitted for analysis by the Sanitary Department and the others by the Police.

Two prosecutions for selling milk reported to fall below the legal standard were undertaken. One case failed and in the other the vendor absconded.

J. T. C. JOHNSON, F.R.C.S. (Ed.), D.T.M. (Camb.),

Principal Civil Medical Officer,

W. W. PEARSE, M.D., D.P.H.,

Medical Officer of Health.

1.

=

-

པས་ད་ཨན་ལྟ་

..

- M 23 -

Table I.-DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING 1920.

Typhus Fever.

Haemoglobinuric

Fever. Paratyphoid Fever.

Influenza.

Small-pox.

Measles.

Typhoid Fever.

Diphtheria.

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis, Dysentery.

Plague.

Malarial Fever.

Cholera.

Puerperal Fever. Septic Infections.

Syphilis.

Poisoning. Injuries. Developmental Diseases.

Old Age.

General Tuberculosis.

Beri-beri.

Cancer.

Paralysis and Convulsions.

Heart Diseases.

Pneumonia.

Phthisis & Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

Enteritis and Gastro- Enteritis.

Cirrhosis of Liver,

Peritonitis.

Nephritis.

Other causes.

Unknown.

All causes.

2

1 1 1 27

:

10

4 10

6

:

1

2

:.

17 3

4

00

27

35

21

7

:

1

6

1 268

...

:

4 88

4

15

36

19

57 142 105 || 124

4 6

26 388 9 170 315 213 | 297 | 238| 46 | 159|121| 1565 897 280 24

17 176 2514| 39| 8,192

8

1

276 15

5

1

:

:

:

:

DD.

:.

:

:

...

:.

:

...

:

S

:

:.Y

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:.

:

4

26

7

С

34

77

1

:

:

2 3

:

:

2 1

...

4

82838

2

4

2

10

1

43

8 101 15

6

4

5

111

136

28888

4

1

20 131

...

:

26 34 1

64 25 243 74

...

48; 17

12

47 419308 191 10

10

79 537 80| 2,728

* 2 8

900

:

:

11

...

:

:

-

:

:.

:.

2

1

...

:

6

4

12

15

17 4

1

2

43

7

3

2

391

2

T

:

I

16

I

1

6

:

:

:

...

...

:

:

...

C

:

N

:

:

1

:

:

:

208

:

93

:

:.

1

28

British and

Foreign Civil,. Community,

Chinese

Community,

Victoria and {

Peak, ....... )

Harbour, ...........................

Kowloon,..............

Shaukiwan,................

Aberdeen, ...............

Stanley,....

Total, 1920,

""

1919,

:

1

1 542 21 23

2 449 15 6

...

888

6

11

57 431 11|304|355 | 596 | 403 | 361

85 36 204 | 178 | 426 | 319 42 15126 208 10256 | 432 | 522 | 539 | 555 | 53

178184 2179 1401 514 | 41 168124 2043 1006 805 47

24 287 3299 198 12,419 31 | 227 2258 460|11,647

.

.

.

1

European

January.

February.

March.

M 24

Table II-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES RECORDED IN EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR 1920.

April.

May.

...

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total, 1920.

Total, 1919.

Plague

Chinese

9

28

56

20

6

3

...

130

138

463

461

Others

8

...

European

3

2

2

6

1

31

20

Typhoid Fever

Chinese

1

4

10

8

2

71

118

101

Others

4

2

1

I

1

16

Paratyphoid Fever

....

Cholera

Small-pox

Diphtheria

European Chinese Others European Chinese Others European Chinese Others

2

1

8

ེརྱསམ

133

2

...

1

1

2

14

3

...

...

1

2

...

4

...

1

...

...

1

4

6

6

41

46

1

...

European

Chinese

Scarlet Fever

Relapsing Fever

.....

Puerperal Fever.....

Typhus Fever.....................

Cerebro-Spinal Fever...

Yellow Fever

Others

European Chinese

Others

European Chinese Others European Chinese Others

European Chinese Others

European Chinese Others European Chinese Others

1

1

1

10

6

3

1

4

1

1

2

7

1

3

6

9

24

34

19

27

1

7

2

1

19

10

10

42

76

39

33

50

1

3

1

15

1

...

1

1

1

1

2

10

10

11

...

12

...

2

3

...

...

1

...

...

...

...

...

Nil

Nil

...

...

3

Nil

3

3

2

1

2

16

12

40

43

10

4

6

5

7

3

154

158

267

269

1

1

...

Nil

Nil

::

***

Total for 1920,

Total for 1919,

45

OF

19

74

78

61 86

51 120 175 209 163

52

88883

63

37

25

35

22233

35

61

25

225

26

26

27

35

پیر

:

:

560

:

1,011

M 26

Table IV.

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS DURING THE YEAR 1920.

CITY OF VICTORIA,

Mus Rattus..

Mus Decumanus,

Total Infected Rats,

^

2

G

10!

.:

Nil.

19

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total

6

Human Cases of Plague,...

Local.... Import-

26

50 18

ed....

A

6

AI

:

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS

DURING THE YEAR 1920.

KOWLOON.

Mus Rattus,

Mus Decumanus,

Total Infected Rats,.

Local,

Human Cases

Import-!

of Plague,

ed,

January.

:

February.

*l[DX ? [[

:

:

:

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

1

:

:

7?

19

3

3 117

18

October,

November.

:

December.

Total,

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Plague

:

కా

ลง

00

N

6

*Q

Co

Kowloon.

Harbour.

New Territories. Villages of Hongkong.

No address.

Imported.

Total, 1920.

Total, 1919.

•[0cI

Table III.-The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases :—

City of Victoria Health Districts.

Enteric Fever

Paratyphoid Fever..

Cholera

Small-pox

Diphtheria

2

3

1

Y

5 6

7

8

CC

9

10

10

20

O

r

N

10

10

10

30 14

10 6 16

1 1

13

:

1

4 19

M 25 -

18

138

464

22

118

133

14

3

6

46

11

34

27

4

76

50

27 595

1

10

12

3

7

Nil.

Nil.

3 Nil.

158

269

Nil.

Nil.

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

N

:.

:

18

18

1

1

}

1

:

*

:

:

www.

:

232333435

:

:

:

:

**

:.

:

1

2

8

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

10

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

:

:

:.

:

:

:

12

10

10

:

1

1

7

23

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

Puerperal Fever.

Scarlet Fever

Relapsing Fever......

Typhus Fever....................

Cerebro-Spinal Fever..........

Yellow Fever

:

:.

...

:

M 27

ANNEXE C.

REPORT BY MR. WALTER J. E. MACKENZIE, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

STAFF.

Inspector D. Duncan was in charge at Ma Tau Kok until he went on leave June 3rd when Inspector W. Old took charge. At Kennedy Town, Inspector Hudson was in charge until he went on leave 16th February, 1920, when Inspector Taylor took charge. On March 19th Inspector McEwen took charge until relieved by Inspector Knight on 7th October. Overseer Johanssen was in charge of Central and Western Markets throughout the year.

GENERAL STATISTICS.

Cattle.The total number of cattle admitted to the Government Depôts for the year was 52,877 as against 42,659 in 1919. Kennedy Town 45,082 were admitted as against 36,401 in 1919. There were 9 rejected as unfit for food on account of leanness against 16 for the same cause in 1919. In Ma Tau Kok 7,795 cattle were admitted as against 6,258 in 1919 and no cases of leanness were rejected against 18 during 1919. These are the only slaughter houses for cattle in the Colony.

Pigs. The total number of pigs admitted to Kenndy Town was 269,215 as against 261,557 in 1919. The total of admissions of pigs to the other slaughter houses are misleading as they include 30,931 pigs which were admitted first to Kennedy Town and afterwards sold and removed to the other slaughter houses or exported.

Sheep and Goats.-The total number of sheep and goats admitted to Kennedy Town was 29,105 as against 27,081 in 1919. As in the case of pigs, sheep and goats are admitted first to Kennedy Town and from there many are removed for slaughter to Ma Tau Kok or for export out of the Colony.

DISEASE IN DEPOTS.

Rinderpest.-At the Cattle Depôt a few cases arrived during the year from the interior beyond Wuchow 15 cases being diagnosed.

TUBERCULOSIS.

7 cases were found in dairy cattle sent in for slaughter as against 14 in 1919. All were of Indian or European strains, noue being found in native cattle.

M 28

KENNEDY TOWN ANIMAL CREMATORIUM.

The carcases destroyed in the Creinatorium were :--

Cattle Calves

Sheep Swine

...

...

...

1919.

1920.

88

193

30

38

30

27

293

360

199

292

...21,049 fb.

19,872 Hb.

139

Dogs, etc.

Horses, mules

Condemned meat

In addition to the above 29 cart loads of old papers, etc., from Government offices and private firms were destroyed (60 cart loads in 1919) also 1,306 cases of damaged tobacco and cigarettes from the British American Tobacco Company (186 cases in 1919) and a number of quantities of damaged goods sent by various firms.

Under Government Notification No. 31 of 1910 the following fees were collected:

269 large animals at $2 each......

6 calves at $1 each.....

$538

6

129 small animals at 50 cents

64.50

53 piculs bone ash at $2.50 per picul

132.50

53 piculs bone ash at $3.00 per picul....

160.50

Refund for fuel used in destroying papers, etc.

194.04

$1,095.54

The amount of coal used was 47 tons, 8 ewts., 1 qr., 16 fb.

SLAUGHTER HOUSES REVENUE.

Kennedy Town :-

Slaughtered.

1919.

C.

1920.

$

f.

Cattle @ 40 c.

33,544

13,417.60

39,571= 15,828.40

Sheep @ 20 r.

16,196

Swine @30 e.

236,800

3,239.20 71,040.00 237,162

16,962-

3.392.40

71,148.60

Cattle and swine slaugh-

tered at Pokfulam

(Dairy Farm) during 1919

Exported.

Cattle @ 50 c. Sheep @ 10 r. Swine @ 10 c.

...

...

...

744.40

663.00 2,473: 1.236.50

1.326

11,177:

1,177.70

=

11,913- 1.191.30

13,493 1,349.30 21,529

2,152.90

$90,826.80

$95,694.50

Ma Tau Kok :

Slaughtered.

Cattle @ 40 c. Sheep @ 20 c.

Swine @30 c.

Cutstanding Tickets sold

M 29

1919.

1920.

$

C.

$

6,265

2,506.00

7,769

794-

158.80

875

...

C.

3,007.60

175.00

54,816

16,444.80

50,164

15,049.20

114.10

211.40

$19,223.70

$18,443.20

Sai Wan Ho (contracted out) :-

1919.

$c.

1920.

$ c.

Swine

Aberdeen (extracted out) :-

7,699 2,580.00 7,118 2,820.00

1919.

1920.

C.

C.

Swine

.3,014=1,284.00 3,251=1,416.00

The total revenue including contracts from the Animal Depôts and Slaughter Houses, is as follows:-

1919.

1920.

Kennedy Town, Fees

.$90,826.80

$95,694.50

Ma Tau Kok, Fees

19,223.70

18,443.20

Kennedy Town Blood and Hair

Contract

7,380.00

7,740.00

Ma Tau Kok

1,440.00

1,620.00

>>

Sai Wan Ho Slaughtering Contract

2,580.00

2,820.00

Aberdeen

1,284.00

3,251.00

$122,734.50 $129,568.70

Increase on 1919

$6,723.70

The following table shows the number of animals slaughtered in all Slaughter Houses during the past ten years :-

Year:

Cattle.

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1911 ......30,371

1912 ......33,761

.37,909 32,643 ......34,158 ...44,819

..40,884

1918.33,895

1919

1920

.39,809 ......47,340

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5

years,

41,349

33,768

Sheep and

Goats.

17,671

18,177

17,586

Average

18,376

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

17,729

17,245

17,966

21,636

19,699

15,719

16,990

17,837 J

Swine.

227,597

242,956

244,609

228,136

264,894

290,528

258,731

290,451

302,329

297,695

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

287,949

241,638

"

'

M 30

GRASS SUPPLY FOR GOVERNMENT BULLOCKS.

The area under cultivation remains the same as last year. The total grass cut at Kennedy Town was 240 tons 24 cwts. (224 tons 2 cwts, in 1919). A considerable amount of this was sup- plied to the Medical Department to feed the ponies used for the preparation of antimeningococcic serum, and no charge was made for this.

EXPORT OF LARD TO THE PHILIPPINES AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

The factories at Ma Tau Kok and Kennedy Town approved for the export of lard and dried meats to American Ports, exported the following quantities under certificate:-

Lard, Dried Meats,

...

1917. 1918.

1,103,9483 1,820,827

1919. 1920.

1,657,390 1,719,175 lb.

64,4271 101,5422 99,651 165,103 fb.

INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN THE COLONY.

RABIES.

Importation of dogs from Shanghai and Chinese ports North of Shanghai still prohibited (Gazette Notification No. 461 of the 19th October, 1917) and importation of dogs from Manila prohibited (Gazette Notification No. 611 of 23rd. December, 1920).

Dogs remain unmuzzled. 26 dogs were detained under observation for Rabies, 23 were returned to owners, one died, one was destroyed. One case died of Rabies.

RINDERPEST.

In June a serious outbreak occurred at Tung Lo Wan and Tai Hang 90 cattle being affected. All affected animals were isolated and thorough disinfection of premises carried out. 12 animals recovered.

PLEURO PNEUMONIA CONTAGIOSA.

In June a serious outbreak occurred at Pokfulam the disease being introduced from Australia among imported cattle. These cattle were slaughtered and the district declared an 'Infected Area'. Cases have continued to occur throughout the year and the disease is being fought by means of vaccination of contacts and isolation. Two hundred animals succumbed to the disease.

MARKETS.

The following statement shows the Revenue derived from Markets :-

Markets.

1907-1916 (average for

1917.

1918.

1919.

1920.

10 years).

$

C.

M 31 -

Central Market

57,269.76

60,635.10

60,493.50

60,640.50

60,792.00

Hung Hom Market

3,817.84

4,198.40

4,247.70

4,294.50

4,324.20

. Mong Kok Tsui Market

1,098.43

1,257.80

1,258.80

1,258.80

1,258.80

Sai Wan Ho Market

1,967.63

2,178.70

2,348.00

2,389.00

2,402.30

Sai Ying Pun Market Shaukiwan Market Shek Tong Tsui Market So Kon Po Market

14,395.72

16,333.20

16,428.10

16,496.70

16,520.40

1,729.80

2,127.00

2,104.80

2,085.60

2,085.60

765.65

942.00

942.00

942.00

942.00

1,412.63

1,493.00

1,491.30

1,490.40

1,490.40

Tai Kok Tsui Market

599.35

609.30

645,60

676.60

796.10

Tsim Sha Tsui Market

3,671.65

4,405.20

4,443.00

4,502.90

4,553.40

Wan Tsai Market

4,525.85

4,842.70

4,832.40

4,842.90

4,862.40

Western Market, (North Block)

14,492.61

19,208.10

19,224.60

19,220.20

19,171.70

Western Market, (South Block)

23,517.62

29,78×.20

32,806.90

32,553.10

32,569.00

Yaumati Market

7,991.07

10,558.30

10,758.00

10,834.00

10,840.80

Aberdeen Market

483.26

462.40

462.00

463.20

458.70

Canal Road Market opened 1/4/13

516.00

516.00

516.00

516.00

516,00

Praya East Market opened 1/12/13.

497.73

415.90

351.40

291.40

326.60

Reclamation Street Market opened 1/9/13

2,799.30

2,787.10

2,764.00

2,729.10

2,671.80

Staunton Street Market opened 1/10/12

856.32

1,234.40

743.55

837.00

940.80

Tai Hang Market opened 1/4/14

1,283.03

724.80

614.70

592.00

590.40

Sham Shui Po Market opened 1/6/18

2,127.10

3,102.80

2,898.40

Total,..........

143,691.25

164,717.60 169,603.45 170,758.70 171,011.80.

- M 32

Annexe D.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. W. B. A. MOORE, L.R.C.P. and S.I., Medical Officer-in-charge.

BUILDINGS.

These have been maintained in good condition.

The old operating theatre was converted into a second class ward to accommodate four patients.

CHANGES IN THE STAFF.

Dr. C. W. KcKenny went on leave on March 11th and was relieved by Dr. D. K. Valentine.

Dr. W. B. A. Moore assumed the duties of Medical Officer in charge on his return to the Colony on May 4th.

The following appointments were made to the Nursing Staff: Sisters Bone, Davis, Dupuy, Lamond Stewart and Purves. Staff Nurses Ebato, Yamagouchi, Kawamoto and Probationer Nurse Unite.

The following left the service:-Sisters Hurdley, Lund, Graham and Bone. Staff Nurses Kawasi and Inkamoto, Probationer Nurse Unite.

Sister Bagley was transferred to the Federated Malay States. Sister Chettle returned from leave on February 11th. Sister Lawrence went on leave on April 1st.

Mrs. McKenny and Mrs. Rickelman did temporary duty for a few days in February.

Mrs. Taylor and Mrs. Poon did temporary duty in October when several of the staff were ill with Dengue.

Admissions.

The total number of admissions was 4,701. This includes 126 patients brought over from 1919. 156 patients remained in hospital at the end of the year.

The daily average number of patients was 152.

There were 63 first class, 223 second class, 2,789 third class. and 1,626 free patients, including 537 cases brought to the Hospital by the Police.

Out-patients :-

31,196 attended as out-patients.

16,234 new prescriptions and 3,071 old prescriptions were

dispensed.

589 vaccinations were performed.

:

!

M 33

Nationality of patients :—

Europeans,

724

Indians,

909

Chinese and other Asiatics,

3,068

Sex of patients :-

3,863

838

Male,

Female,...

Deaths.--251 deaths occurred which gives a death-rate of 5·3%, Of these deaths 125 (i.e. 49.8%) occurred within 24 hours of admission.

Various death-rates :

Men,

Women,

Europeans,

Indians,...

Asiatics, ...

.189 deaths

4.8%

62

7.3 %

16

2.2 %

وو

25

2.7%

...210

6.8 %

""

Injuries accounted for 51 deaths and diseases of the respiratory system (including phthisis) 64.

Operations.-1,077 were performed. The more important

were:-

Laparotomy exploratory, ...

>>

Resection of intestine,

Appendicectomy, Colostomy, ... Gastro-jejunostomy, Splenectomy,

15

for intestinal wounds,... for septic peritonitis,

2

1

14

5

7

1

2

16

...

1

1

...

...

Ovariotomy,

9

Liver, abscess of, Hernia, inguinal,

">

ventral,

Hysterectomy,

Caesarean Section,

Suprapubic cystotomy,

Skin Grafting,

Amputation of thigh,

leg,

arm,

Resection of mastoid process,

Empyema,

Removal of benign tumours,

malignant tumours,

vesical calculus,

...

1

3

16

8

5

6

6

5

40

25

7

>>

breast,

9

1

Trephining, Cataract, Iridectomy.... Harelip

Cleft Palate,

Hæmorrhoids

Tonsils and adenoids

Suture of fractures,

M 34

Entirpation of penis,...

Prostatectomy,

:

ลง

3

4

5

1

...

...

27

13

3

3

1

The following fractures were treated :—

Skull,

Spine,

Femur (one compound),

Tibia and fibula (three compound),

Tibia (three compound),

Fibula,

...

Radius and ulna (two compound),

Radius,

Ulna (two compound),

29 with 24 deaths.

8

3

""

15

1

>>

""

5

""

11

>>

1

6

10

Humerus,.

Clavicle,

Pelvis,

Patella,

Jaws,...

:

Ribs,...

Nasal bones,

The following dislocations were treated :--

Shoulder, ...

...

Hip,

Elbow,

Clavicle,

Phalanges,

POLICE.

3 with 2 deaths.

6

4

2 with 1 deaths.

2

3

7

3

3

4

1

1

1

The strength of the Police Force was 1,281 consisting of Euro- peans 178, Indians 477, and Chinese 626.

Admissions.-1,076 were admitted as against 981 in 1919:-

Europeans, Indians,

...

Chinese,

Sick Rate:-

Europeans 103 as against 77 in 1919.

Indians 121

Chinese 51

129 46

""

""

""

184

580

312

་.

Chief Diseases :-

Malaria,

Digestive system, Respiratory system, Rheumatism,

Typhoid fever, Cellular tissues,

...

M 35

109 against 118 in 1919

122

132

>>

"}

111

.79

>>

}}

63

60

>>

1

""

1

93

97

45

27

73

})

Injuries,

Influenza,

107

170

"J

Per cent.

Per cent.

Malaria.

Total.

1920.

1919.

Europeans,

10

5.5

8.5

Indians,

71

14.8

20.2

Chinese,

25

4

2.5

Invaliding.-8 Europeans, 8 Indians

and 8

Chinese were

invalided as being unfit for further service.

Deaths:

Europeans,

Indians,...

Chinese,

Causes of Death :-

Death-rate.

...0

0

.4

0.8%

4

0·6%

Indians, 1 pneumonia, 1 phthisis, 1 Cerebro-spinal Meningitis, and 1 Fracture of base of the skull (suicide).

Chinese, 1 bullet wound, 1 pneumonia, 1 chronic nephritis,

and 1 Typhoid fever.

UNIVERSITY CLINIC.

The Surgical Clinic is under the direction of Professor Kenelm H. Digby F.R.C.S., Ho Tung Professor of Surgery to the University of Hongkong.

During the year 558 cases were under treatment as in-patients. (366 in 1919).

342 operations were performed under general anaesthesia.

A special Surgical Out-patient clinic is held on Wednesday afternoons, the average attendance being 18 patients each Wednesday.

This clinic has proved of great value in following the after history of cases and in providing additional clinical material.

Conditions of patients discharged from hospital :-

Recovered,

.. 261

Improved,...

166

Unchanged,

81

Deterioriated,

1

Died,...

23

Remaining under treatment,...

21.

558

M 36

Table showing number of cases treated and operations performed during each Month in 1920.

Patients under treatment......

20 24

22

37 37 44 43

51 64 51 54 55 56 26558

Operations 19 13

24

21 31 24 39 46 30 31

39 16

:

342

DENTAL DEPARTMENT.

160 patients were treated during the year.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

There were 560 patients admitted including 17 remaining from 1919, of these 265 were paying and 295 free.

There were 253 male and 250 female children born, including 7 cases of twins, all female.

32 children were still-born including 5 cases of twins.

Craniotomy was resorted to on one occasion only.

Caesarean section was performed once, for contracted pelvis.

Mother and child both did well.

Four cases of eclampsia were treated, all of which recovered. The cases treated were as follows:-

Parturition,

False pains,

Miscarriage,

Abortion,...

Threatened abortion,

Pyelitis,

496

51

6

3

3

560

Deaths. Two mothers died-one from post partum hæmorrhage and one from meningitis. Eight children died-6 from prematurity and two from atelectasis.

Nationality:-

Europeans,

Indians,

Japanese, Chinese,

63

27

1

13

457

560

M 3*

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.

1919.

1920.

Admissions to Civil Hospital,

3,926

4,701

Europeans,

540

724

Indians,

982

909

Chinese,

2,404

3,068

Admissions to Maternity Hospital,

543

560

Death-rate,

Deaths occurring within 24 hours,

Prescriptions dispensed,

Operations performed, ...

Out-patients...

The following Tables are attached :---

1. Admissions and Deaths under respective Diseases.

2. Yearly admissions from Malaria from each Police Station. 3. Number and Class of Patients admitted during the last

ten years and deaths.

5*5%

5.3%

107

125

...13,730 16,234

657 ...22,446 31,196

1,077

Diseases.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Chicken-pox

M 38

Tab

Diseases and Deaths in 1920 at the

Remain- ing in Hospital

CIVIL HOSPITAL,

Yearly Total Total

at end Admis- of 1919. sions.

Cases

Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1920,

Measles

Mumps

Dengue

Influenza

Diphtheria

Febricula....

Enteric Fever........

Paratyphoid

Dysentery

NNN wi⠀⠀⠀

3

5

8

45

45

43

43

306 12

306

3

15

18

31

31

1

20

22

6

8

62

64

2

Whooping Cough

Plague

14

7

14

Malarial Fever

...

...

1. Simple Tertian

23

23

2. Malignant

194

3

194

3

Malarial Cachexia

3

24

1

27

Beri-beri

1

87

88

2

Haemoglobinuric Fever.

Phthisis (Pulmonary)

101

26

101

Puerperal Septicemia

7

7

1

Septicemia

1

1

Tetanus

Tubercle

Leprosy

4

70

Madura Foot

Elephantiasis

Under-Observation

46

NOONIO

2

3

3

8

2

2

1

1

47

1

Syphilis :-

(a) Primary

2

16

18

(b) Secondary

121

123

1

(c) Tertiary

7

Gonorrhoea

176

184

Helminthiasis

00:

Arthritis Deformans

Sprue

Alcoholism

Rheumatism

i

1

54

56

133

1

60

6

Carried forward............... 39

39

1,548

86 1,587

37

!

le I.

M 39

Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Remain-

Total

ing in

Cases

Hospital

ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Admis-

Cases

of 1919.

sions.

Deaths. Treated

at end

of 1920.

at end Admis- of 1919. sions.

Deaths. Treated.

ing in Hospital at end

of 1920.

...

15

16

...

5

4

3

5

GO LO

3

6

∞ : 100+ F

...

...

15

68

16

16

2

3

2

5

2

NG:

^ os

:7

2

2.

68

...

16

...

9

9

2

6

6

...

:::

3

3

...

39

40

:~

:::9

7

1

-::

2

2

...

1

1

12

3

-12

2

:::

...

...

...

6

6

20

20

14

...

441 OL

5

5

4

4

1

1

::

2

2

...

2

2

1

...

2

...

4

:

...

00

8

79

2

87

1

199

5

200

3

...

M 40

Table I,-

Diseases and Deaths in 1920 at the

Remain- ing in Hospital

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

at end Admis- of 1919.

Remain. ing in

Cases Hospital

at end

of 1920.

Discases.

Yearly Total. Total

sions. Deaths.

[Treated.

Brought forward......

39 1,548 86

1,587

37

GENERAL DISEASES,→ Continued.

Gout

New Growth, Non-malignant

New Growth, Malignant

Anemia

Diabetes Mellitus

Debility

LOCAL DISEASES.

1

1

⠀⠀ to co co :

3

80

38

co::

33

3

41

وت

15

17

1

2

:

2

41

41

Diseases of the Nerves :-

Neuritis

Meningitis, Tubercular

1

12

Cerebro-Spinal

""

Myelitis

Migrain

Abscess of Brain

72724

8

12

4

1

1

1

1

*272 TAA

8

...

4

1

1

+

Tumour of Brain

Functional Nervous Disorders: -

Apoplexy

Paralysis

Chorea.....

Epilepsy

Neuralgia

Hysteria...

Neurasthenia

17

5

17

4

5

...

3

3

10

10

...

1

9

9

9

9

1

Mental Diseases :--

Mania

1

General Paralysis of the Insane...

3

3

::

Dementia...

1

11

12

2

Locomotor Ataxy

5

1

5

1

Diseases of the Eye

2

63

65

2

"

""

Ear Nose

::

21

1

21

1

8

8

"

27

Carried forward,......

3833

53

1,880

114 1,933

52

:

+

M 41

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at'end Admis-

Yearly Total. Total

Remain-

of 1919.

sions.

Deaths,

Cases Treated.

ing in Hospital at end of 1920.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1919.

Yearly Total. Total

Cases

Admis-

Deaths. sions.

Treated

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1920.

8

79

2

87

...

1

1

1

I

10

10

:~

13

...

:

8

101

2

3

4.

1

1

10

5

109

}

199

5

200

...

...

A

N

1

1

5

213

10

5

6

2

...

15

5

1

215

4

Diseases.

M 42

Brought forward......

LOCAL DISEASES,~ Continued.

Table I,-

Diseases and Deaths in 1920 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end Admis-

sions. of 1919.

Yearly Total. Total

Cases

Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1920,

53

1,880

114

1,933

52

Diseases of the Circulatory System

93

"

Respiratory System...

15

ство

2

38

4

40

292

38

307

"

""

Digestive System......

15

445

15

460 23

">

""

Lymphatic System

2

81

83

...

2924

"

""

Urinary System

4

67

8

71

4

27

27.

Male Organs

3

179

182

10

"3

27

Female Organs.....

1

70

2

71

4

Organs of Locomotion

1

27

28

2

""

Cellular Tissue

9

345

6

354

10

""

">

Skin

161

:

161

7

""

Injuries, General

Local

Malformations

17

78

8

95

1

760

51

760

24

9

9

1

Poisons

Parasites

Marasmus

21

4

21

8

8

2

2

Immersion

Strangulation

14

1

15

2

...

Malingering

7

In Attendance..

3

89

272

92

2

Total......

126

4,575 251 4,701 156

3

M 43

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total. Total

Remain-

Remain-

Cases

at end Admis- of 1919.

sions.

Deaths, Treated

ing in Hospital at end of 1920,

ing in Yearly Total. Total

Remain-

Hospital at end of 1918.

Admis- sions,

Deaths.

Cases Treated.

ing in Hospital at end of 1919.

CC

8

101

5

109

1

2

213

5

215

...

1722

30

1

1

6

7

3

3

6

3

30

29

29

2

2

5

1

1

4

4

18

1

3

3

11

11

1

17

1

15

15

3

1

1

3

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

17

17

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ co co co

2

...

7

10

203

9

213

1

6

290

11

296

6

Station.

M 44

Table II.-Showing number of cases of Malarial Fever among Members of the Police Force giving Station and percentage

of admissions as compared with strength.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Central (including No.

5 & No. 8)

No. 1 Station.

No. 2 Station.

Wong Nei Chung Gap....

Bay View

No. 7 Station.

Kennedy Town

No. of Cases.

Strength.

Percentage.

No. of Cases.

Strength.

Percentage.

No. of Cases.

Strength.

Percentage.

3

78

3.9

13

143

9

5. 216

143

اتا

12

3

17

17.6

27

3

33

8

25

1.1

29

17.2

48

Pokfulam

Gough Hill

Shau Ki Wan

14

10

Stanley and Tytam

100

66.6

Aberdeen

2

Water Police.

26 15.3

2

13

15.3

196

Lamma

Yaumati

12

16.6

1

34

2.9

Mong Kok

Hung Hom

Sham Shui Po

Kowloon City Sha Tin Gap..... Sha Tin

Tai Po...... Sha Tau Kok. Kat 0......... Sheung Shui Ta Ku Ling

12

8

12.5

14

30

7

14.3

10

12

66.6

1189

50

75

6

11

36.3

33.3

10

40

Lok Ma Chau

2

9

22.2

Au Tau

8

87 5

Ping Shan

10

10

Castle Peak

7

28.6

Tai O

Cheung Chau. Sai Kung Tsan Wan

8

8

1

33.3

I

66.6

SIRESIS

25

75

25

50

Table III.---Number and Class of Patients admitted during the past ten years and deaths.

L

CLASS OF PATIENTS.

1911.

1912.

1913.

1914.

1915.

1916.

1917.

1918.

1919.

1920.

Police

519

657

771

728

731

552

550

695

981

1076

Paying Patients

631

735

667

723

749

775

795

1,037

1,503

1803

Government Servants

188

219

257

312

274

325

329

358

168

196

Police Cases

313

380

370

283

352

344

401

416

430

537

Free.

719

710

728

696

979

1,062

1,217

1,171

844

1089

Total.

2,370

2,731

2,793

2,742

3,085

3,058

3,292

3,677

3,926

4:701

Total Deaths..

173

194

178

194

155

195

167

244

219

251

Percentage...

7.3

7:1

6.4

7.1

5:0

6.4

5:07

6.6

5.5

5.3

M 46

Annexe E.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN,

REPORT BY DR. J. T. C. JOHNSON,

Principal Civil Medical Officer.

Buildings.-These are in good condition.

Staff. Dr. Johnson returned from leave in February, 1920, and took over charge of the hospital.

Admissions to Hospital.-213 patients were admitted during the year and 206 during the previous year. Nine deaths occurred, one from haemoglobinuric fever, one from tuberculosis, one from cancer, two from meningitis, three from enteritis, and one from a congenital malformation.

Operations. The following were performed:-

Circumcision,

For ingrowing toe nail,

Curetting of uterus,

Lumbar puncture, ...

1

1

1

3

Eleven cases of malaria, three of the benign tertian and eight of the malignant tertian type were treated. Fifteen cases of dengue. were admitted.

Annexe F.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

REPORT BY Dr. W. B. A. MOORE, L.R.C.P. and s.1. Medical Officer in Charge.

Buildings:-These have been maintained in good condition. The quarters formerly occupied by the wardmasters having been converted into six private wards, these became available during the latter part of the year.

During the year 1920 there were 224 patients under treatment of whom 105 were brought in by the Police.

There were 47 paying patients.

The deaths numbered 3 being 1.33% of the total number under treatment (38% in 1919).

I

M 47

Table I.

Nationality and Sex of Patients treated in 1920.

Nationality.

Remain-

ing at Admit-

Remain-

end of ted.

1919.

Total number treated.

Dis- charged.

Died.

ing at end of 1920.

M.

F. MF.

M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F.

Europeans,..

1 5

20 +21 9 18 4

2

1 5

Indians,

1

0

9

0 10

0 10

0

0

0

Chinese,

6

1108

67 114

68 102

67

1

0

11

1

Japanese,

0

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

Malay,

0

0 0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

Total,

00

8

6 138 72 (146

78 [131

72

3

0 12

Co

6

:

M 50

Annexe H.

VICTORIA GAOL.

RERORT BY DR. D. J. VALENTINE, Medical Officer.

Staff. Dr. D. J. Valentine succeeded Dr. W. J. Woodman on 25th January, 1920, as Medical Officer in charge of Victoria Gaol.

Buildings.--The prison and yards have been kept in good sanitary condition. The mortuary has been entirely renovated.

A branch prison was opened up at Lai-Chi-Kok on 17th March, 1920, to relieve the overcrowding in the Victoria gaol. This has accommodation for above 200 prisoners and is used to confine short sentence prisoners and juveniles.

Health. The health of the prisoners during the year has been very satisfactory.

Occurence of certain specific diseases.

Disease.

Pulmonary tuberculosis

Number of cases.

Deaths.

32

4

Malaria,

75

Influenza,

18

Dengue fever,.

68

Opium habit,

72

Amoebic dysentery,

7

Typhoid fever,

9

:

i

2.

Deaths.-Eleven deaths from disease took place. The causes were as follows:-Pulmonary tuberculosis 3, Typhoid fever 2, Beri-beri 1, Enteritis 1, Uraemia 2, Cirrhosis of liver 1, Perforated gastric ulcer 1. The mortality rate was 18 per 1,000.

1

M 51

Condition of prisoners on admission to gaol.

Of the 5,153 total admissions to gaol 1,077 or 20.7% were found to be physically unfit for the full task for the following reasons :—

562 were under weight and poorly developed.

269 were incapacitated owing to age.

165 were juveniles.

81 were suffering from disease.

Of these 53 were admitted to hospital at the time of their entry into gaol.

Female prisoners:--

There were 275 females admitted.

The average daily number was 35.

There were 77 attendances for medical treatment for minor complaints. No death occurred.

Vaccinations.-3,487 prisoners were vaccinated and of those inspected 1,113 were successful, 898 were unsuccessful. General Statistics:-

Total admission, 5,153.

The daily average of prisoners,600 in Victoria and 155 at Lai-Chi-Kok.

The total admissions to hospital, 290.

The daily average in hospital, 6'3.

The daily average sick, 17.

The daily average receiving Out-patient treatment, 28.3.

Ten prisoners were transferred to the Government Civil Hospital in a critical condition. Four were released for medical reasons.

M 52

Annexe I.

KOWLOON AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

Captain H. E. Murray, I.M.S., was appointed to perform the duties of Medical Officer, Kowloon and New Territories, on May 16th, 1920, when Dr. Smalley went on leave to England, and Dr. Luk has been the Assistant Medical Officer.

KOWLOON DISPENSARY.

The daily attendance at the Dispensary has been considerable, the greatest number of cases attending being those of minor injuries, ulcers and abscesses, resulting in a great number of cases for daily dressings.

The number of cases treated in the Dispensary during the year was 11,317 as against 13,172 in 1919. This includes 124 physical examinations for the Kowloon-Canton Railway and a few for other Government Departments. There were 218 vaccinations performed which are also included in this total. About three fourths of these patients were Chinese.

The number of prescriptions dispensed during the year was 4,168. The number of ambulance cases sent to various hospitals was twenty-two. Eight of these were European patients.

POLICE FORCE.

The general health of the Police Force and their families has been exceedingly good during the year.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

The health of the European and Chinese staff has been good during the year.

The medical chests and stores on the trains and in the stations have been kept up during the year. The class taught in "First Aid" by Traffic Inspector Winyard, was examined and considered efficient enough to sit for "First Aid" certificate. Some 10 of them were examined by Dr. Keyt according to the St. John's Standard, and 6 (six) received certificates of proficiency from the St. John's Ambulance Corps. The instruction in this course was splendidly carried out by Inspector Winyard.

The Chinese Staff were examined with regard to colour vision during the year.

Two persons were killed on the railway during the year, and five were injured.

KOWLOON AND NEW TERRITORIES.

The Blind Home and the Victoria Home were visited twice during the year when all was satisfactory.

The general health in the New Territories was good, and there was no epidemic of disease during the year. There were 2 cases of Plague, 14 cases of Enteric, 13 cases of Small-pox during the year.

29,023 rats were examined none of them being plague infected. At the Public Mortuary, Yaumati, 1,481 postmortem examina- tions were made and a list of causes of death is herewith appended.

The Dispensary at Tai Po Market has treated 2,862 cases,

}

www.

M 53

TABLE OF CASES TREATED AT GOVERNMENT DISPENSARY, Kowloon.

DISEASES.

GENERAL DISEASES.

YEARLY TOTAL.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Chicken-pox

2

Measles

23

Influenza

283

Enteric Fever

. 1

Dysentery

66

Malaria :-

(a) Simple Tertian

17

(b) Malignant

234

Beri-beri

25

Tubercle of Lung....

36

Skin

86

""

""

Gland

32

**

""

32

""

"

Leprosy :-

General

Anaesthetic

Syphilis:-

(a) Primary

(6) Secondary

(c) Inherited.

N

25

10

170

Gonorrhoea

249

Rheumatism

117

Gout

34

New Growth, Non-malignant.

3

Anæmia

45

Debility

213

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System :-

Sub-section I :-

Neuritis

Sub-section II :—

Neuralgia

48

52

Carried forward

1,805

...

:.

:

M 54

TABLE OF CASES TREATED AT THE GOVERNMENT DISPENSARY,

KOWLOON,—Continued.

DISEASES.

Brought forward

LOCAL DISEASES,—Continued.

Diseases of the Nervous System,--Continued.

YEARLY TOTAL.

Admis- Deaths.

sions.

1,805

Diseases of the Eye

1,110

Ear

520

J:

"

...

Nose

14

""

17

27

"

Circulatory System

3

27

Respiratory System

1,236

Asthma

67

>"

""

>>

Digestive System

621

多多

Epidemic Anteritic

146

وو

""

Lymphatic System

50.

...

"J

Urinary System

30

""

A

""

Male Organs

10

...

""

Female Organs

20

>

39

Organs of Locomotions....

16

Cellular Tissue

657

Skin

25

2,369

Injuries, General.

Poisons, Opium

Scabies...

3

Local

22

1,716

2

Ascaris Lumbricordes

54

***

264

Toeniadae

Burns

Physical Examination

Vaccination

Dog Bite ...

36

169

124

218

...

32

Eyesight and colour vision for Railway employees Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis

21

1

Pregnancy

3

Total,............

11,317

:

1

t

M 55

Annexe J.

Number of Coufinements attended by Government Midwives in 1920.

1920.

Shaukiwau.

Yaumati.

January

29

17

February

22

17

March

30

16

April

17

13

May

24

14

June

16

6

July...

27

22

August

19

11

September

26

15

October

22

21

November

21

20

December

30

14

Yuu Long.

Tai Po.

2 30 10 HIG

NNNW N

10 00 ∞

3333

Total

293

186 27

Cheung Chow.

Tsun Wan.

Total.

58

51

58

39

58

28

57

41

58

62

8

57

10

61

79

10

628

:

M 56

Annexe K.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. 1). J. VALENTINE, Visiting Medical Officer.

STAFF.

Resident Medical Officer

Asst. Resident Medical Officer

...Dr. G. H. Thomas.

...Dr. C. S. Chan.

Seven Chinese Doctors practising native medicine. One qualified midwife.

The total number of in-patients was divided thus:-

Cases treated by Western methods........4,029=57·5%

Eastern

""

.3,362=42.5%

The total number of out-patients was divided thus :—-

Chinese treatment (new and old cases).. 125,946 Western

"

(

""

).

22,643

REMARKS ON SPECIAL DISEASES.

Pulmonary tuberculosis continues to be important. Of 643 admissions for this disease during 1920 there were 349 deaths.

Beri-beri.-In both mild and severe degrees, is still a prevalent disease. It occurs mainly in males of the coolie class whose diet consists sometimes solely of white rice. The large mass of Chinese are well acquainted with the disease but they do not realise that it would not exist among them if they would eat unpolished rice.

Plague did not occur in epidemic form although the mortality rate was high. The numbers for 1920-72 admissions with 63 deaths compare with 229 admissions with 182 deaths for 1919.

Cerebro-spinal meningitis.-There were 61 cases treated of which 29 died. (127 with 67 deaths in 1919 and 486 with 299 deaths in 1918).

Influenza.-There were 739 admissions with 128 deaths.

OBSTETRICAL DEPARTMENT.

There were 789 cases admitted into the labour wards. All these cases were treated by Western methods :-

Cases of normal labour...

abnormal labour

709 80

Three women were delivered of twins and one of triplets.

M 57

The abnormal cases are classified as follows:-

Cases requiring forceps delivery.....

Transverse presentation

Breech presentation

Persistent occipito-posterior .

Face presentation

Eclampsia

Placenta prævia

Obstructed labour, requiring craniotomy

Premature birth

This department continues to grow larger every year.

'SURGICAL DEPARTMENT.

38

4

14

There were 311 operations under general anaesthesia. Among the more important of these were the following:-

Hysterectomy..

Ovariotomy

Suprapubic lithotomy

Cholecystostomy

Appendicectomy

Drainage of hepatic abscess.

Herniotomy

Excision of breast for carcinoma.

Major amputations...

Gastro-jejunostomy

Splenectomy

Relief of Intestinal Obstruction

Drainage of pyo-salpinx

Exploratory laparotomy

EYE DEPARTMENT.

1

6

TO UT N O ∞ =

2

11

3

3

...

This has, as in former years, been under the care of Dr. Harston.

Out-patients... Operations

2,423 98

Hongkong University, (Medical Clinic). During the year, as heretofore, students have attended for lectures and demonstrations · in clinical medicine given by Dr. C. W. McKenny and myself and in the subjects of midwifery, vaccinations and pharmacy by Dr. G. H. Thomas. Selected students act for periods of three months as clinical clerks in charge of medical cases.

Buildings.--These have been well maintained.

The foundation stone of the Jubilee wing commemorating the birth of the institution was laid by H. E. Sir Edward Stubbs, K.C.M.G. on 4th October, 1920. The work of erection is at present in full progress and when completed will accommodate over 100 patients, bringing the total number of beds in the hospital to approximately 450,

M 58

The public service rendered by the Tung Wah Hospital con- tinues to be very valuable. One would like to see the Chinese take still more advantage by seeking medical advice and treatment in the very early stage of disease. Too many of the patients suffer from chronic complaints for which there is often no cure or very little relief. It is interesting to note the increase in the number of women attending hospital for treatment.

GENERAL COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.

1920.

1919.

Cases remaining in hospital at end of 1919,

262

276

Admissions in 1920, ...

7,129

6,726

Total number of in-patients treated

7,391

7,002

Deaths,

1,819

1,903

Discharged

5,242

4,837

Cases remaining in hospital at end of 1920,

330

262

Males,

4,928

5,007

Females...

2,201

1,995

Cases transferred to Government Civil Hos-

pital,

148

76

Cases brought in dead,

1,532

1,494

Bodies sent to the Public Mortuary,

760

702

Free burials....

5,228

4,681

Destitutes sheltered,

901

718

Vaccinations,

1,256

1,510

<

1

M 59

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1920 at the Tung Wah Hospital.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain-

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

ing in Hospital

1919.

at end of Admis-

sions.

Deaths.

Treated. at end of

1920.

Measles

GENERAL DISEASES.

Lobar Pneumonia.

13

13

10

162

66

167

7

Diphtheria....

6

5

Typhoid Fever

7

7

Septicæmia

1

1

I

Tetanus..

10

7

10

Influenza

739

128

739

3

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis

61

29

61

Plague.....

72

63

72

Dysentery..

7

289

103

296

3

Beri-beri

49

618

285

667

41

Leprosy

10

10

Malarial Fever :—

(a) Benign Tertian

8

8

(b) Malignant

25

221

43

246

21

(c) Malarial Cachexia..

1

16

2

17

Syphilis :-

Acquired

3

158

14

161

6

Tuberculosis:-

(a) Phthisis Pulmonalis

38

613

349

681

43

(b) Generalised

89

31

89

2

Gonorrhoea ******

29

29

Rheumatism

¿

New Growths :-

Malignant..

Anæmia

Senile Debility

48

48

I

11

6

11

2

14

1

14

197

93

201

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System

I-Organic -

Diseases of the Nerves, Meninges,

Brain and Cord

13

404

144

417

18

II.-Functional :-

Mental Diseases

15

15

Diseases of the Eye

80

83

Carried forward,

148

3,921 1,874 4,069

158

M 60

Table 1,-(Continued),

Diseases and Deaths in 1920 at the Tung Wah Hospital.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain-

Yearly Total.

Total

ing in

Cases Hospital

at end of Admis-

1919.

Deaths.

Treated, at end of

sions.

1920.

148

3,921

1,374

4,069

155

Brought forward,.......

LOCAL DISEASES,- Continued.

Diseases of the Circulatory System :---

(a) Diseases of the Heart

(b)

وو

Arteries

Diseases of the Respiratory System:- (a) Diseases of the Bronchi

(b)

""

""

(c)

Pleuræ

Lungs

:

21

5

21

10

5

28

486

221

514

26

Diseases of the Digestive System:-

(a) Diseases of the Gastro-intesti-

nal tract.....

(b) Diseases of the Liver

(c)

""

""

5

LO TH

4

Biliary passages

>>

""

Urinary pas-

sages

Diseases of the Urinary System:

(a) Diseases of the Kidney...

Diseases of the Generative System :-

(a) Male

(b) Female

Diseases of the Cellular Tissue

22

Injuries...

Skin

Effects of heat or cold....

Poisons:

(a) Acute Poisoning

(b) Opium Habit.

257

94

262

21

16

6

20

2

2

2

262

103

271

19

10

10

:..

1

2

47

641

11

ཨས ེ

22

24

26

688

58

216000

3

16

16

...

560

571

28

30

30

2

:

1

1

3

68

10

71

5

3

3

4

782

786

1

1

1

1

1

262

7,129

1,819

7,391

330

Parasites :-

Intestinal

Labour ....

(a) Abortion...

Diseases connected with Childbirth :-

(6) Eclampsia ........

(c) Post-partum hemorrhage......

Total,.....

:

M 61

Table II.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1920, with the proportion of cases treated by Western and Chinese methods respectively.

DISEASES.

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT.

Admis- sions.

Admis-

Deaths.

Deaths.

sions.

GENERAL DISEASES,

Measles

5

Lobar Pneumonia

86

25

Diphtheria

Typhoid Fever

4

30 10 30

41

Septicæmia

1

Tetanus

4

2

6

5

Influenza....

391

11

348

87

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis...

33

10

28

19

Plague.......

29

25

43

38

Dysentery

137

31

159

72

Beri-beri

348

127

319

158

Leprosy

10

1

Malarial Fever:

(a) Benign Tertian

5

(b) Malignant

131

12

115

31

(c) Malarial Cachexia

سر

1

11

1

.:

Syphilis :-

Acquired.

93

68

11

Tuberculosis:

(a) Phthisis Pulmonalis

314

168

367

181

(b) Generalised

37

14

52

17

Gonorrhoea

16

13

D

Rheumatism

13

35

New Growths :-

Malignant

Anæmia

5

6

x do

3

1

8

1

Senile Debility

37

24

164

69

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System

I.-Organic-

Diseases of the Nerves, Meuinges, Brain

and Cord.

:

183

53

234

91

II.-Functional:

Mental Diseases

1 1

Diseases of the Eye

78

TH LO

...

Carried forward...

1,987

544

2,082

830

M 62

Table II,-(Continued).

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1920, with the proportion of cases treated by Western and Chinese methods respectively.

DISEASES.

Brought forward,........

LOCAL DISEASES,- Continued.

Disenses of the Circulatory System :-

(a) Diseases of the Heart

(b)

22

Arteries

Diseases of the Respiratory System :--

(a) Diseases of the Bronchi

(b)

""

(c)

22

""

Pleuræ

Lungs

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT.

