Administrative Reports - 1912

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1912

Table of Contents

1 Finances

2 Trade and Shipping, industries, Fisheries, agriculture and Land

3 Legislation

4 Education

5 Public Works

6 Government and aided institutions

7 Institutions Not Supported By Government

8 Criminal and Police

9 Vital Statistics

10 Postal Service

11 General Observations

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

B Assessment

C Registrar General's Department

D Harbour office

E Observatory

F Supreme Court

G Police Magistrates' Court

H Land office

I New Territories

J Police and Fire Brigade

K Prison

L Medical and Sanitary

M Botanical and forestry

N Education

O Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

P Public Works

Q Post office

R Railway

 




HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1912,

1.-FINANCES.

The revenue for the year amounted to $8,180,694, being $503, 206 more than the estimate and $683,463 more than the revenue for the previous year.

Compared with the returns for 1911 there were increases under every head with the exception of Land Sales and Interest, the decrease under the latter head being accounted for hy a Bank over- draft during the second half of 1912.

The expenditure amounted to a total of $7,202,543, inclusive of a sum of $1,051,841 spent on Public Works Extraordinary.

It was less than the estimate by $650,135, the decrease being due princi- pally to exchange, the average rate having been 2/- as compared with an Estimate of 1/9-by the delay in receipt of accounts due by the Post Office in respect of transit charges and mail subsidy, and by the saving of a sum of $96,140 on the vote for Public Works Extra- ordinary.

The detailed figures for 1911 and 1912 are set out in the fol- lowing statements :-

HEADS OF REVENUE.

Light Dues

87,454.95

Light Dues, Special Assessment

98,448.45

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified -

5,371,419.75

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific

purposes, and Reimbursements in Aid

785,534.51

Post Office -

-

401,054.32

Kowloon-Canton Railway

251,971.53

Rent of Government Property, Land and

Houses

873,732.50

Interest

Miscellaneous Receipts

147,293.49

TOTAL,

8,016,909.50

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

163,784.58

TOTAL,

$8,180,694.08

EXPENDITURE.

Governor

77,566.72

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature 67,552.91

Registrar General's Department

45,520.75

Audit Department

26,727.35

Treasury

59,183.11

Harbour Master's Department

207,361.15

Observatory

22,595.08

-

Miscellaneous Services

214,275.04

Judicial and Legal Departments

241,508.52

Police and Prison Departments

749,571.07

Medical Departments

213,602.02

Sanitary Department

324,195.86

Botanical and Forestry Department

39,865.27

Education

243,369.39

Military Expenditure

1,421,352.47

Public Works Department

314,590.96

Do.

Recurrent

447,636.44

Do.

Extraordinary

1,051,840.43

Post Office

296,867.12

Kowloon-Canton Railway

207,350.78

Charge on account of Public Debt

647,172.56

Pensions

258,439.16

Charitable Services

24,399.09

TOTAL,

- $7,202,543.25

The surplus on the year's working was $978,151, and the balance of assets and liabilities showed on the 31st December a sum of $2,805,129 in the Colony's favour.

The following is a statement of the revenue and expenditure of the Colony for the five years 1908-1912 :-

Revenue.

Expenditure

$

$39

1908

6,104,207

6,573,341

1909

6,822,967

6,542,839

1910

6,960,861

6,907,113

1911

-

7,497,231

7,077,177

1912

8,180,694

7,202,553

The capital expenditure on the British Section of the Kowloon- Canton Railway during 1912 was $1,262,922, a large portion of this sum having been used for the acquisition of a site for a terminal station. The total expenditure on this account amounted at the end of the year to a sum of $13,284,425.

The amount of the consolidated loan stands at £1,485,732, and in addition the advances by the Crown Agents for Railway Construc- tion amounted at the end of the year to £199,318. Against these items there is at credit of the Sinking Fund a sum of £141,393 and there is a balance of £330,000 unpaid in respect of the loan to the late Viceroy of Wuchang.

No new taxation was imposed during the year and no change of any importance was made in existing taxation.

The rateable value of the whole Colony amounted to $12,312,306, being an increase of $1,150,916, or equal to 10:31% over the value of the previous year. In the City of Victoria alone the figures rose from $9,006,555 to $10,072,535 an increase of $1,065,980 or 11-83%. The results in the other districts of the Colony were as follows:-

Increases.

The Hill District, $10,925 or 3.91%.

Shau-ki-wan, Sai-wan-ho, and Quarry Bay, $17,161 or 491%. Hongkong Villages, $13,015 or 11:08%.

Kowloon Point, $30,430 or 6·11%.

Yau-ma-ti, $4,285 or 1.67%.

Mong Kok Tsui, $20,020 or 14 94%.

Decreases.

Hung Hom and Hok Un, $6,385 or 2·11%.

New Kowloon, $1,969 or 1.62%.

Kowloon Villages, $2,545 or 2·59%.

For the period 1903-1912 the assessment of the whole Colony has risen from $8,788,063 to $12,312,306 an increase in value of 40·10%.

The circulation on the 31st December of notes of the three Banks having authorised issues was as follows:-

Hongkong & Shanghai Bank

Chartered Bank of India, Australia, & China Mercantile Bank of India

$19,784,469

5,329,419

496,323

$25,610,211

ލ

The currency of the Colony consists, in addition to the notes of these Banks, of British, Hongkong, and Mexican dollars and of subsidiary coin. The inconvenient size of the silver dollar, approx- imating to that of a five shilling piece, has led to a considerable demand among the European population for one dollar notes and a large number of notes of this denomination, issued by the Portuguese Banco Nacional Ultramarino and payable at Macao, are in circula- tion. The Hongkong & Shanghai Bank were authorised during the year under review to increase their issue of one dollar notes from $226,000 to $350,000. Silver subsidiary coin minted by the Chinese Government at Canton is in common use generally at a slightly higher rate of discount than that prevailing for Hongkong subsi- diary coin.

There are also in the Colony a certain number of notes issued by the Republican Government at Canton. These notes are payable only in subsidiary coin and as they are practically unsecured the discount upon them has reached as high a rate as thirty per centum.

The circulation of foreign copper coin is prohibited by Ordi- nance No. 11 of 1912, and there is now none such to be found.

The rate of discount on Hongkong subsidiary coin varied during 1912 between the following limits:-

50 cent pieces 1 per cent. to 4 per cent.

20

10

8

8

31/1 14/12/20

1)

3

5 Copper coin

"

par

5

""

12

The total issue of these coins, less those demonetized, amounts to some $37,432,370 nominal value, and they were up to the year 1905 readily absorbed at par, large quantities being taken by the neighbouring provinces of China. During 1912 twenty and ten cent pieces of the face value of $40,000 and $1,000,000 respectively were shipped to England for purposes of demonetization. The discount which has prevailed since 1905 may be attributed to the immense quantity of similar coin which has latterly been minted at Canton. In 1905 the Hongkong-Government ceased to issue any subsidiary coin and in 1906 it began a policy of demonetising all its subsidiary coin received as revenue. This policy has been continuous- ly followed since except during a brief period in 1911. Coin to the face value of about $7,000,000 has thus been redeemed. The total issue by the Hongkong Government was of the face value of about $44,000,000. It is calculated that about half of that amount has dropped out of circulation.

II.-TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,

AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.) SHIPPING AND TRADE.

The total of the shipping entering and clearing at ports in the Colony during the year 1912 amounted to 488,649 vessels of 36,735,149 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1911, shows a decrease of 54,546 vessels with an increase of 555,997 tons.

The decrease in numbers of vessels is entirely in local trade.

Of the above, 46,603 vessels of 24,269,270 tons were engaged in foreign trade, as against 44,978 of 23,063,108 tons in 1911, and were distributed as follows:-

1911. Numbers.

1912. Numbers.

1911. Tonnage.

1912. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going ships,

10.5 %

84%

35.0 %

32.4 %

Foreign Ocean-

going ships,

10.6

9.2

35:0

35.3

British River

Steamers,

16:0

15'0

17.3

17:3

Foreign River

Steamers, ...

3.3

3.8

3:0

3.5

Steam-launches

(under 60

tons),

7.7

8.6

0.6

0.6

Trading Junks,

51.9

55'0

9.1

10.9

100.0

100'0

100'0

100.0

}

·

The movements of fishing junk s are not included in the above figures.

Of ships of European construction, 4,154 ocean steamers, 1 sailing ship, 4,351 river steamers, and 1,976 steam-launches (not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 287 ships, as compared with 269 in 1911, and 26-7 in 1910.

The average tonnage of individual ocean vessels entering the port has increased from 2,4951 tons to 2,575 7 tons. That of British ships has increased from 2,633'5 tons to 2,7134 tons, while that of foreign ships has increased from 2,365 7 tons to 2,457 tons.

During the past 20 years, the average tonnage of ocean vessels has increased from 1,155'9 tons to 1,969 2 tons.

The average tonnage of river steamers entered during the year has increased from 584.9 tons to 585 1 tons That of British river steamers has increased from 599 tons to 6025 tons, and that of foreign river steamers has decreased from 518 tons to 515'1 tons.

6

A comparison between the years 1911 and 1912 is given in the following table :-

1911.

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

Foreign Ocean-

British Occan-

going,

going,

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Toinage.

3,907 | 7,589,995 3,956 7,779,970 49

189.975

4,180 7,917,640 | 4,367 | 8,592,320

187

674,680

British River

Steamers,..... Foreign River

6,871 | 4,116,736 | 6,968 | 4,197.744 |

97

81,008

Steamers......

1,423

786,057 1,738

394.349

315

158,292

Steamships un-

der GO tons 3,263

130,092 | 3,981 150,612

718

20.520

(Foreign

Trade),...

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

25,331

2,572,588 25,593 | 2,651,275

259

81,687

:

:

:

Trade,

Total, Foreign 14.978 23,063,108 46,603 24,269,270 1.625

1,206,162

Steam-launches

plying in Wa-

ters

of the

461,984 10,981,990 | 411,990 | 10,609,401

49,994

372,586

Colony,

Junks, Local

Trade,

**36,608 *2,134,054† 30,056 †1,856,475

6,552

277,579

Grand Total, 543,570 36,179,152 488,649 36,735.149 1,625, 1,206,162 56,516

650.165

Net,...

555.997 54,921

*Including 13,980 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 818,292 tons.

t

""

9,922

*

of 624,090

This table shows an increase in British ocean shipping of 49 ships of 189,975 tons, or of 125 per cent. in numbers and of 2:49 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to improved trade, high freights, and a greater demand for tonnage. The advent of the British India Steamship Company's vessels to the Colony is also a factor.

British river steamers have increased by 97 ships of 81,008 tons or 141 per cent. in numbers and 197 per cent. in tonnage. This is explained by the increased number of trips made by the Steamships "Wing On" and "Wing Hon". The former having made 320 more trips than she did in 1911, and the latter 212. River steamers generally have run more frequently.

Foreign ocean vessels show an increase of 187 ships of 674,680 tons or 447 per cent. in numbers and 85 per cent. in ton- nage. This result is due to increases in Japanese, Austrian, Chinese, Portuguese, and Russian steamers. Against this there are consider- able decreases in German, Norwegian, Danish, French and Dutch

steamers.

Foreign river steamers show an increase of 315 ships of 158,292 tons, or 2.21 per cent. in numbers and 215 per cent. in tonnage. This is accounted for by the greater number of trips made during the year by French and Chinese steamers. .

.. In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in foreign trade, an increase of 718 ships of 20,520 tons, or 22 per cent. in numbers and 157 per cent. in tonnage, is shown. This appears to be due to the greater number of launches running with passengers and cargo to places in Chinese territory more especially to the Eastward. Some of the launches on this run were heretofore employed in towing lighters, etc., in the harbour, but are no longer able to obtain such employment.

In junks in foreign trade, an increase is reported of 259 vessels of 81,687 tons, or 1 per cent. in numbers and 32 per cent. in tonnage. This is accounted for by the increased control over these vessels, effected by the new system of licensing inaugurated early in 1912, having resulted in more accurate reports of their

movements.

In local trade, large reductions are reported.

Steam-launches in local trade show a decrease of 49,994 ships of 372,586 tons, or 108 per cent. in numbers and 34 per cent. in tonnage. This is explained by the fact that almost all towing in the harbour, which formerly was done by small licensed launches, hired for the purpose by the European and Japanese firms concerned, is now done by the unlicensed private launches belonging to those firms.

Junks in local trade show a falling off of 6,552 vessels of 277,579 tons, or 181 per cent. in numbers and 13 per cent. in tonnage. For this large decrease it is difficult to account, but more than half of it is certainly due to the Sanitary Department employing steam barges for a large part of the scavenging work. The remainder of the decrease is probably due to the new system. of licensing not having been properly understood by the boat population for some time after its inception, with the result that full figures were not at first forthcoming.

It is interesting to note that the entries of ocean steamers during the last quarter of the year show an excess, over the average of the three previous quarters, of 122 ships of 175,332 tons. This is accounted for by the unprecedented demand for tonnage, during the closing months of the year, and consequent rise in freights.

The actual number of ocean vessels of European construc- tion entering during 1912 was 724, of which 336 were British and 388 were foreign. In 1911 there were 720: 348 British and 372 foreign.

These 724 ships measured 1,862,287 tons. They entered 4,155 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 8,186,136 tons. Thus,

compared with 1911, 4 more ships, with a tonnage greater by 65,789 tons, entered 106 more times, and gave a collective tonnage greater by 430,103 tons.

Thus

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1911. 1912. 1911. 1912.

1911.

1912.

Steamers' 344

335

1,952

British

Sailing...

4

1

6

1 16,534

German,

111

98

657

1,977 3,781,6223,892,354

637 1,133,786 1,129,054

2,890

Japanese,.

106

123

509

592

1,354,362 1,572,194

Norwegian,

36

26

210

168

221,039 173,145

Austrian,

6

10

24

46

96,380 153,624

Chinese,

20

30

192

236

241,362 275,310

Danish,

8

6

20

11

45,928 28,927

Dutch,

16

18

130

112

235,881 246,352

French,

27

26

152

142

242,469

229,532

Italian,....

2

4

12

13

31,188!

31,403

Portuguese,

5

79

101

32,842

49.494

Russian,

11

18

20

35

53,080 103,998

Swedish,

6

6

14

14

25,778 37,262

U.S.A. {sailing...

Steamers

18

18

71

70

243,619 260,597

1

1

163

Total,.. 720

7244,049 4,155 7,756,033|8,186,136

TRADE.

In the absence of a Customs Department, the details of the trade of the Colony which it is possible to give are meagre, and of little value, being derived from reports of ship masters, which are given in round numbers, and the several items of cargo are only too frequently returned under the heading "general". In a few cases, however, as opium and sugar, exact figures can be obtained; while in certain other items, from their nature, or for other reasons, approximately accurate returns are rendered. The following remarks are therefore confined to these few articles of trade.

Imports. Under this heading, which includes all cargo brought by ocean vessels or river steamers (not in junks or steam- launches) and landed or transhipped in the Colony, 4,151,805 tons of cargo were reported during the year. This, compared with that reported during 1911 (3,995,793 tons), shows an increase of 156,012 tons, or 39 per cent.

Of this total, there appear increases in the import of coal, cotton, flour, sugar, and timber, while decreases are reported in kerosene oil, opium, and rice.

Coal.--An increase of 10,212 tons or 1 per cent. is reported, 1,056,502 tons having been imported during the year. It is probably due to transhipments of coal to Canton, where there is an increasing demand for it.

Of the above total quantity, 73 per cent. was Japanese, Hongar and Fushun coming next with about 8 per cent. each, other descrip- tions of coal being imported in but small quantities. None arrived from either Australia or Labuan, and but one cargo from England, except that imported by the Admiralty, from Cardiff.

Cotton, including cotton yarn and cotton piece goods, show an increase of 20,552 tons or 514 per cent., which seems to be a genuine increase, and not due solely to a larger proportion of the imports being reported as cotton instead of general cargo. The reason for this phenomenal increase is not far to seek The trade in China, after a total cessation during the last 3 months of 1911 and the first 3 months of 1912, on account of the Revolution in that country, recommenced, and gradually assumed large pro- portions. These soon still further increased, partly owing to the assumption, by a large percentage of the population, of European dress, which opened up a new trade (now rapidly declining), and partly to the disappearance of the old stocks in the hands of the native merchants, and the necessity for their replenishment. The high rate of exchange was also a factor in increasing the trade although the unprecedented demand caused enhanced prices in spite of it. It is of interest to note that this large increase in imports does not include the large and increasing quantity of native grown cotton spun in the Colony, and re-exported as yarn.

Flour.-Here an increase of 16,620 tons, or 20 per cent. was reported. This is explained by the prices being moderate on account of the high rate of exchange. The wheat crop in North China, also, has been poor for the past two seasons, thereby creating a demand for foreign flour, while the Chinese are quickly learning new uses for this commodity, which in many parts is taking the place of rice. Among these is a very fine description of vermicelli, now manufactured at Amoy and Chefoo, which is in great demand, and 20 per cent. of the flour imported at Amoy (through Hongkong) is used for this purpose; considerable quantities are consumed at Amoy and Chefoo and large shipments are made to Hongkong, Canton, the Philippine Islands, Singapore, and other ports out of China. increased use of flour is evident in the Colony, being noticeable even among the boat population of the Harbour, where it is a common thing to see cakes and "flapjacks" being cooked and eaten, instead of the formerly universal rice.

This

Kerosene Oil.-Very large reductions are reported in both bulk and case oil imported during the year- of 42 per cent. in the former and 32 per cent. in the latter. Several causes militated to this end. The large stocks in hand at the commencement of the Revolution in China; the virtual total cessation of trade until well on in the year 1912; and the high freight rates, which have increased by more than 100 per cent. in twelve months.

10

The trade is now restored to its usual proportions, if not still increasing. Out of 105,425 tons imported during 1912, 15,859 tons, or 15 per cent., arrived during the month of December, which seems to point to an increased demand in view of the high freight rates now prevailing.

Liquid Fuel shows an increase of 2,724 tons imported, or 15'4 per cent.

This is due to the greater number of vessels now using this form of fuel instead of coal.

Opium. The imports of raw opium show a decrease of 8,925 chests or 42 per cent, and the exports a decrease of 6,7963 chests or 34 per cent. This decrease is the natural outcome of the Opium Agreement of May, 1911, but has been intensified by the uncertainties and variations of provincial policies in China with regard to opium generally and by the absolute exclusion of Persian opium from the China market. The figures for the last five years are shown in the following table :-

1912. 1911. 1910. 1909. 1908. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests.

Stock in hand, 1st Jan..... 7,587 7,123 4,509 5,808 4,707 Imported during the year, 12,3614 21,286

31,743 35,734 41,821

Total,... 19,948 28,409 36,252 41,542 46,528

Boiled by Opium Farmer, 1,113 761 Spurious Opium destroyed, 2 Exported during the year, 13,2644 20,061 28,333 35,938 39,609

782 1,044

864

14

51

247

Total, 14,379 20,822 29,129 37,033 40,720

Stock remaining 31st Dec., 5,560 7,587 7,123 4,509 5,808

The legitimate importation of morphia and cocaine has ceased except for such quantities as are required for medicinal purposes in the Colony. The trade in compounds of opium is now confined to exportation to Java for the use of the Dutch Government Monopoly.

Rice. Here is reported a decrease of 21,072 tons, or 36 per cent. The rice crops in the two Kwang Provinces have been good, thus the demand for foreign rice has not been so great as usual. The Siamese, Annamese and Cochin China crops were very poor and prices high. Siamese rice used to sell here at $4.50 per picul. This year as much as $7.00 has been asked, and paid. The increased and increasing use of flour among the native population, noticed in the remarks under that heading, no doubt affects the rice market to a certain extent. The import of Japanese rice has apparently entirely ceased.

11

Timber.-An increase of 13,169 tons or 22 per cent. is here reported. Although it is unlikely that this is all a genuine increase, it is certain that the timber trade has received a considerable impetus recently, by reason of the increased demand for foreign woods for the building and furniture trades in Canton and the interior. The principal descriptions of timber imported are teak and ebony from Siam, and hardwoods, such as billion and yacal from Borneo. The demand for European styles of furniture among the Chinese is responsible for large increases in the import of teak. Ebony is used for the manufacture of the Canton "blackwood" now so popular among foreigners. Billion, a very hard, heavy wood, whiteant proof, is being increasingly used for beams, rafters, and joists, in the building trade. Billion is also used almost exclusively for the manufacture of those universal necessities of life in China-chopsticks. Yacal has become very popular for boat and ship building, being easily worked, free from knots, very durable, and can be obtained to almost any size. It is used for the frames of the better class of boats, steam-launches, etc., built in the Colony, while the sheathing and planking is generally made of teak. Native boats and junks are usually built of native wood-China pine- the import of which is not included in these figures.

Emigration and Immigration.

122,657 emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1912, (135,565 in 1911). Of these 88,749 were carried in British ships and 33,908 in foreign ships. These figures show a decrease of 12,908 (or 95 %) under 1911, due undoubtedly to the fact that most of the poorest classes instead of emigrating to foreign countries joined the Revolutionaries in China during the year.

Statement of Number of Emigrants to Straits Settlements 1908 to 1912 compared with Total Chinese

Emigration 1908 to 1912.

No. of Emigrants

to

Straits Settlements.

1908,

1909,

1910,

1911,

1912,

Total No. of Emigrants.

49,639

71,081

48,016

77,430

76,705

111,058

100,906

135,565

84,024

122,657

163,248 returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from coast ports, as against 149,894 in 1911. Of these 125,499 arrived in British ships, and 37,749 in foreign ships.

12

(b.) INDUSTRIES.

(i.)-Under European Management.

Engineering and Shipbuilding. This industry has improved during the year under review.

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng. Co., Ld, Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., W. S. Bailey & Co., . Macdonald & Co.,... Ulderup & Schluter, Tung Hing Lung, Kwong Fook Cheong,

Kwong Hip Loong,

Kwong Tak Cheong,

Kwong Tak Hing,

Kwong Hip Lung Co., Ld.,

Cheung Kee,.

Kwong Sze Sang,.

Kwong Lee,

1912.

6

8 vessels of 2,121 gross tons and 1,065 I.H.P.

وو

""

15

922 491

12

11

1,275 486

"}

"

>>

༞་

""

3

197

218

22

1

19

"

87

120

39

""

50

180

""

665

585

31

"

27

76

"

*

""

548

846

"

""

"

11

91

110

"

"}

25

1

250

575

"

39

11

>>

34

79

24

"3

"

206

32

"

76

1,301 102

"

12

15

11

Total,.......

61 vessels of 5,765 gross tons and 7,018 I.H.P.

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng., Co., Ld., Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., W. S. Bailey & Co.,

Macdonald & Co.,

Ulderup and Schluter,

Tung Hing Lung,

Kwong Tak Hing,.

W. C. Jack & Co.,

1911.

9 vessels of 2,281 gross tons and 3,650 I.H.P.

13

8

5

30

دو

552

703

""

>>

206

413

1)

50

173

22

408

860

وو

""

55

250

""

210

192

""

15

22

>>

45

48

"

""

""

76

76

>>

19

"

Kwong Hip Lung & Co., Ltd.,

Total,....... 73 vessels of 3,883 gross tons and 6,609 I H.P.

Sugar Refineries.-The year 1912 has on the whole been an unfavourable one for the local refined sugar industry. China has not yet recovered from the effects of the Revolution, and until con- fidence is fully restored merchants are apparently content to adopt a hand-to-mouth buying policy. Apart from this the European beet crop has been a record one, latest estimates promising an excess of about 2 million tons over that of 1911; and, with beet and cane combined, a surplus in the world's production of about 14 million. tons over that of any previous season. The result has been a very considerable decline in the world's prices, with a consequent unset- tling reaction in Far Eastern markets.

Cotton Spinning.-Since the termination of the Revolution in China there has been considerable improvement in the Yarn trade, and the year closed with the industry in a healthy condition in China. The local mill has worked full time throughout the year and has benefited by the better conditions.

13

Rope Manufacturing,--The most distinguishing feature of the year has been the extraordinary rise in the price of hemp in the Philippines ranging from 60% to 80% from the beginning to the end of the year.

The full effect of this upon the rope industry has yet to be shown, and if the price is maintained it is feared that consumption of the finished article is likely to be curtailed in favour

rope made from an inferior fibre or from steel.

of

Cement. There has been an increased demand in the Far East throughout the year. An embargo was placed in July on the export of limestone from the Kwangtung province by the Authorities at Canton which seriously interfered with the output of the local Green Island Cement Company, and forced the Company to have recourse to Haiphong for supplies, and at the end of the year the matter remained still unsettled. Owing to the coal strikes and labour troubles in England and Europe, and higher outward freights, supplies from home have been much restricted, and prices in some markets became enhanced, but every year the numerous factories in this part of the world are increasing consumer's independence of Europe.

(ii.)-Under Chinese Management.

Rattan and Fibre Furnitures.-Business was not so good owing to the damp season which injuriously affected the hemp string (linen fibre) and sea grass. The export, retail, and manufacturing businesses all showed a slight falling off.

Native Tobacco. It is to be feared this is a dying industry. The native product is being ousted by foreign tobacco and cigarettes, and owing to the failure of the 1912 crops in the interior, caused by the troubles consequent on the Revolution, the price of tobacco leaf rose to abnormally high figures, and many of the tobacco factories were conducted at a loss.

Tinned Goods.-The three local factories report a very good year, but the total volume of exports fell off owing to the adverse effect of the Revolution and subsequent troubles in Kwang Tung on the output of the Canton factories which send their manufactures to their Hongkong branches for export.

Samshu.-The local manufacturers of native spirits report having had anot r good year. The total local output (including the New Territories) of all kinds of native spirits was 1,154,360) gallons as compared with something less than 1,100,000 gallons in

1911.

Vinegar. All the large native distilleries produce vinegar as well as samshu. The year's output of the seven largest firms amounted to 834,000 gallons a slight falling off on the figures for 1911.

Knitted Vests and Socks.-Another factory was completed in the course of the year, and there are now six establishments, all doing a considerable business, to meet the large and increasing local demand for these articles.

14

Leather and Hides.-The leather manufactured at the local tan- neries is of such an inferior quality that it is gradually being driven out of the market by the competition of imported products: it cannot compete with leather tanned in the Straits.

The export of raw hides to Penang where they are tanned and re-exported to Hongkong in the form of very fair quality leather increased largely owing to the extraordinary demand throughout China for foreign style women's boots and shoes and for military equipment.

Ginger and Preserves.-Very small profits were made by the ginger manufacturers during the year owing to the rise in the price of raw ginger by $2 a picul. Two shops failed and had to close during the year.

Soy. This trade still remains dull; exports to Singapore and the South have again fallen off.

Paper. The trade has not been quite so good, a large stock remaining unsold at the end of the year.

Vermilion. The output has remained about the same, but the demand has still further slackened, and prices dropped by $10 to $15 a picul.

Lard. A considerable amount of lard is manufactured in the Colony for export, chiefly to the Philippines where regulations requiring the purity of animal products to be certified are in force. Most of the local manufacturers have no difficulty in complying with these regulations, and during 1912 no less than 1.119,342 tbs. of lard and 81,342 lbs. of dried meats were exported under these cer- tificates.

(c.)-FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hongkong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shauki- wan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Since the middle of 1911 a Steam Trawler has been engaged in fishing over various grounds, and has contributed its hauls to the local markets. This trawler ceased its operations in January, 1912, and went North to Shanghai. It was found that she was unable to make it pay, as the water was too shallow for her nets, and attempts to fish on the usual fishing grounds resulted in the noise and vibration of her engines scaring away the fish. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

(d.)-FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE AND BOTANY.

The areas, about 200 acres, cleared of pine trees during 1911 on the west side of the island near Aberdeen were sown with pine tree seeds in pits.

15

Pine seedlings were raised in a nursery at the south face of the Shatin Tunnel in the New Territories, and 65,000 pits were dug on the adjoining hill to be filled later with the pine seedlings standing in the nursery.

• Approximately 175,000 pits were sown with seeds of native plants on the low hills near the Shatin Tunnel; the varieties of trees used were Rhodomyrtus, Melastoma, Psidium, Rhus, Mallotus and Lucæna.

In connection with the scheme for beautifying the island, 200 Azaleas were planted on the spur of a hill between Wongneichong Gap and Deep Water Bay.

Beds of Hydrangeas and flowering trees were planted by the roadsides on the upper levels.

The planting of flowering trees and shrubs on Crown land adjoining the Peak tramline, which was begun a few years ago, was continued. Particular attention was given to the area between the Kennedy Road Station and the Lower Terminus.

The avenues of shade and flowering trees in Hongkong and Kowloon have been maintained, dead trees were replaced, and 1,051 new young trees and shrubs planted near roads and banks in different parts of the Colony.

The trees in plantations above and below Taipo Road were thinned, and upwards of 2,000 trees removed from the sides of the road to make room for the Camphor trees, which are used for shade purposes.

In connection with the anti-malarial measures, an area of 3,208,479 square feet was cleared near dwelling houses, police sta- tions and public buildings in various parts of the Colony. In addi- tion to this, an area of 1,025,600 square feet was cleared for the Military Authorities at their expense.

For the purpose of making surveys, an area of 1,962,010 square feet was cleared for the Public Works Department.

The first and second rice crops were fair. and plentiful.

Lichees were cheap

Reports were received from the Director of the Imperial In- stitute upon samples of vegetable products forwarded to him from Hongkong during the year 1911. The most important of these were afterwards submitted to the Hongkong Chamber of Commerce for perusal. A supply of Camphor Oil, which had been favourably reported upon, was sent to the Imperial Institute for distribution among various firms.

The Key to the Flora of Hongkong, the New Territories and Kwang Tung Province has been published by the Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, as an additional series of the Kew Bulletin.

16

(e.)-LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.

The net amount received from sales of Crown land and pier rights after deducting expenses of sales was $163,784 being a decrease of $106,221 on the previous year and $42,485 more than the average received for the past 5 years. Of this amount $8,145 was in respect of sales of land in the New Territories and the remain- der from sales of new lots of Crown land and grants of extensions to existing lots and sales of pier rights in the island of Hongkong and Old Kowloon. The chief item was the sale of Inland Lot 1918, a buildinig site of 59,700 square feet at Morrison Hill, within the City, which realized $47,500.

In addition to the above the Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf & Godown Company Ltd. were granted Kowloon Marine Lot No. 91 (the former Police Camber) containing an area of 84,246 square feet at the price of $288,778, the Government accepting in exchange a surrender from the Company of a part of their pro- perty to that value in lieu of cash. The Government resumed 10 acres 0 rood 10 poles of land at Kowloon from the Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf & Godown Company Ltd. and the Hongkong Land Reclamation Company Ltd. for the purpose of the terminal Railway Station. The total compensation paid in cash and land by way of exchange amounted to $1,762,657.40.

The year was chiefly noted for the sale of a considerable number of building lots adjacent to the City, chiefly in the neigh- bourhood of Kennedy Road, on which blocks of European style residences are being erected by the purchasers.

There has again been a considerable increase both in number and value of private properties which have changed hands. The total purchase moneys paid amounted to $19,029,986 as against $15,343,234 for the previous year. The prices given in many in- stances appear to be much above the value of the property as an investment whilst in other cases the value of property adjoining has remained more or less stationary. Many old buildings have been

· pulled down and have been rebuilt with modern terraces and dwelling houses for the accommodation of the better class Chinese. The rate of interest charged on good mortgage securities is now usually $7 per cent. per annum whereas three years ago it was rarely less than $8 per cent.

The granite quarries, of which there are a large number on the coasts both of the island and in New Kowloon, were wholly or par- tially closed down for a greater part of the year owing partly to the fact that the export of stone to China had practically stopped since the Revolution and also to contracts in Hongkong requiring a large amount of stone having been completed. Reductions of one-third of the annual rents were in many cases granted to the lessees and the leases of only two of the quarries which expired on 31st December were re-let.

Sales of land in the New Territories continue even, consisting chiefly of small building sites for native occupation and patches of

17

undeveloped agricultural land. There is a tendency amongst a few Chinese to buy up land in the neighbourhood of the railway and roads with a view to future development.

The Government have leased 88 acres of waste land at Fan Eing to the Royal Hongkong Golf Club who have laid out an 18 hole course, a large club house has been built and a bungalow has been erected in the neighbourhood of the links by a private individual. Three private families have erected or rented bungalows at Tai Po and further enquiries are being made for building sites there.

III.-LEGISLATION.

Forty-three Ordinances were passed during 1912 of which 18 were amendments to other Ordinances and 11 were connected with the Revision of the Ordinances of Hongkong.

The most important Ordinances were Chinese Marriage Preser- vation (No. 42), Foreign Copper Coin (No. 11), Full Court (No. 27) and Limited Partnerships (No. 18).

IV.-EDUCATION.

There are 63 Government and Grant Schools, the most import- ant of which is Queen's College. Of these 20 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all subjects of the 7th Standard and above. These latter schools have an average attendance of 4,054, and the medium of instruction in all of them, with the exception of four girls' schools, is English. The 43 remaining schools are all Lower Grade. They comprise one school for British Indians, where English and Urdu are taught, four Government Schools and 38 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 1,984. The total average attendance at both grades of schools is 6,038.

The revenue derived from school fees was $66,172.50 (of which $32,720 was from Queen's College).

Two schools are limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Government. In 1912 the combined average attendance at them was 99.

The Hongkong Technical Institute affords an opportunity for higher education to students who have left school. Instruction was given in 1912 in Mathematics, Machine Drawing and Building Con- struction; in Chemistry, Physics and Electricity; in Commercial English, Logic and Political Economy; in French and German, Shorthand and Book-keeping. Classes in Sanitation (Public Hygiene)

17

undeveloped agricultural land. There is a tendency amongst a few Chinese to buy up land in the neighbourhood of the railway and roads with a view to future development.

The Government have leased 88 acres of waste land at Fan Eing to the Royal Hongkong Golf Club who have laid out an 18 hole course, a large club house has been built and a bungalow has been erected in the neighbourhood of the links by a private individual. Three private families have erected or rented bungalows at Tai Po and further enquiries are being made for building sites there.

III.-LEGISLATION.

Forty-three Ordinances were passed during 1912 of which 18 were amendments to other Ordinances and 11 were connected with the Revision of the Ordinances of Hongkong.

The most important Ordinances were Chinese Marriage Preser- vation (No. 42), Foreign Copper Coin (No. 11), Full Court (No. 27) and Limited Partnerships (No. 18).

IV.-EDUCATION.

There are 63 Government and Grant Schools, the most import- ant of which is Queen's College. Of these 20 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all subjects of the 7th Standard and above. These latter schools have an average attendance of 4,054, and the medium of instruction in all of them, with the exception of four girls' schools, is English. The 43 remaining schools are all Lower Grade. They comprise one school for British Indians, where English and Urdu are taught, four Government Schools and 38 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 1,984. The total average attendance at both grades of schools is 6,038.

The revenue derived from school fees was $66,172.50 (of which $32,720 was from Queen's College).

Two schools are limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Government. In 1912 the combined average attendance at them was 99.

The Hongkong Technical Institute affords an opportunity for higher education to students who have left school. Instruction was given in 1912 in Mathematics, Machine Drawing and Building Con- struction; in Chemistry, Physics and Electricity; in Commercial English, Logic and Political Economy; in French and German, Shorthand and Book-keeping. Classes in Sanitation (Public Hygiene)

18

J

and First Aid to the Injured are also held, the examinations being conducted under the auspices of the Royal Sanitary Institute, London, and of the St. John's Ambulance Association respectively. Classes for Men and Women Teachers are a feature of the Institute.

The Lecturers are recruited from the members of the medical and educational faculties of the Colony, and from the Department of Public Works, and receive fees for their services. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped Chemical Laboratory and excellent Physical Apparatus.

While the Technical Institute has suffered in several directions from the activity of the University, it continues to perform many useful functions of its own. The Normal Classes for men and women, the Shorthand, Mathematics and English Classes were all well attended, as also a "First Aid" Class.

The University of Hongkong was opened for teaching in Sep- tember, 1912. Chancellor, His Excellency Sir Francis Henry May, K.C.M.G., Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Sir Charles Eliot, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.C.L., M.A., LL.D., Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Pro- fessor C. A. M. Smith, M.SC., M.I.M.E., Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dr. Francis William Clark, M.D., Registrar, Mr. W. J. Hinton, B.A.

Faculties of Engineering and Medicine are fully established, and a beginning has been made in the Faculty of Arts. In the Engineering Department courses are being given in Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, leading up to the degree of B.Sc. (Eng.). The Medical Faculty prepares students for the degrees of M.B. and B.S. The Arts Faculty gives the degree of B.A. which like all the other degrees of the University is modelled on the London Pass Degree.

Five years of residence are required before the M.B. or B.S. can be granted, and four for the B.Sc. (Eng.) and B.A. There are three terms in the Session, which begins on September 15th and ends about May 31st. The fees are $300 for tuition, and $240 for board and residence, with a deposit of $25 caution money. fees are payable in terminal instalments.

All

The University has shown abundant proof of vitality. At the end of the year the number of students was 72, 31 of whom were taking Engineering and 21 Medicine. There is a Provisional Arts Course which gives courses in Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Chinese, English, History and Economics. While most of the students have studied in Hongkong schools a number come from -Canton, the Coast Ports of China and the Straits Settlements.

V. PUBLIC WORKS.

Of the important: works in progress, the Law Courts were completed and formally opened by H.E. the Governor on the 15th January. The building contains 3 courts, the Court Library, the

18

J

and First Aid to the Injured are also held, the examinations being conducted under the auspices of the Royal Sanitary Institute, London, and of the St. John's Ambulance Association respectively. Classes for Men and Women Teachers are a feature of the Institute.

The Lecturers are recruited from the members of the medical and educational faculties of the Colony, and from the Department of Public Works, and receive fees for their services. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped Chemical Laboratory and excellent Physical Apparatus.

While the Technical Institute has suffered in several directions from the activity of the University, it continues to perform many useful functions of its own. The Normal Classes for men and women, the Shorthand, Mathematics and English Classes were all well attended, as also a "First Aid" Class.

The University of Hongkong was opened for teaching in Sep- tember, 1912. Chancellor, His Excellency Sir Francis Henry May, K.C.M.G., Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Sir Charles Eliot, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.C.L., M.A., LL.D., Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Pro- fessor C. A. M. Smith, M.SC., M.I.M.E., Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dr. Francis William Clark, M.D., Registrar, Mr. W. J. Hinton, B.A.

Faculties of Engineering and Medicine are fully established, and a beginning has been made in the Faculty of Arts. In the Engineering Department courses are being given in Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, leading up to the degree of B.Sc. (Eng.). The Medical Faculty prepares students for the degrees of M.B. and B.S. The Arts Faculty gives the degree of B.A. which like all the other degrees of the University is modelled on the London Pass Degree.

Five years of residence are required before the M.B. or B.S. can be granted, and four for the B.Sc. (Eng.) and B.A. There are three terms in the Session, which begins on September 15th and ends about May 31st. The fees are $300 for tuition, and $240 for board and residence, with a deposit of $25 caution money. fees are payable in terminal instalments.

All

The University has shown abundant proof of vitality. At the end of the year the number of students was 72, 31 of whom were taking Engineering and 21 Medicine. There is a Provisional Arts Course which gives courses in Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Chinese, English, History and Economics. While most of the students have studied in Hongkong schools a number come from -Canton, the Coast Ports of China and the Straits Settlements.

V. PUBLIC WORKS.

Of the important: works in progress, the Law Courts were completed and formally opened by H.E. the Governor on the 15th January. The building contains 3 courts, the Court Library, the

19

Judges' Chambers, the Attorney General's and Crown Solicitor's Offices, the Land Registry Office and the Court Registry Office, besides the necessary cells, lavatories, robing rooms, witnesses' rooms, etc. The Mongkoktsui Breakwater was constructed through- out to a height of 9 feet below low water level whilst in five places it was partly constructed to a height of 12 feet above that level. The reconstruction of the old Western Market had reached roof level and the erection of the ironwork for the roof was well advanced. A contract for the construction of a large masonry dam to impound 1,500 million gallons of water, forming the second section of the Tytam Tuk Scheme, was let in October and the necessary pre- liminary arrangements for the housing of workmen, etc., were well advanced at the close of the year.

The following buildings were completed:-Additional Storey and Extensions, Yaumati English School; Market and Slaughter House, Aberdeen; Stables, Yaumati Disinfecting Station; Quarters for Searchers, Imports and Exports Office; Lighthouse and Quarters, Kap Sing Island; an extension of the Maternity Hospital; a lean-to shed in Staunton Street for a vegetable market and the reconstruc- tion of Coolie Quarters at the City Slaughter Houses to admit of the provision of further accommodation for slaughtering pigs. The following buildings were in course of erection :-Sanitary Offices in Wantsai and Saiyingpun Districts; new Operating Theatre, etc., at the Civil Hospital; a new Public Works Storeyard; an extension of the City Slaughter Houses and Quarters near same for an additional Inspector; a Vegetable and Fruit Market at Yaumati; an exten- sion of the Belilios Public School; and an Underground Trough Closet at the west end of Wellington Street.

A path from Boundary Path to Kennedy Road and another from Chamberlain Road to Plantation Road were completed. Bonham Road was diverted along the northern side of the area formerly occupied by No. 2 Tank and a further diversion of this road to admit of an extension of Inland Lot 754 was carried out. The diversion referred to resulted in an improvement of the alignment of the road. A considerable improvement, both in gradient and alignment, was effected in Pokfulam Road at No. 1 Bridge. A diversion and im- provement of Wongneichong Road to the north of the village bear- ing the same name was in progress. A path from Pinewood Battery to Pokfulam Road was constructed. In Kowloon, a new road south of Kowloon Inland Lot 571 was formed and the old embankment extending from the Tai Po Road to Tong Mi Village was widened and otherwise improved to render it available for ricksha traffic. In the New Territories, the remaining section of the Castle Peak- Sha Tau Kok Road, extending from Au Tau to San Tin, was begun as was also a branch road from Au Tau to Kam Tin.

The training of the stream at No. 12 Bridge, Shaukiwan, was continued, practically the entire length from No. 12 Bridge to the Tytam Tuk Road being completed, and a branch stream, extending to the same road, was also trained. The channelling of Pokfulam Stream was extended to the overflow channel from the Reservoir. Some streams to the westward of the University were trained for

20

considerable distances and various portions of streams in the neigh- bourhood of May Road and between the Military Hospital and the Bowen Road Filter Beds were also trained. The training of sundry other streams in the Wanchai District and to the westward of Mount Austin Barracks was also undertaken and an important extension of the Wongueichong Nullah in the vicinity of the village bearing the same name was in progress. Provision was made for the discharge of stormwater from the site of the University by laying drains in Bonham and Hill Roads. In Kowloon, a further extension of the nullah in Waterloo Road to the north of No. 4 Railway Bridge was nearly completed and a new stormwater drain was laid in Mody Road to intercept the stormwater which formerly flowed across Kowloon Inland Lot 575. The sewer in Craigmin Road to intercept the drainage from houses on the southern slopes of Mount Gough, etc., was completed and practically all the houses were connected with it. Various extensions of sewers in connection with new building lots were carried out and further extensive drainage works were executed at Shamshuipo on account of reclamation works in progress there.

Extensive surface channels were constructed in Kowloon City to assist in improving the sanitary condition of the village. Iron pipes were substituted for earthenware ones in the case of three lengths of sewer in Matheson Street, Leighton Hill Road and in Wongneichong Valley

The reconstruction and raising of Tai Hang Village was com- pleted; considerable progress was made with the Ap Liu Village Improvement Scheme and the reclamation of the area in front of Kowloon Marine Lots 29 to 31, at Yaumati, was continued. Con- siderable reclamations at Shamshuipo and to the south of Kowloon Marine Lot 32, at Taikoktsui, were also in progress. The Govern- ment plots on the east side of Royal Square, corresponding to those on the west side, belonging to the Hongkong & Shanghai Bank, were fenced in.

The work of providing scavenging lanes was continued, com- pensation being paid where necessary. The demolition of the riding floors over the entrance to Amoy Lane was carried out, the owner being compensated by Government.

The waters of a stream in the south-western corner of the Sywan Valley were intercepted and led into Shaukiwan in iron pipes for the supply of this important village and the construction of a service reservoir and filter beds was in progress. A new main was laid at Aberdeen for the supply of Water Boats. The conduit for conveying Tytam water into the City was enlarged over a con- siderable length in order to increase its discharging capacity. A main of larger diameter was substituted for the one previously sup- plying Mount Kellett District.

A large block of land at Kowloon Point was resumed at a cost of $1,473,880 for a site for the terminal Passenger Station of the Canton-Kowloon Railway,

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary was $1,051,840 and on works annually recurrent $447,636.

21

No typhoon passed in such proximity to Hongkong as to cause any damage.

Railway.

At the end of 1911 little construction work remained to be done with the exception of building the Terminal Station at Kowloon. The site for this has been under discussion during the year and it was finally decided to purchase Kowloon Marine Lots Nos. 3, 9, 74 and 75. It was also necessary to acquire a portion of the land in the occupation of Messrs. Holt and Company to gain access to the pro- posed new station and this has been arranged by exchange of an equal portion from Railway property. Mr A. B. Hubback, F.R.I.B. A., Government Architect for the Federated Malay States, was, by the courtesy of the Chief Commissioner, appointed architect and sub- mitted plans before the end of the year which were approved. Work was commenced by raising the Praya Wall at Kowloon Point to such a level as to ensure the safety of the yard against flooding during typhoons. The demolition of the warehouses and other buildings on the site was completed, the head offices of the Railway being transferred to a temporary building which on the completion of the new station will be converted into quarters for the staff. A considerable amount of preliminary work has also been done in the laying out of temporary sidings, the collection of building materials and the transportation of these to the site.

The branch line from Fauling to Sha Tau Kok was completed and opened to traffic on April 1st. Two sidings were laid, one at 11 and one at 4 Miles and a passing loop at Wo Hang Station.

The year's expenditure chargeable to Construction Account was $1,242,132 Main Line and $20,791 Fauling Branch making a_total of $1,262,923 and shows a saving on the Grant of $520,170 which was largely due to a profit on exchange.

The Working Expenses compared with gross receipts show a marked decrease on the previous year, expenditure amounted to $207,351 or $6,378 more than was estimated.

The Revenue derived from Local Traffic was $116,824, Through and Joint Sectional $118,572 and Fanling Branch $6,252, the excess of income over expenditure being $34,298.

Passengers booked by British Section to Stations

in China,

122,390

Passengers booked by Chinese Section to Stations

on the British Section,

134,583

Passengers travelling on the British Section, Main

Line,........

300,337

Passengers travelling on the British Section (Fan-

ling Branch),

42,940

22

VI.-GOVERNMENT AND AIDED INSTITUTIONS.

(a.)-HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital, to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, and the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital. There is an Observation Station capable of accommodating 1,500 persons in the event of an outbreak of infectious disease on board a ship arriving in the Harbour.

The Civil Hospital contains 150 beds in 19 wards. 2,731 in- patients and 15,177 out-patients were treated during 1912 as against 2,370 and 15,489 respectively in 1911. 198 cases of malarial fever were admitted as against 112 in 1911 and 340 in 1910. The Maternity Hospital contains 12 beds for Europeans and 4 for Asiatics. 140 confinements occurred during the year as against 138 in 1911. The Victoria Hospital at the Peak contains 41 beds, and during 1912 234 patients were under treatment there. At Kennedy Town Hospital, which contains 26 beds, 42 cases were treated in 1912, 35 being small-pox.

(b.)-LUNATIC ASYLUM.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 8 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds. 243 patients of all races were treated during 1912 and there were 26 deaths.

(c.)—The TUNG WA AND OTHER CHINESE HOSPITALS.

The Tung Wa Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this institution. Various other services not appertaining to a hospital are performed by the institution, such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. About half the number are now treated by Western methods. The hospital is managed by a committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being sub- mitted to the Governor for confirmation. It is under the supervision of a visiting physician, who is a member of the Medical Department, whilst a Chinese house surgeon, trained in Western medicine, is a member of the hospital staff. There are 323 beds in the buildings and 4,279 patients were accommodated during 1912.

The Tung Wa also maintain a branch hospital for small-pox cases (Chinese only) at Kennedy Town. It contains 58 beds and during 1912 150 cases were treated.

The Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals are managed and controlled by the missionaries resident in Hongkong, agents of the London Missionary Society, and consist of the Alice Memorial

23

Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in 1893, the Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in 1904 and the Ho Miu Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in patients in 1912 was 1,600 and the expenditure $14,597. The number of labours in the Maternity Hospital was 351. The Government makes a grant of $300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives which removal of Chinese plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infec- tious Diseases Hospital entailed, four District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony. These hospitals are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee and receive a grant of $2,000 a year from the Government.

The new Kwong Wa Hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Penin- sula was opened on the 9th October, 1911. It occupies a site having an area of 3 acres and as designed will ultimately provide accom- modation for 210 patients. The existing buildings contain 70 beds and 1,271 patients were accommodated during 1912. The collection of subscriptions and the supervision of the building were under- taken by a special committee under the chairmanship of the Registrar General, but when completed the bospital will form part of the Tung Wa Hospital and be under the same manageinent. hospital receives a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Government.

VII. INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported, by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Po Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Registrar General and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The actual management is entrusted to a committee elected annually by the members of the Society. The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls Protection Ordi- nance, and almost all women and girls detained by the Registrar General under that Ordinance are sent to the Po Leung Kuk. During 1912 the number of persons admitted was 581 and at the close of the year 64 remained under the care of the Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron, and instruc- tion is given them by the matron and a Chinese teacher in elemen- tary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution, under mission aus- pices, founded for rescue work among the Chinese.

It is now housed in the Belilios Reformatory and receives a small grant from the Government.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Govern- It contains a theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, etc., a museum in which are some very

ment.

!

24

fair specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent ($1,280), the French Convent, (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and other charitable institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of in- fectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies. to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence including one for the boat population on a hulk in Causeway Bay. The total cost of maintenance, which is defrayed by voluntary subscription, was $40,085. The Dispensaries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Registrar General.

VIII.

CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 12,660 being an increase of 3,371 or 36 29 per cent. as compared with 1911. There was in 1912 an increase in serious offences of 692 or 19:31 per cent. as compared with the previous year. The number of serious offences. reported was 665 over the average of the quinquennial period com- mencing with the year 1908. The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 2,679 as compared with 1911 and was 1,772 over the average of the quinquennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force in 1912 was Europeans 164, Indians 462, Chinese 547, making a total of 1,173 (as compared with 1,080 in 1911) exclusive in each case of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the Railway and other Government Departments and by private firms. Of this force 14 Europeans, 101 Indians and 39 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year, under the District Officer.

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 124, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats. and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 6,236 as compared with 4,178 in 1911. Of these 1,867 were com- mitted for criminal offences, against 1,191 in 1911. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 286 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance, and 16 less for infringement of Sanitary By- laws, than in 1911.

24

fair specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent ($1,280), the French Convent, (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and other charitable institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of in- fectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies. to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence including one for the boat population on a hulk in Causeway Bay. The total cost of maintenance, which is defrayed by voluntary subscription, was $40,085. The Dispensaries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Registrar General.

VIII.

CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 12,660 being an increase of 3,371 or 36 29 per cent. as compared with 1911. There was in 1912 an increase in serious offences of 692 or 19:31 per cent. as compared with the previous year. The number of serious offences. reported was 665 over the average of the quinquennial period com- mencing with the year 1908. The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 2,679 as compared with 1911 and was 1,772 over the average of the quinquennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force in 1912 was Europeans 164, Indians 462, Chinese 547, making a total of 1,173 (as compared with 1,080 in 1911) exclusive in each case of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the Railway and other Government Departments and by private firms. Of this force 14 Europeans, 101 Indians and 39 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year, under the District Officer.

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 124, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats. and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 6,236 as compared with 4,178 in 1911. Of these 1,867 were com- mitted for criminal offences, against 1,191 in 1911. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 286 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance, and 16 less for infringement of Sanitary By- laws, than in 1911.

25

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 701, the average for 1911 being 595, and the highest previous average heing 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 0.14, which is the average percentage for the last ten years. @wing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly . moving between the Colony and Canton, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Gaol has accom- modation for 590 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 140 as compared with 161 in 1911 and 1-33 in 1910.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including printing, book-binding, washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, etc. The profit on the work done was $60,976 as against $51,833 in 1911. There was $4,636 received and credited to Government for non-Government work against $4,627 in 1911.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.)-POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, was 456,739, of whom 104,287 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories and of New Kowloon, The estimated total population at the middle of the year under review was 467,777, but this includes the New Territories; and, as the death figures given below do not include those from this area (with the exception of New Kowloon), the population for the purposes of calculating death-rates is estimated at 377,183, of whom 21163 were non-Chinese.

The distribution of population at the Census was as follows:- Non-Chinese Civil Community

City of Victoria (including Peak) 219,386 Villages of Hongkong

12,075

16,106

Chinese

Kowloon (including New Kow-

Population.

loon).

67,602

New Territories

80,622

Population afloat

60,948

Total Chinese Population

444,664

Total Civil Population

456,739

(b.)-PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

There has been great activity in regard to building operations during the past year, to meet the urgent demands for house-room created by the immigration of some forty to fifty thousand Chinese, who poured into Hongkong during 1911. These people were of all classes, and came principally from the neighbouring provinces of Kwangtung, Kwangsi and Fokien, seeking refuge from the political

26

unrest which ultimately led to the overthrow of the dynasty and the establishment of a Republican Government in China.

Pending the erection of sufficient dwellings for the accommoda- tion of so large an increase in our normal population, the existing dwellings became greatly overcrowded, but any very strict enforce- ment of the overcrowding laws was deemed impossible while the penalty which had to be paid for this abnormal state of affairs— amounting practically to the conversion of Hongkong into a huge refugee camp-was a severe outbreak of Plague, no less than 1,847 cases being recorded. These cases were generally distributed throughout the City, except in the European business quarter (where only a few cases occurred), and throughout Kowloon, and the most probable determining cause of the epidemic was a considerable augmentation of the rat population consequent on the general over- crowding of the native dwellings. The overcrowding naturally led to a marked increase in the amount of waste food, both in the houses and in the yards and lanes adjacent thereto, and although efforts were made to deal with this excess by improved scavenging, yet it is obvious that where houses are overcrowded with human beings and their belongings, the cleanliness of the premises must fall below the average and refuse of all sorts will lie concealed among the lumber.

The rat population depends almost entirely upon the available food supply, and this large increase in the amount of food refuse would promptly lead to a corresponding increase in the number of susceptible rats by more frequent breeding and larger litters. Plague is endemic among the rats of Hongkong and the infection is known to be carried forward from season to season by the Mus Decumanus or drain rat, among which species Plague-infected animals are found throughout the year. During the human Plague season-February to July-the infection spreads to the house rat (Mus Rattus) and although cases of human Plague do certainly occur when only infected drain rats are being discovered, the infection being acquired in warehouses, basements, workshops, and outhouses generally, into which these rats are driven by the rain storms flood- ing their underground haunts, yet the maximum incidence of human infection corresponds exactly with the maximum incidence of the rattus infection, and the main efforts of the Sanitary Depart- ment are therefore directed to the exclusion of rats from human dwellings, and the limitation of the food supply of the rat popula- tion. The latter is secured by a daily collection of garbage from all dwellings, and by the efficient scavenging of lanes and alleys, while the former object is aimed at by the concreting of ground surfaces, the protection of drain openings by gratings, and the prohibition of ceilings, wainscottings and hollow walls. There is unfortunately however a very large number of old houses in the Colony which possess these hollow walls, constructed of soft bricks, which form ideal nesting places for the Mus Rattus and enable him to enter the dwellings at night to forage for food, and it is in those districts in which such buildings are most numerous that Plague has displayed its greatest incidence since the infection was first imported into the Colony in 1894. There is no remedy for such faulty construction,

27

short of actual demolition of the premises, which is too heroic a measure to be practicable on any extended scale.

The general birth-rate for the year was 9'0 per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 162 per 1,000 among the non-Chinese community, as compared with 63 and 19'2 during 1911.

The general death-rate for the year was 26'33 per 1,000 among the Chinese community, and 14:51 among the non-Chinese com- munity, as compared with 21 13 and 13:38 during 1911.

The higher death-rate among the Chinese as compared with the previous year is due in part to the severe outbreak of Plague and in part to the influx of Chinese from the mainland, while the latter cause contributed also to the higher birth-rate.

The number of deaths from Malaria (432) shows an increase on the previous year (338) which can be accounted for by the excep- tional influx of infected persons from the mainland. The deaths of Chinese from this cause in the City of Victoria numbered 214 out of a population of 225,500; but more than 34 per cent of these deaths occurred in Health Districts Nos. 2 and 9 where most of the coolies reside who have been engaged on the extensive building operations that have been in progress during the year.

The deaths from Plague numbered 1,768 as compared with 253 in 1911 and 23 in 1910. The probable causes of this epidemic have already been discussed herein.

Small-pox deaths numbered 565-all Chinese, with the exception of two British children and one Indian child, all of which were returned as showing no signs of vaccination; only two of the fatal Chinese cases were returned as having been previously vaccinated.

There were 2,317 deaths from respiratory diseases among the Chinese, as compared with 2,487 in 1911. Phthisis claimed 757 Chinese victims, while other forms of Tuberculosis represent an additional 379 deaths, making a total of 1,136 or 121 per cent. of the total deaths among that community.

Beri-Beri was responsible for 231 deaths, as compared with 320 during 1911, and 566 in 1910. During the past few years circulars have been distributed to all large employers of coolie labour calling their attention to the fact that Beri-Beri is produced by the consump- tion of white rice as the staple article of diet without a sufficiency of other foods, and advising that beans should be supplied with the rice, when fresh meat or fresh fish cannot be afforded, and it is pos- sible that the dissemination of this information may have had some influence in reducing the mortality from this disease.

A tabular statement of the principal causes of death is appended.

(c.)-CLIMATE.

The mean shade temperature for the year at the Royal Obser- vatory, Kowloon, (108 feet above mean sea level), was 71°9 as compared with 72°1 in 1911, and 72°1 for the ten preceding years. The maximum temperature was 92°5 on the 10th September and the minimum 45°-3 on the 28th December. The hottest month was July, with a mean temperature of 83°0, and the coldest, January, with a mean temperature of 57°.3.

:

28

The temperature at the high levels of the Peak District is from 3 to 8° less than at the Observatory. At Victoria it is practically the same. The rainfall and humidity are considerably greater at the Peak than at Victoria, the Observatory, or Tai Po (New Territories).

The total rainfall for the year was 63 93 inches, as compared with an average of 8421 inches during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was August with 15'71 inches, the dryest, Octo- ber, when 0'01 inch was recorded. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 6·12 inches on the 15th August, while no rain fell on 218 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 74 %, as compared with an average of 78% during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5.5 hours, being 49% of the possible duration.

X.

POSTAL SERVICE.

The total revenue from the Postal Service in 1912 was $401,054.32 and total expenditure $296,867.12 leaving a credit balance of $104,187.20. The total amount of payments during the year was $256,582.88 less than that estimated for owing to the high rate of exchange, non-receipt of the claims in respect of mails sent via Siberia during the years 1910 and 1911, and non payment of the shares of the Peninsular and Oriental Mail Subsidy for the 4th quarter by the Crown Agents.

Agreements to regulate the exchange of correspondence and parcels with the Portuguese Colony of Macao were signed on 23rd October, 1912.

XI.-GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The Chinese territory adjoining the New Territories was in a disturbed condition during the greater part of the year owing to the withdrawal of the military posts along the frontier to meet exigencies elsewhere. As a result some serious raids were made by armed bands of robbers into British territory. To guard against these incursions 354 officers and men of the 8th Rajputs and 153 officers and men of the 126th Baluchistan Infantry were, by the courtesy of His Excellency the General Officer Commanding, South China, drafted on the 26th of June to various places along the frontier. This force furnished patrols which moved about the country at various hours by night and by day. It was withdrawn on the 30th of November for annual training in Camp in the New Territories. These patrols proved most efficient and the thanks of the Colonial Government were conveyed to the officers and men concerned and to the Military Authorities for the valuable assistance thus rendered.

On the night of the 19th of August an attack was made on the Police Station at Cheung Chau, where 1 European Sergeant and 4 Indian Constables were stationed, by a gang of pirates and robbers about 40 strong who came from Macao in a junk, landed

28

The temperature at the high levels of the Peak District is from 3 to 8° less than at the Observatory. At Victoria it is practically the same. The rainfall and humidity are considerably greater at the Peak than at Victoria, the Observatory, or Tai Po (New Territories).

The total rainfall for the year was 63 93 inches, as compared with an average of 8421 inches during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was August with 15'71 inches, the dryest, Octo- ber, when 0'01 inch was recorded. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 6·12 inches on the 15th August, while no rain fell on 218 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 74 %, as compared with an average of 78% during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5.5 hours, being 49% of the possible duration.

X.

POSTAL SERVICE.

The total revenue from the Postal Service in 1912 was $401,054.32 and total expenditure $296,867.12 leaving a credit balance of $104,187.20. The total amount of payments during the year was $256,582.88 less than that estimated for owing to the high rate of exchange, non-receipt of the claims in respect of mails sent via Siberia during the years 1910 and 1911, and non payment of the shares of the Peninsular and Oriental Mail Subsidy for the 4th quarter by the Crown Agents.

Agreements to regulate the exchange of correspondence and parcels with the Portuguese Colony of Macao were signed on 23rd October, 1912.

XI.-GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The Chinese territory adjoining the New Territories was in a disturbed condition during the greater part of the year owing to the withdrawal of the military posts along the frontier to meet exigencies elsewhere. As a result some serious raids were made by armed bands of robbers into British territory. To guard against these incursions 354 officers and men of the 8th Rajputs and 153 officers and men of the 126th Baluchistan Infantry were, by the courtesy of His Excellency the General Officer Commanding, South China, drafted on the 26th of June to various places along the frontier. This force furnished patrols which moved about the country at various hours by night and by day. It was withdrawn on the 30th of November for annual training in Camp in the New Territories. These patrols proved most efficient and the thanks of the Colonial Government were conveyed to the officers and men concerned and to the Military Authorities for the valuable assistance thus rendered.

On the night of the 19th of August an attack was made on the Police Station at Cheung Chau, where 1 European Sergeant and 4 Indian Constables were stationed, by a gang of pirates and robbers about 40 strong who came from Macao in a junk, landed

28

The temperature at the high levels of the Peak District is from 3 to 8° less than at the Observatory. At Victoria it is practically the same. The rainfall and humidity are considerably greater at the Peak than at Victoria, the Observatory, or Tai Po (New Territories).

The total rainfall for the year was 63 93 inches, as compared with an average of 8421 inches during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was August with 15'71 inches, the dryest, Octo- ber, when 0'01 inch was recorded. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 6·12 inches on the 15th August, while no rain fell on 218 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 74 %, as compared with an average of 78% during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5.5 hours, being 49% of the possible duration.

X.

POSTAL SERVICE.

The total revenue from the Postal Service in 1912 was $401,054.32 and total expenditure $296,867.12 leaving a credit balance of $104,187.20. The total amount of payments during the year was $256,582.88 less than that estimated for owing to the high rate of exchange, non-receipt of the claims in respect of mails sent via Siberia during the years 1910 and 1911, and non payment of the shares of the Peninsular and Oriental Mail Subsidy for the 4th quarter by the Crown Agents.

Agreements to regulate the exchange of correspondence and parcels with the Portuguese Colony of Macao were signed on 23rd October, 1912.

XI.-GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The Chinese territory adjoining the New Territories was in a disturbed condition during the greater part of the year owing to the withdrawal of the military posts along the frontier to meet exigencies elsewhere. As a result some serious raids were made by armed bands of robbers into British territory. To guard against these incursions 354 officers and men of the 8th Rajputs and 153 officers and men of the 126th Baluchistan Infantry were, by the courtesy of His Excellency the General Officer Commanding, South China, drafted on the 26th of June to various places along the frontier. This force furnished patrols which moved about the country at various hours by night and by day. It was withdrawn on the 30th of November for annual training in Camp in the New Territories. These patrols proved most efficient and the thanks of the Colonial Government were conveyed to the officers and men concerned and to the Military Authorities for the valuable assistance thus rendered.

On the night of the 19th of August an attack was made on the Police Station at Cheung Chau, where 1 European Sergeant and 4 Indian Constables were stationed, by a gang of pirates and robbers about 40 strong who came from Macao in a junk, landed

29

at the back of the island, and at once proceeded to the Police Station which is situated in the village. The Indian Constable on guard in the village was shot down, as were two other Indian Con- stables who emerged from the houses in the village in which they had been permitted to live with their families. The Station was ransacked and a sum of $,000 was stolen from the safe together with all the arms and accoutrements of the detachment. The money consisted of Crown Rent and taxes which were being collected at that time of the year. The pirates next looted a pawn- shop and then seized a launch at anchor off the village and made good their escape.

In the course of the enquiries into this daring outrage it was discovered that on the 26th of June four Chinese passengers had been carried away by pirates, who pirated a ferry launch plying between Tai O in Lantao and Hongkong. The piracy had been reported to the Police but no mention had been made of the kidnapping of the four passengers. It was also discovered that on the night of the 30th of June two Chinese had been forcibly carried away from a village in Lantao by robbers who held them to ransom on the island of Wong Kam near Macao, the jurisdiction over which is in dispute between the Portuguese and Chinese Authorities.

As the information of the Hongkong Police pointed to this same island being used as a base by a piratical band, a joint expedition was, at the instance of this Government, organized against the band by the Portuguese and Chinese Authorities. Owing to the inevitable delay in arranging the details of such an expedition the robbers apparently became apprised of the danger which threatened them and the expedition, which took place on 20th of September, proved abortive.

In order to cope with the situation caused by this raid and by the insecurity in the New Territories, an additional launch was bought and armed for the policing of the western waters of the Colony, while steps were taken to strengthen the Police doing duty on land in the New Territories by 10 European and 75 Indian Police.

A serious boycott of the Low Level Tramway was begun towards the end of November owing to the decision of the Company to accept nothing but the legal tender of the Colony in payment of fares. Similar action taken at the same time by the High Level Tramway Company and by the Star Ferry Company passed un- noticed by the Chinese population. The boycott of the Low Level Tramway was due partly to interested action on the part of small bankers, money-changers and others who make large profits by the manipulation of exchange between Hongkong currency and Chinese silver coins, and partly to political agitators who feigned to see in the legal and legitimate action of the Tramway Company a slur on Chinese dignity. The boycott was not stopped till after the close of the year.

In spite of considerable insecurity of life and property in the Kwangtung Province trade, except in one particular, between it and Hongkong was good. The West River was well patrolled by the

30

Chinese Authorities and this water enjoyed a much larger measure of security than many other parts of the Province.

The exception above referred to was in the trade in limestone, freely exported for over 20 years to the Green Island Cement Company, which has a large factory in Hongkong and a branch factory in Macao.

In the month of April a petition was addressed by the Director of the Canton Cement Works to the Board of Industry there asking that the export of limestone from the Province should be prohibited.

In the month of July an embargo was placed by the Canton Authorities on all limestone to be exported to the Green Island Cement Company, on the plea that the stone was illegally quarried, and since that date the Green Island Cement Company have been unable to obtain any supplies of limestone from the Canton Prov- ince. No attempt whatever, as far as can be ascertained, has been made by the Canton Authorities to regularise any irregularity in the titles of the limestone quarriers, who have been quarrying this stone for export for over 20 years; nor have appeals to Treaty under which the trade in articles which are not contraband is safeguarded, been of the slightest avail. The matter has now been placed in the hands of His Majesty's Government.

The policy of the Government in controlling the consumption of morphia and compounds of opium was continued by amending the regulatious so as to prohibit their sale except on a medical prescription.

This action has resulted in the stoppage of a trade in "cough lozenges” and similar confections containing morphia which had a large sale among the Chinese owing to their use as a substitute for opium or as an alleged remedy against the opium habit.

The importation of Persian Opium into China was prohibited as from the 1st January and during the year strict supervision was kept, there having been instituted four prosecutions for attempts to smuggle the article. Numerous prosecutions were also undertaken against illicit opium smoking divans although there is considerable difficulty in the way of finding them out.

Although the transit trade in morphia and cocaine has been stopped there was still a certain amount of illegal business done and several seizures of these drugs were made during the year.

There is little evidence of their actual use in Hongkang but there appears to be a strong demand for them in the Province of Fukien, in Java, Siam and other countries to the south of the Colony.

Every effort is being made to accomplish the suppression of this illicit trade.

Light Dues ...

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YE

Comparative Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure for the

Revenue for

HEADS OF REVENUE.

Estimates 1912.

Actual Revenue to

same

31st Dec., 1912.

period of preceding

Increase.

Decrease.

Year.

85,000.00

87,454.95

$ 82,578.09

$

4,876.86

Governor

Light Dues, Special Assessment

Colonial Secreta

95,000.00 98,448.45 92,802.14

5,646.31

Registrar Gener:

Audit Departme

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

4,821,210.00 5,371,419.75 4.792,952.40 578,457.35

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

Post Office

Kowloon-Canton Railway

718,478.00 785,534.51 742,697.81 42,836.70

420,000.00 401,054.32 399,217.15

1,837.17

Treasury...

Harbour Master'

Observatory

Miscellaneous Se

Judicial and Leg

439,600.00 251,971.53 153,735.12

98,236.41

Police and Priso

Medical Departn

Rent of Government Property, Land and Houses

$69,500.00 873,732.50 841,239.15

32,493.35

Sanitary Departi

Interest

5,000,00

9,621.67

9,621.67

Botanical and F

Education

Miscellaneous Receipts

123,700.00 147,293.49 112,382.11

34,911.38

Military Expend

TOTAL,

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

:

:.

Public Works D

Do.

R.

Do.

E

7,577,488.00 8,016,909.50 | 7,227,225.64

799.395-53

9,621.67

Post Office

100,000.00 163,784.58

270,005.59

1

Kowloon-Canton

Charge on accou

IC5,221.01

Pensions ...

TOTAL,

7,677,488.00 8,180,694.087,497,231.23 799.305 53

115.842.68

Charitable Servic

Appendix A.

AL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1912.

nue and Expenditure for the period ended 31st December, 1912.

ase.

Decrease.

EXPENDITURE.

Estimates,

1912.

Actual Expenditure to 31st Dec., 1912.

Expenditure for same

period of preceding

Increase

Decrease

Year.

76.86

Governor

86,658.00

77.566.72

85,887.75

$ 8.321.03

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ..

82,636.00

67,552.91

65,628.57

1.924.34

46.31

Registrar General's Department...

46,256.00

45,520.75

49,217 74

3,696.99

Audit Department ..

57.35

Treasury.

Harbour Master's Department

36.70

Observatory

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

30,817.00

26,727 35

28,703.10

1975-75

63,770 00

59,183.11

64,392.16

5,209.05

218,079.00

207,361.15

233.141.62

25.780 47

22,639.00

22,595 08

23,353.02

757 94

37.17

Miscellaneous Services...

36.41

93.35

9,621.67

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Prison Departments ...

Medical Departments

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

11.38

15 53

9,621.67

Education

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department ..

Do.

Recurrent

Do. Extraordinary

Post Office

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

IC5,221 01

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions ...

255.3.

115 842 68

Charitable Services

TOTAL,

:

:

202,221.00 214,275.04 186,291.29

260,396.00 241,508.52 237,005.01

27,983.75

4,503.51

761,714.00

749,571.07

724,088.00

25,483.07

237,595.00 213,602.02

225,442.17

11,840.15

342,096.00

324,195.86 349,788.07

25,592.21

41,256.00 39,865.27 45,628.52

264,988.00

243,369.39 237,942.35

5,427.04

1,413,009.00 1,421,352.47 1,390,568.66

30,783.81

354,533.00 314,590.96 308,408.12 6,182.84

429,100.00 47,636.44 486,940.80

5,763 25

39,304-36

1,147,980.00 1,051,840 43

807,181.09

244,659.34

553,450.00 296,867.12

422,267 97

125,400.85

265,973.00 207,350.78 561,637.17

354,286 39

726,263.00 647,172.56 256,975.32

390,197 24

273,869.00

258,439.16

267,911.13

24,380.00 24,399.09 18,777 60

5,621 49

9,471 97

7,852,678 00 |7,202,543.25 7,077,177.23

742,766.43 617,400 41

A 2

Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1912.

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

C.

Deposits not Available,

House Service,

Crown Agents' Advances,

223,777.48

3,805.52

1,913,452.80

Subsidiary Coins,........

251,583.66

Advances,.

6,461.00

Imprest,.

919.89

Postal Agencies in China,

140,803.79

Overdraft, Bank,

633,282.61

Railway Construction,.....

Unallocated Stores,

5,249,535.29

212,212.47

Crown Agents' Current Account,

960.32

Total Liabilities,

2,915,582.52

Balance,

2,805,129.79

Total,............$ 5,720,712.31

Total,$ 5,720,712.31

Statement of Funded Public Debt or Loans borrowed for Fixed Periods outstanding on the 31st December, 1912, and of the Accumulated Sinking Funds at the same date.

Designation of Debt or Loan.

Legal Authority.

Amount Outstanding.

JOINT SINKING FUND 1912.

Amount of Stock, &c.

Cost Price.

Market Value.

Hongkong 3% In- Ordinances Nos. £1,485,732.16.5

scribed Stock.

1 & 2 of 1893| and No. 11 of 1905.

Sterling.

Barbadoes. British Guiana,

33% Stock. 3 %

Cape of G. Hope, 3 % Ceylon,

31%

•1

Gold Coast,

"

Do.,

""

12,115. 7.10

Natal,

"

New Zealand,

3%

•"

Do.,

31%

>

Queensland,

27

Sierra Leone,

34%

South Australia, 31%

"1

South Nigeria

(Lagos),

31%

""

Straits Settlements31%

}}

Trinidad,

4 %

11

Do..

3 %

97

Victoria,

31%

Western A'tralia, 3% India,

"

33%

Total, 1912,...........”....

£ s. d. 12,466.12.11 2,000. 0. 0 2,000. 0. 0 5,000. 0. 0 5,000. 0. 0

200. 0. 0 2,000. 0. 0

1,742. 5. 2 2,000. 0. 0 4,000. 0. 0 1,200. 0, 0

44,221. 7. 5 33,185. 3. 2 4,000. 0. 0 5,718. 3. 4 5.000. 0.0 2,100. 0. 0

£

s. d.

£ s. d. 11,668.18. 2 ( 95 )11,843. 6. 3 1,932.17. 3 ( 84 ) 1,680. 0. 0 1,941. 1. 0 ( 85 ) 1,700. 0. 0 4,900.11. 9 (96) 4,800. 0. 0 4,480.11. 6 ( 84 ) 4,200. 0. 0 11,673.12. 2 ( 93 )11,267. 6. 3

189.19. 5 (811) 163. 0. 0 1,921. S. 8( 81 ) 1,620. 0. 7 1,640.12. 7(92) 1,602.17. 0 1,948. 5.10 ( 80 ) 1,600. 0. 0 3,879.19. 2 ( 98 ) 3,920. 0. 0 1,293:16. 5 ( 94 ) 1,128. 0. 0

42,388. 8. 4 ( 96 )42,452.10. 4 31,562. 1. ( 96 )31,857.15. O 4,082.12. 0(102) 4,080. 0. 0 5,356.12. 0 ( 82 ) 4,688.17.10 4,734. 8. 6 (95) 4,750. 0. 0 2,010. 3. 1(95) 1.785. V. 0 3,786 13. (911) 3,644. 7. 0

£147,931.17.11 £141,392.12. 4

3,982.18. 1

£138,783. 0. 3

Wuchany Loan Account 1912.

Repayments by Provincial Government, (advanced for

Railway Construction), Balance due to Government,.

Loan,

£770,000 330,000

Total...........

£ 1,100,000

£ 1.100.000

Total,

£ 1.100.000

Statement of the Expenditure on Works and Fayments Chargeable to Loan Accounts.

Expenditure on Railway Construction from special fund and various advances ultimately re- payable from the fund up to 31st December,

1911.

During 1912,

Adrances from Loan Fund, £770,000. ...

$12,021,502.77 1,262,922 51

$13,284,425.28

Do.

General Account...

4th April. 1913.

$8.034,889 99

5,249,535.29

$13.284.425.28

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Treasurer.

1

Appendix A (1).

REPORT ON THE FINANCES FOR THE YEAR 1912.

REVENUE.

The total revenue for the year amounted to $8,180,694 being $503,206 in excess of the estimate and $683,463 more than the revenue in 1911. Compared with that year there were increases ⚫ under every head with the exception of Interest and Land Sales, the decrease under the former head being accounted for by a Bank overdraft during the latter half of 1912.

2. The principal sub-heads showing an increase over the estimate are as follows:-

(a.) Stamp Duties,

(b.) Land Sales,

M

(c.) Assessed Taxes,

(d.) Water Excess Supply and Meter Rents,

(e.) Fines,

(f.) Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

(g.) Junk Licences,

- $431,312

63,785

60,292

31,622

30,996

18.546

-

17,982

15,484

(h.) Payment on account in respect of British

Postal Agencies,

These increases are due generally to the following causes:

(a.) Death duties were paid on certain large estates, and trade was prosperous.

(c.) A new assessment, made during the year, showed a con- siderable increase in rentals, which increase is attributed to the influx of Chinese into the Colony on account of the unrest in South China.

(d.) Arrears on account of 1911 were paid in 1912.

(e.) The influx of Chinese owing to the unrest in South China led to a considerable increase in Police Court cases.

(f) Certain unclaimed monies lapsed from bankrupt estates to the Government and the balance of the Praya Reclamation Fund was transferred.

(g.) An improved system of licensing was introduced, under which junk owners were required to pay the sum of $1 for perma- nent licence books.

(h.) Arrears outstanding. When the estimates were framed the amount of these and the probable date of payment were not known,

- $180,481

· A (1) 2

3. The principal decreases were :—

(a.) Kowloon-Canton Railway-Main Line,

Attributed to the unsettled state of the Kwong Tung Province.

(b.) Liquor Duties,

An increase in the rates of duty did not bring in the revenue anticipated.

(c.) Postage,

Anticipations based on the facilities afforded by the through railway traffic to Canton were not realised.

(d.) Imperial Contribution on account of loss of

Opium Revenue,

Due to rise in exchange.

(e.) Stone Quarries, -

19,425

- $ 18,956

The unrest in South China caused stagna- tion in the trade with the Kwong Tung Province.

15,880

8,095

/

EXPENDITURE.

4. The total expenditure amounted to $7,202,543, being $650,135 under the estimate, and $125,366 more than the expen- diture in 1911. Compared with the estimates there was decrease under every head with the exception of Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works Recurrent, and Charitable Services. The excess, amounting to $12,054, under Miscellaneous Services was largely due to charges in connection with a revised edition of the Ordinances and to an under-estimate of loss on sub- sidiary coins. Military Expenditure exceeded the estimate by a sum of $17,068, being the balance of contribution due to the Im- perial Government in respect of the year 1911: and an excess of $18,536 under Public Works Recurrent is more than accounted for by an excess of $27,952 in respect of the vote “ Waterworks: Main- tenance of City and Hill District", due to pumping necessitated by the deficient rain-fall.

5. The principal increases under sub-heads of expenditure are as follows:

(a.) Typhoon Refuge, Mongkoktsui,

Due to better progress being made with the work than was anticipated.

(b.) Compensation for deprivation of marine front- age rights in respect of Kowloon Marine Lots 29, 30, and 31,

This compensation was awarded by the Supreme Court in respect of reclamation being carried out at Yaumati.

- $121,289

97,227

- A (1) 7 —

The value in the Treasury Books was $169,288.31, discount, written off the stock, being taken at 7 per cent. Coins of the face value of $1,040,000 were sent to England during the year for of demonetization.

purpose

16. The limits between which the rates of discount ranged

were :-

50 cent pieces I per cent. to 4 per cent.

20

21

10

3층 4층

8

8 F

""

""

"

5

""

Copper

par 8

""

"

12

"

י

The rates, as in previous years, were lowest towards the end of the summer, owing to the steady drain of subsidiary coin from Canton into the country during the silk season. On the 1st July

an Ordinance prohibiting the circulation of foreign copper coin came into force, and from that date Hongkong copper coin has been inter- changeable with ten cent pieces.

17. The circulation in December of notes of the three Banks having authorized issues was as follows:-

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, Chartered Bank of I., A. & C., Mercantile Bank of India,..

$ 19,784,469 5,329,419 496,323

$ 25,610,211

The inconvenient size of the silver dollar, approximating to that of a five shilling piece, has caused a steady demand on the part of the European population for one dollar notes, and a large number of notes of this denomination, issued by the Portuguese Banco Nacional Ultramarino, are in circulation. The Hongkong and Shanghai Bank were authorized during the year under review to increase their issue of these notes from $226,000 to $350,000.

There was during the year a limited circulation of notes issued by the Chinese Republican Government, but these did not find much favour and they reached a discount of thirty per centum, as they are payable only in subsidiary coin and their redemption is subject to various restrictions.

30th April, 1913.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Treasurer.

9. The following statement shows the Liabilities and Assets on the 31st December, 1912 :-

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

www

C.

Deposits not Available,

223,777.48

Subsidiary Coins,

251,583.66

House Service,

3,805.52 | Advances,

6,461.00

Crown Agents' Advances,

1,913,452.80 | Imprest,

919.89

Postal Agencies in China,.

140,303.79

Railway Construction,

5,249,535.29

Overdraft, Bank,

633,282.61

Unallocated Stores,

212,212.47

}}

Crown Agents' Current Account,

960.32

Total Liabilities,

2,915,582.52

Balance,.

2,805,129 79

Total,

$5,720,712.31

Total,

$5,720,712.31

A (1) 5

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1913-1914.

1. His Excellency the Governor-in-Council, under Section 8 of the Rating Ordinance No. 6 of 1901, ordered the existing valuation for 1912-1913 to be adopted as the valuation for 1913-1914. During the year ending 30th June, 1913, no general assessment has been made, the difference in Rateable Value being the result of Interim Assessments.

2. The City of Victoria.-The Rateable Value has increased from $10,072,535 to $10,236,737, an addition of $164,202, or 163 per cent.

3. Hill District.-The Rateable Value has increased from $290,165 to $298,865, an addition of $8,700, or 2.99 per cent.

4. Shaukiwan, Sai Wan Ho and Quarry Bay.-The Rateable Value has increased from $365,965 to $370,040, an addition of $4,075 or 1'11 per cent.

5. Hongkong Villages.--The Rateable Value has increased from $130,394 to $133,413, an addition of $3,019, or 2:31 per cent.

6. Kowloon Point.-The Rateable Value has decreased from $528,415 to $509,580, a reduction of $18,835, or 3:56 per cent.

7. Yaumati.-The Rateable Value has increased from $260,575 to $262,335, an addition of $1,760, or 0'67 per cent.

8. Mongkoktsui.-The Rateable Value has increased from $153,975 to $156,690, an addition of $2,715, or 176 per cent.

9. Hunghom and Hok Un.-The Rateable Value has increased from $295,449 to $295,589, an addition of $140, or 004 per cent.

10. New Kowloon.-The Rateable Value has decreased from $119,250 to $103,347, a reduction of $15,903, or 13·33 per cent.

11. Kowloon Villages.-The Rateable Value has decreased from $95,583 to $84,396, a reduction of $11,187, or 117 per cent.

12. The Whole Colony.-The Rateable Value has increased from $12,312,306 to $12,450,992, an addition of $138,686, or 1·12 per cent.

B 2

13. Interim Valuations.-Between 1st June, 1912, and 30th June, 1913, rates became payable on 455 Interim Valuations made during that period as follows:-

City of Victoria.

Rest of Colony.

No.

Rateable Value. No. Rateable Value.

New and or Rebuilt Tenements, Tenements structurally altered,..

Replacing Assessments of,..

149

$ 221,121 114

$

50,564

35 111,196

30 64,917

94.385

53,937

16,811

10,980

237,932

61,544

Assessments cancelled, tenements

pulled down, or being in other

76

99,204

51

70,315

respects not rateable,..

No. and Increase,.......

260

138,728 195

Decrease,....

8,771

14. Vacant Tenements.—The number of reported vacant tene- ments in the City of Victoria inspected under Section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 56 monthly as compared with 60 last year.

15. The following table gives a comparison of the assessments for 1912-1913 and 1913-1914:-

District.

Valuation Valuation 1912-13. 1913-14.

Increase, Decrease.

Per- centage.

$

$

*A

The City of Vic-

toria,

10,072,535 10,236,737 164,202

1.63 In-

crease.

Hill District and

Hongkong Villages,

786,524 802,318 15,794

2:00 In-

crease.

Kowloon Point

and Kowloon

Villages,....

1,453,247 1,411,937

2.84 De-

41,310

crease.

12,312,306 12,450,992 | 179,996 41,310

41,310

1.12 In-

Total,.....$12,312,306 12,450,992 138.686

crease.

B 3

16. Comparative statement showing the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each of the ten years from 1904-1905 to 1913-1914 inclusive:

Increase

as com-

Year.

Rateable Value.

Decrease

as com-

pared with pared with previous previous

year.

year.

Percentage of Increase or Decrease in Rateable Value as compared with the previous year.

%

12 98 Increase.

$

$

D

1904-05, 9,929,171 1,141,108

1905-06, ... 10,511,163

581,992

5.86

1906-07, 10,969,203

458,040

4.35

"

1907-08, 10,716,173

253,030

2.30 Decrease.

...

1908-09, 10,816,753

100,580

0.93 Increase.

1909-10, ... 10,750,902

65,851

0.60 Decrease.

1910-11, ... 11,082,179

331,277

3-08 Increase.

1911-12, ... 11,161,390

79,211

0.71

19

1912-13, ... 12,312,306 1,150,916

1913-14, ... 12,450,992

|

10.31

138,686

1.12

"

7. Staff. Mr. Arthur Chapman, Assessor, went on a year's leave on 10th September last from which date I was appointed to assume the duties of the post. Mr. Tang Shing Cheung and Mr. Chu Tsan Hing have discharged their duties as Clerk and Inter- preter respectively to my satisfaction.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE,

1st July, 1913.

DAVID WOOD.

Assessor.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

FOR THE YEAR 1912.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I and II.)

The revenue from all sources during the year was $14,258: less than that for 1911 by $261. The main decrease was due to the transfer of the issue of Money Changers' Licences to the Police Department and to the issue of fewer Emigration House and Mar- riage Licences and fewer certificates to Chinese going to the United States of America. There were a few items which shewed slight in- creases. viz., Forfeitures, Certificates for registration and re-registra- tion of householders, &c.

The expenditure was $45,521 compared with $49,217 in 1911, and fell short of the estimate by $795.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Table III.)

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897.

Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.

The number. of individuals detained under warrant was 183 as against 258 in 1911, all of whom were sent direct to the Po Leung Kuk; the action taken in respect of them (as also in those cases not decided by the end of 1911) is shown in Table III. The number of

women whose detention was found to be unnecessary and who were permitted to leave after enquiry was 120 or 65'6 per cent. against 38% in 1911; 23 cases were still under consideration at the end of the year.

A number of girls were again sent not under warrant to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge and Italian Convent, the number sent through this Office and detained in these institutions at the end of the year being 14 and 3 respectively.

25 names were added to the list of girls under bond to report themselves quarterly, half-yearly or annually to the Registrar General, a precaution taken to guard aginst their being forced into prostitution. The names of girls were removed from the list, of whom 3 were married. The total on the list at the end of the year was 62.

7

C 2

In the case of one girl released under bond it was found that the man in whose charge she had been placed had induced her to become his concubine. She was sent back to the Po Leung Kuk, and the offender's bond of $150 was forfeited.

The number of persons reported by Hongkong residents to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was 239 of whom 55° were found, as compared with 39 out of 244 in 1911. The number of boys reported missing was 90 as against 71 in 1911. The total number of persons reported missing, including reports from China and Macao, was 384 of whom 65 were found. The corresponding figures for 1911 were 416 and 59 (for 1910, 395 and 75). 、

EMIGRATION,

Emigration Ordinance, No. 1 of 1889, (as amended by subsequent Ordinances). (i.)-EMIGRATION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

(Table IV.)

The number of women and children passengers examined and allowed to proceed was 23,248 as against 24,630 in 1911. There is a slight falling off in the numbers going to the Straits Settlements, 20,328 as compared with 22,168 in 1911 but an increase in the number going to the Dutch Indies, and to South America. The number proceeding to North America remains about the same, the United States of America receiving rather more emigrants and Canada rather fewer.

The record of the occupations of female emigrants (women and girls) shows that out of a total of 16,405, 10,620 were going with their husbands or other relatives, or to join relatives: 4,439 gave their occupations as maidservants, 575 as seamstresses, and 505 as prostitutes. The remainder included 17 nuns, 2 school mistresses and one actress.

The usefulness of the examination of female emigrants in order to prevent the kidnapping of young girls as prostitutes was clearly shown on one occasion during the year when an emigration hotel was detected in conniving at the shipment to Singapore as pros- titutes of a batch of young girls who had not been presented for examination. The hotel was fined $200 for the breach of by-laws involved, its licence was cancelled, and the sureties' bond of $1,000 forfeited. (Table VI.)

Forty (40) or '17 per cent. of the total number of

passengers were detained for enquiries, as against 71 out of 24,630 or 28 per cent. in 1911. Five cases were still under consideration at the end of the year, and of the remaining 35, 28 were allowed to leave without any order being made.

C 3

(ii.)-MALE EMIGRATION.

(Table V.)

On

It might have been expected that owing to the unsettled state of the interior after the Revolution the volume of emigration would have considerably increased in comparison with former years. the contrary, however, all the returns of "assisted" emigration show a marked falling off as compared with 1911.

The reason of this striking decrease was presumably that after the collapse of the rubber boom in 1910 and 1911 very few further plantations were opened during the year and the demand for coolie labour fell off accordingly.

The total number of emigrants presented for examination was 21,458 as against 34,087 in 1911. The number of those examined. who refused to proceed was 705 or 3:28 per cent, as compared with 36 per cent. in 1911: the total number rejected as unfit for labour whether by the Emigration Officer or the doctor was 2,531, a per- centage of 119 as compared with 12:2 in 1911.

As in 1911 it appears from the Tables as if only a percentage of the difference between the total number presented (21,458) and the number allowed to proceed (14,798), viz., 2,531 out of 6,760, can be accounted for. The discrepancy is, however, due to the fact that large numbers of emigrants who express their willingness to go abroad at the first examination change their minds afterwards and do not come up again, and that many who are rejected or have passed the first examination for one port begin the process afresh for an- other port; and so appear twice or even more often in the total of

emigrants presented".

During the year there was a steady demand for labour from Deli, Sumatra. This emigration is managed through a Dutch firm in Swatow where all emigrants are brought by the labour recruiters, medically examined, and shipped direct to Sumatra. Towards the end of the year a considerable number of these emigrants passed through Hongkong en route for Swatow and Deli, and many of the emigration boarding houses in the Colony took advantage of the slackness of other business to house these emigrants. The emigra- tion was at first carried on secretly though in fact it involved no breach of the law, and it was only when falsification of the boarding house registers in order to conceal the truth was detected and punished, that petitions were sent in to carry on the business openly. The only obstacle in the way of recognising and regulating this form of emigration was that the Dutch Government in Sumatra was in no way interested-as it is in Banka and Billiton-in the importation of such coolies to labour on the tobacco plantations and there was therefore no guarantee that the terms of the contract would be carried out by the employers. Since, however, enquiries made of the Consul General for Netherlands India proved satisfactorily that this form of emigration approached more nearly to the "Kangany" system than any other in the experience of this Department, and as the whole emigration seemed entirely successful and well managed

C 4

"}

and the emigrants satisfied, no unnecessary obstacles were put in the way of allowing the coolies to pass through Hongkong to their port of departure-Swatow. They could really be ranked as "free emigrants-as free as it is possible for a coolie passenger on a long and expensive journey to be: and it seems a pity that the restric- tions imposed by the Hongkong Ordinance (due largely to the excessively wide definition of an assisted emigrant") should tend to keep this trade away from Hongkong in spite of the many other conveniences this port has to offer.

It will be seen from the Table that only 450 assisted emigrants for British North Borneo were passed during the year, though it is probable that a certain number of coolies were taken down under the "Kangany" system by recruiters sent back from the plantation. All these 450 "assisteds" were passed during January and February rather, it would seem, hurried through to anticipate the new form of labour contract prescribing a maximum term of 300 days work, which came into force on April 1st. The new form of contract was drawn up (after consulting this Government as well) by Mr. Young Riddell, the Labour Commissioner or Chief Protector of Chinese Labour Contracts appointed by the British North Borneo Government; but before the practical difficulties connected with the change of system has been satisfactorily settled Mr. Young Riddell returned to England. This led to not a little confusion ; the planters wished to return to the old form of contract and in- structed their agents in Hongkong to recruit labour on the old terms, but this the Hongkong Government having accepted the British North Borneo Government's new scheme (through Mr. Young Riddell) could not permit without further correspondence with the British North Borneo Government. The difficulties have now, however, been adjusted. The British North Borneo Govern- ment have appointed Mr. J. W. C. Bonnar as their agent for the supervision of labour recruiting in Hongkong and in January, 1913, the first batch of coolies engaged under the new conditions were shipped to Sandakan.

Owing to the prevalence of Small-pox in Hongkong at the beginning of the year, strict quarantine regulations were enforced in Singapore against all arrivals from Hongkong. In January on the arrival of the s.s. "Laisang" in Singapore the assisted passen- gers refused to proceed to the quarantine camp and threatened violence until dealt with by the Police. A circular notice was therefore issued by this Office to all the Hongkong boarding houses explaining the nature of the quarantine regulations in Singapore and requiring them to be brought to the notice of all intending emigrants to that port. No further trouble occurred thereafter.

Three hundred and seventeen (317) coolies were rejected by the Protector of Chinese in Singapore as unfit for labour and sent back to their homes at the expense of the Hongkong Boarding Houses which had recruited them.

The arrangements made with Singapore and Penang for the repatriation of decrepit coolies at the expense of their employers

C 5

continue to work very satisfactorily. During the year 395 decrepits were repatriated from the Malay Peninsula and sent on to their homes via the Tung Wa Hospital.

The similar arrangements made with British North Borneo have now been put on a satisfactory basis. There was formerly some uncertainty over the sums of money to be allowed such decrepits by their employers to cover expenses between Hongkong and their homes and over the method of forwarding and paying the amounts due but these difficulties have now been adjusted.

:

During the year 28 decrepits were sent back from British North Borneo with money and forwarded to their destinations in China.

The registration and photographing of assisted emigrants have again frequently enabled parents and relatives of missing men to trace them through this office and if desired to secure their redemp- tion and repatriation.

During the year there were 26 applications to procure the return of relatives who had emigrated. Of the 28 men concerned 20 had gone to Singapore, 3 to British North Borneo and the re- maining 5 to Muntok. 19 men returned and were restored to their relatives, one refused to return, one had already been sent back as unfit for labour, and 5 (including the 3 in British North Borneo) have not yet been traced, while two had gone as "free" emigrants, paying their own passages, so that there could be no question of redemption.

None of the 13 men mentioned in last year's report as still untraced at the end of 1911, could be located.

The monthly returns furnished by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, Singapore, of the number of contracts to labour in the differ- ent localities signed by Hongkong unpaid passengers give the fol- lowing figures for the year :-

Straits Settlements,

558

British North Borneo,

184

Federated Malay States,

511

Sarawak,

79.

Malay Peninsula (Johore and New States), Dutch Possessions,

2,582

2,810

Total,

6,724

A peculiar case in which it was attempted to smuggle 30 com- paratively respectable Chinese into the Philippines came under notice, and forms an excellent example of the difficulties, arising from their own simplicity, found in the protection of emigrants. The men left Hongkong as free passengers for Sandakan, British North Borneo, and on the way were persuaded by a man Leung

C 6

Shing Yan to hand over all their capital to him on the inducement that he would take them to Manila to make their fortunes. On landing at Sandakan two fishing boats were chartered by Leung and the party set sail for Manila. They were however intercepted by the American Customs Officials and after serving a term of im- prisonment sent back to Hongkong. Leung Shing Yan managed to escape from the steamer on her arrival in harbour leaving his dupes penniless on board. Most of them, however, had friends in Hongkong to take charge of them: the rest were sent to their homes.

Another swindle was perpetrated on four Chinese emigrants who had just returned from the Straits by the master and account- ant of a Hongkong boarding house. The men were induced to place their savings amounting to $100 in the master's charge, and the latter promptly converted the money to his own use and then absconded. A conviction was, however, secured against the ac- countant, and the victims were given their passages home.

A table of prosecutions for offences in connection with Emigra- tion is attached. The majority of the offences are more or less harmless breaches of the by-laws; but continued breaches led to the cancellation of four licences. The most serious case-fraudulent emigration via Swatow-involved the forfeiture of the bond for $1,000. (Table VI.)

The classification of assisted emigrants by the language spoken (Table V shows the different localities from which labour is recruited) gives the following figures-

Cantonese,

Hakka,

Hoklo,

Hainanese,

Mandarin,

...13.346

7,077

103

343

589

21,458

Fifty-eight (58) emigration hotel licences (17 new) and 36 licences (7 new) to keep boarding houses for assisted emigrants were issued during the year. The former had accommodation for 5,395 boarders, and the latter for 1,637.

Twenty-four (24) duplicate licences were issued for removal of premises or transfer of names.

The number of houses holding licences at the end of the year was:-hotels 53, and boarding houses for assisted emigrants 26, as compared with 41 and 35 respectively at the end of 1911.

Early in the year the hotel accommodation was taxed to the utmost by the influx of refugees from Canton and its environs during the fighting with Wong Wo-shun's irregulars but later when in Canton at any rate peace and order were restored many of the refugees returned home and conditions became more normal.

C 7

REGULATION OF CHINESE.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

(i.)-REGISTRATION OF HOUSEHOLDERS.

Two thousand two hundred and twenty-six (2,226) householders were registered; 98 of these being first registration. 9,299 changes in respect of tenants were also registered. In two cases only (29 in 1911) was it found necessary during the year to take proceedings for failure to notify changes of tenancy: in both cases a conviction was secured.

As in previous years the applications of all Chinese in business in Victoria or Kowloon who offered themselves as sureties to other Government Departments were referred to this office for enquiries. The number of sureties reported on during the year was 706.

(ii)-DISTRICT WATCHMEN. (Table VII.)

The District Watchmen's Committee met on 6 occasions, the average attendance of members being between 11 and 12.

On the death of Mr. Lau Yam-chun, Mr. Chan Kai-ming was appointed to fill the vacancy on the Committee.

The balance to the credit of the District Watchmen's Fund at the end of the year was $9,775 as against $7,286 at the close of 1911, the income thus exceeding the expenditure by nearly $2,500. The subscriptions again show a substantial increase, and a consider- able saving has been effected on the expenditure side by a reduction in the strength of the force; the total expenditure was thus only $26,164 as compared with $29,934 in 1911.

The strength of the force is now 99 as against 123 at the beginning of the year, none of the 24 vacancies caused by death, resignations or dismissals during the year having been filled up, and the approved strength reduced from 124 to 100.

The number of convictions secured by members of the force was 415 as compared with 273 in 1911.

The influence of the members of the Committee in support of the Government, and in keeping in order the Chinese in the Colony, was of great value. The excitement bred of the Revolution was at its highest, and an unintelligent passion for politics was (as usual) an element of danger, and at the same time an opportunity for the unscrupulous; and the unostentatious work of the gentlemen on the Committee helped in no small degree to secure the observance of the Colony's regulations and the keeping of the peace during the

year.

(iii.)-PERMITS.

Five hundred and twenty seven (527) permits to fire crackers were issued, 124 of these being on the occasion of marriage. 13 permits were issued to hold processions, 26 permits to perform theatricals in temporary buildings and 36 to hold religious cere- monies.

MARRIAGES.

Ordinances No. 7 of 1875, No. 15 of 1902,

No. 6 of 1903 and No. 20 of 1910.

The number of marriages solemnised during the year was 143 as compared with 161 in 1911. The number contracted at the Registrar General's Office was 17. In 1911 it was 24.

CERTIFICATES OF IDENTITY TO CHINESE ENTERING THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

Eight (8) certificates were issued to Chinese to enter the United States; 1 certificate to enter Philippine Islands.

All these certificates are limited to Chinese British Subjects resident in Hongkong.

REGISTRATION OF Books.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

Forty (40) books were registered during the year as compared with 13 in 1911.

COPYRIGHT IN WORKS OF THE FINE ARTS.

Ordinance No. 17 of 1901.

None were registered during the year.

COPYRIGHT IN BOOKS.

Ordinance No. 14 of 1910.

Three books and 20 newspapers were registered during the year. In accordance with the Imperial Copyright Act, 1912, this Ordinance was repealed from 1st July by Ordinance No. 24 of 1912.

C 9

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

Ordinances No. 1 of 1870, No. 9 of 1904 and No. 10

of 1908 (Man Mo Temple).

(Tables VIII to XIV.)

The Directors for 1913 assumed office on 5th January, 1913.

Their names are:--

Un Ying Shan, Chairman,

Lam Wun U,

Fung Ping Shan, Ma Kai Mi,

Leung Tsz Nam,

Hung Li Tun, Tsoi Po Sien, Chan Lim Fu,

Cheung Yee Sang,

Cheung Pok Shan, Li Hi Shan,

Yeung Ching Shek, Chu Chung Lun, Ip Hiu Ting, Lam Siu Mi.

The first three named gentlemen are in charge of the hospital's finances.

Under the 1912 directorate the Small-pox Hospital at Yaumati was completed by the addition of two sets of quarters for coolies and the building of a mortuary. The primary object of this hospital was to prevent the necessity of transferring Small-pox cases across the Harbour. It stands in an ideal situation for a hospital and has already done good work. The question of its use for diseases other than Small-pox at other seasons, is one for further consideration.

The quarters for destitutes at the Tung Wa Hospital were improved by the erection of an iron fence at the rear; and 4 new bathrooms were added to the hospital.

The hospital's normal revenue has for some years fallen short of the expenditure by some $10,000 to raise which sum a special effort was called for every year, but the effecting of further internal economies and the raising of the rentals of the hospital property (which had remained unchanged for some 15 years) resulted in the 1912 Balance Sheet showing a credit of $8,000.

The total number of in-patients during the year was 4,120 (3,897 in 1911) of whom 1,406 elected to take European treatment, about the same percentage as in 1911. The out-patients numbered 102,333 (as compared with 109,790 in 1911) of whom 8,938 or a percentage of 87 as against 11 in 1911, were treated by European methods.

The number of destitutes admitted was 2,870 of whom 75 went to the hospital of their own accord or were sent by natives of the Colony, while the remainder, including all emigrants rejected in Hongkong or Singapore as unfit for labour, were sent from the Registrar General's Office, and in nearly every case sent back to their homes.

Owing to the disturbed state of the interior very few of the coffins stored in the Free Mortuary at below Mount Davis could be

C 10

removed during the year and the building became over-crowded. The Government was approached with a view to granting a free site for the extension of the mortuary and the work is now in hand.

The number of free coffins supplied to poor inhabitants during the year was 3,347.

On the resignation of Dr. To Ying Kwau, the resident medical officer, Dr. Thomas from the Alice Memorial Hospital was appointed in his stead.

The accounts of the hospital as set out in the tables attached to this Report (Tables IX and X) are still kept according to Chinese reckoning, i.e., they are for the Yam Tsz Chinese year, February 18th, 1912, to February 5th, 1913, and the difficulty mentioned in last year's report of making accurate comparisons between the accounts of different years of varying length has thus not yet been removed. Officially the Chinese have adopted the Gregorian calendar: in private life and business they have not.

The total expenditure, which included no extraordinary items. was $81,923 as compared with $84,162 in the previous year, again showing a considerable saving (the expenditure for 1910 was nearly $93,000). A saving of more than $4,000 was effected under the heading Chinese drugs" alone.

The ordinary receipts for the year amounted to $99,058 an increase of nearly $12,000 on the previous year's figures ($87,388) which is accounted for by the increased balance at the beginning of the year ($12,191 as against $3,551) and an increase of $7,000 from the rental of hospital property.

The extraordinary receipts, contributions from the various Theatres, amounted to $2,475.

The balance in hand at the beginning of the present year has thus been increased from $12,191 to $19,608.

In the management of the Kwong Chau and Shiu Hing Relief Fund (Table XII) the Committee made a new departure. Previously the hospital had co-operated with the "Distress Relief Society in Canton", but during the year past the Directorate undertook famine and flood relief work on its own responsibility. Subscrip- tions to the amount of over $40,000 were raised, and a further sum of $4,290 was appropriated from the balance of the Relief Fund above mentioned.

In the administration of the Man Mo Temple Fund (Table XII) it is worth noting that a considerable sum was expended on converting a garden adjoining the Temple into an extra school to meet the demand from poorer class parents for the education of their children.

Four Chinese women and girls suffering from leprosy were dealt with through this Office during the year. Two were sent home by the Tung Wa Hospital, one was handed over to her husband to

- CI

be taken back to the country, and one was admitted to the Rhenish Leper Asylum at Tung Kun also through the Tung Wa Hospital -the directors (as in previous cases of the kind) themselves sub- scribing the necessary fees.

Arrangements were also made through the hospital at the request of the Protector of Chinese, Singapore, to send on to their homes two male lepers repatriated from the Straits Settlements.

In April a serious explosion of an oil tank belonging to the Asiatic Petroleum Company took place at Pulau Samboe (Dutch Territory) in which 16 Cantonese boiler makers were killed and 3 others injured. The Company though denying responsibility agreed to pay a sum of $1,539 as compensation to the relatives of the men killed. This sum was handed over to the Protector of Chinese, Singapore, and forwarded to this Office. The Tung Wa Hospital undertook the responsibility of getting the various sums paid to the proper persons through the Charitable Institutions in the different districts of Kwong Tung.

The Kwong Wa Hospital in Yaumati completed and officially opened in 1911-this hospital is managed by a Committee composed of the Tung Wa Hospital Annual Committee with the addition of representatives from the Kowloon side of the Harbour-thoroughly justified its existence during the year. (Tables XV and XVI)

In all 1,225 patients were admitted, of whom under Chinese treatment 290 recovered and 410 died, and under European treat- ment 381 recovered and 126 died. It will thus be seen that 507 or over 41 per cent. of the whole admissions elected to be treated by European methods.

The total number of out-patients treated was 6,362 of whom 815 or 12 8 per cent. elected to take European treatment.

The total estimated expenditure being $25,000 and the income of the hospital only 12,000, a proposal was made by the Directors to secure an increase of subscriptions from the various guilds. The proposal is under consideration.

A complete set of modern surgical instruments was presented to the hospital by the Directors, who thus made it possible for serious operations to be performed at the Kwong Wa and obviated the necessity of moving surgical cases a long distance whenever an operation was necessary.

The actual expenditure on the hospital for the Yam Tsz Chinese year amounted to $34,352.50, which included a sum of $9,662 for the extension of the building, and $3,846 expended on the Small-pox Hospital in Yaumati, the management of which has now been taken over by the Kwong Wa Committee.

The total receipts by the Tung Wa Hospital Committee for the Kwong Wa, exclusive of the balance of subscriptions from the previous years amounting to 12,872.22, were $22,516.92; of

C 12

which a sum of over $7,500 was raised by further subscriptions, the Tung Wa Hosipital contributed $2,000 and the Government grant was $8,500.

The extensions to the Hospital mentioned above consist in the construction of additional coolie quarters and of a building contain- ing quarters for the manager and staff and a Chinese dispensary.

The balance with the manager at the end of the year was $1,036.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES AND DISTRICT PLAGUE HOSPITALS.

(Tables XVII, XVIII and XIX.)

The total number of cases treated at the Dispensaries again shows a considerable increase over the figures for 1911, 75,331 as compared with 68,566.

The percentage of return to new cases treated works out at 366 as compared with 37 in 1911.

The total expenditure on the Dispensaries was $29,800-a decrease of over $2,500 as compared with 1911-and fell short of the total revenue by $18,205, which included a donation of $6,000 earmarked for special extension work.

The number of dead or dying infants brought to the Dis- pensaries shows a slight decrease, but the number of vaccinations performed has more than doubled, the figures being 9,736 in 1912 as against 4,635 in 1911.

An analysis of the returns stating the numbers of infants' bodies brought to the Dispensaries shows that confidence in them is maintained. At West Point the number of dead infants brought in was 100 more than in 1911, though only 212 dying infants were treated against 319 in 1911; at the Central Dispensary the numbers in the latter class show a decrease which is balanced by an increase in the former while in the Eastern District there were again no live infants brought in, but a few more dead ones. The number of cases in which it was not stated from what address the infant was brought has more than doubled itself at each of the three Dispen- saries.

The large number of infants under 5 years of age brought in for treatment is extremely satisfactory, the total being 9,043, an increase of 1,150 on the 1911 figures.

The work of the Committee was not marked by any new de- parture during the year, but a scheme which has been on foot since 1910 to provide an additional dispensary at Sham Shui Po came to fruition through the generosity of Messrs. Cheung Pat-shi, Cheung Iu-hin and Tu Tak-shing who subscribed $6,000 towards the building.

The Government has approved the grant of a piece of Crown Land rent free for the purpose, and a large Hall to be used as a Committee-room as well as a Dispensary is in process of construction.

- C 13

The year 1912 was unfortunately marked by a serious epidemic of Plague but despite this fact the number of plague cases treated at the District Plague Hospitals at West Point and Wanchai was few, and it appears that Chinese infected with the disease still prefer to take advantage of the facilities allowed them for leaving the Colony to treatment on the spot. Both hospitals, however, did good work in the treatment of cases of ordinary disease (other than Plague) admitted under the conditions mentioned in last year's Report. The figures of all the cases treated at the two hospitals are as follows :-

Patients.

WEST POINT.

Ordinary Cases.

Plague Cases.

Dis- Died in Ad-

Ad-

Dis- Died in mitted. charged- Hospital. mitted. charged. Hospital.

Male,

8

7

1

5

5

Female,

36

23

. 13

23

2

21

Total,...

44

30

14

28

2

26

WANCHAL.

Ordinary Cases.

Plague Cases.

Patients.

Ad-

Dis- Died in Ad-

Dis- Died in

Male,

4

Female,...

mitted. charged. Hospital. mitted. charged. Hospital.

Co

3

3

3333

27

Total,...

36

30

6

1

3

3

The number of bodies considered by the Registrar General to have been abandoned during 1912 (Table XXI) rose from 315 in 1911 to 760, of which 561 were abandoned during the first 6 months of the year when the epidemics of Small-pox (during the cold weather) and Plague (later on) assumed such serious dimensions. The percentage of these "dumping" cases to the total number of Chinese deaths was 8 1 as compared with 42 in 1911 an increase due largely to the presence of Small-pox and to the special sanitary

C 14

precautions that are necessary to deal with the disease. It is a question now under consideration whether the balance of advantage to the Colony lies in keeping strictly to the existing regulations (which seem to lead to concealment and dumping) or in relaxing them sufficiently to ensure that all cases are brought to the notice of the Authorities concerned.

Of the 760 bodies abandoned 224 were taken to the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

Table XX, compiled from statistics in the Sanitary Department, again shows the number of death certificates issued in proportion to the total number of Chinese deaths, and the number of cases in which post mortem examinations were held, etc.

The percentage of cases in which the cause of death was certi- fied has risen from 38 in 1911 to 41, and in view of the fact that the number of deaths was 9,375 as against 7,496 in 1911 this is satisfac- tory and may to some extent be put to the credit of the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The following table gives particulars of interest regarding Plague and Small-pox :--

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Removed Treat- Disease. Cases. to

ed at Hospital. Home. Hospital.

Percentage

Died

in

Reco- vered.

Report-

of column

ed after

death.

7 to column 2.

Small-

pox,

Plague,

1910.

22

9

1

8

13

59

со

N

25

17

6

15

32

1911.

1753

91

26

64

180.

66:4

Small-

271

pox,

Plague,

269

174

6

157

15

95

35.3

1912.

Sinall-

709

232

88

144

177

67.3

pox,

Plague, 1,847 967

888

78

880

47 6

C 15

It will be noted that the figures compare badly with 1911 and 1912: but they are to some extent vitiated by the special circum- stances of the year. The available accommodation in the Colony was taxed to its limit by the influx due to the troubles in Canton: and the newcomers, while no doubt importing many of the cases, could only be expected to fall short of the resident Chinese in their ac- quaintance with the Colony's Sanitary Regulations. Further, where mere ignorance was not to blame, the difficulty of finding other quarters during the discomfort of the cleansing operations, often led to a conspiracy of silence among all the inhabitants of a house.

Dr. Mitchell, Dr. Gibson and Dr. Fitzwilliams kindly gave gratuitous service in the checking of medicine orders and in other ways during the year.

TRANSLATION WORK DONE IN THE REGISTRAR GENERAL'S

OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1912.

Translation from Chinese

into English.

Translation from English into Chinese.

Petitions,...

53

Ordinances,...

4

Letters,.......

95

Regulations,

13

Newspaper articles and

Government Notices,...... 115

items of news,

298

Unspecified,.

98

Minutes,

Unspecified,

2

18

Total, 544

Total 182

The total number of translations done was thus 726 as compar- ed with 449 in 1911, the number of newspaper articles, etc.,

and Government notices translated having more than doubled. In addition, nearly every translation made in other departments is sent to this Office to be checked and revised; and on numerous occasions less important translation work of which no record is kept has been done by members of the Department other than the Translator.

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XXIII.)

The balance to the credit of the fund at the end of the year was $7,108.53, an increase of about 200. The expenditure which in-

C 16

cluded a sum of $263 for repairing and rebuilding 8 stalls damaged by fire at the end of 1911 was $1,154 and the revenue from the rent of stalls $1,346.

CHARITABLE FUNDS.

(Tables XXIV & XXV.)

The net income of the Passage Money Fund was $1,055 and the total expenditure only $261 which included no extraordinary items.

The balance to the credit of the fund at the end of the year thus rose again from $794 to $1,589 or almost exactly the same as it was at the end of 1910.

The Brewin Charity was administered on the same lines as in 1911. The balance to the credit of the Fund at the end of 1912 had risen to $42,122, the income from mortgages and bank deposits amounting to $2.557; while the year's expenditure was only $443 of which $433 was paid in pensions to widows of deceased workmen or in gratuities to other deserving cases.

REGULATION OF CLUBS AND SOCIETIES.

Ordinance No. 47 of 1911.

From the passing of the Societies Ordinance in 1911 up to the end of 1912 the total number of societies and clubs-including those exempted in the Schedule to the Ordinance and in the subse- quent schedule (Government Notification No. 190, 1912)-which applied for permission to register or for exemption from registration under the Ordinance was 292 (134 in 1911 and 158 in 1912).

There were 255 (121 in 1912) applications for exemption of which 248 were granted, and 6 are still under consideration: in one case the applicants were required to register.

The applications for permission to register numbered 37 of which 29 were granted; 2 being refused on the grounds specified in section 4 of the Ordinance: 6 cases are still under consideration.

The position of schools and educational associations is a difficulty which has arisen and has been submitted to the Government for consideration: schools as such are generally outside the scope of the Ordinance but the evasion of the law by the foundation of Societies under the name of schools is a possibility which calls for some closer definition. The question first arose in connection with the establishment of a Chinese Political School for Girls in the Colony, and has appeared again in connection with another "school" at Aberdeen and in a proposal to establish a "free" Library in Hongkong.

C 17

Of the applications to register which were refused the most important was that of the Chinese Marine Association. This society seems to have been only a new form of an ever recurring business : the boat population are too simple and too easy a prey to be left alone for long. Under the colour of a mutual benefit society for the protection of boat people in the Harbour, it had already collected subscriptions (of which there is now no trace) before it applied for registration.

The case of the Wang Tsz Charitable Society was peculiar : its charitable efforts seemed to consist of running a sort of prescrip- tion lottery women were induced to consult the oracle for any form of illness in order to get a ready made prescription.

The very existence of the Ordinance seems to have encouraged the promotion of a number of societies and clubs. The majority of them are perfectly harmless, and a proportion is likely to die a natural death when the novelty wears off. The normal position of affairs can only reveal itself after some years' working.

The value of the Regulations has not yet been severely tested: but the inquisitory powers they confer seem to have had an excellent effect in the few cases in which they have been exercised. There has been only one important prosecution under the Ordinance that of the Kwong Tung Wo Triad Lodge -which was successful.

INTERPRETATION SUB-DEPARTMENT.

Three student interpreters and one sergeant interpreter passed the examination for a third class certificate. Two received appoint- ments in the Sanitary Department and one in the Police Department. Three new student interpreters were appointed. Of the 52 student interpreters appointed under the present system, 7 are still student interpreters, 20 have third class certificates and 6 second class certificates, 4 have yet to qualify for third class certificates, though they have already received appointments, 15 are no longer in the Government Service.

Five meetings of the Interpretation Board were held. 20 candidates were examined for second and third class interpreter's certificates, 4 third class interpreter's certificates were awarded, and 18 candidates for 5 vacancies for student interpreters were also examined.

ORDINANCES.

The chief Ordinances of other than technical interest affecting the Chinese which were passed during 1912 were as follows:

No. 4 of 1912.-The Gambling Amendment Ordinance. The Principal Ordinance had inter alia merely declared it illegal to conduct a lottery in the Colony.

C 18

Under the Amending Ordinance it is an offence to buy, sell, or be in possession of lottery tickets.

No. 9 of 1912.-The Deportation Ordinance. This Ordinance is in effect merely an elaboration of the formalities connected with Deportation, mainly in the interests of the suspects; though the penalties for return from banishment are made much more severe. In practical working some of these formalities have proved cumber- some, and have led to delay: there is no case during the year of the heavier penalties having been imposed.

No. 11 of 1912.-The Foreign Copper Coin Ordinance. By this Ordinance the importation and circulation of all foreign copper and bronze coins, with the exception of Chinese cash, is absolutely prohibited under penalties. The object of the Ordi- nance was to suppress the use of Chinese copper cents with which the Colony was flooded- -a $1 note exchanged for as many as 120 or 125 Chinese cents. Despite pessimistic prophecies the result of the prohibition was entirely successful and involved no hardship to the Chinese lower classes.

No. 19 of 1912.-The Advertisement Regulation Ordinance : authorising the Governor-in-Council to make regulations for the control of hoardings, etc., used for advertising purposes and of advertisements generally, in order to prevent disfigurement of the landscape and injury to the amenities of public places and pre- scribing penalties for the infringement of such regulations.

No. 29 of 1912.-The Inn-keepers Ordinance. This Ordinance empowers an inn-keeper, in addition to his right of lien, to sell any property left on his premises by a boarder who is indebted to him for any sum for board and lodging with the provisoes that :-

(a.) except in the case of perishable goods such sale shall

not take place until after the expiry of 6 weeks;

(b.) any sum raised by such sale in excess of the amount

of the debt must be refunded on demand;

(c.) notice of any such sale must be given in the news-

papers.

No. 15 and No. 30 of 1912.-The Magistrates Amendment and the Magistrates Further Amendment Ordinance. No. 15 repeals section 86 of the Principal Ordinance and lays down the courses of action open to a Magistrate on the conviction of a male offender under 15 years of age who has been guilty of any offence punishable on summary conviction, as follows:

(a.) discharge such offender with a caution;

(b.) hand him over to his parent, guardian, relative or master, on the latter executing a bond for his good behaviour for 12 months;

(c.) order him to be whipped in the precincts of Court.

2

19

Provided that if such offender is convicted of larceny, or of assault causing bodily harm, or of indecent assault the Magistrate can order whipping in addition to any other punishment.

No. 30 adds to the offences for which a Magistrate can order the offender to be flogged :-

(a.) any act of gross indecency with another male person under the age of 13 (section 52 of No. 2 of 1865);

(b.) indecent assault (section 7 of No. 4 of 1897).

No. 40 of 1912.-The Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance. This Ordinance empowers the Governor-in-Council to make regula- tions for the control of every form of vehicle in use in the Colony and of traffic generally; for the apprehension of offenders; for the prohibition, if necessary, of the driving of any kind of vehicle in particular roads; for prescribing the fees for licences; and for laying down a scale of fares for any form of public vehicle.

No. 41 of 1912.-The Boycott Prevention Ordinance. The pur- pose of this Ordinance is to prevent undue and improper interference with, or hampering of, lawful business and commercial undertakings.

The immediate necessity for the Ordinance was the existence of the Tramway Boycott which began in November when the Tramway Company refused any longer to accept Chinese silver in payment of fares. The movement took on a political aspect, and was carried on by the most ingenious methods of intimidation. While it was far from being a spontaneous popular movement, and was in fact a very serious inconvenience, few dared use the cars from a vague fear of the consequences, and none (if any had it in their power) dared to give information. Mischievous reports found ready credence, and the naturally timid Chinese dared not act in the face of them, until at the time of the passing of the Ordinance an influential Committee of Chinese took in hand an organised resistance which restored confi- dence and ended the boycott in a few days.

No. 42 of 1912.-The Chinese Marriage Preservation Ordinance. To provide punishment for persons found guilty of adultery or of harbouring Chinese married women. This Ordinance consolidates previous enactments dealing with harbouring and adds provisions for dealing with adultery in the case of Chinese married women. The circumstances make the English law on the subject practically a dead letter in the Colony: and yet the offence is almost more serious if possible in Chinese than in Western eyes, and called for particular legislation.

GENERAL.

On the application of Sir Kai Ho Kai and other prominent members of the Chinese community a strip of Crown Land about 15 acres in area was granted rent free to a representative committee of Chinese to be used as a cemetery for permanent Chinese residents

C 20

of Hongkong. The Chinese community have guaranteed $20,000 towards the cost of laying out the site, and $1,500 per annum for upkeep and maintenance.

The increase in the number of motor cars let out for hire in the Colony and a certain number of accidents arising from reckless driving was the cause of a petition signed by some 1,700 of the leading Chinese gentry and merchants requesting the total prohibi- tion of all cars at livery. In addition to the accidents, the common use of cars at all hours of the night for "joyrides" (always with full horn accompaniment) was becoming a general nuisance: and the opportunity for extravagance occasioned a drain on the resour- ces of more than one family which owned a prodigal son. New speed limits, with sufficient signals and the prohibition of the use of cars after 1 a.m. (except in some special cases) under Ordinance No. 40 of 1912 seem now to have set the matter on a satisfactory footing.

The licence of a common lodging house which was discovered by the Police to be run as an opium divan was cancelled and the guarantor's bond forfeited.

Eighteen (18) applications for British Born Subject's Certificate were reported on (including 6 made at the end of 1911) and 5 applications for Naturalisation. The numbers granted were 13 and 5.

Four (4) applications (3 for British Born Subject's Certificate and 1 for Naturalisation) from persons of other than Chinese nationality were also received and referred to the Colonial Secretary's Office. They were all granted.

Sixty-seven (67) appeals by prisoners against the issue of Banishment Orders-most of them being on the grounds of Hong- kong birth--were referred to this Office and reported on.

The Registrar General is also required to furnish a report on any case of a Chinese prostitute committing suicide. Three such reports were furnished during the year, and in no case was there any suspicion of foul play.

Labour Troubles.

Washermen's Strike.-In May there was a strike of the washer- man employees in Victoria, which however only lasted 3 days and caused little inconvenience. The men demanded a rise of $2 a month for regular employees, and of 10 cents a day for odd job workers (san kung). The former demand was acceded to but not the latter, and all the employees thereupon struck work, the regular workmen as well joining the movement. A settlement was however very quickly reached.

Painters' Strike.-In August there was a short strike of the Painters Guild (employees). The men demanded a rise of 5 cents a day, and when this was granted, further required a fixed minimum

C 21

wage

for all members of the Guild. The members as a whole did not desire the strike which was only kept alive by means of in- timidation and was soon settled. The men yielded to reason when once the real cause that had influenced the agitators was brought to light and analysed: a wish to force the masters to engage apprentices, whether efficient or not, at full wages rather than go outside the Guild.

Chairs and Rickshus. -In October there was a 3 days' strike of chair and ricksha coolies, who complained that the methods of regulating traffic and of dealing with breaches of the regulations were too severe and not entirely fair. It did not appear that there was any very general movement in favour of a strike: the action of the men seems to have been the best method they could think of for drawing attention to their grievances. They all agreed to resume work on the understanding that the matter should be investigated.

Rice Coolies.--In November there was a short strike of casual labourers employed in pounding rice, the regular employees remain- ing unaffected. Some 250 men were concerned they demanded a rise of wages from 22 cents to 30 cents a day. The labour required was quite unskilled, and could easily have been found. Representa- tives of both sides were interviewed by the Registrar General, and the men warned against intimidation. The masters made some small concessions and the strikers returned to work at the end of a week.

was

Harbour of Refuge Stone Junks. In September there. a further short strike, the work of professional agitators, among the junkmen engaged in carrying stone for the new IIarbour of Refuge at Mongkok. Two ringleaders seem to have instigated a demand for higher wages among the others, and to have fostered the strike, which was not generally popular; the demands as a whole were refused. Some small concessions by the contractors resulted in a resumption of work by all the junkmen except the two leaders: they were allowed to go elsewhere to look for other work.

TRADE AND COMMERCE (CHINESE).

General Chinese business was by no means the failure at one time foretold for 1912 though owing to the rise in exchange and the fluctuations in the value of the Canton note- currency much of it was on a more than usually speculative basis. The unexpectedly peaceful state of the interior generally had a good effect and more than 95% of the outstanding accounts were collected 5 clear days before the Chinese New Year of 1913-a state of affairs unprecedented for 25 years. Bad debts were practically non-existent and there were no important failures. The only forms of industry that had a remarkably prosperous year were Chinese banks (37 firms realised a profit of $1,000,000), marine and fire insurance companies, hide exporters and manu- facturers of leather goods. The boom in the hide and leather trade is worthy of comment. The 6 firms engaged in the export of raw

C 22

hides from the interior to Penang viâ Hongkong, and the import of the leather manufactured there, made a profit of 14 million dollars owing to the extraordinary demand in China for foreign style boots and shoes (especially women's) and for military equipment.

The dealers in Cotton, Flour, and Beans were all adversely affected by the fluctuations of the Canton paper currency and by the rise in exchange; the Commission Agents-selling rice and sugar on a 20% commission-suffered from the decrease in the imports of these commodities.

STAFF.

Hon. Mr. A. W. Brewin retired at the expiration of his leave. I was appointed Registrar General on the 29th November.

Mr. D. W. Tratman was appointed to act as Head of the Sanitary Department on return from leave on the 17th November and Mr. J. D. Lloyd who was appointed to the substantive post of Assistant Postmaster General on the 18th October continued to act for him as First Assistant Registrar General throughout the year.

Mr. A. E. Wood, Second Assistant Registrar General, held the acting appointment of Assistant District Officer, New Territories (South), until he went on leave on the 16th November. Mr. R. E. Lindsell acted in his place throughout the year.

Mr. Chau Shing Ip, 4th Grade Writer, resigned and Mr. Lau Pak Tun was appointed in his place on the 9th July.

Mr. Tsin Yik Hong was appointed Typist on the 1st October to assist the Translator in typewriting owing to the pressure of translation work.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Registrar General,

31st March, 1913.

C 23

Heads of Revenue.

Details of Revenue.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1911 and 1912.

Ordinance under which received.

Revenue in

1911.

Revenue in

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

$ c.

c.

A

C.

$

Licences and Internal

Revenue not other-.

wise specified,

Marriage Licences,

Money Changers' Licences,

Chinese Gazette Sales,

Householders' Registration,

35

Bond by Non-resident

or

Householders,.

Re-registration,

Emigration House Licences. Forfeitures,

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908.

5,530

*

4,850

*

*

680

*

460

2,200

1,740

No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902.

1,442

833

No. 8 of 1887.

3,970

2,700 †

609

1,269

Certificates to Chinese entering U.S.A.,

No. 3 of 1898.

500

425

75

12

12

No. 3 of 1888.

229

294

65

Court

Fees of Office, l'ayments for Specific Purposes, ‹ and Reimburse- ments-in-aid,.

Deposits not available, Interest,

Miscellaneous,

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

Contribution from Chinese Dispensaries, &c., for Clerical Assistance,

10

10

>>

};

39

1,696

2 128

432

Removals,

Extracts.

19

15

43

15

4

""

Duplicate,

3

27

440

389

50

Registration of Societies,

No. 47 of 1911.

120

120

Unclaimed Balances.

100

100

Interest accrued on official account, Refunds, &c.,

9

4

67

251

184

Copyright Registration,.

No. 14 of 1910.

2

11

9

Total,

14,518.19

14,257.54

2,567.41

2,828.06

Deduct Increase,

$ 2,567 41

Total Decrease in 1912, ....$

260.65

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

† For seven months only. Transferred to Police Department.

C 24

Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Registrar General's Department since 1903.

Rey nue.

Expenditure.

Percent-

Year.

Total.

Decrease. Increase. Total.

Decrease.

Increase.

age of Expendi- ture to Revenue.

$c.

1903,

160,351,81

1904,

167,083 66

1905,

172,947.89

1906,.

177,284 21

1907,

163,261.13 11.203 08

1908,

164 459.99

$ c. $ ('.

23.463.68 26,755.64

6,731.85 | 31,339.71 |

5,864 23 | 31,761.32

4,336.32 | 36,947.46

35 630.88

1,198.86 | 43,848 51

$

ee

$ c.

%

2,525.31 16.68

4,584.07

18.75

421.61

18:36

5,186 14

20.84

1,3.6.58

21.82

8,217.63 26.66

1909,

104,13*** 60 321.11

43,793.61

54.90

42.05

1910,

15 #92.12 88,616.76

42,462.81

1.330.80

271-09

1911,....

1912.

11518.19

14.257.54

973.93

49,217.74

6,751 93

339-01

260 65

45,521 01 3,696.73

:

319-28

Table III.

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Registrar General under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

Under Detention on 1st January, 1912.

Detained during 1912.

Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total.

Total.

Permitted to leave,

15

Permitted to leave under bond,

Restored to husband,..

Restored to relatives,..

Sent to native place,

Married,

Adopted,

Sent to Refuge or Convent,

To French Consul to be sent home,

Dead,

Awaiting marriage,.......

Cases under consideration,

:: ∞ CANING

6

21

92

28

120

14]

2

...

2

9

1

10

12

1

5

5

6

2

4

6

4

1

3

14

19

2

7

1

2

9

3

3

2

2

1

1

1

I

2

2

16

5

21

23

142-28

5

35

9

44

143

40

183

227

Total,.

Cases brought forward, 44.

Cases dealt with during the year, 204.

Cases carried forward, 23.

C 25 —

Table IV.

Number of Assisted Emigrants and of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Registrar

General under "The Chinese Emigration Ordinances, 1889-1908," during the year 1912.

C 26 -

Whither Bound.

Male

Assisted

Women and Children, 1912.

Male

Assisted

Women

and

Emigrants

W

omen.

Girls.

Boys. Total.

Emigrants

Children

1912.

1911.

1911.

Africa,..

I

German New Guinea,

13

19

Japan, ...

5

7

1

Straits Settlements, Malay Peninsula,.

8,490

13,910

1,685

Dutch Indies,

5,858

488

60

4,733

599

20,328

16,129

22,168

1,147

4,810

946

Borneo,

450

...

3,666

Honolulu,

34

9

78

121

108

Pelew Islands,

Canada,

12

6

596

614

673

United States of America,

14

4

313

331

210

Mexico,

111

111

108

South America,

17

Mauritius,

96

Australia,

38

137

220

238

127

144

242

190

32

777

65

...

Peru,

2

10

12

British Columbia,

31

...

...

Total, 1912,......

14,798

14,629

1,776

6,843 23,248

24,605

24,630

Total, 1911,.

24,605

16,445 1,709

6,476

24,630

C 27

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Year. Examined. Passed.

Rejected Rejected

Un- willing.

at

by

Sent

Total

Precentage

of

R.G.O.

Doctor.

back.

Rejected. Rejection.

as unfit.

%

1910,... 24,986 23,554*

179

1,253

218

77

1,727

6.91

1911,... 34,087

24,605* 1,236

2,179

470

281

4,166

12.22

1912,...) 21,458

14,798 * 705

1,370

139

317

2,531

11.79

* Including Emigrants to Borneo.

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1912.

Sent home by Tung Wa Hospital,...........

28

Sent home through Tung Wa Hospital at expense } 2,371

of boarding houses,

Sent away without help,

132

Total rejected,

2,531

Native Districts of Assisted Emigrants.

West River,

East River,

North River,

Canton,

Delta,

Kwong Sai,..

Southern Districts,

Mandarin,

3,207

3,774

798

1,484

1,248

1,900

1,972

415

Total,

14,798

Name of House.

Class of House.

Table VI.

Offences by Emigration Houses.

January, 1912, to March, 1913.

Offence.

l'unishment on summary conviction.

Other punishment.

Assisteds' Boarding House. Making false entries in register (to | Fine of $100.

Wing Fat Tseung,

Cheung Fat,

Hotel.

Shun Hing Lung and Kwong Tai Hing

Boarding House.

Tung On,

Kwong Yuen,

Wing On,

Hotel.

Hotel. Boarding House.

Hotel.

conceal Deli emigration).

Shipping prostitutes to Singapore by fraud

Fraudulent recruiting of coolies for Deli. Sumatra.

Do.

Do.

Cancellation of licence ond forfeiture of bond.

Do.

Fine of $200. Names not entered on register. No charge possible.

Licences cancelled,

Do.

Do.

Licence cancelled. Do.

Conniving at the shipment to Singapore | Recruiter acquitted for lack by fraud of a batch of Hu-Nanese of evidence. coolies.

Impersonation, i.e.. passing free emi-Fine of $100. grants under assumed name with

other men's tickets.

Do.

10.

Fine of $100.

Licence cancelled.

Kee Fat,

Do.

Fine of $50.

Tung Tsun,..

Do.

Kwong Ynen Loi,.

Boarding House.

Failure to enter Boaiders' names in re- gister.

Fine of $25.

Wa Hing,

Do.

False cutries in register to conceal real

|

Fine of $100.

Kwong Tại Lung,

Hotel.

Excess.

Kwong Sam Kee,

Do.

Do.

Do.

Tai Shang,

Kwong Li Yuen,

Do.

dlate of arrival of certain emigrants.

Excess and failure to register names of boarders.

Fine of $50 and caution.

(a.) Failure to enter names of boarders | («.) Fine of $10.

in register.

Fine of $50.

Do.

Do.

(b.) Subletting part of premises.

Wa Li,

* Do.

(a.) Excess.

(3.) Subletting.

(b.) Fine of $25.

(a.) Fine of $75. (b.) Fine of $5.

C 28

C 29

Table VII.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hongkong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1912.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

$

*

C.

$

C.

C.

To Balance,

7,286

By Wages and Salaries :-

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

2,010

Contributions,

25,690

""

men, Detectives,.

1,503

......

1,128

""

Donation from Mr. Fung Wa-chün

1st Class District Watchmen,

1,685

on account of

S.S. 2 of Section

2nd 3rd

94

"

11,291

""

??

180

A of I.L. 680,.....

34

"

100

Allowance to Chief District

Watchmen and Detectives,

1,019

Grant by Government,..

2,000

Medal Allowances,

264

Instructors' Allowances,

96

19,176 95

,, Payment for Special Services,

604

By Miscellaneous :--

Messenger,

60

» Interest,..

217

Cooks,..

432

Coolies,

384

876

00

Fines,

35

""

By Office Staff:-

Manager,

308

Refund by Sanitary Department of travelling expenses for distrib- uting Rat Poison,

Writer,

120

Interpreter,

60

Collector,

300

1

788

183

00

,, Compensation for loss of 2 whistles

Total,...

20,840 95

by Ch'an Sik,

2

By Other Charges:-

Crown Rent,

16

Water Account,.

215

Uniforms and Equipment,

609

Stationery and Printing,...

144

Rewards,

30

Gratuities,

92

Oil,

360

Premium on Fire Policies,

452

Loss on Exchange,

1,713

Rent of Telephone,

416

Repairs,

198

Coolie and Conveyance Hire,...

301

Furniture,

11

Conservancy,

45

Photographs,

Cost of S.S. 2 of Section A of

I.L. 680,

100

Fee for Solicitors'

advice re

encroachment on I.L. 1634

and 1892,

17

Sundries,

295

5,023

85

By Pension:-

So Tai and Au Pún's widow,...

Total Expenditure,..

300

00

26,164 80

Balance,

9,775 90

Total,

.$ 35,940

70

Total,

..$

35,940 70

Disposal of Balance :---

On Fixed Deposit,

At Current Account,

Total,....

6,000.00

3,775.90

.$ 9,775.90

*

Cents omitted except in the totals.

Patients.

Table VIII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1912.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1911.

Treatment.

Chinese

European

Treatment.

Total.

Admitted.

Total Number of pa- tients under treatment.

Discharged.

Deaths.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1912.

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

European

Total.

Out-patients.

Male,

Female,

125 2,178 1,020 3,198 3,323 2,153 1,019

15157,256 4,557 61,813 | 1,381

34 536 386 922 956

463 440

53 36,139 4,381 40,520

Total for 1911,

Vaccination.

Dead bodies brought

for burial. to Hospital Mortuary

Destitutes sent home.

Total,.

159 2,714 1,406 | 3,120 | 4,279 2,616|1,459

204 93,395 8,938 102,333|1 381 1,550 2,870

929|2,870

621

248 2,696 1,201 |3,649|3,897 2,5271,211 159 97,648 12,142 109,790 8131,398 4,243

- C 30 -

C 31

Table IX.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wa Hospital for the Yam Tsz Year (1912).

Receipts.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

$

SA

Balance brought forward from San Hoi

Year, (1911).....

To rent of Hospital property,.

By Food for Staff,

6,779.11

12,191.84

>>

Salaries and Wages,.

15,891.75

""

Sick room expenses,..

6,460.08

37,575.65

"3

Patients' food and washing,

7,368.23

""

Chinese drugs,

14,071.96

To Subscriptions:-

99

European drugs,

2,399.72

""

Light,

3,345.81

1. Annual Subscriptions of Hongs,....

12,245.50

,, Wages

and food for Small-pox

Hospital Permanent Staff,

2,374.59

2. Subscriptions of various shops, .......

220.00

وو

Repairs,...

1,153.01

""

Repairs to Hospital property,

1,220.68

3.

collected on Steamers,

5,703.19

""

Insurance,

902.74

""

Crown Rent,

625.97

4.

and Donations,

5,807.54

""

Stationery, Telegrams, Stamps and

Advertisements,

1,450.59

5.

"}

for the supply of

Sundries,

1,851.57

medicines, coffins,

quilted clothing and

Passage money

to patients and

2,392.24

destitutes,

469.70

6. Subscriptions from wealthy persons,

3,000.00

Subscription to the Kwong Wa Hospital, the Fong Ping Hospital and the London Hospital,

3,200.00

7.

"

by Directors, Assistant

"

Extension of the Hospital,

2,544.05

Directors and Committee,

2,139.50

To Grant from Man Mo Temple,

,, Payments for medicine, sale of kitchen

refuse and rent of Mortuary,

31,507.97

2,500,00

72,109.56

"1

Burial of bodies from Government

mortuary (Victoria),

2,623.43

19

Coffins for bodies from Government

:

6,459.38

mortuary (Victoria),

4,882.53

""

Burial of bodies from Government

>>

Interest,

33

Government Grant,

:

267.27

mortuary (Kowloon),

849.60

"

Coffins for bodies from Government

8,000.00

mortuary (Kowloon),

1,458.05

9,813.61

Balance of Fund for erection of Small-

39

pox Hospital at Sai Wan,

Total Ordinary Receipts,......

Extraordinary Receipts.

By Contribution from the Ko Shing, Chung Hing and Kau U Fong Theatres,

Grand Total,..........

556.65

99,058.76

2,473.29

$10,532.05

Total,

" Balance,.........

Grand Total,..

:

:

81,923.17

19,608.88

$101,532.05

C 32

Table X.

Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the Tung Wa Hospital at the close of the Yam Tsz Year (1912).

Liabilities.

Amount.

Assets.

Amount.

$

EA

To Loan from Relief Fund,.

8,440.60

By Bank Balance at close of

With Sui Tin Bank,....

year:

29

13

Cheap Sale of Rice Fund, Man Mo Temple Fund, San Francisco Relief Fund,

29,681.33

Tin Fuk Bank,

99

5,860.49

>>

the Manager,

10,000.00 9,500.00 108.88

5,470.18

19,608.88

""

To Further Loan from Man Mo Temple

Fund,..

6,000.00

To Further Loan from Cheap Sale of Rice

By House Property (original value) :— 2 houses in Bonham Strand and

Jervois Street,

10,400.00

Fund,......

38,887.02

To Loan from Hospital Extension Fund,. 15,226.69

109,566.32

1 house in Wing Lok Street (includ- ing cost of additions to building),. 10 houses in Aberdeen Street and Tung Wa Lane (including cost of additions to building),

8,108.28

14,900.00

Balance of Assets over Liabilities,

86,896.84

2 houses in Connaught Road and

Des Voeux Road,

17,386.00

7 houses in Queen's Road West

(including cost of additions to building),

30,363.00

2 houses in Bonham Strand West,

26.000.00

3 houses in Bonham Strand,

15,000,00

10 houses in Po Yan Street and New Street (at present used as Plague Hospital),

54,697.00

176,854.28

$196,463.16

Total,.....

$196,463.16

Total,...

Subscriptions not yet paid

From Hongs, From Individuals,

.$2,900.00 1,950.00

$4,850.00

Table XI.

Emergency Fund: Yam Tsz Year (1912).

Receipts.

Amount.

Payments.

Balance from San Hoi Year,

$55,845.30 Gift to boatman Kwok Tsau Kam,

Interest,

1,948.89

Balance,

Total,

57,794.19

Wing Hing Bank, Wing Shang Bank, Shiu Cheung Bank, Hung Tak Bank, Sui Kat Bank, Shanghai Bank,

Disposal of Balance.

Total,

Total,

...

$10,000.00

10,000.00

10,000.00

10,000.00

6,000.00

11,494.19

$ 57,494.19

$

Amount.

300.00

57,494.19

57,794.19

C 33

Table XII.

Receipts.

Man Mo Temple Fund: Yam Tsz Year (1912).

Amount.

Payments.

$

$

Amount.

$35

Balance from San Hoi Year,

Temple Keeper,

Rent of Temple property,

Refund of Crown Rent,.......

13,461.57 Tung Wa Hospital,

2,844.00 Free Schools and Sundries,.

2,500.00

6,963.42

4,702.20

9,463.42

19.60

Subscription from Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati, in aid of the free school,......... Police rates for the free school,

300.00

Balance at close of the year With Ü Tak Bank,

10,000.00

27.62

""

Kwong Hang Bank,...

2,391.87

Interest,

500.30

12,391.87

Total,

$ 21,855.29

Total,..

$ 21,855.29

€ 34

Table XIII.

Kwong Chau and Shiu Hing Relief Fund : Yam Tsz Year (1912).

Receipts.

Amount.

$

Balance from San Hoi Year,

4,367.27

Total,

$

4,367.27

Payments.

By subscription for relief of distress at East River, West River and the North River,... Stamps for Hospital Reports,....

Total,

$

Amount.

4,288.79

78.48

4,367.27

35

Receipts.

Table XIV.

Small-pox Hospital Fund for the Yam Tsz Year (1912).

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

To Balance from San Hoi Year,

3,079.06 By Construction of Small-pox Hospital

at Yaumati,..

1,319.25

79

Wages to Chan Lung for Construction

of Quarters for Destitutes,

500.00

Fees to Architect for alteration of

""

house No. 91, at Jervois Street,

703.16

"}

Tang Wa Hospital,

556.65

Total,..

3,079.06

Total,..

3,079.06

C 36 -

Male,

Female,

Patients.

Table XV.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wa Hospital during the year 1912.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1911.

Chinese Treatment.

European Treatment.

Total.

Admitted.

Total Number of pa- tients under treatment.

Discharged.

Deaths.

on 31st December, 1912.

Remaining in Hospital

Chinese

Treatment.

European Treatment.

Out-patients.

333

ลง

Total,..

46

702

82

Total.

463 346

809

832

465

322

45

397

3,436

46

239 177

416 439

206

214

19

418

2,926 17

Total for 1911,

101

68

169

65

58

nt

523

1,225 1,271 671

536

64

815

63

46

1,56,6

140

13

Vaccination.

Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

:

:

:

C 37

C 38

Table XVI.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Kwong Wa Hospital from 18th February, 1911,

to 5th February, 1912, (Yam Tsz Year).

Receipts.

Amount.

C.

Payments.

Amount.

$

C.

To Balance from San Hoi Year,

Government Grant,

22

""

Contribution by Tung Wa Hospital,

(1) 996.33 8,500.00 2,000.00

By Food for staff,.

2,760.73

"

Salaries and wages,

8,476.66

Sundries,......

1,005.68

""

Contribution by Mr. Fung Ping Shan to'

""

Sick room expenses,

1,084.03

the Dispensary,

2,000.00

Patients' food and washing,

2,775.39

""

Contribution by charitable persons,

5,357.29

""

Chinese drugs...

1,542.10

Contribution by Theatres,

2,266.67

""

European drugs,.

1,498.73

Interest from Shanghai Bank,

80.00

""

Extension of Hospital,

9,662.89

""

"

Balance of subscription by charitable

""

Repairs,

648.30

persons from San Hoi Year,

12,872.22

""

Furniture,

305.21

Fee from Private Patients,

224.24

Utensils,

111.09

""

""

Premium on notes,

525.26

""

Crown rent,

1.00

وو

""

Payments for medicine, and sale of

22

Light,

750.60

kitchen refuse,

567.13

22

Stationery, Stamps and Advertise-

ments,

428.54

Coffins,

622.41

29

>>

Burial expenses,.

362.57

Coffins for bodies from Government

Mortuary (Kowloon),

626.86

Burial of bodies from Government

Mortuary (Kowloon),..

348.14

Erection (Extension) of the Yaumati

Small-pox Hospital,

25.00

""

Expenses for Small-pox Hospital,

Yaumati,

1,316.56

Total,.... Balance,

34,352.50 1,036.63

Grand Total,....................

Cash with the Manager,

Subscriptions not surrendered,.

(1) Cash omitted.

$35,389.14

Grand Total,...................

$ 35,389.14

$1,036.63

150.00

C 39

Table XVII.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan and Kowloon Peninsula.

Description.

Grand Grand

Total. Total Total

1912.

1911.

New Cases,....

Return Cases,

Total,

47,719 27,612

75,331

68,566

Certificate of nature of disease issued,

Certificate of cause of death,

Patients removed to hospital by ambulance,

Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,

Attendance at cleansing of infected premises,..

Compensation, claims sent in,

Applications received for coffins,

11

13

401

454

523

400

1,460

1,061

1,213

272

384

28

717

404

Applications for midwives,

117

172

Infants brought to office, (alive),

240

""

39

(dead),

1,429

Total,

1,669

1,711

Vaccination at house,.

1,200

Vaccination at office,

8,536

Total,

9,736

4,635

C 40

600

To Balance,

Receipts.

Table XVIII.

Chinese Public Dispensaries: Statement of Accounts 1912.

Government Grant to the East and

West Plague Hospitals,.

Donation from Tai Ping Theatre,

Victoria,.

Donation from San Theatre, Victoria,

""

""

Ko Shing and Chung Hing Theatres, Victoria,...

Donation by Committee of Confucius Society and Street Committee of West Point from the proceeds of theatrical performances,

$

SA

*

Expenditure.

Maintenance of Dispensaries, Victoria, 23,807

9,405

86

1,600 00

Subvention to Kowloon City Dis-

258

pensary,

4,200

1,028

316

Maintenance of Harbour Dispensary, 2,656

Shaukiwan

Balance of Cost of building of Coolie Quarters, Central Dispensary,.

ि

*

c.

*

6,145 07

2,878

29,600 | 88

200

Annual Subscriptions, Land,

14,298

Subscriptions, Shaukiwan,

>>

Harbour

from Committee of Dispensaries,

7,850

1,221

29,800 88

Balance :-

747

24,117 71

At Current Account,

18,013

Donation from Messrs. Cheung Pat- shi, Cheung Iu-bin and In Tak-shing towards the building of Shamshuipo Dispensary,

In hand,

132

6,000

Advance to Dispensary Clerks,..

60

Annual subscriptions to Wanchai

143

Plague Hospital,

|18,205| 92

Balance of subscriptions towards the

building of Wanchai Plague

323

Hospital,

Interest,

271

$48,006 80

$148,006 80

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

- O 41

Table XIX.

Kowloon Peninsula Dispensaries.

Statement of Accounts.

Hung-

Yau-

Kowloon

Description.

hom.

mati.

City.

C.

Receipts :-

To Balance,

196

555

77

Subscriptions, &c.,

2,314

4,473

Government Grant,

300

1,831 100

Overdrawn,

...$173.04

Deduct deposit in R.G.O. 216.27

256

Net amount,

$256.77

Donation from Shamshuipo Temple,

Grant from Dispensaries in Victoria.,

Expenditure—

Total,......

45.5

258

3,067.61 | 5,029.28 2,722.55

Through Registrar General's Office, 1,590 1,206 1,608 By Committee......................

1,477 3,307

1,097

Total,.............

3,067.61 4,513.512,705.27

Balance:

At Registrar General's Office, With Committee,·

none

500

none

15

none. 17

Total,.....

none

515.77

17.28

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

Ι

Number of deaths.

2

3

Table XX.

Deaths of Chinese in Hongkong and Kowloon during 1912 showing number in which the cause of death was duly certified and number in which a post-mortem examination was held.

Number certified.

Number uncertified.

4

Percentage of 3 to 2

CO

Victoria,

6,255

3,077

3,178

49

93

Harbour,

855

19

836

2

10

82

1.5

2,395

38

1.2

286

33

Kowloon,........

1,978.

726

1,252

37

5

0.2

1,207

61

Shaukiwan,

203

199

2

0:0

54

27

Other villages in Hongkong,

84

78

7

9.5

12

14

Total,

9,375

3,832

5,543

41

116

1.2

3,954

42

Number examined after death and not sent to mortuary.

Percentage of 6 to 2

Number sent to mortuary.

Percentage of

8 to 2.

C 42 -

9

Table XXI.

Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Registrar General to have been abandoned during the year 1912.

Victoria Districts.

Month.

Victoria.

Total.

Harbour, Kowloon.]

West.

Central. East.

Hongkong outside Victoria.

New Territories.

Total.

Grand

Total.

January,

7

20

14

41

10

11

6

27

68

February,

21

27

16

64

14

23

14

51

115

March,

18

26

16

60

16

10

5

31

91

April,

28

18

6

52

19

22

7

48

100

May,

15

25

11

51

25

17

11

53

104

June,

15

12

17

44

15

14

8

37

81

July,

13

5

22

17

3

28

50

August,

8

5

9

17

September,

11

21

32

October,

11

15

26

November,

10

9

13

25

35

December,

4

13

8

14

1

28

41

Grand Total,..

139

148

100

387

149

153

70

1

373

760

Total for 1911,

80

62

24

166

50

47

49

149

315

Of 760, 224 were taken to the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

--C 43 -

C 44

Table XXII.

Return of Bodies Abaudoned for the years 1910, 1911 and 1912.

(Figures supplied by the Police Department.)

Male.

1910.

Female.

Unknown.

Over

15 years.

15 years & under.

Over

15 years.

15 years & under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

& under.

Victoria,

Kowloon,

19

Harbour,

12

Elsewhere,

18

~42*

40 13

34

18

Total,....... 52 105

42

2 16 30

15

14

7

102

1911.

Victoria,

9 76

Kowloon,.

13

15

Harbour, Elsewhere,

11

12

22

6352

15

Total,...... 45 128

:

2

79

18

2

19

18

:

:

::

4 134

Total.

85

49

2

83

51

:

2

268

166

47

3

50

52

:

1912.

Victoria,

48

Kowloon,..

22

Harbour,

Elsewhere,

*227

76

64

18

25

34

12

61-49

*822

62

76

30

42

...

Total,

95 199

29 210

315

2

194

171

77

95

::

4

537

To Balance,

وو

Rent Stalls,

Table XXIII.

Chinese Recreation Ground: Receipts and Expenditure, 1912.

Receipts.

Total,.

Payments.

$

C.

559 (1)

6,916 (1)| By Wages of Watchmen, &c.,

1,346

"3

Cost of building 8 sheds,

263

Miscellaneous,

332

""

Balance,

7,108

""

8,263.42

Total,....

$ 8,263.42

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 45

Receipts.

To Balance at Current Account,

Cash,

""

"

""

Passage Money received,

Less refunds,

""

Interest on Current Account, Miscellaneous,.

Table XXIV.

Statement of Amounts of Passage Money Fund.

Total,...

Payments.

$ (1)

36

72

...

50

50

20

19

$ (1)

$ 628

166

794

$1,547

}}

521

""

1,026

26

>>

Small gifts to distressed persons,...

""

2

By Gifts to 15 women on being married, Annual Charitable Allowance to two persons, Subscription to Eyre Diocesan Refuge,.

""

to Alice Memorial Hospital,. Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,

Reward to Wong Sze for picking an ill child on

the foreshore,

35

Petty Expenses,

Balance :-

""

Current Account, Cash,

$1,504

84

.$ 1,850.00

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Total,.....

~~

1,589

1,850.00

C 46

Table XXV.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity, 1911 and 1912.

Revenue.

$

C.

Expenditure.

6.

Balance of subscriptions (1911 and 1912),

Interest on Mortgages (1912),.

Interest on Current Account, (Chartered Bank),. Advance from Tung Wa Hospital,

40,009.12 By Charity given to widows,

433.50

2,370.04

""

186.95

"3

Advertisement in Wa Tsz Yat Po, Photographs taken by Wa Fong,

5.40

1.20

102.15

""

Stamps for receipts,

2.25

""

Monthly receipts.