Admis- sions.

Admis-

Deaths.

Deaths.

sions.

1,987

544

2,082

830

~ 2

3

12

10

5

1

3

1

238

84

276

137

Diseases of the Digestive System :-

(a) Diseases of the Gastro-intestinal tract

(b)

(c)

""

">

""

Liver

Biliary passages..

Diseases of the Urinary System :-

(a) Diseases of the Kidney

(b)

""

""

Diseases of the Generative System:-

(a) Male

(b) Female

Diseases of the Cellular Tissue...

""

Injuries

Skin

Effects of heat or cold

Poisons:-

(a) Acute Poisoning (b) Opium Habit

127

38

135

56

13

4

7

2

2

128

41

143

62

Urinary passages

10

8

11

367

: ཡ ུསྶ

14

15

321

3

11

5.

273

298

21

1

30

3

41

Parasites:-

Intestinal

*

Labour

2

...

786

Diseases connected with Childbirth :-

(a) Abortion............

(b) Eclampsia....

(c) Post-partum hæmorrhage

Ι

1

1

1

Total,......

4,029

720

3,362

1,099

M 63

Annexe L.

KWONG WA HOSPITAL.

Captain H. E. Murray, I.M.S., took over the duties of Visiting Medical Officer, Kwong Wa Hospital, Yaumati, from Dr. Smalley on 16th May, and during the year had the able assistance of Drs. Wong and Woo the resident medical officers. He also had the kind assistance of the Chairman Mr. Lee and the other Directors. During the year the New Wing for tuberculosis cases completed and it is hoped to open it shortly.

Was

4,067 patients have been admitted during the year 1920, 2,529 having accepted Western treatment and 1,538 Chinese treatment. 436 mid-wifery cases have been treated. 36,353 patients were treated in the out-patient department. 67 operations were perfor- med the most important being:-

Ligature of femoral artery in Hunters canal... 1 Amputations, leg

arm

fingers

breast

"

Sequestrotomy Hernia

Strangulated hernia

Hare lip (plastic operation). Removal of ovarian cyst

Haemorrhoids

Suprapubic lithotomy

Removal of cervical glands

Entropion (plastic operation)

Cataract (removal)

3

4

1

3

2

2

1

1

5

2

1

4

2

374 patients were admitted in a moribund condition and there were 1,064 deaths.

His Excellency the Governor paid a visit to the Hospital on 27th August, 1920, and expressed complete satisfaction with all the arrangements.

H. E. MURRAY,

Captain, I. M. S.

:

M 64

LAI CHI KOK BRANCH PRISON.

I have been Visiting Medical Officer since 16th May, 1920. The general health of the staff and of the prisoners has been excellent. The sanitation is satisfactory.

A

KWONG WA HOSPITAL, YAUMATI.

(Affiliated to the Tung Wah Hospital.)

No. of Patients remaining at end of 1919, 200

No. of Patients admitted during 1920.... 4,067 No. of Deaths during 1920,

....

1,064

H. E. MURRAY,"

Captain, I. M. S.

Annexe M.

ALICE MEMORIAL AND AFFILIATED HOSPITALS, 1920.

Remaining

at end of Admitted. Died.

1919.

Alice Memorial Hospital,

Nethersole Hospital,

Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital,

Ho Miu Ling Hospital,.

Nil.

60

1

31

693

76

5

...

501

4

22

486

34

Total,

...

58

...

1,740

115

¿

M 65

Annexe N.

BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

Report by H. H. SCOTT, M.D., M.R.C.P. (Lond.), F.R.S.E., M.R.C.S. (Eng.), D.P.H., Government Bacteriologist.

The work of this Institute is best described under the two main headings of I. Routine, II. Special and Research work.

Under the former would be placed the following:-

1. Preparation of Calf Lymph.

2.

3.

4.

"

""

Antimeningococcic serum.

Contagious Abortion Vaccine. Antityphoid, paratyphoid, cholera,

and other vaccines.

5. Bacterial analyses of water samples.

6. Examinations in connection with clinical work. 7. Post-mortem examinations at the Victoria Mortuary.

8. Examination of rats for plague.

Under the second group-Special Work and Research :-

1. In-connection with Enteric Fever.

2.

3.

66

Tuberculosis. Rabies.

1.-THE PREPARATION OF CALF LYMPH.

Ten calves were inoculated during the year. The total num- ber of tubes of lymph issued was 18,738, which exceeds that of the previous year by 11,344. The value of the lymph according to Government Notification No. 380 of 1910 was $4,089.50. Certain difficulty in obtaining buffalo calves for inoculation has arisen owing to the prohibition of exportation of these calves from Kouang Tcheou Wan, but steps have been taken to overcome this.

2.-THE PREPARATION OF ANTIMENINGOCOCCIC SERUM. This is being steadily maintained. During the year four more horses were obtained in place of the original ones.

There were 18 to 20 litres of the serum in stock at the end of last year and, at the present time there are 36 litres, or 1,800 doses.

3.

PREPARATION OF CONTAGIOUS ABORTION VACCINE.

This is regularly prepared here and supplied on demand from the Dairy Farm.

M 66

4.-PREPARATION OF TYPHOSUS AND OTHER VACCINES.

Typhosus, Paratyphosus A, Paratyphosus B and Cholera vaccines have been prepared in large quantity in order that any person desirous of undergoing prophylactic inoculation with one or all of these may be supplied immediately on demand from their medical attendant.

5.- BACTERIAL ANALYSES OF WATER SAMPLES.

These have in the past been carried out every quarter. The results have, on the whole, been very satisfactory this year. All the sources of supply-Pokfulam, Tytam, and Kowloon, both the filtered and unfiltered-are now submitted to bacterial analyses monthly.

The method of analysis previously employed has also been modified to bring it more into line with modern discoveries as re- gards the standards of tropical and subtropical waters.

6.-EXAMINATIONS IN CONNECTION WITH CLINICAL WORK.

The appended Table (Table I) gives the various materials dealt with, the numbers of each, month by month, and the total. It will be seen that the examinations have doubled during the year. A word of explanation of the heading "Miscellaneous" is called for. Under this is included such things as the preparation of special autogenous vaccines, examinations for Leprosy, Rideal-Walker tests for standardisation of disinfectants, and suchlike, which are only occasionally asked for.

7.-POST-MORTEM EXAMINATIONS AT THE VICTORIA MORtuary.

These are treated of in detail in a separate report.

8.- EXAMINATION OF RATS FOR PLAGUE.

These examinations are carried out at the Victoria Mortuary daily. Until last year they have been included in the table of routine examinations at the Bacteriological Institute, presumably because some of them call for bacteriological investigation. The subjoined table (Table II) gives succinctly the restlts of these examinations. It will be noted that the number found infected with plague was remarkably small.

II-SPECIAL WORK AND RESEARCH.

1. IN CONNECTION WITH ENTERIC FEVER.

The following prefatory remarks explain the reasons for undertaking the first of these investigations :-

As a result of making Widal tests with specimens of blood sent up from patients suffering from rise of temperature of obscure origin, one was led to infer that enteric fever in some form was

M 67

more common than was generally believed from the returns of cases so designated. The usually recognised sources for the spread of the disease are, of course, water, food, flies and dust.

Regular analyses of the water supplies show that these are of good quality; furthermore, the number of cases is far smaller than a waterborne virus would produce.

Milk is very little used among the poorer Chinese population, but other food, such as sweetmeats, cakes, &c., are exposed in the streets and might easily be contaminated were the dust nuisance as prevalent here as in many tropical countries, but fortunately it is not. It would, however, be a wise precaution to compel the vendors to keep their wares under cover to protect them from the dust, flies, and the fingers of prospective buyers. The conditions under which, and the surroundings amongst which, these delicacies are prepared are not above reproach, and the purchasers take up one specimen after another before deciding which will give most value for their outlay.

Flies are troublesome at certain seasons, and especially in the poorer quarters, but these can only spread the disease by infecting themselves with the organism from some other source, and this source may be narrowed down to one, namely infected excreta. Very few houses in Hongkong are provided with water-carriage sewerage system, and so far as I am aware, the poorer quarters do not have it. If they do, the inhabitants do not avail themselves of it as much as they might; the usual method of disposal of excreta is on the lines of that of the Garden of Eden. But excreta cannot account for enteric fever unless they come from infected subjects.

(1) In order to test this I have made cultural examinations from the bile of a large number of subjects in the mortuary to ascertain whether any, and if so what proportion of persons over the age of ten years were harbouring the bacilli in their gall- bladders; for it is a well-known fact that this is the site of election of the bacilli in typhoid carriers. In other words I wish to refute or confirm the suspicion that "un-recognised carriers" were going. about the streets.

The subjoined table (Table III) gives the results and these may be summarised by saying that of 295 examined by culture and serological tests (the details of these are of academic interest only and need not be stated here) there were 12 cases of death from enteric fever in some form. Of the remaining 283 there were 14 cases from which the bacilli were isolated and proved. This means that 14 or 4.94% of these patients dying of some disease other than enteric fever were actually carriers of the organism and had, therefore, been capable of, and probably had actually assisted in, spreading the disease.

(2) The above investigation, which I propose to continue, forms a good parallel with another undertaken at the desire of the manager of an important café in the town, to determine whether

M 68

wwwwwwwwc

all the staff there were free from infection or the likelihood of spreading it. After 98 had been through the preliminary examina- tions, enthusiasm waned and no more were sent up. The work, therefore, a laborious undertaking, had to be abandoned half completed. This was a great pity, as, apart from the expense of materials, much time was fruitlessly spent on an investigation which, had one been able to complete it, would have been a valuable piece of work.

(3) Owing to a small outbreak of enteric fever at an institution in Hongkong, the question of possible carriers being responsible was taken up. The upshot of this was that three such were discovered and since then no further outbreak has occurred, and the precaution is now taken of examining all those who may be detailed to act as cooks, or who are concerned with the handling and distribution of food, to see whether they are carriers, and none who prove positive are allowed to be employed in cooking or in distributing food to others.

2.-IN CONNECTION WITH TUBERCULOSIS.

of This investgation was undertaken with the purpose ascertaining several points. Firstly, why the disease is so prevalent amongst children in Hongkong; secondly, what differences, if any, occur between the condition as met with at home and in other tropical countries and that obtaining here; thirdly, to formulate measures for checking the ravages of a disease which is preeminently among those classified as "preventable."

Minute examinations and full records have been made of over 200 cases up to the present and a detailed report is being prepared for transmission to the Tropical Disease Research Committee. The details being rather of academic interest do not call for mention here, suffice it to say that whereas at home the primary portal of entry of the bacillis in children is, in the majority of cases, alimentary, out here the respiratory predominates in the porportion of 5 to 1.

Further, as this is a report upon the work done, the question of preventive measures suggested is beyond its scope; these will, therefore, be considered elsewhere. The investigation which is on lines different from those undertaken in other places will be continued, since the opportunities for studying the condition here are exceptionally favourable, and the morbid anatomy findings yield inferences of importance from the epidemiological aspect,

3. THE INITIATION OF MEASURES FOR THE TREATMENT OF RABIES. Steps were taken for this purpose in May last and rabbit inoculations were started in June. A certain amount of virus was prepared, the material being obtained from Saigon by the kindness of the Director of the Pasteur Institute there.

an

Two patients have been up for treatment, one was exceptionally severe case and on that account is worthy of record.

M 69

The patient, a woman of 50 years of age, was bitten severely by a mad dog on September 20th at Kong Moon. She had two extensive lacerated wounds on the upper part of the left arm and three wounds on the head, two superficial and one deep. There is no doubt that the dog was rabid, the history was quite clear.

Wounds of the arm and head are very dangerous and the incubation period of such is short. She was, therefore, put on the intensive treatment and returned home in a month. Her medical attendant informs me that he has heard from her repeatedly and she continues well. The second patient is still undergoing treatment.

Table I.

Nature of Examination.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Investi- for

Special Total Total

for

gations. 1920.] 1919.

Widals.

Frces for Cultivations

for

For "Carrier" investigation, Blood for Malaria, filaria,

count, etc.,

Wassermann reactions, Bacillus Diphtheria,.. Meningococens, ............. Typhosus, Paratyphosus,

Cholera, etc., Helminth ova,. Amoeba of Dysentery, "Carrier" investigations,

With B. Typhosus,

17

""

B. Paratyphosus A............

6

B.,...

17

"

"3

>>

aaa :

13

9

***:

13 10 26

10

13 10 26

229 :

40

45

26

4.0

45

40

45

19 19 195

:

8 52

70

10

38

27

28

101

36

36 15

(85 contacts)

222

24 21 12

21

3

10

1| ཙནྡྲཔྱེ

9

23

14

999: 2*~

2842

46

35 16

46 35

16

46 35

16

609

17

285

327

17

274

17

285

327

3

98

101

...

81 92 169 157

117

102

856

84

25 26

18

14 14

202

136

...

11

20

18

17

...

218

59

3

3

4

1

212

109

6

2009 10

2

2

295

299

295

10

16

13

14

103

34

11

6

10

10

5

60

7

12

2

3

6

40

36

Morbid Tissues for Section,

5

8

16

19

9

16

13

Sputa,

13

20

13

16

27

23

16

Pus,

1

10

10

21

4

4

994

91

209

48

19

26

215

151

83

29

Urines,.

2

12

15

65

31

For Medico-legal purposes, Bacterial Analyses of Water, Miscellaneous,

9

35

9

18

18

2

18

1

18.

6

88

10

܂

2

7

10

2

4

9

72

37

25

72

Total,

241

154 188 167 254

309 357 333

391 306

261

257

484

8,702 1,791

- OL IN

M 71

Table II.

The Examination (post-mortem) of Rats.

Month.

Total. Male. Female. Plague- Preg-

infected. nant.

Strychnine

poisoning.

Newly boru and

not classified.

January.

February

March

6,083 3,004 3,079

4,842 2,329 2,513

6,612 3,233

2

637

282

494

278

3,379

652

449

April

6,726 3,220 3,506

1

708

357

May.

7,124 3,449

· 3,675

841

...

355

June..

6,321 3,158

3,163

6

743

407

July...

6,386 3,142

3,244

736

August

6,062 2,988

3,074

2

746

September... 5,887 | 2,896

2,991

1

712

October

6,287 3,034

3,253

747

:

:

:

:

393

323

310

348

November... 6,657 3,186 3,471

848

322

December

6,458 3,140

3,318

806

374

Total......75,445 36.779 38,666

19

8,675

4,198

M 72

A V

Table III.

ENTERIC INVESTIGATION.

Table of Positive cases exclusive of subjects dying from Enteric Fever.

No, in Record.

Initials.

Sex.

Age,

Cause of Death.

Bile Culture.

30

L.S.

Male.

19 years.

39

N.L.C.

51

3"

22

Plague, Phthisis,

B. Typhosus.

""

43

Unknown.

65

22

77

"

""

50

L.S.Y.

Female. 18

""

59

H.H.

Male.

36

""

69

W.T.W.

65

""

102

L.H.

50

27

""

171

Unknown.

abt. 50

""

""

173

W.C.

192

L.Y.Y.

وو

وو

46 years.

42

"

204

L.Y.S.

54

""

19

238

N.K.

42

"

250

N.Y.C.

52

>>

279

Y.S.S.L.

Female. 32

Syphilis,

Fracture of Skull, Phthisis,

Aortic incompetence, Tuberculosis of Lungs, Tuu.our of Prostate, Lobar Pneumonia,

Chronic Nephritis,

Cirrhosis of Liver,

""

"

B. Typhosus

and B. Para- Typhosus B. B. Typhosus.

""

"

33

""

""

1

M 73

Annexe O.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA.

REPORT BY THE GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST.

Report on Post Mortems.

1920.

19 19.

Male bodies examined,

...

1,943

1,555

Female bodies examined,...

1,898

1,605

Placenta,

1

1

Total,

3,842

3,161

Claimed bodies sent from hospital and other places, 3,385 Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned,

2,771

457

390

Total,

3,842

3,161

Epitome of Causes of Death.

1.-General Diseases,

1,413

1,684

II.-Local Diseases:

(a) of the Nervous System,

57

26

(b)

Circulatory System,

97

40

"

(c)

""

Respiratory System,

1,792

945

(0)

Digestive System,

290

349

(e)

Genito-Urinary System,...

48

19

(f)

Osseous System,

7

2

III.-Deaths from Violence :—

(a) General,

(b) Local,

85

41

53

55

Total,

3,842

3,161

-

M 74

General Diseases.

1920. 1919.

General Diseases,-Continued.

1920. 1919.

Small-pox Plague Cholera.

3 10

Brought forward, ...1,405 1,666

32

57

6

31 Leprosy...

2

1

Diphtheria

6 Lymphatic leukæmia

1

3

Enteric fever

38 Myelocytic

1

Measles ...

Cellulitis

14

Influenza

9

Heat stroke,

Cerebro-spinal fever

24

65

Malaria

76

53

Beri-beri

13

Septicemia

4

52

Pyæmia...

11

Boils

Puerperal fever

3

Total......1,413 1,684

Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System :-

Tuberculosis

265 325

Syphilis, congenital

299 119

Cerebral hæmorrhage.

acquired

18

concussion

J

};

Rickets

5

syphilis

Amoebiasis

Pernicious anæmia

Splenic anæmia

4 Hydrocephalus

Tubercular meningitis

Cerebral tumour

Meningitis other than C. S. F.

9

1

1

24

21

3

3

Total

57

26

Cerebral abscess,...

COI CONT

6

3

1

1

Prematurity

4

96

Marasmus

145

180

& Tubercular

Still-born

51

36

Cyst of brain

Atelectasis

232

127

Icterus

2

neonatorum

13

148

Noma

Umbilical sepsis

Debility at birth,

Lymphosarcoma, (mediasti-

num)...

Decomposed bodies (no dia-

gnosis possible)

Skeleton, only (no diagnosis

possible)

1

2

1

113

ลง

2

1

24 184

(b.) Of the Circulatory System :—

Pericarditis, acute dry

with effusion, serous 5

3

>>

21

""

purulent 8

chronic

2

2 2

"

Placenta, only (no diagnosis.

possible)

"

septic

1

Acute ulcerative endocarditis

2

6

1 1

Taken for use in school of

Congenital heart disease

10

anatomy, Hongkong Uni- versity

Brown atrophy of heart

26

18

Syphilitic aortitis,

3

Status lymphaticus

Valvular disease of heart

34

9

1

45

Gumma of heart

Acute pemphigus...

1

Lymphadenoma ...

Myocarditis

2

1

Anencephaly...

Rupture of aneurysm of aorta

6

1

Spina bifida

abdominal aorta

1

19

Microcephaly

Aneurysm of thoracic aorta ..

16

10

Imperforated anus

1

Total

97

40

Carried forward, ...1,405 1,666

(c.) Of the Respiratory System:—

M 75

Digestive System,-Continued.

1920. 1919.

1920. 1919.

Broncho-pneumonia and

bronchitis..

1,160 898

Brought forward ... 272 338

Pneumonia

59

Tubercular broncho-pneumonia 7

Mesenteric hæmorrhage

Chronic intestitial pneumonia Acute fibrinous pleurisy

Chronic pleurisy...

Pleurisy

دو

with effusion, serous

4

Ι

Hæmorrhage from oesophageal

varix,...

1

Multiple abscess of liver

1

Pulmonary tuberculosis

Abscess of lungs.

Bronchiectasis

Empyema

Emphysema

Growth of lung

22

12

1

8

6

123

22

མྨལམ |

382

Acute Pancreatitis,

Appendicitis...

Strangulated umbilical

hernia

Acute intestinal obstruction Intussusception

Ascariasis

CO CO CO

!

LO

Pulmonary infarct Hæmothorax...

Suppuration in anterior

mediastinum

2

Total ... 1,792 945

Total ...

290 349

(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System :-

1920. 1919.

(d.) Of the Digestive System :--

Acute nephritis

Chronic nephritis...

11

1920. 1919.

intestitial nephritis

co co |

Cystic kidney...

Tabes mesenterica

104

Hydronephrosis

Fatty degeneration of liver

3

Hæmorrhage following

Acute peritonitis

26

13

abortion

1

Enteritis

51 280

tubercular

17

ture of

Hæmorrhage following rup-

extra-uterine

Acute gastro enteritis

2 23

gestation

Perforated pyloric ulcer,

3

5

Pyosalpinx

Cancer of liver

9

stomach

4

1

Total...

48

19

Hepatitis

2

1

Hydatid of liver

2

1

Cirrhosis of liver...

20

6

Gumma of liver

1

(f.) Of the Osseous System:-

Abscess of liver

6

Cholelithiasis, cholaemia,

Abscess of spleen...

Suppurative cholangitis

Colitis

Dysentery

16

Intestinal hæmorrhage

O^INNON

3

3

1920. 1919.

1

2

Osteomyelitis

1

2

Tubercular caries of spine .

2

Total...

7

GI

Carried forward ... 272 338

Death from Violence

(a.) General:-

Multiple injuries...

stab wounds...

Hanging and asphyxia by

M 76

12

1920. 1919.

Brought forward

1920. 1919.

5

3

34

7

Stab wound of heart

3

1

aorta

"

thorax

1

""

"

ligature

...

9

17

throat

1

19

Asphyxia and suffocation

17

Drowning

11

10

""

Opium poisoning

1

1

Cut-throat

Narcotic

1

Wound of neck

Fracture of skull......

1

scalp.

5

23

34

Burns and scalds ...

11

and rib

1

,,

Electrocution

""

21

"J

& pelvis

rib

""

Total...

85

41

and pelvis

Rupture of spleen...

(b.) Local:-

1920, 1919.

aorta

")

Bullet wound of brain...

1

""

head

1

>>

neck

1

intestine

J

"

chest...

1

"

>>

aneurysm of caeliac

Hæmorrhage following fracture

axis...

5

and liver

""

"2

and

"J

""

kidney

1

1

3

1301

-

"

abdomen spine..

PN

2

T

of rib...

ลง

1

Total...

53 55

Carried forward

5

3

Total plague cases

32

25 claimed.

7 unclaimed.

Total small-pox cases

3

1

claimed.

2 unclaimed.

...

Chinese

3,835 3,645

96

1

2

Japanese

2

1

1

Indian

2

1

European

1

1

Portuguese

1

1

English

1

Number of bodies sent

to Public Mortuary

(Victoria) during 1920.

Victoria.

Harbour.

Old Kowloon.

New Kowloon.

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Shaukiwan.

1

38 53.

Other Villages.

Total... .3,842 3,650 97

1

ลง

38

54

1

}

M 77

Annexe P.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

REPORT BY H. E. MURRAY, CAPTAIN, I.M.S., Medical Officer in charge.

1. The total number of post-mortem examinations made during the year was 1,481 as compared with 1,486 last year and 1,696 in 1918.

2. During the year there were 2 cases of plague and 13 of small- pox, as compared with 26 and 1 last year, and 7 and 11 in 1918.

3. The nationalities of the bodies examined were :—

Chinese,

English,

Japanese,

Filipino

Unknown,

Apparently Chinese

Total

.1,470 3

3

1

.1,481

During the year 29,023 rats were examined and none of them were found to be plague infected, as compared with 27,913 and 10 in 1919.

Mus Deen-

manus.

Plague Mus

Mus Plague

Plague infected. Rattus, infected. Muscu- infected.

lus.

Baby Shrew.

Rats.

4,124

3,915

4,264

Epitome of the Causes of Death.

16,396

321

1920.

1919.

I. General Disease,

520

522-

II. Local Disease:

(a) Nervous System,

25

9

(b) Circulatory System,

25

11

(c) Respiratory System,

554

492

(d) Digestive System,

119

144

(e) Genito-Urinary System,

14

8

(f) Osseous System,

III. Injuries:-

(a) General,

34

61

(b) Local,

38

29

IV. Decomposed Bodies,.

152

207

V. Skeleton,

1,481 1,486

GENERAL DISEASE.

M 78

Nervous System,-Continued.

1920. 1919.

1920. 1919.

Brought forward ...

6

9

Plague,

2 26

Pneumonoccoci meningitis,

Small-pox,

13

1

Suppurative meningitis,

13

Enteric fever,

14

22

Concussion,

1

Diphtheria,

1

...

Lobar pneumonia,

45

45

25

9

Measles,

13

1

Syphilis, congenital,

9

Dysentery,

29

Malaria,

23

51

Malarial cachexia,

General tuberculosis,

23

51

Beri-beri,

I

10

(b.) Of the Circulatory System :-

Suffocation,

1920. 1919.

7

....

Septicæmia,

Marasnius, Prematurity, Still-birth,

Senile decay,

Inanition,

4

6

Septic pericarditis,

1

18

16

Endocarditis,

4

...

6

45

Infective endocarditis,

1

89

32

Valvular heart disease,

1

6

Aortic aneurism,

4

12

Arteric sclerosis,

1

2

Tetanus,

1

1

leterus neonatorum,

23

23

Leprosy,

1

Cerebro-spinal meningitis,..

16

21

Puerperal septicemia,

2

Cardiac failure,

Influenza,

167

127

Cholera,

4

Ascariasis,

12

Ruptured aortic aneurism,..

Mitral and aortic regurgitation, 4 Tricueped regurgitation,

fatty degeneration of heart,

Dilatation and fatty disease

of heart....

Myocarditis,

2

1

21

Anencephalic monster,

1

Asthenia,

4

25

11

Miscarriage, (4 months),

1

Lymphadenitis,

1

Pregnancy complicated by a

(c.) Of the Respiratory System :·

very large head,

1

1920. 1919.

520

522 Asphyxia neonatorum,

Gangrene of lung,

21.

1

Pulmonary tuberculosis,

17

47

Empyema,

27

16

LOCAL DISEASE.

(a.) Of the Nervous System :-

Atelectasis pulmonum,

62

56

Bronchitis,

92

141

Broncho-pneumonia,

269

228

Pleuritic effusion,

1

1920. 1919.

Miliary tuberculosis of liver,

Cerebral hemorrhage,

3

4

Pleurisy,

12

Tuberculous meningitis,

3

Abscess of lung,

2

Cerebral abscess,

1 Phthisis,

22

Basal meningitis,

1

Pneumonia,

28

Convulsion, ...

3

554

492

Carried forward ... 6

9

1.

(d.) Of the Digestive System:-

Ruptured abscess of liver, Cirrhosis of liver,

Tabes mesenterica,

M 79

(f.) Of the Osseous System:-

1920. 1919. Spinal caries,

110

Osteomalacia,

1920. 1919.

1

1

2

5

6

5

Suppurative peritonitis,

5

12

Enteritis,

30

76

INJURIES.

Acute jaundice,

1

Tubercular peritonitis,

Suppurative pylephlebitis,

1

Intestinal obstructions,

2

1100

2

(a.) General: -

1920. 1919.

Drowning,

11

24

Appendicitis,

1

1

Burns,

6

7

Gastro-enteritis,

Primary carcinoma of liver,.. Enteritis, tubercular,

Hepatitis,

Carcinoma of intestine,

39

32

Asphyxia,

1

8 Poisoning,

Q

1

Multiple injuries,

Hanging,

Electric shock,

15

Acute peritonitis,

T. B. peritonitis,

Intussusception,

Strangulated hernia,

1292

34

61

Acute yellow atrophy of liver,

1

(b.) Local:-

Perforated gastric ulcer,

1

1920. 1919.

119

144

Rupture of spleen,

7

5

Gunshot wounds,

3

3

Fracture of skull, Fracture of pelvis,

18

15

1

(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System :--

Stab wounds,

Strangulation,

4

Fracture of spine,

Cut throat,

1

1920. 1919.

Fracture of ribs,

2

Fracture of cranial fossa

1

Nephritis,

Post-partum hæmorrhage,

00 2

8

6

38

29

Ante-partum hæmorrhage,

1

Ruptured ectopic goestation,

1

Child Birth, ...

Ι

Injuries to vulva,

Rupture of right kidney,

Ι

Decomposed bodies,... Skeleton,

1920. 1919.

152 207

14

1

152 208

M 80

Annexe Q.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

REPORT BY MR. E. R. DOVEY, F.C.S., A.R.C.Sc., A.I.C., Government Analyst.

The number of analyses performed during the year was 1,502 as against 1,792 in 1919.

The following classification shows the nature of the work done :-

I.—Chemico-legal.

Toxicological examinations

III.-Food & Drugs Ordinance,—Contd.

1920. 1919.

48

1

1

0

1

0

10.

14

1920. 1919.

Sugar,

(including 11 stomachs),

48

57

Tonic wine,

Articles for stains,

6

28

Vinegar,.

Corrosive liquids,

1

Whisky,

Powders,

1

Explosives,

1

2

Dam: ged mail bag,

1

IV-Potable Waters.

Damaged paper,

1

Public supplies,

Wells, etc.....

II.-Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Distilled water,

36

36

22

10

3

0

88888

Petroleum oil,

124

99

:

Liquid fuel,

74

68

Gasoline,

0

1

V-Building Materials.

Ships for inflammable vapour, 29

35

Paint,

Granite,

Crackers,

1

Ingredients for explosives,

Mortar,

...

Cement,

III.-Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Aerated waters,..........

Beer,

Brandy,

3

0

9

10

Burgundy,

1

Champagne,

1

∞ 40 O O -

0

Wood, preservative,

Varnish,..................