1.50

Balance,

42,225.21

"}

Total,

......$42,669.06

Total,.

42,669.06

O 47

Table XXVI.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 1 of 1889 and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

Discharged.

Convicted.

No. of

Cases.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

Bills,-Posting without permission,

Fireworks, Discharging without permits,

Drums and Gongs,-Night noises by beating, .....

Householder Registration,-Failing to register,

Processions,-Organising in the public streets without permit,..

Ordinance No. 1 of 1889.

4

29

48

3

1

2

2

1

: : : :

2

2

...

...

Decoying men or boys into or away from the Colony, Keeping unlicensed Emigration Houses,

4

5

...

...

Neglecting to enter names of boarders on register,

9

6

4

...

Personating Emigrants,.....

3

3

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Abduction of girls under the age of 18 years (Sec. 26), Decoying women and girls into or away from the Colony, Detaining, harbouring or receiving women or girls, Procuration of girls under age to have carnal connection, Knowingly deriving profits from prostitution, letting women

9

1

10

1

29

5

0100 00

7

out for hire, trading in them,

6

2

3 *

5

2

14

16

3

3

3

2

2

* 1 female committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

C 48-

C 49

Annexe A.

}

Report of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1912.

The following 12 gentlemen were elected in March to act as Managing Committee for the Year 1912-

Pun Wai Sun. Kwok Sut Ting.

Au Chak Man. Chan Kai Ming. Lai Chau Tan. Lo Chung Kui.

Li Po Kwai. Cheung San Wu. Hau Shau Nam. Lo Kit Ping.

Li Yau Chun.

Li Chuk Yu

No Meetings of the Permanent Board of Direction and the Committee sitting together at this office were held during the year.

The number of inmates in the Po Leung Kuk on January 1st was 72, and 581 persons in all were admitted during the year. The circumstances of their admission and the action taken regarding them are detailed in Table A.

332 women and girls were admitted with their own consent : 17 were lost children, 5 were accompanied by parent or guardian, and 17 were runaway maidservants.

On leaving the Po Leung Kuk 179 women and girls were placed in the charge of their husband, parents or other relatives, 51 were sent to Charitable Institutions in China, 27 were adopted, 16 married, while 14 were sent to the French Consulate to be sent to their homes in Indo-China. The number released under bond was 43. The Italian Couvent, Eyre Diocesan Refuge and Victoria Home again took in many suitable cases, 36 women and children being sent to these institutions. The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on the 31st December was 64.

The income and expenditure during the year and the assets and liabilities of the Society are set out in Tables B and C attached. The accounts of the Managing Committee have again been audited by Messrs. Li Yau Tsun and Chiu Chau Sam.

The balance to the credit of the Society on the 31st December was $17,672 as compared with $18.176 at the beginning of the

year.

The total expenditure thus exceeded the income by some 500, and amounted to $9,800 as compared with $10,890 in 1911. The subscriptions amounted to 8,254 an increase of $120 over the 1911 figures.

سکے

C 50

The Kuk was visited monthly by the Visiting Justices, Messrs. Brotherton Harker and Chau Siu-ki, who in no case found occasion for adverse comment. The average number of inmate monthly was 75.

The Matron reports that the inmates have conducted them- selves well: their progress in knitting, reading, etc., during the year was very good: and that quite 75% of them are very diligent at their work.

Dr. Perkins of the London Mission continued to act as honorary medical adviser to the Kuk. Her report on the health of the inmates during the year shows a cleaner bill of health than in 1911. There was no epidemic of infectious disease, and though 2 cases of Small-pox occurred, the contagion did not spread further. There was one case of sudden death from acute abdominal trouble- this happened in the night before medical aid could be summoned.

All the members of the staff have given satisfaction.

31st March, 1913.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Registrar General,

President.

ΚΑΙ Η ΚΑΙ,

Vice-President.

Table A.

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1912 and the

arrangements made regarding them.

January, 1912, In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st

72 35

9

6

:

9

2

72 30

N

ہم

8

r

12

6

ลง

72

Total.

Committed under Warrant from Registrar General's Office. Committed under Warrant from Emigration Office.

Pending the opening of the Registrar General's Office. Sent with their own consent by Registrar General. Sent with their own consent from Singapore, Manila and Swatow. Sent with their own consent by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

Total.

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of

husband,

Placed in charge of parents and relatives

Sent to Charitable Institution in China.

Sent to School, Convent or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Sent to French Consul to be sent home.

Dead.

Cases under consideration,

Total.

Admitted during the year, ... 581143 40 37 211

Total,

Kuk on the 31st Decem-

Remaining in the Po Leung

ber 1912,

21

KG

17

633

653178] 49

43 224 21

96 19

64 15

*

17

581187 +1

9 [161

5 18 653 217 43

161 51 31 15 10 12 3 61 581

10 169 54 36 27 16 14 3 64 653

10

5

24

4 | 14

2

61

- C 51

Table B.

Po LEUNG Kuk.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1912.

RECEIPTS.

EXPENDITURE.

C.

C.

Balance from previous year :-

On Fixed Deposit,

15,000.00

By the Elected Committee (see Table C),

9,800.00

At Current Account,

3,176.47

18,176.47 Balance :—

On Fixed Deposit,

15,000.00

Subscriptions:-

At Current Account.

2,672.30

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,

570.00

17,672.30

Elected Committee,

349.00

Guilds,

4,263.82

Man Mo Temple,............

1,487.90

Theatres,

1,583.33

8,254.05

Interest:-

On Deposit,

928.80

On Current Account,

112.98

1,041.78

Total,..

27,472,30

Total,

27,472.30

C 52

-

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from the 1st January to the 31st December, 1912.

EXPENDITURE.

RECEIPTS.

Balance from previous year,.

110.83

Received from Permanent Board,.

9,800.00

Decorations,

Food,............

Miscellaneous Receipts,

35.08

Light and Fire,

Premium on bank notes,

334.76

Miscellaneous,

Passage Money,

Petty Expenditure,.

Printing,

Repairs,

Total,

10,280.67

Stationery,

Telephone,

Wages,

Balance,

Total,..

45.50

4,257.56

*

C 53

1,398.11

394.81

64.25

667.94

128.66

147.87

129.73

101.89

2,859.90

10,196.22

84.45

10,280.67

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER

FOR THE YEAR 1912.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

1.--Shipping.

2.-Trade.

3.--Revenue and Expenditure. 4. Steam-launches.

REPORT.

9.

10.

5.-Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping. 7.- Marine Magistrate's Court. 8.--Marine Court.

Masters,

Examination of

Mates and Engineers. Examination of Pilots.

11. Sunday Cargo Working. 12.-New Territories. 13. Lighthouses. 14.-Commercial

Intelligence,

Board of Trade.

TABLES.

I-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered. II.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared. III.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered

at each Port.

IV.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared at

each Port.

V.---Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI.-Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VII.-Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII.-Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

X.-Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XI.-Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII.-Statement of Revenue.

XIV.--Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary).

XV.-Return of Emigration.

XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

D 2

XVII.-Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary).

XVIII.-Return of Immigration.

XIX. -Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

XX.-Vessels registered.

XXI.-Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII.-Comparison in Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign

Trade entered and cleared since 1903.

XXIII.-Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. XXIV.-Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

ANNEXES.

A.-Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B.--Report on Imports and Exports Office. C.-Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D.--Report on Gunpowder Depôt.

1.-Shipping.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1912 amounted to 488,649 vessels of 36,735,149 tons, which, compared with figures for 1911, shows a decrease of 54,546 vessels, with an increase of 555,997 tons.

Of the above, 46,603 vessels of 24,269,270 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, as against 44,978 of 23,063,108 tons in 1911, and were distributed as follows:-

1911. Numbers.

1912. Numbers.

1911. Tonnage.

1912. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going ships,

10.5 %

8.4 %

35.0 %

32.4 %

Foreign Ocean-

going ships,

10.6

9.2

35:0

35.3

British River

Steamers,

16:0

15:0

17.3

17.3

Foreign River

Steamers,

3.3

3.8

3:0

3.5

Steam-launches

(under

60

tons),

7.7

8.6

0.6

0.6

Trading Junks,

51.9

55.0

9.1

10.9

100·0

100'0

100'0

100.0

D 3

The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the above figures.

2. Of ships of European construction, 4,154 Ocean Steamers, 1 Sailing Ship, 4,351 River Steamers, and 1,976 Steama-launches (not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 287 ships, as compared with 269 in 1911, and 26-7 in 1910.

3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean Vessels entering the port has increased from 2,495'1 tons to 2,575.7 tons. That of British ships has increased from 2,633.5 tons to 2,713'4 tons, while that of Foreign ships has increased from 2,365'7 tons to 2,457 tons.

During the past 20 years, the average tonnage of Ocean Vessels has increased from 1,155 9 tons to 1,969-2 tons.

The average tonnage of River Steamers entered during the rear has increased from 5849 tons to 585'1 tons. That of British River Steamers has increased from 599 tons to 6025 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers has decreased from 518 tons to 5151 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1911 and 1912 is given in the following table:-

1911.

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British

Ocean-ì

going

Foreign Ocean-

going,

3,907, 7,589,995 3,956

4,180 7,917,640 4,367|| 8,592,320

7,779,970 49 189,975

187

674,680

British River

Steamers...

6,871

4,116,736 | 6,968 | 4,197,744

97

81,008

Foreign River

Steamers.....

1,423

736,057 1,738

894,319

315

158,292

A

Steamship s

un-

der C0 tons 3,263

130,092 3,981 150,612 718

20.520

...

:

(Foreign

Trade)....

Junks, Foreign t

Trade,

25,331

2,572,588 25,593| 2,654,275

259

81,687

Total Foreign (

Trade,

44,978 23,063,108,46,603 || 24,269,270 | 1,625 | 1,206,162

:

Steam-launches

plying in Wa- 461,084 10,981,990 411,990 10,609,401

ters of Colony,

:

:

:

49,99€

372,586

Junks,

Local I

Trade,

*36,608 *2,134,054 † 30,056 †1,856,475

Grand Total,

-

6,552 277,579

543,570| 36,179,152 488,649 | 36,735,149 1,625 I 206,162 66,546 650,165

Net............

555,997 54,921

* Including 13,980 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 818,292 tons.

9,922

11

of 621,090

D 4

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean Shipping of 49 ships of 189,975 tons, or of 1·25 per cent. in numbers and of 2·49 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to improved trade, high freights, and a greater demand for tonnage. The advent of British India Steamship Company's vessels to the Colony is also a factor.

British River Steamers have increased by 97 ships of 81,003 tons or 141 per cent. in numbers and 197 per cent. in toanage. This is explained by the increased number of trips made by the Steamships Wing On and Wing Hon. The former having made 320 more trips than she did in 1911, and the latter 212. River Steamers generally have run more frequently.

Foreign Ocean Vessels show an increase of 187 ships of 674,680 tons or 447 per cent. in numbers and 85 per cent. in ton- nage. This result is due to increases in Japanese, Austrian, Chinese, Portuguese, and Russian steamers. Against this there are consider- able decreases in German, Norwegian, Danish, French and Dutch Steamers.

Foreign River Steamers.-Here is an increase of 315 ships of 158,292 tons, or 2:21 per cent. in numbers and 215 per cent. in tonnage. This is accounted for by the greater number of trips made during the year by French and Chinese Steamers.

In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade, an increase of 718 ships of 20,520 tons, or 22 per cent. in numbers and 157 per cent. in tonnage, is shown. This appears to be due to the greater number of launches running with passengers and cargo to places in Chinese territory more especially to the Eastward. Some of the launches on this run were heretofore employed in towing lighters, etc., in the harbour, but are no longer able to obtain such employment.

In Junks in Foreign Trade, an increase is reported of 259 vessels of 81,687 tons, or 1 per cent. in numbers and 32 per cent. in tonuage. This is accounted for by the increased control over these vessels, effected by the new system of licencing inaugurated early in 1912, having resulted in more accurate reports of their movements.

In Local Trade, large reductions are reported.

Steam-launches in Local Trade show a decrease of 49,991 ships of 372,586 tons, or 108 per cent. in numbers and 34 per cent. in tonnage. This is explained by the fact that almost all towing in the harbour, which formerly was done by small licensed launches, hired for the purposo by the European and Japanese firms concerned, is now done by the unlicensed private launches belonging to those firms.

Junks in Local Trade show a falling off of 6,552 vessels of 277,579 tons, or 181 per cent. in numbers and 13 per cent. in tonnage. For this large decrease it is difficult to account, but more than half of it is certainly due to the Sanitary Department

D 5

employing steam barges for a large part of the scavenging work. The remainder of the decrease is probably due to the new system of licencing not having been properly understood by the boat population for some time after its inception, with the result that full figures were not at first forthcoming.

It is interesting to note that the entries of Ocean Steamers during the last quarter of the year show an excess, over the average of the three previous quarters, of 122 ships of 175,332 tons. This is accounted for by the unprecedented demand for tonnage, during the closing months of the year, and consequent rise in freights.

6. The actual number of Ocean Vessels of European construc- tion entering during 1912 was 724, of which 336 were British and 388 were Foreign. In 1911 there were 720: 348 British and 372 Foreign.

These 724 ships measured 1,862,287 tons. They entered 4,155 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 8,186,136 tons. Thus, compared with 1911, 4 more ships, with a tonnage greater by 65,789 tons, entered 106 more times, and gave a collective tonnage greater by 430,103 tons.

Thus :-

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1911. 1912. 1911.

1912.

1911.

1912.

Steamers 344

335

1,952 1,977 3,781,6223,892,354

British

Sailing...

4

1

6

1 16,534

2,890

German,

111

98

657

637 1,133,786 1,129,054

Japanese,..

106

123 509

592 1,354,3621,572,194

Norwegian,

36

26 210

168

221,039 173,145

Austrian,.

6

10

24

46

96,380 153,624

Chinese,

20

30

192

236

241,362 275,310

Danish,

8

6

20

11

45,928 28,927

Dutch,

16

18

130

112

235,881 246,352

French,

27

26

152

142

242,469 229,532

Italian,.

Portuguese,

24

2

4

12

13

31,188 31,403

5

79

101

32,842

49,494

Russian,

11

18 20

35

53,080

103,998

Swedish,

6

6

14

14

25.778

37,262

Ste mers

18

18

71

70

243,619 260,597

U.S.A....

Sailing...

1

1

163

Total,

720

7244,049 4,155 7,756,033,8,186,136

D 6-

7. The 336 British ships carried 3,330 British Officers and 10 Foreign Officers, the latter consisting of 4 U.S.A., 3 Dutch, 1 Dane, 1 Norwegian and 1 German.

Thus, the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British ships was 0.30%, comprising 5 nationalities, a decrease of 0.05%, with a decrease in number of officers and of ships.

8. The 388 Foreign ships carried 2,720 officers, of whom 96 were British, as follows:--

1912.

1911.

In Chinese Ships

79

70

French

2

4

>>

>>

Japanese

9

12

United States Ships

4

"

96

90

Thus, 35% of the officers serving in Foreign ships were of British nationality, with an increase in number of officers and of ships.

9. The Nationality of the Crews in British and in Foreign ships was as follows:-

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREWS.

U. S. A. AND EUROPEANS

ASIATICS.

1911. 1912. 1911. 1912. 1911. 1912. 1911. 1912.

British, 348

Foreign,. 372

336 22,652 22,829 431 257 119,463 126,314

388 1,195 1,561 27,181 29,229112,584 120,280

Total,

720 724 23,847 24,390 |27,612 | 29,486 232,047 246,594

Hence in British ships :

And in Foreign ships: -

1911.

1912.

1911.

1912.

15.89 %

15.29% of the crews were British.

0·85 %

1.03% of the crews were British.

0·30 %

83.81 %

0.18% of the crews were other Europeans.

84.53% of the crews

were Asiatics.

19:28 % 19:35 % of the crews

were other Europeans.

79.87 % 79'62 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

D 7

2.-Trade.

In the absence of a Customs Department, the details of the Trade of the Colony which I am able to give are meagre, and of little value, being derived from reports of ship masters, which are given in round numbers, and the several items of cargo are only too frequently returned under the heading "general". In a few cases, however, as opium and sugar, exact figures can be obtained ; while in certain other items, from their nature, or for other reasons, approximately accurate returns are rendered. I therefore confine myself, in the following remarks, to these few articles of trade.

Imports.-Under this heading, which includes all cargo brought by Ocean Vessels or River Steamers (not in Junks or Steam- launches) and landed or transhipped in the Colony, 4,151,805 tons of cargo were reported during the year. This, compared with that reported during 1911 (3,995,793 tons), shows an increase of 156,012 tons, or 39 per cent.

Of this total, there appear increases in the import of coal, cotton, flour, sugar, and timber, while decreases are reported in kerosene oil, opium, and rice.

Coal.-An increase of 10,212 tons or 1 per cent. is here reported, 1,056,502 tons having been imported during the year. It is probably due to transhipments of coal to Canton, where there is an increasing demand for it.

Of the above total quantity, 73 per cent. was Japanese, Hongay and Fushun coming next with about 8 per cent. each, other descrip- tions of coal being imported in but small quantities. None arrived from either Australia or Labuan, and but one cargo from England, except that imported by the Admiralty, from Cardiff.

Cotton, including cotton yarn and cotton piece goods.-Here appears an increase of 20,552 tons or 514 per cent., which seems to be a genuine increase, and not due solely to a larger proportion of the imports being reported as cotton instead of general cargo. The reason for this phenomenal increase is not far to seek The trade in China, after a total cessation during the last 3 months of 1911 and the first 3 months of 1912, on account of the Revolution in that country, recommenced, and gradually assumed large pro- portions. These soon still further increased, partly owing to the assumption, by a large percentage of the population, of European dress, which opened up a new trade (now rapidly declining), and partly to the disappearance of the old stocks in the hands of the native merchants, and the necessity for their replenishment. The high rate of exchange was also a factor in increasing the trade although the unprecedented demand caused enhanced prices in spite of it. It is of interest to note that this large increase in imports does not include the large and increasing quantity of native grown cotton spun in the Colony, and re-exported as yarn.

Flour.-Here an increase of 16,620 tons, or 20 per cent, was reported. This is explained by the prices being moderate on account of the high rate of exchange. The wheat crop in North

D 8

China, also, has been poor for the past two seasons, thereby creating a demand for foreign flour, while the Chinese are quickly learning new uses for this commodity, which in many parts is taking the place of rice. Among these is a very fine description of Vermicelli, now manufactured at Amoy and Chefoo, which is in great demand, and 20 per cent, of the flour imported at Amoy (through Hongkong) is used for this purpose; considerable quantities are consumed locally and large shipments are made to Hongkong, Canton, the Philippine Islands, Singapore, and other ports out of China. This increased use of flour is evident in the Colony, being noticeable even among the boat population of the Harbour, where I see cakes and "flapjacks" being cooked and eaten, instead of the formerly universal rice.

Kerosene Oil.-Very large reductions are reported in both bulk and case oil imported during the year-of 42 per cent. in the former and 32 per cent. in the latter. Several causes militated to this end. The large stocks in hand at the commencement of the Revolution in China; the virtual total cessation of trade until well on in the year 1912; and the high freight rates, which have increased by more than 100 per cent. in twelve months.

The trade is now restored to its usual proportions, if not still increasing. Out of 105,425 tons imported during 1912, 15,859 tons, or 15 per cent. arrived during the month of December, which seems to point to an increased demand in view of the high freight rates now prevailing.

Liquid Fuel shows an increase of 2,724 tons imported, or 15'4 per cent.

This is due to the greater number of vessels now using this form of fuel instead of coal.

Opium is dealt with in the report of the Superintendent of Imports and Exports, forming Annexe B to this report.

Rice. Here is reported a decrease of 21,072 tons, or 36 per cent. The rice crops in the two Kwang Provinces have been good, thus the demand for foreign rice has not been so great as usual. The Siamese, Annamese and Cochin China crops were very poor and prices high. Siamese rice used to sell here at $4.50 per picul. This year as much as $7.00 has been asked, and paid The increased and increasing use of flour among the native population, noticed in my remarks under that heading, no doubt affects the rice market to a certain extent. The import of Japanese rice has apparently entirely ceased.

Timber. An increase of 13,169 tons or 22 per cent. is here reported. Although I do not think this is all a genuine increase, it is certain that the timber trade has received a considerable impetus recently, by reason of the increased demand for foreign woods for the building and furniture trades in Canton and the interior. The principal descriptions of timber importd are teak and ebony from Siam, and hardwoods, such as billion and yacal from Borneo. The demand for European styles of furniture among the Chinese is responsible for large increases in the import of teak.

D 9

Ebony is used for the manufacture of the Canton "blackwood" now so popular among foreigners. Billion, a very hard, heavy wood, whiteant proof, is being increasingly used for beams, rafters, and joists, in the building trade. Billion is also used almost exclusively for the manufacture of those universal necessities of life in China-chopsticks. Yacal has become very popular for boat and ship building, being easily worked, free froin knots, very durable, and can be obtained to almost any size. It is used for the frames of the better class of boats, steam-launches, &c., built in the Colony, while the sheathing and planking is generally made of teak. Native boats and junks are usually built of native wood-China pine-the import of which is not included in these figures.

The number and tonnage of ships of European type of construc- tion carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1911, was as follows:-

1911.

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

16,697

4,042 | 7,739,336 | 4,154 | 8,183,246 112 443,910

River Steamers, 4,147 | 2,425,S68 | 4,351 | 2,545,882

201 120,014

Sailing Vessels,.)

1

2,890

6

13,807

Total,..... 8,196 | 10,181,901 | 8,506 |10,732,018| 316 | 563,924 | 6

Net Increase,...... 310 50,117

13,807

12. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction exporting cargo, and shipping bunker coal, follow :-

EXPORTS.

1911.

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Steamers, River Steamers,

Sailing Vessels,..

Total,

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. 4,029 7,732,115 4,167 8,183,264 4,147 | 2,426,925 |4,355 | 2,546,211 9 19,487 8,185 10,178,527 8,523 10,732,365

No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

138 451,419

208 119,286

1

2,890

8

16,597

346

570,435 8

16,597

1

Net Increase,

338

553,838

D 10

Exported 2,335,000 tons including River Trade as compared with 2,161,227 tons in 1911.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Steamers,

4,029

516,2324,167

550,858 138

34,626

River Steamers,..

1,147

65,075 | 4,355

72,166. 208

7,091

Total,..

8,176

581,307 8,522

623,024

346

41,717

:

Net Increase,

41,717

:

...

:.

D 11

J

13. The River Trade, compared with 1911, is shown in the

following Table :---

Year.

1911,..

1912,

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

337,207

308,773

2,343,414

363,776

319,565

3,435,235

14. The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony

for 1911 and 1912 :-

IMPORTS.

1912.

1911.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,

13,158

1,363,928

12,862

1,286,807

Local Trade,

14,891

934,032

18,798

1,068,211

Total,

28,049

2,297,960

31,660

2,355,018

EXPORTS.

1912.

1911.

Foreign Trade, 12,435

...

1,290,347

12,472

1,285,781

Local Trade, ........ 15,165

922,413

17,810

1,065,843

Total,

27,600

2,212,790

30,282

2,351,624

15. A summary of the Shipping and Trade of the Port for the year 1912. nearest 1,000 tons only

The trade return is given to the

D 12

TONS.

Passengers.

No. of

Ships.

Emi-

British Ocean-going,

3,956

Foreign Ocean-going,

British River Steamers, Foreign River Steamers,...!

145,000 132,000

Dis- In

charged. Transit.

1.472.000 1,155.000 2,472,000 4,367 2.033.000 1,006,000 2,105,000 6,968 219,000 188,000 1,738

grants.

Shipped.

Bunker Coal. Total.

Registered

Arrived. Departed.

Tonnage.

243,000 | 5,318,000

7,779,970

187,622

141,873

88,749

302,000 | 5,446,000

8,592,000

112,355

100,868

33,908

54,000

461,000

4,197,744

1,456,989

1,513,277

18,000

Total,..

17,029,869,000 2,481,000 | 4,577,000

295,000

623,000 11,550,000 | 21,464,383

894,349

270,524

194,445

...

2,027,490

1,950,463 | 122,657

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade, Junks, Foreign Trade,

Total Foreign Trade, Steam-launches, Local Trade,

3,981

25,593

2,000

468,000

6,000

732,000

6,000 14,000 150,612 1,200,000 2,654,275

22,759

28,306

31,734

30,678

::

46,603 | 4,339,000 3,219,000 | 4,577,000

629,000 12,764,000 | 24.269,270

2,081,983

2,009,447

411,990

2,000

1,000

27,000 30,000 10,609,404 3,613,712

3,649,856

Junks, Local Trade,..

Total, Local Trade,

Grand Total,

30,056

445,000

62,000

...

507,000 1,856,475

3,066

3,390

442,046

447,000

63,000

27,000

537,000 | 12,465,879

3,646,778

3,653,246

488,649 | 4,786,000 | 3,282,000 | 4,577,000

13,301, 656,000 13,301,000 | 36,735,149 5,728.761

5,662,693 | 122,657

D 13

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

16. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $549,275.40 as against $506,964.85 collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $42,310.55 or 8.3% :-

Light Dues..

Light Dues, Special Assessment, Licences and Internal Revenue, Fees of Court and Office,.... Miscellaneous Receipts,

- Total,

1911.

1912.

Incrcose. Decrease.

$ 82,578 09 $ 87,454.95 $ 4,876.86 $

92,802.14

137,368.56

194,023.86

98,448.45 163,923.47 199,146.33

5646,31

26,551,91

5,122,47

192.20

302.20

110.00

...$ 506,964.85 $549,275.40 $ 42,310.55 $

...

The principal increases are under Junk Licences, $16,595.76; Boat Licences, 6,763.60; Light Dues, $4,876.86; Light Dues, Special Assessment, $5,646.31; Storage of Gunpowder &c., $3,671.59; Sunday Cargo Working Permits, $3,250; Fines, $2,216; Engage- ment and Discharge of Seamen, $701.20; Emigration Brokers' Licences, $600; Examination of Masters, &c., $597.50; Register Fees, $592; Fishing Stake and Station Licences, $345.50; Rent for Private Moorings and Buoys, $180; Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, $180; Message Fees $110; Steam-launch Licences, &c., $84.25; and Sale of Printed Forms, $55.25.

There has been falling off in Revenue under the headings:-

Medical Examination of Emigrants, $2,049; Survey of Steam- ships, $1,690.07; Forfeitures, $235.20; Survey of Steam-launches, $180; Pilots' Licences, 25; and Engagement of Masters and En- gineers of Steam-launches, $6.

17. The expenditure of the Harbour Department (excluding the Imports and Exports Office) for 1912 was $149,043.58 as against $161,149.32 expended in 1911, showing a decreased expenditure of $12,105.74, which is partly due to the fact that the expenditure of 1911 included the sum of $7,386.47 paid for coal for Harbour Office steam-launches while in 1912 such expenditure, amounting to $6,544.98 (or $841.51 less than in 1911) was paid out of the Vote for Coal for Government Steam-launches under "Miscellaneous Services". Further, the above does not include the sum of $1,418.81 for balance due on account of installation of Matthews' Incandescent Oil Burners in Gap Rock, Waglan Island and Green Island Light- houses; $225 for a Buoy to mark a submerged rock in Cheung Sha Wan Bay; and $175 for 2 Duplex Test Gauges for the Marine Sur- veyor's Office; all these being "special expenditure" and non-

recurrent.

The Amount of Light Dues collected was as follows :-

Special Assessment.

No. of

Class of Vessels.

Tonnage.

Trips.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Total Fees

Collected.

D 14

Ocean Vessels,

3,732

8,163,183 | 1 cent.

81,631.83

1 cent.

81,631.83

..

163,263,66

Steam Launches,

1,911

86,820 I

868.20 1

868.20

1,736.40

""

"?

River Steamers (Night Boats),

2,825

1,486,347

4,954.92

7,432,38

12,387.30

River Steamers (Day Boats),

1,506 1,021,923

Nil.

Lako

"

8,516.04

8,516.04

Total,..

9,974

10,758,273

$87,454.95

$98,448.45

$185,903.40

^

4.

- D 15

Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, there were 304 Steam-launches (in- cluding Motor Boats) employed in the Harbour. Of these, 135 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, etc., 127 were privately owned, 20 were the property of the Government and 22 belonged to the Imperial Government, comprising 4 Military and 18 Naval.

Four Masters' Certificates were suspended for incompetency or negligence in the performance of their duties; 2 were suspended for 2 months one of whom was required to satisfy the Harbour Master as to his knowledge in the rules of the road before his certi- ficate was returned; 1 was suspended for one inonth and was required to pass a further examination before his certificate was returned; and 1 was suspended for a fortnight and was required to satisfy the Harbour Master as to his knowledge in the rules of the road before his certificate was returned.

Five hundred and three (503) engagements and four hundred and ninety-two (492) discharges of masters and engineers were made during the year.

Eight (8) Steam-launches were permitted to carry arms for their protection against pirates.

5.-Emigration and Immigration.

19. One hundred and twenty-two thousand six hundred and fifty-seven (122,657) Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1912 (135,565 in 1911).

Of these, 88,749 were carried in British Ships, and 33,908 in Foreign Ships.

These figures show a decrease under 1911 of 12.890 (or 9.5%), due undoubtedly to the fact that most of the poorer classes instead of emigrating to foreign countries joined the Revolutionaries in China during the latter part of the year.

One hundred and sixty-three thousand two hundred and forty- eight (163,248) returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had been emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 149,994 in 1911. Of these 125,499 arrived in British ships, and 37,749 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, etc., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 18 ships were registered under the pro- visions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 8 Certificates of Registry were cancelled. 105 Documents, etc., were dealt with in connection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $1,438 as compared with $846 in 1911.

D 16

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. Four hundred and eighty-seven cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court (235 in 1911). Breach of the Harbour Re- gulations, Disobeying the Lawful Orders of the Harbour Master, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Failing to observe the Rules of the Road, and carrying passengers in excess were the principal offences.

8.-Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899.)

22. During the year there were two courts held :-

(1.) On the 3rd day of September, 1912, inquiry was made into the circumstances attending the charge of misconduct on the part of W. McGhee, number of whose certificate of competency is 028,762 of Liverpool, First Officer of the British Steamship "Kumchow Official Number 128,682 of Hongkong.

The Court found that the charge made by the master of the British Steamship "Kumchow" against William McGhee, num- ber of whose certificate of competency is 028,762 O.C. of Liverpool, First Officer of the above named ship, proved, in that during the middle watch, Friday, August 23rd, at or about 0.30 a m. when he (the First Officer) who was in charge of the navigation of the ship steaming in the vicinity of Cape Padaran with 600 passengers on board left the bridge without any competent person in charge for a considerable period and was afterwards found by the master in one of the cabins in the after saloon drinking with a passenger. In con- sideration of the previous serious charge officially logged against him at Saigon but also of the previous record of sobriety and good conduct produced to the Court we ordered his certificate to be sus- pended for 12 months during which period a Second Mate's certificate will be granted to him and that before his certificate was returned to him he would be required to produce to the Board of Trade a reference of sobriety covering the previous six months.

(2.) On the 1st day of November, 1912, inquiry was held into the circumstances attending the loss of the British Steamship "Dacre Castle" Official Number 124,119 of Liverpool, Edward Arthur Gough, number of whose certificate of competency is 0.C. 034,469, London, was Master.

The Court found that the British S.S. "Dacre Castle" Official Number 124,119 of Liverpool of which Edward Arthur Gough, number of whose certificate of competency is 034,489, London, was Master, left Yokohama on a voyage to Boston and New York viâ ports and arrived at Keelung, Formosa, on the 14th September, 1912, with a general cargo of about 5,300 tons this being about one half her total capacity. That she was there moored head and stern be- tween two buoys in the inner harbour, and starboard anchor down.

On the 15th September a typhoon warning was hoisted, and the barometer gave warning of approaching bad weather. On that

D 17

evening additional wires to the buoys were supplied. The following day at about 4 p.m. the stern wires parted. The ship which had swung round in the vicinity of two Japanese steamers was given a sheer to port and the port anchor let go. She then began to drag and as soon as sufficient steam was available (5 p.m.) she got under way

and proceeded to the outer harbour, where both anchors were let go, in line to windward. Twice these anchors dragged, and ship was taken to windward and re-anchored. The second time she was struck by a very heavy squall and carried bodily on the rocks where she shortly afterwards broke into two.

The Court was of opinion that all possible steps were taken to prevent disaster, and that no blame attached to anyone concerned.

The Court wished to place on record their sense of the good seamanship displayed by the master in getting his ship out of the very narrow waters of the inner harbour under the then existing circumstances.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers.

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed:

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

20

3

Master, (Provisional Certificate),

First Mate,

13

1

Second Mate,

2

Mate,

1

Mate, River Steamer,

Total,

42

30

6

First Class Engineer,...

25

Second Class Engineer,..

39

J

Total,

64

4

*

D 18

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Or- dinance No. 10 of 1899:-

For Master,....

Candidates.

For Engineer,

Total,

Passed.

Failed.

58

4

67

125

4

10. Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

24. There was no candidate examined during the year. Four- teen licences were renewed.

11.-Sunday Cargo Working.

25. During the year 357 Permits were issued under Ordinance No. 1 of 1891 as compared with 319 in 1911. Of these 124 were not used as it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday and the fees in such cases were refunded.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $40,225 as against $36,975 in 1911.

12.-New Territories.

Fourteenth year of British Administration.

26. The Outstations attached to the Harbour Department, now eight in number, have continued to perform the work allotted to them, and during the year Licences, Port Clearances, Permits, &c., have been issued by them as follows:-

1911.

1912.

Cheung Chau, opened 1899.....

13,780

12.327

Tai O,

1899....

7,494

8,051

25

Tai Po,

1900.

8,928

8,879

Sai Kung,

1902....

3,504

2,372

""

Long Ket,

1905......

""

6,473

4,972

/

Deep Bay, Ping Shan, Lantao,

1911...

660

""

4,278

1911...

42

426

29

1912..

787

40,881

42,092

D 19

Lantao Station, on board a Police launch, was opened in October.

A Motor Boat has been attached to the Deep Bay Station to facilitate the licensing of small craft.

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Terri- tories during the year was $35,947.51 as compared with $29,054 in 1911.

13.-Lighthouses.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

27. During 1912, 756 vessels passed this Station, all of which were reported to the Harbour Office by telegraph. Of this number 133 were signalled by Morse lamp.

Three thousand and sixty-eight (3,068) telegraphic messages were sent, including meteorological observations for the Observatory, and 1,164 messages were received.

Telegraphic communication was maintained throughout the year except for a few interruptions, caused by the land lines being in

contact.

There were 144 hours and 50 minutes of fog and the fog signal was fired 935 times.

On only one occasion was the relief delayed by rough weather.

WAGLAN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1912, 1,832 vessels were reported. 1,603 messages were sent and 503 received. Owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted, 548 vessels were not reported.

There were 352 hours and 24 minutes of fog and the fog signal was fired 3,648 times.

The relief was delayed on two occasions.

GREEN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1912, 1,549 vessels were signalled and reported from this Station. 667 messages were sent and 443 were received.

Owing to communication being interrupted on 9 occassions, 43 vessels were not reported.

The new illuminating apparatus installed in 1911 in the above 3 lighthouses has justified its installation, inasmuch that the power of the lights has been at least doubled, at a cost reduced by $1,670 or 58%, as compared with 1910 (the last complete year during which the old burners were in use). On the other hand, certain

- D 20

parts of the apparatus have given considerable trouble, and have had to be constantly repaired or renewed. It is hoped that, with increased experience in the management of the apparatus, such repairs and renewals will become less frequently necessary.

A new light was installed on Kap Sing Island just to the south- ward of Kap Sing Mun during the year and was first lit on the 29th April. It is a double flashing light, and is fitted with a fog bell, actuated by clockwork. Apart from the difficulty in lighting the lamp when there is any wind due to the form of tower upon which it is supported providing no shelter, and inexperience on the part of the Chinese lightkeepers having caused irregularities in the working, the apparatus has done well, showing an excellent light. No opportunity has, however, been afforded for testing the efficacy of the fog bell since the apparatus has been erected.

14.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

28. Forty-eight (48) letters were received during the year from firms and individuals, principally in Great Britain, asking for in- formation concerning commercial matters in the Colony, requesting me to put them into communication with local firms, or to obtain local agents for the sale of their goods.

The replies sent have been as full as the information at our disposal permitted, but as the last class of application mentioned above predominated, and we find it increasingly difficult to induce local firms to undertake agencies, our efforts have not been as successful as I should wish. In the majority of cases, however, the desired results have been effected.

{

I

1

HARBOUR OFFICE,

30th January, 1913.

BASIL TAYLOR, Commander, R.N., Harbour Master.

:

TOTAL.

Australia and

New Zea-

land.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

D 21

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED in the

COUNTRIES WHENCE

Coast of China,

Ships.

Coast of China, Steamships under 60 tons.

Coast of China,] Junks.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

goes,

Vessels,..

Tons,

36

22

27

3,487

77,325 35,210 | 109,675 2,645,326

Crews,.....

3,034 1,325 4,610

156,175

Discharged,. 18,000 52 000 57,000

406,000

Transit,

24,000 9,000 47,000

571,000

Vessels,

Tons,.

Crews,.

[Vessels,.

Tons,.

185

:

:

:

:

271,103

13,397

36

22

27

3,672

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Cochin China. ́

Continent of

Europe.

Formosa.

Great Britain.

Straits

Settlements.

India and

Japanese Ports.

Java and other

Islands in

Archipelago.

the Indian

Kwang-chau-

wan.

.16

12

58,762

10

5

140

178

191

23

46,858 13,862 492,088 496,275 565.905

2,576 1,346 248 9,747 21,973 15.701

33,724

1,491

83,000

8,000

151,000 213,000| 266,000 37,000

:

48,000 18,000 | 569,000| 310,000| 437,000

2,000

2

2

3

1,267

6,237

1.359

9,611

77

211

90

132

46

12

6

142

180

194

23

77,325 35,210 | 109,675 2,916,429

58,762

46,858 15,129 498,325 497,634 575,546 33,724

TOTAL.

Crews,....

3,034 1,325 4,610

169,572

Car-

goes,

Discharged,.

Transit,

18,000 52,000 57,000

406,000

2,576

1483,000

FOREIGN.

IN BALLASTr.

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

[ Vessels,

Tons,

24,000 9,000 47,000

28 28

571,000

9

Crews,...

goes,

Discharged,

Transit,

61,427 38,492 34,376

2,623 1,646 785

11,000 57,000| 6,000

27,000 16,000 | 8,000

1,095 856 9,355

980,647 30.363 895,093

87,674 9,236 | 124,076

206,000

454,000

252,000

ŏl

148

57,668 544,920 81,062

2,520 17,323 5,289

91,000 100,000 |22,000

1,346 325 9,958 22,063 15,833 1,491

8,000

151,000 213,000 266,000 37,000

48,000 18,000 569,000| 310,000 437,000 2,000

81

21

398

63 105

91,674 234,219 1,151,576 138,606 |52,601

2,192

14,000 91,000 766,000 85,000 25,000

:

84

5,019 30,378 3,936 4,772

4,000 557,000| 6,000 | 116,000| 197,000| 661,000 | 67,000

Vessels,.

Tons,

Crews,..

Vessels,.

132 809 3,333

141,179 26,316| 415,565

:

:

:

6,178 6,956

52,717

2,292

143

17,423

576

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:.

28

28

51

148

Tons,..

61,427 38,492 34,376

TOTAL.

Car-

goes,

Crews,....

2,623 1,646 785

Discharged,

-Transit,

11,000 57,000 6,000

27,000 16,000 8,000

Vessels,

64

97

12,688 1,227 | 1,665

1,121,826 56,679 1,310,658 57,668 544,920 83,354 91,674 234,219 1,168,999 138,606 52,601

93,852 16,192❘ 176,793 2,520 17,323 5,432 2,192 5,019 30,951 3,936 4,772

206,000

454,000 91,000 100,000 22,000 14,000 91,000 766,000 85,000 25,000

252,000

+4000 | 557,000 6,000| 116,000| 197,000| 661,000 67,000

160

589

$6

85

21

84

402

63

105

86

161

262

105

goes,

612,000

823,000

50 36 4,582 856 9,355 138,752 73,702 | 144,051 | 3,625,973|30,363 | 895,093| 116,430| 591,778 |94,924 || 583,762 730,4941,717,481 172,330 52,601| 6

5,657 2,971 | 5,395

Discharged, 29,000 109,000 €3,000

51,000 25,000 55,000

243,849 9,236 121,076 5,096 18,669 5.537 11,939 26,992 16,079 5,427 1,772

Crews,....

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

Tons,.

Transit,

454,000

174,000| 108,000 22,000 165,000 304,000 1,032,000 122,000 25,000

4,000 605,000 21,000 685,000 | 507,000|1,098,000 69,000

IN BALLAST.

Vessels,..

Tons,

:

317 809 3,333

2

Crews,.....

412.282 26,316| 415,565

19.575 6,956

3.559

52,717

:

:

6,237 1,359 27,061

220

211

90

708

:

:

:

(Vessels,.

Tons,.

Chews,......

TOTAL.

('ar-

groes,

Discharged..

Transit,

64

50

36

97

160

138,752 73,702 | 144,051

5,657 2,971| 5,395

29,000 | 109,000 63,000

51.000 25,000 55,000 823,000

:

4,899 1.665 12,688 4,038,255 56,679 1,310,658 116,430 591,778 98,483 589,999 731,853 1,744,545 172,330 52,601 | (

263,424 16,192 176.793 5,096 18,669 5,757 12,150 27,082 46,787 5,427 4,772

612,000

454,000 174,000 | 108,000 22,000 165,000 304,0001,032,000| 122,000 25,000

4,000 605,000 24.000 685.000 507.000 1.098,000 69,000

91

163

261

596

$6

105

:

:

:

5

D 21

RED in the COLONY of HONGKONG from EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1912.

TRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

wan.

Archipelago.

Kwang-chau-

uu!yux 942

Į Java and other

Islands in

Ships.

Macao,

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao,

Junks.

Macao,

23

33,724

792

1,491

588,868

26,153

37,000

50,000

2,000

:

:

:

10

3,896

127

:

:

Mauritius.

America.

North and

South

Pacific.

North

Philippine

Islands.

Port Arthur.

Hainan and

Tonkin. Gulf of

Ports in

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

Amerita.

South

Tsingtau.

of America.

United States

:

:

1

2

114

1

85

3

2

1,450 3,563

150,471

1,227

99,497 8,549

2,621

53

142

7,544

62 5,171 208

109

1.000

5,000

46,000

2,000 129,000

3,000

21,000

:

44,000 12,000

1,000

:

:

:

:

1

1,423

92

:

13

15,198

1,501

802

140

:

1

:

Weihaiwei.

TOTAL.

5,216

68 11

231,330 14,536| 5,677,122

4,779 721 263,163

160,000 9,000] 1691,000

347,000 7,000 2,472,000

1

1,122 2,541 | 2,599

30

74

44

:

T:

:

217

317,890

15,216

23

:

33,724

797

592,764

1

3

127

:

1,491

26,280

37,000

50,000

|1,450 | 4,986

53 234

1,000

:

:

:

87

3

1

Ι

68

11

5,463

165,669 1,227 | 101,001| 8,549

8,346

46,000

62 5,311 208

2,000 129,000

3,743 2,541 2,599 | 231,330 14,536 5,995,012

139 74 11 4,779 721 278,384

3,000

160,000| 9,000| 1,691,000

2,000

:

5,000

***

21,000

44,000 12,000

1,000

:

347,000 7,000| 2,472,000

63 105

138,606 52,601

3,936 | 4,772

85,000 25,000

133

21,607 16,565

1,609 6,397

20,000

303

238

2

3

42

8

15

26,196 2,010

2,892 123

2,000 11,000 1,000

1,849

144

1,000

263

62,603 15,110 218,766 35,027 153,234 24,906 32,754 468,718

3,328

311 11,188 690 7,325 590 536 14,532

23,000 19,000 275,000 3,000 | 205,000 23,000 1,000 133,000

152

6

10

88

13,585

5,472,069

347,164

2,648,000

67,000

:

:

3,000

7,000

3,000 59,000 37,000

41,000 41,000

2,105,000

22

8

257

38

1

10

13,889 274 27,645

40,934

883

3,822

833

60

4,210

:..

:

1,869

31

206

1

2

1

47 2,418

10,267

16 119

232

4,617

:

702,954

74,176

63

333333

105

155

311

495

h

2

62

3

80

9

138,606 52,601 35,496 16,839

3,936 4,772 2,442

85,000 25,000 20,000 2,000

67,000

53,841 2,010

1,849 103,537

268 15

15,993 222.588 35,027 | 153,281 27,324 32,754

153

8

10

89

18,202

478,985

6;175,023

6,457

7,132 123

11,000 1,000

:

86 105

172,330 52,601 610,475 16,565

5,127 1,772 27,762 6,397

925

303

3

122,000 25,000

70,000

2,000

238

3

26,1963,460 3,563 1,849 | 213,074

2,892 176 142 144 10,872

14,000 2,000

1,000 69,000

2

9

69,000

:

5,000

24,000

7,000 103,000 49,000

144 5,197 372 11,394 690 7,341 709 536

1,000 23,000 19,000 275,000 3,000 205,000 23,000 1,000

3,000 7,000 59,000 37,000 3,000

41,000

156

348 18

154 6 10

11 18,831

16,337 318,263 43,576 155,855 24,906 32,754 700,048 14,536 11,149,191

403 16,359 $98 7,434 590 536 19,311 721 610,332

21,000 404,000 3,000 208,000 23,000 1,000 293,000 9,000 4,339.000

41,000 391,000| 7,000| 4,577,000

14,761

421,340

133,000

...

2,648,000

44,000

156

..

2,105,000

4,000

་་

27

8

257

:

17.785

271 27,645

:

:

:

960

60 4,240

1

1,423

92

:

51

1

2

56,132

883 5.326

2,671

31

346

:

:

:

1

1,169|4,959| 2 599

3

1

46 193

41

10,267

232

4,834

1,020,844

89,392

86

105

952

311

495

3

3

3

207

10

355

18

156

9

11

157

11 23,665

:

5172,330 52,601| 628,260| 16,839

5,427 4,772 28,722 6,457

122,000 25,000 70,000 2,000

3 69,000

1,000

:

5,000

53,841 |3,460 | 4,986| 1,849 | 269,206 17,220 323,589 43,576 | 157,024 29,865 35,353 710,315 14,536 |12,170.035

7,132 176 234 144 13,543 431 16,705 898 7,180 783 580 19,543 721 699.724

14,000 2,000

69,000 21,000 404,000 3,000 208.000 23,000 1,000 293,000 9,000 1,339,000

24,000 7,000 | 103,000 |49,000 4,000

41,000

391,000 7,000| 4,577,000

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Australia and

New Zealand.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

Ceast of China,

Ships.

Coast of China,| Steamships under 60 tons.

Coast of China,

Junks.

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLE

COUNT

Cochin China.

[ Vessels,

Tons,

29

13

25

3,603

:

50

16

1

2

:

100

170

220

54,728 17,675 85,792 2,580,357

69,026 449,85.

2,358 3,549501,375 | 483,559 | 681.001

Crews,

2,456 920 3,543

166,444

2,467 1,475

35

10,806 22,671 18,673

Shipped, Bunker

Cargoes.

Coal,...

6,000 3,000 23,000

679.000

14,000

15,000

$,000 1,000 1,000

100,000

Vessels,

11

52

Tons,

Crews,

20,286

:

67,073

470

3,145

Bunker Coal,

2.000

5.000

Vessels..

29

24

25

3.655

Tons,.

54.728 37.961 85,792 2,647.430

:

:

:

·:

:

:

1,000 81.000 111,000

70.000

12,000

4,000 59,000

39,000

1+

3

12

17,347

9.261

:

:

:

14

25.683

27,291

791

164

652

922

3,000

1,000

5,000 2,000

61

19

1

2

100

$2

231

86.373

54.259

2.358

3,549 501,375 509,242 | 708,292

Crews,

2,456 1,390 3.543

169,589

3,258

1.639

35

Shipped, Bunker

(Cargoes..

6,000 3.000 23.000

679,000

14,000

15,000

1.000

Coal,...

[Vessels,

8,000 3,000 1,000

18 16

20

Tons,

Ciews,

Cargoes, Shipped, Bunker

Coal,..

3,000

63.260 20.743 75,318

2,684 1,030 1,739

32,00 4,000| 26,000

1 000

[Vessels,

1

3

Tons,

2, 09.4,582

105,000

1,166 844 9,841

1,016.686 31.25+ 1,071,880

59,886 9,674 154,370

246,000 1000| 701,000

44,000 2.000

49 852 2,169

60,659 29.124 169,131

15,000 1.000

32

152

3

39,748 | 520,102

1,350 17,908

30,000 | 103,000

8,000 34,000

20

90

6,740 251,873

177 5 523

2,000 75.000

1,000 1,000

16

1!1 10.806

81,000 111.000

70,000

4.000 64,000 41,000

93

23.323 19,595

269

$5,414 235,989 | 794,846

2.058 5,713 26,174

13.000

71.000 114,000

15,000 62,000

1

3

16

67

141

21,594

2,699

16,027 25,354

80,566 249,273

Crews,

49

156

2,267 7.450 22,853

760

89

532

675

Bunker Coal,

باله

6.000 3,000

3,000

1,0 0

3.35

24,000 3,000

5,274

{ Vessels,

19

19

20

Tons,

Crews,

(Vessels,

65,369 25,325 75,318

2,733 1,186 1,739

Cargoes, 32,000 4,000| 26,000 Shipped, Bunker

Coal....

3,000 1.000

47

20

45

Tons,

Crews,

Shipped, Bunker

Vessels,

J

14

Tons,

2,109 24,868

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

49 626

2,000

1,215❘ 1,696

12,010

1,077 345 60,378 1,241,011|| 61,342 | 522,801

62,153 17,124 177,223 2,110 17,947

246,000 1,000 | 704,000 30,000 | 103,000

50,000 5,000

11,000, 31,000_

4,769 844 9,841

82 168

117,988 38,418 161,110| 3.597,043 31,254 | 1,071,880 108,774 | 565,100

5,140 1,950 5,282

226,330 | 9,674 | 151,370 3.817 19.383

Cargoes,. 38,000 | 7,000| 49,000

925,000 1,000| 701,000 44,000 118,000

Coal,... 11,000 2,00 1,000 144,000 2,000

20,000 34,000

101 852 2,169

127,732 29.124| 169,131 38,941

5,412 7,450 22,853 1,551

11,000 3,000

6,000

52

153

6

85.414

92

106

22,767 277,227 |

709 6,198 2,058

2,000 75,000 13,000

2,000 1,000

4

9,098 255,429 586,789 719,548 1,475,847

212 5,631 12,864 28,384 44,847

2,000 76,000 94,000 182,000 181 000

1,000 1,000 4,000 74,000 101,000

16

160

410

316,555 1,044,119]

116

263

9,548 31.448

71,000 114,000

39,000 65,000

489

34

4

3

16

79

155

48

48

45

4,870 1,696 12.010

116

11,960

203

1,000

172

16,027 25,354

532 675

1.000

106,249 | 276,564

4,487 6,196

29,000 5,000

7 108

116

342

611

Tons,

Crews,

5,189 2.576 5,282

Cargoes.. 38,000 7,000 49,000 Shipped, Bunker

Coal,... 11.000 4,000 1,000

120,097 63.286 161,110 3,724,775 60,378 1,241,011 147,715 577,060 | 25,125 | 280,776 586,759 825.797 1,752,+11|

231,742 17,124 | 177,223 5 368 19.586

925.000 1,000 74,000

44.000 118,000

155.000 5,900

26.000 35.000

}

741 6,309 12,864 32 871 51,043

2.000 76.000 94,000 182,000 | 184,000

2,000 1.000 4,000 | 103,000 106,000

Continent of

Europe.