Pigments,

VI.-Pharmacy Ordinance.

~~~Coco

2002 --S

2

2

1

0

0

Medicines for poison,

3

8

Cheese,

0

I

Morphine,

14

10

Chinese sauce,

1

0

Cocaine,

8

2

Chinese wine,

3

Cinchona tincture.

1

0

Coffee,

Cantharides,

Flour,

Glycerine,

1

Fruit syrup,

Nux Vomica seeds,

Fruit wine,

Neoarsaminol,

1

Gin,

Quinine.

Lard,

46

204

Pills,

1

Liqueur,.

1

0

Other drugs,

0

14

Milk, fresh,

61

189

Milk, sterilised,

Milk, condensed,

(

VII.—Mineralogical.

Port wine,

9

Metals,

206

53

Rice,

0

4

Ores,

251

151

Rum,

&

Coal,

26

14

Sherry,

2

2

Cokes,

3

(!

M 81

Anise,

Cassia,

VIII-Oils, etc.

IX.-Miscellaneous,—Continued.

1920. 1919.

1920, 1919

45

97

Fish skin,

0

1

44

37

Arrack,

3

0

Wood,

Peanut,

Teaseed,.

Lubricating,

Coconut,

Perilla,

Castor,

119

220

Bleaching powder,

53

228

Dyes,

0

28

81

Borneol camphor,

3

Liquids,

2

0

Linen,...

1

Rhubarb root,

1

1

Rattans,..

0

.....

Soya Bean,

Camphor oil,

1

Gauze,

...

N

2

0

Indigo,

1

1

Camphor,

45

31

Prussian blue,

Cigarettes,

IX.-Miscellaneous.

Liquors, (Unclassified),

22

Coal tar disinfectants,

5

.1

Beeswax,

0

Urine,

7

10

Wattle Bark,

2

Sulphuric acid,

3

Soy,

2

Fertiliser,

1

Rust,

Ι

Caustic soda,.

0

Peanut cake,

4

Ammonium sulphate,

1

Peanuts,...

3

Acetic acid,

1

Perilla seeds,

Nitric acid,

I

Paraffin

in wax..........

Hydrochloric acid,

1

Renal Stone,

Sodium bisulphite,

Sodium carbonate,..

1

Soda solution,

2

Writing ink,

Printing ink, Paper, Alcohol,

Rat poison,.

2

0

1

0

O~O~O

0

ONOOO-

Stomach contents,.......

Ampules,

Millet spirit,

2

0

Hemp,

Total,...... 1,502 1,792

M 82

TOXICOLOGICAL.

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations made during the year were 26 cases of suspected human poisoning. The results are tabulated below :-

Results of Analysis.

No poison found

Opium present

Morphine present

Cocaine present

Nerlin digitalin present

Arsenic

Anise oil

Unidentified alkaloid

Total,

No. of Cases.

2

2

1

7922 ~ ~ ~ ~

26

PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES.

3. Monthly examinations of the Pokfulum, Tytam, and Kowloon water supplies, showed that these supplies were maintaining their usual high degree of purity.

DANGEROUS Goods.

4. Of petroleum oil and liquid fuel, 198 samples were tested during the year. The tanks of 29 steamers were tested with the Clowes-Redwood apparatus.

FOOD AND Drugs.

5. The following table gives the results of 96 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Department:--

Description.

No. of Samples Examined.

No. found

Genuine.

No. found Adulterated.

Beer..

Brandy

Gin

Milk.. Port Wine.

Rum...

Sherry

Whisky

8

6

60

4628

INWAXNo co co

8

0

3

2

58

4

3

2

7

BONO♡00

3

2

3

Ο

- M 83

MINERALOGICAL.

6. The 421 samples of metals and ores examined during the year comprised the following:-

Metals.

Ores.

Description.

1920. 1919.

Description. 1920. 1919.

Tin

168 24

Tungsten.

Nickel

10

Bismuth

སྐྱ༤

124

79

18

26

Antimony

4

Manganese

37

19

Copper.

71 Iron.

6

Zine

01 Copper.

1

3

Lead

Antimony

14

1

Iron

1

Tin

1

1

Silver..

0

Lead

2

Solder

5

Zinc..

4

Brass

1

Molybdenum.

2

1

Arsenic

0

Barium.

Titanium

0

Graphite

3

Silver

0

Other Ores

3

10+ N O

4

3

2

Total,...... 206

53

Total,..... 216

151

SAMPLING.

7. The amount of sampling done during the year is shown

in the following table:-

88,260 slabs. Wood Oil

Tin .....

Antimony

2,316 cases.

Lard

Steel Wire.....

171 coils. Tea Oil

61,229 cases. 24,900 14,561 ""

""

Silver....

445 Ingots Sugar..

35,147

""

Wolfram

205 tons.

Anise Oil

4,015

""

Manganese Ore.....

27,870

""

Antimony Ore....

Peanut Oil.................

""

Cassia Oil. Camphor

2,225

""

2,122

""

305 109,732 cases.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

8. Owing undoubtedly to adverse trade conditions, less work was done during the year for local exporting firms than in 1919. The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amount to $33,415.00 as against $35,258.50 in 1919.

The value of the year's work as determined from the Tariff of Fees (Government Notification No 439 of 1918) is $37,445.00 as against $39,918.50 in 1919.

M 84

LIBRARY.

9. Several standard works of reference have been added.

SPECIAL REPORTS.

10. Special Reports have been supplied on "Constants of Chinese Oils", "Waterproofing of Casks ", "Composition of Chinese Wolfram". "Inflammability of Dyes" and "The Adulteration of Millet spirit with Arrack ".·

5

RESEARCH.

11. Work has been done on the Adulteration of Millet Spirit with Java Arrack, on the bismuthate proceess as applied to Man- ganese Ores, and the determination of the saline constituents of the Hongkong waters. A comparison has been made of the methods in use for the determination of tin in wolfram ores.

STAFF.

12. In August last Mr. R. C. Hurley joined the staff to act as official sampler, and Mr. J. Maxwell who had previously carried out these duties rejoined the Post Office Staff.

1

M 85

Annexe R.

OFFICE OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE PORT.

REPORT BY DR. G. P. JORDAN, Health Officer of the Port.

During the year the work of this department was carried on by Dr. Jordan and Dr. Keyt.

Dr. Keyt returned to the Colony on February 22nd after being absent on leave for six months

The work of this department may be described under three headings viz :-

(a.) The daily inspection of ships arriving in port. (b.) The medical inspection of emigrants.

(c.) Quarantine duty.

(a.)-DAILY INSPECTION OF SHIPS ARRIVING IN PORT.

All vessels entering the port are boarded and particulars are obtained as to any illness or death during the voyage, and the number of the passengers and crew, and a certificate to this effect is signed by the master of the ship.

Under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance of 1899, Section 23, Table L, all passengers and crews of ships arriv- ing from ports which are declared to be infected are examined, and in the event of any disease of an infectious type having occurred during the voyage, such ships are detained in quarantine and are dealt with under the provisions of the Ordinance. Healthy vessels receive pratique as soon as the medical inspection is over.

During the year there were 4,807 arrivals in port of which 2,090 were of British register and 2,717 Foreign.

These figures do not include the Canton and Macao River Steamers. Junks and smaller craft are not boarded, except in the event of any epidemic disease occurring in them.

(b.)-INSPECTION OF EMIGRANTS.

During the year there was a marked increase in emigration, viz:-105,258 as compared with 59,969 for the previous year, a difference of 45,289. As usual the greatest number were for the Straits Settlements and Calcutta viz:-45,579, next come the Java Ports with 18,175 and British Columbia with 13,832.

Table I gives the numbers of emigrants passed and rejected, while Table II gives the monthly figures, the number of rejections

M 86

and the number of the crews which were also examined. Thus the total number of emigrants and crews passed during the year amounts to 146,963, which roughly gives an average of 400 examinations for every day in the year.

The wave of emigration reached its maximum in May when 12,848 were passed, while the minimum of 1,851 was in February, marking the Chinese New Year, which always acts as a deterrent to emigration.

The total number of rejections was 464 as compared with 222 for 1919, of these, 176 were rejected for skin affections, mainly scabies and Ringworm. There were 147 rejections for trachoma.

Table III gives the causes of rejections under the various diseases tabulated.

(e).-QUARANTINE DUTY.

During the year six ships were detained in quarantine, three for small-pox, two for plague, and one for cholera.

Table IV gives the number of ships detained, the causes, dates and periods of detention.

The S.S." Kamo Maru" from Shanghai was placed in quaran- tine for observation for twenty-four hours, for having a plague suspect on board, she received free pratique the next day, when the bacteriological findings proved negative.

Table V gives the names of the ports declared infected during the year, for what disease, the Authority, and dates of rescission of the decree.

It is satisfactory to note that no infectious cases were found on ships arriving from these ports during the year.

Table VI is compiled from figues contained in the notifica- tions regarding infectious diseases prevalent in neighbouring ports and showing the monthly returns under Plague, Cholera and Small- pox, at each port.

In conclusion I desire to record with regret that this is the last report which will be sent in by me, as, owing to certain changes in the Department, my resignation as Health Officer of the Port has been accepted as from the 1st January, 1921. I have thus reluctantly severed my connection with the Government after a period of 32 years service, my appointment dating from March 1st, 1888.

G. P. JORDAN, M.B., C.M. (Ed.), M.R.C.S. (Eng.)

M 87

Table I.

Showing Emigrants Passed and Rejected for 1920.

Ports of Destination.

Passed. Crews.

Rejected.

Straits Settlements

43,935

9,944

312

Calcutta

1,644

San Francisco

11,521

10,806

67

Honolulu ....

4,046

3

Japan

576

British Columbia

13,832

12,592

9

Australia

2,371..

3,036

19

Java Ports

18,175

2,971

6

British Borneo

3,524

1,192

13

Mauritius

838

214

13

Mexico

...་

184

603

1

South America

Havana...

931

92

1,811

::

South Sea Islands

1,871

255

21

Total

105,258

41,705

464.

Table II.

Showing Monthly Returns of Emigrants, Crews, and Rejections.

Months.

Emigrants. Crews. Rejections.

January.. February.

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

5,346

3,555

30

1,851

1,772

10

6,721

3,492

22

8,796

2,612

15

12,848

4,008

80

8,809

3,597

33

9,412

4,231

59

9,026

3,450

37

10,752

3,973

47

9,831

3,406

6

10.106

3,262

61

11,760

4,347

64.

Total

105,258

41,705

464

M 88

Table III.

Causes of Rejection of Emigrants.

Diseases.

Numbers rejected.

Skin Diseases :—

Scabies........

Tinea

Other forms...

Eye Diseases :--

Trachoma

Conjunctivitis

Fevers

Jaundice

Anæmia and Debility.

Enlarged Spleen.

Deformities

....

Heart Disease

Insanity

Enlarged Lymphatic Glands. Pulmonary Tubrculosis

136

11

29

147

7

58

6

54

1NNN-N

2

7

2

1

2

-

Total

464

Table IV.

Showing the number of ships detained in Quarantine, with the Causes, Dates and Periods of Detention.

Name of Vessel.

Port.

Cases.

Causes.

Date.

Detention.

s.s. "Pyrrhus

Müke.

1

Small-pox.

Feb. 28.

24 hours.

8.8.

" Dunera

Bombay.

1

Do.

Mar. 2

24

""

8.8.

Antilochus

Vladivostock.

10

Do.

Mar. 12

48

""

Ꭶ...

"Borneo Maru "

Balik Papan.

Plagne.

Aug. 1

3 days.

8.8. "Monteagle

>>

Shanghai.

}

Cholera.

Aug. 20

s.s." Kamo Marn"

Do.

1

Plague.

Dec. 9

24 hours.

M 89

:

:

M 90

Table V.

Port.

Disease.

Authority.

Decree rescinded.

Bangkok....

Cholera.

26. 4. 1919

Philippine Islands

Do.

12. 9. 1919

29. 4. 1920

Formosan Ports

Do.

21. 5. 1920

Saigon

Do.

28. 8, 1920

Infectious

Kobe

16. 10. 1920

20. 11. 1920

Disease.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the decrees affecting Bangkok, Formosan Ports, and Saigon are still in force, for the diseases specified.

2.

Appendix, N.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT HONGKONG FOR THE YEAR 1920.

GENERAL REMARKS.

:

The first quarter of the year, during which rain fell on 27 days amounting to 4.60 inches, was very favourable for gardening operations.

During the second quarter, rain fell on 57 days amounting to 43.45 inches, this was exceptional and most favourable to the continued planting of forest and roadside trees.

During the third quarter rain fell on 55 days amounting to 59.24 inches.

The last quarter was favourable for gardening operations generally, with the exception of the raising of annual vegetable and flower seedlings, both of which suffered from the heavy rains.

The amount of damage resulting from storms or the proximity of typhoons was fortunately very small.

GARDENS AND GROUNDS.

Botanic Gardens.--The annual pruning of shrubs and creepers was commenced in February and large numbers of cuttings from these were put in to propagate young plants for the garden stock and for sale.

All Poinsettias in beds were given a second pruning in June.

The Amaryllis in a bed outside the plant houses, Old Garden, were taken up and replanted after the bed had been well dug and inanured. All the other Amaryllis beds were given a dressing of old stable manure.

After the completion of the alteration to the wall at the north-east corner of the Old Garden, several new varieties of Hibiscus were planted to replace those which had been destroyed when this work was in progress during 1919.

Short iron railings were fixed to the top of the stone walls on both sides of the north-west gate of the Old Garden by the Public Works Department.

All the vacant spots in rockeries in both gardens were planted up with ferns and foliage plants in the spring as usual.

Several patches of Blue Grass under trees were repaired, and a bare bank at Upper Glenealy Rockeries was also covered with this useful plant.

N 2

All ferns and foliage plants in the plant houses were repotted in February; Chrysalidocarpus and Nephrolepis in the Loan Plant Compound, and elsewhere in the Botanic Gardens were divided and repotted as usual.

Plants in beds on the lower terrace were renewed with summer or winter annuals as required.

In the second quarter, the following trees, which are being tried for the first time in the Colony, were planted in suitable places in the Old and New Botanic Gardens:-Bauhinia candicans, Thuya plicata, Cupressus lusitanica, Cupressus macrocarpa, Eugenia uniflora, Eugenia myrtifolia, Gleditschia tricanthos, and a number of new varieties of Hibiscus raised in Honolulu.

Two young plants of Rhodoleia Championi, two of the white- flowered variety of Bauhinia Variegata, one of Punica Granatum and one of Zizyphus vulgaris were also planted.

The trees of Paulownia Fortunei flowered very well, but, as during the last two years, a man had to be placed there each day during the early part of the year to drive birds away whilst the buds were opening.

The Renanthera coccinea-Spider Orchid-grown in pots about the fountain made a splendid show while in flower in May.

Earth worms in lawns were very troublesome, and dressings of Cha-chai were applied on wet days, this had the effect of bringing most of the large worms to the surface, where they were collected and destroyed.

At the lower entrance to the New Garden, the remaining part. of the bamboo hedge, which always became untidy in the winter months, was rooted up and replaced with Chrysalidocarpus.

Throughout the whole year, teak labels of the trees, shrubs, &c., in both gardens were renewed as required.

In front of a garden seat on the upper part of the New Garden, a few steps composed of broken green pots and cement were made to give visitors easy access to the seat, and at the same time to prevent further damage to the turf near it.

About the middle of the year, a small and disused plant house near the Macdonnell Road entrance to the Old Garden was taken down and the ground on which it stood as well as the grass bank behind it, was cleared and used for storing pot plants.

Twelve granite slabs obtained from this old house were used as seats in various parts of both gardens.

After heavy rains on June the 11th and 12th a bank at the west end of the palm plot in the New Garden gave way and buried a few Camellias of good varieties. The soil so washed down was packed against the bottom of the remaining portion of the bank to prevent further landslips.

+

N 3

On the slope above the gallery walk and on the bank below the lower entrance to the New Garden, a number of wild trees and shrubs, which might have fallen into Albert Road during a storm, were cut down and removed.

The small-meshed wire netting forming the sides and front of the Deer-pen, which was quite worn out was completely removed and replaced by iron wire sheep netting of a much larger mesh supported by iron posts.

The decomposed granite floor within the enclosure was also re-surfaced.

One big tree of Poinciana regia which effectively served for many years as a shade tree for the numerous plants stored in the Loan Plant Compound was blown down and killed by a gale on July the 31st.

All the brick plant stands in the pot nursery near the office and the water channels alongside walks in both gardens were pointed with cement.

There was a great demand for the smaller varieties of Maiden- hair ferns, small flowering trees, shrubs and Bamboo Palms (Chrysalidocarpus) during the year, the total number of plants sold being 1,955.

The yearly show of the Hongkong Horticultural Society was held in the Botanic Gardens on March the 4th and 5th and the exhibits of both flowers and vegetables were very good notwith- standing the weather which was very dull for the few days im- mediately preceding the show.

The attendance at the show on both days was fairly good.

All the young trees in both gardens were retied or re-staked as required before the time when typhoons may be expected.

The Alpinias near the large tree of Michelia Champaca in Glenealy which unfortunately always afforded an excellent shelter for bricks and other rubbish dumped by coolies were destroyed and the area planted with Blue Grass, the adjoining white-flower- ed Pancratiums were taken up and replanted.

All the garden seats, gates, iron fences and summer house were scraped and repainted as usual.

Plant houses in the pot nursery as well as those in the Old Garden were given a coat of white or colour-wash.

As an experiment the Rose bushes in beds in both gardens were not pruned this year, all were given a heavy dressing of old

manure.

Owing to the late arrival of seeds from England, the main crops of winter vegetable and flower seeds could not be sown until the end of October instead of at the beginning of that month,

N 4-

·66

Very little damage was done by grass caterpillars" this year. The only places which suffered slightly were the lawns on the lower terrace and a few small patches elsewhere in the Old Garden.

The Hibiscus which had been planted to form a boundary hedge along the wall in Garden Road, were again pruned in October.

After a heavy rainstorm on April the 29th, a reptile 42 inches in length was found near the fountain in the old Garden, it was captured and removed to one of the Aviary tanks, and was later identified by Mr. A. H. Crook as a large specimen of the Giant Salamander-Cryptobranchus maximus.

Government House Grounds.--Flowering shrubs and foliage plants were given the usual yearly pruning in the first quarter.

The remaining part of the bamboo hedge forming the north boundary was entirely removed and the vacancies refilled with Bamboo Palms (Chrysalidocarpus). This hedge has now a fairly clean and neat appearance.

A small rockery on the east side of the main entrance was dispensed with and was replaced by a small earth bank planted with Blue Grass and plants of Hypericum chinense and Hydran- gea; the latter are being tried for the first time in these grounds. The trees of Erythrina indica made a fine show when in flower in May.

The interior of the House was decorated with pot plants and hanging baskets of flowers on four occasions during the year.

A similar scheme of decoration without hanging baskets was carried out on the occasion of the visit of H. R. H. the Crown Prince of Rumania.

All the less decorative Cannas in beds were rooted out and replaced by better varieties.

The big trees of Banian (Ficus retusa) in front of the House and those near the servants' quarters were pruned in August.

The small bamboo hedge outside the stables was removed, as the plants of Hibiscus, which were planted there about two years ago to take its place, have now formed a more effective and decorative hedge.

The path round the front lawn on the south side and those on the north side of the grounds were re-surfaced with decomposed granite.

A specimen tree of Cassia nodosa was planted in a rockery east side of the Guard House at the beginning of the year.

The large irregularly shaped bed of flowering shrubs on the north side of the grounds was removed and the area levelled and turfed.

{

N 5

A small triangular bed near the main entrance was also re- arranged and planted with a more showy selection of flowering plants.

"Grass Caterpillars", which have always been very trouble- some on the grass lawns, did not damage the turf so much this year, the lawn on the south side and a small one on the north were attacked but after two light dressings of weak Jeye's Fluid these pests fortunately disappeared.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-The plants in the large bed below the big retaining wall suffered very much from the effects of wind and fog this year, also the seedling Cosmos, which have always produced a good mass of orange flowers in previous years were a total failure.

All the Cannas in the various beds were taken up, divided and replanted after the ground had been thoroughly manured.

Undergrowth in the valley and elsewhere in the grounds was cleared as usual.

The Blue Grass on areas in front of the house and in centre of the big lawn, where the soil had become sterile, was taken up and replanted in fresh soil.

The tennis lawns were given a dressing of old stable manure in February.

Eleven plants of Allamanda were planted on a slope near the big lawn and four on a hill opposite the main entrance.

Grass lawns, banks and putting greens were regularly cut, rolled and kept in good order generally throughout the year.

A number of flowering shrubs were planted in the bed below the retaining wall to replace those which had been stripped of their leaves by the wind.

Blake Garden.-Patches of Blue Grass damaged during the preceding year were repaired, and the rockery at the north-east entrance was partially replanted.

One tree of Cupressus macrocarpa, one Rhodoleia Championi and one white-flowered Bauhinia variegata were planted in suitable places in the garden.

To prevent coolies carrying loads through the garden, the two upper gates at the east and west ends were kept locked.

Poinsettias, Lagerstroemias, Acalyphas and other flowering shrubs were pruned as usual,

Gates, garden seats and summer houses were scraped and painted.

King's Park. The young trees planted during the past five years were closely watched, retied and re-staked as required.

N 6

Owners of bullocks were on four occasions prosecuted and fined at the Police Court for allowing their animals to graze and damage young trees in the park.

The trees of Erythrina indica, which were planted two years ago, have made good progress.

Seedling Mimosa, Lantana and long grass were cut from time to time by gangs of women under the charge of the Parkkeeper, a large proportion of the grass which could be used for feeding cattle, was given to the women in lieu of cash payment.

Colonial Cemetery.-Long grass in various parts of the Cemetery was cut by Gardeners and temporary coolies.

Hibiscus and other flowering or foliage shrubs were pruned as usual, and a large number of young plants propagated for filling up vacant plots next year.

Summer and winter annuals were raised for growing in pots and beds.

All new and a large proportion of the old graves were turfed or planted with Blue Grass as usual.

The matshed which is maintained by the Public Works Department and used by this Department as a propagating house was removed to a spot where it will be less noticeable.

Since the new road at the back of the cemetery has been opened a number of thefts by unlicensed hawkers of the branches of Biota orientalis which are sold for medicinal purposes, have taken place, two of the offenders were arrested, one was sentenced to a suitable term of imprisonment, the other unfortunately escaped from the custody of the sexton.

Other Grounds.-Most of the Poinsettias planted some years ago on a bank under the pine trees in the Civil Hospital Grounds are now well established, a few which had died were replaced with young plants.

Earth worms on lawns were a great nuisance, these were treated in the same way as those on lawns in the Botanic Gardens and elsewhere.

At the west end of the upper garden, the bank covered with Blue Grass, which had gone into an untidy state, was entirely replanted.

Seedling annuals were continuously supplied from the Botanic Gardens for use in pots in various parts of the grounds.

At the request and expense of this Department, a 2-inch pipe with hydrant for watering purposes was laid along the edging of the big lawn by the Public Works Department.

Caterpillars, which have regularly damaged the turf in former years, did not make their appearance this year.

N7

The Lunatic Asylum Grounds were put in order after the completion of the building of the additional storey; fresh plants were added and the remainder re-arranged.

In the Victoria Hospital Grounds, Ficus creepers on walls and elsewhere were clipped as required.

The lawns and grass banks were regularly weeded, cut and rolled..

Grass plots in Peak Garden, Government Pavilions and Villas were cut regularly throughout the summer, and the grounds kept in good order generally.

The new playground for children on the Peak was placed under the charge of this Department in July. The grass plot and banks were cut and a few flowering shrubs planted on the side banks.

The trees planted by this Department on the bank below the Peak School, received frequent inspection and attention.

In connection with the extension of Kowloon British School Grounds, 25 Pine trees were cut down and removed.

Plants on the approach road to the Royal Observatory were pruned; a few were badly damaged or killed by careless soil- dumping by coolies working ou the playground extension.

Two small trees in the Kowloon Children's Playground were removed to make room for the erection of swings, etc.

Long grass and Mimosa seedlings in West End Park were cut as required.

After every match the damaged turf on the Cricket Pitch on the Hongkong Cricket Ground was removed and replaced. The pitch was machined and weeded regularly and was given a dressing of well-rotted stable manure. This work was paid for by the Cricket Club:

Blake Pier was decorated with pot plants and palms on June the 10th on the occasion of the landing of H. R. H. the Crown

Prince of Rumania.

In the Albany Nurseries, Cannas and Hedychiums were taken up, divided and replanted after the ground had been well manured.

The iron railings of the Upper Albany Nursery were damaged four times by motor-cars during the year, on each occasion they were put in order at the expense of the car owners.

Sweet Corn, Cucumbers and a few other summer vegetables in the Sukunpo Vegetable Garden, were badly damaged by rains in July, August and September.

The Hibiscus along the boundaries of Sukunpo Recreation Ground were pruned and generally kept in order throughout the year.

N 8

Rockeries, Blue Grass patches and other shrubs at the St. John's Cathedral Compound were kept in order and repaired as required.

Grass lawn and banks at the Helena May Institute were cut and the flowering shrubs and creepers there also received constant attention.

The grass plot and the Privet hedge at the Volunteer Parade ground were cut and kept in order throughout the year.

At the Subordinate Officers' Quarters, Breezy Point, the lawns were cut and weeded regularly during the summer months. The turf on the front lawns was repaired at the commencement of the wet season.

In addition to those mentioned, several other small gardens, roadside plots or rockeries under the charge of this Department were regularly inspected and kept in good order throughout the year.

HERBARIUM.

287 specimens were mounted and 236 received during the year were pressed and poisoned.

Duplicate specimens, which are used for exchange purposes, were labelled and filed.

All plant specimens were examined, brushed and poisoned at least once during the year.

Duplicate specimens of Ferns were presented to Mons. H. Heuvrard of 10, Avenue d'Lima, Paris, and 54 specimens of the Kwai Chau plants were received from him.

102 specimens of Australian plants were presented by the Director of Sydney Botanic Gardens.

FORESTRY.

Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.-8,424 one year old pine tree scedlings were planted on the bare hills at Cheung Chau.

Forty pounds of Pinus Massoniana seeds were sown on the barest hills at Fanling.

On the lower slopes of the hills at Cheung Chau, about 50 lbs. of Pinus Massoniana and a small quantity of American Pine seeds were sown broad-cast.

All grass and earth banks below Taipo and coastal roads, formed by the Public Works Department were thickly sown with Pinus Massoniana seeds.

Broad-leaved Trees Planted.-880 broad-leaved trees of various kinds were planted on the hills at Fanling, 250 on Taipo Road, and 1,014 along the coastal road from Chin Wan to Castle Peak.

N 9

The trees planted in these areas were chiefly Casuarina, Callistemon, Poinciana, Erythrina and Tristania.

In addition to these, 85 trees of various kinds were planted in place of those which had died out on the slopes of Fanling Hills, 50 on Fanling Road, 78 on Taipo Road, 19 on Sheung Shui Road, 387 on the Frontier Road, Fanling, 22 on the Cross Road, Fanling, 157 on Lok Ma Chau Road, 141 on Castle Peak Old Road, 212 on the road from Santin to Autau, 234 on the road between Chin Wan and Castle Peak, 76 on Autau Road and 70 on other roads in the New Territories.

Care of Trees in Plantations.—Caterpillars in large numbers appeared on pine trees in Plantations 9A, 9B and 9c near Kowloon City during the months of April, May and June, the total collected and destroyed amounted to about 8 tons in weight.

All the plantations in Hongkong and in the New Territories were closely watched and creepers climbing on trees were cut and removed.

A large number of Pine and other trees growing on Farm and Building Lots sold by the Public Works Department were felled and removed.

In connection with road alterations and improvements a number of fine specimens of Banian and other shade trees had to be sacrificed.

Several hundreds of dead trees were cut down and removed from various plantations in Hongkong and Kowloon.

A number of large Banian trees were felled and removed from the parade ground at Police Headquarters at the request of the Captain Superintendent of Police.

In the Shaukiwan District, villagers continue to give a lot of trouble by cutting down trees and lopping off branches in the plantations behind the village.

The Forest Guards made numerous arrests and obtained convictions in most of the cases.

Protection from Fire.- About 19 miles of old fire barriers were cleared in Kowloon, 16 miles in Hongkong and 5 miles at Fanling.

A new barrier about 1,600 feet long was made in the new pine plantations on the hills near Fanling.

Thirty-eight fires were reported during the first quarter, 6 in the second, none in the third and 3 in the fourth, making a total of 47 for the year compared with 44 in the previous year.

A serious fire occurred in Plantation 16, Wanchai Gap on 22nd January, but in consequence of the information promptly given to this Department by the Police not more than 100 Pines were destroyed.

N 10

The Tsing Ming Festival was on the 5th April, and only two small fires were reported on that day.

At the Chung Yeung Festival, on the 20th October, only one small grass fire in a Pine Plantation was reported.

Many times during the year. Officers in charge of Police Stations gave very valuable assistance by promptly engaging large gangs of coolies to beat out forest fires in many parts of the Colony.

The thanks of the Department are due to the Honourable the Secretary for Chinese Affairs for lending District Watchmen to assist in watching for fires at the spring and autumn festivals.

Forest Guards Service. The total number of persons pro- ceeded against for committing forestry offences was 465 against 447 in 1919.

Of these 410 were convicted, 27 dismissed with a caution, 15 without, 10 had their bail estreated, 1 was required to find a personal bond, I was birched and the case against one withdrawn.

Particulars of the cases are given in Tables II and III.

Several contractors had various sums amounting to $280, deducted from their securities as compensation for damage done to growing trees in the vicinity of their workmen's matsheds.

Planting and Care of Roadside Trees. On the new road between Morrison Hill and Bowen Road, 310 flowering trees and shrubs were planted.

From Stanley to Tytam Road, 906 flowering trees and shrubs of various kinds were put in on both sides of the road.

Forty-three trees and shrubs, and 4 Chinese Palms were planted near the Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town.

On either side of the new road adjoining Repulse Bay, 251 plants of various kinds were put in.

Trees on the route of the electric tramway and those near the different telephone lines were pruned back to prevent their branches coming in contact with trams or wires.

Miscellaneous Planting.-The forester who is now permanently stationed at Cheung Chau has been able to prevent most of the illicit cutting of wild and planted trees there.

All the trees are doing well and have much improved the appearance of the island.

Many of the residents have from time to time expressed their appreciation of the tree planting scheme which is now being carried out.

·

N 11

Fifty-seven Bauhinia variegata, 60 Albizzia and 10 Erythrina were planted on the roadsides between Shaukiwan and Tytam New Road.

On the slopes near Hung Hom Police Station, 24 Hibiscus, 19 clumps of Russelia and 6 Mussaendas were planted.

In Fanling Road, 6 Albizzia procera, 12 Bauhinia Blakeana and 180 Ficus creepers were planted.

Six Bauhinia variegata and 45 Hibiscus bushes were planted at the east end of Kennedy Road.

About 120 feet of bamboo were planted round a septic tank below the old road at Repulse Bay.

At the Bowen Road Tram Station, a small plot was planted with Blue Grass and 7 Bamboo Palms (Chrysalidocarpus).

Forty-five feet of bamboo were planted around a latrine at Barker Road Tram Station.

Eighty flowering shrubs and 106 Ficus creepers were planted on Crown Land at Wanchai Gap at the expense of a building contractor who had damaged the wild trees and shrubs there.

Around the Military Cemetery, Stanley, 32 Aleurites and 4 Banian cuttings were planted.

On a plot by the side of Chatham Road, Kowloon, 72 Hibiscus were planted.

Forestry Service Paths.-These paths which were originally made for the use of Forest Guards were all repaired at the end of the year.

Clearing Undergrowth around Houses.-About 5,504,160 square feet were cleared in various parts of the Colony in connection with anti-malarial measures.

At Mount Davis an area of 118,125 square feet of Crown Land was cleared by the Military Authorities under the supervision

of a forester.

Clearing for Survey Purposes.-4,393,120 square feet of undergrowth were cleared for the Public Works Department in connection with the formation of new roads.

Forestry Licences, New Territories.-The total amount of fees collected amounted to $4,926.47 compared with $4,881.11 in 1919.

NURSERIES, AGRICULTURE, &c.

Beacon Hill Nursery.-15 lbs. of Pinus Massoniana and 11 lbs. of American Pine tree seeds were sown in beds to raise young trees for use in forming plantations in 1921.

N 12

In the same nursery, seeds of Cupressus macrocarpa, Pinus radiata, Pinus echinata, Pinus ponderosa sepulorum, Poinciana regia, Glyptostrobus heterophyllus, Bischofia javanica, Callistemon, Aleurites and Camphor were sown.

At the Fanling Economic Garden seedling tobacco plants were raised and a large area planted with the varieties known as "Broad Leaved", "Nan Yang" and " Manila ".

The resulting crop was good but suffered badly from the effect of the heavy early rains.

The spineless leaved variety of Pineapple fruited well up to the end of October.

The improved variety of Papaya produced some very fine fruits of excellent flavour.

The annual crop of Onions grown from seed obtained from Teneriffe was again very good, the local vegetable growers dis- played great interest in this crop and a number applied for the small quantity of seed which is distributed free of charge.

Four hundred pounds of Pine tree seed were collected for sowing in various parts of the New Territories during 1921.

In order to stimulate interest in the growing of Camphor trees, permits to remove leaves and twigs from the trees on Crown Land for use in Camphor distillation were given to two persons, one at Ho Chung, Sai Kung District and the other at Aberdeen.

The work was carried on under the supervision of a Forest Guard and the result was very satisfactory.

The distillation was carried on in proximity of the Camphor trees by means of the ordinary Chinese still composed of two metal boilers and a barrel.

A good grade of Camphor was produced from leaves and twigs which were boiled for not more than 30 minutes, the small quantities which the holders of permits were allowed to make found a ready sale in the local market.

All bulbs of Narcissus Tazetta (Chinese New Year Flower) for export to America were again examined and certified by an officer of this Department.

The bulbs were said to be grown at Chang Chow Fu in Fokien Province and are now all brought down to Hongkong for inspection in order to comply with the requirements of the United States of America Government Regulations governing live plants.

Between July the 16th and October the 28th, 3,536 cases in 73 lots containing 482,110 bulbs were examined and passed. The number of bulbs inspected was double that of the preceding year.

"

N 13

M

Owing to the long continuous, wet summer, almost all the bulbs were infected with a common fungoid disease. Before the bulbs could be passed for export, the firms dealing in them were required to clean and dry the infected bulbs in the sun for some hours.

¡

.

A number of the inspections were carried out on board the ships which brought the bulbs to Hongkong so that the work of transhipment might not be impeded.

By the instruction of His Excellency the Governor, a large quantity of seed of "Jak" Fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) from the two specimen trees in the Old and New Gardens was collected from the largest fruits and sown.

The whole of the seeds germinated and about 500 young plants were raised for planting on the island and in the New Territories.

HAY FEVER.

The removal of the flowers of the common Privet, Ligustrum sinense has now become part of the regular programme of the Department.

The pollen from the flower of this plant, which is very re- adily carried by the wind, is said to be the chief cause of "Hay Fever".

All the flowers were removed from plants in the vicinity of houses and in many cases whole plants were destroyed.

EXCHANGE OF SEEDS, &c.

The Department is indebted to the following donors of seeds, plants and Herbarium Specimens:-Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Director, Botanic Gardens, Sydney; Honourable Mr. A. G. M. Fletcher Miss Loureiro; Messrs. A. Mackenzie, Cheung Chau ; J. Cavalerie, Kwai Chau; Chung King Pui; A. Grove, Kentons, near Henley-on-Thames; L. N. Leefe; C. Edgcumbe; Henry Humphreys; E. A. Irving; A. Nicol; and the Captain Super- intendent of Police.

A Handbook of Tropical Gardening and Planting by H. F. Macmillan was presented by His Excellency the Governor.

The following were the principal recipients :-Director, Department of Agriculture, Salisbury (Rhodesia), South Africa ; Director, Botanic Gardens, Singapore; Director, Horticultural Section, El Giza, Mudiriya, Egpyt; Sir Edmund Giles Loder, Bart., Leonardslee, Horsham, Sussex, England; Dr. W. M. Docters Van Leeuwen, Director of the Botanic Gardens, Java; Messrs. Howard Spence, Eskdale, Knutsford, Cheshire, England; G. J. Pierce, Department of Botany, Stanford University, California, U.S.A.; Walter T. Swingle, Department of Agricul- ture, Washington, U.S.A.; H. Heuvrarb, 10, Avenue d' Lima,

.

N 14

Paris, France; Sergeant Kerr; Kowloon, Hung Hom and Taipo Police Stations; Yaumati District School; Royal Hongkong Golf Club; Commander Beckwith, R. N.; Honorary Secretary, Peak Club; Mrs. Gompertz; Inspector Blackman;

Messrs. Henry Humphreys; A. E. Wood, Taipo; E. F. Hill; W. Fitz Gibbon; G. P. de Martin; Ho Kom Tong, and T. H. King.

.

STAFF.

I greatly regret to have to record the death of the. Superintendent Mr. W. J. Tutcher, which took place on the night of April 5th.

The late Mr. Tutcher was seriously ill with pneumonia during January, but apparently recovered and resumed duty on March 15th, a few days later he had a relapse which resulted in his death. The Assistant Superintendent resumed duty on January the 26th.

The Assistant Head Forester Mr. Ng Kam-shing resigned at the end of May and Mr. Lam Kun-yau was appointed to fill the vacancy on August the 3rd.

H. GREEN,

Superintendent.

June, 1921.

1

י

Table I.

RAINFALL, 1920.

Botanic Gardens.

DATE.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar. April May

June

July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

- N 15-

inch.

inch.

inch. inch.

inch.

inch. | inch. inch. inch.

inch. inch. inch.

1,

.02

2,

.26

3,

5,

.10

7,

8,

9,

10,

.02

11,

12,

13,

14,

15,

16,

སྤྱན་ང ོ ོང 9ལ 3882

.84

1.58

.08 3.08

.17 .70

2.20

.06

.37

.61

1.38 .11

.45

.04

.21

1.83

2.50

.11

.05

1,82

.39

.07

.03

1.17

1,34

.09

.02

.65

.07

.01

.52

.37

2.27

3.10

.05

.10

.25

.62

.91

.16

.12 .02

.19

.02

.62

.62

.98

.02

: ធនៈ : :

.06

.01

.07

.60 .18

.71

2.00

.55

.25 .07

.72

2.46

.61

1.90

.75

1.39

.81

4.80

.02

.32

3.65

1.86

.09

.03 1.23

2.55

.21

5.10

.95

.05

.03

.12 .58

.47

.08

.55

.13 .13

.28

.03

:48

: :

:

Table I,-Continued.

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov. Dec.

inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. | inch. | inch. | inch. inch.

N 16-

17,

.11

.10 .01

18,

.30

1.20

19,

.10

20,

.07

.06

21,

.13

.10

23,

24,

.02

25,

26,

212

28,

29,

1.93

.03

30,

31,

Total,

.02

.07

རུ : ;ཎྜ

.01

.03

.03

8888888

.96

.61

.10

.12 1.25

1.44

1.20

2.45

.27

.02

རྔུ7952:9མིག་མི3

45

.41

.78

.18

.03

5.05

.09

.18 3.60

.61

.31

.08 .07

888

.01

10.33

.02

.02 2.12

.05

.06

.16

.38

.01

:

.12

1.89

.01

.04

.47

1.05

.02

.46

.02

2.47

.15

.45 1.00

.21

.16

.20

.10

.20

.05

.28

2.48

3.05

.02

.02

.92

3.10 1.50 7.87 17.68 17.90 27.28 14.74 17.22 8.66 7.16

Total for the year 124.03 inches. Average for the last ten years at the Botanic Gardens-88.20 inches. Total rainfall registered at the Hongkong Observatory for the year-107.88 inches,

Village or District. Block. Compartment.

stealing.

Pine trees

Table II.

FOREST GUARDS' SERVICE: OFFENCES.

Pine tree Pine tree Brush- branches needles

wood

stealing. stealing. stealing.

Grass

cutting. Wild

stealing. Wild

flowers

stealing.

fruits

REPORT OF

Cattle

Earth

grazing in cutting in plantation. plantations.

Victoria,

A.B.E.D.G.

Wongneichong,

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

Shaukiwan,...

A.B.C.D.E.F.

676

45

2

2

23

28

60

Tytam,

Stanley,

A.B.D.E.F.

2

3

14

Aberdeen,

A.B.C.D.E.F.

11

8

44

Pokfulam,

B.C.D.E.F.G.

Kowloon,..

A.B.C.

Harbour Belt,..

9

A.B.C.

Cheungshawan,

10

Kanghau,

11

New Territories,

12

LO 30 CO

INN

11

22

11

FREEONNO

19

180

10

5

6

1

3

100

2

Total for 1920,... 60

73

17

216

57 29

Total for 1919,

59

86

28

153

79 19

Fern stealing.

1

1

1

7

1

2

ลง

7

2

1

LO

5

Setting

fire to

plantation.

Assault

on Forest

Guard.

Imperson-

ating

Forest

Guard.

3

2

Releasing

prisoner from custody of Forest Guard,

2

- N 17 -

- N 18

Table III.

POLICE COURT RESULTS.

Cases.

50 cents to $1 fine,

$1.50 to $2

33

...

:

:

:

.::.

...

:

$2.50

to $3

34

$4

to $5

^

$6

to $10

99

$11

to $25

""

5

$120

:

:

...

1920.

1919.

103

89

68

43

11

27

25

32

16

6

5

1

57

36

69

63

44

39

...

:

:.

:

:

...

:

:

...

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

...

:

:.

:

.:.

:

...

:.

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

...

...

...

:

:

:

:.

1 to 4 days' imprisonment,

5 to 7

"

13

8 to 14

3 weeks'

4

>>

1 month's

5 weeks'

6

""

">

66.

3

...

:

:

:

Discharges,

Cautions,

Forfeiture of Bail,

Personal Bond, ...

...

...

Strokes with the birch,

Withdrawal,

...

...

***

1

7

2

1.

1

1

15

27

27

53

...

10

12

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

:

...

:

...

Total,

...

...

465

447

Locality. Kowloon Tsai,

Fanling, East Point,

N 19

Table IV.

NURSERIES.

Expenses. $476.00

360.00 65.00

Total,...

$901.00

Table V.

REVENUE.

REVENUE.

Timber Sales, Sale of Plants,

Loan of Plants,

Forestry Licences,

Inspection of Nursery Stock, Interest on Current Accounts, Miscellaneous Receipts, Fine Fund,

:

Table VI.

1920.

1919.

$

C.

$ c.

1,891.42

1,835.11

682.10

729.75

405.72

340.44

4,926.47

4,881.11

610.00

490.00

5.62

7.86

15.77

9.25

10.66

14.25

$8,547.76 $8,307.77

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure

for the years 1911-1920.

Years.

Total Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

% of Revenue to Expenditure.

$

C.

95

C.

1911

45,750.85

7,769,82

% 16.98

1912

39,865.18

2,304.91

5.78

1913

48,745.88

8,352.06

17.13

1914

49,095.97

6,934.21

14.12

1915

49.404.56

6.871.67

13.19

1916

47.325.89

7,034.67

14.86

1917

51,253.82

7,294.49

14.23

1918

51,967.08

6,282.45

12.09

1919

51,457.65

8,307.77

16.16

1920

55,975.49

8,547.76

15.27

Appendix O.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

FOR THE YEAR 1920.

SUMMARY OF CONTENTS:

Revenue and Expenditure.

Number of Pupils.

Education in English.

Vernacular Education.

Staff.

Training of Teachers.

Medical Inspection of Schools.

The University.

Board of Education.

Excluded Schools.

Boy Scouts and Girl Guides.

Athletics and Prizes.

ANNEXES.

A.-Report of the Inspector of English Schools.

B.-.

י

Director, Technical Institute.

"

D.---

Inspectors of Vernacular Schools. on the Military Educational Establishment.

TABLES.

I.-Government Schools.

II.-Grant Schools.

III.--Subsidized Schools in the Colony.

IV.

New Territories.

V.-Chart shewing numbers in Schools 1901-1920.

VI.-University. External Examinations.

VII.---Fees remitted to Free Scholars.

VIII-Technical Institute.

IX-XIV. Scholarship Accounts.

1

7

=

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

1920.

1. A change has been made this year in the arrangement of the report. Detailed information as to the Schools and the Technical Institute is supplied by the Inspectors and the Director in An- nexes A, B & C. A report on the Army School which is of some public interest has been forwarded to me by the courtesy of the Military authorities and is given in Annexe D. The only schools not covered by these reports are the Police School and the two Schools which are outside the operation of the Education Ordinance. These are referred to in paragraphs 41 to 43.

2. With these exceptions the report covers all the Schools in the Colony and a number of those in the New Territories, as explained in Annexe C.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I, II, III, IV, VII & VIII).

3. After deducting the school fees received, the total nett expenditure on education was $444,150.05 ($254,302 in 1919). The increase is mainly due to higher rates of salary. An additional sum of $20,000 was voted for Capitation Grants owing to more schools being included in the Grant Scheme. And during the year the Grants to English schools, which had not been revised since the war, were increased, absorbing $21,036 additional. $23,500. above the Estimates of 1919 was voted for and spent upon Vernacular Education.

4. School and Technical Institute fees amounting to $103,032 were collected ($103,505 in 1919). In addition $4,781 fees were remitted to free scholars ($4,185 in 1919).

STAFF.

5. I much regret to report the death on 3rd December of Mrs. Fletcher, acting Head Mistress of the Peak School. She was an admirable teacher and a very great loss to the Department and her pupils.

6. The estimated British Staff was 24 men and 26 women. At the close of the year it was 5 men and 16 women short. This shortage has been remedied to some extent by the employment of temporary women teachers, of whom several have fairly good qualifications. Others have none at all: such teachers become after a few months of some value, but they need much supervision, and they can not take big Classes unaided. The shortage was increased by the necessity of coming to the assistance of the University as explained under that heading below.

NUMBER OF PUPILS.

(Tables I to V).

7. Table V gives the number of pupils receiving an English Education as nearly 10,000, or more than 3 times what it was 20

years ago. The desire for a knowledge of English is by no means adequately shewn in this Table, as the English Schools are full and turning away candidates for admission.

8. The increase in Vernacular Education in the year under review is striking, but is partially explained by the fact that more schools in the New Territories have come under the hands of the Department.

9. The combined average attendance at the 3 British Schools, 163, was the same as in 1919. There was a falling off in attendance at the Peak School, for reasons probably connected with the very great difficulty which was experienced in maintaining the Staff. The Victoria School also shewed a falling off, partly the cause and partly the consequence of a decision to confine it to girls and small boys. The Kowloon School on the other hand began at the end of the year to grow exceedingly, and beyond its seating accommodation. 10. The total number of pupils at schools in the Colony exclud- ing the Police School and the uncontrolled schools in the New Territories are:—

Number of Pupils in

Total.

English Vernacular

Schools.. Schools.

* Government Schools

2.929

2,929

* Military Schools

145

145

*Excluded Private Schools...

121

26

147

* Grant Schools

2,330

3,409

5,739

Controlled Private Schools.

3,679

13,719

17,398

† Controlled Private Schools,

New Territories

1.761

1,761

Technical Institute

588

588

Total...

9,792

18,915

28.707

* Average attendance.

† Total enrolment.

11. This is an increase of 2,921 over 1919, the increase in pupils in English Schools being 647 and in the Vernacular Schools, 2,274.

EDUCATION IN ENGLISH.

12. The writer has now completed his 20th year in the Depart- ment and a very brief comparison of the general development in that period may perhaps be allowed. Twenty years ago, our effort in English education was largely meaningless, because the teaching of spoken English was almost entirely neglected. The standard reached by a few pupils, as shewn by the Oxford Local results was,

04

if at all, little below what it is now. But the general improvement is demonstrable by the fact that all pupils in the two Senior classes of all schools are now compelled to take the University Matriculation (or Senior) and Junior Examinations. Considering this, the per- centage of passes is fairly high (Table VI), and compares favourably with that of the selected candidates from outside schools. Also it varies little from year to year. When a comparison is made bet- ween such schools as Queen's College (Government) St. Joseph's (Grant) and St. Stephen's (Uncontrolled) little difference can be detected. The syllabuses adopted have again and again been amended in detail by various strong committees. As a whole I am satisfied that there is not room for any startling change in method or curriculum.

13. It is a well-known fact that the candidates who matriculate from the Straits have a higher knowledge of English as a whole than the average of Hongkong pupils: the reason in fairness to local schools should be known also. Here by common consent Chinese boys are expected to study Chinese, and this involves three years preliminary study in a Vernacular School, and about eight periods weekly for the eight years of their school career. In the Straits on the contrary it is not held essential that Chinese should be able to write their language.

VERNACULAR EDUCATION.

14. Twenty years ago Vernacular Education was known to the Department solely by the work of 78 Missionary Grant Schools. With a few exceptions it was almost valueless. The Committee on. Education reported in 1902:---

"Beginning with the Trimetrical and Thousand Character and certain other Classics, which are learned by heart, the scholars are taught first to read and then to write the characters. Subsequently they learn their meanings, first as isolated characters and afterwards. in their context. Unfortunately they nearly all leave school before getting as far as this, that is to say, unable to read.

"Geography is taught (very badly) in the Fourth Standard, where many of the Scholars were at the last examination ignorant that Hongkong was a British Colony: a number hazarded the opinion that it belonged to Russia.

"But this is not all: the children from whom alone such know- ledge was expected are a very small minority, as the following figures show. Out of 795 boys who obtained passes in the last examination, only 54 or 7 per cent. were in the higher Standards (Fourth or above)."

15. As late as 1914 only 24 per cent. of the pupils were in Standards III and above. In 1920 the proportion was 46 or almost double, and that with a much higher standard set.

16. The present position is outlined in the following paragraphs: Urban District.-There are 13,719 children on the books of the Vernacular Day Schools of the Colony and 405 more in the Night

*

Schools. The average attendance at the day schools is 88 per cent. of the total enrolment. This is a high figure all things considered. and shews that there is considerable competition for seats.

17. The Government does not operate any purely Vernacular Schools, but assists them in four ways:-(1) by Grants; (2) by Subsidies; (3) by Inspections; (4) by operating Normal Schools for teachers as described below.

18. Grants. --These--except for a very few schools which are specially favoured--vary from $3 to $5 for each unit of average attendance. The schools in receipt of these Grants are all managed by missionary or (latterly) non-Christian charitable bodies. In the first category there are 26 Mission Schools as compared with 78, twenty years ago. They are now mostly for girls.

19. This falling off in numbers is explained by the superior attractions of the Subsidy system; also, it may be presumed, by the competition of the Confucian and Tung Wa Grant Schools which with few exceptions give a free education. All the Grant Schools are bound by the conditions of the Grant Code.

20. Subsidies.-The system of subsidies was first started in the New Territories, and lately adopted in Hongkong. It consists in giving quarterly a lump sum of $5 to $20 to schools which appear to the Director of Education upon the advice of the Inspectors to be deserving. In 1920, $20,000 was thus absorbed by schools in the. Colony, including $10,000 given to the Confucian Society, and $7,200 by schools in the New Territories. The Inspectors in for- ming their opinion are guided by the absolute value of the schools judged from a technical stand-point; by their size; by their Anancial position; and by their usefulness. Thus a bare-foot school in a poor district might receive a subsidy in preference to one corresponding to a private preparatory school at home:

21. The Subsidy can be withdrawn without notice, wherein lies a distinction between the Grant and Subsidy systems. Another is that the subsidized schools get a lump sum, roughly proportioned to their size, and not a Grant calculated on the exact number of pupils. As the maximum Subsidy is $20 a month it is not at present possible to apply this system to big schools; but this is a remediable weakness.

22. It is obvious that the system requires inspectors and sub- inspectors of considerable qualifications and experience. At present the Department is very well served in these respects.

23. Inspections.-In theory the Correspondents of Grant Schools and the Managers of Subsidized Schools control the teaching and general conduct of their schools. In practice this is only rarely the case. The teachers look more and more to the Inspectorial Staff for guidance. Under the Grant Code, new teachers have to be approved by the Department, and it follows that the inspections which take place at irregular intervals throughout the year do not merely result in reports on existing conditions, but are occasions

T

for advice and instruction. In fact the duties of the Inspectors are really those of peripatetic Normal Masters. Under these conditions the standard of efficiency in the Vernacular Schools has risen very rapidly in the past few years, and is now about as high as can be expected of the general level of capacity displayed by the teaching staff. That is unfortunately a low one on the whole. And the best hope of a rapid improvement lies in teaching the teachers. To this end, Evening Classes have for many years been established as explained below. But it is much to expect of a teacher to attend such Classes at a distance from his home at the conclusion of a day's work. Many teachers besides are of an age and mental habit which render them irresponsive to new ideas. For this among other reasons, the training of the next generation of teachers is the most necessary step precedent to any further great advance in education as a whole.

TRAINING OF TEACHERS.

24. Similar difficulty in obtaining Staff prevails all over the world; and that is one reason why Normal training is so very im- portant in Hongkong. Another reason is that though our school buildings are now full, which limits the Staff required, a big forward stride is sure to be taken sooner or later, when the demands on the Staff will be greater than ever. A third reason is that the growing cost of British trained teachers calls for the dilution of their services by a locally trained product.

25. This need has been recognized for many years, and a number of efforts some very unambitious in appearance but con- siderable in the aggregate-have been made to meet it. The existing centres of Normal Training conducted by the Department are:--

A.-Normal Instruction through the medium of English.

(i) The pupil teacher system at Queen's College. 19 of the senior pupils take a two or three years course at the College while completing their education. At its conclusion they have hitherto been given masterships at Government Schools. (But see iii).

(ii) On thus becoming masters they go through a three years' course of evening instruction at the Technical Institute, at Classes which are also attended by Chinese Masters from the Grant Schools. There are at present in Government Schools 66 masters who have completed or are completing this course.

(iii) Four years ago it was decided as an alternative to send some pupil teachers to the University as "Students in Training," there to take a degree in Arts and a Diploma in Pedagogy. The experiment having proved successful, it has been decided to sub- stitute this field of training for the Technical Institute. Provision has been made for 26 such students in 1921.

(iv) There is a Normal Class for women at the Technical Institute with an attendance of about 10, mostly junior teachers from the British and Belilios Schools. It is a three years' course,

and 11 women teachers in the Department have completed or are taking it. The practical side of their teaching receives supervision during Class hours, and this has notably been the case at the Belilios School during the past year.

B.-Normal Instruction in the Vernacular.

(i) There is a three years' course for men and another for women at the Technical Institute with an average attendance of 34 men and 55 women. 31 men and 38 women have completed this course. There are at present 20 third year students, 26 second year students and 84 first year students in attendance, more than half of whom are women.

(ii) With the exception of the Students in Training at the University all these students are improving their qualifications in their spare time. There are obvious limits to the usefulness of such efforts; but the need of more and better Vernacular teachers may with any expansion of Vernacular Education become insistent. Arrangements were therefore made in the year for the opening at the beginning of 1921 of two well equipped Normal schools for men and women respectively, which will, it is confidently hoped, turn out in 1923 and onwards between 30 and 40 trained teachers annually. The Tung Wa Committee have kindly permitted the housing of the school for men in a floor of their new Man Mo Vernacular School. The Staff had been already engaged by the end of the year, a Chinese graduate of Oxford University and a Lecturer of the Hongkong University with high reputation as a Chinese Scholar. Provision was made for 20 pupils in the first year, and 40 subsequently. A nominal fee of $1 per mensem has

been fixed.

The

The Normal School for women will have a similar constitution. Arrangements were made to house it in the Belilios School. fees charged will be $2 per mensem.

MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS,

26. The principal Grant Schools are periodically inspected.

27. The British Schools are inspected by Government doctors. The reports shew that the general health is good. The condition of the children's teeth during recent years appears as a result of these inspections and the consequent information to parents to have greatly improved.

28. The medical inspection of eyesight in Queen's College, Belilios Public School and the District Schools has at last been put on a satisfactory basis. The system is as follows:-

29. An entrance fee equalling one month's school fee is now charged to new pupils, which is credited to a fund, against which the fee for Medical Inspection by Dr. Harston-at first $7 but now $10-and the cost of spectacles ($7) is charged. In return, every pupil is entitled to free examination and spectacles if needed. As

this privilege is extended to all pupils whereas only new pupils pay fees, it was anticipated that for the first year or two the fund would shew a deficit, but owing to the percentage of defective eyesight being less than that anticipated, there was a credit balance at the end of the

year.

30. The method in force is that the pupils' eyesight. (and incidentally teeth and general health) is examined by a Government doctor in the case of the Belilios Public School Dr. Alice Hickling, M.B.E. kindly officiated. All suspect cases are sent with a form to Dr. Harston. If spectacles are not required, the form is returned to the Headmaster for the information of the inspecting Doctor on his next visit. Otherwise the pupil is passed with his prescription and form to the optician, who sends the form to this office with his bill, and it then goes to the Head Master to note. Under this system a record will easily be kept of each pupil's eyesight as he passes from Class to Class or School to School.

31. The figures up to the end of the year are:--

Schoo!

No. of pupils

examined

No, supplied with glasses

Percentage

Queen's College

455

52

11.

Ellis Kadoorie....

491

71

14

Yaumati

281

58

21

Belilios

20

1.247

181

14.5

32. There are thus great differences in the percentage needing glasses at the different schools, of which I am not prepared at present to attempt an explanation.

THE UNIVERSITY.

33. My time was mainly occupied during two months in the spring with the University Commission, of which I was a member.

34. In the autumn term Mr. Forster, a master in the Depart- was seconded to the University as Professor of Education. While in the existing shortage of Staff he could ill be spared, the necessity of filling the appointment was considered paramount in the interests of our schools and Students in Training, no less than those of the University. At the end of the year Mr. Morris. Headmaster of Saiyingpun School, was appointed Master of Method at the University, in addition to his own duties. Here again it is very advantageous to the Department that the teaching of Government students should be conducted on the lines which they will be expected to follow. when they take up their work as teachers in the Department.

35. The following Table shews the successes at the University Matriculation and External Examinations during recent years.

Government Schools Queen's College &

Belilios School.

Other Schools in the Colony.

External Schools!

& students at University.

Total

Matric. &

Junior

Matric. &

Junior

Senior

Senior

Matric. & Senior

Junior

Matric.& Senior

Junior

1914...

11

24

22

57

1915...

30

23

46

16

92

99

1916...

15

35

93

BB

1

102

129

1917.

16

47

90

38

16

119

153

1918...

26

60

82

28

29

138

171

1919...

23

22

89

25

32

93

143

1920...

22

69

84

127

51

157

233

143

256

402

552

213

120

758

928

36. The great increase in the passes for the Junior this year should produce a corresponding increase in the Matriculation successes next year.

37. The larger number of successes for the external Schools shews that the Hongkong standard of education is an increasing influence in the schools of China and the Straits.

38. The University authorities have decided to change the date of their principal external examinations from June to December. The change meets with the approval of the local schools.

BOARD OF EDUCATION.

39. A Board of Education was established early in the year "for the purpose of assisting the Director of Education in matters pertaining to the development and improvement of Education in the Colony." The Director of Education is Ex-officio Chairman and the Inspector of English Schools and Senior Inspector of Vernacular Schools are Ex-officio Members. In addition, the Board is composed of 9 Members nominated by the Government.

40. The full Board met thrice in the course of the year. Sub-Committees were formed which visited the principal schools, and their advice has been of the greatest use to the Department.

EXCLUDED SCHOOLS.

THE POLICE SCHOOL.

41. The Police School, formerly staffed by Masters from the Education Department, has been replaced by a Police Training School, which is entirely under the control of the Police and staffed by them.

"

Ö 10

42. St. Paul's College was placed upon the Grant List as from 1st July, 1919. Of the non-Government schools which at the coming in force of the Education Ordinance were excluded from its operation there now remain two only: St. Stephen's Colleges for Boys and for Girls. They had an average attendance of 139 and 86 respectively (132 and 60 in 1919).

Boy Scouts.

43. The Boy Scout movement has been revived, and put on a sound basis. H.E. the Governor is Chief Scout, and Lieut.- Colonel Bowen, Commissioner. Towards the end of the year the following troops were raised: The St. Joseph's College Troop, the Murray (Garrison School) Troop, the Wesleyan (Wanchai) Troop, and the St. Andrew's (Kowloon) troop, with an enrolment of nearly 140 boys. Further considerable developments were pend- ing at the end of the year.

Girl Guides.

14. Preliminary steps were taken to organize this movement, of which Lady Stubbs has kindly accepted the Commissionership.

Athletics and Prizes.

45. In Appendix A under the Heading Queen's College there is given a description of extra-mural activities which may be regarded as a sample of what takes place at all the principal schools of the Colony. This realm of sport is probably the one where the character of British Masters most surely influences their pupils; but there is some danger that the ordinary school work may lose prestige in comparison. Perhaps the immature mind does not have such a view of relative values forced on it: possibly it regards play and work as belonging to separate and incompar- able worlds. I hoped it was so when I saw recently a silver pot 12 inches high won by a little girl for a fifty yards egg and spoon If as a result of a year's hard work she had won her form prize it would probably have been "Little Folks", price 5/-

race.

46. But prizes are absurdly overdone anyhow. At some schools the prize winners number 75 or 80% of the total.

EDUCATION OFFICE,

Hongkong, 6th May, 1921.

E. IRVING, Director of Education.

1

Annexe A.

REPORT BY THE INSPECTOR OF ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Table 1)

Queen's College.-The Maximum Enrolment was 656 (769 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 571 (609 in 1919).

The Head Master, Mr. Tanner, went on leave in October. his place being taken by Mr. R. E. O. Bird. The following Extracts from the Head Master's Report are of interest:-

Organisation. The chief change has been the decision that the school year shall end in January or just before Chinese New Year, instead of in July. It is beneficial because it is easier to work in the winter, and because Chinese New Year is the natural termination of the year for the Chinese.

An innovation was the appointment of 10 Vernacular Pupil Teachers, who were given a special course in Chinese with the object of training as Vernacular Masters. Later in the year, however, it was considered better that all Pupil Teachers should be trained at the University in future, accordingly, those who were able to matriculate entered the University as Teachers in Training in September last, while the remainder are preparing for the Matriculation Examination, and will proceed to the Univer- sity in due course.

Discipline.-This has been very satisfactory. The school Prefects have worked well, and the tone of the school has every appearance of being thoroughly sound.

Studies.--In July 21 boys were entered for the Matriculation examination of the University. Of these, 14 passed in the Matri- culation examination and 1 in the Senior Locals.

One boy gained the President of China's Scholarship with Honours.

One boy gained Honours.

Three boys gained Canton Government Scholarships.

Seventy-six were entered for the Junior. Eight were absent and 50 passed, of whom 15 gained distinctions.

In the December examination 1 boy passed in the Matricula- tion and 9 in the Junior of whom 2 obtained distinctions.

The Vernacular studies have been carried on successfully, under the Senior Vernacular Teacher.

O 12

Athletics.--There has been great activity this year as regards football. In the Inter-class Competition every class, except Com- mercial 1, entered a team, making 19 in all; that is, there were more than 200 boys actually taking part in the games. We entered a team for each of the 3 leagues but did not occupy first place in any of them. However, the training in physique and esprit de corps was invaluable. The Masters spent much time and energy in supervising the improvements on the ground, and it is now in very good condition. We have an inter-class competition in Volley Ball, which gives practice to a very wide number of players as the game requires 12 a side. In tennis the Ralston Cup brings together present and past pupils in friendly competition. Swim- ming parties are taken out every week in the summer. were also several all-day excursions. In our annual Aquatic Sports we were successful in retaining, against strong opposition, the Coronation Shield, open to teams from all schools in the Colony. In running we met with marked success. We won the team race at the Lusitano sports and at St. Joseph's College Sports. At the Hongkong Schools sports we won the Chater Cup for the Senior Team Race and also the Senior Championship. A Chinese Boxing Class has lately been started and about 60 boys have joined it. It has met with great regularity twice a week. We entered for a Basket-ball League and were 3rd out of 5 teams. Last mouth we defeated a strong team from Canton.

There

Library. The Library and reading-room continue to be of great service, especially to the Upper Classes. Periodicals and illustrated papers are widely used.

Amateur Dramatic Association.-Theatrical performances were held in the College Hall, on 22nd, 23rd, and 24th December. The selected plays were "The Merchant of Venice" in Chinese, "The Two Half-sisters" and the "Two Detectives." Large houses were present on each occasion and the sum of $1,988.30 was obtained thereby. The money was divided between the Northern Famine Relief Fund and the Tung Pak War Distress Fund.

The Old Boys' Association.-This is now an established body and has already had two meetings. We have very many distin- guished Old Boys, who have always taken a deep interest in Queen's College and have given us a very generous support on all

occasions.

The Yellow Dragon.-This school magazine attained its majority in June when a special anniversary number of 64 pages with a new cover was issued. It contained a history of Queen's College; an article by Dr. Bateson Wright, who was Head Master when the Yellow Dragon first saw the light of day; and numerous illustrations. The circulation averages 800 copies a month. The magazine finds its way into the 5 continents. The new Old Boys' Association promises to help the circulation of the magazine consi- derably. We hope to devote a page or more regularly to the doings. of our Old Boys.

F

>

O 13

General.-The school has had a very prosperous year and has done very good work. I will not say there is no room for improve- ment. I think greater attention-I may say, far greater attention- should be paid to colloquial English. There are several reasons for this weakness. There is too much of a tendency to work along stereotyped lines. The Chinese study their own language entirely from written characters, and they do not realise the importance of trying to speak English correctly.

District Schools for Chinese Boys: - Ellis Kadoorie, Saiyingpun, Yaumati and Wantsai.-These Schools are again full, and large numbers of applications for admission have to be refused.

As in previous years special attention is devoted to English which is learned not only in the school-room but also in a more colloquial and useful form in the various sports and social activities where the boys meet their English Masters and Mistresses.

Ellis Kadoorie School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 736 (629 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 607 (554 in 1919).

Mr. Mycock has during the year acted as Head Master.

The school continues to progress.

Drawing is a special feature; a Competition is held annually, prizes being awarded by the Hon. Mr. Severn, C.M.G., Colonial Secretary.

With commendable ambition 8 boys entered for the Annual Open Harbour Swim, being coached by Mrs. Richmond. All finished the course creditably.

Lantern Lectures on the British Empire, etc., were given to the whole school at intervals.

The Library has been increased by some 300 Volumes. Books suitable for each Class have been obtained and special efforts are being made to encourage the reading of English books.

Boxing has recently been introduced, and some promising

material has been discovered.

Saiyingpun School. The Maximum Enrolment was 340 (370 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 314 (334 in 1919).

Mr. Hamilton acted as Head Master during the greater part of the year.

The School has been full throughout the year, and only about one-third of those who applied for admission could be accommodated.

The attendance is regular, and 31 boys made every possible attendance,

O 14

The discipline and tone of the School continue excellent. Handwriting throughout the School continues to merit special praise; at a recent "Vere Foster's International Writing Com- petition" one pupil from this School sent in a copy which was adjudged to be "of conspicuous merit and deserving of special commendation", and was ranked "fourth.”

Map drawing is particularly good.

Useful additions to the general equipment of the School have been made these include 100 volumes for the Library, material for the Sports' Section and various series of pictures for conver- sational and decorative purposes. Most of this was personally selected by the Head Master when on leave in England.

In Sports the School has held its own; football, volley-ball and swimming are the favourite recreations.

The School is now the recognised Practising School for the University and three Students in Training are in constant attendance. Yaumati School.--The Maximum Enrolment was 311 (302 in

1919).

The Average Attendance was 263 (263 in 1919).

Written subjects were very successful, but some weakness was apparent in the oral examinations.

An attendance competition has been instituted and has been won by Class VIB with 9 weeks of full attendance. The Head Master reports that the attendance, which was very good in the middle of the winter term, became unsatisfactory as the Chinese New Year approached, small boys being too frequently withdrawn for "family affairs" the alleged "importance" of which seemed inconsistent with the ages of the boys concerned.

Discipline has been excellent, the Prefects rendering useful assistance in the maintenance of order.

The health of the School was satisfactory, though no less than 21 per cent. of the boys were found to require glasses.

The Library, now containing nearly 600 books, is much used. The Prefects act as Librarians under the direction of the Chinese Masters.

Sports are in a flourishing condition.

The Staff and boys recently organised a concert which realised a sum of $732 for the relief of the distress in famine-stricken areas. Wantsai School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 233 (238 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 207 (219 in 1919).

The School continues to do very satisfactory work.

E

0 15

The building is unable to accommodate all the boys who seek admission, a large number being turned away each Term.

Sports are popular, and the School has won outright the District Schools Football Challenge Cup.

The Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians.-The Maximum Enrolment was 115 (104 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 101 (89 in 1919).

Urdu is taught in addition to the usual school subjects. Praya East School. The Maximum Enrolment was 116 (113 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 95 (94 in 1919).

This School is under a Chinese Head Master and does very satisfactory work. Many boys pass from it to the District Schools where they acquit themselves creditably; for instance three boys who passed to the Wantsai School in 1919 gained the first three places in their Class at the 1920 Examination.

The boys take a keen interest in athletics, but are handicapped by the fact that the School is held in a Chinese tenement, and has no playground. Arrangements to mitigate this disadvantage are being made.

OUTLYING DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

Taipo School.-The Maximum Enrolment was

in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 53 (44 in 1919).

70 (57

Un Long School. The Maximum Enrolment was 36 (33 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 26 (26 in 1919).

Cheung Chan School.--The Maximum Enrolment was 27 (29 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 20 (22 in 1919).

The attendance at the Taipo School is steadily increasing; there is an obvious demand for increased accommodation and greater facilities for teaching English to boys from the neighbouring villages.

BRITISH SCHOOLS.

These Schools have suffered considerably from the difficulty in obtaining Trained Teachers. Some good work has been done by Temporary Mistresses, but the very frequent changes in the Staff have made it difficult to obtain the best results.

.

0 16

Efforts are being made to teach Drawing according to the methods recommended by the Royal Drawing Society. Mrs. McPherson visits the three schools and a good beginning has been made.

French is taught at the three schools by Mistresses on the Staff, while in addition Madame Moussion visits the schools and gives regular instruction.

The Games Mistress, Miss Macdonald, visits the schools to supervise the Games and Physical Instruction.

The schools are inspected regularly by a Government Medical Officer who examines each pupil and where necessary makes a report to the parents concerned. The health of the pupils has been very good.

Victoria School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 49 (58 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 38 (45 in 1919).

There have been many changes in the Staff during the year. The work generally is satisfactory, especially that done by those children who have attended the school a year or more.

Geography appears to be weak. The Head Mistress writes Most of the children display a very superficial knowledge of Geography; few could tell me what changes the war had effected.“

English Composition and Spelling would be improved if the children read more at home.

Other subjects are satisfactory. The cookery class has been revived, and a special class in painting is very successful.

Three pupils were presented for the Hongkong University Junior Local Examination, and of these two passed.

Kowloon School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 122 (94 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 86 (72 in 1919).

There was considerable increase in attendance towards the end of the year and an extension of the school building became

necessary.

The general improvement in tone, discipline and studies which was commented on last year has been continued.

All the pupils in the Senior Classes were presented at the Hongkong University Local Examinations and all passed, two in the Senior Section and seven in the Junior; one candidate was awarded Distinction in Biblical Knowledge.

Great interest is taken in sports. The enlarged and a Fives Court has been built.

playground has been Boxing is taught and

1

0 17

is popular among the boys; a very successful tournament was held in March. Football is played. Sea Bathing is indulged in with enthusiam, few of the pupils being now unable to swim. One girl won the 100 yards Ladies' Championship, and another was third in the Harbour Race for women.

The School has suffered a great loss in resignation of Miss Neave, who left on her marriage. Miss Neave was one of the first pupils to be enrolled when the School was opened and after - passing through all the Classes she went to England. On her return she became a Student Teacher, then Assistant Mistress and has just left after 10 years' service, to the great regret of all connected with the School.

Peak School.-The Maximum Enrolment was 62 (61 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 39 (46 in 1919).

This School has suffered much because of many changes both in the Staff and in the pupils. The Head Mistress, Mrs. Main, retired on pension in March and there were constant changes until the return of Mrs. Stark at the end of the year. Pupils are con- stantly leaving for Home and others returning; during the year 47 new pupils were admitted and 46 left. In addition, the attendance is very irregular, especially in summer, although morning school only is held during the summer months. In her Annual Report the Head Mistress laid special stress on this feature ; the following extract from her Report is interesting, "In the Log Book I found an entry of this nature, 'Mrs. X

had a party, and in consequence no children are present this afternoon? În the short time that I have been Head Mistress here I have found that anything, however trivial, is allowed to interfere with a child's attendance at school.”

Belilios Public School for Chinese Girls.-The Maximum Enrolment was 577 (529 in 1919).

The Average Attendance was 508 (465 in 1919).

The School is full and many applicants had to be refused admission.

Six girls sat for the Senior University Locals, and all passed. Eleven sat for the Junior, and ten passed. Six Distinctions were gained. Five girls entered for the Oxford Local (Preliminary), and two passed.

Apart from outside examinations, all Classes were examined in all subjects in June and December, and the results recorded in the Teachers' Books: these were examined regularly by the Inspector of English Schools and Inspector of Vernacular Schools respectively. The work is tested every week in Class examinations, set and cor- rected by the mistress in charge, while occasional papers are set by the Head Mistress or the Senior Vernacular Mistress.

it.

The girls are as anxious as ever to give help to those who need As a result of the sale of articles made by the girls, the sum

O 18

of $1,232 was contributed to the Ministering Children's League, and a collection for the North China Famine Relief Fund amounted to $242.60, while monthly subscriptions are paid to the Nethersole

Hospital and the Kowloon Orphanage.

Two courses of Cookery Lectures were attended by those members of the Staff who belong to the Victoria Nursing Division, and at the examination held in June every candidate gained Distinction. Cookery is a well-taught Class subject.

GRANT SCHOOLS

(Table II.)

There are 10 English Grant Schools, all of which were visited during the year. The Classes were seen at work, and all exercises written during Term were examined. Papers were set and worked for the Inspector, and Classes examined orally.

The work of these schools is satisfactory, progress being ap- parent each year. Special attention is devoted to the training of character in the Girls' Schools instruction is given in first aid to the injured, home nursing, and cookery, in addition to the usual subjects.

ENGLISH PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

During the year 27 Boys' Schools (5 Day and 22 Night) were closed; 40 new Boys' Schools (9 Day and 31 Night) were opened.

The total number of Schools open was:-Day Schools,--1 Girls' and 30 Boys'; Night Schools.-76 Boys'; with a maximum enrolment of 5 girls and 1,969 bays in the Day Schools, and 1,705 boys in the Night Schools, making a total of 3,679 pupils, an in- crease of 370 upon 1919.

In addition there were 2 Exempted Schools,--the Catholic Seminary, a Day School with 23 Students training for the priesthood, and a Night School maintained by the Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company for the instruction of some their Chinese employees, with 60 in attendance.

The work done in most of the schools is still of a very ele- mentary character. Pronunciation of English is often poor, the teachers themselves being in many cases not free from faults in this direction.

Discipline is generally good.

Monthly Attendance Reports are furnished by all the Schools, and the Regulations are carefully observed.

E. RALPHS,

Inspector of English Schools.

Hongkong, 1st March, 1921.

:

I

O 19

Annexe B.

REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF THE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

The Institute was open as usual during 8 months of the year.

The number of students in attendance during the Session ending June 30th was 588 as against 471 in 1919.

The Institute continues to do useful work and is always prepared to provide instruction in any subject for which there may be a demand.

At the end of the Session examinations were conducted as in previous years by independent examiners. 257 students were examined; 139 passed in one subject, 11 in two subjects, and 2 in 3 subjects, a total of 152, or 59% passed. The standard required for a pass has again been raised, especially in the Teachers' Classes.

Teachers' Classes.-At the June Examination referred to 77 Teachers' Certificates were awarded (52 in 1919). Of these 12 were given for Third Year work in English and 16 for the same in Chinese, and were in the nature of final certificates. The attendance at the English Teachers' Classes was 36,--14 men,

22 Women.

The number of students in attendance at the Vernacular Teachers' Classes was 150,-70 men and 80 women. Of these 7 men and 8 women are "Passed Students" who have returned to attend only the lectures on Chinese classics by Mr. Au Tai Tin, which have proved very popular.

At the June Examination, 6 men and 10 women passed the final Vernacular Teachers' examination, and were awarded the Certificate of the Institute.

Chinese

The women's classes have made good progress. studies, which were at one time very weak, are now steadily improving. The men's classes, however, lack energy, though a few of the Senior students are getting on steadily. The work done is on the whole satisfactory.

Mr. Law, Inspector of Vernacular Schools, visits the classes frequently, giving at times extra lectures on Chinese literature and method. As an experiment, he gave during the last Session a course of lectures on General Elementary Science which were well attended.

Other Classes.-Other important Classes are those for Building Construction and Architectural Design, Mathematics, Chemistry, English, Cookery, Shorthand and Book-keeping.

E. RALPHS, Director, Technical Institute,

Hongkong, 1st March, 1921.

=

O 20

Annexe C.

REPORT BY THE INSPECTOR OF VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS IN THE COLONY.

(Fable III)

During the year 89 new Private Day Schools were registered, (85 in 1919). 70 Day Schools closed: 21 of these disappeared without notification, and 7 were struck off the register. 1 Private School was transferred to the Grant List, and the School at Stanley was transferred cice rersa. The number of existing Private Day Schools is now 359. Of these 1 (the Chamber of Commerce Language School) is exempted, 4 are in class A, 271 in class B and 83 in class C.

The number of Grant Schools is 54. Of these 26 are Mission Schools, 20 are managed by the Confucian Society, and 8 by the Tung Wa Society.

Certificates have been issued to 11 New Private Night Schools. Of these 6 have closed already, in addition to 8 Old Schools. The number of Night Schools now existing is 16. A School for teaching Mandarin started with a large attendance but did not last long, and the Japanese School for Chinese children has had to suspend work.

The total number of Vernacular Schools, excluding those of the New Territories, is thus 429 (54 Grant, 359 Private Day and 16 Private Night Schools). 3 applications for the registration of New Schools were refused. Of these, one for a Girls' Night School was submitted to the Board of Education and refused on their recommendation. There has been no prosecution of schools during the year.

Subsidies to the extent of $10,000 having been voted for Vernacular Schools for the first time, it was decided to award these to deserving free Schools and to other Schools which were being run at a loss. In such cases it was usually some charitable Society that had to bear the loss. Altogether 66 Schools have been so subsidised.

We have personally inspected each school in our respective spheres at least once, and through the addition of one more Sub- Inspector to the Staff schools have altogether been visited more than in previous years.

REPORT ON N. T. VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

During the year 63 applications for subsidy were received. Of these 38 were satisfactory, and, more money for subsidies being available this year, the respective schools were all put on the List.

O 21

Four of last year's Teachers disappeared, and the schools at Tap Mun and Shek Kong Tsuen were struck off the list, bringing the total number of subsidised schools to 80.

Of these 8 are in class A, 51 in class B and 21 in class C. A further subsidy of $120 each for the last quarter was awarded in the case of class A schools, and of $60 each in the case of 14 Schools which are above the average for Class B.

The number of pupils is 1,761 and the average attendance 1,462. Of these about 120 are girls. Only 16% continue beyond the 3rd standard and 44% beyond the 4th.

1 Free Scholar was admitted to the Un Long English School from a Vernacular School in the neighbourhood, but there were no applications for scholarships to Taipo English School. A request was made that the Government should put up an English School in the Sha Tin district, but it was decided instead to award 10 Free Scholarships to Yaumati Government School open to pupils from various subsidised schools in the neighbourhood. 12 Candidates presented themselves for examination, and of these only 7 were up to the required standard.

Three additional sub-inspectors having been appointed from the beginning of the year, the whole of the New Territory has been divided into 6 districts, and schools have been visited about once a month whereas in previous years it was possible to visit them only once a quarter.

We have also ourselves visited each school in our respective spheres at least once, besides visiting the various schools from which applications for subsidy were received.

Hongkong, 10th January, 1921.

A. R. CAVALIER.

Y. P. LAW,

Inspectors of Vernacular Schools.

22

Annexe D.

REPORT ON THE MILITARY EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS, HONGKONG, FROM CAPTAIN H. S. MILLS, M.B.E., B.A., Inspector of Educational Training, China, Straits Settlements, and Ceylon Commands.

average

During the past year conditions in the Garrison Schools as regards staffing and organisation have been fairly normal. The latest returns show 145 children on books with an attendance of nearly 90 per cent., the latter figure being a little below the usual standard owing to sickness. Very satisfactory progress has been made by all classes and in the Handwriting Competition held for Army Schools at home and abroad the results were very creditable.

1

Arrangements have been made for the more active parti- cipation of boys and girls from these schools in the Hongkong inter-school athletic competitions and sports. In this connection a mixed committee including representatives from units, etc., concerned has been formed and has proved a useful auxiliary.

In particular very favourable reactions on the educational influence of the school have arisen from the formation (from the Garrison School boys) of the Murray Troop of the Baden-Powell Boy Scouts. The Headmaster of the school as Scoutmaster has thrown himself into this work with energy and enthusiasm and the parents have shown themselves as very appreciative of the benefits accruing to their boys from association with this movement. For the younger boys a Pack of Wolf Cubs has been formed and this is providing a useful training ground for the senior organisa- tion. More recently steps have been taken to form a Troop of Girl Guides and it is hoped that similar advantages may be reaped in their case.

The education of adult soldiers formerly carried on in the Garrison School is now, under the new system of educational training, carried on in the units under the direction of the Com- manding Officers responsible, with the help of a specialist staff drawn from the Army Educational Corps, whose function it is to advise, assist, and examine. This branch of training is under military control and inspection, but it is a matter for gratification that in respect of technical education it has been possible to co-operate with the civil authorities and arrange for the fuller utilisation of classes at the Hongkong Technical Institute by selected non-com- missioned Officers and men. The fees for their attendance were paid by the army authorities and it is hoped that funds will be available in the coming year to render possible a continuance of these beneficial arrangements.

O 23

Table I.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

STAFF.

Maximum Average

Rate of

NAME AND NATURE. (1)

Certificated Passed Student'

Teachers.

(2)

·

and 'Student'

Teachers

(3)

Vernacular.

Monthly At- Enrolment. tendance. per mensem.

Fees

Fees

Collected.

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

Kowloon, Victoria, and Peak Schools-for children of European British Parentage. Primary and Secondary

Queen's College-mainly for Chinese and Indians. Pre- pares for Hongkong University Matriculation and for Commercial Examinations

15

1. French

Mistress.

1 Games:

Mistress

1 Drawing

Mistress.

$

C.

1

2 Chinese

Teachers.

233

163 $5-$15

8,226.50.

13

10

10

656

571

1 Shorthand Teacher.

33,020.00

Ellis Kadoorie, Saiyingpun, Wantsai, and Yaumati Schools -for Chinese. Prepare for Upper School at Queen': College

9

44

16

1,628

1,392

$3

43,287.00

15

Belilios Public School for Girls-mainly for Chinese. Primary and Secondary.

2 Needlework

6

13

Teachers

577

508

$2

10,492.00

1 Drawing Mistress

2 Pupil Teachers

116

.95

$2

1,970.00

Praya East-mainly for Chinese. Primary

Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians--prepares for Upper School, Queen's College

2

Tai Po, Un Long, and Cheung Chau Schools--Elemen- tary English for Chinese.

Primary

115

101

$2

2,200.00

3

4

133

99

50 cents.

564.00

(1) For boys unless otherwise stated.

(2) Certificated or with the degree of a British University. (3) Student Teachers or Passed Student Teachers (local).

3,458

2,929

99,759.50

Attendance. Average

*

O 25

TABLE II.

RECEIPT OF A GRANT UNDER THE GRANT CODE OF 1910.

ENGLISH

SCHOOLS

School year ends on 30th June.

Higher Classes.

CAPITATION GRANT.

Remove Classes.

A

Total

Capitation

UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION GRANT.

B

Grand

Total

Total

Local

Lower Classes.

Senior.

Junior.

Honours.

Refund

Grants

Grants

Grants

of

of

of

of Fces.

Average

Attend-

ance.

Rate.

1 Average !Attend- Total.

2

Rate.

Average Total. Attend-

Rate.

3'

Total.

Columns

1, 2 & 3.

ance.

ance.

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

5

Total.

6

7

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

No. of Rate.

Total.

Total.

Columns

5, 6, 7, & 8.

A & B.

Columns

Pupils.

$

$

*

€9

*

$

**

ŠA

#

*

#

549 74

408 20

124

13

123

9

286

163

133

50

147

20

347 40

告砦:

**: ****888

50

3,700

316

30

9,480

50

1,000

50

650

41

50

50

450 49

1,900 161

50

400

50

50

50

20 8,180 138 30 4,140 250 20 5,000 30 1,230 70 20 1,400

301,470

30 4,830 43 30 1,290 34 30 1,020 50 30 1,500 1,000 76 30 2,280

159

16,360

10,140

20

3,280

1

65 20 1,300

3,220

97

20

1,740

8,470

: 10

:

112 20

98

61

20

30 2,000 227 30 6,810 80 20 1,600 10,410

22:22

2,240

3,930 ·

3

20

1,960

3,030

1,500

1,020 4,300

4

6

2000 : en co: ***

30

600

49

1.5

30

240

15

30

30

15

30

450 23

15

30

90

7

15

30

120

7

15

30

180

18

15

56: 66: 665

735

2

100

200

690

2,225

18,585

120

2

100 200

180

740

10,880

75

60

165

3,445

3,220

345

380

1,175

9,645

105

100

295

4,225

3,030

1,500

105

220

445

4,745

270

240

690 111,100

2,330 223

11,150 11,150 1,135

34,050 972

19,440 64,640

57

1,710

117

1,755

4

400

1,870

5,735

70,375

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

(Upper Grade.)

School year ends on 31st December.

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

(Upper Grade.)

School year ends on 31st December.

mum

hly

nent.

Average

Attendance.

Rate.

Total

Capitation

Grant.

Rent

Grand

of

Grant. Total

Grants.

$

$

50

11

550

550

204

11

2,244

480

2,724

132

11

1,452

1,452

205

11

2,255

2,255

144

9

1,296

1,120

2,416

1

735

7,797

1,600

9,397

VERNACULAR

(Lower Grade.)

SCHOOLS.

32

34

32

GAASIKA

62

♡♡

61

19

32

80

54

48

50

50

40

24

100

14

18

34

38

10

30

3

QKQWPONOCES A

89

33

31

4

75

37

2

42

39

4

35

26

49

42

108

-186

244

186

244

57

57

96

200

296

320

240

560

144

192

336

150

150

i

120

120

500

80

580

267

218

485

132

180

312

124

124

375

375

148

136

284

168

***

:

168

156

156

175

116

291

104

72

176

147

280,

427

168

90

258

162

120

282

49

42

108

1,098

30 44 30

i

1

168

162

90

38885

120

258

282

3,943

1,924 5,867

5

33

132

72

216

64

192

60

180

39

3

117

37

3

111

73

4

292

37

4

148

44

2

88

80

3

240*

40

4

160

39

4

156

42

168

42

168

61

183

71

174

85

425

38

114

46

138.

39

117

20

80

33

165

34

102

42

126

30

150

28

84

}

28

112

}

18

90

1,275

4,429

5,438

80,808

132

216

192

180

117

111

292

148

88

240

160

156

168

168

183

174

425

114

138

117

80

165

102

126

150

84

112

90

4,428

3,524 90,067

· O 25

TABLE II.

CONTROLLED SCHOOLS IN SCHOOLS IN RECEIPT OF A GRANT UNDER THE

No. !

Name and Nature of School.

Mission.

:

St. Joseph's College,

2

Italian Convent,

French Convent,

Diocesan Girls' School,

Diocesan Boys' School,

9

St. Mary's School,

13

St. Francis' School,

14

St. Joseph's Branch,

15

Ying Wa College,...

16

St. Paul's College.

10

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

School year ends on 30th June.

CAPITATION GRANT.

A

UNIV

Total

Higher Classes.

Remove Classes.

Lower Classes.

Capitation

Average

Attend-

auce.

Rate.

1 Average !Attend- Total.

ance,

Rate.

2 Average

Total. Attend-

Rate.

3'

Total.

1, 2 & 3.

:

ance.

Grants

of

Columns

Senior.

No. of Rate..

Pupils.

*

26

$

$

*A

30

R. C. M.

8

.98.

766

549

74

50

8 & Inf.

199

11

454

408 20

8 & Inf.

179

>>

168

124 13

C. of E.

8 & Inf.

192

157

123

9

8

190

""

355

286 38

R. C. M.

8 & Inf.

200

211

163

7 & Inf.

$97

"}

154

133

I

2

01

59

50

L. M. S.

229

192

147 20

C. M. S.

218

433

347 40

**: ******g

50 1,000

50

650

3,700 316 30 9,480 159 138 30 4,140

41 30 1,230

20

250 20

70 20

8,180 16,360 5,000 10,140 1,400 3,280

20

30

30

30

50

450 !

49

30

1,470 65

20

1,300

3,220

50

1,900

161

30

4,830

97

20

1,740

8,470

15

30

50

400

43

30

1,290 112

20

50

50

34 30

1,020 98

20

50 30

1,500

྾དྨེ:

2,240

3,930

3

30

,960

3.030

1,500

50

1,000

76

30

2,280 51

20

1,020 :

4,300

30

50

2,000 227

30

6,810 80 20

1,600

10,410

30

2,0052,949 2,330 223

11,150 11,150 1,135 1,135

34,050 972

19,440

64,640

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

(Upper Grade.)

School year erds on 31st December.

(Upper Grade.)

School year ends on 31st December.

No.

Name and Nature.

Mission.

Number

of

Standards.

Number Maximum

Average of School Monthly Attendance. Days. Enrolment.

Rate.

Total

Capitation

Grant.

17

Foundling Home, (G.)

C. M. S.

18

Fairlea, (G.)

19

Victoria Home (G.)

20 i

Ying Wa Girls' School (G)

L. M. S.

10

21

St. Paul's Girls' School,

C. M. S.

40499

266

52

50

11

550

6

231

229

204

11

2,244

231

138

132

11

1,452

216

235

205

11

2,255

225

177

144

9

1,296

10

831

735

7,797

SCHOOLS.

VERNACULAR

(Lower Grade.)

24

27

22

26 Caine Road, (G.)

R. C. M.

228

67

62

-186

Holy Infancy, (M).

230

82

61

244

"}

28

Aberdeen, (M)

231

21

19

57

27

30

2 Taipingshan Street, (G.)

L. M. S.

221

35

32

96

33

199 Queen's Road East, (G.)

228

84

80

320

35

Pottinger Street, (G.)

>>

>>

241

54

48

144

36

Wanchai Chapel, (B.)

217

62

50

150

87

Totsai Chapel, (B.)

235

50

40

120

38

65 & 67 Battery Street, (G.)

249

124

100

500

""

43

158 Reclamation Street,

226

94

89

267

44

20 Aberdeen Street, (G.)

4

251

38

33

""

45

Tanglungchau Chapel, (G.)

229

34

31

"

46

Wanchai Chapel, (G.)

233

88

75

>>

67

311 Queen's Road West, (G.)

C. M. S.

249

50

37

4454

132

124

375

148

59

Yaumati Chapel, (G.)

241

52

42

168

>7

60

232 Hollywood Road, (G.)

251 ·

50

39

156

11

61

20 Pokfulam Road, (G.)

L. M. S.

240

44

35

175

103

3 ོ ོ ོ

62

44 Shankiwan East, (G.)

C. M. S.

251

33

26

104

68

17 Elgin Street. (G.).

W. M.

251

56

49

3

147

70

Kowloon City, (G.)

C. M. S.

251

52

42

4

168

71 Battery Street, (B)

L. M. S.

6

127

116

108

3

162

21

1,286

1,098

3,943

21

1,286

1,098

3,943

75

76

77

126 Aberdeen (B.)

9 Blacksmith's Lane, (B.)

6 Bridges Street, (B.)

C. S.

78

52

13

(B.)

>>

79

111 Canton Road, (B.)

,,

80

7 Cook Street, (B.)

81

42 & 44 Des Voeux Road Central, (B.).

17

82

99A High Street, (B.)

2

}}

83

Kowloon Walled City, (B.)

""

84

Lung On Street, (B.)...

"}

85

Lung On Street Guild Room, (B.)

2

86

98 Nathan Road, (B.)

12

87

88

373

>>

89

208 Queen's Road East, (B.)...

32 & 34 Fook Tsuen Heung, (B)

"3

West, (B.)

25

90

17 Star Street, (B.)

91

12 Tai Hang, (B.)

3

>>

92

88A Wanchai Road, (B.)

>>

93

25 Water Street, (B.)

>>

94

30 Western Street, (B.)

>>

95

75 Wellington Street (R.)

T. W. H.

96

184 Queen's Road East, (B.).

2

97

253

West, (B.)

""

98

14 Tai Yuen Street, (B.)

>>

99

100

101

2

>>

102

3 Centre Street, (B.)

2 Ladder Street, Ground Floor, (B.).

2A Aberdeen Street, (B.)

1st Floor, (B.)

NNNNNNNNN - - ∞N N N N N NO NO JA LO DI 10 10 00 00 10 10

201

45

33

132

213

100

72

216

217

75

64

192

216

77

60

180

219

50

39

117

216

48

37

111

217

83

73

292

216

44

37

148

220

77

44

88

2

181

115

80

240

173

50

40

160

208

50

39

156

212

50

42

168

206

50

42

168

219

91

61

183

217

'95

71

174

218

100

85

176

50

38

221

50

46

217

45

39

190

26

20

215

37

33

199

38

34

221

44

42

211

33

30

217

36

28

211

30

28

199

23

18

OFF C or 00 00 01 HA co co co Ou

425

114

;

138

117

80

165

102

126

150

84

112

90

Total Number of Schools 64.

1,612

1,275

Grand Total,

5,438

NOTE.-R. C. M.

Roman Catholic Mission.

C. of E.

Church of England.

C. M. S.

Church Missionary Society.

L. M. S.London Missionary Society.

Wesleyan Mission.

W. M.

B.

-Boys.

G.

=Girls.

M.

=Mixed.

4,428

80,808

19,000

18,000

17,000

16,000

15,000

1:1,000

13,000

12,000

11,000

Tab

V.

Average Attendance in all Government and Gra Schools, and total enrolment at Private Schools and the Technical Institute, which was opened in 1908.

Note.-The figures prior to 1913 are not very trustorthy, as there was no right of entry, into private schools until that year.

The figures for the New Territories are included in 913 for the first time.

The University and Police School are not included:

English Schools :-Red.

Vernacular Schools :-Black.

1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. | 1907. 1908.

1909. 190. | 1911.

1912. | 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918. 1919. 1920.

!

12,989

11,919

12.092

13,230

15,4613

!

16,582

16,641]

18,915

15,000

14,000

13,000

12,000

11,000

10,000

9,000

8,000

7,000

6,785

8,140

9,863

10,327

12,989

6,442

6,000

6,065 6,100

5,752

5,582

5,420

| 5,230

5,427

5,000

5,096

4,580

1,660

4,540

4,430

4,630

4,610

4,490

4,000

3,970

3,680

3,875

3,213

3,000 2,900

12,092

11,919

13,230

15,461

9,145

8,962

8,474

7,873

7,764

7,462

9,792

No.

O 27

Table III.

Subsidised Schools (in the Colony), 1920.

Address

Average Attendance

Total Subsidy

Paid

Boys

Girls

Little Hongkong

1

154 Reclamation Street..

71 Belcher St., Kennedy Town

25

2

$ 340

87

240

30

7

240

25 Canton Road

5

30

240

11 Bridge Row

43

240

6

C. M. S Boys' School, Kowloon City

85

240

7

6 Aberdeen

20

140

8

116 Aplichau

43

200

9 232 Hollywood Road.

17

3

200

10 208

48

200

""

11

210

43

200

12

24 Sai Street

32

200

13

24 Eastern Street..

28

200

14

Yaumati Temple (North)

69

200

15

(South)

25

200

16

38 Bridges Street

52

200

17

301 Canton Road

28

200

18

533 Shanghai Street..

29

200

19

20

21

22

23

28 72 *

St. Paul's Junior School, Yaumati

54

200

St. Paul's Students' Free School, 67,

High Street...

43

200

3 Gresson St. Girls' Free School.

29

200

St. Paul's Boys' Free School, 17,

Warren Street

39

200

St. Paul's Girls' Free School, Shan-

49

200

kiwan Road

24.

Sha Po Tsuen, Kowloon City

43

200

25

C.M.S. School, Stanley

10

26

55 Battery Street.

48

27

3 Tin Lok Lane.

15

28

C.M.S. Girls' School, Tokwawan

52

29

16 Second Street

39

30 265 Des Voeux Road

38

31

95 High Street...

8

32

Lai Yin, Bonham Road.

33

22 Western Street

3

34

72 Second Street..

12

35

70 Bridges Street

32

36

61 High Street..

37

92 Portland Street

16

38

2 Dundas Street.

72

* IN 2002;

200

200

180

150

150

150

150

12

150

18

150

150

150

12

150

150

150

No.

O 28

Table III-Continued.

Subsidised Schools, (in the Colony) 1920,-Continued.

Address

Average Attendance

Total Subsidy

Paid

Boys

*Girls

39 186 Shanghai Street

41

40

266

33 Kowloon City Road

42

43

87 Bulkeley Street

5 Causeway Bay

44 42A Sai Tau, Kowloon City

45

114 Aplichau..

46

Kaulungtong

47

3 Suitor St., Taikoktsui

48

3 Fukchow St., Shamshuipo

49

68 Lai Chi Kok Rd., Shamshuipo.

50

104 Third Street

WHERE NOR

57

60

20

: : : : ME

44

150

25

150

120

120

100

60

100

100

25

100

38

100

14

100

24

100

33

100

51

62 Catchick Street

16

100

#

54

55

52

53

305 Shanghai Street.

Kaulungtsai

43 Sai Street

44 Queen's Rd., East

12

100

24

70

28

60

29

60

56 124

36

60

57 190

36

60

""

>1

58

137 Shaukiwan Road East

43

60

59

Shek O

32

60

60

Holy Cross Church, Shaukiwan West...

10

60

61

Mongkok Village

20

5

50

62

9 Shing On St., S'Wan West

26

50

63

Tokwawan Village School.

19

50

64

B.M. Premises.

25

50

""

65

13 Heard Street

11

50

66!

8 Shan Pin Terrace, Shaukiwar East..

30

40

Total,...

1,698

577

$ 9,630

1

O 29

Table IV.

Subsidised Schools, New Territories.

No.

School

Average Attendance

Total Subsidy Paid

1

Mang Kung Uk

41

$ 180

2 Cheung Chau (Loh Mo To)

37

180

3

Un Long (Ng Sing Chi) .

23

180

4

Tsing Yi

25

180

5 Kau Wa Kang

24

180

6

Tai Lam Liu.

17

180

7

Un Kong

14

180

8 Shui Tseng Tin

14

170

2

9

Tai Wai

30

120

10 Sheung Tsuen

26

120

11 Chung Uk Tsuen (Tai Po).

21

120

12 Tai Wan

20

120

13 Tai Po Market (Girls)..

20

110

14 Sha Kok Mie

20

120

15 Ying Lung Wai

18

120

16 Kam Tin

16

120

17 Tai Hang

14

120

18 Sai Kung R.C. Church

14

120

19 Ho Sheung Heung

13.

120

20 Tsung Am Tong

11

120

21 Shek Kong Wai

17

110

22 San Tin, Tung Chan Wai

15

110

23 Ping Long

14

60

24 Shan Mei

10.

60

25 Cheung Chau, L.M.S. Girls' Schl.

24

. 60

26 San Tin.......

13

60

27 Chung Pak Long.

18

60

28 Ping Shan (Tang King Nam)

14

60

29 Ping Shan (Tang Hok Wa)

20

60

30 Wang Chau

19

60

31 Kam Tin (Shui Tau)

17

60

Tsuen Wan (L.M.S. Girls' Schl.)

27

60

33 Ma Wan

12

60

34 Kwai Chung

19

60

35 Cheng Tau

14

60