Egypt.

Formosa.

Great Britain.

India and

Straits

Settlements.

Japanese Ports.

Continent of

Europe.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

D 22

S and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED in the COLONY of HONGKONG to EACH COUNTRY, in the

Mauritius.

North Ameri ca.

Philippine

Islands. -

Hainan and

Ports in

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Port Arthur.

50

16

1

100

170

220

15

791

126 | 449,GST

2,358 3,549| 501,375 | 483,559 | 681.001

20,463

587,940

:

:

:

167

1,475

35

000

15,000

111 10,806 22,671

1,000

18,673

1,004

29,437

81.000 111,000 70,000

20.000

38,000

000

14

3

'47

9,261

'91

164

: :

:

:

4,000

59,000

39,000

5,000

11,000

12

14

6

25.683

27,291

12,047

2,162

652

:

922

269

155

100

1,000

5,000

2,000

1,000

:

:

64

19

1

2

100

182

234

21

795

:

73

54.259

2,358

3,549 501,375 | 509,242 | 708,292

32,510

590,102

158

1,639

35

00

15,000

00

1,000

4,000 64,000

111 10.806 23.323 19,595

1.000 $1,000 111.000

70,000

41,000 6,000

1,273

29,592

20,000

38,000

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

18

1,123 159,00

50,357

5,483

91

7,647

3,035

154

1,122 2,

50

153,000

17,000

3,0

23,000

5,000

1,000

1

51

1

1

1,423

11,80 171,344

2.874

2,416

92

230

2,829

28

54

1,000 2,010

4,000

2

99

3

2

2,816 171,430 221,701

186 7,877 5.864

8,357

3,538 2.4

182

104

:

:

153,000 17,000

3,0

32

152

800

48 520,102

50 17,908

GO | 103,000

00 34,000

3 90

6,740 251,873

177 5 523

2,000 75,000

1,000 1,000

16

93

269

50 103

85,414 | 235,989 794,846 | 130,599 52,580 | 32,209 16,522 41,286 951

2.058 5,713 26,174

3,911 4,830

2,140

6,359

13.000 71.000 114,000 31.000 16,000 1,000 5,000

15,000 62,000 7,000 6,000 1,000 1,000

11,000

144

1,000 25,000

9,000

1,000

1,0

303

362

1

48

198

2

11

91

5,077 65

28,000 1,000

1,000

:

:

62,251 167,519 | 3,994

52,800

98,105 1,2

3,757 7.825 89

$3,000 76,000

1,064

5,231

3,000 112,000

13,000 18,000

2,000 32,000

23

20.

1

3

16

67

141

12

:

11

6

87

72

46

34

2,699 16,027 |25,354

30

#9

532 675

00

1,0 0

52

153

16

2

31,000

32

168

116

74 565,100

17 19.383

10 | 118,000

¡

00

34,000

34

4

3

16

80,566 | 249,273 18,573

3. 35 5,274 505

24,000 3,000 3,000

6 106

160 410

68 105

42 522,801 22,767 277,227 85.414 316,555 1,044,119 149.172 52,580

10 17,917 709 6,198 2,058 9,548 31,448

4,416 4,830

00 103,000 2,000 75,000 | 13,000 71,000 114,000 31,000 16,000

00

2,000 1,000

39,000 65,000 10,000 6,000

4 92

263

489

71 105

9,098 255,422 586,789 719,548 1,475,847 151,062 52.550 620,149

212 5,634 12,861 28,384 44,817 4,915 4,880 31,577

2,000 76,000 | 94,000 |182,000 | 184,000 51,000 16, 00 39,000

1,000 1,000

4,000

74,000 101,000

12,000 6,000 12,000

79

18

...

3,530

194 8,609

13,770

71,988 7,972

48,284 2,4

319

46

940

591

2,985 156

:

2,659

1

:

:

10,000

...

15,000

:

155

309

449

1

.53

270

6

11

137

:

35,739 16,716 49,895

2,159 6,405

1,000 5,000

1,000 1,000

935

951

:

,76,021 239,507 11,966

52,800 146,389 | 3.6

6,017 65

303

16,522

6,359

5,000

362

28,000 1,000

-1,000

Ι

:

4,318 10,810 245

$3,000 76,000

1,064

7,890

3,000 112,000

:

13028,000

-2,000

47.000

I

169

246

2

B

92

41,286 951

5,077 65

1,423 221,871 217,876 3,994

94 11,424 10,860 $9

28,000 | 1,000

236,000 93,000

58,283 99.227 3,6.

1,218 5,281

3,000 112,000| 3,00

1

1,000

1,000

36 000

23,000

3,000

32,000 1,00

155

15

11,960 | 16,027 (25,351

51

203

532

675

10 1,000

1,000

:

:

6

87

I

10

123

4

1

47

106,249 276,564 30,620

5,692

194 8,609

29,000

4,487 6,196

5,000

774

171

46

940

4,000

:

:

:

:

:

1,423 25,580 243,332 7,972

2.874

92

1,000

801 5,814 156

2,000 14,000

28

:

50,700 2.41

2,713

15,000

1-

...

:

172

7

108

116

42

644

89 105

960

309

449

1

2

00

35.000 2,000 1 000

5577,060 | 25,125 280,776 586,789 | 825,797 |1,752,411| 181,682|52,580| 625 841

38 19,586 741 6.309 12,864 32 871 51,043 5,689 4,830 32.051

00 118,000 2.000 76.000 94,000 182.000 184,000 51,000 16,000 39,000

16,000 6,000 | 12,000

4000 | 103,000 | 106,000

16.716 49,895 951

6,105 6,017 65

5,000 28,000 1,000

1,000

1.000

179

2,846 247,451| 461.208|11,966

369

6

14

139

186 12.225 16,674 245

236,000 93,000

1,000 38,000

37,000

:

:

61.157 149,927| 6,0

1.246 7.994

3.000 112,000| 3.00

3,000

30

17,000

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

islands in

the Indian

Archipelago.

Kwongchau-

wan.

- D 22

S TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Ships.

Macao,

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao,

Junks.

Macao,

Mauritius.

RED in the COLONY of HONGKONG to EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1912.

North Ameri ca.]

Philippine Islands.

Hainan and Ports in

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Port Arthur.

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

South Africa.

America.

South

South Pacific.

Tsingtau.

15

20,463

:

:

...

791

587,940

:

1,004

29,437

20,000

38,000

5,000

11,000

G

4

:

2,047

269

1,000

2,162

155

8,573

:

505

21

795

2,510

590,102

1,273

29,592

0,000

38,000

6,000

11,000

50 103

144

303

362

1

0,599 52,580

32,209 16,522

41,286

951

3,911 | 4,830

2,140

6,359

5,077

65

1.000 16,000

1,000

5,000

28,000 1,000

7,000 6,000

1,000 1,000

1,000

12

11

6

87

3,530

194

8,609

319

46

910

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

1

11

1,423 159,60 50,357

94

7.617

153,000

18

:

3,035

J

17,000

23,000 5,000

5

51

1,423

11,80 171,344

92

210

2,829

1,000

2,070

4,000

126

99

2

1

5,483

1,122 2,422 1,423

154

50

H

:

10

52

3

5.276

13,367 211,880 5,811

5,585,729

91

622

3,000

:

12,000

5.015 169

96,000 1,000

277,027

:

:..

1,343,000

1,000

1,000 1,000

1,000

1,000 1,000

274,000

1

1

2

:

ӣ

2

185

2,874

2,416

1,671

17,733 3,552

396,973

28

54

70

276

151

10,278

:

:

:

:

:

1.0.0

1.000 1,000

29,000

3

2

1

2

10

58

5

5,461

2,816 171,430 | 221,701

8,357

186

7,817

5,864

182

104

3,538 2.422 1,423 4,671

88

70

91

153,000 17,000

3,000

:

1,000

25,000

9,000

1,000

1,000 1.000 1,000

12,000

1,000

13.367 | 229,613 | 9,363

622

320 5,291

96,000 1,000

2,000 2,000

5,982,702

287,305

1,343,000

303,000

48

198

2

11

91

1

6

4

63

13,955

:

:

:

:

62,251 167,519 3,994

3,757

7.825

89

83,000 76,000

13,000

18,000

52,800 98,105 1,209 22,622 4,593

1,064 5,231

3,000 112,000

2,000

32,000

:

373,671

5,274,764

72 556

149

12,900

342,311

11,000 1,000

84,000

1,876,000

5,000

257,000

72

46

2

3

1

3,571

13,770 71,988 7,972

48,284 2,418 3,191

:

3,252

842,899

:

:

591

2,985 156

2,659

119 173

31

52,419

3,000

10,000

:

15,000

1,000

69,000

68

105

155

309

449

1

53

270

6

11

137

3

64

17,526

9.172 52,580

35,739

16,716

49,895

951

4,416 4,830

2,459

6,405

6,017

65

1,000 16,000

1,000

5,000

28.000 1,000

0,000 6,000

1,000 1,000.

-1,000

:

:

:

,76,021 239,507 11,966

4,318

10,810 245 $3,000 76,000

28,000

47.000

52,800 | 146,389 3,627 25,813 4,593

221 734 1,064

119 7,890

14,000 1.000 3,000 112,000

2,000

376,923

6,117,663

12,931

394,760

$1,000

1,876,000

6.000

326.000

71

935

2,000 6,000 12,000

105

1,062 52.530 620,149 16,522 41,286 951

4,915 4,830 31,577 6,359 6.077

1,000 16, 00 39,000 5,000 28,000 1,000

1,000

303

362

Ι

169

246

13

92

3

10

115

65

94

1,000

1,423 | 221,871| 217,876 3,994

10,860 89 11,424

236,000

36 000

58,283

93,000

23,000

99.2273,631 24.045 | 4,593

160 617 149 1,218 5,281

3,000 112,000| 3,000 14,000 1,000

3,000 32,000 1,000 1,000

3 19,231

13.367 55,551 | 5,811 || 10,860,493

622

169

619,338 17,915

3,219,000 12,000 150.000 1,000

6.000 1,000 1,000

531,000

18

15

6

87

}

10

123

4

1

47

3

7

0,620

5,692

191

8,609

774

474

46

940

92

1,000

89 105

:

:

1,000

930

309

449

1

2

',682|52,580 | 625 841

1,689 4,830 32.051

,000|FG.000 39.000

1,000 6,000 12.000

49,895 16 716

951

6,405 6,017 65

5,000

1,000

28,000 1,000

801

2,000

179

2,816 247,451 | 461.208||1,966

12.225 186

16,674

236,000 93,000

1,423 25,580 243,332 | 7,972 |

5,814

14,000

369

156

2,874

28

6

14

245

1.000

1,000

38,000

37,000

50,700 2.418| 3.191| 4,671

2,713

15,000

139

61,157 149,927| 6,049 |27.236 9.264

825 219 1.246

309 7,994

3.000 112,000| 3.000|14.000| 1,000

1 000 3,000

1,000 47,000 1.000

:

149 178

70

:

1,000

5

10

10

20,985 3,552

307

2,000 1,000

122

18,222 320

12,000 180,000, 1.000

1 000 8.00J | 2,000

3,756

1,239,872

62,727

98.000

22,987

13,367 | 606,536|9,383| 12,100.365

622

682.065

3,219.000

2

151

5

629,000

of America.

United States

Wei-hai-wei.

TOTAL.

D 23

Table III.--NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION

ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1912.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

ENTERED.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

5,246 5,677,122 263,168

217 317,890

15,216

5,463 5,995,012 278,384

American,

64

256,247 10,009

6 4,350

257

70 260,597 10,266

Austrian,

46

153,624 3,627

46

153,624 3,627

Chinese,

576 344,034 67,558

40 34,220

2,240

616

378,254 69,798

Chinese Junks,

9,593 921,289 126,968

3,590 443,210

56,957

13,183 1,364,499 183,925

Danish,

11

28,927 439

11 28,927 439

Dutch,

90 228,477 5,932

22 17,875

814

112 246,352 6,746

French,

495 551,039 21,332

1

279

22

496

551,318 21,354

German,

564 1,033,068 39,535

73 95,986

4,251

637 1,129,054 43,786

Italian,

13 31,403 1,176

13 31,403 1,176

Japanese,

566 1,536,371 41,490

26

35,823 1,235

592 1,572,194 42,725

Norwegian,

129 133,913 4,566

39

39,232

1,252

168 173,145 5,818

Portuguese,

232 70,320 6,220

1

558

46

233 70,878 6,266

Russian,

33 99,167 2,107

2

4,831

86

35 103,998 2,193

Swedish,

14 37,262 572

14

37,262 572

Steamships under 60

tons trading to ports outside the Colony,

1,159 46,928 15,633

817

26,590 7,016 1,976 73,518 22,649

TOTAL,

18,831 11,149,191 610,332 4,834 1,020,844 89,392 23,665 12.170,035 699,724

_

D 24

Table IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION

CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1912.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

5,276 5,585,729 277,027

185 396,973

10,278 | 5,461 5,982,702 237,305

American,....

68

256.184 11,087

4

1,990

141

72

261,174 11,228

Austrian,

46 153,624 3,904

46

153,624 3,904

Chinese,

591

360,695 40,814

29

17,554

1,266

620 378,249 42,080

Chinese Junks,

10,203 1,113,166| 159,447

2,256 177,740

23,793

12,459 1,290,906 183,240

Danish,

10 25,923 400

1

3,001

39

11 28,927 439

Dutch,

100

226,785

6,461

12

19,567

602

112

246,352 7,063

French,

489

545,718 21,013

8

6,771

289

497

552,489 21,302

German,

475

929,462 34,381

162 201,367

9,636

637 1,130,829 44,017

Italian,

13

31,403

1,152

13

31,403 1,152

Japanese,

427 1,268,175 34,369

168 309,410

6,617

595 1,577,585 40,986

Norwegian,

108

111,380 4,376

62

63,670

'2,264

170

175,050 6,640

L

Portuguese,

Russian,

Swedish,

232 70,219

6,204

1

714

233 70,933 6,212

33 98,910

2,279

2

5,088

70

35 103,990 2.349

14

37,262

522

14

37,262

522

1

500

18

6

1,288

79

1,788

97

No Flag,

Steamships under 60 tons trading to ports outside. the Colony,

1,147

47,776 16,033

858

29,318 7,496

2,005 77,094 23,529

TOTAL,...... 19,233 10,862,911 619,487 3,754 1,237,454 62,578 22,987 12,100,365 682,065

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

I

TOTAL.

T

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,.

Discharged,...

Cargoes,

Transit,..

Vessels,

:

:

Aberdeen.

:

:

:

Cheung Chau.

Long Ket.

Saikung.

:

:

:

:

:

D 25

Table V-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED

at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1912.

Shaukiwan.

Stanley.

Tai O.

Tai Po.

:

:

NAMES OF PORTS.

Yaumati.

Victoria.

Hunghom,

5,246

5,246

5,677,122

5,677,122

263,168

263,168

1,691,000

1,691,000

2,472,000

2,472,000

217

217

Tons,

Crews,..

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Vessels,

Discharged,

! Transit,..

:

:

:

:

:

317,890

317,890

15,216

15,216

:

:

5,463

5,995,012

5,463

5,995,012

278,384

278,384

:

:

466

88

:

:

1,691,000

1,691,000

2,472,000

2,472,000

769

14

39

2,195

10,014

13,585

Tons,

Crews,..

2,302

492

Discharged,

9,000 1,000

Cargoes,

Transit,......

Vessels,

29

41

Tons,

13,142 1,290

75,623

7,380

64 637

201,151 5,180,162

5,472,069

42 203

51,000

:

28,113

101,000 2,486,000

308,632

347,161

2,648,000

2,105,000

2,105,000

311

3

10

4,223

4,617

1,075 532

:

53,861

249

393

646,844

702,954

Crews,

[ Vessels,

207 233

495 129

5,013

72

333

93

68,558

74,176

1,080

17 49

2,195 14,237

18,202

Tons,

Crews,..

14,217 1,822

129,484

313 1,030

2,509 725

12,393

114

296

Cargoes,

Discharged,... 9,000 1,000

Transit,...

51,000

:

:

:

:

201,151 5,827,006

28,113 377,190

101,000 2,486,000

6,175,023

421,340

BRASION

Vessels,

466

888

769 14

Tons,

13,142 1,290

75,623

39

64 637

Crews,..

2,302 492

7,380

42 203

Discharged,... 9,000 1,000

51,000

:

2,105,000

2,195

15,260

201,151 10,857,284

28,113 571,800

101,000 4,177,000

2,105,000

18,831

11,149,191

610,332

4,339,000

Cargoes,

Transit,..

4,577,000

4,577,000

Vessels,

29

41

:

311

3 10

4,440

:

4,831

Tons,

1,075 532

53,861

249

393

964,734

1,020,841

Crews,.

Vessels,

207 233

5,013

72

93

83,774

89,392

Tons,

495 129

14,217 1,822

1,080 17 49

2,195

19,700

23,665

Crews,

2,509

725

129,484

12,393 114

313 1,030

201,151 11,822,018

12,170,035

:

296

28,113 655,574

699,724

Discharged; 9,000 1,000

:

51,000

101,000 4,177,000

4,339,000

Cargoes,

Transit,..

:

4,577,000

4,577,000

TOTAL.

D 26

Table VI. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1912.

IN

BRITISH.

BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

NAMES OF PORTS.

Aberdeen.

Cheung Chaft.

Deep Bay.

Hunghom,

Long Ket.

Saikung.

Shaukiwan.

Stanley.

Tai O.

:

:

:.

:

:

Tai Po.

:

Yaumati.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Victoria.

TOTAL.

5,276

5,276

5,585,729 5 585,729

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Shipped.

Bunker Coal, .

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

:

:

:

:

:

÷

:

Vessels,

Tous.

Crews.

81 38

2,806. 405

503

224

Cargoes,

2,000

Shipped.

Bunker Coal,.

Vessels,.........

139

Tons,.

Crews..

3,367

ེརྩ

69

745

746 432

Bunker Coal,

220 107

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN

BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

Vessels.

Tons,.

:

:

:

:

:

6,173 | 1,150

277.027

277,027

1,343,000 1,343.000

274,000

274,000

t

185

I

185

396,973

396,973

10.278

10,278

29,000

29,000

5,461

5,461

5,982.702 5,982,702

287,305

287,305.

1,343,000 1,343,000

303,000 303,000

540

7

22

|65,909

282

590

2,149 11,118

196.926 5,007,846 5,274,764

13,955

6,792 90

1641

27,659 306,879 342,311

£9,000

:

84.000 1,741,000 1,876,000-

257,000

516

10

61,187 31 357

5,306 24 117

22

22

:

1,056

17

44

:

:

:

:

:.

:

257.000

2815

777,212

3,571*

842,899

45,824

52,449,

69,000 69,000-

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

127,096 313 947

12,098 114 281

49,000

:

:

:

:

Crews,

1,249

656

Į

Cargoes,

2,000

Shippeù,

Bunker Coal,.

:

"Vessels,

81 38

Tons,

2,806

405

Crews,

503 224

Cargoes,

2.000

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

:

:

Vessels,

139 69

Tons,

3,367

745

Crews,

746 432

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

:

220

107

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

:

:

6,173 1.150

:

:

:

:

:

:

2,149

13,933 17,526

196,926 5,785,058 6,117,663

27,659 352,703 394,760

84,000 1,741,000 1,876,000

:

:

326,000 326,000-

2,149 16,394

19,231

619,338

196,926 10,593,575 | 10,860,493

84,000 3.084,000 3,219,000

531,000 531,000

6,792 90

164

...

27,659

583,906

540

7

22

65,909 282 590

49,000

23

22

:

:.

516

10

61,187 31

357

5,306 !

24 117

:

:

3,000

3,756-

1,174,185 1,239.872

56,102

62,727

98,000

98,000

1,056

17

44

2.149

19,391

22.987

127,096

313 917

196,928 11,767,760 | 12,100,365

12,098

114 281

27,659 640,00S 682,055

49,000

:

84,000 3,084,000 3,219,000

:

629,000 629.000

...

.

:

:

:

:

:

Crews,

1,249

656

Cargoes,

2,000

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

Tons.

TOTAL.

:

:

:

:

#1

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1912,

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

D 27

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Cargo, gers. Tons. sels.

Ves-

Tons. Crew.

Passen- Ves-

gers. sels.

Tons.

Crew.

'Fassen-

gers.

('argo,

Tons.

Canton,

1,480 | 216,521 | 25,557

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

West Coast,...

3,905 374,511 555,81 238 26,196 2,892 3,093 226,507 | 32,188 877 77,554 10,750

114,834 1,085 186,037 14,606 172,379 |1,965 |209,273 6 13,640 257 27,645 298137,098 233 16,551 141 29,832 50 3,704

3,154

712

17,812 30 2,565 402,558 43,369 31,039 | 15,013 | 5,870 | 583,784| 86,620 4,240 495 53,841] 7,132 1,644 | 3,326 | 243,058 35,342 14 927 81,258) 11,462

30114,834

29,619 172,379

6 13.610

1,942 | 137,098

155 29,832

Total, 1912,

9,593 | 921,289 | 126,968

15,051

167,783 3,590 | 443,210 56,957

16,701 13,183 1,364,499| 133,925

31,752 | 467,783

Total, 1911,

9,514 929,156 127,296 13,258 474,837 3,348 357,651

52,285

,286,807 18,587 12,862 |1,286,807 179,581

31,845 474,837

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED. at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1912.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ď 28

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo, Ves- Tons. sels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Canton,.

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

West Coast,.

2,603 396,166 56,338 3,977 | 437,236 61,252 362 41,286 5,077 2,444160,693 26,954 817 77,785 9,826

322,252 148 18,556 2,203 27,100 287,093 1,191 68,110 12,887 573 28,231 87 8,609 940 969 66,663 766 79,451 7,275 281 27,824 64 2,714 488

2.751 414,722 58,541

322,252

1,739 | 5,168 | 505,646

74.139

28 839 287,093

419 49,895

3.210 204,141| 34,229

6,017

573

28,231

969

66,663

31

881 80,499

10 314

312

27,824

Total, 1912,

....

10,203 1,113,166| 159,447

28,923 732,063 2,256 | 177,740

23,7,93

1,770 12 459|'.290.906| 183,240 | 30,693 732,063

Total, 1911,

1,172,420 10,324 1,172,420| 155,367

26,379 679,856 2,148113,361

20,662

615 12 472 1,285,781| 176,029 26,994 | 679,856

-

D 29

Table IX.

SUMMARY.

1912.

1911.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

5,246

5,677,122

263,168

5,142

5,554,361

258,015

Do.

do. in Ballast, ...

217

$17,890

15,216

251

300,823

13,339

Total,......

5,4€3

5,995,012

278,384

5,393

5,855,184

271,354

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

5,276

5,585,729

277,027

5,171

5,524,935

263,724

Do.

do. in Ballast,......

185

396,973

10,278

214

326,612

10,225

Total,.......

5,461 |

5,982,702

287,305

5,385

5,851,547

273,949

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

2,833

4,503,852

204,563

2,580

4,117,420

156,399

Do.

do. in Ballast,...

210

233,154

10,203

223

209,297

9,495

J

Total,......

3,043

4,737,006

214,766

2,803

4,326,717

165,894

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,605

4,113,822

166,831

2,252

3,711,075

146,419

Do.

do. in Ballast,...............、

Total,....

457

635,841

21,160

548

615,905

21,377

3,062 4,749,663

187,991

2,800

4,326,980

167,796

do.

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,....

Do.

1,159

46,928

15,633

641

28,857

9,969

do.

in Ballast,......

Total,.......

817

26,590

7,016

976

35,864

9,801

1,976

73,518

22,649

1,617

61,721

19,770

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,.

1,147

47,776

16,033

669

29,624

10,291

Do.

dc.

do. in Ballast,......

858

29,318

7,496

977

35,747

9,834

Total,.......

2,005

77,094

23,529

1,616

65,371

20,125

Junks entered with Cargoes,

9,593

921,289

126,968

9,514

929,156

127,296

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

3,590

413,210

56,957

3,348

357,651

52,285

;

Total,........

13,183

1,364,499

183,925

12,862

1,286,807

179,581

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

10,202

1,113,166

159,447

10,324

1,172,420

155,367

2,256

177,740

23,793

2,148

113,361

20,662

Total,.....

12,459

1,290,906

183,240 12,472

1,285,781

176,029

Total of all Vessels entered,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

23,665 12,170,035 22,987 12,100,365

699,724 682,065

22,675

11,533,429

636,599

22,303

11,529,679

637,899

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in Į

46,652

24,270,403

1,381,789

44,978

23,063,108

1,274,498

Foreign Trade,.

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

Do.

cleared,

14,891 15,165

934,032 922,443

144,900 146,079

18,798

1,068,211

138,349

17,810

1,065,843

138,445

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,...

30,056 1,856,475

290,979 36,608

2,134,054

276,794

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,.

Grand Total,............

46,652 24,270,400 30,056 1,856,475

76,708 26,126,875

1,381,789 44,978 290,979 36,608

23,063,108

1,274,498

2,134,054

276,794

1,672,768

81,586 25,197,162

1,551,292

PLACES.

Outside the Waters of the Colony:

-~

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1912.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1911, .

Do.,

1912,

133,347 2,965,738 | 1,048,454| 103,429 2,315,796 733.202

6,425

97 645

2,525,257

6,195 102,566 | 2,938,906

708,687 2,860,112 750,556 | 3,637,517

926

1,201

230,992 | 5,490,995 | 1,757,001| 2,866,617) 205,995 | 5,804,702 1,483 758 | 3,643,712|

926

1,201

Cargo, Tons.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

TOTAL.

Crews.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Canton,

West River,

Macao,

Heungchow,.....

East Coast,

127 4,523 1,188

93 3,061 795

2741

60

:

101 2,786

470

36

260 26 842 237 93

:

303|16,565| 6,397 6,910 2,441

...

...

39 1,751

377

826

53 2,168 829| 659

327 16,190 5,584 8,735

Other places,

596 16,564 4,144

15 363 8,794 2,568 5,225

Total,..

6,590

817 26,590 7,016

:

228 7,309 1,658 36

...

119|3,903 1,032 353

311|16,839 6,457 | 6910| 2,441

39 1,751 377 826

380 18,358 6,413 9,394

899 25,358 6,712 5,240

2,441 934 1,159 46,928 15,633 21,825 2,441 1,976 73,518 22,649 22,759 2,441

21,825

- D 30

PLACES.

Table XI.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1912.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen- Cargo, Vessels. gers. Tons.

Ton-

nage.

Crews. Passen- Cargo, gers. Tons.

Bunker

Coal,

Tons.

Within the Waters of the Colony 1911,

Do.,

1912,

124,740 2,834,174| 985,830 103,392 2,314,809 732,872

7,320

106,252 | 2,656,121

771,2012,840,383

1,082

3,008

102,603 2,989,893 750,886 3,643,948

1,216

230,992 5,480,995 205,995 | 5,304,702

1,757,901 | 2,847,703 1,483,758 | 3,649,856

1,082

1,216

36,452

27,167

Outside the Waters of the Colony :--

D

31

Canton,

163 6,341 1,473

West River,.

104 3,375

958

207

253

53 1,475 481 106

411

216 7,816 1,954 106

411| 1,125

809 240 233

3

129 4,184 1,198 440

3 975

Macao,..

6

194

461

:

303 16,522 6,359 10,357 4,851

|

30916,716 6,405 10,357 | 4,851 | 1 208

Heungchow,

1

56

9

41 1,757 386 1,127

42 1,813 395 1,127

91

...

East Coast,

48 1,924 766

584

342 16,639 5,821 10,144

890 18,563 6,590 10,728

3 1,315

Other places,

536 17,428 4,244

383 10,574 2,743 5,548

4

919 28,002 6,987 5,548

4 1,378

Total,

858 29,318 7,496

| | 791 1,147 47,776 16,033 27,515 5,272 2,005 77,094 23,529 28,306 5,272 6,093

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences issued and fees collected during the year 1912 as compared with the previous year. (Under Table T, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

1911.

1912.

DESCRIPTION OF BOATS.

LICENCES.

DUPLI-

CATES.

REPAINI-

ING.

FEES. LICENCES.

LICENCE

Book.

REPAINT-

ING.

FEES.

Licence Book, $1.00 each, Repainting, $0.25 each,.... Passenger Boats, Class A,

...

...

484

Passenger Boats, Class B,

773

2

:

Passenger Village Boats,

1,536

Cargo Boats,.

1,259

Lighters,

239

Water Boats,

74

Other Boats,...

1,082

Cinder, Bum, Hawker and Mar-

ine Dealers' Boats,

382

Fish Drying Hulks,....

81

::

28.2

70.50

...

446

9,881.25

694

1,601

25,436.89

1,292

7,882.75

245

1,452.50

63

4,898.00

1,126

807.00

412

531.75

81

5,759

803

5,759.00

200.75

9,493.25

26,413.00

8,215.66

1,347.75

4,952.25

894.00

569.25

TOTAL,

5,910

6

282

$50.960.64

5,960

5,759

803 $57,844.91

Refunded on Lighters laid up,.

TOTAL,

D 32

318.00

$57,526.91

N

***

D 33

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour

Department during the Years 1911 and 1912.

Sub-head of Revenue.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

39

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not other-

Special Assessment,

wise specified :-

Amount

1911.

Amount 1912.

$ C. 82,578.09 92,802.14

C.

$7,454.95

98,448.45

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, ... 50,763.31 57,526.91

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

1,515.00 1,695.00

Emigration Brokers' Licence, Ordi-

nance 1 of 1889,

1,000,00

1,600.00

Fines, ...

4,934.50

7,180.50

Forfeitures,...

306.20

71.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,

166.00

199.50

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, do.,

from the New Territories,

2,336.30

2,648.30

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

44,668.80

54,683.05

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

from the New Territories,

26,717.70

33,299.21

95.00

70.00

4,865.75

4,950.00

T

Pilots' Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimburse- ments-in-Aid :—

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Gunpowder, Storage of--Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,

Printed Forms, Sale of,

23,023.00 23,724.20

257.50

251.50

1,685.00 2,282.50 9,861.02 13,577.86

#84,770.50 †82,721.50

207.75

263.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for---

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..........

3,480.00

2,660.00

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

846.00

1,438.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899......

3,510.00

3,330.00

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899,

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,....

7. Miscellaneous Receipts (other)-Message

Fees for notifying ships signalled,

Total,.........

*

† See next page.

..$506,964,85 549,275,40

29,408.09 27,718.02

36,975.00 40,225.00

192,20

302.20

+

:

D 34

* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1911:-

Harbour Department, Registrar General's Office,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health, Medical Department,..

Revenue

collected by.

$ 84,770.50 5,530.00

6,959.50

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,100.00 (Estimated.)

6,387.34

15,478.25

$ 97,260.00

$ 25,965.59

Net Revenue,....$ 71,294.41

† Statement of Emigration Fees, 1912 :—

Harbour Department,

Registrar General's Office,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,...

Revenue collected by.

$ 82,721.50 4,850.00

8,358.50

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

3,235.20

12 958.86

$ 20,389.06

95,930.00

Net Revenue,....$ 75,540.94

(Net Revenue, 1910, $54,589.12.)

1

12,300,000

|12,100,000

11,900,000

11,700,000

HI,500,000

11,300.000

TE 200,000

11.000 000

+0,000,000

9.900,000

-9,800,000

·9,700,000

9,600,000

¡ ̈9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300.000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000

8.900,000

8.800,000

8,700,000

8.600.000

8,500.000

8,400,000

:

8,300,000

8.200,000

8,100.000

$,000,000

7.900,000

7 800,000

TONS.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongko

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tounc DOTTED BLACK LINE represents German S1 DOTTED RED LINE represents Japanese Ship BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Ton GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only VIOLET LINE represents Steam-launch Tonne THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Foreig

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880

1881.

!

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885

1886.

:

1

t

Table XXIV.

nnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1912 inclusive.

resents British Shipping Tonnage only,

K LINE represents German Shipping Tonnage only.

LINE represents Japanese Shipping Tonnage only,

presents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

E represents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

represents Steam-launch Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

LINE represents entire Foreign

Trade in British and Foreign Ships, Junks and i

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

t

1

1886.

1887.

*8381

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

4

1901

1

----

}

!

Love.

1

12 inclusive.

2.

il Trade.

A Foreign Ships, Janks and Steam-launches.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1

1901.

1905.

1906.

1907.

1908.

1909.

1910.

1911.

1912.

TONS

12.300.000

12,100,000

11,900 000

|11,700,00

11,500,000

11,300,000

11,200,000

11.000.020

|10,000,000

9,900,000

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000 orn

8,900.000

8,800,000

8.700,000

8,600.000

8.500 000

8,400.000

8.300,000

8,200,000

8.100.000

8,000 000

!

7.900,00

7,800 000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

*

8,700,000

8,600.000

8,500,000

8.400,000

8,300,000

t

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7 800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7.400.000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5 800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

1

5,500,000

5,400,000

5.300,000

5,200,000

5.100,000

5,000,000

4.900 000

4,800,000

4,700,00)

4,600,000

4,500,000

4.400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3.700 000

3,600.000

:

Ľ

Ґ

!

:

:

8.700,000

8,600 000

8.500.000

8.400.000

! 8.300,000

8,200.000

8.100,000

8,000 000

7.900,000

7,800 000

7.700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,00

6.600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100.000

6,000.000

5,900,000

5,800 oco

-5.700.000.

5,600,000

5 500,000

5,400.000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,00

+,600,00

4,500,000

4,400.000

4,300.000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

7.900 000

3,800.000

3.700,00

3,600,000

4,00

4.500.000

4.400,000

4,300,000

MT

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

!

3,900,000

3,800,000

3.700 000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3.300.00

200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

BLACK

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2.100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1.400,003

YELLOW 1,300,000

GREEN 1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

"

900,000

800,000

RED

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

400,000

300,000

DOTTED

200,000

BLACK

100,000

LINE

90,000

VIOLET

80,000

50,000

40,000

İDOTTED-

30,000

RED

INE

20,000

4.500,000

4,400.000

4,300.000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,00

7.900 000

3,800 000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3.500,00.

3.400,003

:

3,300,000

!

3,200 000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

_900,000

200,000

700,000

600,000

- 500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

ICO,000

90,000

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

1

"

1

}

1

Table XIV.

Summary of Chinese Emigration from Hongkong for Ports other than in China, during the year 1912.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Childre n.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total,

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

Australian Ports,

Canada,

Caroline Islands,

Dutch Indies

1,555

8,906

4

:

1,559 499

3

503 2,054

7

2,062

A

421

9,332 3,326

13

112

7 3,458 12,232

15

536

12,790

293

34

22

8

357 293

34

22

8

357

10,964

506

606

65 12,141 10,964

506

606

65

12.141

Fiji,

Honolulu,

78

79

4

4

82

1

83

30

31

412

32

64

14

522

442

32

65

14

553

Japan..

Mauritius,

Mexico,

South America,....

13

13

80

4

81

93

4

97

1,197 95

138

6

1,436 | 1,197

95

138

6

1,436

1,653

53

1.706 1,771

65

1,836 | 3.424

118

3,542

447

21

215

684 447

21

215

684

56,676 12,347 | 4,085 1,451 |71,559|

287

15

117

I

308

119

983

5

51 4 1,043 | 3,160

Straits Settlements,.

Tahiti,.

Timor,

U. S. of Americą,.

Total 1912,

Do. 1911, .

70,298 12,370 4.626 1,455 88.749 29,777 1,957 | 1.899275 33,908 |74,386|12,390 | 4,526 1,389 92,691 36,996 3,579 1,902 397 42,874

Total Passengers by British Ships,. Total Passengers by Foreign Ships,

Excess of Passengers by British Ships,

100,075|i4,327 | 6,525 | 1,730|122,657 111,382 15,969 6,428 1,786| 135,565

70.29812,370| 4626| 1,455) 88,749 29,777 1,957| 1,899 275 33,908 |40,521 |10,413 | 2,727 1,180|| 54,841

7,624| 1,244

424 173 9,465 |64,300 |13,591|4,509| 1,624 | 84,024

287

15

6

...

117

1

1

250

3,418 4,143

12 301

308

119

5

4,461

--- D 35 ---

Table XV.

Statement of average number of Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1910 inclusive.

1880.

41,720

1885. 1890. 1895. 1900. 63,138 66,706 60,360 66,961

1905. 1910. 73,103 88,452

Table XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1903 to 1912 inclusive.

Whither bound.

1903.

1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911.

1912.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

53,759 53.131 45.948 51,5$9 71,141 40,746 40,129 65.372 83,875 9,628 9,596 9,026 8,731 11,907 8,893

68,809

7.887 11,333 17,031

15,215

63,387 62,727 54,974 60,320

83,048 49.639 48,016

76.705 j 100,906

84,024

Other Ports, Males. Other Ports, Females,

19,915

82

13.499

78

9.308 16.348

59 57

22,829

90

21.299

143

28,965

449

33,692

661

33.935

37,791

724

842

Total

19,997

13,577

9,367

16,405 22,919

21,442

29,414 34,353

34,659

38,633

Grand Total,.

83,384

76,304

64,341

76,725 | 105 967

71,081

77,430111,058 135,565 | 122,657

-- D 36 -

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the Year 1912.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

1.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

From Australian Ports,

2,266

103 65

40

2,474

648

29

""

Bangkok,...

3,373

173

92

222223

12

54

24

711

2,914

132

87

52

3,185

3,692

3.373

173

92

Canada,

5,315

90

65

42

5,512

5.315

90

65

...

Dutch Indies,

227

227

6,794

286

83

49

11

Honolulu,

*99

5

5

111

795

39 31

22

""

Japan,

318

21

10

355

1,363

136

44

29

2225

7,212

7,021

286

83

887

894

44

36

2008

51

3,692

42

5,512

49

7,439

24

998

1 372

1,681

157

1

51

35

1,927

Mauritius,

105

105

876

:

376

481

...

481

Mexico,

255

1

259

253

1

254

508

New Guinea,.

535

13

6

657

535

13

44

1

513

6

557

- D 37

Panama,

...

South America,

704

10

7

3

724

704

10

7

3

724

"}

Straits Settlements,

104,955

U. S. A.,...

1,734

5,976

28

19

2,4441 286 114,661 14

16,03

497 165

110

16,802

120,985

1,795

4,622

168

103

69

4,962

6,356

122

6,473 | 2,609 1,396 131,463 196

83 6,757

1912 Total,.

1911 Do.,

115,274

6,226 2,609 1,390 125,499

35,493

1,352

553

351

37,749 150,767

7,578 | 3,162 | 1,741 | 163,248

104,571

4,485 | 2,965 | 1,307112,328

35,834

866

515

351

37,566 | 140,405

5,351 |2,480 |1,658 | 149,894

Total Passengers by British Vessels, Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels. Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

115,274

6,226 2,609 1,390 125,499

35,493

1,352 553 351 37,749

79,781

4,874 2,056 1,039

87,750

1

Table XVIII.

Statement of average number of Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1910 inclusive.

1880. 1885. 48,114 68,830

1890.

96,068

1895. 1900. 1905. 104,118 109,534 137,814 146,585

1910.

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for 10 years, from 1903 to 1912, inclusive.

Where from.

1903.

1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911.

1912.

D 38

!

Straits Settlements, Wales. Straits Settlements, Females,

116,705

Total,

1.

Other Ports, Males. Other Ports, Females,

Total,

18,068

Grand Total,

5,778

123,542 114,653 110,525 |121.935 125,228 |112.093 | 110,439 |114,069 | 123,594 4,842 6,210 4,043 2,403 4,422 3,387 7,524 5,688 7,869

122,483 128,384 | 120,863 | 114,568 |124,338 129,650 115,480117,963 119,757131,463

17,826 20,417 19.291 242 364 329

27.869

290

29,180

161

30,986 28,816 30,335

615 1,321 1,450

31,601 30,137 31,785

19 848 21,387

496 97 20,811 19,620 20.5544 21,484 28.159 29,341

140,551|149,195 140,483 | 134912 145.822 157,809 144,821 149,564 | 149.894 | 163,248

ぐい

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1912.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Fower.

Built

Rig.

Where built and when.

Remarks.

of.

1. Parva,

128,713

5.26

40

Nil Carvel

2. Fiume,

128,683 838.52

550

3. Logam,

128,714

1.52

45

Hongkong.......... Schooner Clencher Kiel, Nil

.1911.

1882.

Re-registered.

Carvel Hongkong,..

1901.

4. Peiching,

127,227 271.58 290

,

Clencher Shanghai,.

1911.

Transferred from Shanghai.

5. Nile,

102,804

3135.09 7,500 | Schooner

""

Clyde Bank. Dum-

bartonshire,...

1893.

6. Circe,

128,715

314.20 500

""

Hongkong,..

1912.

Transferred from London.

7. Taikoo Cheong,.

128,716

12.14 65

Nil

Carvel

1909.

}}

8. Taikoo Kuai,

128,717

38.78 175

1911.

}}

11

9. Taikoo Shun-0,.

128.718

18.73 65

1899.

"

"

10. Taikoo Shing,

11. Taikoo Dock,.......................

128,719 14.74 40 128,720 20.98 75

1909.

}}

19

1909.

งา

12. Taikoo Koong,

133,231

13.91

1911.

""

"

13. Tai Hon,.

133,232

50.06 100

1912.

91

"

"

14. Cholon (Oil Motor),.

133,233

67.75 44

Clencher

1912.

"}

15. Taikoo Kom,.

133,234

30.62 3.0

.1912.

"}

"}

16. Sin Tai Yat,

133,235

148.72

Carvel

1912.

...

31

17. Sin Tai Yee,

133,236

148.72

1912.

...

"}

""

"}

18. Pak Hin Hok,.

133,237

27.11

17

Clencher

1912.

"1

"}

D 39

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1912.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built

of.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

1. Fiume,

128,683 838,52] 1910

550 Schooner

Iron

Kiel,

...1882 | Sold to Foreigners.

2. Hing Lee,

109,874 395.13 | 1903

288

Nil

Wood

Hongkong,

1903

Do.

3. Tow,

128,692 53.28 1910

330

"}

4. Tarang,

123,074

86.76 1907

Steel

Schooner Carvel San Francisco,

1910

Do.

"}

..1903 Constructively lost in typhoon.

5. Parva,

128,713

5.26 | 1912

6. Fiume,

128,683

838.52 1912

40 Nil

550 Schooner Clencher Kiel,..

""

Hongkong,

...1911 Sold to Foreigners.

.1882

Do.

7. Pak Hin Hok,.

120,976

8. Hoi Fung,

128,703

16.10 1905

69.41❘ 1911

17

Nil Carvel

Canton,

1903

Do.

400

Ketch Clencher Middlesbrough, ......1911

Do.

*

— D 40 —–

}

- D 41

Table XXII.

Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade Entered and

YEAR.

Cleared since 1903.

NO. OF

VESSELS.

ToNNAGE.

1903

46,255

21,716,870

1904

51,173

22,299,582

1905*

51,578

22,653,616

1906†

44,550

22,453,077

1907

47,660

23,032,891

1

1908

45,403

22,305,131

1909

43,794

22,415,125

1910

38,727

23,067,391

1911

44,978

23,063,108

1912

46,603

24,269,270

Net Increase in 1912 against 1903: -348 vessels and 2,552,400 tons.

* Steamships not exceeding 60 tons in Foreign Trade included for first time. † Decrease due to Typhoon of 18th September, 1906.

Table XXIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

Year.

Total Revenue of Department.

Total Expenditure of Department.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

C.

%

1903,.

285,288.42

158,936.52

55.71

1904,.

301,128.95

146,951,90

48.80

1905,.

302,817.76

147,396.72

48.67

1906,..

274,008.78

160,899 99

58.43

1907.

348,300.10

160,389 48

46.05

1908,

357,768.52

163,579.54

45.72

1909,

462,469.82

172,680.55

37.34

1910,....

494,234.84

160,035,89

32.38

1911.

506,964.85

* 161,149.32

31.76

1912,....

549,275.40

149,043.58

27.13

* Including $507.90 coal in stock.

- D 45

Annexe A.

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

19,240 seamen were shipped and 19,362 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year, com- pared with 18,262 shipped and 17,341 discharged during 1911.

175 distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home, &c.; of these, 54 were sent Home, 2 to Bombay, 3 to Calcutta, 1 to Colombo, 3 to Manila, 3 to Port Said, 27 to Singapore, 4 tó Sydney, 1 to Vancouver, 1 passenger to Australia, 39 to Canton, 5 to Hoihow, 3 to Japan, 1 to Manila, 2 joined the Chinese Customs, 2 deserted, 2 died in the Government Civil Hospital, 1 remained in the Sailors' Home and 21 obtained employment.

$4,241.62 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen,

Annexe B.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

Liquors Consolidation Ordinance, 1911.

1. The revenue collected from liquor duties and licensed ware- houses for the year 1912 was $705,574.80 made up as follows:

Duties, European Liquors, Duties, Chinese Liquors, ...

Licensed Warehouse Fees,

Licensed Warehouse Overtime Fees,...

$243,627.94 455,135.80

6,732 06

79.00

$705,574.80

2. The duty collected from European liquors shows a very slight increase as compared with 1911. There is a distinct decrease in the consumption of champagne, gin and beer. Of these the decrease in gin may be directly attributed to the high rate of duty. The decrease in champagne and beer appears to be due to more general causes. There is a noticeable increase in the consumption of brandy, and a slight increase in that of whisky. Other varieties show very little difference as compared with the two previous years. The details of the trade in European liquors is given in Table I.

3. The revenue from Chinese wines shows an increase which practically corresponds with the difference in the length of time during which the higher rate of duty was collected. (The present

D 46

rate came into force in March, 1911.) The actual quantity consumed is, as in 1911, rather below that consumed in 1910. This seems to be due to the unsettled conditions in the earlier months of the year and not to the higher rate of duty. The details of the trade in Chinese liquors is given in Tables II and III.

4. The expenditure incurred by the department was $56,149.74. This figure represents rather more than the actual cost of collection of liquor duties as a considerable amount of work is done by the department in connection with opium and other matters not con- nected with the Liquors Ordinance.

5. Thirty-two convictions were obtained against persons for being in possession of liquor the duty on which had not been paid. These cases were of a more or less trivial nature.

6. Opium. The imports of raw opium show a decrease of 8,925 chests or 42% and the exports a decrease of 6,7963 chests or 34%. This decrease is the natural outcome of the Opium Agreement of May, 1911, but has been intensified by the uncertainties and varia- tions of provincial policies in China with regard to opium generally and by the absolute exclusion of Persian opium from the China market. The general figures of the imports and exports since 1908 are shown in the following table:-

1912.

chests.

1911. 1910. 1909. 1908.

chests. chests. chests, chests.

Stock in hand 1st January,... Imported during the year,...

Total,..

Boiled by Opium Farmer,

Spurious opium destroyed,..

7,587 7,123 4,509 5,808 4,707 12,3614 21,286 31,743 35,734 41,821

19,9481 28,409 36,252 41,542 46,528

1,113 2

761 782 1,044

14

864 51 247

Exported during the year,.. | 13,2644 20,061 28,333 35,938 39,609

Total,

14,3791 20,822 29,129 37,033 40,720

Stock remaining on 31st Dec., 5,560 7,587 7,123 4,509 5,808

!

7. The imports and exports of the different varieties of raw opium are given in Table IV. It will be seen that practically the whole of the decreasc is in Bengal and Persian opium. There is a slight decrease in the imports of Malwa opium and an increase of 3,023 chests in the exports. This is largely due to the comparatively small reduction, as compared with Bengal opium, in the sales of Malwa opium in India for the China market. During the year 6,700 chests of Bengal and 14,560 chests of Malwa opium were sold in India for shipment to China. The import of Persian opium into China has been prohibited since January 1st, 1912. Further details of the opium trade are given in Tables V, VI, VII and VIII.

D 47

8. Four prosecutions were instituted for offences against the Opium Ordinance in connection with the movement of raw opium, and convictions were obtained in three cases. All four cases were connected with Persian opium.

9. Morphia and Cocaine. -The trade in morphia and cocaine has ceased except for local medicinal purposes. Compounds of Opium to the extent of 1,333 lbs. were exported to Java for the use of the Opium Regie.

10. Three seizures of morphia and eight seizures of cocaine. were made during the year. Six convictions were obtained: two for illegal possession of morphia and four for illegal possession of cocaine. 417 oz. of morphia and 4,240 oz. of cocaine were forfeited by the Magistrate to the Crown.

11. Sugar.-The imports of sugar show an increase of 72,485 tons or 28%. Particulars will be found in Table IX.

12. Preventive Force. Further powers were conferred on Re- venue Officers by Ordinance No. 31 of 1912 enabling them to make arrests in certain cases not connected with the Liquors Ordinance. Good work was done by the Force during the year and in addition to the cases mentioned above a considerable number of convictions were obtained through the medium of revenue officers for attempts to smuggle prepared opium out of the Colony and also for offences. against the Gambling Ordinance, the Arms and Ammunition Ordi- nance and the Post Office Ordinance.

28th February, 1913.

R. O. HUTCHISON, Superintendent,

Imports and Exports Office.

35

Table I.

- D 48

Class of Liquor.

Balance in

Bond on

31st De-

Exported

Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1912.

& ex Ship

Arrivals.

to Ship

Ship

Store.

cember,

1911.

Consumed

locally.

In Holt's

or ex

In H.K. & K. Godown Co.'s

General

Bond.

General Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Bonded

Warehouse.

Total in

Bond.

Warehouse.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gullons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons

Gallons.

Ale, Beer and Stout,

196,176

614,791

275,122

60,186

307,222

5,138

9,040

154,259

168,437

Bitters,

219

598

293

34

261

30

199

229

Brandy,

7,217

33,585

23,761

1,679

5,335

226

756

9,045

10,027

California Wine,

2,510

2,510

Champagne,

3,028

98,96

3,897

1,299

4,880

24

340

2,484

2,848

Claret,

6,898

24,167

12,229

3,446

8,906

34

2,442

4,008

6,484

Cider,

239

758

559

23

142

273

273

Gin,

5,582

28,475

16,992

6,252

5,034

...

20

...

118

5,641

5,779

Ginger Wine,

177

61

9

3

151

75

75

Liqueurs,

2,217

4,739

2,417

510

1,472

+

204

2,349

2,557

Malaga,

3

3

Madeira,

H...

123

390

28

173

137

175

175

Marsala,

229

437

90

62

205

809

309

Medicated Wine,

62

248

239

21

2

48

50

Muscatel,

26

...

26

Port,

4,399

14,184

8,141

1,206

4,847

...

32

268

4,089

4,389

Prune Wine,

30

19

11

11

...

Rum,

837

3,905

1,229

81 (1) 2,405

440

586

1,026

(1) Includes 340 gallons denatured for preserving Tobacco, and 23 gallons distilled locally.

Class of Liquor.

Balance in

Bond on

31st De-

cember,

1911.

Arrivals.

Table I,-Continued.

Exported

& ex Ship

to Ship

or ex

Bond.

Ship

Store.

Consumed

locally.

Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1912.

In H.K. & K.

In Holt's

General

Godown Co.'s

General Bonded

Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Total in

Bond.

Warehouse.

Warehouse.

Galions.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Sake,.

438

7,888

1,246 1,300

5,028

512

240

752

Sherry,

2,870

4,762

1,751

617

2,089

170

2,505

2,675

Sparkling Wine,

708

439

256

86

361

N

46

396

444

Spirits of Wine & Arrack.

19,526

262,352

180,125

(2) 72,306

28,816

631

29,447

Other Still Wine,.

2,903

57,723

43,748

2,290 (3) 4,212

1,054

3,322

4,376

Tonic Wine,

14

18

23

6

6

Vermouth,.

1,644

13,625

10,891

757

1,807

'136

1,678

1,814

Vebrona,

14

76

63

27

27

Whisky,

18,209

51,770

20,033

10,044

22.343

4,846

790

Wincarnis,

73

40

86

11.923

27

17,559

27

Wine (European), .....(4)

37,536

37,536

...

...

...

...

F

Includes 72,189 gallons denatured for burning, perfumery, &c. (3) Includes 44 gallons denatured for preserving Tobacco. Re-exported immediately without examination.

D 49

Table II.

Balance in Bond

Arrivals.

on 31st Dec., 1911.

Consumed

Locally.

Exported.

Denatured and used for Vinegar.

Bond.

Dis- Im- Distilled Im- Distilled tilleries. ported. Locally. ported. Locally.

ex Bond

or ex Ship to Ship

Distilled

Im-

Locally. ported.

Remaining in Bond on the 31st December, 1912.

In

Holt's Distilled General Locally. Bonded Co.'s Gen-

In

H.K. & K.

Godown

In Li-

censed

In Dis-

Ware.

tilleries.

Ware-

house.

eral Bond-

ed Ware-

house.

houses.

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,

9,905

15,243 916,744 1,053,075 651,227 873,266 268,165 82,723

93,621

70

299

6,889

18,708

""

35%

473

"}

}}

45%

""

"

50%

109,337

1,612

308 61,037

108510,462

11,406 31,912

42,347 32,401

7,583

75 2,233

""

Above 50%

2,421

15

1,461

7,411 28,082

1,724 435,160

75 3,237

15

3,561

40

132 1,344

742

4,909

7,697 35,547

200

20.947123,394

273

1,167 2,558

960

""

Total,.

121,327

15,659 1,498,247|1,106,918 719,234 |882,491 | 734,644 91,193

7,737 129,168

270

22,515 135,144 *19.725

* Not including New Territories.

D 50

Table III.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1912.

Output.

Hongkong and New Kowloon. Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight.| 693,214 489,487

Hongkong.

Rum,

35%

45%

}}

50%

;)

Total,

Consumed Locally.

Sold into

Bond.

Exported.

Denatured with salt for preserving bean-curd.

Denatured

with turpen- tine for

veterinary

purpose.

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

The 31st

Dec., 1912.

19,011

72,354

10 440 5,597

540

3,561

93,621

18,708

742

50,483

1.680 8,072

4.909

35,543

275

68

68

173

23

150

754,378 | 496,855

27,656

80,824

35,543

4

93,621

19,875

Manufactured in New Terri | Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight. 202,203 190,219 1,615 10,369 tories for consumption in

Above

""

35%

45%

50%

"

"

50%

"}

Total,

* No figures are available.

1,814 1,814

2,384

44

2,310

7

7

15

15

206,423 | 192.099 3,955 10,369

*

D 51

Table III,- Continued.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1912.

Manufactured in New Terri- tories for local consumption.

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight 193,560 | 193,560

35%

45%

Hongkong and New Kowloon

Manufactured in New Terri-

tories for consumption in Hongkong.

Manufactured in New Terri- { tories for local consumption.

Total,...

193.560 193,560

Exported.

Denatured with salt for preserving bean-curd.

Denatured

with turpen tine tor

veterinary

pripose

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

the 31st

Dec., 1912.

Total..

754,378 | 496,855

27,656 80,824

35,543

93 621

19,875

206,4:3 | 192,099 3,955 10,86

193,560 | 193,460

Grand Total,.

|1,154,361| 8:2.514

31,611

91.193

35 543

+

93,621

19,875

* No figures are available.

D 52

Table IV.

Varieties of Opium Imported.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISII. CHINESE. TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1911,

4,4801

9,779

5,221

1,804

2

21,286

1912,

4,097

5,350

2,266

6481

12,3611

Increase,

Decrease,

3831/

4,429

2,955

1,155

2

8,925

Varieties of Opium Exported.

MALWA.

PATNA. BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH. CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1911,

1912,

2,597

9,906

5,273

2,282

2

20,061

4,6202

4,215

1,978

1,4523

13,2661

Increase,

Decrease,

3,023

3,023

5,691

3,295

8292

ลง

9,817

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed {

1911

1912.

11,912

8,758 chests.

"

- D 53-

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER

FOR THE YEAR 1912.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

1.--Shipping.

2.-Trade.

3.--Revenue and Expenditure. 4. Steam-launches.

REPORT.

9.

10.

5.-Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping. 7.- Marine Magistrate's Court. 8.--Marine Court.

Masters,

Examination of

Mates and Engineers. Examination of Pilots.

11. Sunday Cargo Working. 12.-New Territories. 13. Lighthouses. 14.-Commercial

Intelligence,

Board of Trade.

TABLES.

I-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered. II.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared. III.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered

at each Port.

IV.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared at

each Port.

V.---Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI.-Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VII.-Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII.-Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

X.-Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XI.-Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII.-Statement of Revenue.

XIV.--Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary).

XV.-Return of Emigration.

XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

D 2

XVII.-Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary).

XVIII.-Return of Immigration.

XIX. -Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

XX.-Vessels registered.

XXI.-Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII.-Comparison in Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign

Trade entered and cleared since 1903.

XXIII.-Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. XXIV.-Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

ANNEXES.

A.-Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B.--Report on Imports and Exports Office. C.-Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D.--Report on Gunpowder Depôt.

1.-Shipping.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1912 amounted to 488,649 vessels of 36,735,149 tons, which, compared with figures for 1911, shows a decrease of 54,546 vessels, with an increase of 555,997 tons.

Of the above, 46,603 vessels of 24,269,270 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, as against 44,978 of 23,063,108 tons in 1911, and were distributed as follows:-

1911. Numbers.

1912. Numbers.

1911. Tonnage.

1912. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going ships,

10.5 %

8.4 %

35.0 %

32.4 %

Foreign Ocean-

going ships,

10.6

9.2

35:0

35.3

British River

Steamers,

16:0

15:0

17.3

17.3

Foreign River

Steamers,

3.3

3.8

3:0

3.5

Steam-launches

(under

60

tons),

7.7

8.6

0.6

0.6

Trading Junks,

51.9

55.0

9.1

10.9

100·0

100'0

100'0

100.0

D 3

The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the above figures.

2. Of ships of European construction, 4,154 Ocean Steamers, 1 Sailing Ship, 4,351 River Steamers, and 1,976 Steama-launches (not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 287 ships, as compared with 269 in 1911, and 26-7 in 1910.

3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean Vessels entering the port has increased from 2,495'1 tons to 2,575.7 tons. That of British ships has increased from 2,633.5 tons to 2,713'4 tons, while that of Foreign ships has increased from 2,365'7 tons to 2,457 tons.

During the past 20 years, the average tonnage of Ocean Vessels has increased from 1,155 9 tons to 1,969-2 tons.

The average tonnage of River Steamers entered during the rear has increased from 5849 tons to 585'1 tons. That of British River Steamers has increased from 599 tons to 6025 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers has decreased from 518 tons to 5151 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1911 and 1912 is given in the following table:-

1911.

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British

Ocean-ì

going

Foreign Ocean-

going,

3,907, 7,589,995 3,956

4,180 7,917,640 4,367|| 8,592,320

7,779,970 49 189,975

187

674,680

British River

Steamers...

6,871

4,116,736 | 6,968 | 4,197,744

97

81,008

Foreign River

Steamers.....

1,423

736,057 1,738

894,319

315

158,292

A

Steamship s

un-

der C0 tons 3,263

130,092 3,981 150,612 718

20.520

...

:

(Foreign

Trade)....

Junks, Foreign t

Trade,

25,331

2,572,588 25,593| 2,654,275

259

81,687

Total Foreign (

Trade,

44,978 23,063,108,46,603 || 24,269,270 | 1,625 | 1,206,162

:

Steam-launches

plying in Wa- 461,084 10,981,990 411,990 10,609,401

ters of Colony,

:

:

:

49,99€

372,586

Junks,

Local I

Trade,

*36,608 *2,134,054 † 30,056 †1,856,475

Grand Total,

-

6,552 277,579

543,570| 36,179,152 488,649 | 36,735,149 1,625 I 206,162 66,546 650,165

Net............

555,997 54,921

* Including 13,980 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 818,292 tons.

9,922

11

of 621,090

D 4

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean Shipping of 49 ships of 189,975 tons, or of 1·25 per cent. in numbers and of 2·49 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to improved trade, high freights, and a greater demand for tonnage. The advent of British India Steamship Company's vessels to the Colony is also a factor.

British River Steamers have increased by 97 ships of 81,003 tons or 141 per cent. in numbers and 197 per cent. in toanage. This is explained by the increased number of trips made by the Steamships Wing On and Wing Hon. The former having made 320 more trips than she did in 1911, and the latter 212. River Steamers generally have run more frequently.

Foreign Ocean Vessels show an increase of 187 ships of 674,680 tons or 447 per cent. in numbers and 85 per cent. in ton- nage. This result is due to increases in Japanese, Austrian, Chinese, Portuguese, and Russian steamers. Against this there are consider- able decreases in German, Norwegian, Danish, French and Dutch Steamers.

Foreign River Steamers.-Here is an increase of 315 ships of 158,292 tons, or 2:21 per cent. in numbers and 215 per cent. in tonnage. This is accounted for by the greater number of trips made during the year by French and Chinese Steamers.

In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade, an increase of 718 ships of 20,520 tons, or 22 per cent. in numbers and 157 per cent. in tonnage, is shown. This appears to be due to the greater number of launches running with passengers and cargo to places in Chinese territory more especially to the Eastward. Some of the launches on this run were heretofore employed in towing lighters, etc., in the harbour, but are no longer able to obtain such employment.

In Junks in Foreign Trade, an increase is reported of 259 vessels of 81,687 tons, or 1 per cent. in numbers and 32 per cent. in tonuage. This is accounted for by the increased control over these vessels, effected by the new system of licencing inaugurated early in 1912, having resulted in more accurate reports of their movements.

In Local Trade, large reductions are reported.

Steam-launches in Local Trade show a decrease of 49,991 ships of 372,586 tons, or 108 per cent. in numbers and 34 per cent. in tonnage. This is explained by the fact that almost all towing in the harbour, which formerly was done by small licensed launches, hired for the purposo by the European and Japanese firms concerned, is now done by the unlicensed private launches belonging to those firms.

Junks in Local Trade show a falling off of 6,552 vessels of 277,579 tons, or 181 per cent. in numbers and 13 per cent. in tonnage. For this large decrease it is difficult to account, but more than half of it is certainly due to the Sanitary Department

D 5

employing steam barges for a large part of the scavenging work. The remainder of the decrease is probably due to the new system of licencing not having been properly understood by the boat population for some time after its inception, with the result that full figures were not at first forthcoming.

It is interesting to note that the entries of Ocean Steamers during the last quarter of the year show an excess, over the average of the three previous quarters, of 122 ships of 175,332 tons. This is accounted for by the unprecedented demand for tonnage, during the closing months of the year, and consequent rise in freights.

6. The actual number of Ocean Vessels of European construc- tion entering during 1912 was 724, of which 336 were British and 388 were Foreign. In 1911 there were 720: 348 British and 372 Foreign.

These 724 ships measured 1,862,287 tons. They entered 4,155 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 8,186,136 tons. Thus, compared with 1911, 4 more ships, with a tonnage greater by 65,789 tons, entered 106 more times, and gave a collective tonnage greater by 430,103 tons.

Thus :-

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1911. 1912. 1911.

1912.

1911.

1912.

Steamers 344

335

1,952 1,977 3,781,6223,892,354

British

Sailing...

4

1

6

1 16,534

2,890

German,

111

98

657

637 1,133,786 1,129,054

Japanese,..

106

123 509

592 1,354,3621,572,194

Norwegian,

36

26 210

168

221,039 173,145

Austrian,.

6

10

24

46

96,380 153,624

Chinese,

20

30

192

236

241,362 275,310

Danish,

8

6

20

11

45,928 28,927

Dutch,

16

18

130

112

235,881 246,352

French,

27

26

152

142

242,469 229,532

Italian,.

Portuguese,

24

2

4

12

13

31,188 31,403

5

79

101

32,842

49,494

Russian,

11

18 20

35

53,080

103,998

Swedish,

6

6

14

14

25.778

37,262

Ste mers

18

18

71

70

243,619 260,597

U.S.A....

Sailing...

1

1

163

Total,

720

7244,049 4,155 7,756,033,8,186,136

D 6-

7. The 336 British ships carried 3,330 British Officers and 10 Foreign Officers, the latter consisting of 4 U.S.A., 3 Dutch, 1 Dane, 1 Norwegian and 1 German.

Thus, the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British ships was 0.30%, comprising 5 nationalities, a decrease of 0.05%, with a decrease in number of officers and of ships.

8. The 388 Foreign ships carried 2,720 officers, of whom 96 were British, as follows:--

1912.

1911.

In Chinese Ships

79

70

French

2

4

>>

>>

Japanese

9

12

United States Ships

4

"

96

90

Thus, 35% of the officers serving in Foreign ships were of British nationality, with an increase in number of officers and of ships.

9. The Nationality of the Crews in British and in Foreign ships was as follows:-

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREWS.

U. S. A. AND EUROPEANS

ASIATICS.

1911. 1912. 1911. 1912. 1911. 1912. 1911. 1912.

British, 348

Foreign,. 372

336 22,652 22,829 431 257 119,463 126,314

388 1,195 1,561 27,181 29,229112,584 120,280

Total,

720 724 23,847 24,390 |27,612 | 29,486 232,047 246,594

Hence in British ships :

And in Foreign ships: -

1911.

1912.

1911.

1912.

15.89 %

15.29% of the crews were British.

0·85 %

1.03% of the crews were British.

0·30 %

83.81 %

0.18% of the crews were other Europeans.

84.53% of the crews

were Asiatics.

19:28 % 19:35 % of the crews

were other Europeans.

79.87 % 79'62 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

D 7

2.-Trade.

In the absence of a Customs Department, the details of the Trade of the Colony which I am able to give are meagre, and of little value, being derived from reports of ship masters, which are given in round numbers, and the several items of cargo are only too frequently returned under the heading "general". In a few cases, however, as opium and sugar, exact figures can be obtained ; while in certain other items, from their nature, or for other reasons, approximately accurate returns are rendered. I therefore confine myself, in the following remarks, to these few articles of trade.

Imports.-Under this heading, which includes all cargo brought by Ocean Vessels or River Steamers (not in Junks or Steam- launches) and landed or transhipped in the Colony, 4,151,805 tons of cargo were reported during the year. This, compared with that reported during 1911 (3,995,793 tons), shows an increase of 156,012 tons, or 39 per cent.

Of this total, there appear increases in the import of coal, cotton, flour, sugar, and timber, while decreases are reported in kerosene oil, opium, and rice.

Coal.-An increase of 10,212 tons or 1 per cent. is here reported, 1,056,502 tons having been imported during the year. It is probably due to transhipments of coal to Canton, where there is an increasing demand for it.

Of the above total quantity, 73 per cent. was Japanese, Hongay and Fushun coming next with about 8 per cent. each, other descrip- tions of coal being imported in but small quantities. None arrived from either Australia or Labuan, and but one cargo from England, except that imported by the Admiralty, from Cardiff.

Cotton, including cotton yarn and cotton piece goods.-Here appears an increase of 20,552 tons or 514 per cent., which seems to be a genuine increase, and not due solely to a larger proportion of the imports being reported as cotton instead of general cargo. The reason for this phenomenal increase is not far to seek The trade in China, after a total cessation during the last 3 months of 1911 and the first 3 months of 1912, on account of the Revolution in that country, recommenced, and gradually assumed large pro- portions. These soon still further increased, partly owing to the assumption, by a large percentage of the population, of European dress, which opened up a new trade (now rapidly declining), and partly to the disappearance of the old stocks in the hands of the native merchants, and the necessity for their replenishment. The high rate of exchange was also a factor in increasing the trade although the unprecedented demand caused enhanced prices in spite of it. It is of interest to note that this large increase in imports does not include the large and increasing quantity of native grown cotton spun in the Colony, and re-exported as yarn.

Flour.-Here an increase of 16,620 tons, or 20 per cent, was reported. This is explained by the prices being moderate on account of the high rate of exchange. The wheat crop in North

D 8

China, also, has been poor for the past two seasons, thereby creating a demand for foreign flour, while the Chinese are quickly learning new uses for this commodity, which in many parts is taking the place of rice. Among these is a very fine description of Vermicelli, now manufactured at Amoy and Chefoo, which is in great demand, and 20 per cent, of the flour imported at Amoy (through Hongkong) is used for this purpose; considerable quantities are consumed locally and large shipments are made to Hongkong, Canton, the Philippine Islands, Singapore, and other ports out of China. This increased use of flour is evident in the Colony, being noticeable even among the boat population of the Harbour, where I see cakes and "flapjacks" being cooked and eaten, instead of the formerly universal rice.

Kerosene Oil.-Very large reductions are reported in both bulk and case oil imported during the year-of 42 per cent. in the former and 32 per cent. in the latter. Several causes militated to this end. The large stocks in hand at the commencement of the Revolution in China; the virtual total cessation of trade until well on in the year 1912; and the high freight rates, which have increased by more than 100 per cent. in twelve months.

The trade is now restored to its usual proportions, if not still increasing. Out of 105,425 tons imported during 1912, 15,859 tons, or 15 per cent. arrived during the month of December, which seems to point to an increased demand in view of the high freight rates now prevailing.

Liquid Fuel shows an increase of 2,724 tons imported, or 15'4 per cent.

This is due to the greater number of vessels now using this form of fuel instead of coal.

Opium is dealt with in the report of the Superintendent of Imports and Exports, forming Annexe B to this report.

Rice. Here is reported a decrease of 21,072 tons, or 36 per cent. The rice crops in the two Kwang Provinces have been good, thus the demand for foreign rice has not been so great as usual. The Siamese, Annamese and Cochin China crops were very poor and prices high. Siamese rice used to sell here at $4.50 per picul. This year as much as $7.00 has been asked, and paid The increased and increasing use of flour among the native population, noticed in my remarks under that heading, no doubt affects the rice market to a certain extent. The import of Japanese rice has apparently entirely ceased.

Timber. An increase of 13,169 tons or 22 per cent. is here reported. Although I do not think this is all a genuine increase, it is certain that the timber trade has received a considerable impetus recently, by reason of the increased demand for foreign woods for the building and furniture trades in Canton and the interior. The principal descriptions of timber importd are teak and ebony from Siam, and hardwoods, such as billion and yacal from Borneo. The demand for European styles of furniture among the Chinese is responsible for large increases in the import of teak.

D 9

Ebony is used for the manufacture of the Canton "blackwood" now so popular among foreigners. Billion, a very hard, heavy wood, whiteant proof, is being increasingly used for beams, rafters, and joists, in the building trade. Billion is also used almost exclusively for the manufacture of those universal necessities of life in China-chopsticks. Yacal has become very popular for boat and ship building, being easily worked, free froin knots, very durable, and can be obtained to almost any size. It is used for the frames of the better class of boats, steam-launches, &c., built in the Colony, while the sheathing and planking is generally made of teak. Native boats and junks are usually built of native wood-China pine-the import of which is not included in these figures.

The number and tonnage of ships of European type of construc- tion carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1911, was as follows:-

1911.

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

16,697

4,042 | 7,739,336 | 4,154 | 8,183,246 112 443,910

River Steamers, 4,147 | 2,425,S68 | 4,351 | 2,545,882

201 120,014

Sailing Vessels,.)

1

2,890

6

13,807

Total,..... 8,196 | 10,181,901 | 8,506 |10,732,018| 316 | 563,924 | 6

Net Increase,...... 310 50,117

13,807

12. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction exporting cargo, and shipping bunker coal, follow :-

EXPORTS.

1911.

1912.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Steamers, River Steamers,

Sailing Vessels,..

Total,

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. 4,029 7,732,115 4,167 8,183,264 4,147 | 2,426,925 |4,355 | 2,546,211 9 19,487 8,185 10,178,527 8,523 10,732,365

No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

138 451,419

208 119,286

1

2,890

8

16,597

346

570,435 8

16,597

1

Net Increase,

338

553,838

D 10

Exported 2,335,000 tons including River Trade as compared with 2,161,227 tons in 1911.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Steamers,

4,029

516,2324,167

550,858 138

34,626

River Steamers,..

1,147

65,075 | 4,355

72,166. 208

7,091

Total,..

8,176

581,307 8,522

623,024

346

41,717

:

Net Increase,

41,717

:

...

:.

D 11

J

13. The River Trade, compared with 1911, is shown in the

following Table :---

Year.

1911,..

1912,

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

337,207

308,773

2,343,414

363,776

319,565

3,435,235

14. The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony

for 1911 and 1912 :-

IMPORTS.

1912.

1911.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,

13,158

1,363,928

12,862

1,286,807

Local Trade,

14,891

934,032

18,798

1,068,211

Total,

28,049

2,297,960

31,660

2,355,018

EXPORTS.

1912.

1911.

Foreign Trade, 12,435

...

1,290,347

12,472

1,285,781

Local Trade, ........ 15,165

922,413

17,810

1,065,843

Total,

27,600

2,212,790

30,282

2,351,624

15. A summary of the Shipping and Trade of the Port for the year 1912. nearest 1,000 tons only

The trade return is given to the

D 12

TONS.

Passengers.

No. of

Ships.

Emi-

British Ocean-going,

3,956

Foreign Ocean-going,

British River Steamers, Foreign River Steamers,...!

145,000 132,000

Dis- In

charged. Transit.

1.472.000 1,155.000 2,472,000 4,367 2.033.000 1,006,000 2,105,000 6,968 219,000 188,000 1,738

grants.

Shipped.

Bunker Coal. Total.

Registered

Arrived. Departed.

Tonnage.

243,000 | 5,318,000

7,779,970

187,622

141,873

88,749

302,000 | 5,446,000

8,592,000

112,355

100,868

33,908

54,000

461,000

4,197,744

1,456,989

1,513,277

18,000

Total,..

17,029,869,000 2,481,000 | 4,577,000

295,000

623,000 11,550,000 | 21,464,383

894,349

270,524

194,445

...

2,027,490

1,950,463 | 122,657

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade, Junks, Foreign Trade,

Total Foreign Trade, Steam-launches, Local Trade,

3,981

25,593

2,000

468,000

6,000

732,000

6,000 14,000 150,612 1,200,000 2,654,275

22,759

28,306

31,734

30,678

::

46,603 | 4,339,000 3,219,000 | 4,577,000

629,000 12,764,000 | 24.269,270

2,081,983

2,009,447

411,990

2,000

1,000

27,000 30,000 10,609,404 3,613,712

3,649,856

Junks, Local Trade,..

Total, Local Trade,

Grand Total,

30,056

445,000

62,000

...

507,000 1,856,475

3,066

3,390

442,046

447,000

63,000

27,000

537,000 | 12,465,879

3,646,778

3,653,246

488,649 | 4,786,000 | 3,282,000 | 4,577,000

13,301, 656,000 13,301,000 | 36,735,149 5,728.761

5,662,693 | 122,657

D 13

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

16. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $549,275.40 as against $506,964.85 collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $42,310.55 or 8.3% :-

Light Dues..

Light Dues, Special Assessment, Licences and Internal Revenue, Fees of Court and Office,.... Miscellaneous Receipts,

- Total,

1911.

1912.

Incrcose. Decrease.

$ 82,578 09 $ 87,454.95 $ 4,876.86 $

92,802.14

137,368.56

194,023.86

98,448.45 163,923.47 199,146.33

5646,31

26,551,91

5,122,47

192.20

302.20

110.00

...$ 506,964.85 $549,275.40 $ 42,310.55 $

...

The principal increases are under Junk Licences, $16,595.76; Boat Licences, 6,763.60; Light Dues, $4,876.86; Light Dues, Special Assessment, $5,646.31; Storage of Gunpowder &c., $3,671.59; Sunday Cargo Working Permits, $3,250; Fines, $2,216; Engage- ment and Discharge of Seamen, $701.20; Emigration Brokers' Licences, $600; Examination of Masters, &c., $597.50; Register Fees, $592; Fishing Stake and Station Licences, $345.50; Rent for Private Moorings and Buoys, $180; Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, $180; Message Fees $110; Steam-launch Licences, &c., $84.25; and Sale of Printed Forms, $55.25.

There has been falling off in Revenue under the headings:-

Medical Examination of Emigrants, $2,049; Survey of Steam- ships, $1,690.07; Forfeitures, $235.20; Survey of Steam-launches, $180; Pilots' Licences, 25; and Engagement of Masters and En- gineers of Steam-launches, $6.

17. The expenditure of the Harbour Department (excluding the Imports and Exports Office) for 1912 was $149,043.58 as against $161,149.32 expended in 1911, showing a decreased expenditure of $12,105.74, which is partly due to the fact that the expenditure of 1911 included the sum of $7,386.47 paid for coal for Harbour Office steam-launches while in 1912 such expenditure, amounting to $6,544.98 (or $841.51 less than in 1911) was paid out of the Vote for Coal for Government Steam-launches under "Miscellaneous Services". Further, the above does not include the sum of $1,418.81 for balance due on account of installation of Matthews' Incandescent Oil Burners in Gap Rock, Waglan Island and Green Island Light- houses; $225 for a Buoy to mark a submerged rock in Cheung Sha Wan Bay; and $175 for 2 Duplex Test Gauges for the Marine Sur- veyor's Office; all these being "special expenditure" and non-

recurrent.

The Amount of Light Dues collected was as follows :-

Special Assessment.

No. of

Class of Vessels.

Tonnage.

Trips.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Total Fees

Collected.

D 14

Ocean Vessels,

3,732

8,163,183 | 1 cent.

81,631.83

1 cent.

81,631.83

..

163,263,66

Steam Launches,

1,911

86,820 I

868.20 1

868.20

1,736.40

""

"?

River Steamers (Night Boats),

2,825

1,486,347

4,954.92

7,432,38

12,387.30

River Steamers (Day Boats),

1,506 1,021,923

Nil.

Lako

"

8,516.04

8,516.04

Total,..

9,974

10,758,273

$87,454.95

$98,448.45

$185,903.40

^

4.

- D 15

Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, there were 304 Steam-launches (in- cluding Motor Boats) employed in the Harbour. Of these, 135 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, etc., 127 were privately owned, 20 were the property of the Government and 22 belonged to the Imperial Government, comprising 4 Military and 18 Naval.

Four Masters' Certificates were suspended for incompetency or negligence in the performance of their duties; 2 were suspended for 2 months one of whom was required to satisfy the Harbour Master as to his knowledge in the rules of the road before his certi- ficate was returned; 1 was suspended for one inonth and was required to pass a further examination before his certificate was returned; and 1 was suspended for a fortnight and was required to satisfy the Harbour Master as to his knowledge in the rules of the road before his certificate was returned.

Five hundred and three (503) engagements and four hundred and ninety-two (492) discharges of masters and engineers were made during the year.

Eight (8) Steam-launches were permitted to carry arms for their protection against pirates.

5.-Emigration and Immigration.

19. One hundred and twenty-two thousand six hundred and fifty-seven (122,657) Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1912 (135,565 in 1911).

Of these, 88,749 were carried in British Ships, and 33,908 in Foreign Ships.

These figures show a decrease under 1911 of 12.890 (or 9.5%), due undoubtedly to the fact that most of the poorer classes instead of emigrating to foreign countries joined the Revolutionaries in China during the latter part of the year.

One hundred and sixty-three thousand two hundred and forty- eight (163,248) returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had been emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 149,994 in 1911. Of these 125,499 arrived in British ships, and 37,749 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, etc., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 18 ships were registered under the pro- visions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 8 Certificates of Registry were cancelled. 105 Documents, etc., were dealt with in connection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $1,438 as compared with $846 in 1911.

D 16

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. Four hundred and eighty-seven cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court (235 in 1911). Breach of the Harbour Re- gulations, Disobeying the Lawful Orders of the Harbour Master, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Failing to observe the Rules of the Road, and carrying passengers in excess were the principal offences.

8.-Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899.)

22. During the year there were two courts held :-

(1.) On the 3rd day of September, 1912, inquiry was made into the circumstances attending the charge of misconduct on the part of W. McGhee, number of whose certificate of competency is 028,762 of Liverpool, First Officer of the British Steamship "Kumchow Official Number 128,682 of Hongkong.

The Court found that the charge made by the master of the British Steamship "Kumchow" against William McGhee, num- ber of whose certificate of competency is 028,762 O.C. of Liverpool, First Officer of the above named ship, proved, in that during the middle watch, Friday, August 23rd, at or about 0.30 a m. when he (the First Officer) who was in charge of the navigation of the ship steaming in the vicinity of Cape Padaran with 600 passengers on board left the bridge without any competent person in charge for a considerable period and was afterwards found by the master in one of the cabins in the after saloon drinking with a passenger. In con- sideration of the previous serious charge officially logged against him at Saigon but also of the previous record of sobriety and good conduct produced to the Court we ordered his certificate to be sus- pended for 12 months during which period a Second Mate's certificate will be granted to him and that before his certificate was returned to him he would be required to produce to the Board of Trade a reference of sobriety covering the previous six months.

(2.) On the 1st day of November, 1912, inquiry was held into the circumstances attending the loss of the British Steamship "Dacre Castle" Official Number 124,119 of Liverpool, Edward Arthur Gough, number of whose certificate of competency is 0.C. 034,469, London, was Master.

The Court found that the British S.S. "Dacre Castle" Official Number 124,119 of Liverpool of which Edward Arthur Gough, number of whose certificate of competency is 034,489, London, was Master, left Yokohama on a voyage to Boston and New York viâ ports and arrived at Keelung, Formosa, on the 14th September, 1912, with a general cargo of about 5,300 tons this being about one half her total capacity. That she was there moored head and stern be- tween two buoys in the inner harbour, and starboard anchor down.

On the 15th September a typhoon warning was hoisted, and the barometer gave warning of approaching bad weather. On that

D 17

evening additional wires to the buoys were supplied. The following day at about 4 p.m. the stern wires parted. The ship which had swung round in the vicinity of two Japanese steamers was given a sheer to port and the port anchor let go. She then began to drag and as soon as sufficient steam was available (5 p.m.) she got under way

and proceeded to the outer harbour, where both anchors were let go, in line to windward. Twice these anchors dragged, and ship was taken to windward and re-anchored. The second time she was struck by a very heavy squall and carried bodily on the rocks where she shortly afterwards broke into two.

The Court was of opinion that all possible steps were taken to prevent disaster, and that no blame attached to anyone concerned.

The Court wished to place on record their sense of the good seamanship displayed by the master in getting his ship out of the very narrow waters of the inner harbour under the then existing circumstances.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers.

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed:

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

20

3

Master, (Provisional Certificate),

First Mate,

13

1

Second Mate,

2

Mate,

1

Mate, River Steamer,

Total,

42

30

6

First Class Engineer,...

25

Second Class Engineer,..

39

J

Total,

64

4

*

D 18

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Or- dinance No. 10 of 1899:-

For Master,....

Candidates.

For Engineer,

Total,

Passed.

Failed.

58

4

67

125

4

10. Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

24. There was no candidate examined during the year. Four- teen licences were renewed.

11.-Sunday Cargo Working.

25. During the year 357 Permits were issued under Ordinance No. 1 of 1891 as compared with 319 in 1911. Of these 124 were not used as it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday and the fees in such cases were refunded.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $40,225 as against $36,975 in 1911.

12.-New Territories.

Fourteenth year of British Administration.

26. The Outstations attached to the Harbour Department, now eight in number, have continued to perform the work allotted to them, and during the year Licences, Port Clearances, Permits, &c., have been issued by them as follows:-

1911.

1912.

Cheung Chau, opened 1899.....

13,780

12.327

Tai O,

1899....

7,494

8,051

25

Tai Po,

1900.

8,928

8,879

Sai Kung,

1902....

3,504

2,372

""

Long Ket,

1905......

""

6,473

4,972

/

Deep Bay, Ping Shan, Lantao,

1911...

660

""

4,278

1911...

42

426

29

1912..

787

40,881

42,092

D 19

Lantao Station, on board a Police launch, was opened in October.

A Motor Boat has been attached to the Deep Bay Station to facilitate the licensing of small craft.

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Terri- tories during the year was $35,947.51 as compared with $29,054 in 1911.

13.-Lighthouses.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

27. During 1912, 756 vessels passed this Station, all of which were reported to the Harbour Office by telegraph. Of this number 133 were signalled by Morse lamp.

Three thousand and sixty-eight (3,068) telegraphic messages were sent, including meteorological observations for the Observatory, and 1,164 messages were received.

Telegraphic communication was maintained throughout the year except for a few interruptions, caused by the land lines being in

contact.

There were 144 hours and 50 minutes of fog and the fog signal was fired 935 times.

On only one occasion was the relief delayed by rough weather.

WAGLAN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1912, 1,832 vessels were reported. 1,603 messages were sent and 503 received. Owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted, 548 vessels were not reported.

There were 352 hours and 24 minutes of fog and the fog signal was fired 3,648 times.

The relief was delayed on two occasions.

GREEN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1912, 1,549 vessels were signalled and reported from this Station. 667 messages were sent and 443 were received.

Owing to communication being interrupted on 9 occassions, 43 vessels were not reported.

The new illuminating apparatus installed in 1911 in the above 3 lighthouses has justified its installation, inasmuch that the power of the lights has been at least doubled, at a cost reduced by $1,670 or 58%, as compared with 1910 (the last complete year during which the old burners were in use). On the other hand, certain

- D 20

parts of the apparatus have given considerable trouble, and have had to be constantly repaired or renewed. It is hoped that, with increased experience in the management of the apparatus, such repairs and renewals will become less frequently necessary.

A new light was installed on Kap Sing Island just to the south- ward of Kap Sing Mun during the year and was first lit on the 29th April. It is a double flashing light, and is fitted with a fog bell, actuated by clockwork. Apart from the difficulty in lighting the lamp when there is any wind due to the form of tower upon which it is supported providing no shelter, and inexperience on the part of the Chinese lightkeepers having caused irregularities in the working, the apparatus has done well, showing an excellent light. No opportunity has, however, been afforded for testing the efficacy of the fog bell since the apparatus has been erected.

14.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

28. Forty-eight (48) letters were received during the year from firms and individuals, principally in Great Britain, asking for in- formation concerning commercial matters in the Colony, requesting me to put them into communication with local firms, or to obtain local agents for the sale of their goods.

The replies sent have been as full as the information at our disposal permitted, but as the last class of application mentioned above predominated, and we find it increasingly difficult to induce local firms to undertake agencies, our efforts have not been as successful as I should wish. In the majority of cases, however, the desired results have been effected.

{

I

1

HARBOUR OFFICE,

30th January, 1913.

BASIL TAYLOR, Commander, R.N., Harbour Master.

:

TOTAL.

Australia and

New Zea-

land.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

D 21

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED in the

COUNTRIES WHENCE

Coast of China,

Ships.

Coast of China, Steamships under 60 tons.

Coast of China,] Junks.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

goes,

Vessels,..

Tons,

36

22

27

3,487

77,325 35,210 | 109,675 2,645,326

Crews,.....

3,034 1,325 4,610

156,175

Discharged,. 18,000 52 000 57,000

406,000

Transit,

24,000 9,000 47,000

571,000

Vessels,

Tons,.

Crews,.

[Vessels,.

Tons,.

185

:

:

:

:

271,103

13,397

36

22

27

3,672

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Cochin China. ́

Continent of

Europe.

Formosa.

Great Britain.

Straits

Settlements.

India and

Japanese Ports.

Java and other

Islands in

Archipelago.

the Indian

Kwang-chau-

wan.

.16

12

58,762

10

5

140

178

191

23

46,858 13,862 492,088 496,275 565.905

2,576 1,346 248 9,747 21,973 15.701

33,724

1,491

83,000

8,000

151,000 213,000| 266,000 37,000

:

48,000 18,000 | 569,000| 310,000| 437,000

2,000

2

2

3

1,267

6,237

1.359

9,611

77

211

90

132

46

12

6

142

180

194

23

77,325 35,210 | 109,675 2,916,429

58,762

46,858 15,129 498,325 497,634 575,546 33,724

TOTAL.

Crews,....

3,034 1,325 4,610

169,572

Car-

goes,

Discharged,.

Transit,

18,000 52,000 57,000

406,000

2,576

1483,000

FOREIGN.

IN BALLASTr.

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

[ Vessels,

Tons,

24,000 9,000 47,000

28 28

571,000

9

Crews,...

goes,

Discharged,

Transit,

61,427 38,492 34,376

2,623 1,646 785

11,000 57,000| 6,000

27,000 16,000 | 8,000

1,095 856 9,355

980,647 30.363 895,093

87,674 9,236 | 124,076

206,000

454,000

252,000

ŏl

148

57,668 544,920 81,062

2,520 17,323 5,289

91,000 100,000 |22,000

1,346 325 9,958 22,063 15,833 1,491

8,000

151,000 213,000 266,000 37,000

48,000 18,000 569,000| 310,000 437,000 2,000

81

21

398

63 105

91,674 234,219 1,151,576 138,606 |52,601

2,192

14,000 91,000 766,000 85,000 25,000

:

84

5,019 30,378 3,936 4,772

4,000 557,000| 6,000 | 116,000| 197,000| 661,000 | 67,000

Vessels,.

Tons,

Crews,..

Vessels,.

132 809 3,333

141,179 26,316| 415,565

:

:

:

6,178 6,956

52,717

2,292

143

17,423

576

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:.

28

28

51

148

Tons,..

61,427 38,492 34,376

TOTAL.

Car-

goes,

Crews,....

2,623 1,646 785

Discharged,

-Transit,

11,000 57,000 6,000

27,000 16,000 8,000

Vessels,

64

97

12,688 1,227 | 1,665

1,121,826 56,679 1,310,658 57,668 544,920 83,354 91,674 234,219 1,168,999 138,606 52,601

93,852 16,192❘ 176,793 2,520 17,323 5,432 2,192 5,019 30,951 3,936 4,772

206,000

454,000 91,000 100,000 22,000 14,000 91,000 766,000 85,000 25,000

252,000

+4000 | 557,000 6,000| 116,000| 197,000| 661,000 67,000

160

589

$6

85

21

84

402

63

105

86

161

262

105

goes,

612,000

823,000

50 36 4,582 856 9,355 138,752 73,702 | 144,051 | 3,625,973|30,363 | 895,093| 116,430| 591,778 |94,924 || 583,762 730,4941,717,481 172,330 52,601| 6

5,657 2,971 | 5,395

Discharged, 29,000 109,000 €3,000

51,000 25,000 55,000

243,849 9,236 121,076 5,096 18,669 5.537 11,939 26,992 16,079 5,427 1,772

Crews,....

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

Tons,.

Transit,

454,000

174,000| 108,000 22,000 165,000 304,000 1,032,000 122,000 25,000

4,000 605,000 21,000 685,000 | 507,000|1,098,000 69,000

IN BALLAST.

Vessels,..

Tons,

:

317 809 3,333

2

Crews,.....

412.282 26,316| 415,565

19.575 6,956

3.559

52,717

:

:

6,237 1,359 27,061

220

211

90

708

:

:

:

(Vessels,.

Tons,.

Chews,......

TOTAL.

('ar-

groes,

Discharged..

Transit,

64

50

36

97

160

138,752 73,702 | 144,051

5,657 2,971| 5,395

29,000 | 109,000 63,000

51.000 25,000 55,000 823,000

:

4,899 1.665 12,688 4,038,255 56,679 1,310,658 116,430 591,778 98,483 589,999 731,853 1,744,545 172,330 52,601 | (

263,424 16,192 176.793 5,096 18,669 5,757 12,150 27,082 46,787 5,427 4,772

612,000

454,000 174,000 | 108,000 22,000 165,000 304,0001,032,000| 122,000 25,000

4,000 605,000 24.000 685.000 507.000 1.098,000 69,000

91

163

261

596

$6

105

:

:

:

5

D 21

RED in the COLONY of HONGKONG from EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1912.

TRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

wan.

Archipelago.

Kwang-chau-

uu!yux 942

Į Java and other

Islands in

Ships.

Macao,

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao,

Junks.

Macao,

23

33,724

792

1,491

588,868

26,153

37,000

50,000

2,000

:

:

:

10

3,896

127

:

:

Mauritius.

America.

North and

South

Pacific.

North

Philippine

Islands.

Port Arthur.

Ports in

Hainan and

Tonkin. Gulf of

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

Amerita.

South

Tsingtau.

of America.

United States

:

:

1

2

114

1

85

3

2

1,450 3,563

150,471

1,227

99,497 8,549

2,621

53

142

7,544

62 5,171 208

109

1.000

5,000

46,000

2,000 129,000

3,000

21,000

:

44,000 12,000

1,000

:

:

:

:

1

1,423

92

:

13

15,198

1,501

802

140

:

1

:

Weihaiwei.

TOTAL.

5,216

68 11

231,330 14,536| 5,677,122

4,779 721 263,163

160,000 9,000] 1691,000

347,000 7,000 2,472,000

1

1,122 2,541 | 2,599

30

74

44

:

T:

:

217

317,890

15,216

23

:

33,724

797

592,764

1

3

127

:

1,491

26,280

37,000

50,000

|1,450 | 4,986

53 234

1,000

:

:

:

87

3

1

Ι

68

11

5,463

165,669 1,227 | 101,001| 8,549

8,346

46,000

62 5,311 208

2,000 129,000

3,743 2,541 2,599 | 231,330 14,536 5,995,012

139 74 11 4,779 721 278,384

3,000

160,000| 9,000| 1,691,000

2,000

:

5,000

***

21,000

44,000 12,000

1,000

:

347,000 7,000| 2,472,000

63 105

138,606 52,601

3,936 | 4,772

85,000 25,000

133

21,607 16,565

1,609 6,397

20,000

303

238

2

3

42

8

15

26,196 2,010

2,892 123

2,000 11,000 1,000

1,849

144

1,000

263

62,603 15,110 218,766 35,027 153,234 24,906 32,754 468,718

3,328

311 11,188 690 7,325 590 536 14,532

23,000 19,000 275,000 3,000 | 205,000 23,000 1,000 133,000

152

6

10

88

13,585

5,472,069

347,164

2,648,000

67,000

:

:

3,000

7,000

3,000 59,000 37,000

41,000 41,000

2,105,000

22

8

257

38

1

10

13,889 274 27,645

40,934

883

3,822

833

60

4,210

:..

:

1,869

31

206

1

2

1

47 2,418

10,267

16 119

232

4,617

:

702,954

74,176

63

333333

105

155

311

495

h

2

62

3

80

9

138,606 52,601 35,496 16,839

3,936 4,772 2,442

85,000 25,000 20,000 2,000

67,000

53,841 2,010

1,849 103,537

268 15

15,993 222.588 35,027 | 153,281 27,324 32,754

153

8

10

89

18,202

478,985

6;175,023

6,457

7,132 123

11,000 1,000

:

86 105

172,330 52,601 610,475 16,565

5,127 1,772 27,762 6,397

925

303

3

122,000 25,000

70,000

2,000

238

3

26,1963,460 3,563 1,849 | 213,074

2,892 176 142 144 10,872

14,000 2,000

1,000 69,000

2

9

69,000

:

5,000

24,000

7,000 103,000 49,000

144 5,197 372 11,394 690 7,341 709 536

1,000 23,000 19,000 275,000 3,000 205,000 23,000 1,000

3,000 7,000 59,000 37,000 3,000

41,000

156

348 18

154 6 10

11 18,831

16,337 318,263 43,576 155,855 24,906 32,754 700,048 14,536 11,149,191

403 16,359 $98 7,434 590 536 19,311 721 610,332

21,000 404,000 3,000 208,000 23,000 1,000 293,000 9,000 4,339.000

41,000 391,000| 7,000| 4,577,000

14,761

421,340

133,000

...

2,648,000

44,000

156

..

2,105,000

4,000

་་

27

8

257

:

17.785

271 27,645

:

:

:

960

60 4,240

1

1,423

92

:

51

1

2

56,132

883 5.326

2,671

31

346

:

:

:

1

1,169|4,959| 2 599

3

1

46 193

41

10,267

232

4,834

1,020,844

89,392

86

105

952

311

495

3

3

3

207

10

355

18

156

9

11

157

11 23,665

:

5172,330 52,601| 628,260| 16,839

5,427 4,772 28,722 6,457

122,000 25,000 70,000 2,000

3 69,000

1,000

:

5,000

53,841 |3,460 | 4,986| 1,849 | 269,206 17,220 323,589 43,576 | 157,024 29,865 35,353 710,315 14,536 |12,170.035

7,132 176 234 144 13,543 431 16,705 898 7,180 783 580 19,543 721 699.724

14,000 2,000

69,000 21,000 404,000 3,000 208.000 23,000 1,000 293,000 9,000 1,339,000

24,000 7,000 | 103,000 |49,000 4,000

41,000

391,000 7,000| 4,577,000

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Australia and

New Zealand.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

Ceast of China,

Ships.

Coast of China,| Steamships under 60 tons.

Coast of China,

Junks.

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLE

COUNT

Cochin China.

[ Vessels,

Tons,

29

13

25

3,603

:

50

16

1

2

:

100

170

220

54,728 17,675 85,792 2,580,357

69,026 449,85.

2,358 3,549501,375 | 483,559 | 681.001

Crews,

2,456 920 3,543

166,444

2,467 1,475

35

10,806 22,671 18,673

Shipped, Bunker

Cargoes.

Coal,...

6,000 3,000 23,000

679.000

14,000

15,000

$,000 1,000 1,000

100,000

Vessels,

11

52

Tons,

Crews,

20,286

:

67,073

470

3,145

Bunker Coal,

2.000

5.000

Vessels..

29

24

25

3.655

Tons,.

54.728 37.961 85,792 2,647.430

:

:

:

·:

:

:

1,000 81.000 111,000

70.000

12,000

4,000 59,000

39,000

1+

3

12

17,347

9.261

:

:

:

14

25.683

27,291

791

164

652

922

3,000

1,000

5,000 2,000

61

19

1

2

100

$2

231

86.373

54.259

2.358

3,549 501,375 509,242 | 708,292

Crews,

2,456 1,390 3.543

169,589

3,258

1.639

35

Shipped, Bunker

(Cargoes..

6,000 3.000 23.000

679,000

14,000

15,000

1.000

Coal,...

[Vessels,

8,000 3,000 1,000

18 16

20

Tons,

Ciews,

Cargoes, Shipped, Bunker

Coal,..

3,000

63.260 20.743 75,318

2,684 1,030 1,739

32,00 4,000| 26,000

1 000

[Vessels,

1

3

Tons,

2, 09.4,582

105,000

1,166 844 9,841

1,016.686 31.25+ 1,071,880

59,886 9,674 154,370

246,000 1000| 701,000

44,000 2.000

49 852 2,169

60,659 29.124 169,131

15,000 1.000

32

152

3

39,748 | 520,102

1,350 17,908

30,000 | 103,000

8,000 34,000

20

90

6,740 251,873

177 5 523

2,000 75.000

1,000 1,000

16

1!1 10.806

81,000 111.000

70,000

4.000 64,000 41,000

93

23.323 19,595

269

$5,414 235,989 | 794,846

2.058 5,713 26,174

13.000

71.000 114,000

15,000 62,000

1

3

16

67

141

21,594

2,699

16,027 25,354

80,566 249,273

Crews,

49

156

2,267 7.450 22,853

760

89

532

675

Bunker Coal,

باله

6.000 3,000

3,000

1,0 0

3.35

24,000 3,000

5,274

{ Vessels,

19

19

20

Tons,

Crews,

(Vessels,

65,369 25,325 75,318

2,733 1,186 1,739

Cargoes, 32,000 4,000| 26,000 Shipped, Bunker

Coal....

3,000 1.000

47

20

45

Tons,

Crews,

Shipped, Bunker

Vessels,

J

14

Tons,

2,109 24,868

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

49 626

2,000

1,215❘ 1,696

12,010

1,077 345 60,378 1,241,011|| 61,342 | 522,801

62,153 17,124 177,223 2,110 17,947

246,000 1,000 | 704,000 30,000 | 103,000

50,000 5,000

11,000, 31,000_

4,769 844 9,841

82 168

117,988 38,418 161,110| 3.597,043 31,254 | 1,071,880 108,774 | 565,100

5,140 1,950 5,282

226,330 | 9,674 | 151,370 3.817 19.383

Cargoes,. 38,000 | 7,000| 49,000

925,000 1,000| 701,000 44,000 118,000

Coal,... 11,000 2,00 1,000 144,000 2,000

20,000 34,000

101 852 2,169

127,732 29.124| 169,131 38,941

5,412 7,450 22,853 1,551

11,000 3,000

6,000

52

153

6

85.414

92

106

22,767 277,227 |

709 6,198 2,058

2,000 75,000 13,000

2,000 1,000

4

9,098 255,429 586,789 719,548 1,475,847

212 5,631 12,864 28,384 44,847

2,000 76,000 94,000 182,000 181 000

1,000 1,000 4,000 74,000 101,000

16

160

410

316,555 1,044,119]

116

263

9,548 31.448

71,000 114,000

39,000 65,000

489

34

4

3

16

79

155

48

48

45

4,870 1,696 12.010

116

11,960

203

1,000

172

16,027 25,354

532 675

1.000

106,249 | 276,564

4,487 6,196

29,000 5,000

7 108

116

342

611

Tons,

Crews,

5,189 2.576 5,282

Cargoes.. 38,000 7,000 49,000 Shipped, Bunker

Coal,... 11.000 4,000 1,000

120,097 63.286 161,110 3,724,775 60,378 1,241,011 147,715 577,060 | 25,125 | 280,776 586,759 825.797 1,752,+11|

231,742 17,124 | 177,223 5 368 19.586

925.000 1,000 74,000

44.000 118,000

155.000 5,900

26.000 35.000

}

741 6,309 12,864 32 871 51,043

2.000 76.000 94,000 182,000 | 184,000

2,000 1.000 4,000 | 103,000 106,000

Continent of

Europe.

Egypt.

Formosa.

Great Britain.

India and

Straits

Settlements.

Japanese Ports.

Continent of

Europe.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

D 22

S and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED in the COLONY of HONGKONG to EACH COUNTRY, in the

Mauritius.

North Ameri ca.

Philippine

Islands. -

Hainan and

Ports in

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Port Arthur.