36 Fanling

12

60

37 Sai Kung

13

60

38 San Ha Wai

15

60

39 She Tau

11

60

40 Sheung Shui (Liu Hee Tin)

24

60

41

Tai No

13

60

42 Taipo Market (Boys)

29

60

43 Tap Mun

44 Tsang Lan Shu

12

60

18

GO

O 30

Table IV,-Continued.

Subsidised Schools, New Territories,-Continued.

No.

School

Average Attendance

Total Subsidy Paid

45 Tung O (Lanıma)

46

To Ka Tsz

18

V

55

9

47 Pak Sha...

48 Un Long, Sai Pin Wai

18

50

23

50

49

Un Long, Nam Pin Wai.

19

50

50 Un Long, L.M.S.

17

50

51

Un Long, Tai Kiu

16

50

52

Shan Pui Wai

15

50

53

Lai Ka Tsz

54 Tin Liu...

55 Wai Tau

56 Ha Wo Tse

13

50

11

50

11

50

9

50

57 Lin Fa Tei

14

50

58 Wong Toi Shan

15

50

59 Cheung Chau (Fung Sam Kei)

22

50

60 Tai Ping (Lamina)

27

50

61 Tai O..

22

50

62 Sha Lo Wan

14

50

63 Pok Wai

15

50

64 Chau Tau

15

30

65 Chung Uk Tsuen (Ping Shan)

10

50

66 Tsuen Wan Boys' School

38

50

67 Cheung Kwan Au

19

50

68 Kwai Tau Ling

22

50

69 Luk Kang...

23

50

70 Lung Yeuk Tan

19

50

71 Nam Chung

12

50

72 Pak Sha Au

14

50

73 Sheung Shui (Liu Hon Fan)

16

50

74 Tai Long

15

50

75 Teng Kok..

24

50

76 Pak Tam Chung

23

50

77 Tsing Fai Tong

14

45

78 Ho Chung..

21

45

79 Kak Tin

14

30

SO Wo Hang

17

30

81 Taipotan

15

30

82 Shek Kong Tsuen*

40

*

1,462

$6,230

Struck off the list October 31st.

Appendix Q.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS FOR THE YEAR 1920.

Expenditure.

1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings, were as follows:-

Amount voted.

In Estimates.

Supplemen- tary Votes.

Actual Expenditure.

Total.

(i) Personal Emoluments

and Other Charges,... 492,406.00

31.224.67 523,630.67

468,371.82

(A) Special Expenditure;

Typewriter, etc.,

700.00

700:00

615.96

(ii) Annually

Recurrent

Works,

785,600.00

76,149.98 861,749.98 825,493,70

(iii) Extraordinary Works.......... 3,973,700.00 || 524,107.05 4,497,807.05 2,555,877,69

Total,..

5,251,706.00 632,181.70 5,883,887.70 3,850,359.17

Detailed statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B.

With regard to (i), the saving is due to vacancies in the Staff, refunds on account of supervision of work executed by the Depart- ment for various companies and the higher rate of exchange (average 4/54) which prevailed throughout the year as compared with that adopted (3/-) when the Estimates were framed.

In the case of (ii), savings occurred on the following sub-heads as set forth below:

Hongkong. Communications.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City, Improvements to Roads and Bridges in City, Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City, Improvements to Roads and Bridges outside City,. Maintenance of Telephones including all cables,

..$1,107.16

2.963.28

6,399.20

586.10

623.59

Expenditure.

Drainage.

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

130.73

Lighting.

Electric Lighting, City, Hill District and Shaukiwan, .......

665.35

Miscellaneous.

Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

384.82

Maintenance of Public Cemeteries,

1,094.90

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,

218.02

Stores Depreciation,

5,714.05

Water Works.

Maintenance of Aberdeen,

383.70

Kowloon,

Buildings.

Maintenance of Buildings,

142.75

Communications.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges,

1,645.35

Improvements to Roads and Bridges,

190.91

Maintenance of Telephones,

486.14

Drainage.

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,.

2,495.53

Miscellaneous.

Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers, Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries, Maintenance of Recreation Grounds,

1,541.97

.04

344.39

Water Works,

Maintenance of Water Works,..........................

685.39

New Territories.

Communications.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges,

222.20

Improvements to Roads and Bridges, Maintenance of Telephones,

274.58

1,726.23

Drainage.

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, etc.,

112.63

Lighting.

Electric Lighting, Shamshuipo,

482.60

Q 3

Expenditure.

Miscellaneous.

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,

Water Works.

.90`

Maintenance of Laichikok,

Water Account, (Meters, etc.),....

356.55

28.88

The savings were far more than counterbalanced by excesses on other sub-heads, the principal of which were the following:-

Hongkong. Buildings.

Maintenance of Buildings,..

Improvements to Buildings,

Maintenance of Lighthouses,

$2,251.81

2,365.42

330.98

Lighting.

Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and Hill District,

1,209.95

Miscellaneous.

Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds,

12.08

Dredging Foreshores,

..$ 1,477.14

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

34,102.93

Water Works.

Maintenance of City and Hill District,

13,852.49

Maintenance of Shaukiwan,.

599.23

Water Account, (Meters, etc.),

95.90

Kowloon,

Buildings.

Improvements to Buildings,

28.19

Lighting.

Gas Lighting,

1.336.72

Electric Lighting,

170.08

Miscellaneous.

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

6,540.95

Water Works.

Water Account, (Meters, etc.),

476.24

Expenditure.

Q 4

New Territories.

Buildings.

Maintenance of Buildings,

Improvements to Buildings,

Miscellaneous.

180.84

468.46

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

Comparison of Expenditure, 1919 and 1920.

5,402,43

2. The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1920 as compared with that of the previous year :--

1919.

1920.

Increase. Decrease.

C.

(i) Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges,

390,006:29

$ c.

468.371.82

$ 6.

78,365.53

C.

(A) Special Expenditure;

Typewriters, etc.,

1,376.35

615.96

760.39

(ii) Annually Recurrent Works, 822,509.87 $25,493.70

2,983.83

320,874.74

(iii) Extraordinary Works,... 2,235,002.952,555,877.69

Total, $3,448,895.16 | 3,850,359.17 402,224.10 *760.39

Item (i). The increase is due to the increase of salaries under the revised scheme, increase of staff, and the grants of Special Bonuses to Officers who have been called upon to perform extra duties in addition to their own. The average rate of ex- change for 1920 was 4/54 as compared with 3/9 during 1919.

Item (ii).-The increase is insignificant compared with the increase in the number of Public Works dealt with under this head.

Item (iii).The increase is principally due to the expenditure in the erection of Officers' Quarters at Leighton Hill and Happy Valley, but there was also an increase in the amount expended in the formation of New Roads and widening and improvement of existing ones, the volume of such work even exceeding the record of the previous year. The gross amount expended under "Com- pensation and Resumptions" was $295,370.85 as compared with $539,523.56 during 1919 being a decrease of $244,152.71. The principal item was the resumption of land at Kowloon Bay Reclamation at a cost of $115,470.00. (vide para. 40.)

Q 5

Water Works Revenue.

Revenue from Water Works.

3. Water Works Revenue.-The following is a statement of the revenue derived from Water Works during 1920, the figures for 1919 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison :-

1920.

Excess Con- sumption.

$ e.

Rates 2%.

1919 Total.

Total.

C.

C.

:

City including Wongnei-

chong Village

and

properties bordering

Shaukiwan Road,

Hill District,

Pokfulam District,

141,270.11

7,022.67

5,385.30

276,738.80 £18,008.91 387,625.90

6,830.63 13,853.30 11,924,34

5,385.30 3,397.10

Kowloon: including Sham-

shuipo and Kowloon

City,

67,174.16

43,919.52 111,093.68 90,216.97

Aberdeen,

3,253.83

Shaukiwan,...

Laichikok,

2,919.00

381.39

3,625.70

3,635.22

3,336.83

6,544.70

6,415.29

30,809.02

:

30,809.02 28.165.37

Total,

$ 257,834.09 831,496.04 589,330.13 531,081.80

The figures show an increase in all cases amounting in the aggregate to $58,248.33.

Land Sales, &c,

Q 6

Land Sales and Surveys.

4. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, etc.-The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $558,660.21, or nearly three times the amount of the Estimate which amounted to $200,000.00.

The following is a comparative statement of the Revenue derived from Land Sales, etc., for the years 1918-1920:-

Sales by Auction

Sales without Auction

Extensions granted

1918.

1919.

1920.

C.

$

c.

C.

202,675.30-

159,365.37

390,567,50

547.40

257.00

15,402.64

77,359.20

93,279,30

80,785.56

4,300.00

Grants on Nominal Terms

Grants on Short Leases...

Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75

years

2,086.50

207.50 1,868,20

Premia derived from sale of rights to

erect piers

4,559.82

4,043,51

7,860.16

Fees for Boundary Stones to define lots

1,639.45

1,454.59

3,109,25

Conversions and Exchanges

3,560.32

6,861.59 59,066.60

Total,

Actual amount of premium paid into

the Treasury

296,727.99 265,468.86 558,660.21

$ 301,760.87 265,468.86 558,660.21

5. Sales by Auction.-Twenty-four lots were sold in Hongkong, eleven in Kowloon and four in New Kowloon, which realised $103,234.20, $70,060.00 and $209,115.00 respectively. The District Officer at Taipo sold 146 small lots which realised $6,690.50 and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 33 lots which realised $1,467.80.

6. Sales without Auction.-Seven lots wers sold under this heading in Hongkong and realised $11,582.60. There were no sales in Kowloon nor in New Kowloon, but four lots were sold in the New Territories for a total sum of $2,266.04. The District Officer at Taipo sold 104 lots which realised $809.00 and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 21 lots for a total sum of $745.00.

Q 7

Land Sales, &c.

7. Extensions granted.-The extensions granted in Hongkong comprised additional areas to Inland Lots Nos. 1627, 1744 (two), 2271, 2048, 1937, 1910, 1923, 1945, 1905, 2295, 2267, 2080, 2303, Rural Building Lots Nos. 137, 140, 148, 143, Shaukiwan Inland Lots Nos. 434, 435, 453, 442 and Quarry Bay Inland Lot No. 7.

In Kowloon, extensions were granted to Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 1375, 1376, 1377, 1150, 1154, Kowloon Marine Lots Nos. 26, 28, 52, 53 and 67. In New Kowloon and the New Territories, extensions were granted to New Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 146, 180, Taipo Inland Lot No. 10, Cheung Chau Inland Lots Nos. 7, 29, 30, 37, 34 and 25. Only one extension was granted by the District Officer at Taipo, viz:-Lot No. 3423 D. D. 91. The Assistant District Officer at Hongkong granted an extension to Lot No. 362, D. D. 450, and also to Lot No. 426, D. D. 443.

Areas leased and payments made

by Government

Description of Property.

Hongkong.

8. Conversions and Exchanges.

Area

sq. ft.

Amount

paid.

Areas surrendered to and premium received by Government.

Description of Property.

:

sq.

Area

ft.

Land Sales, &c.

Amount

of pre-

miuin.

I.L. 1942.

I.L. 2293.

Conversion.

do.

Portion of G.L. 46...

4,390

439.00

F.L. 50

86,73018,682.00

I.L. 2270.

do.

F.L. 48

20,200.00

I.L. 2298

5,797

I.L. 2294

6,358 J

in exchange for

I.L. 2067 and a portion of

2,668

t

I.L. 2301.

27,850

do.

I.L. 1927. R.P. of F.L. 22 & F.L. 8.

4,745

6,962.50

Fire Brigade Station, Queen's

Road Central

24,000

do.

R.B.L. 76 (The "Homestead" 165,021

Shaukiwan I.L. 446

9,780

[site)

447

>1

8,080

do.

Shaukiwan Lots 33 & 35.

448

6,314

"1

31

449

,,

"

6,590 J

455

1,050

do.

Shaukiwan Lot 227

420.00

456

8,020

do.

Shaukiwan I.L. 304 and

building thereon

3,350.00

11

13

457

1,050

do.

Shaukiwan I.L. 223 and

buildings thereon.

452

>>

3,600

do.

Shaukiwan Lots 228 & 229.

420.00

279.00

8. Conversions and Exchanges,-Continued.

Areas leased and payments made

by Government.

Areas surrendered to and premium received by Government,

Description of Property.

Area

sq. ft.

Amount

paid.

Description of Property.

Area

sq. ft.

Amount

of pre-

mium.

Nil.

Kowloon,

10,000

Conversion.

Cheung Chau Lot 253.

New Kowloon,

Certain exchanges in connec- tion with the relaying of Shamshuipo Village

New Territories. Cheung Chau Inland Lot 38... Exchanges or conversions of 34 lots were arranged by the District Officer, Taipo, and 8 by the District Officer (South), particulars of which will be found in the Land Officer's report....

Q 9

Land Sales, &c.

:

Land Sales, &c.

Q 10

9. Grants on Nominal Terms.--A portion of West End Park was granted to the Church Missionary Society for a girls' school.

There were no grants under this heading at Kowloon nor in the New Territories,

10. Grants on Short Leases.-An area of 22,816 square feet opposite the Central Market was granted at a monthly rental of $2,100.00. The old Post Office was let for a period of ten months for a sum of $13,800.00 and afterwards the building was let to various lessees at an aggregate rental of $3,850.00 for the remaining two months of the year.

Portions of the old Supreme Court were let for varying periods to various lessees during the year.

The old Land Office building was let for seven months at a rental of $453.00 per month and afterwards for five months for a sum of $1,200.00 per month.

There is nothing to report under this heading in Kowloon nor in the New Territories.

11. Permits to occupy lands, etc., for Short Periods.-These were of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of individual mention; most of them were for small areas to be held on half-yearly permits.

12. Extensions of Short Period Leases.-The lease of Garden Lot No. 3 was extended for 21 years from 24th March, 1920, the premium paid being $1,201.90. The leases of Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 733, 734, 735, 736, 737, 746, 747, 921, 922 and 923 were extended to 75 years, commencing from 1st January, 1897, the premium charged being respectively $66.40, $67.50, $68.00, $67.50, $67.40, $58.90, $60.60, $70.00, $70.00 and $70.00. The lots mentioned were originally leased to squatters for a period of 21.years from 1st January, 1897.

There were no extensions of short period leases in the New Territories.

13. Prospecting and Mining Licences.-One Mining Licence and eight Prospecting Licences for areas in the New Territories were issued.

Q 11

Land Sales, &c.

14. Resumptions.-

Amount paid.

Purpose

Description of Property.

Area ft.

sq.

$

of Resumption.

Hongkong.

Portions of Nos. 59, 61, 63

and 63A, Wanchai Road

Dealt with 7,000.00 by B.O.O.,

Widening Wanchai

Road.

area

Sections A, B and C of

I L. 656...

R.P. of I.L. 863

Portion of M.L. 25

no

stated.

Do.

1331

16,500.00 3.333.33

Public purpose.

8,000

12,000 00

F.L. 40.

16 acres 18,000.00

Shaukiwan I.L. 314...

805

542.00

311...

5561

206.00

""

Term of lease expired.

312...

252

300.00

Do.

15

and 222...

Building on S.I.L's. 221

Shaukiwan Lot 228

| 204.00

Do.

Construction of a new

street.

For building sites.

Public purpose.

Payment made ex- gratia.

Shaukiwan Improve-

ment Scheme.

2,464

500.00

Public

229

858

purpose.

>>

Shaukiwan Im-

225

228

100.00

226

183

provement Scheme.

Portion of S.S. 2, Sec. A of M.L. 36, house No. 122... Portion of I.L. 199, houses

Nos. 67-93

Portion of R.P. of S.S. 1 Sec. A of M.L. 36 house No. 118...

141

3,000.00

1,565

21,900.00

Dealt with 12,000.00 by B 0.0..

no

area

stated.

Portions of houses Nos.

95, 97 and 99, Queen's

Widening Queen's

Road East.

Road East

280

9,800.00

Portion of R.P. of S.S. 1,

Sec. D of I.L. 61, house

No. 187 ...

110

3.000.00

Portion of Sec. A of S.S. 1 of Sec. D of I.L. 61, houses Nos. 189 & 191.......j

260

6,000.00

Land Sales, &c.

Q 12

14. Resumptions.-Continued.

Amount paid.

Description of Property.

Purpose of

Area

sq. ft. $

Resumption.

Portion of house No. 134...

279

3,300.00

128..

211 3,000.00

11

136...

359

>>

**

4,000.00

130

}}

>>

Widening Queen's

& 132...

493

6,000.00

Road East.

120...

123

3,000.00

124

""

دو

& 126...

354

5,900.00

Lot 190, Shan Pin Terrace

Kowloon.

188

439.00

Public Purpose.

Portion of K.I.L. 720

116

116.00

Widening Dundas

Street.

721

220

297.00

Widening Hamilton

"

K.I.L. 106 R.P. and Sec.

K. S.S. 2

Street.

4,600.00

Construction of New

Road from Mong-

kok-tsui to Kow-

loon City.

K.I.L. 108, Sec. D, and

K.I.L. 107 Secs. F and I..

3,330.71

Do.

S.S. 1 of Sec. K of K.I.L.

106

1,515

6,013.36

S.S. 2 of Sec. J of K.I.L.

Do.

106

Sec. A K.I.L. 106

727

J

107

1,507 8,081.04

K.I.L. 665

99.00

669...

400.60

55

Do.

670...

44.80

Ma Tau Wei Lots 546-554..

265.00

New Kowloon and

New Territories.

Kowloon Tong Lot No. 18.. 84 mows

42 lots (various)

18,400.66

Various lots

'36 acre

913.33

Public purpose. Shamshuipo Impro- vement Scheme. In some cases, areas of land were exchanged. Construction of Road from Mongkoktsui to Kowloon City.

:

Q. 13

Land Sales, &c.

14. Resumptions.-Continued.

Description of Property.

Amount paid.

Area

ft. sq.

$

Purpose of Resumption.

32 lots in Cheung Sha

Wan and district ..

10.80 acres 42,041.02 Public

purposes,

mainly for Service

Roads to Cheung

Sha Wan Reclam- ation.

Taipo Market Lots 38,

38C, 38D, 38E, 38F and

38G

2,001

1.227.93

Improvements

to

Taipo Market Vill-

age.

S.D. 1

Lots 138 R.P. and 44,

Lots 511 & 547 D.D. 2

Kowlon Bay Reclamation... 15.244

167.20

511.00 115,470.00

Public purpose.

Site for New Gaol.

acres

Northern District, N.T.,

214.49

Various reasons.

12, lots

acre

Northern District, N.T.,

100 lots re-entered for non-payment of Crown

rent

Southern District; N.T.,

150 lots ...

Southern District, N.T., 62 lots were surrendered or re-entered for non- payment of Crown Rent..

25.88 acres 55,597.05

Various reasons.

15. Lease Plans.-Plans and particulars (in duplicate) of 126 lots were prepared and forwarded to the Land Office in con- nection with the issue of leases.

16. Boundary Stones.-Boundary Stones were fixed to 64 lots in Hongkong, 17 in Kowloon and 69 in the New Territories.

17. Surveys. Some progress was made with the Ordnance Survey. about 140 acres being surveyed and plotted to a scale of 1 in 50 ft. This was chiefly composed of very close detail work in the City of Victoria. The two remaining members of the staff, of those who had been on Military Service, returned early in the year, but two others were allowed to go on long leave and a third was absent on three months leave. Owing to the increased number of applications for land and the numerous surveys required for lease plans and for defining the boundaries of lots, the staff was chiefly occupied during the year in dealing with such work. A proposed new road between Causeway Bay and North Point

Land Sales, &c.

Q 14

was set out and monuments defining the centre line fixed. A main traverse of 91 chains was made and checked between Causeway Bay and Quarry Bay and numerous setting out and surrender plans were made in connection with Queen's Road East Widening Scheme.

18. Naval and Military Lands.-An area of 78,426 square feet being a portion of Inland Lot No. 87 was transferred by the Naval Authorities to the Colonial Government. This area was required in connection with the new road from Gap Road to Wanchai Gap.

The following areas were transferred to the Colonial Govern- ment by the Military Authorities, viz :——

An area of 46,677 square feet known as Murray Battery for a sum of $118,423.25 plus $103.00 for building.

A portion of North Point Battery, containing 90,288 square feet, for $21,184.50.

The remaining portion of Victoria Battery comprising an area of 1 ac 2 rds: 22 pls: for $26,565.80.

:

A portion of Belchers Battery, containing 3.750 square feet, for $625.00.

In each case, the sums enumerated above were credited to the Military Authorities in the Military Lands Account.

A portion of Elliott Battery, containing 19,820 square feet, was exchanged for an area of Crown Land, containing 26,726 square feet, to allow of a diversion to Pokfulam Road, the Colonial Government being credited with the sum of $1,680.60 as compen- sation for difference in area.

.

19. Piers.-There was only one grant under long lease in Hongkong, viz., Permanent Pier No. 33 opposite Marine Lot No. 277. This pier contained an area of 1,928 square feet and the premium paid was $1,928. An extension of 3,600 square feet at a premium of $3,000.00 was afterwards granted to this pier. An extension of 1,000 square feet was also granted to Permanent Pier No. 27 opposite Marine Lot No. 293 for a premium of $1,000.00. There were no grants under long lease in Kowloon nor in the New Territories.

Licences for the following temporary piers were issued or renewed:-22 in Hongkong, 16 in Kowloon and 7 in the New Territories. Licences were also issued or renewed for 14 slipways in Hongkong, 2 in Kowloon and 2 in the New Territories, the total fees of which amounted to $4,350.00. The premia derived in respect of temporary piers amounted to $1,932.46.

20. Cemeteries.-Aberdeen Inland Lot No. 91 containing a total area of 89,000 square feet, which includes an area of 11,290 square feet converted from Aberdeen Inland Lot No. 1, was granted to the Tung Wah Hospital as a Permanent Chinese Cemetery for the unidentified victims of the Race Course disaster.

Q 15

B. O. Work.

Work under the Buildings Ordinance.

21. By-laws and Regulations.An important addition was made to the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance No. 1 of 1903 by the passing of Ordinance No. 9 of 1920, the latter providing for the incorporation of two additional Sections (116A & 116в) in the original Ordinance. Under these Sections, the heights of storeys in domestic buildings in certain cases need not be greater than 10, feet and the heights of certain specified rooins may be less than as hitherto prescribed.

22. Plans.--There has been a slight decrease in the number of plans dealt with as compared with 1919, but there has been a marked increase in the number of new Chinese houses for which plans were submitted, viz., 199 Chinese houses more than in 1919 (the figure for 1918 being exceeded by 253).

The following is a tabulated statement showing the number of buildings, etc., for which plans were deposited during the year, the figures for 1919 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:--

1919.

1920. Increase.

Decrease.

European houses,

168

100

G8

Chinese houses,

381

580

199

Buildings and structures other than

the above,

197

164

33

Alterations and additions to exist-

ing buildings,

2,308

2.101

207

Verandahs,

289

300

11

Balconies,

168

247

79

Sunshades, Piers,

101

92

Total,

3,617

3,506

289

400

23. Certificates.-The following certificates for new buildings were issued :—

116, under Section 204 of Ordinance 1 of 1903, for 401

>

domestic buildings, of which 87 were European and 314 Chinese dwellings.

78 for 92 non-domestic buildings.

These figures show decreases of 57 and 13 in the case of “domestic " and "non-domestic" buildings respectively.

24. Notices and Permits.--The following is a tabulated state- ment of the notices served and permits issued during the year, the

24

B. O. Work.

Q 16

figures for 1919 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison :-

1919.

1920.

Increase. Decrease.

Dangerous Structure Notices,

275

185

Miscellaneous Notices.....

272

127

90 145

Private Street Improvement

Notices,

391

532

141

Nuisances reported by Officers of

the Sanitary Department,

4,075

4,340

265

Signboards,.

484 *

481

Permits,

2,162

2,472

310

Fees collected on account of the

Fees for issue of new permits....

issue of permits to obtain sand and stone from Crown land,

The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to failure to obtain per- mits, the number of convictions obtained, and the amount of fines imposed :--

$ 840

614

$ 226

82

82

Nature of Offence.

No. of Cases.

No. of Convictions.

Amount of Fines.

Removal of stone, &c., from Crown land or

foreshore without permission,

Depositing materials on Crown land with-

out permission,

Erecting or maintaining matsheds without

permission,

3

4

ཨ ེ་ཚོ། དྩོ

90

210

In cases where persons who had permission to obtain stone or other materials from Crown land had damaged trees in the vicinity, they were required to refund the cost of the damage as assessed by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department. The amount collected from this source was $280.00, as compared with $91.60 in 1919, which was credited to "Timber Sales".

No fees were received in respect of advertisements on hoardings on Crown land. Fees, amounting to $18.00, were re- ceived in respect of permission to erect matsheds on Crown land in connection with religious festivals.

25. Resumptions for Scavenging Lanes, &c.-A statement of the work done will be found under the heading "Public Works Extraordinary" (paragraphs 121, 145 & 162).

26. Private Streets.-Re-surfacing and other repairs under the provisions of Section 186 were carried out by this Department at the cost of the frontagers in twenty-three streets.

* During the year, steps were taken to cope with the numerous illegal sign- boards in certain streets in which they were most evident.

1

Q 17

B. O. Work.

27. Improvements, &c., of Public Streets.-The policy of re- quiring houses, when undergoing reconstruction, to be built at a higher level where necessary in order to provide for the future raising of certain low-lying areas in Hongkong and Kowloon has been continued. In some cases, arrangements are made with owners whereby the ground floors of their houses are retained at their former levels upon their giving an undertaking to raise such floors when the raising of the street is carried out.

In the case of some streets, steps have been taken towards effecting improvements in the building lines whilst in others schemes for widening have been decided upon. These proposals are being carried out into effect as opportunity arises.

The schemes for widening Wanchai Road, Queen's Road Central and East and Shanghai Street have been proceeded with, and, in the case of several premises, the widening scheme is being put into effect.

28. Footways.-Attention has been given to footways under balconies and verandahs, notices having been served upon owners to repair such footways.

29. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-There is no damage to record under this heading.

30. Landslips.-As a result of excavating on the site of St. John's Cathedral Hall, a boulder became dislodged causing the death of two men whilst three others were injured.

There were a few other landslips of a minor nature, none of which call for special comment.

31. Collapses. --The following collapses occurred:-

A retaining wall at No. 4, Peace Avenue.

The roof of No. 88, Temple Street.

A portion of No. 114, Queen's Road East, eausing the

death of one person.

Several others of a minor nature which do not call for

special comment.

32. Tests of Mortar.-Attention was given to the testing of mortar, 170 samples being taken from works in progress, but in no case was the mortar found to be below the accepted standard.

B. O. Work.

Q 18

33. Prosecutions. The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to illegal works and other nuisances, the number of convictions obtained and the amount of fines imposed:-

Nature of Offence.

No. of Cases.

No. of Convictions.

Amount of Fines.

$

Illegal works (i.e., divergence from approv- ed plans, non-submission of plans before commencing building opera- tions, construction of illegal works and occupation of matsheds, &c., with- out permission),

Other nuisances (i.., non-compliance with notices issued in connection with nui- sances reported by Officers of the Sanitary Department),

27

23

755.00

57

47

736.00

34. Testing Drains.-Fees, amounting to $50.00, were collected on account of additional inspections necessitated by carelessness or negligence on the part of the parties concerned in the carrying out of the work. 187 drainage inspections were made during the year.

35. Modifications.--Written modifications of various Sections of the Ordinance were granted in 58 cases under the powers con- ferred by Section 264b. This shows a decrease of 1 as compared with 1919.

36. Applications and Appeals to the Governor-in-Council under Section 265.-Applications for modifications of various Sections of the Ordinance were made to the Governor-in-Council in 18 cases, 12 of which were granted, (3 conditionally), the others being refused. Appeals to the Governor-in-Council were made in 2 cases which were granted on certain conditions.

37. Cemeteries.-Work in connection with forming new ter races, &c., to afford additional grave spaces was carried out in the following cemeteries :--

Mount Caroline (Sections A and B).

Kai Lung Wan (Section A).

Kai Lung Wan East (Section A and Plague Section). Hau Pui Loong (Sections A and B and Plague Section). Kowloon Tong (Section A).

Sai Yu Shek (Section A).

In addition, various paths were surfaced, roads formed and general repairs executed at Mount Caroline, Kai Lung Wan and Kai Lung Wan East. A kitchen was added to the Sextons' Quarters at Aberdeen Cemetery.

..

Q 19

B. O. Work.

During the latter portion of the year, it was considered advisable for steps to be taken to render the areas occupied by Hau Pui Loong and Kowloon Tong Cemeteries available for build- ing purposes as early as possible. In consequence of this, it was decided to set apart practically the whole of the valley in which the Small Pox Hospital (K.I.L. 1264) stands for the purposes of the "Kowloon Cemeteries". The greater portion of this area, which contains 97.22 acres, will be utilized for Chinese Cemeteries and the remainder will be reserved for European Protestants (6.61 acres) and Roman Catholics (3.12 acres). It is proposed to divert all burials which would otherwise have gone to Hau Pui Loong and Kowloon Tong Cemeteries to the new "Kowloon Cemeteries" and to give up the area on the Yaumati to Kowloon City Road formerly reserved for a European Cemetery.

38. Places of Public Entertainment Regulation Ordinance.- There is nothing to report under this heading.

39. Fires.—The following buildings were seriously injured by fire, some of them being damaged to such an extent as to require re-construction:-

No. 40, Queen's Road East.

99, Connaught Road West.

Nos. 26/32A, Praya, Kennedy Town, and 29B, Belchers

Street.

No. 291, Queen's Road Central.

Nos. 44/48, Staunton Street.

138/140, Des Voeux Road Central.

No. 82, Wing Lok Street.

20

119, Bonham Strand.

12, Peel Street.

Nos. 273/275, Queen's Road Central.

No. 24, Pokfulam Road.

Soy Street on K.M.L. 43.

Man Hing Ching Fire Cracker Factory, Mongkoktsui.

No. 9, Pekin Road.

ཏྭཾ ཀྭ

105, Shanghai Street.

310, Canton Road.

>>

14, Yiu Wa Street.

25

13 houses, Kowloon City.

30 houses, Main Street, Aberdeen.

B. O. Work.

Q 20

40. Reclamations.--The following is a statement of the private reclamations which were completed or in progress during the

year :—

Area in sq. ft.

N.K.I.L's. 190 & 191, Laichikok, (in

progress),

618,000

Aberdeen I.L's. 81 to 88, Aberdeen (in

progress),

165,000

M.L's 277 & 281, (additions to), North

Point, (in progress)......

134,200

K.I.L. 1382, To Kwa Wan, (in pro-

gress),

87,110

K.M.L. 52, (additions to), To Kwa Wan

(in progress),

138.150

Q.B.M.L. 1, (additions to), Quarry Bay,

(in progress),

33,600

The areas stated are those of the lots, which in some cases extend further inland than old high water mark and are therefore not exclusively reclaimed from the sea.

In addition to the above, considerable progress was made with the works in connection with the reclamation of about 230 acres of foreshore and sea-bed at the head of Kowloon Bay referred to in previous year's Reports. Of this reclamation, an area of 15.244 acres was surrendered to Government at a cost of $115,470.00 as a site for a new Gaol.

41. Principal Works of a Private Nature.-The new residen- tial wing at the Repulse Bay Hotel on R.B.L. 142 was completed and the erection of an additional residential wing and of an extensive two-storeyed garage was commenced.

Considerable progress was made with the erection of a power house for the China Light and Power Company on K.M.L. 93, Hunghom, and the erection of two large buildings for Officers and Staff Quarters respectively was commenced.

The large reinforced concrete godown for the Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company on K.M.L. 91 referred to in last year's Report was completed and the erection of a large block of offices for the same Company on K.M.L. 11. was commenced.

The development of the area at Ho Mun Tin (K.I.L's. 1308 to 1348) referred to in last year's Report was proceeded with, 17 houses were completed by the end of the year, and 4 others were in course of erection.

Within the area owned by the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company at Hunghom, two large blocks containing 16 houses were erected to accommodate the Company's European Staff and another block was commenced. Progress was made with sites for other blocks and with the erection of a Platers' Shed and of the other buildings referred to in last year's Report,

1

Q 21

B. O. Work.

The reclamation of N.K.I.L's. 190 and 191, Laichikok, for the Standard Oil Company progressed throughout the year, and the erection of a Welding Shed, of additions to the Filling House on N.K.I.L. 2, and of 12 large oil tanks N.K.I.L's. 190 and 191 was commenced.

The extensive reclamation adjacent to the Dock at Aberdeen was practically completed, 5 Chinese houses on A.1.L. 88 were completed and the erection of 26 Chinese houses on A.I.L's. 84 to 87 was commenced.

The erection of 30 Chinese houses in Li Chit Street, on M.L. 25, of 18 Chinese houses in Chun Sing Street on I.L. 834, and of 9 Chinese houses in Water Street, on M.L. 198 was completed.

Considerable progress was made with the erection of the im- portant extension to St. Joseph's College on I.L. 1642.

The extensive business premises on I.L's. 1864 and 1865 for the Kwong Sang Hong, referred to in last year's Report, were completed.

The large Cigarette Factory on I.L. 1315, Bowrington, was nearing completion at end of the year.

Considerable progress was made with the erection on M.L. 103, Section B, in Des Voeux Road Central, of an addition to the Hongkong Bank, and with the erection, on I.L. 291A, No. 4, Queen's Road Central, of a block of offices six storeys in height.

The erection of several additional godowns at Kennedy Town was commenced and several of these and of those referred to in last year's Report were completed.

The erection of several factories, godowns, etc., in various parts of Kowloon was commenced and several were completed.

A large block comprising Printing Office and Quarters on I.L. 2235, Whitfeild, was erected.

The erection of a large Sweet Factory on I.L. 2234, Whit- feild, was commenced.

A block containing 18 residenial flats on. K.1.L. 574, Hanoi Road, was nearing completion at the end of the year, and the erection of several other blocks containing 69 flats in Nathan and Kimberley Roads, etc., was commenced.

The erection of blocks containing 33 residential flats on I.L's. 2139, 2267 and 471, May Road, Tregunter Path and Yee Wo Street, was commenced.

The building on I.L. 579, Robinson Road, formerly St. Joseph's College, was converted into residential flats.

The reclamation of an area of about 134,200 sq. ft. for the Asiatic Petroleum Company on M.L's. 277 and 281, North Point,

B. O. Work.

22

was commenced. The formation of the large area known as I.. 2273, Whitfeild, for the same Company was also commenced. On the latter area, two large fuel tanks and other buildings were constructed and the erection of three additional tanks was commenced.

In the compound of St. John's Cathedral, buildings compris- ing a Church Hall, Caretakers' Quarters, etc., were erected and practically completed by the end of the year.

At Quarry Bay, the erection of a block containing 6 re- sidential flats on Q.B.I.L. 7 was commenced, some additions to workshops on Q.B.I.L. 2 were commenced and progress was made with reclamation and other works on Q.B.M.L's. 1 and 2.

Two large blocks containing 33 residential flats on K.I.L's. 715 and 721, Nathan Road, were erected,

The following is a summary of the smaller works which have been completed or commenced during the year, in addition to the larger ones specifically mentioned above:-

Works completed.

37 European houses in Hongkong including 1 in the Peak

5

District, Kowloon,

21 Chinese houses in Victoria,

19

139

6

17

5

"

**

23

Hongkong Villages,

Yaumati and Mongkoktsui, Taikoktsui,

Shamshuipo, and

Kowloon Villages,

besides numerous buildings of a non-domestic character in Hong- kong and in Kowloon.

Works commenced.

15 European houses in Hongkong including 3 in the Peak

3

District, Kowloon,

23 Chinese houses in Victoria,

23

112

15

""

94

2

26

Hongkong Villages,

Yaumati and Mongkoktsui, Taikoktsui,

Shamshuipo,

Kowloon Villages, and

on the reclamation at the head of Kow-

loon Bay, besides numerous other buildings of a non-domestic character in Hongkong and in Kowloon.

33

Q 23

P.W.R. Hongkong.

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

HONGKONG.

42. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings generally were kept in a state of good repair, a number of them being renovated throughout in accordance with the recurring programme. The expenditure amounted to $102,251.81.

43. Improvements to Buildings.—The principal improvements carried out under this heading comprised the construction of reinforced concrete partitions to bedrooms, Government House; renewal of poultry and meat stalls in reinforced concrete at Central Market; surfacing yard to Bullock Stables, Wanchai, with cement concrete and granite setts; renewing floors in cement concrete and hard boarding, erecting verandah for Indians and new urinal for Chinese at the Aberdeen Police Station; erecting concrete parti- tions at the Ellis Kadoorie School; renewing roof to verandah to the Office of the Colonial Secretariat in reinforced concrete. Numerous other improvements of a smaller nature were effected in various buildings. The total expenditure under the Vote amounted to $17,365.42.

44. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-The lighthouses were paint- ed and colourwashed according to programme and otherwise main- tained in good order at a cost of $6,330.98.

45. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City.

Approximate

Improvements to Roads and Bridges in City. Mileage, 61.-The road surfaces were maintained generally in a satisfactory condition. The asphaltum treatment of carriageways was still further extended throughout the City, and granite setts laid in the carriageways in those portions of the City where the increasing traffic rendered such paving desirable.

The following figures show the extent of the operations carried out at the Government Quarry during the year:-

Stone. Various grades passed through crushers :---

A total quantity of 18,071 cubic yards, of which 842 cubic yards were made into tar macadam, 1,478 cubic yards into sand carpeting and 15,751 cubic yards were delivered to various works as the material came from the crushers. Further, 1,306 yards lineal of reinforced concrete standards and railings were made, and 43,634 granolithic paving slabs for use on footways.

P.W.R. Hongkong.

Q 24

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year :—

Substitution of granite setts for macadam or

concrete,

Substitution of 2" asphaltum laid on cement

sy. yds.

1,613

concrete bed for macadam,

7.187

Substitution of asphaltum carpeting laid on

macadam for ordinary macadam,

4,018

240

39,650

10.772

Resurfacing worn-out concrete footways with.

asphaltic sand carpeting,

Tarring and sanding,

2" granolithic paving slabs laid in footways,

Approx-

46. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City. Improvements to Roads and Bridges outside City. imate Mileage, 60.-The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner.

Further extensive improvements were undertaken on the Pokfulam Road between the junction of Victoria Road and the No. 10 Bridge.

The following are particulars of the improved surfacing intro- duced on a number of roads in addition to those mentioned in previous reports :-

Tarring and sanding,

2′′ Granolithic paving slabs laid in footways, Substitution of asphaltum carpeting for lime

and cement concrete,

sq. yds.

70,530

1,140

500

47. Maintenance of Telephones including all Cables.—The lines and instruments were maintained in good order.

Several diversions of the telephone lines had to be made on account of road improvements and alteration to buildings.

Eight additional telephones to Government Buildings were installed, seven of which were connected to the Central Police Station exchange and, the other to the New Government Offices exchange.

Electric bell services and alarms were installed in the follow- ing buildings :—

(a.) Victoria Gaol.

(b.) No. 8 Police Station.

(e) Harbour View (Quarters for Police).

The undermentioned new buildings were wired throughout for electric light, bells and fans :-

(a.) Leighton Hill Quarters (2 Blocks).

(b.) Happy Valley Quarters ( 2 Blocks).

Q 25

P.W.R. Hongkong.

All the electric services in Government Buildings were maintained.

Work executed in the electrical workshops comprised the making of bell-pushes, 3" and 6" bells, special fittings for certain electric lights, blocks for mounting electric light fittings, bronzing new and old fittings, rewinding and cleaning fans the making of battery boxes, and a large amount of repair work in conection with the above services.

48. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs &c.—The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs generally were cleaned and main- tained in good condition, the open nullahs and channels in the City of Victoria and in the Shaukiwan District being cleaned by the Sanitary Department. The automatic flushing tanks were kept working continuously and the manual flushing tanks were operated during the period of low tides. Sand deposits were cleared as they occurred. The temporary timber outfall opposite Triangle Street was kept in repair.

The sedimentation tanks at Wanchai Gap and near R.B.L. 137, Pokfulam Road, were periodically sludged.

All metal work in connection with the various drainage systems was inspected, and, where found necessary, was repaired and tarred.

Repairs were made to several sewers, nullahs, storm-water drains and channels, the most important being to sewers in Ship Street opposite Hau Fung Lane; Lane west of Pedder Street between Des Voeux Road and Queen's Road; Wilmer Street: Des Voeux Road West between Centre Street and Eastern Street ; Wongneichong Road opposite Latrine; Pottinger Street opposite Lok Hing Lane; Swatow Street; Conduit Road east of I.L. 2137; Connaught Road opposite the Harbour Office; Wing Lok Street at the junction of Cleverly Street; Praya East between Yee Wo Street and Arsenal Street; Morrison Hill Road opposite Civil Service Club; Shaukiwan Road at Tung Lo Wan: Praya East opposite Jardine's Bazaar; Kennedy Road; Water Street between Second and Third Streets; and to storm-water drains in Seymour Road; Bowrington Road; Central Police Station Compound; Old Bailey; Main Street, Shaukiwan West; and to nullahs at Albany, Calder Path, and Whitfeild near the Bay View Police Station.

About 1,015 feet of old disused drains of various sizes and types were destroyed and filled in.

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations,

Repairs,

Tools for cleansing operations,

General incidental expenditure,

...

$11,635.87

4.775.55

471.12

986.73

Total.

as against $17,906.84 in the previous year.

$17,869.27

+

P.W.R. Hongkong.

Q 26

49. Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and Hill District.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City and its precincts was 1,217, an increase of 15 over the previous year, and in the Hill District 135, an increase of 2 as compared with the previous year.

50. Electric Lighting, City, Hill District and Shaukiwan.- The number and positions of incandescent lamps in the principal roads of the City are as under :-

City of Victoria

Various Roads.... 55 On Tramway route

(58 pairs),

1,000 C.P.

116

100 C.P.

Shaukiwan,

30*

50 C.P.

Bowen Road,

10

32 C.P.

...

...

...

Path from Bowen Road to May Road, G

32 C.P.

Lugard Road,

...

32 C.P.

Barker Road,

16 C.P.

Wongneichong Road,

100 C.P.

Magazine Gap Road,

32 C.P.

Tregunter Path,

7

32 C.P.

Excelsior Terrace,

4

32 C.P.

Breezy Point Quarters,

1

50 C.P.

51. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The Principal items of expenditure under this heading were the general repairs carried out to the Lee Kee Wharf at a cost of $2,984.52 and to the Kennedy Town Cattle Wharf at a cost of $1,564.30. Consider- able repairs were also executed to Murray Pier.

52. Maintenance of Public Cemetery.--Improvements were made to Sections 16C and 17 in order to provide additional areas for interments.

53. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has already been alluded to in paragraph 37 of this Report.

54. Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds.-The various grounds were maintained in good order. The use of Departmental labour for the purpose of mowing grass, cleansing ditches, etc., was continued.

Plot "E" allotted to the Military and Navy for football was returfed.

* In addition to these, the Taikoo Dock Company provide and light 10 lamps,- each having a cluster of 3-100 C.P. incandescent lamps.-for lighting the road adjacent to their property, and the Taikoo Sugar Refining Company provide and light 7-2,000 C.P. incandescent lamps for lighting it adjacent to their property.

Q 27

P.W.R. Hongkong.

55. Dredging Foreshores.-The Grab Dredger was employed at the following places and removed the quantities of material stated during the year?-

Shamshuipo Reclamation,-trench for foundations of

Shamshuipo Ferry Pier,

sea-wall....

Drain outfalls,

Causeway Bay Shelter,

...

...

Total,

cubic yds.

8.449

-2,019

...

12,286

17,802

40,556

22,754 cubic yards of the above material was deposited on the site of the Shamshuipo Reclamation and 17,802 cubic yards on the East Point Reclamation Site.

The vessel was put on the slip and thoroughly overhauled. defective engine parts being renewed, by the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company at a cost of $1,054.60.

56. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The continuous heavy rains throughout the year, and more especially during the months of June and July, caused numerous landslips and badly scoured the macadamized surfacing not treated with asphaltum.

The new road between Repulse Bay and Shaukiwan was closed to traffic on two occasions on account of very large landslides at Stanley and Sai Wan Gaps, necessitating the erection of retaining walls.

There were also very heavy landslides on the following roads:

Pokfulam Road near the University;

New Road from Bowen Road to Wanchai Gap; Findlay Road.

57. Stores Depreciation.-The adjustment of store values and re-conditioning of old stores have been met from this Vote, amounting to $78.81.

The following sums were credited to the Vote :—

$2,695.96, being rebate on freight charges in connection with stores purchased in England through the Crown Agents; $2,996.90, being the value of stores returned, which had been issued prior to 1920.

The result has been that, instead of showing any expenditure. the Vote shows a credit balance of $5,614.05.

58. Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks.-A constant supply of water was maintained throughout the year without at any time having to restrict the supply by house services

P.W.R. Hongkong.

Q 28

or resort to the use of the rider mains. Last year was the first occasion since 1908 which it has been found possible to give a continuous supply throughout the year and it is hoped that a restricted supply will not again become necessary.

The total quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoirs on the 1st January amounted to 1,551 million gallons, there being 397 million gallons in the gravitation reservoirs and 1,154 million gallons in the low-level reservoirs requiring pumping. It reached a minimum on the 25th April when the total was 929.97 million gallons, there being then 221.5 million gallons in the gravitation reservoirs.

The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow levels for the following periods :---

Capacity to permanent overflow level.

(Million gallons.)

384.80

Reservoir.

Taitam,

Taitam Byewash,

22:36

Taitam Intermediate,

195.91

Taitam Tuk,

1,419.00

3034

66.00

Wongueichong,.

Pokfulam,

Period.

94 days between 4th July

and 26th October.

33 days between 20th July

and 16th October:

214 days between 1st June

and 31st December.

113 days between 20th July

and 9th November.

33 days between 20th July

and 18th October. 98 days between 3rd June

and 20th November.

The rainfall for the year amounted to 10785 inches (Observatory Record) or 24-35 inches above the average.

The wet season was abnormally long, extending from April to November, during which period 101.95 inches of rain fell.

The maximum quantity of water impounded in all the reservoirs during the year amounted to 2,15168 million gallons during September or 33-27 million gallons more than the maximum during

1919.

The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 1,822.21 million gallons.

No. 1 Engine (Tangye) ran 123 days.

2

>>

3.5

"

>>

(Simpson)

107 64

105

15

**

The total quantity of water pumped from Taitam Tuk Reservoir during the year amounted to 779.28 million gallons, 486-38 million gallons being pumped by the new Simpson Engines and 292.92 million gallons by the Tangye Engines. This total is less than last year's by 497 million gallons.

1

Month.

Q 29

P.W.R. Hongkong. -

The following is a comparative statement of the cost of pumping during 1919 and 1920:-

Taitam Tuk Pumping Station.

Coal, Wages,

74,765.00 *

9,785.42

Miscellaneous, including repairs and stores other

than coal,....

52,155.00 * 11,885.63

7,219,16

4,066.12

Total,

$ 91,769.58

$ 68,107.05

1919.

1920.

*This is the value of the coal consumed during the year. Coal to the value of $6,300.00 was carried forward from 1919 to 1920 and coal to the value of $315.00 was carried forward from 1920 to 1921. The price of coal was $22.50 during the whole year.

A comparative statement of the local rainfall for the year at various points is given in the following table

:—

Royal

Observatory.

Kowloon

Reservoir.

Public

Gardens.

Taitam

Reservoir

Taitam Tuk

Reservoir.

Pokfulam

Reservoir.

January,

.065

.07

.11

February

2.640

3.66

3.10

2.48

2.23

2.33

5.44

March,

1.390

1.53

1.50

1.87

1.40

1.17

.2.15

April,

8.265 10.16

7.87

8.67

8.19

8.14

7.03

May,

18.155 18.26

17.68

16.87

17.99

16.24

13.44

June,.

15.555 12.93

17.90

15.15

13.71

13.42

18.82

July,

24.040 26.39

27.28

25.87

25.10

26.32

24.55

August,.

10.975 14.78

14.74

8.56

8.44

10.26

28.35

September,

11.750 12.01

17.22

10.97

10.63

14.11

7.90

October,

6.190

7.15

8.66

$.95

8.64

7.24

4.68

November,

7.045

5.99

7.16

4.72

5.38

5.26

7.50

December,

1.810

1.24

-0.92

0.56

0.61

0.12

0.59

1919,

Total 1920.. 107.880 114.17 124.03 104.67 102.32 76.140 79.07 $9.31 90.48 79.39

104.61 120.56

83.82 96.02

*

Increase, or Decrease,

+31.740+35.10 +34.72 +14.19 +22.93 +20.79 +24.54

The total quantity of water supplied during the year amount- ed to 2,731.93 million gallons filtered and 46.20 million gallons unfiltered making a grand total of 2,778.13 million gallons, or 295 34 million gallons more than during 1919.

The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes throughout the year amounted to about 267 gallons.

Taipo

Quarters.

P.W.R. Hongkong.

Q 30

In arriving at this figure, the population has been estimated at 279,300.

Full details of consumption, etc., will be found in Annexes C. & D.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst show that the water was of good quality throughout the year and the results obtained by bacteriological examinations were also satisfactory.

The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District of the City amounted to 145 13 million gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of about 396,000 gallons, whilst 48.19 million gallons were pumped to the Hill District, giving an average daily consumption of 132,000 gallons. As compared with 1919, there was an increase of 6·39 million gallons pumped to the High Level Districts and an increase of 6·17 million gallons pumped to the Hill District.

The grand total pumped during the year to the High Level and Hill Districts amounted to 193-32 million gallons as compared with 180-76 million gallons pumped during 1919, an increase of 12:56 million gallons.

Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities of water pumped to the High Levels of the City and to the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E.

All engines, motors and station-buildings have been kept in good repair throughout the year.

The work of overhauling the valves on the principal mains in the City was continued during the year, the number thoroughly repaired amounting to 144.

One additional Group Hydrant was fixed in the City.

The number of meters in use at the end of the year amounted to 1,877 in the City and 183 in the Hill District mak- ing a total of 2,060 as compared with 1,838 and 181 or a total of 2,019 at the end of 1919. These figures do not include 15 meters in use at Pokfulam.

The quantity of water supplied by meters was as follows:

Filtered

:

Trade......

Domestic (City),

(Hill District),

310-08 million gallons.

213.22

>>

48.19

Unfiltered,...

46.20

"

Total,

617.69

These figures show an increase of 41.44 million gallons in the quantity supplied by meters as compared with 1919.

1

Q 31

P.W.R. Hongkong.

New services were constructed or old ones altered, improved. repaired or connected to the mains to the number of 1.499 and 75 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The number of inspections of private services carried out amounted to 9,956. Defective services were found in 494 cases all of which were put in proper repair after the usual notices had been served.

59. Maintenance of Waterworks, Shaukiwan.—A full supply of water was maintained from the beginning of the year until the middle of January when, owing to the early dry season, the streains dropped rapidly and it was found necessary to curtail the supply. By the end of January, the streams bad fallen so low that the supply became totally inadequate and water from a new source had to be obtained. Through the courtesy of Messrs. Butterfield and Swire, a connection was made to the Taikoo Private Waterworks and, by this means, from 29th January to 31st March when the streams had sufficiently recovered, the Government supply was augmented.

The total quantity of water drawn from the Taikoo Water- works was about 990,000 gallons.

The average daily consumption for the year was 146,000 gallons, and during January the consumption fell to the minimum of 89,000 gallons per day. These figures do not include the quantity supplied to the Sai Wan Battery.