50

16

1

100

170

220

15

791

126 | 449,GST

2,358 3,549| 501,375 | 483,559 | 681.001

20,463

587,940

:

:

:

167

1,475

35

000

15,000

111 10,806 22,671

1,000

18,673

1,004

29,437

81.000 111,000 70,000

20.000

38,000

000

14

3

'47

9,261

'91

164

: :

:

:

4,000

59,000

39,000

5,000

11,000

12

14

6

25.683

27,291

12,047

2,162

652

:

922

269

155

100

1,000

5,000

2,000

1,000

:

:

64

19

1

2

100

182

234

21

795

:

73

54.259

2,358

3,549 501,375 | 509,242 | 708,292

32,510

590,102

158

1,639

35

00

15,000

00

1,000

4,000 64,000

111 10.806 23.323 19,595

1.000 $1,000 111.000

70,000

41,000 6,000

1,273

29,592

20,000

38,000

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

18

1,123 159,00

50,357

5,483

91

7,647

3,035

154

1,122 2,

50

153,000

17,000

3,0

23,000

5,000

1,000

1

51

1

1

1,423

11,80 171,344

2.874

2,416

92

230

2,829

28

54

1,000 2,010

4,000

2

99

3

2

2,816 171,430 221,701

186 7,877 5.864

8,357

3,538 2.4

182

104

:

:

153,000 17,000

3,0

32

152

800

48 520,102

50 17,908

GO | 103,000

00 34,000

3 90

6,740 251,873

177 5 523

2,000 75,000

1,000 1,000

16

93

269

50 103

85,414 | 235,989 794,846 | 130,599 52,580 | 32,209 16,522 41,286 951

2.058 5,713 26,174

3,911 4,830

2,140

6,359

13.000 71.000 114,000 31.000 16,000 1,000 5,000

15,000 62,000 7,000 6,000 1,000 1,000

11,000

144

1,000 25,000

9,000

1,000

1,0

303

362

1

48

198

2

11

91

5,077 65

28,000 1,000

1,000

:

:

62,251 167,519 | 3,994

52,800

98,105 1,2

3,757 7.825 89

$3,000 76,000

1,064

5,231

3,000 112,000

13,000 18,000

2,000 32,000

23

20.

1

3

16

67

141

12

:

11

6

87

72

46

34

2,699 16,027 |25,354

30

#9

532 675

00

1,0 0

52

153

16

2

31,000

32

168

116

74 565,100

17 19.383

10 | 118,000

¡

00

34,000

34

4

3

16

80,566 | 249,273 18,573

3. 35 5,274 505

24,000 3,000 3,000

6 106

160 410

68 105

42 522,801 22,767 277,227 85.414 316,555 1,044,119 149.172 52,580

10 17,917 709 6,198 2,058 9,548 31,448

4,416 4,830

00 103,000 2,000 75,000 | 13,000 71,000 114,000 31,000 16,000

00

2,000 1,000

39,000 65,000 10,000 6,000

4 92

263

489

71 105

9,098 255,422 586,789 719,548 1,475,847 151,062 52.550 620,149

212 5,634 12,861 28,384 44,817 4,915 4,880 31,577

2,000 76,000 | 94,000 |182,000 | 184,000 51,000 16, 00 39,000

1,000 1,000

4,000

74,000 101,000

12,000 6,000 12,000

79

18

...

3,530

194 8,609

13,770

71,988 7,972

48,284 2,4

319

46

940

591

2,985 156

:

2,659

1

:

:

10,000

...

15,000

:

155

309

449

1

.53

270

6

11

137

:

35,739 16,716 49,895

2,159 6,405

1,000 5,000

1,000 1,000

935

951

:

,76,021 239,507 11,966

52,800 146,389 | 3.6

6,017 65

303

16,522

6,359

5,000

362

28,000 1,000

-1,000

Ι

:

4,318 10,810 245

$3,000 76,000

1,064

7,890

3,000 112,000

:

13028,000

-2,000

47.000

I

169

246

2

B

92

41,286 951

5,077 65

1,423 221,871 217,876 3,994

94 11,424 10,860 $9

28,000 | 1,000

236,000 93,000

58,283 99.227 3,6.

1,218 5,281

3,000 112,000| 3,00

1

1,000

1,000

36 000

23,000

3,000

32,000 1,00

155

15

11,960 | 16,027 (25,351

51

203

532

675

10 1,000

1,000

:

:

6

87

I

10

123

4

1

47

106,249 276,564 30,620

5,692

194 8,609

29,000

4,487 6,196

5,000

774

171

46

940

4,000

:

:

:

:

:

1,423 25,580 243,332 7,972

2.874

92

1,000

801 5,814 156

2,000 14,000

28

:

50,700 2.41

2,713

15,000

1-

...

:

172

7

108

116

42

644

89 105

960

309

449

1

2

00

35.000 2,000 1 000

5577,060 | 25,125 280,776 586,789 | 825,797 |1,752,411| 181,682|52,580| 625 841

38 19,586 741 6.309 12,864 32 871 51,043 5,689 4,830 32.051

00 118,000 2.000 76.000 94,000 182.000 184,000 51,000 16,000 39,000

16,000 6,000 | 12,000

4000 | 103,000 | 106,000

16.716 49,895 951

6,105 6,017 65

5,000 28,000 1,000

1,000

1.000

179

2,846 247,451| 461.208|11,966

369

6

14

139

186 12.225 16,674 245

236,000 93,000

1,000 38,000

37,000

:

:

61.157 149,927| 6,0

1.246 7.994

3.000 112,000| 3.00

3,000

30

17,000

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

islands in

the Indian

Archipelago.

Kwongchau-

wan.

- D 22

S TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Ships.

Macao,

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao,

Junks.

Macao,

Mauritius.

RED in the COLONY of HONGKONG to EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1912.

North Ameri ca.]

Philippine Islands.

Hainan and Ports in

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Port Arthur.

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

South Africa.

America.

South

South Pacific.

Tsingtau.

15

20,463

:

:

...

791

587,940

:

1,004

29,437

20,000

38,000

5,000

11,000

G

4

:

2,047

269

1,000

2,162

155

8,573

:

505

21

795

2,510

590,102

1,273

29,592

0,000

38,000

6,000

11,000

50 103

144

303

362

1

0,599 52,580

32,209 16,522

41,286

951

3,911 | 4,830

2,140

6,359

5,077

65

1.000 16,000

1,000

5,000

28,000 1,000

7,000 6,000

1,000 1,000

1,000

12

11

6

87

3,530

194

8,609

319

46

910

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

1

11

1,423 159,60 50,357

94

7.617

153,000

18

:

3,035

J

17,000

23,000 5,000

5

51

1,423

11,80 171,344

92

210

2,829

1,000

2,070

4,000

126

99

2

1

5,483

1,122 2,422 1,423

154

50

H

:

10

52

3

5.276

13,367 211,880 5,811

5,585,729

91

622

3,000

:

12,000

5.015 169

96,000 1,000

277,027

:

:..

1,343,000

1,000

1,000 1,000

1,000

1,000 1,000

274,000

1

1

2

:

ӣ

2

185

2,874

2,416

1,671

17,733 3,552

396,973

28

54

70

276

151

10,278

:

:

:

:

:

1.0.0

1.000 1,000

29,000

3

2

1

2

10

58

5

5,461

2,816 171,430 | 221,701

8,357

186

7,817

5,864

182

104

3,538 2.422 1,423 4,671

88

70

91

153,000 17,000

3,000

:

1,000

25,000

9,000

1,000

1,000 1.000 1,000

12,000

1,000

13.367 | 229,613 | 9,363

622

320 5,291

96,000 1,000

2,000 2,000

5,982,702

287,305

1,343,000

303,000

48

198

2

11

91

1

6

4

63

13,955

:

:

:

:

62,251 167,519 3,994

3,757

7.825

89

83,000 76,000

13,000

18,000

52,800 98,105 1,209 22,622 4,593

1,064 5,231

3,000 112,000

2,000

32,000

:

373,671

5,274,764

72 556

149

12,900

342,311

11,000 1,000

84,000

1,876,000

5,000

257,000

72

46

2

3

1

3,571

13,770 71,988 7,972

48,284 2,418 3,191

:

3,252

842,899

:

:

591

2,985 156

2,659

119 173

31

52,419

3,000

10,000

:

15,000

1,000

69,000

68

105

155

309

449

1

53

270

6

11

137

3

64

17,526

9.172 52,580

35,739

16,716

49,895

951

4,416 4,830

2,459

6,405

6,017

65

1,000 16,000

1,000

5,000

28.000 1,000

0,000 6,000

1,000 1,000.

-1,000

:

:

:

,76,021 239,507 11,966

4,318

10,810 245 $3,000 76,000

28,000

47.000

52,800 | 146,389 3,627 25,813 4,593

221 734 1,064

119 7,890

14,000 1.000 3,000 112,000

2,000

376,923

6,117,663

12,931

394,760

$1,000

1,876,000

6.000

326.000

71

935

2,000 6,000 12,000

105

1,062 52.530 620,149 16,522 41,286 951

4,915 4,830 31,577 6,359 6.077

1,000 16, 00 39,000 5,000 28,000 1,000

1,000

303

362

Ι

169

246

13

92

3

10

115

65

94

1,000

1,423 | 221,871| 217,876 3,994

10,860 89 11,424

236,000

36 000

58,283

93,000

23,000

99.2273,631 24.045 | 4,593

160 617 149 1,218 5,281

3,000 112,000| 3,000 14,000 1,000

3,000 32,000 1,000 1,000

3 19,231

13.367 55,551 | 5,811 || 10,860,493

622

169

619,338 17,915

3,219,000 12,000 150.000 1,000

6.000 1,000 1,000

531,000

18

15

6

87

}

10

123

4

1

47

3

7

0,620

5,692

191

8,609

774

474

46

940

92

1,000

89 105

:

:

1,000

930

309

449

1

2

',682|52,580 | 625 841

1,689 4,830 32.051

,000|FG.000 39.000

1,000 6,000 12.000

49,895 16 716

951

6,405 6,017 65

5,000

1,000

28,000 1,000

801

2,000

179

2,816 247,451 | 461.208||1,966

12.225 186

16,674

236,000 93,000

1,423 25,580 243,332 | 7,972 |

5,814

14,000

369

156

2,874

28

6

14

245

1.000

1,000

38,000

37,000

50,700 2.418| 3.191| 4,671

2,713

15,000

139

61,157 149,927| 6,049 |27.236 9.264

825 219 1.246

309 7,994

3.000 112,000| 3.000|14.000| 1,000

1 000 3,000

1,000 47,000 1.000

:

149 178

70

:

1,000

5

10

10

20,985 3,552

307

2,000 1,000

122

18,222 320

12,000 180,000, 1.000

1 000 8.00J | 2,000

3,756

1,239,872

62,727

98.000

22,987

13,367 | 606,536|9,383| 12,100.365

622

682.065

3,219.000

2

151

5

629,000

of America.

United States

Wei-hai-wei.

TOTAL.

D 23

Table III.--NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION

ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1912.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

ENTERED.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

5,246 5,677,122 263,168

217 317,890

15,216

5,463 5,995,012 278,384

American,

64

256,247 10,009

6 4,350

257

70 260,597 10,266

Austrian,

46

153,624 3,627

46

153,624 3,627

Chinese,

576 344,034 67,558

40 34,220

2,240

616

378,254 69,798

Chinese Junks,

9,593 921,289 126,968

3,590 443,210

56,957

13,183 1,364,499 183,925

Danish,

11

28,927 439

11 28,927 439

Dutch,

90 228,477 5,932

22 17,875

814

112 246,352 6,746

French,

495 551,039 21,332

1

279

22

496

551,318 21,354

German,

564 1,033,068 39,535

73 95,986

4,251

637 1,129,054 43,786

Italian,

13 31,403 1,176

13 31,403 1,176

Japanese,

566 1,536,371 41,490

26

35,823 1,235

592 1,572,194 42,725

Norwegian,

129 133,913 4,566

39

39,232

1,252

168 173,145 5,818

Portuguese,

232 70,320 6,220

1

558

46

233 70,878 6,266

Russian,

33 99,167 2,107

2

4,831

86

35 103,998 2,193

Swedish,

14 37,262 572

14

37,262 572

Steamships under 60

tons trading to ports outside the Colony,

1,159 46,928 15,633

817

26,590 7,016 1,976 73,518 22,649

TOTAL,

18,831 11,149,191 610,332 4,834 1,020,844 89,392 23,665 12.170,035 699,724

_

D 24

Table IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION

CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1912.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

5,276 5,585,729 277,027

185 396,973

10,278 | 5,461 5,982,702 237,305

American,....

68

256.184 11,087

4

1,990

141

72

261,174 11,228

Austrian,

46 153,624 3,904

46

153,624 3,904

Chinese,

591

360,695 40,814

29

17,554

1,266

620 378,249 42,080

Chinese Junks,

10,203 1,113,166| 159,447

2,256 177,740

23,793

12,459 1,290,906 183,240

Danish,

10 25,923 400

1

3,001

39

11 28,927 439

Dutch,

100

226,785

6,461

12

19,567

602

112

246,352 7,063

French,

489

545,718 21,013

8

6,771

289

497

552,489 21,302

German,

475

929,462 34,381

162 201,367

9,636

637 1,130,829 44,017

Italian,

13

31,403

1,152

13

31,403 1,152

Japanese,

427 1,268,175 34,369

168 309,410

6,617

595 1,577,585 40,986

Norwegian,

108

111,380 4,376

62

63,670

'2,264

170

175,050 6,640

L

Portuguese,

Russian,

Swedish,

232 70,219

6,204

1

714

233 70,933 6,212

33 98,910

2,279

2

5,088

70

35 103,990 2.349

14

37,262

522

14

37,262

522

1

500

18

6

1,288

79

1,788

97

No Flag,

Steamships under 60 tons trading to ports outside. the Colony,

1,147

47,776 16,033

858

29,318 7,496

2,005 77,094 23,529

TOTAL,...... 19,233 10,862,911 619,487 3,754 1,237,454 62,578 22,987 12,100,365 682,065

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

I

TOTAL.

T

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,.

Discharged,...

Cargoes,

Transit,..

Vessels,

:

:

Aberdeen.

:

:

:

Cheung Chau.

Long Ket.

Saikung.

:

:

:

:

:

D 25

Table V-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED

at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1912.

Shaukiwan.

Stanley.

Tai O.

Tai Po.

:

:

NAMES OF PORTS.

Yaumati.

Victoria.

Hunghom,

5,246

5,246

5,677,122

5,677,122

263,168

263,168

1,691,000

1,691,000

2,472,000

2,472,000

217

217

Tons,

Crews,..

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Vessels,

Discharged,

! Transit,..

:

:

:

:

:

317,890

317,890

15,216

15,216

:

:

5,463

5,995,012

5,463

5,995,012

278,384

278,384

:

:

466

88

:

:

1,691,000

1,691,000

2,472,000

2,472,000

769

14

39

2,195

10,014

13,585

Tons,

Crews,..

2,302

492

Discharged,

9,000 1,000

Cargoes,

Transit,......

Vessels,

29

41

Tons,

13,142 1,290

75,623

7,380

64 637

201,151 5,180,162

5,472,069

42 203

51,000

:

28,113

101,000 2,486,000

308,632

347,161

2,648,000

2,105,000

2,105,000

311

3

10

4,223

4,617

1,075 532

:

53,861

249

393

646,844

702,954

Crews,

[ Vessels,

207 233

495 129

5,013

72

333

93

68,558

74,176

1,080

17 49

2,195 14,237

18,202

Tons,

Crews,..

14,217 1,822

129,484

313 1,030

2,509 725

12,393

114

296

Cargoes,

Discharged,... 9,000 1,000

Transit,...

51,000

:

:

:

:

201,151 5,827,006

28,113 377,190

101,000 2,486,000

6,175,023

421,340

BRASION

Vessels,

466

888

769 14

Tons,

13,142 1,290

75,623

39

64 637

Crews,..

2,302 492

7,380

42 203

Discharged,... 9,000 1,000

51,000

:

2,105,000

2,195

15,260

201,151 10,857,284

28,113 571,800

101,000 4,177,000

2,105,000

18,831

11,149,191

610,332

4,339,000

Cargoes,

Transit,..

4,577,000

4,577,000

Vessels,

29

41

:

311

3 10

4,440

:

4,831

Tons,

1,075 532

53,861

249

393

964,734

1,020,841

Crews,.

Vessels,

207 233

5,013

72

93

83,774

89,392

Tons,

495 129

14,217 1,822

1,080 17 49

2,195

19,700

23,665

Crews,

2,509

725

129,484

12,393 114

313 1,030

201,151 11,822,018

12,170,035

:

296

28,113 655,574

699,724

Discharged; 9,000 1,000

:

51,000

101,000 4,177,000

4,339,000

Cargoes,

Transit,..

:

4,577,000

4,577,000

TOTAL.

D 26

Table VI. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1912.

IN

BRITISH.

BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

NAMES OF PORTS.

Aberdeen.

Cheung Chaft.

Deep Bay.

Hunghom,

Long Ket.

Saikung.

Shaukiwan.

Stanley.

Tai O.

:

:

:.

:

:

Tai Po.

:

Yaumati.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Victoria.

TOTAL.

5,276

5,276

5,585,729 5 585,729

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Shipped.

Bunker Coal, .

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

:

:

:

:

:

÷

:

Vessels,

Tous.

Crews.

81 38

2,806. 405

503

224

Cargoes,

2,000

Shipped.

Bunker Coal,.

Vessels,.........

139

Tons,.

Crews..

3,367

ེརྩ

69

745

746 432

Bunker Coal,

220 107

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN

BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

Vessels.

Tons,.

:

:

:

:

:

6,173 | 1,150

277.027

277,027

1,343,000 1,343.000

274,000

274,000

t

185

I

185

396,973

396,973

10.278

10,278

29,000

29,000

5,461

5,461

5,982.702 5,982,702

287,305

287,305.

1,343,000 1,343,000

303,000 303,000

540

7

22

|65,909

282

590

2,149 11,118

196.926 5,007,846 5,274,764

13,955

6,792 90

1641

27,659 306,879 342,311

£9,000

:

84.000 1,741,000 1,876,000-

257,000

516

10

61,187 31 357

5,306 24 117

22

22

:

1,056

17

44

:

:

:

:

:.

:

257.000

2815

777,212

3,571*

842,899

45,824

52,449,

69,000 69,000-

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

127,096 313 947

12,098 114 281

49,000

:

:

:

:

Crews,

1,249

656

Į

Cargoes,

2,000

Shippeù,

Bunker Coal,.

:

"Vessels,

81 38

Tons,

2,806

405

Crews,

503 224

Cargoes,

2.000

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

:

:

Vessels,

139 69

Tons,

3,367

745

Crews,

746 432

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

:

220

107

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

:

:

6,173 1.150

:

:

:

:

:

:

2,149

13,933 17,526

196,926 5,785,058 6,117,663

27,659 352,703 394,760

84,000 1,741,000 1,876,000

:

:

326,000 326,000-

2,149 16,394

19,231

619,338

196,926 10,593,575 | 10,860,493

84,000 3.084,000 3,219,000

531,000 531,000

6,792 90

164

...

27,659

583,906

540

7

22

65,909 282 590

49,000

23

22

:

:.

516

10

61,187 31

357

5,306 !

24 117

:

:

3,000

3,756-

1,174,185 1,239.872

56,102

62,727

98,000

98,000

1,056

17

44

2.149

19,391

22.987

127,096

313 917

196,928 11,767,760 | 12,100,365

12,098

114 281

27,659 640,00S 682,055

49,000

:

84,000 3,084,000 3,219,000

:

629,000 629.000

...

.

:

:

:

:

:

Crews,

1,249

656

Cargoes,

2,000

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

Tons.

TOTAL.

:

:

:

:

#1

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1912,

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

D 27

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Cargo, gers. Tons. sels.

Ves-

Tons. Crew.

Passen- Ves-

gers. sels.

Tons.

Crew.

'Fassen-

gers.

('argo,

Tons.

Canton,

1,480 | 216,521 | 25,557

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

West Coast,...

3,905 374,511 555,81 238 26,196 2,892 3,093 226,507 | 32,188 877 77,554 10,750

114,834 1,085 186,037 14,606 172,379 |1,965 |209,273 6 13,640 257 27,645 298137,098 233 16,551 141 29,832 50 3,704

3,154

712

17,812 30 2,565 402,558 43,369 31,039 | 15,013 | 5,870 | 583,784| 86,620 4,240 495 53,841] 7,132 1,644 | 3,326 | 243,058 35,342 14 927 81,258) 11,462

30114,834

29,619 172,379

6 13.610

1,942 | 137,098

155 29,832

Total, 1912,

9,593 | 921,289 | 126,968

15,051

167,783 3,590 | 443,210 56,957

16,701 13,183 1,364,499| 133,925

31,752 | 467,783

Total, 1911,

9,514 929,156 127,296 13,258 474,837 3,348 357,651

52,285

,286,807 18,587 12,862 |1,286,807 179,581

31,845 474,837

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED. at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1912.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ď 28

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo, Ves- Tons. sels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Canton,.

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

West Coast,.

2,603 396,166 56,338 3,977 | 437,236 61,252 362 41,286 5,077 2,444160,693 26,954 817 77,785 9,826

322,252 148 18,556 2,203 27,100 287,093 1,191 68,110 12,887 573 28,231 87 8,609 940 969 66,663 766 79,451 7,275 281 27,824 64 2,714 488

2.751 414,722 58,541

322,252

1,739 | 5,168 | 505,646

74.139

28 839 287,093

419 49,895

3.210 204,141| 34,229

6,017

573

28,231

969

66,663

31

881 80,499

10 314

312

27,824

Total, 1912,

....

10,203 1,113,166| 159,447

28,923 732,063 2,256 | 177,740

23,7,93

1,770 12 459|'.290.906| 183,240 | 30,693 732,063

Total, 1911,

1,172,420 10,324 1,172,420| 155,367

26,379 679,856 2,148113,361

20,662

615 12 472 1,285,781| 176,029 26,994 | 679,856

-

D 29

Table IX.

SUMMARY.

1912.

1911.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

5,246

5,677,122

263,168

5,142

5,554,361

258,015

Do.

do. in Ballast, ...

217

$17,890

15,216

251

300,823

13,339

Total,......

5,4€3

5,995,012

278,384

5,393

5,855,184

271,354

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

5,276

5,585,729

277,027

5,171

5,524,935

263,724

Do.

do. in Ballast,......

185

396,973

10,278

214

326,612

10,225

Total,.......

5,461 |

5,982,702

287,305

5,385

5,851,547

273,949

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

2,833

4,503,852

204,563

2,580

4,117,420

156,399

Do.

do. in Ballast,...

210

233,154

10,203

223

209,297

9,495

J

Total,......

3,043

4,737,006

214,766

2,803

4,326,717

165,894

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,605

4,113,822

166,831

2,252

3,711,075

146,419

Do.

do. in Ballast,...............、

Total,....

457

635,841

21,160

548

615,905

21,377

3,062 4,749,663

187,991

2,800

4,326,980

167,796

do.

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,....

Do.

1,159

46,928

15,633

641

28,857

9,969

do.

in Ballast,......

Total,.......

817

26,590

7,016

976

35,864

9,801

1,976

73,518

22,649

1,617

61,721

19,770

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,.

1,147

47,776

16,033

669

29,624

10,291

Do.

dc.

do. in Ballast,......

858

29,318

7,496

977

35,747

9,834

Total,.......

2,005

77,094

23,529

1,616

65,371

20,125

Junks entered with Cargoes,

9,593

921,289

126,968

9,514

929,156

127,296

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

3,590

413,210

56,957

3,348

357,651

52,285

;

Total,........

13,183

1,364,499

183,925

12,862

1,286,807

179,581

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

10,202

1,113,166

159,447

10,324

1,172,420

155,367

2,256

177,740

23,793

2,148

113,361

20,662

Total,.....

12,459

1,290,906

183,240 12,472

1,285,781

176,029

Total of all Vessels entered,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

23,665 12,170,035 22,987 12,100,365

699,724 682,065

22,675

11,533,429

636,599

22,303

11,529,679

637,899

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in Į

46,652

24,270,403

1,381,789

44,978

23,063,108

1,274,498

Foreign Trade,.

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

Do.

cleared,

14,891 15,165

934,032 922,443

144,900 146,079

18,798

1,068,211

138,349

17,810

1,065,843

138,445

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,...

30,056 1,856,475

290,979 36,608

2,134,054

276,794

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,.

Grand Total,............

46,652 24,270,400 30,056 1,856,475

76,708 26,126,875

1,381,789 44,978 290,979 36,608

23,063,108

1,274,498

2,134,054

276,794

1,672,768

81,586 25,197,162

1,551,292

PLACES.

Outside the Waters of the Colony:

-~

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1912.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1911, .

Do.,

1912,

133,347 2,965,738 | 1,048,454| 103,429 2,315,796 733.202

6,425

97 645

2,525,257

6,195 102,566 | 2,938,906

708,687 2,860,112 750,556 | 3,637,517

926

1,201

230,992 | 5,490,995 | 1,757,001| 2,866,617) 205,995 | 5,804,702 1,483 758 | 3,643,712|

926

1,201

Cargo, Tons.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

TOTAL.

Crews.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Canton,

West River,

Macao,

Heungchow,.....

East Coast,

127 4,523 1,188

93 3,061 795

2741

60

:

101 2,786

470

36

260 26 842 237 93

:

303|16,565| 6,397 6,910 2,441

...

...

39 1,751

377

826

53 2,168 829| 659

327 16,190 5,584 8,735

Other places,

596 16,564 4,144

15 363 8,794 2,568 5,225

Total,..

6,590

817 26,590 7,016

:

228 7,309 1,658 36

...

119|3,903 1,032 353

311|16,839 6,457 | 6910| 2,441

39 1,751 377 826

380 18,358 6,413 9,394

899 25,358 6,712 5,240

2,441 934 1,159 46,928 15,633 21,825 2,441 1,976 73,518 22,649 22,759 2,441

21,825

- D 30

PLACES.

Table XI.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1912.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen- Cargo, Vessels. gers. Tons.

Ton-

nage.

Crews. Passen- Cargo, gers. Tons.

Bunker

Coal,

Tons.

Within the Waters of the Colony 1911,

Do.,

1912,

124,740 2,834,174| 985,830 103,392 2,314,809 732,872

7,320

106,252 | 2,656,121

771,2012,840,383

1,082

3,008

102,603 2,989,893 750,886 3,643,948

1,216

230,992 5,480,995 205,995 | 5,304,702

1,757,901 | 2,847,703 1,483,758 | 3,649,856

1,082

1,216

36,452

27,167

Outside the Waters of the Colony :--

D

31

Canton,

163 6,341 1,473

West River,.

104 3,375

958

207

253

53 1,475 481 106

411

216 7,816 1,954 106

411| 1,125

809 240 233

3

129 4,184 1,198 440

3 975

Macao,..

6

194

461

:

303 16,522 6,359 10,357 4,851

|

30916,716 6,405 10,357 | 4,851 | 1 208

Heungchow,

1

56

9

41 1,757 386 1,127

42 1,813 395 1,127

91

...

East Coast,

48 1,924 766

584

342 16,639 5,821 10,144

890 18,563 6,590 10,728

3 1,315

Other places,

536 17,428 4,244

383 10,574 2,743 5,548

4

919 28,002 6,987 5,548

4 1,378

Total,

858 29,318 7,496

| | 791 1,147 47,776 16,033 27,515 5,272 2,005 77,094 23,529 28,306 5,272 6,093

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences issued and fees collected during the year 1912 as compared with the previous year. (Under Table T, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

1911.

1912.

DESCRIPTION OF BOATS.

LICENCES.

DUPLI-

CATES.

REPAINI-

ING.

FEES. LICENCES.

LICENCE

Book.

REPAINT-

ING.

FEES.

Licence Book, $1.00 each, Repainting, $0.25 each,.... Passenger Boats, Class A,

...

...

484

Passenger Boats, Class B,

773

2

:

Passenger Village Boats,

1,536

Cargo Boats,.

1,259

Lighters,

239

Water Boats,

74

Other Boats,...

1,082

Cinder, Bum, Hawker and Mar-

ine Dealers' Boats,

382

Fish Drying Hulks,....

81

::

28.2

70.50

...

446

9,881.25

694

1,601

25,436.89

1,292

7,882.75

245

1,452.50

63

4,898.00

1,126

807.00

412

531.75

81

5,759

803

5,759.00

200.75

9,493.25

26,413.00

8,215.66

1,347.75

4,952.25

894.00

569.25

TOTAL,

5,910

6

282

$50.960.64

5,960

5,759

803 $57,844.91

Refunded on Lighters laid up,.

TOTAL,

D 32

318.00

$57,526.91

N

***

D 33

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour

Department during the Years 1911 and 1912.

Sub-head of Revenue.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

39

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not other-

Special Assessment,

wise specified :-

Amount

1911.

Amount 1912.

$ C. 82,578.09 92,802.14

C.

$7,454.95

98,448.45

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, ... 50,763.31 57,526.91

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

1,515.00 1,695.00

Emigration Brokers' Licence, Ordi-

nance 1 of 1889,

1,000,00

1,600.00

Fines, ...

4,934.50

7,180.50

Forfeitures,...

306.20

71.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,

166.00

199.50

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, do.,

from the New Territories,

2,336.30

2,648.30

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

44,668.80

54,683.05

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

from the New Territories,

26,717.70

33,299.21

95.00

70.00

4,865.75

4,950.00

T

Pilots' Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimburse- ments-in-Aid :—

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Gunpowder, Storage of--Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,

Printed Forms, Sale of,

23,023.00 23,724.20

257.50

251.50

1,685.00 2,282.50 9,861.02 13,577.86

#84,770.50 †82,721.50

207.75

263.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for---

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..........

3,480.00

2,660.00

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

846.00

1,438.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899......

3,510.00

3,330.00

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899,

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,....

7. Miscellaneous Receipts (other)-Message

Fees for notifying ships signalled,

Total,.........

*

† See next page.

..$506,964,85 549,275,40

29,408.09 27,718.02

36,975.00 40,225.00

192,20

302.20

+

:

D 34

* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1911:-

Harbour Department, Registrar General's Office,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health, Medical Department,..

Revenue

collected by.

$ 84,770.50 5,530.00

6,959.50

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,100.00 (Estimated.)

6,387.34

15,478.25

$ 97,260.00

$ 25,965.59

Net Revenue,....$ 71,294.41

† Statement of Emigration Fees, 1912 :—

Harbour Department,

Registrar General's Office,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,...

Revenue collected by.

$ 82,721.50 4,850.00

8,358.50

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

3,235.20

12 958.86

$ 20,389.06

95,930.00

Net Revenue,....$ 75,540.94

(Net Revenue, 1910, $54,589.12.)

1

12,300,000

|12,100,000

11,900,000

11,700,000

HI,500,000

11,300.000

TE 200,000

11.000 000

+0,000,000

9.900,000

-9,800,000

·9,700,000

9,600,000

¡ ̈9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300.000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000

8.900,000

8.800,000

8,700,000

8.600.000

8,500.000

8,400,000

:

8,300,000

8.200,000

8,100.000

$,000,000

7.900,000

7 800,000

TONS.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongko

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tounc DOTTED BLACK LINE represents German S1 DOTTED RED LINE represents Japanese Ship BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Ton GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only VIOLET LINE represents Steam-launch Tonne THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Foreig

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880

1881.

!

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885

1886.

:

1

t

Table XXIV.

nnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1912 inclusive.

resents British Shipping Tonnage only,

K LINE represents German Shipping Tonnage only.

LINE represents Japanese Shipping Tonnage only,

presents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

E represents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

represents Steam-launch Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

LINE represents entire Foreign

Trade in British and Foreign Ships, Junks and i

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

t

1

1886.

1887.

*8381

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

4

1901

1

----

}

!

Love.

1

12 inclusive.

2.

il Trade.

A Foreign Ships, Janks and Steam-launches.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1

1901.

1905.

1906.

1907.

1908.

1909.

1910.

1911.

1912.

TONS

12.300.000

12,100,000

11,900 000

|11,700,00

11,500,000

11,300,000

11,200,000

11.000.020

|10,000,000

9,900,000

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000 orn

8,900.000

8,800,000

8.700,000

8,600.000

8.500 000

8,400.000

8.300,000

8,200,000

8.100.000

8,000 000

!

7.900,00

7,800 000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

*

8,700,000

8,600.000

8,500,000

8.400,000

8,300,000

t

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7 800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7.400.000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5 800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

1

5,500,000

5,400,000

5.300,000

5,200,000

5.100,000

5,000,000

4.900 000

4,800,000

4,700,00)

4,600,000

4,500,000

4.400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3.700 000

3,600.000

:

Ľ

Ґ

!

:

:

8.700,000

8,600 000

8.500.000

8.400.000

! 8.300,000

8,200.000

8.100,000

8,000 000

7.900,000

7,800 000

7.700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,00

6.600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100.000

6,000.000

5,900,000

5,800 oco

-5.700.000.

5,600,000

5 500,000

5,400.000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,00

+,600,00

4,500,000

4,400.000

4,300.000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

7.900 000

3,800.000

3.700,00

3,600,000

4,00

4.500.000

4.400,000

4,300,000

MT

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

!

3,900,000

3,800,000

3.700 000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3.300.00

200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

BLACK

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2.100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1.400,003

YELLOW 1,300,000

GREEN 1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

"

900,000

800,000

RED

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

400,000

300,000

DOTTED

200,000

BLACK

100,000

LINE

90,000

VIOLET

80,000

50,000

40,000

İDOTTED-

30,000

RED

INE

20,000

4.500,000

4,400.000

4,300.000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,00

7.900 000

3,800 000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3.500,00.

3.400,003

:

3,300,000

!

3,200 000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

_900,000

200,000

700,000

600,000

- 500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

ICO,000

90,000

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

1

"

1

}

1

Table XIV.

Summary of Chinese Emigration from Hongkong for Ports other than in China, during the year 1912.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Childre n.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total,

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

Australian Ports,

Canada,

Caroline Islands,

Dutch Indies

1,555

8,906

4

:

1,559 499

3

503 2,054

7

2,062

A

421

9,332 3,326

13

112

7 3,458 12,232

15

536

12,790

293

34

22

8

357 293

34

22

8

357

10,964

506

606

65 12,141 10,964

506

606

65

12.141

Fiji,

Honolulu,

78

79

4

4

82

1

83

30

31

412

32

64

14

522

442

32

65

14

553

Japan..

Mauritius,

Mexico,

South America,....

13

13

80

4

81

93

4

97

1,197 95

138

6

1,436 | 1,197

95

138

6

1,436

1,653

53

1.706 1,771

65

1,836 | 3.424

118

3,542

447

21

215

684 447

21

215

684

56,676 12,347 | 4,085 1,451 |71,559|

287

15

117

I

308

119

983

5

51 4 1,043 | 3,160

Straits Settlements,.

Tahiti,.

Timor,

U. S. of Americą,.

Total 1912,

Do. 1911, .

70,298 12,370 4.626 1,455 88.749 29,777 1,957 | 1.899275 33,908 |74,386|12,390 | 4,526 1,389 92,691 36,996 3,579 1,902 397 42,874

Total Passengers by British Ships,. Total Passengers by Foreign Ships,

Excess of Passengers by British Ships,

100,075|i4,327 | 6,525 | 1,730|122,657 111,382 15,969 6,428 1,786| 135,565

70.29812,370| 4626| 1,455) 88,749 29,777 1,957| 1,899 275 33,908 |40,521 |10,413 | 2,727 1,180|| 54,841

7,624| 1,244

424 173 9,465 |64,300 |13,591|4,509| 1,624 | 84,024

287

15

6

...

117

1

1

250

3,418 4,143

12 301

308

119

5

4,461

--- D 35 ---

Table XV.

Statement of average number of Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1910 inclusive.

1880.

41,720

1885. 1890. 1895. 1900. 63,138 66,706 60,360 66,961

1905. 1910. 73,103 88,452

Table XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1903 to 1912 inclusive.

Whither bound.

1903.

1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911.

1912.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

53,759 53.131 45.948 51,5$9 71,141 40,746 40,129 65.372 83,875 9,628 9,596 9,026 8,731 11,907 8,893

68,809

7.887 11,333 17,031

15,215

63,387 62,727 54,974 60,320

83,048 49.639 48,016

76.705 j 100,906

84,024

Other Ports, Males. Other Ports, Females,

19,915

82

13.499

78

9.308 16.348

59 57

22,829

90

21.299

143

28,965

449

33,692

661

33.935

37,791

724

842

Total

19,997

13,577

9,367

16,405 22,919

21,442

29,414 34,353

34,659

38,633

Grand Total,.

83,384

76,304

64,341

76,725 | 105 967

71,081

77,430111,058 135,565 | 122,657

-- D 36 -

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the Year 1912.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

1.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

From Australian Ports,

2,266

103 65

40

2,474

648

29

""

Bangkok,...

3,373

173

92

222223

12

54

24

711

2,914

132

87

52

3,185

3,692

3.373

173

92

Canada,

5,315

90

65

42

5,512

5.315

90

65

...

Dutch Indies,

227

227

6,794

286

83

49

11

Honolulu,

*99

5

5

111

795

39 31

22

""

Japan,

318

21

10

355

1,363

136

44

29

2225

7,212

7,021

286

83

887

894

44

36

2008

51

3,692

42

5,512

49

7,439

24

998

1 372

1,681

157

1

51

35

1,927

Mauritius,

105

105

876

:

376

481

...

481

Mexico,

255

1

259

253

1

254

508

New Guinea,.

535

13

6

657

535

13

44

1

513

6

557

- D 37

Panama,

...

South America,

704

10

7

3

724

704

10

7

3

724

"}

Straits Settlements,

104,955

U. S. A.,...

1,734

5,976

28

19

2,4441 286 114,661 14

16,03

497

165

110

1,795

4,622

168

103

ིང

69

16,802

4,962

120,985

6,356

122

6,473 | 2,609 1,396 131,463 196

83 6,757

1912 Total,.

1911 Do.,

115,274

6,226 2,609 1,390 125,499

35,493

1,352 553 351

37,749 150,767

7,578 | 3,162 | 1,741 | 163,248

104,571

4,485 | 2,965 | 1,307112,328

35,834

866

515

351

37,566 | 140,405

5,351 |2,480 |1,658 | 149,894

Total Passengers by British Vessels, Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels. Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

115,274

6,226 2,609 1,390 125,499

35,493

1,352 553 351 37,749

79,781

4,874 2,056 1,039

87,750

1

Table XVIII.

Statement of average number of Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1910 inclusive.

1880. 1885. 48,114 68,830

1890.

96,068

1895. 1900. 1905. 104,118 109,534 137,814 146,585

1910.

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for 10 years, from 1903 to 1912, inclusive.

Where from.

1903.

1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911.

1912.

D 38

!

Straits Settlements, Wales. Straits Settlements, Females,

116,705

Total,

1.

Other Ports, Males. Other Ports, Females,

Total,

18,068

Grand Total,

5,778

123,542 114,653 110,525 |121.935 125,228 |112.093 | 110,439 |114,069 | 123,594 4,842 6,210 4,043 2,403 4,422 3,387 7,524 5,688 7,869

122,483 128,384 | 120,863 | 114,568 |124,338 129,650 115,480117,963 119,757131,463

17,826 20,417 19.291 242 364 329

27.869

290

29,180

161

30,986 28,816 30,335

615 1,321 1,450

31,601 30,137 31,785

19 848 21,387

496 97 20,811 19,620 20.5544 21,484 28.159 29,341

140,551|149,195 140,483 | 134912 145.822 157,809 144,821 149,564 | 149.894 | 163,248

ぐい

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1912.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Fower.

Built

Rig.

Where built and when.

Remarks.

of.

1. Parva,

128,713

5.26

40

Nil Carvel

2. Fiume,

128,683 838.52

550

3. Logam,

128,714

1.52

45

Hongkong.......... Schooner Clencher Kiel, Nil

.1911.

1882.

Re-registered.

Carvel Hongkong,..

1901.

4. Peiching,

127,227 271.58 290

,

Clencher Shanghai,.

1911.

Transferred from Shanghai.

5. Nile,

102,804

3135.09 7,500 | Schooner

""

Clyde Bank. Dum-

bartonshire,...

1893.

6. Circe,

128,715

314.20 500

""

Hongkong,..

1912.

Transferred from London.

7. Taikoo Cheong,.

128,716

12.14 65

Nil

Carvel

1909.

}}

8. Taikoo Kuai,

128,717

38.78 175

1911.

}}

11

9. Taikoo Shun-0,.

128.718

18.73 65

1899.

"

"

10. Taikoo Shing,

11. Taikoo Dock,.......................

128,719 14.74 40 128,720 20.98 75

1909.

}}

19

1909.

งา

12. Taikoo Koong,

133,231

13.91

1911.

""

"

13. Tai Hon,.

133,232

50.06 100

1912.

91

"

"

14. Cholon (Oil Motor),.

133,233

67.75 44

Clencher

1912.

"}

15. Taikoo Kom,.

133,234

30.62 3.0

.1912.

"}

"}

16. Sin Tai Yat,

133,235

148.72

Carvel

1912.

...

31

17. Sin Tai Yee,

133,236

148.72

1912.

...

"}

""

"}

18. Pak Hin Hok,.

133,237

27.11

17

Clencher

1912.

"1

"}

D 39

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1912.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built

of.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

1. Fiume,

128,683 838,52] 1910

550 Schooner

Iron

Kiel,

...1882 | Sold to Foreigners.

2. Hing Lee,

109,874 395.13 | 1903

288

Nil

Wood

Hongkong,

1903

Do.

3. Tow,

128,692 53.28 1910

330

"}

4. Tarang,

123,074

86.76 1907

Steel

Schooner Carvel San Francisco,

1910

Do.

"}

..1903 Constructively lost in typhoon.

5. Parva,

128,713

5.26 | 1912

6. Fiume,

128,683

838.52 1912

40 Nil

550 Schooner Clencher Kiel,..

""

Hongkong,

...1911 Sold to Foreigners.

.1882

Do.

7. Pak Hin Hok,.

120,976

8. Hoi Fung,

128,703

16.10 1905

69.41❘ 1911

17

Nil Carvel

Canton,

1903

Do.

400

Ketch Clencher Middlesbrough, ......1911

Do.

*

— D 40 —–

}

- D 41

Table XXII.

Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade Entered and

YEAR.

Cleared since 1903.

NO. OF

VESSELS.

ToNNAGE.

1903

46,255

21,716,870

1904

51,173

22,299,582

1905*

51,578

22,653,616

1906†

44,550

22,453,077

1907

47,660

23,032,891

1

1908

45,403

22,305,131

1909

43,794

22,415,125

1910

38,727

23,067,391

1911

44,978

23,063,108

1912

46,603

24,269,270

Net Increase in 1912 against 1903: -348 vessels and 2,552,400 tons.

* Steamships not exceeding 60 tons in Foreign Trade included for first time. † Decrease due to Typhoon of 18th September, 1906.

Table XXIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

Year.

Total Revenue of Department.

Total Expenditure of Department.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

C.

%

1903,.

285,288.42

158,936.52

55.71

1904,.

301,128.95

146,951,90

48.80

1905,.

302,817.76

147,396.72

48.67

1906,..

274,008.78

160,899 99

58.43

1907.

348,300.10

160,389 48

46.05

1908,

357,768.52

163,579.54

45.72

1909,

462,469.82

172,680.55

37.34

1910,....

494,234.84

160,035,89

32.38

1911.

506,964.85

* 161,149.32

31.76

1912,....

549,275.40

149,043.58

27.13

* Including $507.90 coal in stock.

- D 45

Annexe A.

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

19,240 seamen were shipped and 19,362 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year, com- pared with 18,262 shipped and 17,341 discharged during 1911.

175 distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home, &c.; of these, 54 were sent Home, 2 to Bombay, 3 to Calcutta, 1 to Colombo, 3 to Manila, 3 to Port Said, 27 to Singapore, 4 tó Sydney, 1 to Vancouver, 1 passenger to Australia, 39 to Canton, 5 to Hoihow, 3 to Japan, 1 to Manila, 2 joined the Chinese Customs, 2 deserted, 2 died in the Government Civil Hospital, 1 remained in the Sailors' Home and 21 obtained employment.

$4,241.62 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen,

Annexe B.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

Liquors Consolidation Ordinance, 1911.

1. The revenue collected from liquor duties and licensed ware- houses for the year 1912 was $705,574.80 made up as follows:

Duties, European Liquors, Duties, Chinese Liquors, ...

Licensed Warehouse Fees,

Licensed Warehouse Overtime Fees,...

$243,627.94 455,135.80

6,732 06

79.00

$705,574.80

2. The duty collected from European liquors shows a very slight increase as compared with 1911. There is a distinct decrease in the consumption of champagne, gin and beer. Of these the decrease in gin may be directly attributed to the high rate of duty. The decrease in champagne and beer appears to be due to more general causes. There is a noticeable increase in the consumption of brandy, and a slight increase in that of whisky. Other varieties show very little difference as compared with the two previous years. The details of the trade in European liquors is given in Table I.

3. The revenue from Chinese wines shows an increase which practically corresponds with the difference in the length of time during which the higher rate of duty was collected. (The present

D 46

rate came into force in March, 1911.) The actual quantity consumed is, as in 1911, rather below that consumed in 1910. This seems to be due to the unsettled conditions in the earlier months of the year and not to the higher rate of duty. The details of the trade in Chinese liquors is given in Tables II and III.

4. The expenditure incurred by the department was $56,149.74. This figure represents rather more than the actual cost of collection of liquor duties as a considerable amount of work is done by the department in connection with opium and other matters not con- nected with the Liquors Ordinance.

5. Thirty-two convictions were obtained against persons for being in possession of liquor the duty on which had not been paid. These cases were of a more or less trivial nature.

6. Opium. The imports of raw opium show a decrease of 8,925 chests or 42% and the exports a decrease of 6,7963 chests or 34%. This decrease is the natural outcome of the Opium Agreement of May, 1911, but has been intensified by the uncertainties and varia- tions of provincial policies in China with regard to opium generally and by the absolute exclusion of Persian opium from the China market. The general figures of the imports and exports since 1908 are shown in the following table:-

1912.

chests.

1911. 1910. 1909. 1908.

chests. chests. chests, chests.

Stock in hand 1st January,... Imported during the year,...

Total,..

Boiled by Opium Farmer,

Spurious opium destroyed,..

7,587 7,123 4,509 5,808 4,707 12,3614 21,286 31,743 35,734 41,821

19,9481 28,409 36,252 41,542 46,528

1,113 2

761 782 1,044

14

864 51 247

Exported during the year,.. | 13,2644 20,061 28,333 35,938 39,609

Total,

14,3791 20,822 29,129 37,033 40,720

Stock remaining on 31st Dec., 5,560 7,587 7,123 4,509 5,808

!

7. The imports and exports of the different varieties of raw opium are given in Table IV. It will be seen that practically the whole of the decreasc is in Bengal and Persian opium. There is a slight decrease in the imports of Malwa opium and an increase of 3,023 chests in the exports. This is largely due to the comparatively small reduction, as compared with Bengal opium, in the sales of Malwa opium in India for the China market. During the year 6,700 chests of Bengal and 14,560 chests of Malwa opium were sold in India for shipment to China. The import of Persian opium into China has been prohibited since January 1st, 1912. Further details of the opium trade are given in Tables V, VI, VII and VIII.

D 47

8. Four prosecutions were instituted for offences against the Opium Ordinance in connection with the movement of raw opium, and convictions were obtained in three cases. All four cases were connected with Persian opium.

9. Morphia and Cocaine. -The trade in morphia and cocaine has ceased except for local medicinal purposes. Compounds of Opium to the extent of 1,333 lbs. were exported to Java for the use of the Opium Regie.

10. Three seizures of morphia and eight seizures of cocaine. were made during the year. Six convictions were obtained: two for illegal possession of morphia and four for illegal possession of cocaine. 417 oz. of morphia and 4,240 oz. of cocaine were forfeited by the Magistrate to the Crown.

11. Sugar.-The imports of sugar show an increase of 72,485 tons or 28%. Particulars will be found in Table IX.

12. Preventive Force. Further powers were conferred on Re- venue Officers by Ordinance No. 31 of 1912 enabling them to make arrests in certain cases not connected with the Liquors Ordinance. Good work was done by the Force during the year and in addition to the cases mentioned above a considerable number of convictions were obtained through the medium of revenue officers for attempts to smuggle prepared opium out of the Colony and also for offences. against the Gambling Ordinance, the Arms and Ammunition Ordi- nance and the Post Office Ordinance.

28th February, 1913.

R. O. HUTCHISON, Superintendent,

Imports and Exports Office.

35

Table I.

- D 48

Class of Liquor.

Balance in

Bond on

31st De-

Exported

Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1912.

& ex Ship

Arrivals.

to Ship

Ship

Store.

cember,

1911.

Consumed

locally.

In Holt's

or ex

In H.K. & K. Godown Co.'s

General

Bond.

General Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Bonded

Warehouse.

Total in

Bond.

Warehouse.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gullons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons

Gallons.

Ale, Beer and Stout,

196,176

614,791

275,122

60,186

307,222

5,138

9,040

154,259

168,437

Bitters,

219

598

293

34

261

30

199

229

Brandy,

7,217

33,585

23,761

1,679

5,335

226

756

9,045

10,027

California Wine,

2,510

2,510

Champagne,

3,028

98,96

3,897

1,299

4,880

24

340

2,484

2,848

Claret,

6,898

24,167

12,229

3,446

8,906

34

2,442

4,008

6,484

Cider,

239

758

559

23

142

273

273

Gin,

5,582

28,475

16,992

6,252

5,034

...

20

...

118

5,641

5,779

Ginger Wine,

177

61

9

3

151

75

75

Liqueurs,

2,217

4,739

2,417

510

1,472

+

204

2,349

2,557

Malaga,

3

3

Madeira,

H...

123

390

28

173

137

175

175

Marsala,

229

437

90

62

205

809

309

Medicated Wine,

62

248

239

21

2

48

50

Muscatel,

26

...

26

Port,

4,399

14,184

8,141

1,206

4,847

...

32

268

4,089

4,389

Prune Wine,

30

19

11

11

...

Rum,

837

3,905

1,229

81 (1) 2,405

440

586

1,026

(1) Includes 340 gallons denatured for preserving Tobacco, and 23 gallons distilled locally.

Class of Liquor.

Balance in

Bond on

31st De-

cember,

1911.

Arrivals.

Table I,-Continued.

Exported

& ex Ship

to Ship

or ex

Bond.

Ship

Store.

Consumed

locally.

Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1912.

In H.K. & K.

In Holt's

General

Godown Co.'s

General Bonded

Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Total in

Bond.

Warehouse.

Warehouse.

Galions.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Sake,.

438

7,888

1,246 1,300

5,028

512

240

752

Sherry,

2,870

4,762

1,751

617

2,089

170

2,505

2,675

Sparkling Wine,

708

439

256

86

361

N

46

396

444

Spirits of Wine & Arrack.

19,526

262,352

180,125

(2) 72,306

28,816

631

29,447

Other Still Wine,.

2,903

57,723

43,748

2,290 (3) 4,212

1,054

3,322

4,376

Tonic Wine,

14

18

23

6

6

Vermouth,.

1,644

13,625

10,891

757

1,807

'136

1,678

1,814

Vebrona,

14

76

63

27

27

Whisky,

18,209

51,770

20,033

10,044

22.343

4,846

790

Wincarnis,

73

40

86

11.923

27

17,559

27

Wine (European), .....(4)

37,536

37,536

...

...

...

...

F

Includes 72,189 gallons denatured for burning, perfumery, &c. (3) Includes 44 gallons denatured for preserving Tobacco. Re-exported immediately without examination.

D 49

Table II.

Balance in Bond

Arrivals.

on 31st Dec., 1911.

Consumed

Locally.

Exported.

Denatured and used for Vinegar.

Bond.

Dis- Im- Distilled Im- Distilled tilleries. ported. Locally. ported. Locally.

ex Bond

or ex Ship to Ship

Distilled

Im-

Locally. ported.