The total consumption for the year amounted to 57-24 million gallons which includes 3-87 million gallons to the Barracks at Sai Wan and 3-38 million gallons supplied to the boat population, or an average of about 156,000 gallons per day. These figures show an increase of more than 100% over the consumption during 1914 when the last additions were made to the Shaukiwan Works.

Details of the consumption are given in Annexe F.

There were 10 meters in use at the close of the year.

60. Maintenance of Waterworks, Aberdeen.-A satisfactory supply of water was maintained throughout the year, the total consumption being 21.98 million gallons, including 6·23 million gallons supplied through the water boat station, as compared with a total consumption of 20.66 million gallons and a water boat supply of 575 million gallons during 1919. The average con- sumption throughout the year amounted to 60.000 gallons per day.

Details of the consumption are given in Annexe G.

There were 9 meters in use at the close of the year.

61. Water Account.--The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 1,325. A systematic overhaul of all meters is now being carried out.

-

P.W.R, Hongkong.

Q 32

The following is a statement of expenditure under the Vote: -

New meters (difference in value between

issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters,

1.346.45

7.739.57

125.62

2,884.26

. Total,

...$ 12,095.90

Meter boxes, Miscellaneous,

P.W.R. KOWLOON.

62. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings generally were kept in a state of good repair, a number of them being renovated throughout in accordance with the recurring programme. The expenditure amounted to $14,857.25.

63. Improvements to Buildings.—A number of improvements were carried out at several of the Government Buildings at a cost of $1,528.19. None of them call for special mention.

64. Maintenance of

of Roads and Bridges. Approximate

Improvements to Roads and Bridges.

mileage 28.—The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory

manner.

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year :-

Surfacing macadam with 1′′ asphaltum

carpeting,

Substitution of 2" asphaltic mixture laid on

cement concrete bed for macadam,

Tarring and Sanding,

sq. yds.

1.450

970 7.000

39,764

2" Granolithic paving slabs laid in footways,

65. Maintenance of Telephones.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order.

A telephone was installed at the Yaumati Slipway and con- nected to the Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station Exchange.

Electric bell services were installed in Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station.

The new Fire Station was wired for electric light, bell and fan services.

All electric services in Government buildings were maintained in good order.

66. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &e.-The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs were cleansed and maintained in good condition, the open channels and nullahs being attended to

1

I

33

P.W.R. Kowloon.

by the Sanitary Department. Sand deposits were removed as they occurred. Repairs were made to the sewers in Hong Lok Street at the junction of Nelson Street; Shanghai Street between Public Square Street and Wing Sing Lane; Shanghai Street at the junction of Soy Street; Pitt Street at the junction of Reclam- ation Street; and to storm-water drain at Saigon Street outfall W.I. railings were also fixed alongside the nullah in Waterloo Road.

All metal work in connection with the drainage systems was inspected and, where necessary, repaired and tarred. About 317 feet of old disused drains of various sizes and types were destroyed and filled in.

The details of the expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations. Repairs,

...

Tools for cleansing operations,.. General incidental expenditure,

Total,

as against $5,853.65 in the previous year.

... 4,918.79

997.81

226.59

361.28

.$ 6,504,47

;

67. Gas Lighting.---The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year was 348, an increase of 8 over the previous

year.

68. Electric Lighting.—The number of electric lamps in use at the end of the year, all of which are incandescent, was 140, an increase of 8 as compared with the previous year.

69. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.--The principal item executed under this heading was general repairs to Tsim Sha Tsui Pier at a cost of $577.83.

70. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has already been anuded to in paragraph 37 of this Report.

71. Maintenance of Recreation Grounds.-The use of depart- mental labour for keeping these grounds in good order was continued during the year.

72. Typhoon und Rainstorm Damages.-The heavy rains already referred to in paragraph 56 of this Report caused numerous landslips throughout the district, the largest of which, was at Ho Mun Tin on the East side of Victory Avenue, necessitating the erection of a small retaining wall.

The surfaces of those roads treated with asphaltum suffered only to a trifling extent, but practically the whole of the ordinary macadamized roads had to be repaired, owing to scour.

P.W.R. Kowloon.

Q 34

73. Maintenance of Waterworks.-A constant supply of water was maintained throughout the year, the total quantity supplied being 603 million gallons giving an average daily consumption of 1.65 million gallons or 15.6 gallons per head per day, taking an estimated population of 105,500.

Details are given in Annexe H.

The quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoir on the 1st January amounted to 298 55 million gallons and it reached a minimum on the 24th April when it amounted to 176·70 million gallons. The reservoir was at or above its permanent overflow level from 12th June to 29th December. The quantity of water remaining in the reservoir at the end of the year amounted to 352.5 million gallons.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst and the examinations made by the Bacteriologist were satisfactory.

The various buildings were kept in a good state of repair during the year.

There were 584 meters in use at the close of the increase of 37 as compared with 1919.

year, an

House Services were constructed, altered or repaired in 212 instances, and 41 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

74. Water Account.-The number of meters examined and repaired during the year amounted to 303.

The following is a statement of expenditure under the vote :-

New Meters (difference in value between

issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters,

Meter boxes,

Miscellaneous,

$1,758.60

2,692.79

1.019.65

5.20

Total...........

$ 5,476.24

P.W.R. NEW TERRITORIES.

75. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings generally were kept in a good state of repair, a number of them being renovated in accordance with the recurring programme. The expenditure amounted to $14,180.84.

76. Improvements to Buildings.-Improvements to three Go- vernment buildings were carried out at a cost of $1,468.46.

77. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges.

Improvements to Roads and Bridges.

Approximate mileage

66.—The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner.

35

P.W.R. New Territories.

In connection with the widening of the Taipo Causeway, new macadam was laid to the required camber and the surfacing treated with asphaltum.

Owing to the difficulty in obtaining satisfactory progress with the work under the maintenance contract, it was decided, at the end of September to cancel the contract, and employ departmental gangs for repairing the whole of the roads in the New Territories.

The following are particulars of the improved surfacing introduced on the new roads laid out at Shamshuipo :-

Tarring and Sanding,

2" granolithic paving slabs laid in footways,

sq. yds. 2,400 2,474

78. Maintenance of Telephones.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order.

A telephone was installed at Lai Chi Kok Branch Prison and connected to the Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station Exchange.

All the telephones and electric signalling apparatus on the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway were maintained in good condition.

All telephone alarms were kept in working order.

79. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.-The sewers and the trained nullahs at Shamshuipo, and the concrete channels in Kowloon City were cleansed and maintained in good order. About 100 feet of old disused drains of various sizes and types were destroyed and filled in.

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations,

Repairs,

Tools for cleansing operations,

$371.51 31.46

General incidental expenditure.

84.40

Total,.

$487.37

as against $335.91 in the previous year.

80. Electric Lighting, Shamshuipo.-The number of lamps in use at the end of the year, all of which are incandescent, was 46, the same as mentioned in last year's Report.

81. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has already heen alluded to in paragraph 37 of this Report.

82. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The heavy rains referred to in paragraph 56 of this Report caused a considerable amount of damage in the shape of landslips along the new and old roads.

P.W.R. New Territories.

૨. 36

The Taipo Road, near the 6th mile, was breached the full width for a length of 130 feet, necessitating the closing of this road for a considerable period whilst those portions of it, where improvements were being effected, also suffered considerable damage.

The principal landslips occurred between the 13th and 17th miles on the Taipo Road and between Tsun Wan and Tsing Lung Tau on the Coastal Road. The surfacing to the Coastal Road especially on the steep portions.was badly scoured and had to be entirely re-surfaced.

On the Tsun Wan Road, two bridges and one culvert were damaged and had to be reconstructed.

The Kung Ling Bridge between Fanling and Au Ha Gap was badly damaged necessitating extensive repairs.

83. Maintenance of Waterworks, Laichikok.--The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 121.02 million gallons which is an increase of 5.31 million gallons over 1919 or an average of 330.000 gallons per day.

Details of consumption are given in Annexe J.

There were 16 meters in use at the close of the year.

84. Water Account.-Meters were examined and repaired in 13 instances.

The expenditure under the vote was as follows

New meters (difference in value between

issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters,

Meter boxes.

Miscellaneous.....

$262.80

6.13

2.19

Total.........

$271.12

L

1

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

HONGKONG.

85. Central Police Station,-Extension.-This building was practically completed during 1919 and was fully described in paragraph 86 of last year's Report. A small amount of work remaining to be done to the two lower floors was executed during January and the whole building was ready for occupation before the end of that month..

1920 Estimates, .$60,000.00 | Total Estimates,..

$281,000.00

Expenditure to

. $263,161,63*

1920 Expenditure,... $35,528.53 31/12/20,...

*In addition to this amount, a sum of $244,362.60 was expended in the

resumption of the necessary property.

Q 37

P.W.E. Hongkong.

86. Imports & Exports Office.-The work was well advanced at the end of 1919 and by the end of March the building was ready for occupation.

It has been designed as an extension to the Harbour Office and its front elevation is a continuation of the Harbour Office facade. The ground floor consists of a large Permit Office. 46′ 10′′ × 27'-0" with two small offices and lavatory accommoda- tion behind. The two upper floors are each self-contained flats for occupation as European Quarters, and consist of a Living Room and two Bedrooms together with Bathrooms, Kitchen, Servery, Servants Quarters, etc., the average size of the Living and Bedrooms is about 15'-6" square. Access to the upper floors is obtained by means of the existing staircase at the end of the Harbour Office building.

The upper floors are at present used as office accommodation. pending the erection of other buildings.

1920 Estimates,

$45,000.00 | Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

1920 Expenditure,... 32,683.64 31/12/20,.

.$345,000.00-

83,338.59

87. Quarters for European Officers, Leighton Hill.--This work was referred to in paragraph 91 of the 1918 Report and paragraph 88 of last year's Report.

By the end of the year, the houses 8 in number were nearing completion.

The buildings are two storeys high and comprise the following accommodation :-

Ground Floor-Entrance Hall 22′0′′ x 14′0′′, Drawing Room 25′0′′ x 20'0", Dining Room 22′0′′ x 17′0′′ together with Kitchen, Pantry. Servants Quarters, etc.

First Floor.-Three Bedrooms 25′0′′ x 20′0′′, 22′0′′ x 19′0′′, 22'0" x 18'0", respectively, with Bathrooms attached. fitted with European baths. One water flushed closet is provided in each house. There is a Basement . under Front Verandah only.

Externally the walls are of brick covered with rough cast plaster relieved by cement dressings.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,

$140,000.00 | Total Estimates,

19,493.89

$240,000.00

1920 Expenditure,

$159,493.89 159,493.89

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

$184,884.44

88. Quarters for Scavenging Coolies, Hospital Road.-This work was referred to in paragraph 90 of last year's Report.

The erection of the building has continued without interruption and by the end of the year the retaining walls, granite work to sub-basement, and brickwork to basement were completed.

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 38

The foundations in many places had to be taken down to a greater depth than was anticipated, owing to the nature of the

soil and site.

|

1920 Estimates,

$100,000.00 | Total Estimates,

...$160,000.00

1920 Expenditure,

Expenditure to 31/12/20,.

69,985.73

89. Officers' Quarters

55,184.48 |

Quarters below" Tanderagee".-As mentioned in para- graph 91 of last year's Report, the site formation and foundations to three houses were carried out by Messrs. Kang On & Co. In August, a Contract for the superstructure of three houses was let to Messrs. Kien On & Co.-the amount of the Contract being $148,331.55-and an immediate commencement made with the work. By the end of the year, the brickwork to two of the houses was completed to first floor level.

Work to the third house was not commenced by the end of year, owing to certain difficulties on the site. Quarters for the Puisne Judge. This work was placed

in the hands of Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs and a Contract was let to Messrs. Ng Mow Hing for $48,015.66 in October. By the end of the year, site preparation was nearing completion and the foundations of the main building had been commenced. Quarters on the Spur East of R. B. L. 106" Dunedin” and to the South of Barker Road for Mr. John Duncan. This work was carried out by Mr. Duncan in accordance with plans prepared by himself. The Contract for the erection of these quarters was awarded to Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. whose lump sum tender amounted to $25,000.00. The Contract Documents having been signed on the 18th October, the works were commenced on the 22nd October; the Contract time for completion is seven months. Good progress was made, the site having been level- led, foundations constructed and brickwork com- menced by the end of the year.

Quarters (elsewhere).-R. B. L. 76, Mount Kellett, The Peak, known as the "Homestead " site, was acquired during the year for the purpose of erecting quarters thereon-vide paragraph 8 of this Report. Ar- rangements were made with Messrs. Little, Adams and Wood for them to submit plans for such quarters and to supervise their construction. No work on the site had been commenced by the end of year.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$200,000.00

26.322.85

Total Estimates, ..... Expenditure to

31/12/20,.

$26,593.96

- ;

Q 39

P.W.E. Hongkong.

90. Lunatic Asylum, Extension.-This work was described in paragraph 94 of last year's Report. Some further minor items were carried out, but the extension was ready for occupation in March.

Gas fires to the private wards were fitted later in the year when they arrived from England.

1920 Estimates,

$5,000.00 | Total Estimates, Expenditure to

$30,300.00

29,918.73

1920 Expenditure, ... 4,643.99 31/12/20,

91. Quarters for Scavenging Coolies, Belchers Street. Arrangements were completed with the Military Authorities for the readjustment of the boundary between Crown land and the War Department land which resulted in an improved site for this building.

The tender of Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. for this work amounting to $102,921.37 was accepted, the contract being signed on the 21st May.

An immediate commencement was made with clearing the site, etc., and the work generally proceeded rapidly.

By the end of the year, the whole of the foundations were laid, the retaining wall completed and piers to front wall partly

erected.

· 1920 Estimates,

$80,000.00 | Total Estimates, Expenditure to

1920 Expenditure, ... 16,081.61 | 31/12/20,

$138,500.00

16,081.61

92. Fire Brigade Station.-This building will cover the site. opposite the Central Market enclosed by Des Voeux Road. Connaught Road, Jubilee Street and Queen Victoria Street, and, in addition to housing the Fire Brigade, will provide accommoda- tion for several other Gevernment Departments.

Several schemes were considered and at the end of the year preliminary working drawings were being prepared.

1920 Estimates, ......$50,000.00 | Total Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

Nil.

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

Nil.

93. Crematorium, Happy Valley.-Certain information was obtained from England and three preliminary schemes prepared, but it was decided not to proceed with the work.

1920 Estimates, ......$20,000.00 Total Estimates,......

|

1920 Expenditure, ... Nil.

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

Nil.

1

P.W.E. Hongkong.

40

94. Mortuary, Hill Road,-Removal to new site.-A prelimina- ry scheme was prepared, but it was not possible to proceed with the work during the year.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,...

$20,000.00 | Total Estimates,.....

Nil.

Expenditure to

31/12/20,..

Nil.

95. Married Quarters for Police, Caine Road.—This building will be a three-storied block containing 6 flats similar in type to those in the adjoining block.

The tender of Mr. Mou Hing for this work amounting to $65,000.83 (exclusive of fittings, etc., supplied by Government), was accepted, the contract being signed on the 14th December. Preliminary work on the site was in hand by the end of

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$50,000.00 | Total Estimates,

Nil.

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

year.

$73,000.00

Nil.

96. Additional Quarters at Happy Valley_(12_houses).- A contract was let in March to Messrs. Kang On for the erection of two blocks of terrace houses (six in each block) adjoining the existing Government Quarters in Wongueichong Road.

Each house contains an Entrance Hall, Sitting Room 20′6′′ × 15'9" and Dining Room 19′0′′ × 14′0′′ and three Bedrooms 15′9′′ × 15′0′′,14′0′′ × 12′3′′ and 15′9′′ × 10′0′′, respectively, together with two Bathrooms, one containing a Water-Closet, Kitchen, Pantry and Servants' Quarters are also included. A wide verandah is provided on both floors, that on ground floor being augmented by the addition of a bay. A basement extends under each house.

Externally the walls are of Canton bricks, the basement portion being covered with cement, and the ground and first floors with rough cast.

1920 Estimates,......$180,000.00 | Total Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,...

...$180,000.00

Expenditure to

85,892.71

85,892.71 31/12/20,...

97. Summer Quarters, Gough Hill, The Peak, for Police and others.—Preliminary drawings for two schemes were proposed but it was decided not to proceed with the work during the year.

1920 Estimates,

$20,000.00 Total Estimates,

1920 Expenditure, ... Nil.

Expenditure to

31/12/20,.

Nil.

98. Block House, Wongneichong Gap.-This work was com- menced in January, and completed for occupation at the end of July.

It consists of a brick building 25′0′′ × 213′′ with a double tiled roof and covered verandah in reinforced cement concrete on 3 sides.

?

P.W.E. Hongkong.

The accommodation includes a Living Room 19′0′′ × 12′0′′, Kitchen 7'0" × 7′0′′, Coolie Room 7′0′′ × 6′3′′, Bathroom 7′0′′ × 5'3⁄4", Coal House and Latrine.

A portion of the ground on the Western side of the station was concreted and surfaced with granolithic to form a small parade ground.

1920 Estimates..

1920 Expenditure,

$3,000.00 2.669.88

99. Latrines and Urinals.—The following public conveniences were completed during the year :--

Trough Closet (4 seats and 2 Trough Urinals) underneath

steps leading from Duddell Street to Ice House Street. Trough Closet (2 seats and 1 Trough Urinal) near Barker

Road Tram Station.

Trough Closet (2 seats and 1 Trough Urinal) adjoining the

Nullah, West of I.L. 1549, Conduit Road.

All the structures referred to were of the usual type.

The total expenditure is as under :—

1920 Estimates,

1920 Supplementary Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

100. Roads :-

$2,500.00

2,000.00

$4,500.00

4.125.60

(a.) Repulse Bay to Taitam Tuk,--1st Section,- New Road.- This section of the road referred to in paragraph 98 (c) of last year's Report was described in paragraph 93 (e) of the 1918 Report. The expenditure incurred was for payment of the reten- tion money under the Contract, and for treating the surface with asphaltum.

1920 Estimates...... $16,000.00 Total Estimates,... $148,000.00 1920 Sup. Vote,.... 2,500.00

$18,500.00 Expenditure to

31/12/20,

1920 Expenditure,.. 17,913.08 |

144,742.75

(b.) Taitam Gap to Shaukiwan,-Improving existing road.-- A description of this work was given in paragraph 98 (e) of last year's Report. The expenditure incurred was for payment of the retention money under the Contract, and for treating the surface with asphaltum.

$14,000.00 Total Estimates,..... $81,000.00

| 1,010.00

1920 Estimates,.... 1920 Sup. Vote, ....

Expenditure to 1920 Expenditure,... 15,009.22 31/12/20,....

$15,010.00

86,774:88

1

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 42

(c.) Lugard Road Extension.-By the end of the year, all the pier work for the bridging, rabble retaining walls, cutting and channelling had been finished, only a small amount of work consist- ing principally of bridge decking, railing, and road surfacing still remaining to be done in order to complete the work.

The road construction comprises 1,448 lineal feet of reinforced concrete decking and beams carried on 87 cement concrete piers, 1,543 lineal feet of rubble retaining walling and 1,859 lineal feet of hillside benching. It has a minimum width of 8 ft. throughout with a maximum gradient of 1 in 20. All rail standards and railings are of reinforced concrete.

During the construction, it was found necessary to remove numerous dangerous boulders, weighing up to 45 tons each, while others were secured by buttresses, and, in numerous cases, the bridge piers were constructed as buttresses. Owing to the nature of the work, its progress was necessarily slow.

1920 Estimates, $45,000.00 | Total Estimates,...... $55,000.00 1920 Sup. Vote, ...... 5,000.00

$50,000.00 Expenditure to 1920 Expenditure,... 49,960.23 | 31/12/20,...

65.781.63

(d.) Road contouring hillside in Wongneichong and Tai Hang Valleys.----This road, referred to in paragraph 98 (h) of last year's Report, was completed in August. It has a width of 20 feet and is protected throughout its entire length with stone parapet walls or earth mounds; the surface is coated with asphaltum. The section from Gap Road to Bowen Road is 126 miles long. The first 330 yards from Gap Road has a grade of 1 in 15, the remain- ing portion 1 in 20. Bowen Road from this point to the Taitam Tunnel outlet, a length of 37 mile, was widened to 20 ft.

1920 Estimates... $40,000.00 Total Estimates,..... $120,000.00 1920 Sup. Vote, 11,500.00

$51,500.00

Expenditure to

31/12/20,......

1920 Expenditure,... 51,435.33

124,139.58

(e.) Branch road to Wanchai Gap.-The construction of this road was of a heavy nature, and its formation involved the construction of numerous massive retaining walls which were generally built of lime and cement concrete backing, faced with rubble in lime and cement mortar and pointed in cement.

The road surface is coated with asphaltum.

The road was completed and in general use by the middle of December..

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,..

$70,000.00 Total Estimates,..... $97,000.00

51,000.00

$121,000.00

1920 Expenditure,... 117,986.25

Expenditure to

31/12/20,.

146,597.20

Q 43

P.W.E. Hongkong.

(f.) Road contouring Mount Gough and forming sites for quarters. The Contract comprised the re-construction of a portion of the Findlay Road and the formation of 3 sites for Officers' Quarters and the construction of the brick foundations for the proposed houses up to formation site level.

The road retaining walls, which are of a heavy character are of lime and cement concrete. The road has a minimum width of 10 ft. and is surfaced with decomposed granite. This section of the Contract was finished in October.

The site formations necessitated heavy cutting and retaining walls, which are lime and cement concrete backing faced with granite masonry in lime and cement mortar.

Two of the sites were finished in August.

The construction of the third one was unavoidably held up owing to heavy landslides, the trouble being finally rectified by the construction of a heavy retaining wall below the house site. By the end of the year, the latter site and foundations were nearly completed.

1920 Estimates, ...$50,000.00 Total Estimates,

1920 Expenditure, ... $40,606.99

|

$53,000.00

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

$64,342.59

year

(g.) Wanchai Road, Widening to 42 feet.-During the some of the properties affected were resumed, in other cases the existing buildings were set back to the new alignment; particulars of the resumptions are set out in paragraph 14 of this Report. 1920 Estimates, ......$80,000.00 | Total Estimates,

1920 Expenditure, ...$22,025.00

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

....$80,000.00

$42,134.63

(h.) Queen's Road East,- Widening_to_60 feet. -Extensive resumptions of property, the details of which are given in paragraph 14 of this Report, and alterations of existing buildings were effected.

By the end of the year, a number of buildings had been set back to the new alignment and the re-building of others was in an advanced stage.

1920 Estimates,.....$150,000.00 Total Estimates, ...$300,000.00

1920 Expenditure, $ 81,286.49

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

$144,844.49

(i.) Pokfulam Road Improvements.—The improvements to this road, referred to in paragraph 98 (m) & (n) of last year's Report, were extended to that portion of it immediately South of the Pumping Station, which was diverted to a new alignment through the old Elliott Battery thus eliminating two dangerous bends. Between this point and No. 8 Bridge, the carriageway was widened and otherwise improved.

-

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 44

Work on the section between No. 10 Bridge and Aberdeen Docks was also commenced and by the end of the year many of the dangerous bends were improved, and the bridges widened.

1920 Estimates,

$40,000.00

1920 Supplementary Vote,...... 15,277.46

1920 Expenditure,

2

$55.277.46

54.795.52/

(j.) Raising Praya Wall and Roadway (Connaught Road West) West of Morrison Street. The Tramway track, referred to in paragraph 98 (0) of last year's Report, having been relaid to an improved level, the carriageway abutting it was similarly dealt with, the surface being finished with granite setts on the sea side and treated with asphaltum ou the other.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$3,000.00 .$1,581.21

(k.) Shaukiwan,-- Widening existing road between North Point and Quarry Point.-The carriageway between these points was widened to a minimum width of 35 ft., the sea-wall being erected or re-erected throughout the entire length to retain and protect such widening. A minimum width of 10′ 6′′ is provided between the nearest Tram-rail and the sea-wall.

Culverts were extended and Tramway standards and poles were moved to new positions to conform with the improved alignment.

The surfacing, which is of macadam, is coated with asphaltum.

$60,000.00

1920 Estimates,

1920 Supplementary Vote,...... 20,000.00

1920 Expenditure,

$80,000.00 79,880.51

(1.) Shaukivan Road,—Improvements to Shaukiwan Village.- To give greater effective width to the carriageway passing through Quarry Bay, flat concrete channelling was substituted for the existing circular channelling, and, in order to admit of traffic passing between the Tramway track and a portion of the Northern side of Quarry Bay Inland Lot No. 8, the approach path to the houses erected on this lot was set back an average depth of 8 feet.

The carriageway on the North side of the Tramway track between Sai Wan Ho Market and a point where the Tramway track takes a sharp turn to Shaukiwan Village East (about 430 yards to the Eastward of Sai Wan Ho Market) was widened to its proper alignment, kerbed, channelled and surfaced with macadam treated with asphaltum.

Į.

Q 45

P.W.E. Hongkong.

It was impossible to carry through the arrangements for the resumptions of certain houses near the Tramway terminus, and the contemplated improvements to this section of the work were incomplete at the end of the year.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$30,000.00 $19,817.26

(m.) Shaukiwan Village,-Forming roads around Shaukiwan Marine Lots 5-10.-The whole of the carriageways around these lots were kerbed, channelled, macadamized and the footpaths paved with slabs. The macadam was finished with a coating of asphaltum.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$ 20,000.00 9,627.51

(n.) Kennedy Road,- Widening.-Considerable improvements were made to this road between Macdonnell Road and the Peak Tram Station; sharp bends were eased, and, in the narrower portions, granite retaining walling erected to permit of the carri- ageway being widened. The surfacing throughout was laid to new levels and treated with asphaltum.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$ 10,000.00 9,900.22

(o.) Road skirting Mount Davis and connecting Pokfulam and Victoria Roads.-A Contract for this work was let in July to Messrs. Po Yick & Co., and, at the. close of the year, the work was well advanced.

This road commences at Pokfulam Road at a point 600 feet East of the old path to Mount Davis Cemetery. The portion from Pokfulam Road to the old path is almost level, then it skirts the Western slope of the hill with a down grade of 1 in 23, join- ing the Jubilee Road at a point 500 feet West of the Military Signal Station. It is 0·94 of a mile in length and 20 feet wide.

There are numerous building sites along its route.

1920 Estimates, ...... $30,000.00 | Total Estimates,.

Expenditure to

1920 Expenditure,... 29,871.10 | 31/12/20,

.$40,000.00

29,871.10

(p.) Road from Bowen Road to Deep Water Bay,-Ist Section.-A Contract was let for this work in November to Mr. Li Ng. Preliminary work only was carried out during the year.

This road commences in Bowen Road at a point where the road from Wanchai Gap to Gap Road crosses it and terminates at Wongneichong Gap, the ultimate objective being Deep Water Bay. It is 4/5 mile in length and 20 feet wide, with a grade of

1 in 16.

1920 Estimates, ... $25,000.00 | Total Estimates, ......$40,000.00

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

1920 Expenditure,...

1,881.96

1,881.96

:

.

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 46

(4.) Road from Taitam Gap to Shek O and Cape D'Aguilar, -1st Section.-A Contract for this work was let in August to Mr. Un Ng Tsung, and, by the end of the year, satisfactory pro- gress had been made with it. The length of this section, which is 20 ft. wide throughout, is 2:3 of a mile, the grade is 1 in 150. 1920 Estimates, ... $30,000.00 | Total Estimates, ... $130,000.00

Expenditure to

1920 Expenditure,... 23,846.87 | 31/12/20,

23,846.87

(r.) Road skirting North side of hills_from_Wanchai Gap to Magazine Gap.-A Contract for this work, which will have a length of 3,000 lineal feet and a width of 20 feet, was let in September, and, by the end of the year, good general progress had been made..

1920 Estimates,

.$20,000.00

1920 Expenditure,...

7,462.72

Total Estimates, ......$20,000.00 Expenditure to

31/12/20,

7,462.72

(s.) Victoria Road,--Improvements · and Widening.-The Public Works Committee decided not to proceed with this work. There was no expenditure under this heading.

(t.) Main Roads in City,—Surfacing with asphaltum.—The relaying, throughout the City, of the greater portion of the lower level Company's Tramway track afforded an opportunity to re- gulate the level of the carriageways.

The space between the two tracks, which has to be maintained by Government, was paved with similar material to that used by the Company, whilst the carriageways were resurfaced with similar material to that previously existing.

1920 Estimates,.

1920 Expenditure,

$60,000.00 58,895.37

(u.) General Works.-The following is a brief description of the principal works carried out under this heading :

In connection with the improvement to that part of Holly- wood Road outside the New Central Police Station, referred to in paragraph 98 (0) of last year's Report, the carriageway was kerbed, channelled and surfaced with sand carpeting and the footway paved with granolithic slabs.

The improvements to the Western Entrance of the Public Gardens also referred to in the same paragraph of last year's Report were completed.

The flight of steps to give access to Kennedy Road from Queen's Road East was completed.

At the junction of Lower Albert and Garden Roads, a con- siderable improvement was made to prevent congestion of traffic

Q 47

P.W.E. Hongkong.

at this point. The boundary wall of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank premises was set back and the small island removed so as to give a minimum width of 16 feet.

Consequent upon the erection of new buildings, kerbing and channelling operations were executed in the following roads, the footpaths being paved and any necessary alterations in levels or alignment being effected :-

Aberdeen Inland Lot No. 88, Back Street, Tai Hang,

Belchers Street,

Caine Road,

Conduit Road,

Des Voeux Road Central,

Hill Road,

Jervois Street,

Morrison Street,

. Praya West,

1920 Estimates.....

Queen's Road East, Queen's Road West, Sai Wan Ho,

Second Street, Shankiwan Road, Smithfield,

Upper Albert Road, Water Street, Wongneichong Road, and Wyndham Street.

1920 Supplementary Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

.$ 60,000.00

7,000.00

$ 67,000.00

62.224.78

101. Hill Tramway to Wanchai Gap.-A finished survey and longitudinal section were made, also the necessary working drawings for the track formation.

1920 Estimates......$ 150,000.00

1920 Expenditure,...

102. Training Nullahs:

Total Estimates,...... Expenditure to 31/12/20...

(a). Mount Davis and Belchers.-This work at Belchers was commenced in April and completed during the year. To permit of excavations from the Pokfulam Road diversion being deposited over the area between Fly Point and Belchers Battery, the 5′0′′ × 4′0′′ culvert under Pokfulam Road was extended 301 feet, and an open stepped channel continued and connected to the storm-water culvert in Belchers Street. The total length trained was 449' feet. It was decided not to proceed with the training of the stream- courses at Mount Davis until the new road connecting Pokfulam and Victoria Roads had been completed, lest any new training work should be damaged by the falling of boulders.

1920 Estimates,

*1920 Expenditure,.

$ 4,500.00 4,446.85

*This is inclusive of a sum of £125.0.0 dne from the Military Authorities as

a contribution to the cost.

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 48

(b.) Nullah, West of Farm Lot 49, Wongneichong. This work was undertaken in connection with the development of the adjoin- ing lots, but was not completed during the year. It consists of an extension of the existing 6'0" x 5'0" culvert from a point 170 feet South of I.L. 1926 to the road bridge South-West of F.L. 49. The total length trained was 403 feet,

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,.

$ 5.000.00

4,738.51

(r.) General Works.—A considerable amount of training work was done during the year, the most important items being the train- ing of the stream-course, East of I.L. 2237, Bowen Road, and of the channel, West of Victoria Hospital; the extension of the nullab at No. 12 Bridge, Shaukiwan; the training of the nullah, North- West of I.L. 2270, Wongneichong, (incomplete); the stream- course between the Peak Road and the Peak Chair-Coolie Quarters; the stream-course between Findlay Road Extension and Craigmin Road; the branch stream-course, West of R.B.L. 42, and of the stream-course, South-East of R.B.L. 137. The total lengths trained were 1,842 feet.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Supplementary Vote,

1920 Expenditure (from

Government funds), $ 20,429.77

1920 Expenditure (contri-

butions by various

$ 10,000.00 16,750.00

$ 26,750.00

lessees, &c.),

608.66

-$ 21,038.43

103. Miscellaneous Drainage Works :--

(a.) Main sewer to intercept drainage from houses on West side of Mount Kellett.-This work, which consists of the laying of a 6′′ pipe sewer from a point, West of Cameron Villas, to join the sewer which was laid in 1906 from the Matilda Hospital to Kellett Bay, was completed during the year.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,.

$10,500.00 7,230.96

(b.) General Works.-Considerable lengths of storm-water drains and sewers were laid during the year, the principal works being the extension of a 12′′ storm-water drain from Hill Road to I.L. 834; the relaying of a 9" sewer between Hill Road and I.L. 834: alterations to a culvert below I.L. 2137: the extension of 9′′ and 6′′ sewers to S.I.L. 443, Sai Wan Ho, referred to in paragraph 100 (b.) of last year's report; the construction of 21′′ and 18" storm-water drains to S.I.L. 443; the extension of: :-ཡ{| 12′′ storm-water drain in the road, South of Wongneichong Village, a 6" sewer to I.L.'s. 2138 and 2260, Conduit Road, a 6" sewer to European Officers' Quarters, Leighton Hill, and a 6" sewer to the

1

#

49

P.W.E. Hongkong.

European Officers' Quarters, Mount Gough; the construction of 15′′ and 12" storm-water drains at A.I.L.'s 81-88; the extension of a 6" sewer to A.I.L.'s 81-88; the laying of a 6" sewer from I.L.'s 2268 and 2232, Bowen Road, to connect with the Military sewer, North of Bowen Road; the laying of a 9" storm-water drain in Li Chit Street, Praya East; the extension of a 6" sewer to I.L. 1889, Conduit Road. The number of drain connections made was 107.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure (from Govt. funds),... $23,459.95 1920

(contributions by

various lessees, etc.),

$25,000.00

6,951.17

$30,411.12

?

104. Extensions of Lighting.-26 lamps were erected during the year-9 electric and 17 gas.

1920 Estimates,.

1920 Expenditure,

$1,500.00 1,495.13

It Was not

J

105. Wongneichong Village Improvements.

Shaukiwan Village Improvements.

found possible to undertake these works systematically, a number of old properties in Shaukiwan have however been dealt with, by arrangement with the lessees. There was no expenditure under either of these heads, any sums paid as compensation having been charged to the Vote "Compensation and Resumptions".

106. Reconstruction of Ferry Piers.-The Contract for the construction of a re-inforced concrete pier 127′ 8′′ × 37′ 4′′ opposite Queen Victoria Street, Hongkong, was awarded to Mr. Lam Woo whose tender amounted to $33,928.20; the Contract Documents were signed on the 17th June, 1920.

The mud overlaying the existing sea-wall rubble mound was dredged and 20 columns erected and 20 piles driven by the end of the year. The re-inforced concrete piles required for this pier vary from 46 feet to 70 feet in length.

Tenders were received for the supply of iron and steel work in boat-landing steps, bollards, &c., but the Contract for the supply of this material had not been awarded by the end of the year. 1920 Estimates, ......$60,000.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

1920 Expenditure,... 6,756.10 | 31/12/20,

$28,851.51*

107. Chinese Cemeteries, — Laying out new areas.—A statement of the work carried out under this heading will be found in paragraph 37 of this Report.

1920 Estimates,.

1920 Expenditure,

$2,500.00 944.16

* As mentioned in paragraph 145 of the Report for 1918, a sum of $42,896.17 was expended in resuming and repairing or extending the old ferry piers.

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 50

108. Kennedy Town Hospital,-Installing Electric Lights.- This work was commenced in January and completed in April.

1920 Estimates, 1920 Sup. Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

$1,700.00 210.00

$1,910.00

$1,909.84

109. Kennedy Town Hospital,-Installing water-closets and extending sewer. This work was not commenced until October owing to the non-arrival of the sanitary fittings from England.

The work consists of installing water-closets in ward lavatories and bathrooms for the use of patients and European staff and water flushed trough-closet and urinals for the Chinese staff.

It was not possible to complete the work by the end of the year.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$1,800.00

839.05

Total Estimates, Expenditure to

31/12/20,

$ 839.05

110. Aplichau,-Reclamation Scheme.-The Contract for re- claiming approximately five acres of the foreshore at Aplichau and protecting the area by the construction of pitched rubble embankments, was awarded to Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. whose tender amounted to $31,395.00; the Contract Documents were signed on the 18th September, 1920.

As the removal of certain buildings in the way had to be effected, active operations could not be commenced until the end of December.

1920 Estimates.

1920 Expenditure,...

$10,000.00 Total Estimates,

$43,000.00

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

111. Renewing cable to Green Island.-The existing submarine cable to Green Island had deteriorated to such an extent as to render it useless and a new cable was laid on the 16th July, 1920.

1920 Estimates,.

1920 Sup. Vote,..

$2,000.00 400.00

1920 Expenditure,

$2,400.00

2,396.86

112. No. 7 Police Station,-Bunks for Chinese Police.-21

double iron bunks were provided.

1920 Estimates,.

1920 Expenditure,

$1,200.00 869.86

Q 51

P.W.E. Hongkong.

113. Government Quarters,—Installing_water-closets.—This work was considerably delayed owing to the late arrival of the sanitary fittings from England, but was completed by the end of the year.

One water-closet fitting complete was provided in each house. or flat in the Government Quarters at West End Park, Mount Parish and Happy Valley, and in the Police Quarters, Caine Road.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$13,000.00 3,455.50

114. Central Police Station,-Improvements, including concrete floors in Barrack Block. The work consisted of the renewal of balustrades, the substitution of reinforced concrete for the old wood floors to a portion of the building, the provision of cement dados to certain rooms and the erection of a new urinal. Sixty double iron bunks were also provided. The work was cominenced in July and completed in November.

1920 Estimates,

$12,000.00

Total Estimates,...... Expenditure to

31/12/20,

1920 Expenditure, ... 12,153.60

115. Central Police Station,--Reconstruction of Kitchen and Bathroom Block. -A Contract was let to Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. in August for this work.

By the end of the year, the old buildings had been demolished, foundations of new block laid and the footings to the new retaining wall were practically completed.

1920 Estimates, $30,000.00

1920 Expenditure,

...

4,237.99

Total Estimates, Expenditure to

31/12/20,

$30,000.00

4,237.99

116. Central Police Station,---Extending and resurfacing yard consequent upon erection of new offices.-This work consisted of the demolition of existing small buildings between the old main building and the new extension, the relaying of that portion of the yard already concrete surfaced but in bad condition, with asphaltic sand carpeting, and the continuation of this asphaltic surfacing up to the new building, thus converting the whole of the space between the old and new buildings into a large paved yard.

Some work to the existing drainage was necessitated before the new surfacing could be laid. The new surfacing was completed in June.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$8,000.00

Total Estimates, Expenditure to

.$8,000.00

7,520.74

31/12/20,.

7,520.74

117. Central Police Station,-Fittings and furniture.—The work consisted of the provision of specially designed furniture and fittings required for the new building, and a large amount for

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 52-

the existing one. The whole of the articles required for the new building were completed and delivered by the end of May and those required for the existing building were provided later in the

year.

1920 Estimates,

$25,000.00 Total Estimates,

$25,000.00

1920 Expenditure,... 18,289.08

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

18,289.08

118. Survey of Colony.-An account of the survey work executed will be found in paragraph 17 of this Report.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

.$3,000.00 1,950.04

119. Boundary Stones.-A statement of the boundary stones fixed will be found in paragraph 16 of this Report.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

$1,500.00

800.00

$2,300.00

2,136.48

120. Miscellaneous Works.-The following is a brief descrip- tion of the principal works carried out under this heading :-

Government House. The work of widening the Main Entrance involving the construction of new wrought iron Entrance Gates was executed.

A new Gentlemen's Lavatory was constructed adjacent to the Billiard Room and alterations to the Ladies' Lavatory in the Main Building were carried out. Victoria Gaol,-Bars to cell doors and iron grilles at the

end of corridors were fixed for additional security. Repulse Bay,-A Diving Pier was constructed to permit

of diving from the end thereof at all states of tide. Police Station, Wongneichong Gap. - A new telephone circuit was installed between this Station and No. 2 Police Station.

Wongneichong Road, Dangerous rocks were removed from the rear of No. 11, and a masonry wall was erected to retain Crown land.

Wongneichung Recreation Ground,-In order to afford greater facilities, the allotments were rearranged in accordance with the wishes of the Recreation Grounds Committee. The new lay-out gave two additional football pitches.

Motor Signs,-Several of these were erected throughout

the Island for the better control of the traffic.

T

¥

[

Q 53

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Supply from Wongneichong Reservoir to Repulse Bay Hotel,-An arrangement was concluded with the Hongkong Hotel Company for Government to lay

a supply of water between these points, the Company bearing a portion of the cost.

Owing to the difficult nature of the ground to be travers- ed by the supply pipe, progress was slow, but, by the end of the year, the greater portion of the 3* W.I. pipe (about two miles in length) had been laid.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,

1920 Expenditure,.

$30,000.00

7,707,89

$37,707.89

38,851.87

121. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903,-Com- pensation and Resumptions.—This vote provides for the resumption of areas required in connection with development schemes, the improvement of public streets or the provision of scavenging lanes as well as for the removal of riding floors over the ends of streets and other matters. Where houses are of moderate depth, a modification of the open space requirements has, in many cases, been granted permitting owners to count the scavenging lanes as part of their open space, subject to the condition that no compensa- tion is payable in respect of such lanes.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$100,000.00 97,421.70

The following is a statement of the various resumptions effected during the year and of the scavenging lane areas provided by owners without compensation:---

(1.) Properties resumed :

Compensation paid.

A number of properties were resumed, details of which will be found in paragraphs 8, 14 and 18 of this Report,.....

C.

59,624.33

The riding-floors known as 56a, Lower Lascar

Row, were resumed,

7.500.00

Compensation was paid for buildings in Murray

and Elliott Batteries,.

2,103.00

Total,....

$69,227.33

Sums amounting to $275.00 were paid for retaining the services of firms of architects and surveyors and for valuations made by those firms in connection with various resumptions; a sum of $1,237.50 was paid to the former owners of I.L. 1096

f

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 54

R.P., Bonhamn Road, in respect of architects' fees for work per- formed previous to the resumption of this lot in 1918; a sum of $470.00 was paid to a Contractor for demolishing Nos. 1-4, U Yain Lane, (resumed in 1919); a sum of $49.98 was paid for the demolition of buildings on Lot 314, Shaukiwan Road; sums amounting to $16,511.79 were paid to Contractors for certain widening improvements in Caine and Conduit Roads and for other minor works in connection with resumptions. The widening in Caine Road involved setting back the road boundary wall of I.L. 522 and constructing a similar wall on the Western side of lot in order to provide an area equal to that lost by the widening. A flight of steps was also formed giving access to Seymour Road from Caine Road. Conduit Road was widened by setting back the road boundary in front of G.L. 22 involving the erection of a retaining wall to the new alignment. This vote was also debited with sums amounting to $4,235.10, being interest at 8% on $70,585.00 (the value of the Fire Station site), paid to Sir Robert Ho Tung who was granted the Fire Station site in part exchange for R.B.L. 76 but who is not yet allowed to occupy these premises. A sum of $5,415.00 was paid for architects' fees in connection with the resumption of R.B.L. 76 referred to in paragraph 8 of this Report.

(2.) Scavenging Lanes provided in payment of compensation.-- There is nothing to report under this heading.

(3.) Scavenging Lanes provided by owners but not surrendered to Government,-15 areas, aggregating 9,695 square feet, in the rear of various premises, were provided during the year.

(4.) Scavenging Lanes to be provided by owners when an opport- unity occurs of gaining access to them from the adjoining streets, 2 areas, aggregating 1584 square feet, were arranged for.

122. Taitam Tuk Scheme,-2nd Section.-Pavement lights and flooring and wall tiles were ordered from England for the Engine House, but had not arrived by the end of the year.

A new fire service was laid for the Engine House and con- nected before the close of the year.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$15,000.00 9,738.30

123. Eastern District Filter Beds, &c.-The survey of the site for the Filter Beds and Service Reservoir was completed and plotted and preliminary drawings were prepared.

Three Trial Pits were sunk on the site to ascertain the nature of the foundations, which were found satisfactory.

The 18" C.I. Pipe to connect the Service Reservoir with the City Mains arrived from England, and the first section from the

Q. 55

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Monument at Morrison Gap Road to Wongneichong Village was laid.

To relieve the Eastern District of the City, Grit Filters were constructed at Bowen Road and a 12" C.I. temporary pipe was laid to connect them to the above 18" C.I. Main at Wongneichong Village and so to the City Mains. These beds were in operation by the middle of April and worked satisfactorily till the end of the year.

1920 Estimates,......

1920 Expenditure,

$80,000.00 31,142.72

124. Additional Rising Main to the Peak.-The pipes arrived from England at the end of the year and were stacked at Pok- fulam Road Pumping Station preparatory to laying.

1920 Estimates,..

1920 Expenditure,

$15,000.00 Nil.

125. Peak Distribution System,-Substitution of 5" and 4" mains for existing_3′′ from Victoria Gup_to_R.B.L. 76.—The necessary 4′′ and 5′′ W.I. pipes arrived from England in April and laying commenced in May, and, by September, the new mains were in operation much improving the pressures on the higher levels of the Peak.

The work consisted of substituting 2,000 lineal feet of 5" W.I. pipe and 600 lineal feet of 4" W.I. pipe for existing 3" WI. pipe. A portion of the 3" W.I. pipe recovered was used in general improvements to the Peak Distribution System.

1920 Estimates, 1920 Sup. Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

$6,000.00

800.00

$6,800.00

6,586.91

126. Extension of Quarters at Garden Road Motor House.- The alterations and extensions comprised the following works :—

The enlargement of the quarters on the first floor by the addition of a new dining-room, bed-room, bathroom, verandahs and staircase. A separate entrance was provided to the Motor House from Garden Road. The extension of the quarters on the first floor provided additional covered yard space below. In ad- dition to these alterations, a new roof was constructed to the whole of the building.

The work was nearing completion at the end of the year.

1920 Estimates,... 1920. Expenditure,

$10,000.00, 8,420.11

P.W.E. Hongkong.

1

Q 56

127. Miscellaneous Waterworks

(1.) Mount Gough Main,-This work consisted of lifting and relaying the main from Mount Gough Service Reservoir to Barker Road. This was necessitated by the building of the new Government Quarters on Severn Road.

(2.) Special Repairs to West Point Filter Beds,--This work consisted of the reconstruction of Beds Nos. 1 and 2 on modern lines thereby increasing their efficiency.

(3.) Temporary Supply to Magazine Gap Road,-This supply was for the new Telegraph Company's houses, but, as building operations were not com- menced, the scheme was not proceeded with. The expenditure incurred was for repairing a Cast Iron Tank to be used in the scheme,

(4.) Relaying Bowen Road Filter Bed No. 1 with bricks and tiles,-The foundation of this Bed was altered from broken stone to perforated tiles supported by vitrified bricks thereby increasing the efficiency of the Bed.

(5.) Extensions to Mains,-The 4" main in Chancery Lane was extended and a Fire Hydrant was installed.

(6.) Leighton Hill Quarters,—A supply was laid to

these quarters.

P.W.E. KOWLOON.

128. Quarters for Subordinate Officers, (2nd Block).—These quarters were completed and occupied towards the end of 1919 and were fully described in the report for that year. A few minor details were executed and the final account and retention money were paid early in 1920.

1920 Estimates, ......$ 15,000.00

1920 Expenditure,...

5,476.48

Total Estimates,...$ 104,000.00 Expenditure to 31/12/20,.

111,335.79

129. Fire Station, Tsimshatsui.—A Contract was signed with Messrs. Yee Shun Hen Kee on the 27th October, 1919, for $13,006.61 excluding certain stores and fittings supplied by Government and the Contract for the supply and erection of steel- work which was let separately to Messrs. Bailey & Co. for $4,350.00.

Whilst the work was in progress, it was decided to increase the accommodation orginally provided in order to include housing accommodation for the Station Officer.

Q 57

P.W.E. Kowloon.

This caused some delay in the progress of erection but the buildings were completed and occupied towards the end of the

year.

The accommodation comprises :-

Ground Floor,-Engine House: 59′0′′ × 39′0′′ together with small Workshop, etc., Servants Quarters are provided in a one-storied building at rear of Engine House and connected to Station Officers' flat by an outside concrete staircase.

First Floor,-Station Officers' flat consisting of Living Room 13'9" × 18'6", Bedroom 13′9′′ × 18′6′′ and two other rooms each 9'0"x14′0′′ together with Bath- room with Water-Closet.

Externally, the walls are of brickwork with cement dressings. Fire alarms and telephones were installed and an under- ground cable laid to give direct communication with Tsimshatsui Police Station.

A new pathway surfaced with concrete has been formed behind Fire Station to give direct access to the Water Police Station, where the Chinese firemen are housed.

1920 Esitmates, 1920 Sup. Vote,

$ 18,000.00 Total Estimates.......$ 18,000.00

5,500.00

$ 23,500.00 Expenditure to

1920 Expenditure,... 22,418.03

31/12/20,..

22.418.03

130. New Police Station, Yaumati.-Preliminary schemes for this building were prepared and approved, but it was not found possible to commence the work during the year.

1920 Estimates, ......$ 30,000.00 Total Estimates,......

1920 Expenditure,...

Expenditure to 31/12/20.....

131. Quarters for Royal Observatory Staff.-This work com- prises the erection of a pair of semidetached houses in the Royal Observatory ground for housing the European Assistants.

The Contract was let on the 10th December to Mr. Lam Dore for $29,308.86 excluding certain stores to be provided by Government.

1920 Estimates, $ 20,000.00 Total Estimates,....

1920 Expenditure....

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

132. Additional Quarters in King's Park Area. This scheme was not proceeded with,

1920 Estimates, ...$ 100,000.00 Total Estimates,......

1920 Expenditure,

|

Expenditure to 31/12/20,.

P.W.E. Kowloon.

Q 58

133. Tsimshatsui Police Station Extensions.-This consisted in carrying out certain alterations to the existing building, and adding an additional storey to the East and West wings and over part of the North wing.

This has modernised the building and added considerably to the accommodation, providing new quarters for a married European Sergeant, new recreation room for European staff, in- creased kitchen accommodation, together with the installation of water-closets for Europeans and water flushed trough-closets for the native staff.

1920 Estimates, ......$ 38,000.00 | Total Estimates,...... 1920 Sup. Vote, ..

8,500.00

$46,500.00 Expenditure to

1920 Expenditure, .. 45,717.06 31/12/20,.

$ 45,717.06

A Cou-

134. Latrine adjoining Market Street, Yaumati. tract was let for this work in March and included the removal of the present latrine and the construction of a latrine on the improved lines now adopted for such structures.

The work was finished in November, and, by the end of the year, all liabilities had been paid.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,

....$ 7,000.00 Total Estimates,......

3,000.00

1920 Expenditure,...

135. Roads :

$10,000.00 Expenditure to

9,379.30

31/12/20,..

$ 9,379.30

(a.) Main Road in Kowloon,—Kowloon City to Mongkoktsui.- This work is being carried out in 2 sections and under 2 contracts as under

Section I-Kowloon City to East side of _Railway Embank- ment. -A Contract was let in January for this work, which consists of cutting and filling; good progress had been made by the end of the year.

As the cutting exceeds the filling required for the road width (100 ft.), the low-lying areas adjacent to the road alignment are being filled in to approved levels.

The expenditure on this section during the year amounted to $42,068.64.

Section II,--West of Railway Embankment to Shanghai Street, Mongkoktsui.-A Contract for this section was let in June; it embraces heavy cutting and filling, and the construction of a nullah varying from 24′0′′ to 30'0" wide along a portion of its length with the necessary cross-road bridges.

As the cutting greatly exceeds the filling required for the road width (100 ft.), the low-lying area East of Shanghai Street is being filled to road formation level with the surplus material.

:

Q 59

P.W.E. Kowloon.

By the end of the year, good progress had been made with the cutting, filling and nullah training.

The expenditure on this section during the year amounted to $26,895.00.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$150,000.00 Total Estimates, ......

68,963.64

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

.$69,225.93

(b).

Extending Coronation Road northwards through hill (formerly) K.F.L. 11.-A Contract was let for this extension in June and consists of cutting and filling, the surplus filling being deposited in the low-lying area, East of Shanghai Street.

By the end of the year, good progress had been made with the work.

1920 Estimates,

..$30,000.00 | Total Estimates, Expenditure to

31/12/20..

1920 Expenditure, ... 3,986.10

$3.986.10

(c). Road to China Light and Power Company's New Station.— This work, referred to in paragraph 146 of last year's Report, was completed except surfacing, which is held over until the under- ground telephone and telegraph cables are diverted on to this road. The old cable routes being now within the area leased to the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company.

1920 Estimates, $40,000.00 Total Estimates, Expenditure to 39,552.14 31/12/20,

1920 Expenditure,

$50,000.00

42,443.16

(d). General Works.-The following is a brief statement of the principal works carried out under this heading: ...Path along side Kowloon-Canton Railway from Ho Mun Tin to Hunghom was widened, channelled and railings fixed.

Woosung Street, Pakhoi Street, Pitt Street, Canton Road, Shanghai Street, Changsha Street, Reclamation Street and Soy Street were all raised to their new levels.

The following roads were kerbed and channelled, the footpaths being paved with granolithic slabs and any necessary improvements being made in front new buildings erected during the year:-

Austin Road,

Bowring Street, Coronation Road, Haitan Street,

Hong Lok Street,

Ivy Street,

Kansu Street,

Lai Chi Kok Road,

Liberty Avenue, Ho Mun Tin,

1920 Estimates,

Nan Chang Street,

Nathan Road,

Ningpo Street,

Path from Nathan Road to

Jordan Road,

Peace Avenue, Ho Mun Tin, Temple Street.

Yu Chau Street, Yunnan Lane,

$50,000.00 29,450.00

1920 Sup. Vote,

$79,450.00

1920 Expenditure,

66,093.67

P.W.E. Kowloon.

136. Training Nullahs:-

60

(a). Argyle Street Nullah,--Constructing South wall and invert.-The whole of the South wall was completed during the year. The total length trained was 980 feet.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

.$10,000.00 9,100.53

(b). General Works.--The reconstruction of the nullah in Soy Street mentioned in paragraph 117 of last year's Report was com- pleted. Reinforced concrete bridges over the nullah were const- ructed at Shanghai Street, Reclamation Street and Canton Road. The invert of the nullah North-East of K.I.L. 1358, To Kwa Wan, was formed and a culvert was constructed through the roadway to the North-East of the lot.

Temporary works were also carried out to prevent To Kwa Wan Village from flooding after the reclamation works at K.I.L. 1382 have been completed.

The total lengths trained were 670 feet.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

$10,000.00

2,750.00

$12,750.00 12,647.65

137. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.-Numerous extensions of the drainage systems were carried out during the year to pro- vide for building developments. The most important sewer extensions were the following:-18" and 15" sewer in Waterloo Road to Ho Mun Tin mentioned in paragraph 118 of last year's Report; 6" sewer in Wing Sing Lane to K.I.L. 1365; 6" sewer in the lane between K.I.L's 720 and 721; 6" sewer in the lane between K.I.L's 715 and 716; 6" sewer in Man Ming Lane towards Nathan Road; 9" sewer in Shantung Street to K.I.L. 1303; 6" sewer in the lane between Shanghai and Reclamation Streets to K.I.L. 1387; " sewer in Bowring Street from Shang- hai Street to K.I.L. 421; 6" sewer in Austin Road from K.I.L. 1154 to K.I.L. 1297; 6" sewer to K.I.L. 1391 in the lane between Portland Street to Hong Lok Street; 6" sewer from Carnarvon Road in the scavenging lane of K.I.L. 574.

The following extensions of storm-water drains were carried out:-15" and 12" storm-water drains from Jordan Road to K.I.L. 1134; 9" storm-water drain from Bowring Street to K.I.L. 1134; 18", 15", 12" and 9" storm-water drains in Austin Road from K.I.L. 1154 to 1134.

The following storm-water drains were constructed:-15" and 12" storm-water drains in Canton Road between Kansu Street and Public Square Street; 4′0′′ x 2′8′′ and 3′9′′ x 2′5′′

Q 61

P.W.E. Kowloon.

egg-shaped storm-water drain in Ivy Street from Canton Road to Portland Street; 24" and 21" storm-water drain North-West of K.I.L. 1358.

The number of drain connections made was 136.

1920 Estimates, 1920 Supplementary Vote,

$30,000.00 3,500.00-

$33,500.00

1920 Expenditure (from Govern-

ment funds),..

$30,183.14

1920 Expenditure (contributions

by various lessees,' &c.),

295.34

-$30,478.48

138. Extensions of Lighting.-16 lamps were erected during the year in the Kowloon District-8 are gas and 8 electric.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$1.500.00 885.22

139. Filling in Tidal Flat and cutting down hill between Taikoktsui and Fuk Tsun Heung.-This work comprises the remov- al of the ragged and rocky ridge of hills which divide Taikoktsui and Shamshuipo, filling in approximately 1,868,500 square feet (42.9 acres) of the Tidal Flat East of Taipo Road, protecting the reclamation area on the Southern boundary by a granite rubble- faced Sea Wall approximately 735 feet long, the construction of a nullah on the South-Eastern boundary approximately 1,200 feet long and the construction of a re-inforced concrete bridge appro- ximately 171 feet long over the nullah where it passes under Taipo Road.

The Contract for these works was awarded to Mr. Lam Woo. whose tender amounted to $325,173.60, the Contract Documents being signed on the 13th November.

Temporary offices and workshops were erected but, as the necessary wagons, rails, etc., have to be imported, active operations on the Contract works had not commenced by the end of the year. 1920 Estimates, $30,000.00 Total Estimates, ...$303,000.00

Expenditure to

31/12/20,

1920 Expenditure....

Nil.

|

Nil.

140. Filling in low-lying area East of Shanghai Street.-No expenditure was incurred as the necessary filling was provided by the excavation obtained from the construction of the Taikoktsui to Kowloon City Road which is being carried out under 52 (a.), P.W.E., Main Roads, Kowloon.

1920 Estimates,... 1920 Expenditure,

$30,000.00 Nil.

P.W.E. Kowloon.

Q 62

141. Enlarging Playground at Kowloon British School.-The existing playground was enlarged to about 100' x 100' and a Fives Court provided. A short length of retaining wall required was built and a reinforced concrete fence erected around the ground.

1920 Estimates,.

1920 Expenditure,

$4,000.00 3,997.59

142. King's Park Quarters,-Installing water-closets.-This work consisted of providing one water-closet fitting complete in each house (1st Block).

1920 Estimates,..

1920 Expenditure,

$2,000.00 893.12

143. Chinese Cemeteries,—Laying out new areas: -A state- ment of the works carried out under this heading will be found in paragraph 37 of this Report.

1920 Estimates,..

1920 Expenditure,

$1,000.00 991.13

144. Miscellaneous Works.-The following is a brief descrip- tion of the principal works carried out under this heading:-

Improvements to wireless mast, etc., and alterations to telescope enclosure at the Royal Observatory, supplying and fixing gymnastic apparatus in children's playground, Chatham Road, and four garden seats immediately West of playground, and erecting a pay office, store, etc., at the Yaumati Police Camber.

145. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903,-Com- pensation and Resumptions.—The purposes of this vote are refer- red to in paragraph 121 of this Report.

1920 Estimates,.

1920 Expenditure,.

$50,000.00 23,706.22

The following is a statement of the resumptions effected during the year and of the scavenging lane areas provided by owners without compensation:-

(1.) Properties resumed :—

Compensation paid.

$

C.

23,411.22

400.00

A number of properties were resumed, details of which will be found in paragraph 14 of this Report,

Compensation was paid for setting back No.

359, Shanghai, Street,

$23,811.22

A sum of $25.00 was paid to a firm of Architects and Sur- veyors in connection with various resumptions; a sum of $20.00 was paid to a Contractor for demolishing buildings on K.I.L. 106 ; and the vote was credited with $150.00 being the sum paid by a

63

P.W.E. Kowloon.

Contractor for the privilege of removing building materials from a portion of K.I.L. 106 which had been resumed.

(2.) Scavenging lanes provided by owners and surrendered to Government.

There is nothing to report under this heading.

(3.) Scavenging lanes provided by owners but not surrendered to Government.

18 areas, aggregating 12,6074 square feet, were laid out as private scavenging lanes.

146. Substituting 18′′ C.I. main for existing 12" C.1. main from Kowloon Filter Beds to Yaumati.—The laying of this main was commenced at the beginning of the year and finished in November with the exception of a small section near the third mile stone which was held up owing to road diversion works which had not been completed by the end of the year.

With the above small exception, there is now an 18" C.I. supply main from the Filter Beds to the North end of Yaumati. 1920 Estimates,..... $150,000.00 | Total Estimates,..... $175,000.00

Expenditure to 1920 Expenditure,

115,479.51 31/12/20,

115,479.51

147. Enlarging mains to improve the distribution system in Kowloon.—The pipes for this work commenced to arrive in the Colony in March, but, owing to the non-arrival of specials, work could not be commenced till June.

The existing 10", 7" & 5′′ C.I. mains in Coronation and Nathan Roads were lifted from Fife Street to Tsimshatsui and replaced by new 15′′ 12′′ 10′′ & 8′′ C.I. pipes.

1920 Estimates, 1920 Expenditure,

$50,000.00 44,647.13

148. Miscellaneous Waterworks.-The following is a state- ment of the expenditure under this heading :-

:-

(1.) Glazed channels for Main Catchwater to

Kowloon Reservoir,

(2.) Extensions to Mains at Hunghom and installation of New Fountains at Yaumati, Shamshuipo, and Mongkoktsui,

(3.) Three Group Hydrants in Coronation

Road,

$2,085.00

3,026.05

580.71

1,234.27

Total,.....

$6,926.03

$8,000.00

6,926.03

(4.) Unforeseen Works.--Diverting Main at Ho Mun Tin and survey at Shek Lai Pui Village,

1920 Estimates, 1920 Expenditure,.

P.W.E. New Territories.

64

P.W.E.

P.W.E. NEW TERRITORIES.

149. Block House, Shatin Gap.--This work was commenced in January and completed in July. It consists of a brick building 20′3′′ × 16′6′′ with a covered verandah in reinforced concrete 5 feet wide on 3 sides.

The accommodation includes a living-room 15'0" x 12'0", kitchen 6'6" × 6′0′′ and bathroom.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,.

150. Public Latrines and Urinals.

$3,000.00 2.470.18

.

(a.) One at junction of Apliu and Kweilin Streets,

Shanshuipo.

(b.) One at junction of Yee Kuk and Pei Ho Streets,

Shamshuipo.

A Contract was let for the above two conveniences in October and they are on the improved lines now adopted for such structures.

By the end of the year, substantial progress had been made with the main brickwork for the buildings.

1920 Estimates,

$15,000.00 | Total Estimates,.

$15,000.00

1920 Expenditure,...

5,093.34

Expenditure to 31/12/20...

5,093.34

151. Roads :-

(a.) Taipo Road,- Widening and improving road between Sha- tin and Taipo.-The work made poor progress during the year.

By the end of the year however, all work, with the exception of the Ma Yiu Shui Bridge and the new road approaches to same, had been finished.

The bridge abutments and piers were finished and the center- ing for the beams and decks were in position and the road approaches were being finished off.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

$10,000.00 Total Estimates,

29,000.00

$39,000.00 Expenditure to

28,877.78. 31/12/20,

$132,341.68*

(b.) Metalling and tarring road from Fanling to Castle Peak.- The asphaltic painting of that portion of the Fanling to Mai Po

* This sum includes the cost of improving the road between the 5th and 9th mile stones.

1

Q 65

P.W.E. New Territories.

Road mentioned in paragraph 125 (). of last year's Report as well as the section from Mai Po to Castle Peak was completed.

1920 Estimates,...

1920 Revote (unexpended balance 1919 Estimates),

1920 Expenditure,

$ 60,000.00 49,053.00

$109,053.00

90,316.20

(c.) Fencing alongside new roads.-Concrete fences and earth bunds have been erected along the Coastal Road, where considered necessary, for the protection of traffic.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

.$10,000.00 9,928.52

(d.) Road to Kowloon Walled City. This work was not pro- ceeded with.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$ 5,000.00

Nil.

(e.) Path (3 feet wide) along Frontier to Lin Tong for Police Patrol. This work was not proceeded with.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$14,000.00

Nil.

(f.) General Works.-The following is a brief statement of the principal works carried out under this heading

The road leading from Sheung Shui Station to the Cross Road was macadamized and treated with asphaltum.

The necessary resumptions having been carried through, the Main Road at Taipo Market between Taipo Road and Taipo Market Station was laid out, kerbed and channelled; the work was uncom- pleted at the end of the year.

The improvements to the Taipo Road between the 3rd and 5th miles mentioned in paragraph 125 (d.) of last year's Report were put in hand and considerable progress was made, many of the bends being eased and the culverts and bridges widened.

Road from Cheung Chau Village to the Pak Tai Temple was channelled and laid with cement concrete.

The following roads were kerbed and channelled, the footpaths being paved with granolithic slabs and any necessary improvements being made in front of new buildings erected during the year :-

Haitan Street.

Lai Chi Kok Road.

152. Training Nullahs :-

Nan Chang Street. Yu Chau Street.

£

.

P.W.E. New Territories.

Q 66

(a.) Storm-water culverts in connection with Shamshuipo Reclamation. This work consisted of the laying of storm-water culverts in Yen Chau Street between Apliu Street and Tung Chau Street. They vary in size from 51 to 69 inches in diameter internally and were completed prior to the commencement of the adjoining reclamation works.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$30,000.00 20,350.66

(b.) Training main stream at Laichikok. This work was com- menced after the conditions of letting of N.K.M.L. 8 had been accepted towards the end of the year. This nullah when completed will have a width of 40 feet at the invert.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

.$20,000.00 Nil.

(c.) General Works.-The extension of the nullah in Nanchang Street, Shamshuipo, towards Laichikok Road referred to in para- graph 126 of last year's Report was continued. A further exten- sion of this nullah to Aplin Street was also undertaken, but was. not completed at the close of the year. The total lengths trained were 364 feet.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure (from Govern-

$25,000.00

ment funds),..

$24,623.42

1920 Do. (contributions

120.00

$24,743.42

by various lessees, etc.).....

153. Miscellaneous Drainage Works:-

(a.) Kowloon City Reclamation Sewerage Scheme.-The construction of 18", 15", 12" & 9" main sewers to dispose of sewage on the Western portion of the reclamation was commenced late in the year. The laying of a 6" sewer to N. K. I. L. 251 was also undertaken.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$10,000.00 Nil.

(b.) General Works :-Numerous extensions of the drainage systems were carried out during the year to provide for building developments. The most important were the construction of 30" dia. storm-water drain in Laichikok Road between Nanchang Street and N.K.I.L. 202; the construction of 15" and 12" storm-water drain in Laichikok Road between Nanchang Street and Peiho Street; the construction of 27" storm-water drain in Tai Nan Street between Nanchang Street and N.K.I.L. 311; the construction of 15′′ storm-water drain in Hai Tan Street between Kweilin Street and Yen Chow Street; the construction of

:

Q 67 P.W.E. New Territories.

-

15′′ storm-water drain in Hai Tan Street between Nanchang Street and Peiho Street; the construction of storm-water drains at Taipo Market (24", 21", 18" & 15" dia.) between the Railway Station and Taipo Road (incomplete); the extension of a 6′′ sewer in the scavenging lane North of Hai Tan Street between Peiho Street and Nanchang Street; the extension of a sewer in the scavenging lane between N.K.I.L's 23 and 25; the extension of a 6" sewer between N.K.I.L's 152 and 179 and the extension of the sewer outfalls at Peiho and Kweilin Streets (incomplete).

The number of drain connections made was 67.

1920 Estimates,

$10,000.00

1920 Supplementary Vote,

7,400.00

$17,400.00

1920 Expenditure (from Govt. funds).. 12,269.88

154. Filling in between bridges, Tai Wo Shi.-A Contract was let for this work to a local Village Elder in February.

The work consisted of filling in the mangrove swamp to the North-West of Tai Wo Shi Village between the Railway and Road bridges to O.D.+ 15.00 and facing the stream bank with a pitched rubble wall set in lime and cement mortar. The neces- sary filling was obtained by cutting away a portion of the hill at the rear of the village to formation level.

The work was finished in October and, by the end of the year, all liabilities had been discharged.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$10,000.00 8,887.44

155. Further Reclamation at Shamshuipo.-The negotiations for the resumption of land in order to provide routes for the transport of material required for filling in the reclamation, referred to in paragraph 128 of last year's Report, were unavoidably protracted and in consequence progress with this work was delayed.

The dredging of trenches, by the Government Grab Dredger, for pell-mell rubble mounds was completed on the 8th of May, the total quantity of material excavated amounting to 36,814 cubic yards (Junk Measurements).

Satisfactory progress was made with the depositing of pell- mell rubble forming the foundations of the sea and future nullah walls, the quantity deposited during the year amounting to 32,116 cubic yards and the total quantity to the end of the year 45,701 cubic yards (found by soundings above the bottoms of the dredged trenches).

The construction of the embankment for the transport line. from the cutting at Laichikok foot-hills was commenced on the 3rd of March and completed on the 15th of May from which latter

P.W.E. New Territories.

68

date satisfactory progress was maintained with the depositing of filling material from this site, the total quantity deposited amounting to 31,605 cubic yards (measured in reclamation).

The construction of the embankment for the transport line from the cutting above Taipo Road (from which cutting 86% of the total quantity of filling required has to be obtained) was com- menced on the 15th of May, suspended owing to the protracted negotiations for the resumption of lands and completed by the 29th December from which latter date 202 cubic yards of filling material were deposited on the reclamation area.

The estimated total quantity of filling material required for this reclamation is 2,110,000 cubic yards of which quantity 31,807 cubic yards were deposited to the end of the year.

1920 Estimates, ..$200,000.00 | Total Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

Expenditure to

53,885.27 31/12/20,

$730,000.00

76,875.28

156. Chinese Cemeteries,-Laying out new areas.-A state- ment of the works carried out under this heading will be found in paragraph 37 of this Report.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

.$500.00 462.09

157. Telephonic Communication to Police Stations,--Submarine Cables.-The new submarine cables mentioned in paragraph 130 of last year's Report were laid at the early part of the year between the Mainland and Lan Tau; Lan Tau aud Cheung Chau; Hong- kong and Lamma; the Mainland and Crooked Island to establish telephonic communication with the undermentioned Police Stations :-

(a.) Tung Chung, (b.) Tai O,

(c.) Cheung Chau,

and also the village of Mui Wo.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

(d.) Lamma, (e.) Kut O.

$21,500.00 20,699.35

158. Electric Light Scheme for Taipo.-There was no ex- penditure under this heading as it was decided to postpone this scheme pending more detailed data with regard to the dry weather flow of the streams in the vicinity of the power station.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$40,000.00 Nil.

159. Tai 0,-Extending pier to form typhoon refuge.-The work in connection with the extension of this pier was not proceeded with, but a certain portion of this vote was used for raising the main street to new levels to prevent the flooding of houses during the wet season.

1920 Estimates, 1920 Expenditure,

$6,000.00 968.22

160. Pier at Cheung towards the end of the year. piles being made on the site.

1920 Estimates,

Q 69

P.W.E. New Territories.

Chan -This work was commenced A number of reinforced concrete

1920 Expenditure,

$5,500.00 3,392.93

161. Miscellaneous Works.-The following are the principal items of expenditure under this heading :---

A new telephone line was constructed between Tsün Wan and Tsing Loong Tau Police Stations.

Duplicate apparatus was installed for fog signals at Waglan lighthouse.

A signalling mast with arms to take three vertical lights was erected at Tai O Police Station.

A lightning conductor was installed for the protection of the mechanical anemograph at Gap Rock Lighthouse.

On Adamaster Rock, Cheung Chau Channel, an Aga light was erected.

A combined fence and entanglement were erected at the Cheung Chau Police Station.

A watch platform was erected at the Laichikok Branch Prison and the fence and entanglements were extended. Extensive barbed wire fences with entanglements were erected, considerable alterations to buildings on lower terrace were undertaken and a system of alarm bells and electric lights installed. A separate entrance (and caretakers lodge) was constructed to the five huts upon upper terrace in order that they could be used separately and kept distinct from the huts on lower terrace which are used by the Prison Authority.

An entanglement was erected at the Castle Peak Police Station.

Matsheds for Indian Married Sergeants were constructed at the following Police Stations:-

Ping Shan, Sai Kung and Taipo.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Sup. Vote,

1920 Expenditure,

$14,000.00

21,300.00

$35,300.00

34,210.49

162. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903,-Com- pensation and Resumptions.-The purposes of this vote are referred

to in paragraph 121 of this Report.

1920 Estimates, 1920 Sup. Vote,.

1920 Expenditure,

$35,000.00

150,470.00

$185,470.00

174,242.93

:

P.W.E. New Territories.

(1.) Properties resumed.

Q 70

A statement of the properties resumed in the New Territories will be found in paragraph 14 of this Report.

(2.) Scavenging lanes.

There is nothing to report under this heading.

163. Shamshuipo District,—Laying water mains. This work was completed in December by laying 2,000 ft. of 6” C.I. pipes.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$5,000.00 3.358.25

WORKS NOT APPEARING IN ESTIMATES.

HONGKONG.

164. Peak Signal Station.-General renovation and repair work throughout were carried out in February.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$3,655,57

165. Repulse Bay to Taitam Tuk, 2nd Section,—-Improving and widening existing_road.-The asphaltic treatment of the surfacing of this road mentioned in last year's Report under paragraph 98 (d) was completed.

1920 Estimates,.........

1920 Expenditure,... $5,749.46

Total Estimates, Expenditure to

31/12/20,

.$75,173.93

166. Supplying Furniture for Government Quarters.-In accordance with a policy inaugurated this year of providing heavy furniture for officers' quarters and charging rent therefor, 17 sets were made as follows:-

1 set (part) for the Honourable Attorney General. 8 sets for Subordinate Officers' Quarters, Hongkong.

8

*

**

"

Kowloon.

and in addition a few minor repairs were made to furniture removed from Government House to be used in Subordinate Officers' Quarters. The total cost amounting to $10,346.25

NEW TERRITORIES.

167. Taipo Road between 3rd and 5th Miles.-The improve- ments to this road between these points referred to in paragraph 78 of last year's Report were put in hand and considerable progress

L

-Q 71

Works not appearing in Estimates. Hongkong.

was made, many of the bends being eased and the culverts and bridges widened.

1920 Estimates,..

1920 Expenditure,

.$9,288.63

168. Road from Taipo Road to Taipo Market Station.---The necessary resumptions having been carried through, this road was laid out, kerbed and channelled. The work was uncompleted at the end of the year.

1920 Estimates,

1920 Expenditure,

$3,914.42

169. Road from Sheung Shui Station to Cross Road.—This road was macadamized and treated with asphaltum.

1920 Estimates, 1920 Expenditure,

.$1,633.35

HONGKONG HARBOUR.

170. Extensive hydrographic surveys of the Harbour were made and tentative Schemes of Harbour Improvements prepared in advance of the arrival of Sir Maurice Fitzmaurice, C.M.G.. Senior Partner in the firm of Messrs. Coode, Matthews, Fitzmaurice and Wilson, Consulting Engineers to the Crown Agents for the Colonies, who, at the request of the Government, were asked to send out a member of their firm to make local investigations and advise on the Improvement of Hongkong Harbour.

Sir Maurice Fitzmaurice arrived in Hongkong on the 13th November and left on 1st December.

As extensive boring operations have yet to be carried out and further surveys to be made, for which work additions to the Staff are necessary, it will be some time before the Consulting Engineers will have obtained all the information they require on which to base their Report,

ADVANCE ACCOUNT.

HONGKONG.

171. Praya East Reclamation Scheme.-A meeting of those persons entitled to participate in the Scheme was held in the City Hall on the 4th May. The Honourable Sir Paul Chater, C.M.G., presided and was supported by Mr. M. S. Northcote, Secretary of the Land Investment & Agency Company, Limited.

The estimated cost (prepared in August, 1919) of the works to be borne by those persons entitled to participate is $3,385,000.00, the area of building land available for apportionment being

:

Advance Account.- Hongkong.

Q 72

estimated at 2,249,004 square feet. The estimated cost of building land is therefore $1.50 per square foot and including a 25 cents premium, $1.75 per square foot.

After the plan and statement, referred to in paragraph 147 of last year's Report, had been inspected and each lot-holder informed of the cost and area of his particular allotment, the Chairman pro- posed that the Scheme under the Conditions laid down by Govern- ment be accepted. The motion was seconded by Mr. M. J. D. Stephens and carried unanimously.

The preparation of 27 sheets of Contract Drawings was com- menced on 12th July, but was not completed until the end of November, as progress was somewhat interrupted during October and November by the visit of Sir Maurice Fitzmaurice in connec- tion with proposed Harbour Improvements.

A sum of $2,306.67 was expended during the year in the completion of the construction of the stormwater drain, referred to in paragraph 147 of last year's Report, and in incidental expenses on surveys and mounting plans.

The sum charged to "Advance Account" amounted to $80,418.10.

WORKS DEFRAYED FROM FUNDS NOT PROVIDED UNDER P.W.E. VOTES.

HONGKONG.

172. Bathing Facilities.-These were provided at North Point and Kennedy Town as in former years at a cost of $2,485.59, which included watchmen's wages, etc., the cost being defrayed from Class 1, Item 9, Miscellaneous Services."

STAFF, &c.

173. The death of the following officer occurred during the

year :-

Mr. Tang Ki-fan, 3rd Class Draughtsman.

174. The following officer retired on pension

Mr. G. E. Thomas, Clerk of Works, 3rd August, 1920,

175. The following promotions were made:---

Mr. H. E. Goldsmith, 2nd Grade Executive Engineer, to

1st Grade, 16th March, 1920.

Mr. J. W. White, Assistant Engineer, to 2nd Grade

Executive Engineer, 1st January, 1920.

1

Q 73

Staff, &c.

Mr. John Duncan, Assistant Engineer, to 2nd Grade

Executive Engineer, 1st January, 1920.

Mr. R. M. Henderson, Assistant Engineer, to 2nd Grade

Executive Engineer, 1st January, 1920.

Mr. A. G. W. Tickle, Assistant Engineer, to 2nd Grade

Executive Engineer, 1st January, 1920.

Mr. A. Anderson, Assistant Land Surveyor, to Assistant

Engineer, 16th February, 1920.

+

Mr. J. If. Barrington, 1st Class Overseer, to Clerk of

Works, 1st January, 1920.

Mr. J. H. Kynoch, 1st Class Overseer, to Clerk of

Works, 1st January, 1920.

Mr. D. J. Brown, 1st Class Overseer, to Road Surveyor,

1st January, 1920.

Mr. G. W. Kynoch, 1st Class Overseer, to Senior Overseer,

1st January, 1920.

Mr. A. W. J. Simmons, 1st Class Overseer, to Senior

Overseer, 1st January, 1920.

Mr. J. A. Howe, 2nd Class Overseer, to 1st Class Overseer,

1st January, 1920.

Mr. J. T. Ewing, 2nd Class Overseer, to 1st Class Overseer,

1st January, 1920.

176. The following officers left the service of the Department during the year :--

Mr. O. M. Hoyer, 2nd Class Overseer.

Mr. E. W. Ovenden, Temporary Overseer.

Mr. Lam Ming, 4th Grade Clerk.

Mr. J. Schlothe, 4th Grade Draughtsman.

Mr. Tu Po-kau, 6th Grade Draughtsman.

Mr. J. R. Castilho, Meter Reader.

Mr. Luiz Lopes, Meter Reader.

Mr. Li Wen, Computer.

Mr. Lin Chin-cheung, Computer. Mr. Ng Wan, Temporary Foreman.

Mr. Lo Shing, Temporary Foreman. Mr. Yau Sheung, Temporary Foreman.

Mr. Chong Chung-yee, Temporary Foreman. Mr. Li Kam-shang, Temporary Foreman. Mr. Tam Jit, Temporary Foreman. Mr. Chung Sing, Temporary Foreman. Mr. Wong Kwai, Temporary Foreman. Mr. F. T. Mun, Temporary Foreman. Mr. Kong Yung, Temporary Foreman.

and numerous other officers of subordinate rank.

Staff, &c.

74

177. The following appointments were made:-

Mr. E. L. Agassiz, Office Assistant. Mr. R. P. Shaw, Assistant Engineer. Mr. R. S. Logan, Assistant Engineer. Mr. C. J. Cooper, Assistant Engineer. Mr. R. A. Walter, Assistant Engineer. Mr. E. S. Carter, Assistant Engineer. Mr. C. B. Robertson, Assistant Engineer. Mr. A. J. C. Taylor, Inspector of Stores. Mr. A. E. Clarke, Assistant Electrician. Mr. S. Hamer, Surveyor of Buildings. Mr. F. C. Neville, 1st Class Overseer. Mr. S. A. Roberts, 2nd Class Overseer. Mr. W. R. N. Andrews, 2nd Class Overseer. Mr. W. Keegan, 2nd Class Overseer. Mr. J. S. Beach, 2nd Class Overseer. Mr. Mok Chan-ki, 3rd Class Draughtsman. Mr. Lau Kwok-ping, 4th Class Draughtsman. Mr. Fong Yau-leung, 4th Class Draughtsman. Mr. Tang Po-yee, 4th Class Draughtsman. Mr. Ho Yew-wing, 4th Class Draughtsman. Mr. Ng In-au, 4th Class Draughtsman.

Mr. Mak Kun, 4th Grade Clerk. Mr. Lai Ming-kai, 4th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Chu Hin-loi, 5th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Wong Cheung-chuen, 5th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Chung Kin-fat, 6th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Chow Kee, Temporary Clerk.

Mr. Abdul Karrim, Meter Reader.

Mr. Luis Ayam, Meter Reader.

Mr. Li Kai-wah, Apprentice Surveyor. Mr. Wu In-nam, Computer.

Mr. Pou Shu-chak, Computer.

Mr. Lo Fat, Foreman.

Mr. Tang Wan, Foreman.

Mr. Kwok Chun, Foreman.

Mr. Chan Sik-ling, Foreman. Mr. Tsun Hing, Foreman. Mr. Wong Fook, Foreman. Mr. Lo Oi-tong, Foreman.

Mr. Ip Lam, Foreman.

and numerous other officers of subordinate rank.

178. The following officers joined and left the service of the

Q 75

Staff, &c.

Department during the year :-

Mr. C. H. Lloyd, 2nd Class Overseer.

Mr. G. Lupson, 2nd Class Overseer.

Mr. Chien Hung-van, 3rd Class Draughtsman.

Mr. Tang Choy, Temporary Foreman.

179. The following officers, who had been granted long leave, were absent during the periods stated :—

Mr. T. L. Perkins, Ist Assistant Director of Public Works,

17.4.20 to 31.12.20.

Mr. D. Wood, Superintendent of Accounts and Stores,

6.5.20 to 31.12.20.

Mr. L. C., P. Rees, Principal Land Surveyor, 8.4.20 to

31.12.20.

Mr. H. E. Goldsmith, 1st Grade Executive Engineer,

12.6.19 to 15.3.20.

Mr. R. M. Henderson, 2nd Grade Executive Engineer,

8.4.20 to 31.12.20.

Mr. H. C. Lowick, Assistant Engineer, 29.3.20 to 31.12.20. Mr. H. S. Rouse, Assistant Engineer, 30.3.20 to 29.12.20. Mr. P. D. Wilson, Assistant Engineer, 12.5.20. to 31.12.20. Mr. F. Sutton, 1st Class Land Surveyor, 8.4.20 to 29.12.20. Mr. R. J. Stevenson, Electrician, 1.7.19 to 15.3.20. Mr. J. H. Barrington, Clerk of Works, 9.1.20 to 28.12.20. Mr. F. J. Ling, 1st Class Overseer, 26.1.20 to 28.12.20. Mr. Colin Sara, 1st Class Overseer, 28.5.19 to 15.3.20. Mr. J. Dickson, 1st Class Overseer, 28.8.20 to 31.12.20. Mr. J. E Eldridge, 1st Class Overseer, 6.3.20 to 31.12.20. Mr. C. J. Tacchi, 1st Class Overseer, 10.7.19 to 2.6.20. Mr. T. J. Richards, 1st Class Overseer, 17.4.20 to 28.12.20. Mr. R. J. Everest, 1st Class Overseer, 5.6.20 to 28.12.20.

180. The following officers were granted local leave :--

The Honourable Mr. W. Chatham, C.M.G., Director of

Public Works, 3 months and 7 days.

Mr. B. W. Grey, 1st Class Land Surveyor, 3 months. Mr. C. A. Grimes, 2nd Class Overseer, 1 month.

Mr. D. J. Santos, House Service Inspector, 2 months.

Mr. Tang Ki-fan; 2nd Grade Tracer, 1 month.

181. During the absence on leave of Mr. W. Chatham, C.M.G., Director of Public Works, his duties were performed by Mr A. H. Hollingsworth, Acting First Assistant Director of Public Works.

Staff, &c.

Q 76

182. Mr. A. E. Wright, 1st Grade Executive Engineer, was absent from the Colony from the 14th September to 30th November, his services being lent to the Wei-hai-wei Government at the request of His Honour the Commissioner.

T. L. PERKINS, A.M.I.C.E., A.R.J.B.A. Director of Public Works.

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 30th AUGUST, 1921.

Q 77

Annexe A.

ANNUALLY RECURRENT EXPENDITURE, 1920.

PROVISION-

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

ALLY

BALANCE.

VOTED.

ESTABLISHMENT.

$ C.

$

(.

C

('.

Personal Emoluments and Exchange Com-

pensation,

447,650 425,376.68

Other Charges, ...

44,756 42,995.14

3,660.38 5,421.24

22,273.32 26,283.20. 48,556.52 4,941.47 6,702.33

$492,406 468,371,82

3,660.38 27,694:56 31,224.67

31,224.67 55,258.85

Special Expenditure.

Document Presses

Typewriters,

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

HONGKONG.

380.38

380.38

400.00

19.62

235.58

235.58

300.00

64.42

615.96

615.96

700.00

84.04

સિ

EXCESS.

J

Buildings.

1. Maintenance of Buildings,...

100,000

102,251,81

2,251.81

2. Improvements to Buildings,

15,000

17,365.42

2,365.42

3. Maintenance of Lighthouses,

6,000

6,330.98

330.98

1,794.43 2,700.00 330.98

467.38

334.58

Communications.

4. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

City,

85,000

83,892.84

1,107.16

5. Improvements to Roads and Bridges

in City,

25,000

22,036.72

2,963,28

6. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

outside City,

40,000

33,600.80

6,399.20

7. Improvements to Roads and Bridges

outside City,

7,000

6,413.90

586.10

8. Maintenance of Telephones, including

all Cables,

6,500

5,876.41

623.59

:

:.

1,107.16

-2,963.28

6,399.20

586.10

623.59

Drainage.

9. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

18,000 17,869.27

130.73

130.73

...

Lighting.

10. Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and

Hill District,

57,000 58,209.95 1,209.95

1,300.00

11. Electric Lighting, City, Hill District

and Shankiwan,

26,000

25,334.65

...

665.35

90.05

665.85

Miscellaneous.

13. 14.

وو

15.

23

12. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

Public Cemetery, Chinese Cemeteries, Public Recreation

8,000 7,615.18 2,500 1,405.10

2,500 2,281,98

384.82 1,094.90 218.02

384.82

1,094.90

218.02

Grounds,

4,000 4,012.08

12.08

20.

21.

17

""

Shaukiwau, Aberdeen,

""

16. Dredging Foreshores,

17. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,. 18. Stores Depreciation,

Water Works.

19. Maintenance of City and Hill District,

22. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

KOWLOON.

Buildings.

23. Maintenance of Buildings,

24. Improvements to Buildings,

15,000

14,857.25 1,500 1,528.19

Carried forward,$ 614,100 655,626.82

9,000 10,477.44 1,477.44 22,000 56,102.93 34,102.93

100 Cr.5,614.05

500.00 1,500.00 35,000.00

487.92

22.56

897.07

5,714.05

5,714.05

150,000

163,852.49 13,852.49

1,000

1,599.23

599.23

1,000

12,000

616.30 12,095.90

383.70

95.90

15,000.00 700.00

2,000.00

1,147.51

100.77

383.70

1,904.10.

142.75

28.19

56,326.42 20,413.65 | 60,815.41 25,398.21

142.75

28.19

495.57

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

Brought forward,

Kowloon,-Continued,

Communications.

25. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges,

Q 78

ANNEXE A,—Continued.

PROVISION-

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY BALANCE.

30

fff&

C.

$ C.

C.

VOTED.

C.

614,100 655,626,82 56,326.42 20,413.65 60,815.41

· |

EXCESS.

c. $ C.

25,398.21

495.57

35,000

33,354.65

26. Improvements to Roads and Bridges,... 27. Maintenance of Telephones,

5,000

4,809.09,

1,645,35 190.91

2,500

2,013.86

486.14

1,645.35 190.91 486.14

...

Drainage.

28. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,.

9,000

6,504.47

2,495.53

2,495.53

Lighting.

29. Gas Lighting,

14,000

15,336.72

30. Electric Lighting,

6,000

6,170.08

1,836.72 170,08

1,800.00 300.00

463.28 129.92

::

Miscellaneous.

31. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

3,000

1,458.03

32.

""

Chinese Cemeteries,.

500

499.96

33.

Recreation Ground,

1,000

655.61

1,541.97 .04 344.39

1,541.97

.04 314.39

כל

34. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

4,000

10,540.45

6,540.45

6,540.45

Water Works.

35. Maintenance of Water Works,

14,000

13,314.61

685.39

685.39

36. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

5,000

5,476.24

476.24

460.85

15.39

NEW TERRITORIES.

Buildings.

37. Maintenance of Buildings,

38. Improvements to Buildings,

Communications.

39. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges, 40. Improvements to Roads and Bridges, 41. Maintenance of Telephones,

Drainage.

14,000 1,000

14,180,84

180.84

1,468.46 | 468.46

28,000

27,777,80

3,000

2,725.42

5,000

3,273.77

:

42. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

600

487.37

Lighting.

43. Electric Lighting, Shamshuipo,

2,500

2,017.40

:

Miscellaneous.

222.20

274.58

1,726.23

112.63

180.84 650.00

181.54

222.20 274.58 1,726.23

112,63

482.60

...

482.60

44. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries, 45. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

Water Works.

100 15,000

99.10 20,402.43

.90

.90

5,402.43

5,402.43

46. Maintenance of Laichikok,.......... 47: Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

3,000 300

2,643.45 271.12

356.55 28.88

356.55 28.88

831,107.75

Less credit,

Total,...

.$ 785,600

*5,614.05

825,493.70 70,901.64 31,007.94 76,149.98 36,767.24 510.96

* Vide item No. 18.

:

7

Q 79

Annexe B.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE, 1920.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

PROVISION-

INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

HONGKONG.

Buildings.

1. Central Police Station,-Extension

C.

CA

C.

CA

C.

JA

C.

#A

C.

C.

:

:..

60,000

2. Imports and Exports Office

45,000

35.528.53 32,683.64

......

24,471.47 12,316,36

24,471.47 12,316.36

3. Quarters for European Officers, Leigh-

ton Hill.

140,000

159,493.89

19,493.89

19,493.89

4. Quarters for Scavenging Coolies,

Hospital Road

100,000 55,184.48

44,815.52

5. Officers' Quarters,

200,000

26,322.85

173,677.15

6. Lunatic Asylum,-Extension

5,000

4,643.99

356.01

44,815.52 173,677.15

356.01

7. Quarters for Scavenging Coolies,

Belchers Street

80,000

16,081,61

63,918.39

63,918.39

8. Fire Brigade Station

50,000

$50,000.00

50,000.00

:

9. Crematorium, Happy Valley

20,000

20,000.00

20,000.00

10. Mortuary, Hill Road,-Removal to

new site

20,000

20,000.00

20,000.00

11. Married Quarters for Police, Caine

Road

50,000

50,000.00

50,000.00

12. Additional Quarters at Happy Valley,

(12 houses).......

180,000

85,892.71

94,107.29

94,107.29

13. Summer Quarters on Gough Hill, The

Peak, for Police and others

20,000

20,000.00

20,000.00

14 Block House, Wongneichong Gap.. 15. Latrines and Urinals

3,000

2,669.88

330:12

330.12

2,500

4,125.60

1,625.60

2,000.00

374.40

Communications.

16. Roads:-

(a) Repulse Bay to Taitam Tuk,-

1st Section-New road

16,000

17,913.08

1,913.08

2,500.00

586.92

(b) Taitam Gap to Shaukiwan, Improving existing road

14,000

15,009.22

1,009.22

1,010.00

.78

(c) Lugard Road Extension.....

45,000

49,960,23

4,960.23

5,000.00

39.77

(d) Road contouring hillside in

Wongneichong and Tai Hang Valleys

40,000

51,435.33 11,435.33

11,500.00

64.67

(e) Branch road from the above to

Wanchai Gap

70,000

117,986,25 47,986.25

51,000.00

3,013.75

(f) Road contouring Mount Gough

and forming sites for quarters (g) Wanchai Road,-Widening to

50,000

40,606.99

9,393.01

9,393.01

42 feet...

80,000

22,025.00

57,975.00

57,975,00

(h) Queen's Road East,-Widen-

ing to 60 feet

150,000

81,286.49

68,713.51

68,713.51

(i) Pokfulam Road,-Improve-

ments

40,000

54,795.52

14,795.52

! 15,277.46

481.94

(i) Raising Praya Wall and Road- way (Connaught Road West) west of Morrison Street................ (k) Shankiwan,--Widening exist- ing road between North Point and Quarry Point..

3,000

1,581.21

1,418.79

1,418.79

60,000

(1) Shaukiwan Road,-Improve- ments in Shaukiwan Village..... (m) Shaukiwan Village,-Forming roads around Shaukiwan Ma- rine Lots 5-10.........

30,000

79,880.51

19,817.26

19,880.51

20,000.00

119.49

10,182.74

10,182.74

(2) Kennedy Road,- Widening (0) Road skirting Mount Davis and

connecting Pokfulam and Vic- toria Roads

20,000 10,000

9,627.51 9,900.22

......

10,372.49 99.78

10,372.49

99.78

...

30,000

29,871.10

(p) Road from Bowen Road to Deep Water Bay,-1st Section

25,000

1,881.96

128.90

23,118.04

128.90

23,118.04

Carried forward...$ 1,658,500 1,026,205.06 123,099.63 755,394.57 127,781.35 760,076.29

"

+

80

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

ESTIMATED.

ACTUAL.

INCREASE.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

BE

|

$

C.

c.

PROVISION-

DECREASE. ALLY. BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

$

$

c. į

C.

Brought forward........... 1,658,500 1,026,205.06

Hongkong,-Continued.

Communications,—Continued.

16. Roads --Continued.

(g) Road from Taitam Gap to Shek O and Cape D'Aguilar, ist Section

(r) Road skirting North side of hills, from Wanchai Gap to Magazine Gap

(s) Victoria Road,-Improvements

and Widening...

(t) Main Roals in City,Surfac-

ing with asphaltum.

(u) General Works

123,099.63 755,394.57 127,781.35 760,076.29

30,000 23,846.87

6,153.13

6,153.13

20,000

7,462.72

12,537.28

12,537.28

50,000

50,000.00

50,000.00

17. Hill Tramway to Wanchai Gap

-60,000 58,895.37 60,000 62,224.78 150,000

1,104,63

2,224.78

7,000.00

150,000.00

1.104.63 4.775.22 150,000.00

Drainage.

18. Training Nullahs:-

(a.) Mount Davis and Belchers....

4,500

4,446.85

53.15

53.15

(b.) Nullah West of Farm Lot 49

Wongneichong

5,000

(c.) General Works

10,000

4,738.51 20,429.77

.261.49

261.49

10,429,77

16,750.00

6,320.23

19. Miscellaneous Drainage Works :-

(a.) Main sewer to intercept drain- age from houses on West sidę.

of Mount Kellett...

10,500

7,230,96

(b.) General Works

25,000

23,459.95

3,269.04 1,540,05

3,269.04 1,540,05

Lighting.

20. Extensions of Lighting

Miscellaneous.

1,500

1,495.13

4.87

4.87

*

:

C.

}

21. Wongueichong Village Improvements-

10,000

10,000.00

10,000.00

22. Shaukiwan Village Improvements 23. Reconstruction of Ferry Piers

10.000

10,000.00

10,000.00

60,000

6,756.10

53,243.90

53,243.90

24. Chinese Cemeteries,-Laying out new

areas

2,500

944.16

1,555.84

1,555.84

25. Kennedy Town Hospital,-Installing

electric light

1,700

1,909.84

209.84

210.00

.16

7

26. Kennedy Town Hospital,-Installing

water-closets and extending sewer......

1,800

839.05

27. Aplichan,--Reclamation Scheme 28. Renewing cable to Green Island

10,000

960.95 10,000,00

960.95 10,000.00

2,000

2,396.86

396.86

400.00

3.14

29. No. 7 Police Station, -Bunks for

Chinese Police

1,200

869.86

330.14

330.14

:

:

30. Government Quarters, Installing

water-closets

13,000

3,455.50

9,544.50

9,514.50

31. Central PoliceStation,—Improvements,

including concrete floors in barrack block...

12,000

12,153.60

153.60

:

32. Central Police Station,

Reconstruc-

tion of kitchen and bathroom block...

30,000

4,237.99

25,762.01

153.60

25,762.01

33. Central Police Station, -Extending

and resurfacing yard consequent upon erection of new offices

8,000

7,520.74

479.26

:

479.26

34. Central Police Station,-Fittings aud

furniture

25,000

18,289.08

35. Survey of Colony

3,000

1,950.04

6,710.92 1,049.96

36. Boundary Stones

1,500

2.136.48

37. Miscellaneous Works

30,000

38,851.87

635.48 8,851.87

800.00 7,707.89

6,710.92 1,049.96 163.52

1,143.98

-k

Carried forward

$2,306,700 1,342,747.14 146,002.83 | 1,109,955.69 160,649.24

1,125 899.68

1,297.53

Q 81

ANNEXE B-Continued.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED.

Brought forward

2,306,700

Hongkong,-Continued.

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903.

38. Compensation and Resumptions

Water Works.

PROVISION-

ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY. BALANCE. Excess.

VOTED.

C.

1,342,747.14

C.

*

C.

C.

C.

146,002.83 1,109,955.69 160,649.24 | 1,125,899.68

100,000

97,421.70

2,578.30

2,578.30

*

C.

1,297,58

39. Taitam Tuk Scheme,-Second Section 40. Eastern District Filter Beds, &c. 41. Additional Rising Main to the Peak.....| 42. Peak Distribution System,—Substitu- tion of 5" and 4" mains for existing 3" from Victoria Gap R.B.L. 76

15,000

9,738.30

80,000

31,142.72

15,000

5,261.70

48,857.28

15,000.00

5,261.70 48,857.28 15,000.00

6,000

6,586.91

586.91

800.00

213.09

43. Extension of Quarters at Garden Road

Motor House

10,000

8,420.11

1,579.89

44. Miscellaneous Water Works,

10,000

11,793.13

1,793.13

1.814.81

1,579.89 21.68

KOWLOON.

Buildings.

45. Quarters for Subordinate Officers, (2nd

Block)

15,000

5,476.48

9,523.52

9,523.52

46. Fire Station, Tsimshatsui

18,000

22,418.03

4,418.03

10,000.00

5,581.97

47. New Police Station, Yaumati.

30,000

30.000.00

30,000.00

48. Quarters for Royal Observatory Staff... 49. Additional Quarters in King's Park

20,000

20,000.00

20,000.00

Area.....

100,000

100,000.00

100,000.00

50. Tsimshatsui Police Station Extensious 51. Latrine adjoining Market Street, Yau-

mati

38,000

15,717.06

7,717.06

8,500.00

782.94

7,000

9,379.30

2,379.30

3,000.00

620.70

Communications.

52. Roads:-

(a) Main Roads in Kowloon,

150,000

68,963.64

81,036.36

81,036.36

(b) Extending Coronation Road

northwards through hill (for- merly K.F.L. 11)

30,000

3,986.10

26,013.90

26,013.90

(c) Road to China Light and Power

Co.'s new station

40,000

(d) General Works

50,000

39,552.14 66,093.67

447.86

16,093.67

29,450.00

447.86 13,356.33

Drainage.

53. Training Nullahs :-

(a) Argyle Street Nullah,-Cons-

tructing South wall & invert...

10,000

9,100.53

899.47

(b) General Works

10,000

12,647.65

54. Miscellaneous Drainage Works

30,000

30,183.14

2,647.65 183.14

2,750 00 3,500.00

899.47 102.35 3,316.86

Lighting.

55. Extensions of Lighting

Miscellaneous.

1,500

885.22

56. Filling in Tidal Flat and cutting down hill between Taikoktsui and Fuk Tsun Heung

30,000

57. Filling in low-lying area East of

Shanghai Street....

30,000

Carried forward

614.78

30,000.00

30,000.00

614.78

30,000.00

30,000.00

$3,152,200 1,822,252.97 181,821.72 1,511,768.75 220,464,05 | 1,351,708.66 1,297.58

HEADS AND SCB-HEADS.

82

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

PROVISION-

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE, DECREASE. ALLY. BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

C.

Brought forward

3,152,200

1,822,252.97

Kowloon,-- Continued.

Miscellaneous,-Continued.

C.

$

c.

CA

C. $

C.

181,821.72 1,511,768.75 220,464.05 1,551,708.66

$

C.

1.297.58

58. Enlarging Playground at Kowloon

British School...

4,000

3,997.59

2.11

2.41

59. King's Park Quarters,-Installing

water-closets

2,000

893.12

1,106.88

. 1,106.88

60. Chinese Cemeteries,-Laying out new

areas

1,000

991,13

61. Miscellaneous Works

7,000

5,853.21

8.87 1,146.79

8.87 1,146.79

Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance, 1903. ·

62. Compensation and Resumptions

50,000

23,706.22

26,293.78

26,293.78

Water Works,

63. Substituting 18" main for existing 12" from Kowloon Filter Beds to Yau-

:

150,000

115,479.61

34,520.49

34,520.49

64. Enlarging mains to improve the distri- bution system in Kowloon...

65. Miscellaneous Water Works ....

50,000 8,000

44,647.13

5,352.87

6,926.03

1,073.97

5,352.87 1,073.97

...

New Territories.

Buildings.

66. Block House, Shatin Gap 67. Public Latrines and Urinals

Communications.

3,000

15,000

2,470.18 5,093.34

529.82 9,906.66

529.82 9.906.66

68. Roads:-

(a) Taipo Road,-Widening and improving road between Shatin and Taipo

10,000

28,877.78

18,877.78

() Metalling and tarring road from

Fauling to Castle Peak

60,000

90,316.20

30,316,20

29,000.00

49,053.00

(c) Fencing alongside new roads

10,000

9,928.52

(d) Road to Kowloon Walled City (e) Path (3 feet wide) along Fron- tier to Lin Tong for Police Patrol

5,000

71.48 5,000.00

10,122.22

18,736.80 71.48 5,000.00

14,000

14,000.00

14,000.00

Drainage.

69. Training Nullahs -

:

(a) Storm-water culverts in con- nection with Sham Shui Po Reclamation

30,000

20,350.66

(b) Training main stream at Lai

Chi Kok

20,000

(c) General Works

25,000

24,623.42

9,649.34

20,000.00 376.58

:

9,649.34

20,000.00 376.58

:

70. Miscellaneous Drainage Works :-

(a) Kowloon City Reclamation

Sewerage Scheme

10,000

10,000.00

(b) General Works

10,000

12,269.88

2,269.88

7,400.00

10,000.00 5,130.12

Carried forward.... .$ 3,636,200 2,218,676.89

233,285.58

1,650.808.69 305,917.05 1,724,737,74

1,297.58

Q 83

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

PROVISION-

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY

VOTED.

BALANCE. EXCESS.

+fs

$

C.

Brought forwoard.

3,636,200

2,218,676.89

C.

e

C.

233,285.58 | 1,650,808.69 305,917:05

C.

$_c.

1,297.58

1.724,737.74

New Territories,-Continued.

Miscellaneous.

71. Filling in between bridges, Tai Wo Shi 72. Further Reclamation at Shamshuipo... 73. Chinese Cemeteries,- Laying out new

areas

74. Telephonic Communication to Police

Stations,-Submarine Cables

10,000 200,000

8,887.44 53,885.27

1,112.56 146,114.73

1,112.56 146,114.73

500

21,500

462.09

20,699.35

37.91

37.91

800.65

75. Electric Light Scheme for Taipo 76. Tai 0,-Extending Pier to form ty-

phoon refuge

10,000

40,000.00

800.65

40,000.00

6,000

968.22

5,031.78

5,031.78

77. Pier at Cheung Chau

5,500

3,392.93

2,107.07

2,107.07

78. Miscellaneous Works

14,000

34,210.49

20,210.49

21,300.00

1,089.51

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903.

79. Compensation and Resumptions.....

35,000 174,242.93 139,242.93

Water Works.

80. Shamshuipo District,-Laying water

mains

5,000

3,358,25

Work's not appearing in

the Estimates.

Hongkong.

81. Victoria Peak Signal Station,-Re-

instating Buildings....

1,641.75

150,470.00

11,227.11

1,641.75

:

3,655.57

94.43 3,750.00

94.43

82. Roads Repulse Bay to Tytam Tuk 2nd Section,-Improving and Wi- dening existing Road.....

5,749.46

250.54

83. Furniture for Officers' Quarters..

10,346.25

6,000.00 153.75 10,500.00

250.54 153.75

...

Kowloon.

84. Latrine at intersection of Ning Po and

Woosung Streets

New Territories..

85. Roads :--General Works

Improvements of roads from Cheung

Chau Village to Pak Tai Temple

Taipo Road. Widening and impro-

ving road between 3rd and 5th miles

Road from Sheung Shui Station to

Cross Road

Approach road (10 feet) to Sheung

Shui Police Station..... Road from Taipo Road to Taipo

Market Station

Less eredits :-Recovery from Contractor...

Total

:

:.

1,497.15

2.85

1,500.00

2.85

1,070.00

1,070.00

1,400.00

1,400.00

1,400.00

9,288.63

1,633.35

5,711.37 | 15,000,00

166.65 1,800.00

5,711.37

166.65

400.00

400.00

400.00

3,914.42

2,555,938.69 61.00

1,085,58 5,000.00 1,085.58

:..

:.

3,973,700 2,555,877.69

392,739.00 1,856,920.31 524,107.05 1,943,165.98 1,297.58

མ་ད

MONTH.

Q 84

Annexe C.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1920. Monthly Consumption and Contents of Reservoirs (Millions of Gallons).

POKFULAM.

TAITAM.

WONGNEICHONG.

TOTAL CON-'

MINT DAM BLUE POOL

COLLECTED TOTAL CON-

RAIN-

FALL

TENTS OF

AND

SUPPLIES

GRAND

AT

ΜΑΙΝ.

In Reser-

voir 1st of

month.

Delivered

BY-WASH. INTERMEDIATE. TAITAM TUK.

FROM

SUMPTION

REMARKS.

Delivered

over

over

gauge.

In Reservoir | In Reservoir 1st of month. 1st of month.

In Reservoir 1st of month.

In Reservoir Ist of month.

gauge.

In Reser-

voir 1st of

month.

Delivered

over

gauge.

|IMPOUNDING"

RESERVOIRS.

STREAMS. (Filtered).

FROM

POK FULA M

CONDUIT (Unfiltered).

OBSER-

TOTAL.

VATORY'

(Inches).

Jan.,

45.68

11.96

348.68

.70

162.34

991.99

173.59

1.94

1,551.33

7.42

192.97

3.96

196.93

⚫065

Feb.,

34.51

9.20

310.47

1.40

160.18

847.00

168.91

1.98

1,355.54

2.17

180.28

3.78

184.06

2.640

March, 28.36

8.68

282.24

.41

141.56

743.26

181.72

2.19

.22

1,198.02

2.08

192.70

4.75

197.45

1.390

April,.

20.70

16.84

235.76

.77

107.38

651.35

172.54

1.98

4.34

1,017.94

7.82

201.54

3.21

204.75

8.265

May,

20.55

44.26

188.94

1.98

121.66

605.00

157.63

1.49

14.41

939.62

12.74

229.04

3.06

232.10

18.155

Constant Supply by

June,

61.06

55.80 227.68

2.05

195.90

763.10

131.65

10.42

28.26

1,260.21

24.18

239.89

2.13

242.32

15.555

house services in all

July,

56.76

51.63

352.78

4.67

195.90

1,095.50

149.71

11.46

27.14

1,717.07

24.65

253.13

3.69

256.82

24.040

districts throughout

Ang.,. 68.02

52.10

391.96

23.68

195.90

1,419.00

156.27

31.80

19.8**

2,130.36

32.40

260.64

4.50

265.14

10.975

the whole year.

Sept.,

67.30

47.60

399.34

16.78

195,90

1,419.00

170.70

28.24

16.99

2,126.56

26.18

261.47

3.46

264.93

11.750

Oct.,... 63.44

43.27

375.00

18.88

195.90

1,419.00

171.11

26.24

15.80

2,098.46

24.85

255.03

3.32

258.35

6.190

Nov.,

61.06

24.11

368.00

2.51

195.90

1,419.00

176.03

23.48

19.30

2,069.95

16.43

235.87

5.82

241.69

7.045

:

Dec.,

64.16

19.48

319.70

2.62

195.90

1,390.92

188.67

14.68

14.51

1,987.98

6.71

229.37

4.22

233.59

1.810

Total,

384.93

1920.

Total,

302.14

1921.

Increase

or

Decrense.

:

+ 82.79

...

:

...

:

1,998.53

1,867.57

160.84

91.05

+ 130.96

+ 69.79

:

187.63

2,731.93

46.20

2,778.13 107·880

176.67

2,437.43

45.36

2,482.79 76.140

+ 10.96 + 294.50

0.84

+

+ 295.34 +31740

Annexe D.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1920. Particulars of Mctered and Unntetered Supplies.

(Millions of Gallons.)

FILTERED SUPPLY.

UNMETERED.

METERED.

TOTAL

METERED

UNFILTERED

GRAND

MONTII.

CITY.

CITY.

HILL

DISTRICT.

AND

UNMETERED.

SUPPLY

(Metered).

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

Trade. Domestic.

January,

151.18

23.15

15.24

3.40

41.79

}

192.97

3.96

196.93

February,

135.85

25.73

15.88

2.82

44.43

180.28

3.78

184.06

March,

150.58

24.90

14.13

3.09

42.12

192.70

4.75

197.45

85

April,

158.56

23.99

15.88

3.11

42.98

201.54

3.21

204.75

May,

180.98

26.33

18.05

3.68

48.06

229.04

3.06

232.10

June,

188.09

27.90

20.00

3.90

51.80

239.89

2.43

242.32

July,

200.82

27.40

20.05

4.86

52.31

253.13

3.69

256.82

August,

206.44

29.38

19.96

4.86

54.20

260.64

4.50

265.14

September,

207.68

28.69

19.77

5.33

53.79

261.47

3.46

264.93

October,....

203.80

26.33

19.90

5.00

51.23

255.03

3.32

258.35

November,

191.22

22.85

17.62

4.18

44.65

235.87

5.82

241.69

December,

185.24

23.43

16.74

3.96

44.13

229.37

4.22

233.59

Total, 1920,

2,160.44

310.08

213.22.

48.19

571.49

2,781.93

46.20

2,778.13

Total, 1919,

1,906.54

295.62

193.25

42.02

530.89

2,437.43'

45.36

2,482.79

Increase or Decrease,

+ 253.90

+ 14.46

+ 19.97

+ 6.17 + 40.60

+ 294.50

+ 0.84

+ 295.34

Annexe E.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1920.

Water pumped to Hill District and High Levels of the City (Millions of Gallons).

(Theoretical Displacement of Pumps.)

HILL DISTRICT.

HIGH LEVELS OF THE CITY.

,

GRAND

MONTH.

700′ and 750′ TANKS.

* (Conduit & Peak Roads District.)

600′ and 650′ TANKS, (Robinson Road District.)

TOTAL

Combined PUMPED,

Totals.

Motor.

Engine. Total.

Motor.

Engine.

Total.

Motor.

Engine.

Total.

January,

February,

3.40

3.40

3.51

3.51

3.81

4.03

7.84

11.35

14.75

2.82

2.82

2.81

2.81

3.64

3.70

7.34

10.15

12.97

March,.

3.09

3.09

2.97

2.97

3.93.

4.10

8.03

11.00

14.09

April,

3.11

3.11

3.33

3.33

3.79

3.54

7.33

10.66

13.77

May,

3.68

3.68

2.80

2.80

3.71

4.02

7.73

10.53

14.21

June,

3.90

· 3.90

.08

4.43

4.51

3.30

4.12

7.22

11.73

15.63

July,

4.86

4.86

5.41

5.41

3.76

4.25

8.01

13.42

18.28

August,

4.86

1.86

.39

5.66

6.05

3.34

4.44

7.78

13.83

18.69

September,

5.33

5.33

1.03

6.62

7.65

2.91

-4.28

7.19

14.84

20.17

October,

5.00

5.00

5.80

5.80

3.42

3.97

7.39

13.19

18.19

November,

4.18

4.18

1.79

4.79

3.89

3.85

7.74

12.53

16.71

December,

3.96

3.96

1.07

1.07

4.15

3.68

7.83

11.90

15.86

Total, 1920,

48.19

48.19

1.50

52.20

53.70

43.45

47.98

91.43

145.13

193.32

Total, 1919,

42,02

42.02

9.59

13.54

53.13

43.86

41.75

85.61

138.74

180.76

Increase or Decrease.,...

+

6.17

-- 6.17

8.09

+ 8.66

+

0.57

0.41

+

6.23

5.82

6.39 + 12.50

Annexes F, G, & J.

VILLAGE AND WATER BOAT SUPPLIES, 1920.

Details of Consumption (Millions of Gallons).

F.

G.

SHAUKIWAN WATER WORKS.

ABERDEEN WATER WORKS.

Month.

Metered

Unmetered

Total.

Sai Wan

Grand

Supply.

Supply.

Supply.

Total.

Metered Unmetered Supply. Supply.

Total.

J.

LAICHIKOK

WATER BOAT SUPPLY

(METERED).

January,..

0.36

2.39

2.75

0.09

2.84

0.58

1.24

1.82

11.69

February,

· 0.43

3.25

3.68

0.16

3.84

0.83

1.09

1.92

9.93

March,.

0.46

8.22

3.68

0.14

3.82

0.71

1.08

1.79

12.22

April,.

0.44

8.57

4.01

0.26

4.27

0.52

1.35

1.87

10.89

May,

0.40

3.87

4.27

0.58

4.85

0.56

1.31

1.87

10.57

June,

0.41

4.04

4.45

0.72

5.17

0.49

1.39

1.88

8.16

July,

0.56

4.79

5.35

0.47

5.82

0.30

1.48

1.78

10.14

August,

0.52

4.52

5.04

0.39

5.43

0.49

1.22

1.71

9.34

September,

0,55

4.59

5.14

0.40

5.54

0.53

1.38

1.91

9.64

October,

0.52

4.81

5.33

0.30

5.63

0.69

1.18

1.87

9.78

November,

0.55

4.43

4.98

0.23

5.21

0.67

1.08

1.75

8.30

December,

0.50

4.19

4.69

0.13

4.82

0.72

1.09

1.81

10.36

Total, 1920,...

5.70

.47.67

53.37

3.87

57.24

7.09

14.89

21.98

121.02

Total, 1919,...

6.47

46.03

52.50

2.27

54.77

6.26

14.40

20.66

115.71

Increase or Decrease,

0.77

+ 1.64

+ 0.87

+ 1.60

+ 2.47

+ 0.83

+ 0.49

+ 1.32

+ 5.31

Annexe H.

KOWLOON WATERWORKS, 1920.

Contents of Reservoir and Details of Monthly Consumption (Millions of Gallons).

In Reservoir

Metered Supply.

Unmetered

Grand

Month.

Remarks,

1st of Month.

Supply.

Total.

Trade.

Domestic.

Total.

January,

298.45

12,51

3.39

15.90

31.39

47.29

February,

263.02

12.36

4.12

16.48

28.83

45.31

1

March,...

239.00

13.70

3.70

17.40

30.40

47.80

April,.

201.66

11.92

4.45

.16.37

28.03

44.40

May,

194.65

16.76

5.04

21.80

26.87

48.67

Constant supply

June,

294.48

13.41

5.45

18.86

34.48

53.34

July,

352.50

14.94

6.88

20.82

34.56

55.38

Angust,.

352.50

15.94

5.68

21.62

34.12

55.74

throughout the whole year.

September,

374.00

14.85

5.50

20.35

34.99

55.34

October,

374.00

14.10

5.57

19.67

37.46

57.13

November,

373.10

13.11

5.37

18.48

31.40

49.88

December,

369.50

13.31

4.96

18.27

24.45

42.72

Total, 1920,

166.91

59.11

226.02

376.98

603.00

Total, 1919,

141.03

51.69

192.72

806.59

499.31

Increase or Decrease, .

+ 25.88

+

7.42

+ 33.30

+ 70.89

+ 108.69

Q 89

Annexe K.

REPORT ON LAND SURVEY WORK FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31ST MARCH, 1921.

Map, numbered 1, accompanies this report.*

1. Organization. The Land Survey Office, which at present includes a staff of 10 European Surveyors, 3 native Assistant Surveyors, 2 native Apprentice Surveyors, under the direction of an officer designated the Principal Land Surveyor, forms a branch of the Public Works Department.

The Principal Land Surveyor, in addition to supervising the usual survey work necessary in a rapidly developing Colony, is the executive officer for dealing with all matters relating to Crown Lands, the whole of which are under the charge of the Director of Public Works. He submits reports on all applications for land, conducts all sales of areas to be let on long leases, prepares permits for temporary occupation of land and licences for temporary piers and slipways and attends to the preparation of lease plans for lots of land, permanent piers, etc., and to the keeping of numerous records.

Two Land Bailiffs, whose time is wholly occupied in preventing illegal squatting and encroachment upon Crown Land, which are very common offences among the Chinese population, are attached to the office.

Two Computers, four Clerks, and nine Draughtsmen, all natives, are employed in the office.

In addition to the above staff, there are 52 Survey Coolies receiving wages varying from $11.00 to $25.00 per month with allowances.

* Not reproduced.

2.-Survey Staff.

90

Office.

Name.

Rate of Salary.

Present

Salary.

Allowance.

Date of

arrival in

Date of

Colony.

present

rank.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Principal Land

Surveyor, 1st Class Surveyor,

Do.,

Do.,

Do., 2nd Class Surveyor,

E.B.Lambert, F.N.G.S. B. H. C. Hallowes.

L. C. P. Rees.

£650 to £800 by £25 annually.

£ 800

$360 per annum con--

4-1-02. 5-11-01.

veyance allowance.

B. W. Grey.

E.. B. Reed. P.A.S.I. F. Sutton F.S.I. (Col.) H. West, P.A.S.I. W. A. J. Cooper.

£550 to £700 by £25

700

Do.

1-5-99.

1-1-20.

annually.

Do.

650

Do.

12-12-05.

1-1-20.

Do.

625

Do.

29-7-08.

1-1-20.

Do.

575

Do.

3-8-10.

1-1-20.

£400 to £520 by £20

520

Do.

14-8-12.

1-1-20.

annually.

Do.

520

Do.

27-12-13.

1-1-20.

Do.

520

Do.

23-2-14.

1-1-20.

B.A., B.A.I.,

15-5-14.

1-1-20.

H. H. Pegg, (1)

Do.,

Do.,

E. Larmour.

Do.

520

Do.

19-11-14.

1-1-20.

F. W. Wood.

Do.

520

Do.

19-11-14.

1-1-20.

Date of First

1st Class Native Assist :

Land Surveyor,

Do.,

2nd Class Native Assist: Land Surveyor, Native Apprentice Sur-

veyor,

Wong Hon.

$2,900 to $3,800 by

$ 3,200

Do.

Appointment. 3-1-11.

1-10-20.

Ng Ka-pui.

$150 annually.

Do.

2,900

Do.

1-2-11.

1-1-21.

Wen Cho-ming.

$2,200 to $2,800 by $100 annually.

2,400

$180 per annum con-

14-6-16.

1-10-20.

veyance allowance.

Chan Pui-lau.

$900 to $1,500 by

1,000

Do.

1-2-13. 1-10-20.

$100 annually.

Do.,

Lo Ka-tsok.

Do.

1,400

Do.

1-11-06. 1-10-20.

(1) Tran

to the Engineering Branch on 6th January, 1921.

[

* Office.

Name.

3.-Staff of Land Bailiffs, Computers, Clerks, &c.

Rate of Salary.

Prosent Salary.

Allowance.

Date of First Date of pre- Appointment. sent rank.

1st Grade Bailiff,

F. H. Dillon.

£320 to £360 by £10 annually.

£360.

$360 per annum cou- veyance allowance. and $360 per an- num personal allowance.

6. 6. 04.

1. 1. 20.

J. C. Mackay,

Do.,

Do.

£360.

$360 per annum con- veyance allowance and $60 per annum language allowance

1. 10. 07.

1. 1. 20.

Computer,.

Do., Clerk, 4th Grade,.

Do.,

Clerk, 5th Grade,

Clerk, 6th Grade,

1st Class Draughtsman,

2nd Class

Wu Iu-nam."

Pou Shu-chak. Wong Yau-ming.

$480 to $1,200 by $60 annually.

Do.

$480.

6.

4. 20.

1. 10. 20.

$480.

so

6. 4. 20.

1. 10. 20.

$1,200 to $1,500 by

$1,350.

9. 1. 06.

1. 1. 21.

$75 annually.

Chan Tin-fuk. Lai Ming-kai.

Do.

$1,200.

21. 6. 09.

1. 1. 21.

$900 to $1,150 by

$950.

9. 8. 11.

1. 1. 21.

$50 annually.

Chu Hin-loi,

$450 to $850 by $50 annually.

$550.

27. 6. 18.

1. 1. 21,

Tang Ngok-wan, | $2,200 to $2,800 by $100 annually.

$2,400.

28. 10. 05.

1. 10. 20.

Draughtsman,

Luk Kui.

$1,600 to $2,100 by

$1,800.

12.

9. 10.

1. 10. 20.

$100 annually.

3.- Staff of Land Bailiffs, Computers, Clerks, &e,—Continued.

Office.

Name.

Rate of Salary.

Prescut Salary.

Allowance.

Date of First Date of pre- Appointment. | sent rank.

Q 92

3rd Class

Draughtsman,

Lo Nam-chui.

$900 to $1,500 by $100 annually.

$900

9. 6. 16. 1. 10. 20.

4th Class

Draughtsman,

Do Kam-loi.

$420 to $840 by $60

$720.

13. 6. 16.

1. 10. 20.

annually.

20. 2. 13.

1. 10. 20.

Do.,

Tang Chi-lun.

Do.

$600.

Do.,

Do..

Tang Po-yi.

Do.,

Do.,

Fong Yau-leung.

Ho Yew-wing.

Fung Kun.

Do.

$600.

6.

4. 20.

1. 10. 20.

Do.

$600.

6. 4. 20.

1. 10. 20.

Do.

$600.

19.

4. 20.

1. 6. 14.

1. 10. 20.

1.-10. 20.

Do.

$600.

(

93

4. Cost of Office.-As the Survey Office forms part of the Public Works Department and is accommodated in the same building, the charges for numerous items such as lighting, heating, electric fans, etc., cannot be stated. Omitting these items, the following is a state- ment of the cost:

Salaries,

Conveyance Allowances,

Wages for Coolies,

Land Survey Contingencies,

Transport & Travelling Expenses,.

Survey of Colony,

Incidental Expenses,

Plans,...

Rent Allowances,

Drawing Materials and Mounting

Total,......

$ 82,767.12

4,931.45

8,894.02

7.50

332.63

1,941.65

517.55

21.40

3,433.84

$102,847.16

5. Trigonometrical Survey.-No trigonometrical work Tras carried out during the year.

6. Topographical and Cadastral Survey-Further progress was made with the Ordnance Survey, about 140 acres being surveyed and plotted on 50'-1' scale. This was chiefly composed of very close detail work in the City of Victoria and entailed the running of several miles of minor traverses. Two European Officers were absent on long leave for the greater part of the year and another was absent on three months' leave; two other also left on long leave on 11th February of this year. One European Surveyor was trans- ferred to the Engineering Staff in January. Owing to the increased number of applications for land and the numerous surveys required for lease plans and defining the boundaries of lots, the staff was chiefly occupied during the year on application work.

Further work in connection with the Shamshuipo Reclamation Scheme has been carried out and numerous small surveys, etc., have been made in connection with the new Reclamation at Cheung Sha Wan

One Surveyor was stationed at Taipo during the greater part of the year chiefly employed on the demarcation of lots and surveys required for sale purposes by the District Officer in the New Territories.

Surveys were inade for sale purposes of 39 lots in Hongkong, Kowloon and New Kowloon covering an area of 2,270,746 square feet, which were put up to public auction and realized $390,567.50 in premium and $16,020.00 in Crown Rent.

7. Maps Published. The maps of the Kowloon Ordnance Survey 200′ – 1′′ which had been sent to England for reproduction were returned and were ready for publication at the end of the year.

94

8. Miscellaneous Matters.--The following plans were prepared for official use during the year:-141 Lease Plans (in triplicate), 27 Sales Plans (in duplicate), 279 Tracings and 2,495 Sunprints in connection with proposed sales, permits, etc., whilst 1,065 permits for temporary occupation of Crown Land and 62 licences for tem- porary piers and slipways were issued.

9. The undermentioned officers were absent on leave during

viz.: ས་

the year,

Sick Leave. Vacation Leare.

Mr. L. C. P. Rees

9 months 12 days

Mr. B. W. Grey

23 days

3 months 5 days

Mr. F. Sutton

8 months 23 days

Mr. H. West

3 days

Mr. W. A. J. Cooper

9 days

1 day

Mr. B. H. C. Hallowes

3 days

I day

Mr. E. Larmour..

11 days

1 month 17 days

Mr. F. W. Wood..

10 days

1 month 17 days

Mr. Ng Ka-pui

1 day

5 days

Mr. Wen Cho-ming

28 days

21 days

Mr. Chan Pui-lau

3 days

HONGKONG, 23rd May, 1921.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works.

Γ

i

:

Appendix R.

REPORT ON THE GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, FOR THE YEAR 1920,

1.-STAFF.

Mr. S. B. C. Ross, Postmaster General, went on long leave on 6th May and was succeeded by Mr. M. J. Breen. The post of Assistant Postmaster General remained vacant from May 6th to the end of the year.

Mr. A. J. Reed, the Accountant, resumed duty, on return from long leave on 7th April.

The post of Postal Inspector was abolished on 1st August when Mr. R. C. Watt returned to the Police Department. The duties of the post have since been carried on by Mr. T. M. Perpetuo, 1st Grade Clerk.

Mr. C. J. Poole, Supervisor, was promoted to the vacant post of Superintendent Registration & Parcels Branch on 1st October. The post of Supervisor is still vacant.

During the year the changes amongst the Clerical Staff were one clerk invalided from the Service, three dismissals, nine resign- ations and three transferred to other Departments.

2.-MAILS.

The number of mail bags and packets despatched from Hong- kong during the year amounted to 171,154 as against 144,592 in 1919, an increase of 26,562; the number received was 169,107 as against 134,754, an increase of 34,353.

The number of mail bags and packets sent in transit through the Colony amounted to 107,852 as against 90,428 in 1919, an increase of 17,424.

Boxes and baskets in transit amounted to 16,046 as against 10,169, an increase of 5,877.

4,956 steamers carrying mails arrived and 6,894 left in 1920 as against 4,549 and 6,463 respectively in 1919.

Full details appear in Table I.

*

3.-REGISTRATION AND PARCELS.

Registered and insured articles handled by the General Post Office amounted to 1,083,606 as against 955,535 in 1919, an increase of 128,071.

:

R 2

Full details appear in Table II.

Parcels, ordinary and insured, handled by the Post Office, amounted to 287,442 as compared with 219,143 in the previous year, an increase of 68,299.

Full details appear in Table III.

4.-REVENUE AND EXPEnditure.

Table IV contains a statement of Postal Revenue and Expend- iture for the year.

The total revenue from the Postal Service in 1920 amounted to $526,122.08 an increase on the previous year of $76,065.33. The Expenditure for 1920 amounted to $229,378.70.

The balance of revenue $296,743.28.

over expenditure amounted to

Table V shows the postage stamps, etc., of each denomination issued for sale during the years 1919 and 1920.

Table VI shows the revenue and expenditure of the Post Office (exclusive of the Telegraph Sub-Department) for the ten years 1911 to 1920.

Table VII gives the revenue from the sale of postage stamps for the years 1918, 1919 and 1920. The increase of revenue from this source in the year 1920 over that of 1919 amounted to $82,026.19.

5.-MONEY ORDERS.

The high exchange value of the Hongkong dollar in 1920 is reflected in the increase in Money Orders issued in Hongkong for payment in Gold using countries. This increase in respect of Money Orders issued on the United Kingdom amounted to £15,498 largely on account of remittances home by members of H. M. Forces.

Conversely the amount of inward Money Orders received for payment was adversely effected by exchange, though a considerable increase in Money Orders from Canada has to be noted, due to the high premium charged by Canadian Banks in 1st quarter of 1920 on drafts on Hongkong. The Chinese residents in that country anticipating a falling dollar consequently preferred to remit by Money Order and thus secure the benefit of the lower exchange ruling when the order reached Hongkong.

The total volume of Money Order transactions in 1920 resulted in an increase of £33,948.4.2 in comparison with a corresponding increase of £10,109.13.0 in 1919.

R 3

Outward telegraphic Money Orders have similarly increased, viz:-91 orders amounting to £1,654 against 39 orders for £721 in 1919. The inward orders amounted to £320.16.6 in 1920 against £403.5.6 in the previous year but the number of orders were the same, i.e., 15 in number.

An increase is shewn in the sales of British Postal Orders but a decrease in payment, viz:-£3,478 and £3,341 respectively. Local Postal Notes are coming into public favour as a means of making remittances to Macao as they can be more easily cashed than Money Orders. An increase of $8,000 is shewn under this head in 1920.

Full details appear in Table VIII, IX and X.

6.-CHINESE CORRESPONDENCE.

Chinese Delivery Section, General Post Office.

During the year this section handled 2,151,082 ordinary letters, 98,643 other articles, and 7,449 postal hong packets, as against 2,066,899 ordinary letters, 93,097 other articles and 6,940 postal hong packets in 1919.

The registered articles delivered amounted to 307,055 of which 197,930 were from the United States of America and Canada, and 109,125 from China and other countries, showing an increase of 37,857, as compared with 269,198 in 1919.

3,144 insured letters were dealt with as against 2,743 in 1919.

The total number of Chinese private boxes for which licences were issued during the year was 304, an increase of 7 as compared with 297 in 1919.

The licences of 22 Chinese Postal Hongs were renewed, the same number as in 1919.

7.-TELEGRAPH SUB-DEPARTMENT.

The revenue collected during the year from radio-telegrams amounted to $14,591.73 an increase of $4,241.70 on the amount collected in 1919. Advices of vessels signalled at the lighthouses yielded $581.20 making a total of $15,172.93 from the Telegraph Service. Expenditure amounted to $39,335.15.

The Telegraph Service was worked at a loss of $24,162.22.

Details are given in Tables XI and XII.

The number of radio-telegrams forwarded during the year was 1,965 consisting of 25,221 words against 1,118 with 15,577 words in 1919 and 5,306 were received consisting of 75,007 words as against 2,825 with 38,191 words in 1919.

8.-MISCELLANEOUS,

ť

The mail contract with the Canadian Pacific Ocean Services expired in 1920 but the outward service from Hongkong was

!

:

R 4

maintained by this administration pending the conclusion of a new agreement. By arrangement with the Washington Postal Author- ities commercial correspondence between Hongkong and the larger American cities is now transmitted direct by the United States Postal Aeroplane Service between Victoria B.C. and Seattle Washington.

The English Mail to the Colony was transmitted throughout the year via Bombay Negapatam and Singapore, and was despatched every Thursday from

from London with the regular Indian Mail scheduled to reach Bombay in 14 days. This arrangement though admirable in respect of regularity and speed proved unsatisfactory in one respect. As the Negapatam-Penang service is bi-weekly a delay in the initial stage to Bombay entails the loss of the connec- tion from Negapatam onwards and therefore a further delay of at least 3 days. During the early portion of the year failures to maintain the schedule were not infrequent and at the instance of the Chamber of Commerce strong representations were made to the British Postal Authorities. However as a larger complement of fast vessels became available for the London-Bombay Service a considerable improvement was effected. The Straits Settlements Postal Administration have also assisted by undertaking to intercept at Penang the letter mail to Hongkong and transmit it by rail in Singapore; and thence by the first available steamer to Hongkong.

Arrangements were made with the Peninsular & Oriental and Blue Funnel Companies for the despatch of parcel mails to the United Kingdom by those Companies' ships and the service now assured is practically a weekly one.

The privilege of free postal facilities granted during the War to H. M. Naval and Military Forces was withdrawn in 1920.

A Money Order Agreement between this Colony and the Chinese Post Office came into force on January 1st, 1920. The agreement provides for the exchange of Money Order transactions through the intermediary of Hongkong between China and Foreign countries.

The first post-war Postal Congress was held at Madrid in October, 1920. Considerable increases of postal rates were author- ised to meet the universal increase in expenditure and the depre- ciation of currencies. As no official notification of the postal policy to be adopted by the United Kingdom or the British Empire was communicated to this Administration no action was taken during the year in the revision of the Colony's postal rates.

14th April, 1921.

M. J. BREEN,

Postmaster Generál.

Table I.

Mails Received and Despatched during the years 1919 and 1920.

For H.M.

To and From Hongkong. Ships on China

For Foreign Sent in Transit Men-of-War. through Hongkong.

Steamers Carrying Mails.

Station.

Loose

Bags Boxes

Bags.

Packets. Letter Boxes.

Bags.

Bags.

and

and

Arrivals. Depar-

tures.

Packets. Baskets.

20

Ꭱ ;

Ch

Increase,

Decrease,..

Received in 1920,

157,888 11,219

649

4,826

765

4,956

Received in 1919,

125,410

9,344

749

1,256

643

...

4,549

32,478 1,875

3,576

122

407

100

Despatched in 1920,

170,792

362

2,207

893

107,852

Despatched in 1919,

144,207

385

1,481

691

90,428

16,046

10,169

6,894

6,463

Increase,

26,585

726

202

17,424

5,877

431

Decrease,

23

...

Table II.

Statistics of International and Hongkong Registered Correspondence and Insured Letters for the years 1919 and 1920.

Description of Correspondence.

International and Local.

Comparison with 1919.

Total 1920. Total 1919.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

H

R 6

Insured Letters,

4,906

6,873

11,779

8,748

3,031

Registered Articles,.

443,864

627,963

1,071,827

946,787

125,040

Registered Articles viâ Siberia,

Total,........

448,770

634,836

1,083,606

955,535

128,071

Total Increase of 128,071 Articles.

Table III.

Statistics of International and Hongkong Registered Parcels for the years 1919 and 1920.

Description of Parcels.

International and Local.

Comparison with 1919.

Total 1920. Total 1919.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

Insured Parcels via Gibraltar,..

1,828

5,720

Ordinary Parcels viâ Gibraltar,

18,867

27,151

7,548

46,018

4,153

20,982

3,395

25,036

Cash on Delivery Parcels,

3

152

155

59

96

America, Manila, and Honolulu Parcels,

5,156

17,994

23,150

21,094

2,056

French Parcels by French Ships,

1,495

1,495

773

722

Chinese Parcels,

28,148

38,315

66,463

Indian Insured Parcels,

1,471

1,174

2,645

Indian Ordinary Parcels,.

3,891

3,527

7,418

Indo-China Parcels,..

13,737

8,623

22,360

Straits Parcels,

8,167

5,631

13,801

172,082

36,994

Australian Parcels,

1,545

2,414

3,959

Dutch East Indies Parcels,

2,947

518

3,465

Japanese Parcels,..

3,392

11,152

14,544

Miscellaneous Parcels,.

7,968

4,512

12,480

Local Posted Parcels,

61,941

61,941

Total,.

97,120

190,322

287,442

219,143

68,299

Total Increase of 68,299 Parcels.

— R 7 —

Table IV.

Revenue and Expenditure.

Post Office.

Revenue.

1919.

1920.

Increase.Decrease.

Expenditure.

1919.

1920.

Increase. Decrease.

$

$

Sale of Postage Stamps,

Unpaid Postage,"

396,802.80 178,828.99 | 82,026.19 5,005,$$ 5.864.44

Working Expenses,

$

155,886.07|175,702.61|19,816.54|

Box-holders' Fees,

8,294.00

9,270.00

858.56

976.00

Commission on Money Orders| and Postal Notes,.

Carriage of Mails: --

6,882.87

8,234.67 1,351,80

Transit Charges,

58,009.17

53,676.09

4,333.08

Profit on Exchange on Money Order transactions, Interest on Money Order Funds,} Void Money Orders and Postal Notes,

31,798.02 | 22,857.36 1,063.28 891.27

209.90

172.35

8,940.66

169.01

37.55

213,895.24 | 229,378.70 19.816.54 4,333.08

'Deduct Arrears of Transiti Charges recovered from other Administrations,

109,821.37

Net Expenditure,.. .$104,073.87 | 229,378.70

Profit,

315,982.88 296,743.38

Total,

$450,056.75 526,122.08 85,212.55 | 9,147.22

Total,

450,056.75 526,122.08

R 8

"

- R 9

Table V.

Postage Stamps, etc., issued for sale in Hongkong during the years 1919 and 1920.

Denomina-

tion

1919.

1920.

Increase + Decrease

Postage Stamps,

1

cent.

580,616

578,400

2,216

2

cents. 4,602,661 5,168,400 +565,739

59

2,227,766 2,584,080 +356,314

""

"

.

>>

00

};

153,961 128,400 25,561

58,598 64,560 + 5,962

20

*

8 & 19 N =

10

1,129,684: 1,295,280 +165,596

54,474 58,800 4,326

25

33,841

38,880 5,039

+

30

52,161

""

91,680 + 39,519

50

49,913

67,740 + 17,827

""

1 dollar.

21,401

دو

32,760 + 11,359

2 dollars.

8,007

""

9,820+ 1,313

3

3,189

3,500 +

311

"

10

5

3,588

""

"

3,875 +

287

10

"

""

5,291

6,140 +

849

Books of Stamps,.

1 dollar.

4,240

6,275 + 2,035

Post Cards,

1 cent.

43,503

42,078

1,425

""

11⁄2 cents.

18,640

18,000

--

640

19,680

""

20,100 +

420

Newspaper Wrappers,

Postage Envelopes,

2

1,515

1,515

4

10,947

14,075 +

3,128

Registration Envelopes,.... 10

20,245

""

26,200 | +

+ 5,955

R 10

Table VI,

Revenue and Expenditure for the years 1911 to 1920.

Post Office.

Year.

Total Revenue.

Total Expenditure.

Profit +

Loss

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C,

$

C.

$

C.

%

1911......

399,217.15

1912...... 401,054.32

1913...... 439,189.37

1914...... 398,426.38

1915......

422,267.97

wy.com

23,050.82

105.77

296,867.12

+ 104,187,20

74.02

622,587.51

-

183,398.14

141.76

371,646.C6 + 26,780.32

93.27

368,457.77

403,609.02

35,151.25

109.54

1916...... 401,742.33

308,136.33

93,606,00

76.70

1917....

403,869.87

259,214.83

+ 144,655.04

64.18

1918.

427,132.88

156,107.69

+ 271,025.19

36.54

1919...

1920.

450,056.75

526,122.08

104,073.87

+ 345,982.88

23.12

229,378.70

+ 296,743.38

43.59

:

- R 11

Table VII.

Comparative Table of Revenue from Sale of Postage Stamps

during the years 1918, 1919, and 1920.

Month.

1918.

1919.

1920.

$

January,

34,583.80

34,716.18

38,505.24

February,

26,743.58

26,200.30

33,138.45

March,

32,902.48

35,041.36

41,617.75

April,

31,731.90

31,357.63

36,790.80

=

May,

31,535.55

35,002.25

39,967.53

June,

27,758.60

29,675.66

36,515.21

July,

31,227.25

33,372.66

38,656.43

August,.

31,461.35

31,798.71

37,954.12

September,

28,702.70

32,901.75

39,382.59

October,

31,911.50

35,208.99

42,303.05

November,

30,445.90

33,983.60

47,143.45

December,...

34,458.70

37,543.71

46,854.37

Total,....

$373,463.31

$396,902.80

$478,828.99

Table VIII.

Money Order Transactions during the years 1919 and 1920.

- R. 12

1920.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

Orders

United Kingdom, Queensland,

New South Wales,

Victoria,

South Australia,.

Country.

£ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d.

issued. Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders

Orders paid.

issued.

Crders paid.

34,481 4 7 12,593 8 8 18,982 14 304 15 720,600 2 11 1,869 8 10 5,470 17 9

9 20,018 0 11 15,498 622 0 4 16,868 8 6 942 17 85,115 13 5

£ S. d.

9 10

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

£ S. d.

7,424 12 3

926 11 2

3,731 14 5 355 4 4

317

4 9

353 14 11

1,772 19

7

· 406 18 2

,304 14 5

468 5 2

25 0 2

530 13 0

29 11 5

976 10 11

53 3 3

4 11 3

445 17 11

Tasmania,

New Zealand,.

51 6 0

439 15 9

29 16 7

182 13 10

21.9

5

257 1 11

109 0 0

2,030 211

71 1 6

1,620 14 4

37 18 6

409 8 7

Western Australia,

Union of South Africa,

United States of America,.

Canada,

Philippine Islands,.

Japan,

Straits Settlements,

4,317 11

Federated Malay States,

184 2 9 3,659 6 3 2,418 7 5

69 14 1 748 16 2 759 17 7

4,021 15 10 10,004 9 10 111,074 12 4 450 8 353,316 10 10 980 9 416,513 18 9 386 19 0 2,721 16 3 564 17 2 7,053 11 0 30,330 14 8 8,456 12 9 33,717 19 10 12,353 10 8 4,477 12 1 6,178 15 2 2,836 9 7 5,576 0 4 1,641 2 6 585 3 96,098 10 ̊ 2. 221 9 49,076 14 10 363 14 5

165 4 8

61 19 10

18 18 1

7 14 3

1,240 18 10

11 1 5

295 15 3 1,070 2 6

36,802 12 1

530 1

1 177 18 24,331 14 9 3,387 5 2 3,896 17 11

602 14 10

2.978 4 8

Carried forward,

$

,701 0 6 134,622 18 0 63,951

1

3 110,913 9 3 18,515 18 243,868 0 2 4,765 18 11 20,158 11 5

.....

:

Table VIII,--Continued.

Money Order Transactions during the years 1919 and 1920,—Continued.

- R 13 -

1920.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

Country.

Orders

issued

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

£ S. d. £ s. d. £ 8.

£ 8. d. £ .S.

Brought forward, British North Borneo,

Sarawak,

Siam,

77,701 0 6 134,622 18 0 63,951 184 7 7

329 14 3

19 3

1,911 9 9

925 12 5

177 18 2

Macao,

China,

Shanghai,

1,951 1 8 1.334.6 3 11,045 11 9

3,245 6 10

358 16

118 0 5

15 4 4

1,382 11 10

d d. £ $. d. 1 3 110,913 9 318,515 18 243,868 2 1 1,858 6 4 53 3 5

£ s. d. £ S. d. 4,765 18 11 20,158 11 5 174 8 6

969 3 6

107 16 5

1,528 11

211 13 10

43 11 1

3 19 5

70 1 9

7

2,019 5 1

568 9 10 1,334 6 3

1,716 15 3

2,019 5 1

Agencies in China,

India,

17,019 19 9

13,950 4 2 17,481 19 6 13,400 13 10 24,991

9,217

0

89,554 19 4

1,828 11

1

4,395 4 10

114,869 3 9

2,612 15 9

4

128,110 5 0

Ceylon,

French Indo-China,

105 4 2

112 15 2

6,728 3 21

282 4

8 1,971 7 11

988 3 7

220 17 11- 941 6 8

Base Post Office,

55 810

Total,

13 0

4,756 15 3

46 16 11

54 15 10

7,971 4 4 14,709 11 2

177 0 6

108 2 9

£109,803 4 10 195,507 3 4 100,537 1 3 170,825 2 9 22,462 18 7 59,593 14 313,196 15 0 34,911 13 8

£305,310 8 2

£82,056 12 10

£271,362

4 0

Net Increase,..

.£33,948

4 2

£48,108 8 8

.:

Table IX.

British Postal Orders issued and paid at Hongkong, and at Agencies in China.

ORDERS ISSUED.

R

No. of Notes.

Amount.

£

S.

d.

6,637

5,726

4

10

10,305

9,067

19

6

VALUES.

Amount.

S.

d.

d.

S.

d.

0

6

1 0

1

જે

S. d.

S. d.

S.

d.

S.

d.

S.

d.

2 6

5

0

10 0

10

6

20 0

?

£

S.

d.

Total in 1920,.

654

2,097

1,436

1,591

2,788

3,584

618

8,042

11,283 4 6

dr

Total in 1919,

694

1,710

1,176

1,203

1,956

2,349

428

5,575

7,804 12 6

Total in 1920,...

Total in 1919,...

ORDERS PAID.

:..

:..

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

...

:..

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

1:2

15.

:

Table X.

Statement of Local Postal Nores issued at Hongkong at the Agencies in China.

25 cts.

50 cts.

VALUES.

$1.00

$2.00

$3.00

Amount.

$4.00

$5.00

$10.00

$

Total in 1920,.

521

650

490

511

532

507

1,297

3,080

42,876.25,

Total in 1919,.

578

681

542

521

584

540

1,176

2,304

34,901.00

– R 15 –

Revenue.

Message Fees :-

Table XI.

Revenue and Expenditure-Telegraph Sub-Department.

1919.

1920.

Expenditure.

1919.

1920.

Radio Telegrams,..........

10,350.03

14,591.73

Working Expenses :-

Semaphore Messages,

15.40

Messages notifying vessels passing lighthouses,

470.40

581.20

Personal Emoluments :- Staff, G. P. O.,

Station 1st Oct., 1919, to 30th September, 1920,

Staff, (Naval), Cape D'Aguilar

Incidental Expenses,..

9,745.68

9,244.62

201

15,457.72

16,041.94

88.97

110.90

Stores and Repairs,

8,950.94* 7,510.21

Transport,

6,277.08

Uniforms for Messengers,

7.50

150.40

Loss,

23,314.98

24,162.22

Total,

34,150.81

39,335.15

Total,

$34,150.81

39,335.15

* Includes "Transport".

R 17

Table XII.

Revenue and Expenditure for the years 1915 to 1920.

Telegraph Sub-Department.

Year.

Total Revenue.

Total Expenditure.

Profit +

Loss

Percentage of

Expenditure

to Revenue.

-

C.

$

C.

1915, 15th July to 31st ( December,

1916.

2,623.30

4,112.07

1,488.77

%

156.75

:

9,188.49

10,846.21

1,657.72

118-04

1917.

23,817.40

39,174.38

- 15,356.98

164.47

1918.

24,453.60

25,100.73

647.13

102.64

1919.

10,835.83

34,150.81

- 23,314.98

315.17

1920.

15,172.93

39,335.15 - 24,164.22

259.24

Appendix S.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY,

(British Section.)

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1920.

1. The steelwork and roofing materials for the platform awnings at Kowloon arrived early in the year, when a Contract for the erection, including drainage, was entered into, and the work is now completed. The lighting arrangements for the platforms were carried out by the Public Works Department. The platform awnings are of steel frame construction, roofed with corrugated asbestos cement sheeting, and provide a very necessary shelter from the sun and rain to a considerable portion of the platforms, as well as to the east side of the concourse.

2. Good progress was made in the construction of the new wharf for Kowloon Station Yard which is built of reinforced concrete, the longest piles being 55 feet long. The wharf is 150 feet long and projects 50 feet from the sea-wall. There are six tiers of stairs which facilitate the transfer of cargo to and from local craft at any state of the tide.

With the exception of the cast iron stair treads, the wharf was completed at the end of the year.

3. Owing to the dilapidated condition of the old iron wharf at Blackheads's Point acquired by the Railway in 1906, it was considered advisable to dismantle it rather than spend a large sum of money on extensive and possibly unremunerative repairs. It was consequently sold and has since been removed.

4. The Electric Turret Clock for Kowloon Station Clock Tower arrived in the Autumn and the work of installing was at ance begun. Unfortunately, however, progress has been seriously delayed owing to the non-arrival of necessary drawings and instructions from the makers.

5. The repairing of Government Motor Cars and Motor Fire Engines is now undertaken by this Department, and a brick build- ing has been erected in the Locomotive Yard to serve as a workshop for this purpose.

6. An iron building has also been erected near the workshops to accommodate the newly acquired electric welding plant which must necessarily be outside the workshops proper.

S 2

7. The Locomotive Superintendent's Office has been rebuilt in masonry. The Office was originally a wooden frame structure, and was found to be infested by white ants, which would have caused serious damage to patterns, etc., stored above the Office had not steps been taken to exterminate them.

8. During the year, water-closets were installed in the Manager's House, and connected with the sewers recently laid in the vicinity.

9. At Taipo Market, a temporary island platform has been constructed of old sleepers. This neighbourhood is developing fast, and it is apparent that, in the near future, it will be necessary to considerably enlarge this station to meet traffic requirements.

10. At Fanling Station, an additional short siding was laid to facilitate and encourage the cattle traffic.

An approach road to this station is also under construction, and the old temporary latrine has been substituted by one of a permanent nature built in brickwork.

11. The Sheung Shui Halt Platform has been metalled and tar

· surfaced.

12. Owing to the gradual growth of Yaumati and neighbour- hood, the question of a wide-span road bridge, where the road will pass under the Railway north of Yaumati Station was again considered. Drawings were submitted to the Consulting Engineers who have since approved the general design and steelwork details and working drawings are now in preparation.

13. Three public road level crossings at 7th, 9th and 18th mile respectively have been widened; new check rails laid, and the new gates necessitated by the widening of the frontier road have been provided.

14. It had been observed for some time past that the rails in Beacon Hill Tunnel were rapidly wearing down; and, early in the year, a fractured rail was discovered.

After a careful examination of the track throughout the tunnel, it was decided to relay with new rails, and reserve those taken out for sidings. Sufficient rails and fastenings for this work were ordered through the Crown Agents and are now in the Colony.

In

15. No serious damage to the line was caused by the rainstorms during the year, although several points were threatened. cutting No. 1, a slip occurred at the deepest point in a rift of soft material exposing a spring, which necessitated a heavy concrete face wall 30 feet long and 42 feet high.

At mile 14, the training wall mentioned in my last report has been completed, and subsequently it was found necessary to considerably extend this wall to protect the Railway bank at other points.

1

-

S 3

16. A small slip occurred in the cutting at mile 15 and a low retaining wall of some 100 feet in length was built, further methods of draining the subsoil will be carried out later.

17. The existing 8-foot span bridge at mile 16 proves to have insufficient waterway, causing flooding of the railway bank and an additional span will be added in 1921.

18. The reinforced-concrete sleepers referred to in my last report have proved most successful, and more have been laid in the track during the year.

In view of the increased cost of materials, and the high rate of exchange prevailing, it was considered more economical for the time being to delay the complete substitution of reinforced-concrete sleepers for the Australian hardwood sleepers.

19. About 2,000 sleepers were renewed in the Main Line and 1,200 laid in the sidings. Many of the condemned sleepers were halved and partly or wholly used again on the Fanling Branch narrow-gauge line.

20. Preparations were made for the introduction of the Metric System in 1921. A very convenient chart to facilitate the conversion of the weights now in use to the metric weights was prepared and lithographed, and considerable attention was devoted to new tariff rates, but the scheme is still in abeyance.

21 New axleboxes have been fitted to Locomotive No. 1, steam chest ports faced up, new slide valves fitted, and wheel tyres turned up to gauge and template. The new cylinders ordered for this engine, which were expected about July, unfortunately did not arrive owing to the Moulders' strike in England.

22. The tyres of Locomotives Nos. 3, 4, 5 and 6 have been turned up to gauge and template, and all have had the steam chest ports chipped and faced up and also new slide valves fitted.

23. No. 8 Locomotive has been fitted with new axleboxes and tyres turned up to gauge and template. It has been necessary to renew a large number of boiler tubes on all Locomotives largely due to the inferior quality of the coal used during the year.

24. The two shunting engines have been in the shops for extensive boiler repairs, and an order placed for two new boilers for these Locomotives. Heavy repairs to the Fanling Branch Locomot ives have also been carried out.

25. Carriages Nos. 5, 16, 21, 22 and 27 have been given a general overhaul and the floors laid with decolite, new double roofs have also been fitted and the coaches repainted inside and out. Nos. 1 and 28 have been fitted with new double roofs and given a thorough overhaul and repainted. Ten other carriages have also received general repairs.

1

S 4

1

26. New roofs have been fitted to goods wagons Nos. 2, 17 and 18, and about half of the old goods stock repainted. The couplings of most of the rolling stock have been repaired and new draw bar springs fitted where required; many of the couplings which had worn very slack have been built up again to original size by the Electric Welding process.

27. The underframes of 30 30-ton goods wagons which arrived from England were erected, and the teak bodywork built in the workshops. These wagons were completed and placed into service during the year.

28. A small Turret Lathe, Universal Grinding Machine, and also a Cylinder Boring Machine have been installed in the workshops.

The Electric Welding Machine which arrived last year could not be used until April, as some of the parts were found to be defective, and considerable delay was experienced in obtaining renewals from America.

This process of electric welding of metals has proved most useful, and it is now possible to build up and repair a great number of machinery parts which could not be done hitherto.

29. Numerous overhauls to the Police Department Motor Cars and Motor Cycles have been carried out in the Railway workshops and various parts of the motor and steam fire engines have been made.

30. On April the 3rd, the fitters and turners of the Colony came out on strike, and the Railway fitters were compelled by their Guild to join the strikers, 16 days later the drivers and firemen were obliged to stand off in sympathy with the fitters and turners. On April the 19th, however, the strike was settled by a Commission appointed by the Government of which the Honourable Mr. John Johnstone was chairman.

During the absence of the Chinese Drivers, men from the Navy and Army were lent by the Authorities, and I am pleased to state that they proved very willing workers, and greatly assisted in maintaining the train service during the period of the strike.

31. On August the 1st, a washout occurred on the Chinese Section near Nam Kong which necessitated the cancelling of both the down morning express, and the up afternoon express for 5 days. A temporary footbridge was erected, and the train service partly maintained by the transfer of passengers at this point until August the 8th when the repairs were completed.

Shortly afterwards, owing to internal trouble in the Kwong Tung Province, through traffic was again seriously interrupted. Fighting occurred in Chinese Territory on September 16th near Nga Yeo (26 miles from Canton). The up afternoon and down morning through expresses were cancelled that day and, from the 17th to 20th, with the exception of the up afternoon express on the 20th, the through and joint sectional trains were suspended between Canton and Sheklung in Chinese territory.

S 5

Fighting recommenced in October, resulting in further trouble in the Chinese territory, some rails were removed from the track near Sheklung on October the 6th; and a railway bridge between Sheklung and Shek Ha was damaged 4 days later, also on the 14th the track was broken in the neighbourhood of Shek Ha, and, as the unsettled conditions continued until the end of October, the morning down and the afternoon up through expresses did not run from October the 6th until the 2nd of November and the afternoon

; down, and the morning up expresses were cancelled between the 24th of October and the 1st of November.

The running of the two slow through trains had to be discontinued for 10 days during this period; and it was not until the 2nd November that the full train service was resumed.

32. The Fanling Branch Line was closed for 14 days in August, owing to serious settlement of the piers of one of the bridges, caused by scour during the rainy season.

33. Notwithstanding the frequent suspension of the through train service, the receipts show an increase when compared with the previous year.

34. In commemoration of the second anniversary of "Armistice Day" at 11 a.m. on November the 11th, all traffic on the line stopped, and in the workshops and elsewhere all motion was suspended for 2 minutes.

35. The amount provided in the Estimates under Special Expenditure was $372,904 and during the year at various times other amounts were voted, making a total of $622,502.80.

A sum of $241,344 was provided for the purchase of 4 carriages, 2 motor coaches and 1 trailer, but was not expended as delivery was not possible before the end of the year. Further, it was decided to reboiler the two Hudswell Clark shunting engines and thus avoid the expense of a new locomotive; an order was therefore placed locally for two boilers to be delivered in 1921 and under this arrangement $14,800 lapsed.

Owing to the non-arrival of one pair of Locomotive Cylinders, Ramapoa Switch Stands, and certain additional machines for the workshops, a further su m of $12,632.86 included in the Estimates was not required.

The total expended amounted to $335,428.43 and the details are shown in the Table of Expenditure herein.

36. The Revenue Statements of Earnings and Expenditure follow the line previously adopted. The actual expenditure amounted to $487,144.04 against an estimate of $420,167.00 which shows an excess of $66,977.04.

During the year, the salaries of the European and the outdoor Chinese Staff were revised, and the amount available under Personal Emoluments therefore proved insufficient by the sum of $16.467.56.

S6

With regard to "Other Charges", the expenditure of all departments has been carefully watched. The vote for coal was exceeded by $48,053.32 due partly to the high price paid, and to a smaller extent increase in the mileage. The following figures show the cost of coal per ton to the Railway for the past four years:-

1917

1918..

1919..

$16.78

$19.80

$19.20

$22.50

1920..

The expenditure under sub-head "Sleepers" amounted to $10,824.75 against an estimate of $6.000, it being necessary to renew a larger number of sleepers than the estimate provided for. However, small sums lapsed under other sub-heads and the total excess of "Other Charges" was reduced to $50,509.48.

37. The Local Traffic Earnings have improved. The receipts amounted to $194,041.14 against $179,434.14 or $14,607.00 more than the previous year, the increase being under passenger receipts. In May, it was decided that the Railway should discontinue its custom of debiting other departments for the transport of Govern- ment passengers travelling on duty and other services rendered, and accordingly the sum of $4,577.77 is not included in the Railway earnings.

38. Through and Joint Sectional Traffic Receipts were $318,345.37 an increase of $16,017.63 when compared with 1919.

39. The Gross Receipts for the year were $520,176.10 as against $490,092.77 for 1919 an increase of $30,083.33.

The balance after paying working expenses stands at $33,032.06 which is $40,028.57 less than the previous year. This difference however, is more than accounted for by the general increase in salaries granted to the staff, the high cost of coal, and sleeper re- newals mentioned in previous paragraphs.

40. For the past 5 years the results are as follows:-

Gross Receipts. Working Expenses. Net Receipts.

1916....

1917.

1918..

1919.

1920.

$366,215.67

428,246.46

433,274.43

490,092.77

520,176.10

$296,691.63

337,431.48

356,221.07

417,032.14

487,144.04

$69,524.04

90,814.98

77,053.36

73.060.63

33,032.06

41. The Through and Joint Sectional Passengers carried were

as follows:-

1918.

1919.

1920.

Passengers booked by Stations in British

Territory to Sta-

tions in China...... 307,494

344,716 365,665

Passengers booked by

Stations in China to

Stations in British

Territory....

323,642

354,699

373,776

$ 7

The Local Passengers carried were as follows:-

Main Line

Fanling Branch

1918. 296,379

1919.

345,314

1920.

392,206

45,187 48,917 47,787

42. The final division of Through and Joint Sectional Traffic Receipts has been agreed between the two Administrations to the end of June, 1920.

43. There were two serious accidents in 1920 which are included in the following

Shunting Collisions

1

Coupling failures

3

Engine failures

2

Engine derailments

3

Coach

1

Wagon

1

""

Broken rails

1

Serious Minor

Te Railway Employee's

""

"

Passengers Others

Deaths Injuries Injuries

2

2

1

0

The reduction in coupling failures from 14 during 1919 to 3 for the year under report, is attributable partly to the installation of the electric welding plant by which the wear in the British. Section couplings has been made good by welding on fresh faces.

The two deaths are those of one Chinese (male) and one Chinese (female) who were run over while trespassing on the Railway.

Of the three engine derailments, two were of minor import- ance involving light shunting engines. The shunting collision occurred in Shum Chun Station Yard in Chinese Territory during the exchange of trains with the Chinese Section.

44. The First Aid" Classes begun in 1918 were continued throughout the year, and in connection with the examination referred to in my last report 3 efficiency badges were awarded to candidates, and three others who previously held badges qualified to wear them for a further 12 months.

It was suggested by His Excellency The Governor that perhaps some of the Railway Staff would like to be examined for the St. John's Ambulance Association certificate and 6 Station Masters, 2 Booking Clerks, 1 Goods Clerk and 1 Guard presented themselves for the examination conducted by Dr. Keyt in May 27th last.

Six candidates were successful and the certificates gained have been issued to the officers concerned,

9 8

45. Mr. G. A. Walker, Chief