Remaining in Bond on the 31st December, 1912.

In

Holt's Distilled General Locally. Bonded Co.'s Gen-

In

H.K. & K.

Godown

In Li-

censed

In Dis-

Ware.

tilleries.

Ware-

house.

eral Bond-

ed Ware-

house.

houses.

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,

9,905

15,243 916,744 1,053,075 651,227 873,266 268,165 82,723

93,621

70

299

6,889

18,708

""

35%

473

"}

}}

45%

""

"

50%

109,337

1,612

308 61,037

108510,462

11,406 31,912

42,347 32,401

7,583

75 2,233

""

Above 50%

2,421

15

1,461

7,411 28,082

1,724 435,160

75 3,237

15

3,561

40

132 1,344

742

4,909

7,697 35,547

200

20.947123,394

273

1,167 2,558

960

""

Total,.

121,327

15,659 1,498,247|1,106,918 719,234 |882,491 | 734,644 91,193

7,737 129,168

270

22,515 135,144 *19.725

* Not including New Territories.

D 50

Table III.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1912.

Output.

Hongkong and New Kowloon. Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight.| 693,214 489,487

Hongkong.

Rum,

35%

45%

}}

50%

;)

Total,

Consumed Locally.

Sold into

Bond.

Exported.

Denatured with salt for preserving bean-curd.

Denatured

with turpen- tine for

veterinary

purpose.

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

The 31st

Dec., 1912.

19,011

72,354

10 440 5,597

540

3,561

93,621

18,708

742

50,483

1.680 8,072

4.909

35,543

275

68

68

173

23

150

754,378 | 496,855

27,656

80,824

35,543

4

93,621

19,875

Manufactured in New Terri | Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight. 202,203 190,219 1,615 10,369 tories for consumption in

Above

""

35%

45%

50%

"

"

50%

"}

Total,

* No figures are available.

1,814 1,814

2,384

44

2,310

7

7

15

15

206,423 | 192.099 3,955 10,369

*

D 51

Table III,- Continued.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1912.

Manufactured in New Terri- tories for local consumption.

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight 193,560 | 193,560

35%

45%

Hongkong and New Kowloon

Manufactured in New Terri-

tories for consumption in Hongkong.

Manufactured in New Terri- { tories for local consumption.

Total,...

193.560 193,560

Exported.

Denatured with salt for preserving bean-curd.

Denatured

with turpen tine tor

veterinary

pripose

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

the 31st

Dec., 1912.

Total..

754,378 | 496,855

27,656 80,824

35,543

93 621

19,875

206,4:3 | 192,099 3,955 10,86

193,560 | 193,460

Grand Total,.

|1,154,361| 8:2.514

31,611

91.193

35 543

+

93,621

19,875

* No figures are available.

D 52

Table IV.

Varieties of Opium Imported.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISII. CHINESE. TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1911,

4,4801

9,779

5,221

1,804

2

21,286

1912,

4,097

5,350

2,266

6481

12,3611

Increase,

Decrease,

3831/

4,429

2,955

1,155

2

8,925

Varieties of Opium Exported.

MALWA.

PATNA. BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH. CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1911,

1912,

2,597

9,906

5,273

2,282

2

20,061

4,6202

4,215

1,978

1,4523

13,2661

Increase,

Decrease,

3,023

3,023

5,691

3,295

8292

ลง

9,817

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed {

1911

1912.

11,912

8,758 chests.

"

- D 53-

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE ROYAL

OBSERVATORY, HONGKONG, FOR THE YEAR 1912.

I. GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.

The grounds were kept as tidy as the available coolie labour permitted. Provision for a gardener has been made in the Estimates for 1913.

The additions to the main building sanctioned in July were commenced on November 8.

Three rooms were colour-washed in the month of February, and electric light installed throughout the building.

II. METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

Kew Barograph.-In the month of May this instrument was modified to give a scale of approximately 5 inches on the photographic paper for every inch rise or fall of the mercury in the barometer, and a scale was photographed on the register to facilitate measure- ment. In the month of December it was further modified to enable the photographic paper to run for 16 days without being changed.

Kew Thermograph.-Owing to the unsatisfactory exposure of the thermometers, registration with this instrument was discon- tinued on May 27, pending the construction of a suitable shelter.

Beckley Anemometer.-On February 7-8 this instrument was dismounted, cleaned, and oiled. A new gear wheel and endless screw were fitted in place of the old ones which were badly worn. In the month of December the instrument was modified to eliminate the errors of time scale and zero, inherent in its original form.

Dines-Baxendell Anemograph.-The method of determining the zero was altered at the end of July. Formerly the float was made to just touch the base of the water tank, without appreciable pressure, by placing a sufficient number of shot in the cup. But it was found that though this adjustment was made with the greatest care, after a few hours, if the taps were turned off, either the float did not fall sufficiently to touch the base of the tank, or, more frequently, it rested on it with quite appreciable pressure, as evidenced by the number of shot which had to be removed in order to re-adjust the float. It was therefore decided to adopt the method of adjustment given in the "Observers' Handbook ", issued by the London Meteorological Office, namely, to add shot until

- E 2

the float rests at a given level, as denoted by a mark on the stem. It has also been the practice, since March 1, to turn off the taps for 5 minutes at intervals of 6 hours, in order to check the time scale and to detect any change of zero. The exact times are written on the sheets and new base lines drawn through the recorded zeros. The hourly ordinates are measured from the new base lines.

As the instrument had to be tilted considerably to make the spindle float centrally, a light arm, 3 inches long, with an adjustable counterpoise at its extremity, was fitted to the penholder on Nov- ember 17. This has corrected the defect.

In the month of December the instrument was modified to obtain both direction and velocity of the wind on the same sheet, and to allow the paper to run for an indefinite time. Arrangements were also made to time-scale the sheets electrically, by hourly im- pulses from a dial driven by the mean time clock; a cam on the minute arbor of the dial closing a circuit from the 60th to the 3rd minute of each hour. The current actuates the armature of an electro-magnet which lifts the pens from the paper.

The monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph, since the installation of the Dines instrument in April, 1910, are given in the following table:—

Factor for Converting the Actual Run of the Beckley Anemograph Cups to Velocities Recorded by the Dines Pressure

Tube Anemograph.

Factor.

Mouth.

1910.

1911.

1912.

January,

2°33

2°30

February,

2°34

2°32

March,

2.30

2.35

April,....

2°27

2°33

May,

2.23

2.25

2.34

June,

2.23

2.10

2.44

July,

2014

2.21

2.57

Angust,

2'07

2.25

2.65

September,

2.18

2.31

2'49

October,

2.30

2.27

2 51

November,

2:28

2*27

2'47

December,.

2*23

2.31

2°24

Year.

2.25

2.29

2'41

E3

It will be seen that the factor was considerably greater from June to November, 1912, than in the two previous years, increasing steadily from May to August. It was also found that from the end of May to the middle of November the factor varied inversely with the velocity, whereas formerly it varied directly. Since the introduction of a counterpoise on the float spindle the factor has been nearly the same as in 1910-11, and no definite variation with velocity has been detected.

Halliwell Pluviograph. After several unsuccessful attempts to make this instrument work satisfactorily, registration was discon- tinued on September 21.

III. METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT THE OBSERVATORY.

Continuous photographic records showing the variations of barometric pressure are obtained with a Kew barograph, and automatic records of the direction and velocity of the wind with a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph; the instruments having been modified as described in Section II. The amount of rain is recorded automatically by a Beckley pluviograph, the amount of sunshine by a Campbell-Stokes universal sunshine recorder and the relative humidity of the air by a small Richard hair hygrograph.

Eye observatious of barometric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation, and the amount of cloud were made at each hour of Hongkong local time. The character and direction of motion of the clouds were observed every three hours. Daily readings were taken of self-registering maximum and minimum and solar radia- tion thermometers.

Principal features of the Weather in 1912.-The year was characterized by a temperature 2°8 below normal in January and from 1° to 2° above from May to August. In the autumn the tem- perature was slightly below normal. The maximum, 913, occurred on September 10, and the minimum, 453, on December 28. The rainfall was above normal from January to March, and in August and December. In the remaining months it was below normal. A somewhat serious drought occurred from September 26 to November 27; only 0 02 inch of rain falling in this interval (0·10 inch on October 7, 0005 inch on October 26, and 0·005 inch on November 15.) The total rainfall for the year was 63.935 inches against an average of 84 438 inches.

The Colony was not visited by a typhoon during the year, though five passed within 300 miles. The strongest typhoon wind, 43 m.p.h., occurred on September 5, with the centre of the typhoon 150 miles to south-westward. On March 13, the N.E. Monsoon attained a velocity of 46 m.p.h.

Fifteen typhoons and thirty-five less intense depressions occur- red in the Far East in the year 1912. The tracks of the typhoons and the more important depressions will be published in the annual volume of Observations.

E 4

In the following table the rainfall at the Observatory is com- pared with the fall at the Police Station, Taipo, and the Botanical Gardens, Hongkong :---

Months.

Observatory Police Station

Botanical

Gardens

(Kowloon).

(Taipo).

(Hongkong).

inches

inchis.

nches.

January,.

2.710

3'370

3.280

February,

2'435

4140

20630

March,

4'345

3'350

4360

April,

3*995

3*720

1750.

May,.

3'940

5*180

5.810

June,

14'160

13.490

14'490

July,

7:555

9'760

7'000

August, ....

15 715

10'300

16.450

September,.....

3.880

3'740

4.850

October,

0'015

0'000

0'040

November,

0.285

0°230

0'440

December,

4'900

7'1 20

6.270

Year,

63.935

64°400 ! 67.370

IV. — WEATHER FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS.

Daily Weather Report.-A weather map of the Far East, and the China Coast Meteorological Register, containing the Daily Weather Reports from about 40 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, and the Philippines, and a daily weather forecast for Hong- kong and District, the Formosa Channel, the south coast of China between Hongkong and Lamocks, and between Hongkong and Hai- nan, were issued daily as in former years. Copies of the

map were exhibited on notice boards at the Hongkong Ferry Pier, the Blake Pier, and the Harbour Office. Since April 4 a copy has been sent daily to the Director of the Meteorological Observatory, Macao. Seventy copies of the Register were distributed to various offices, etc., in the Colony, and since November 18, a copy has been sent daily to the Director of the Meteorological Observatory, Macao. Copies are sent every week to the Hydrographic Office, Tokio, and to Lieut.- Commander Pradyat, Royal Siamese Navy; every 10 days to the

E 5

Director, Central Meteorological Observatory, Phulien, and every month to the Directors of the Weather Bureaus at Washington, Manila, and Melbourne. Additional Daily Bulletins are sent to the Local Press.

Daily Weather Telegrams.-In the month of February an at- tempt was made to establish uniform times of observation for the daily weather telegrams over the whole of China, and at my request the times were altered to 6 a.m. and 2 p.m. (120th meridian) at the following stations:--

Cape St. James.

Tourane.

Phulien.

Gap Rock. Waglan. Macao.

Gutzlaff.

Zi Ka Wei. Wei Hai Wei.

At Sharp Peak, where the telegraph office does not open until 7 a.m., the hours of observation were altered to 7 a.m. and 2 p.m. As regards other stations under the control of the Chinese Maritime Customs, the Authorities, while appreciating the object of the scheme, thought it unadvisable to make the proposed change, as under existing conditions the improvement in synchronism would be at the expense of accuracy.

2

From March 15 the Manila weather telegrams for 6 a.m. and p.m. were modified to show wind direction to 16 points instead of 8, and the reading of the wet bulb thermometer omitted.

By the courtesy of the Inspector General of the Chinese Mari- time Customs, Changsha and Ichang were added to the list of telegraphic reporting stations in the month of June. Though the observations arrive too late to be included in the daily weather map, the previous afternoon's observations are of considerable value, except in cases of rapid weather changes.

Representations to the Chinese Telegraph Administration have led to an improvement in the transmission of weather telegrams from all reporting stations except Hoihow and Pakhoi, from which it appears to be impossible to obtain the observations with regularity or despatch. Apparently there are ten transmitting stations between Pakhoi and Hongkong, and eleven or twelve between Hoihow and Hongkong. It is not surprising therefore that delays occur.

For the prompt receipt of weather reports from these stations wireless telegraphy is necessary. It would also be of considerable benefit to install wireless stations at Yu-ling Kang on the south coast of Hainan, Swatow, Chelang Point, the Pratas Shoal, and the Paracels. Apart from the utility of the information thus obtained in connec- tion with the ordinary daily weather forecasts, wireless messages from these stations would be a safeguard against the small but disastrous typhoons which occasionally strike the Colony without warning, and would ensure more accurate forecasts of the track and severity of practically every typhoon affecting Hongkong or the shipping leaving Hongkong.

£ 6

Extra Weather Telegrams. The service of extra telegrams during typhoon weather, hitherto confined to messages sent by the Director of the Manila Observatory at his discretion, and by the Director of the Taihoku Observatory ou receipt of certain code words, was extended to Phulien, Macao, Amoy, and Sharp Peak, through the courtesy of the Authorities at these stations and of the Superin- tendent of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company in Hongkong who made the necessary arrangements for the transmission of these telegrams at half rates over the lines of the Eastern Extension and the Great Northern Telegraph Companies. The French Telegraph Administration transmit the Phulien messages free over their lines.

From May to October the 9 p.m. observations at Swatow were forwarded to the Observatory by the Customs Authorities as in pre- vious years, the Chinese Telegraph Administration making no charge for their transmission; but the messages were frequently delayed and sometimes not received.

By the courtesy of the Naval Authorities meteorological obser- vations made on board His Majesty's ships were occasionally forwarded to the Observatory by wireless telegraphy.

Results of Weather Forecasts. The results of comparison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather subsequently experienced are given below, together with the results for the previous five years:

Year.

Complete Partial Partial Success. Success. Failure.

Total Failure.

%

%

%

1907

57

1908

59

1909.

58

1910

58

1911..

55

1912..

62

www www

32

IO

I

31

9

I

32

32

32

34

N22 +

8

2

9

I

I I

2

3

I

The forecasts comprise wind direction and force, and weather. Two elements correct constitute a partial success, and only one element correct constitutes a partial failure.

Storm Warnings.-Storm Warnings according to the "China Coast" code, and the local code, were displayed when necessary. Others according to the Hongkong telegraphic code were sent to the following Ports-Amoy, Swatow. Macao, Canton, Phulien, Manila, Labuan, and Singapore. In addition to the above, special warnings were sent to Canton when typhoons approached within 300 miles of Hongkong.

code was modified

In the month of May the " China Coast so as to utilise 16 points of the compass in place of 8, when signall- ing the tracks of typhoons.

E 7

For the benefit of vessels taking shelter in Kowloon Bay and to the west of Stonecutters Island, arrangements were made early in the year with the Military Authorities and the Standard Oil Company, respectively, to repeat the local storm warnings at Lyemun and Lai-Chi-Kok.

V.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS, TREATY PORTS, &C.

Logs received. In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 10 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 334 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, representing 23,202 days' observations, have been utilised for determining typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for the year 1911 were 348 and 24,653.

Comparison of Barometers.-During the year several hundred indirect comparisons of ships' barometers have been made, and direct comparison of barometers for various persons in the Colony.

Material for Pilot Chart.-The entry of sea observations into degree squares for the area 9° South to 45° North latitude and 100° to 180° East longitude has been discontinued except for squares containing less than 50 observations. For those containing more than 50 observations means are being formed and the observa tions collected into two-degree squares in place of one-degree squares. It is hoped that the material for a detailed pilot chart will be ready by the end of the year 1913.

VI.-MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

Absolute determinations of magnetic horizontal force, dip, and declination were made near the middle of each month with instru- ments of the Kew pattern. Four dip needles were used in rotation, two on one day of each month.

A new mirror was fitted to the magnet of unifilar instrument No. 55 on January 5.

Beginning with the year 1912 the observations of horizontal force have been reduced by the aid of three tables; the first giving the correction to log. T. for varying chronometer rates and arcs of vibration (mean of the arcs at the beginning and end of the observations); the second giving the values of

log. T2 K-log 1 +

H F

for varying values of t, when (1 +

(gt + y't2) }

H

1·00354,

F

m

X

=

with a subsidiary table of corrections for any departure from this value, and the third giving the values of

log. { 1 + 2 + (gt + q't2) + log. 2 + log. ( 1

1.3

2

p

2

for varying values of t, and two values of r, namely, 30 cms and

8 CI

The value of P used in this table was 7·05 (the mean computations are considerably

40 cms. of the past 3 years).

The shortened by using these tables.

The mean values of the magnetic elements for the years 1911 and 1912 were as follows :-

1912.

Declination (west)

Dip (north)...

1911.

0° 2′ 26′′

0° 4′ 16′′

.30 58 29

30 56 20

0:37193

0.22294

.0.43324

0:43363

Horizontal Force (C. G. S. unit).. 0'37145 Vertical Force (C. G. S unit) . ..0 22297

Total Force (C. G. S unit)

VII.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Time Service.-In February a proposal was submitted to Govern- ment for an improved Time Service, including an hourly signal to the Post Office for distribution to the various offices. etc., at a nominal charge.

Before any action was taken in the matter, however, the Manager of the China and Japan Telephone Company applied for a daily time signal to correct a recently imported electric transmitter with which he proposed to drive half-minute dials at, various points in the Colony.

On the recommendation of the Director this application was approved, and in the month of December the Telephone Company laid an underground cable for this.service from the Observatory to the telephone cable which connects Hongkong with Kowloon, and also re-modelled and re-wired the entire Time Service according to specification. The new system was brought into use on Decem- ber 20.

Since the beginning of the year 1913 the Time Ball on Black heads Hill has been dropped on Sundays and Government Holidays as well as on week days, at 13" Hongkong Standard Time (5" G.M.T.), arrangements having been made with the Harbour Master to have the ball hoisted by the Light Keeper stationed on the hill.

The Time Ball was dropped successfully 300 times in the year 1912. It failed on one occasion, December 16, owing to a break in the wire from the clock to the relay, which occurred after the noon test. The ball was not hoisted on March 13 and May 15 owing to gales It fell with an error of Os.3, or less, on 257 occasions, with an error of Os.4 or Os 5 on 30 occasions, with an error of Os 6 or Os 7 on 8 occasions. Errors of Os 8, 0s 9, 18.0, 1s.1 and 18.2 occurred The probable error varied from Os 33 in January to Os.11

once.

in May.

At the request of the Manager of the Kowloon-Canton Railway a time-signal has been sent to the Railway Station at 9.45 daily, since November 14. A time-signal is also telegraphed daily at 9h.

E 9

to the Office of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company in Hong- kong, and occasionally a special 9 a.m. signal is transmitted to Labuan.

Observations for Time.-Observations for time are made daily with the transit instrument, weather permitting. During the year 1912 the number of transits observed was 1,012. The errors of collimation, level, and azimuth were determined 52, 395, and 63 times, respectively. New spider threads were inserted on February 23 and October 15. On the second occasion they were fixed to the micro- meter frame; formerly they were fixed to the wire plate. It is proposed to substitute a glass scale for the spider threads.

Clocks. The Mean Time clock by Brock has proved useless as a Standard clock. After maintaining a fairly steady rate for one or two weeks its time-keeping becomes erratic, for no apparent reason. It is proposed to substitute an invar pendulum rod with a hardened lead bob in place of the present steel rod and heavy iron bob. In the month of November the clock was removed from the west Com- puting Room to the Clock Room. The performance of the Sidereal Standard clock (Dent No. 39741) was generally satisfactory except during disturbed and variable weather. The daily losing rate varied from +0 78 on February 7 to -0 98 on September 11, the temperature of the Clock Room on these days being 59°3 and 85°8. and the barometric pressure 30ins 19 and 29 70. The Time-Ball clock (Dent No. 39740) is corrected daily by the electric regulating apparatus, and its rate kept within 05 per day by the addition or removal of weights from the pendulum. A new Standard electric clock and three minute-dials have been ordered from Messrs. Gent and Co. of Leicester.

A discussion of the rates of the Standard Sidereal clock shewed that:

(a.) The adopted temperature co-efficient (0s.063 gain per day for an increase of 1° Fah.) was too large, and that the clock took an appreciable time to respond to the changes of temperature registered by thermometers placed on the side of the clock pillar opposite to the clock. There are at present no means of accurately determining the temperature of the pendulum.

(b.) The barometric co-efficient, hitherto considered indeter- minate, is at least Os.5 (gain per day for a decrease of 1 inch of barometric pressure).

(e.) The effect of humidity is uncertain, owing partly to want of accurate determinations of the humidity within the clock case.

As temperature changes in Hongkong usually follow barometric pressure changes very closely, it is difficult to differentiate the effect of each on the clock rate. If the changes in these elements were perfectly correlated both as regards amplitude and phase, differentia- tion would be unnecessary; but in practice it is, on account of occasional imperfect correlation.

E 10

A new main spring was fitted to the mean time chronometer, Dent No. 40917, on August 18.

Special Work.-Special magnetic observations were made on May 12 at the request of the Superintendent of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company in connection with a simultaneous series of observations of the strength, rate of change, direction, etc., of electrical carth currents in the cables between England and Hong- kong.

At the request of the Naval Authorities two anemometers de- signed for use on board ship for calibrating guns, were tested at the Observatory in the months of June and July, and reported upon.

Special weather forecasts for Tongking Gulf were despatched to the Eastern Telegraph Company's repairing ship on August 31 and September 1.

Wind Force and Barometric Gradient.-A discussion of the wind force and barometric gradient at Gap Rock, taken from the Hongkong Weather Maps in 1910-12, gave the following results:-

Gradient.

Force (Beaufort scale).

Force (m.p.h.)

*01 inch per

15 miles.

cm.s. apart of 1 inch

isobars on Hongkong

weather Map.

Summer.

Winter.

Sum- Win-

mer. ter.

1910. 1911. Mean.

1910-1911-| 11. 12.

Mean. Mean. Mean.

0'23

8.0 2.9 2.4

0.30

6'0

3.2

2.8

0*45

4'0

3.8

3°3

0.61

3°0 4'I

3.8

0'73 2°5 4.3 4.3

+∞ moo m

2.7

2'9

3°0

3.5

4.0

4*3

o'91

2.0 4'7 5'0

48

18

47

I'22 15 5'3

6.0

5.6

1.82

I'O 6.3

7:3

6.8

6.3

Quitt tww r

Out twww.

2.6

2.7

8.2

8.2

3.8 3.4

3°0 3'I

97

10'2

3.6

1273

12.7

3.8

4

150

15.0

16-6

16.0

4.6

19.6

18.5

573

249 22.8

3.65

6.1 33°1 28.2

9.0

9'0

50'4

=

The Beaufort scale of force has been converted into miles per hour by means of the formula V 187 B3, where V the true velocity of the wind, i.e., the velocity by the Beckley anemograph multiplied by 0'73.

Designation of Observatory.—In a despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies, No. 3309 of June 12, it was notified that His Majesty the King had been pleased to sanction that the Obser vatory should be styled the Royal Observatory, Hongkong.

E 11

Visitors. On February 15 General de Negrier of the French Army visited the Observatory to discuss the question of atmospheric electricity in connection with its effect on aviation. Dr. C. K. Edmunds, the President of the Canton Christian College, visited the Observatory on his return from a magnetic surveying expedition in Indo-China and Siam in April. On September 9 Dr. Stanislaf Hanzlik, Professor of Meteorology and Climatology in the Imperial Bohemian University, Prague, visited the Observatory to discuss weather maps and forecasting. He proposed to visit the principal Observatories en route from Tokio to Prague. On July 17 His Excellency the Governor visited the Observatory to ascertain what additions to the buildings were necessary. Several Officers of the Navy and Army visited the Observatory in the course of the year, and many Commanders of vessels in Harbour called to make en- quiries concerning the weather they were likely to encounter after leaving Hongkong. Similar enquiries were frequently made by telephone.

Commission for Maritime Weather Signals.-The Director was unable to accept an invitation to attend the Meeting of the Commis- sion for Maritime Signals held in London in the month of Septem- ber.

Staff.-Mr. F. G. Figg resigned the Office of Director on June 13, after 29 years' service. Mr T. F. Claxton was appointed Director on June 14. Mr. C. W. Jeffries was promoted to be Chief Assistant on the same date, and Mr. B. D. Evans, of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, was appointed First Assistant on May 17. He arrived in the Colony on June 20.

Expenditure. The annual expenditure on the Observatory for the past ten years is as follows:

Year.

Total Expenditure.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

C.

$

C.

1903

22,780.97

299.99

1904

21,937-15

1905

21,220.40

1906

19,995.17

843.82 716.75

1,225.23

1907

20,110.53

115.36

1908

21,110.61

1,000.08

1909

22,388.63

1,278.02

1910

21,787.55

601.08

1911

23.353.02

1,565.47

1912

22,595.08

757-94

Acknowledgments.-Acknowledgments are here made to the various persons and institutions who have contributed to the suc- cessful working of the Observatory during the past year.

In par- ticular to the Directors of the Weather Services in the Far East and

E 12

the Chinese Maritime Customs for daily observations and extra observations during typhoon weather, and for their kindly encourage- ment and help in my efforts to improve the Hongkong Weather Service; to the Telegraph Companies for transmitting the observa- tions free of charge; to the Superintendents of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company at Hongkong and Shanghai for their courteous co-operation; to the Officers of the Company at Cebu, Iloilo, Bacolod, and Malate, for making and transmitting observations twice daily; to the commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological ob- servations; and finally to the Observatory Staff for the manner in which they have carried out their respective duties.

1913, January 30.

T. F. CLAXTON,

Director.

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT

FOR THE YEAR 1912.

1.-ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1912 was 224, and there were 180 pending at the commencement of that year as against 200 and 419 respectively in 1911. 117 were disposed of during the year, 52 being settled or withdrawn before trial, leaving a balance of 557 undisposed of, as against 139, 50 and 180 respectively in 1911.

There was no interim injunction granted during the year.

The total amount involved was $2,496,284, not including a claim for £2,983. 7s. 64., as against $1,509,463 in 1911.

The debts and damages recovered amounted to $581,537 as against $442,047 in 1911.

The total fees collected amounted to $15,333 as against $12,710 in 1911.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages (0. 3), (0, 3), (0, 4) and (Y. 3) and (Y. 4) of the Blue Book for the year 1911.

2.--SUMMARY JURISDICTION,

The number of Actions instituted during the year was 2,037 and 230 were brought forward from 1911, as against 1,868 and 177 respectively in 1911, and were disposed of as follows:-Settled or Withdrawn 875, Judgment for the Plaintiff 796, Judgment for the Defendant 50, Non Suited 6, Struck out, Dismissed and Lapsed Writs (not served) 219, Struck out of the Cause Book as having been standing over for more than a year 123, leaving 198 as pending, as against 2,045, 621, 819, 48, 15, 224, 88 and 230 respectively in 1911.

The total amount involved was $336,378 and the debts and damages recovered amounted to $139,484 as against $338,240 and $140,874 respectively in 1911.

The total amount of fees collected amounts to $8,895 as against $8,614 in 1911.

;

لالها

F

The number of Distress Warrants for Rent issued was 575 representing aggregate unpaid Rents amounting to $42,525 of which the agreggate sum of $16,466 was recovered, as against 617, $36,883 and $11,618 respectively in 1911.

416 Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties, as against 403 in 1911.

The total fees collected amounted to $2,849 as against $2,973

in 1911.

3.--CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 61 cases and 104 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 100 and 141 respectively in 1911.

The number of persons actually indicted was 104 of whom 76 were convicted and 27 were acquitted Against 1 person the case was abandoned. In 1911 the figures were respectively 134, 94 and 40.

4.--APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

There were 8 Appeals instituted during the year, riz. :—

From the decision of the Chief Justice, 6 as against 6 in 1911.

"

51

})

""

Puisue Judge, I Magistrate, 1

7

17

0

""

13

of which the following were disposed of, riz.:-

From the Chief Justice,

""

Puisne Judge, Magistrate,

2 as against 4 in 1911.

+

*

3

No leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted but two judgments by the Privy Council were received during the year, i.c., in Original Jurisdiction Actions No. 73 of 1904, Imperial Bank of China and Leung Shiu Kong, and No. 200 of 1908, Thomas Alex- ander Mitchell r. John Lemm. In the former action the appeal by the Imperial Bank was dismissed with costs and in the latter the appeal by John Lemmm was allowed with costs.

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

There were 2 actions instituted and 2 actions were tried during the year. The case that was pending since 1908, is still pending.

No ressel was arrested.

t

F 3

The total fees collected amounted to $77.25 as against 880 in 1911.

6.-BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

There were 38 Petitions filed, 18 being Creditors' Petitions, and 20 being Petitions by the Debtors themselves. The figures for 1911 were respectively 36, 20 and 16.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 29, being 11 on Creditors' Petitions, and 18 on Debtors' Petitions; 3 Administration Orders were made. The figures for 1911 were respectively 23, 12 and 11 and 2 Administration Orders.

The number of Public Examinations held was 17 as against 15 in 1911.

There were 22 Adjudications. The figures in 1911 were 16 Adjudications, and 2 Compositions.

There were no Discharges granted.

The aggregate amount of estimated Assets, in case where Re- ceiving Orders were made and were not rescinded, was $216,856 and estimated Liabilities #659,654 as against $109,738 and $275,321 respectively in 1911.

The fees collected amounted to $1,851 as against $2,332 in 1911 and the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors to $4,945 as against $14,435 in 1911.

7.--PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

There were 231 Grants made by the Court, being :-

Probate,....

Letters of Administration, ..

88

143

231

The figures in 1911 were respectively 91 and 126.

The aggregate value of the Estates was $6,213,955 as against $3,816,534 in 1911.

Probate Duties amounted to $356,185. Court Fees amounted to $10,600 and Official Administrator's Commission to $1,914. The figures in 1911 were respectively $197,981, $8,649, and $2,949.

There were 53 Estates vested in or administered by the Official Administrator during the year, representing an aggregate value of $39,279. The figures for 1911 were respectively 38 and $58,700.

F4

22 Estates were wound up during the year, representing an aggregate value of $25,785 as against 38 in 1911 representing $85,687.

8.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The total number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of 1912 was 27 and the aggregate amount of Trust Funds $116,085 as against 27 Estates aggregating $116,085 in 1911 and certain house property.

The amount of Commission collected was $226 as against $428 in 1911.

9.-REGISTRATION OF COMPANIES.

The total number of Companies registered from the commenc?- ment of the Companies Ordinance, 1865, was 760 with au aggregate capital of $363,083,603.

Of the 760 companies on the Register 140 are defunct, 2 were not floated, 155 were wound up and 135 were in the course of being wound up, leaving 308 on the Register at the end of 1912 represent- ing an aggregate capital of $338,254,343.

The figures in 1911 were respectively 724, $348,047,200, 121, 2, 142, 114, 345 and $326,445,192.

There were 36 companies registered in 1912 as compared with 39 in 1911 the revenue from which was :-

Registration Fees, ...... $4,826 as against $5,806 in 1911. Filing and other Fees,... 4,475

$9,301

3,474

$9,280

The number of licences granted under section 35 of "The Companies Ordinance 1911" (No. 58 of 1911) enabling Companies operating outside the Colony to keep local registers of members was 146.

The Fees collected in respect of such licences amounted to $34,581.

10.-FEES AND COMMISSION.

The total sums collected during the year by way of Fees and Commission amounted to $60,544 as against $48,342 in the previous year.

Sir Francis Taylor Piggott retired from the post of Chief Justice on the 30th April and was succeeded by the Honourable Mr. (now Sir) William Rees Davies, Attorney General, on the 1st of May.

-

F 5

Mr. C. A. D. Melbourne, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, acted as 2nd Police Magistrate for the whole of last year and his duties were performed by Mr. A. G. M. Fletcher, Official Receiver, in addition to his other duties until 20th November when he was appointed to act as Assistant Colonial Secretary. Mr. S. B. B. McElderry, Passed Cadet, succeeded Mr. Fletcher in the acting appointment.

I was appointed to act for Mr. Fletcher as Official Receiver and Registrar of Trade Marks in addition to my other duties, on the 20th November.

Mr. I. U. Mirza, 2nd Grade Clerk and Clerk to the Puisne Judge, returned from 6 months' leave of absence on the 9th February.

Mr. N. G. Nolan, Chief Interpreter, proceeded on 12 months' leave of absence on the 2nd of April. Mr. Wong Kwong Tin, 2nd Interpreter, was appointed to act as Chief Interpreter, Mr. A. J. Mackie, 3rd Interpreter, who returned from 9 months' leave of absence on the 21st of June, was appointed to act as 2nd Interpreter and Mr. Leung Tun Sheung, Sergeant Interpreter, was appointed to act as 3rd Interpreter.

On the retirement of Mr. F. Howell, First Bailiff, on the 31st December, 1911, the following appointments were made:-Mr. J. Leonard, 2nd Bailiff, to be First Bailiff, Mr. A. W. Hill, Clerk and Usher, to be 2nd Bailiff, and Mr. T. F. O'Sullivan, a Constable in the Police Force, to be Clerk and Usher. ·

HUGH A. NISBET,

Registrar.

28th February, 1913.

Table showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.

(From 1903 to 1912.)

Total

Number

Expenditure.

Revenne.

Year.

of Cases

dealt

Percentage of Revenue to Expenditure.

with.

Total.

Increase. Decrease.

Total.

Increase. Decrease.

$

C.

$

%

1903,

968

75,544.52

4,926.87

41,758.83

1,483.41

55.27

1904,

1,038 58,681.03

16,863.49

49,108.37

7,349.54

83.68

1905,

1,166

66,711.72

8,030.69

61,984.69

12,876.32

92.91

1906,

1,039

69,667.23

2,955.51

52,904.11

9,080.58

75.93

1907,

1,031

69,592.75

71.48

56,156.78

3,252.67

80.69

1908,

1,014

87,270.40 | 17,677.65

46,592.80

...

9,563.98

53.38

1909,

1,030

89,209.17

1,938.77

45,861.55

731.25

51.40

1910,

1,259

91,789.15

2,579.98

65,527.80 19,666.25

71:38

1911,

1,963

86,702.10

5,087.05 *48,342.49

17,185.31

55.75

1912,

1,263

88,346.36

1,644.26

*60,544.50 12,201.81

68.53

F6-

* Not including amonnts paid direct to Treasury for Fees in respect of licences to keep Local Registers issued by the Registrar of Com- panies under the Companies Ordinance, 1911.

Appendix G.

REPORT ON THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS

FOR THE YEAR 1912.

Mr. Hazeland, 1st Police Magistrate, was on leave from 1st January to 15th November and Mr. Irving, Director of Education, acted as 1st Police Magistrate during his absence.

Mr. Wood, 2nd Police Magistrate, acted as Director of Educa- tion from 1st January to 17th September and went on leave on 18th September.

Throughout the year Mr. Melbourne, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, acted as 2nd Police Magistrate.

Mr. Woodcock, Clerk to the Magistrates, acted as Assistant Land Officer in addition to his own duties from 1st January to 28th November.

The number of cases was 13,450 as compared with 10,471 in 1911; the revenue was $99,253.10 as compared with $52,464.87 for 1911.

20th February, 1913.

I

F. A. HAZELAND,

Police Magistrate.

?

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the

Magistracy for the years 1903 to 1912.

Expenditure.

Revenue.

Year.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total

Number

of Cases

tried.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

ሮ.

$

C.

$

c.

%

1903

38,046.30

8,995.68

71,310.77

25,412.49

14,268

53.35

1904

38,486.48

440.18

95,405.12

24,094.35

14,505

40.34

1905

35,762.86

2,723.62

88,145.26

7,259.86

13,450

40'57

1906

39,303.16

3,540.30

79,557.64

8,587.62

18,871

49.40

1907

40,455,52

1,132.36

67,133.26

12,424.38

13,414

60.26

1908

46,018.18

5,562.66

68,696.43

1,563.17

10,555

66.98

1909

40,119.69

5,898.49

69,986.12

1,289.99

10,771

57.32

1910

38,428.03

1,691.66

75,970.76

5,984.34

...

11,688

50.58

1911

43,298.26

4,870.23

52,464,87

23,505.89

10,471

82.53

1912

41,590.98

1,707.28

99,253.10

46,788.23

13,450

41.90

G 2

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1912.

1.-REGISTRATION.

During the year two thousand three hundred and fifty-three (2,353) Deeds and Documents were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 affecting four thousand and twenty-seven (4,027) lots of land. The total money consideration on sales, mortga- ges, surrenders and miscellaneous documents amounted to $42,816,508 particulars of which are shown in Table I.

2.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The total area of land sold and granted on Lease during the year was 288 acres 3 roods 30 poles of which 66 acres 3 roods 24 poles was in respect of lands dealt with by the District Offices. The total area resumed was 314 acres 0 rood 11 poles being an excess of 25 acres 0 rood 21 poles land resumed over land granted during the year which was due to the falling in of a large number of Quarry Leases which were not renewed. Particulars of the grants are shown on pages W 2 and W 3 of the Blue Book for 1912.

3.-GRANTS OF LEASES.

The number of Crown Leases granted during the year was 57 particulars of which are specified in Table II. The inability of the Survey Department owing to pressure of work to supply lease plans was the cause of a fewer number of Crown Leases being granted during the year.

4.-FEES.

The total amount of fees collected by stamps exclusive of the New Territories during the year amounted to $42,154 being $2,531 more than the previous year. The amount of Land Regis- tration Fees in the New Territories amounted to $3,075.

The amounts of fees collected under the different headings for the years 1903 to 1912 are shown in the Table III.

5.-CROWN RENT ROLL.

The total Crown. Rent due in respect of leased lands in Hong- kong and Kowloon (excluding certain Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon entered in the Village Rent Roll) amounted for the year ending 25th December to $409,373 a decrease of $16,964 on the previous year which was due to the Government having resumed

H 2

-

several large areas of land for the Railway Terminus at Kowloon and to the reductions in rent granted to a number of lessees of quarries who had suffered considerably by the closing down of their quarries owing to the Revolution in China. The total amount due in respect of leased lands in the Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon appearing in the Village Rent Roll for the year ending 30th September was $3,549 a decrease of $16 due to the resumption and re-entry of a few small lots. The total number of lots of Crown Land appear- ing in the Rent Rolls with the total Rents is shown in Table IV.

6.-NAVAL AND MILITARY LANDS.

Agreements were made with the War Department for the tem- porary occupation of camping grounds at Hung Hom and Lai Chi Kok and they were also granted temporary permits for telephone sta- tions at various places on the Island.

7.-SCAVENGING LANES,

Areas for Scavenging Lanes were in the case of 19 properties either resumed by the Crown for money payments or dedicated by the Crown Lessees as Scavenging Lanes in consideration of their be- ing granted by the Building Authority modifications or exemptions from certain provisions of the Public Health and Buildings Ordi- nances 1903 to 1911 and the necessary documents were completed and registered.

8.-NOISY AND OFFENSIVE TRADES.

Sixteen licences were granted under the provisions of the Crown Leases to carry on offensive trades on their premises in cases where such licences were recommended by the Sanitary Board.

9.--BUILDING COVENANTS.

In ten cases applications were made by Crown Lessees for an extension of time in which to comply with the Building Covenant in their Crown Leases or grants. The applications were granted on payment of penalties and the agreements completed and registered.

10. STAMP DUTY.

The amount of Stamp Duty paid on registered documents amounted to $114,971.

11.-AMALGAMATION.

The Office of Crown Solicitor, Land Office and Official Receiver's Office were on instructions from the Secretary of State amalgamated during the year, the amalgamation has not however had any appre- ciable effect upon the work of the Department.

H 3

12. STAFF.

The amalgamated offices of Land Officer and Official Receiver in Bankruptcy which had been jointly held by the Land Officer since 1883 was on the instructions of the Secretary of State abolished on the 24th August, 1912. Mr. Wakeman accordingly relinquished the post of Official Receiver on that date and Mr. Fletcher, the Deputy Official Receiver, was appointed in his place. Mr. G. A. Woodcock, First Clerk of the Magistracy, acted as Assistant Land Officer from 1st January to the 28th November during the absence on leave of Mr. Jacks.

Mr. Tam Hing Yang, 3rd Grade Clerk, was promoted to the 4th Grade on the 5th February, 1912, and Mr. Lo Tak Cheong, 6th Grade Clerk in the Sanitary Department, was appointed 5th Grade Clerk in place of Mr. Tam Hing Yan promoted.

28th February, 1913.

?

G. H. WAKEMAN,

Land Officer.

Marinc.

H 4

Table I.

Particulars of Deeds and Documents registered in the Land Office.

No. of Lots

Description of Documents.

Number Registered.

or portions of Lots affected.

Total Consideration.

C.

Assiguments,

890

1,219

19,029,986.27

Mortgages, Transfers of

Mortgages, Reassign-

ments and Satisfaction..

1,168

2,029

22,249,924.20

Surrenders,

36

158

1,477,379.00

Judgments and Orders of

Courts,....

96

318

Probates and Letters of

Administration,

52

127

Miscellaneous Documents,

111

176

59,219.00

Total,....

2,353

4,027

$42,816,508.47

Table II.

Crown Leases granted during the year 1912.

Kowloon and

Hongkong.

Hung Hom.

New Territories.

Total.

Inland.

Hill District.

Farm and Garden.

Villages.

Marine.

3 19

LO

5

3

2 1 13

Inland.

0

Quarries.

Piers.

Oyster Beds.

Salt Pan.

New Kowloon Farm.

Tai Po.

Fan Ling.

LO

5

2 1 1

1

57

H 5

Table III.

Fees collected during the ten years from 1903 to 1912.

Year.

Registra- tion of

Searches and Copies

Deeds.

of Docu-

ments.

Grants of Leases.

Total.

C.

$

C.

C.

1903,

27,664.00

1,507.00

2,805.00

31,976 00

1904,

30,209.00

2,029.00

2,355.00

34,593.00

1905,

34,161.00

2,567.05

1,220.00

37,948.05

1906

27,565.00

2,219.30

1,310.00

31,094.30

1907,

21,507.00

2,010.05

1,835.00

25.352.05

1908,

23,178.00

1,920.50

1,970.00

27,068.50

1909,

22,325.00

2,268.75

1 270.00

25,863.75

1910,

27,798.00

2,722.25

5,305.00

35,825.25

1911,

33,871.00

2,827.20

2,925.00

39,623.20

1912,

37,528.00 2,805.75

1,820.00

42,153.75

H 6

Table IV.

Crown Rent Roll,

Locality and Description.

No. of

Lots.

Total

Crown Rent.

C.

Hongkong, Marine,

228

61,919.12

19

Praya Reclamation Marine, Inland,

169

18,549.00

1,551

146,870.19

Quarry Bay, Marine,

2

18,334.00

Inland,

11

3,207.00

Hongkong, Farm,

42

1,917:80

Garden,

34

957.00

Rural Building,

115

10,596.84

Aberdeen, Marine,

5

579.16

Inland.

60

2,098.88

Apleechow. Marine,

20

150.56

22

Inland,.

22

172.64

Shaukiwan Bay, Marine,

10

1,928.00

Juland,

140

2,395.40

"J

Stanley, Inland,

4.00

Kowloon, Marine,

Inland,

57

41,216.13

824

Farm....

Garden,

"}

48,428.43 161.12

Quarries,

Hunghom, Marine,.

""

Inland,

Shek O, Inland, Tai Tam, Inland, Tong Po, Inland, Lantao, Marine,

New Kowloon, Marine,

632

64.00 3,862.00

220

6,775,50

1.00

1

1.00

1.00

2

1,300.00

24,268.00

5

7,368.00

Inlaud,

37

1,834.00

Farm,

940.00

>>

""

Rural Building,

1

18.00

Tai Po, Inlaud,.

169.00

Fan Ling,

1

1.00

Sai Kung, Marine,

>>

Peng Chau, Farın,

Mining,

1

Inland,

I

500.00

1

225.00

2

2,560.00

Total,.....

3,601

1 $409,372.77

H 7

Village Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of

Lots.

Total

Crown Reut.

C.

Wongneichung,

129

225.00

Aberdeen,

29

87.50

Pokfulam,

36

73.03

Tai Hang,.

157

635.50

Ab Kung Ngam,

27

20.25

Kai Lung Wan,

9.80

Shaukiwan,

175

245.75

Tai Kok Tsui,

10

16.00

Mong Kok,

51

113.00

Hokun,

95

277.50

Tokwawan,

188

329.00

Shek Shan,

31

69.00

Sun Shan,

18

59.50

Mataukok,

31

44.50

Mati,

2

5.50

Ho Mun Tin,

9

37.50

Matauchung,

58

138.50

Matauwei,

126

220.50

Kau Pui Shek,

31

112.00

Hau Pui Loong,

15

53.50

Tung Lo Wan,

5

23.00

Wong Tsuk Hang,.

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream,

19

82.00

Little Hongkong,

8.00

Tong Po,

3.50

Stanley,

II

21.00

Tytam,...

Tytam Tuk,

Chai Wan,....

Shek O,....

1

3.50

2.50

Wong Ma Kok,

1

2.00

18.00

8

23.00

Hok Tsui,

Chung Hom Bay,

Aplichau,

1

1.50

1

3.00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road, Victoria,..

Tsat Tse Mui,..................

Old Kowloon Farm Lot 13,

Deep Water Bay,

Telegraph Bay,........ Hung Hom West,

1

3.00

68

272.00

35

99.00

48

125.00

13

EN

2.00

43.50

6.00

Total,........

1,456

$3,548.83

Appendix I.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1912.

A. NORTHERN DISTRICT.

wwwwwww

I.--STAFF.

Mr. G. N. Orme acted as District Officer throughout the year.

Mr. S. B. B. McElderry acted as Assistant District Officer from January 1st to November 20th, and Mr. X. L. Smith from that date until the end of the year.

II.

POLICE.

The early part of 1912 brought with it a revival of piracies on our northern borders. The fighting in the neighbouring Chinese districts had led to considerable importation of arms and to the enlistment of many soldiers who on the cessation of the disturbance were disbanded but not disarmed; and as money and booty became scarce in their own country, they were naturally drawn, by the comparative opulence of the New Territories, into making some determined raids upon the nearest villages. The state of affairs became so serious that towards the end of June a request for military assistance was made and readily granted. Indian troops were sent out to camp at convenient points and patrol the border, and from that time the border robberies entirely ceased In the neighbour- ing Chinese Territory robberies continued for 2 months more, until the looting of Lo Fong Customs Station, and of some shops in Sham Chun, led to more vigorous measures and the despatch of 300 troops from Canton to Shani Chun. Shortly afterwards four pirates before being shot in Sham Chun admitted that they had been concerned in several of the robberies across our border.

The troops remained on the border until October, when they moved into their usual winter camps at points more suitable for

manœuvres.

The Police Force was increased by some 12 per cent. during the year, and arrangements made for a substantial increase in 1913. Measures were taken to discover and deal with the bad characters remaining in the Territory, and at the end of the year there were probably very few left. There was an increased demand by house- holders for permits to possess arms, and 345 were issued, as com- pared with 287 in 1911.

III. MAGISTRACY,

The following table gives statistics of Magistracy work during the last three years.

The diminution in number of warrants is due chiefly to the cessation of opium smuggling, and of search warrants on that account. In the civil court, summons fees of $1 were charged from January 1st, 1912, in the case of all claims of $5 and over.

A.-Criminal.

I 2

1910.

1911.

1912.

Cases heard,

467

332

396

Persons brought before the

Magistrate on various

charges,

640

558

710

Persons convicted,

399

278

479

Persons discharged,

141

126

172

Persons imprisoned,

139-

85

123

Fines,

$2,627.05 $1,829.92

$2,477.26

Warrants,...

292

157

53

B.-Civil (Small Debts).

Cases,

240

205

193

Writs of Execution,

35

75

86

Summons Fees,

Nil.

Nil.

$179.00

IV. LAND OFFICE.

There was an increase in private land transactions, especially in the Fan Ling neighbourhood, and 4,036 deeds were registered, bringing in fees to the amount of $1,966.20. The following table shows the number of deeds registered annually since the Land Ordinance of 1905: a charge was made for registration from March, 1911.

No. of Deeds.

Fees.

1905,...

1.794

1906,..

1,407

1907,...

2,160

1908,,

2.384

1909....

2,544

1910,...

3,885

1911,...

3,590

$1.414.70

1912,...

4,036

1,966.20

There was also a considerable increase in the amount of Crown Land disposed of; $5,786.40 being realised in premia with Crown rent of $388.83 against $4,649 with Crown rent of $315.61 in 1911.

On the other hand resumptions and surrenders were responsible for the abandonment of 2107 acres carrying Crown rent of $89.91, as against 12 24 acres in 1911 with Crown rent of 41.58. This increase was mainly due to the increase in resump- tions for public roads.

V.-REVENUE.

The revenue for the year is set out in Table E. The increase is considerably larger than appears from the figures, since Tsün Wan was transferred to the Southern District on May 1st, and with it some $3,500 of revenue formerly collected in this office.

The collection of Crown Rent was carried out without friction, and only 17 warrants were executed on account of non-payment, as against 144 in 1909, 99 in 1910, and 20 in 1911.

7

Ï 3

The revenue from sales of Crown Land showed a substantial in- crease but the larger revenue from forestry is due only to the pay- ment of arrears in the early part of 1912.

VI. OPIUM.

Owing to the stricter measures taken by the Chinese authorities against opium smoking, the smuggling of opium into British Territory has almost ceased, and the offences against the Opium. Ordinance only numbered 22.

The price of Patua opium was raised to $5.00 and that of Malwa to $3.50 by the end of the year.

VII.

LIQUOR.

The total revenue from liquor duties for the Northern District was $13,778 86, of which $5,159.16 was collected through this office, and the rest paid direct to Hongkong.

The falling off under this head is due chiefly to the entry of Tsün Wan and part of Sai Kung under the Southern District instead of the Northern.

VIII-PUBLIC WORKS.

The necessary land was resumed for the Au Tau-San Tin Section of the Castle Peak Sha Tau Kok road, and for the branch road from Au Tau to Kam Tin; and work on both was begun before the end of the year. A much needed path was constructed by the side of the light railway from Fan Ling to Au Ha Gap.

A portion of the proposed road from Tai Po to Fan Ling about 600 yards long with a 25' concrete bridge was constructed.

An additional section of the reclaimed land in front of Tai Po Market was raised to approved levels, and a new survey was made of this neighbourhood. A large scale survey (50 feet to 1 inch) of the New Territories villages was taken in hand, but little progress was made owing to press of other work: the revision of the 2′′ maps, begun in 1911, was completed during the year.

IX.-GENERAL.

The border line between the Northern and Southern Districts was materially altered by an order of the Governor-in-Council, the chief effect of which was to transfer the Police District of Tsün Wàn, and with it several hill villages formerly in Au Tau district, from the Northern to the Southern District.

The year 1912 was the driest on record in the New Territories, only 62 13 inches of rain being registered in the Tai Po rain gauge, as against an average of 99-40 for the last six years.

The first crop of rice was just saved by a timely fall of rain in June, and was nearly up to the average, while good prices were re- alised owing to the drought and disorder in the neighbouring Chinese Territory which were together responsible for a scanty harvest.

I 1

The second rice crop came in for a severe drought in September and October, and was very poor in consequence.

Sweet potatoes, sugar-cane and peanuts all did well in the begin- ing of the year, and the latter realised higher prices than usual.

Fruit growing began on a considerable scale in the Fan Ling district. Mr. Ho Tung planted several acres, chiefly of Lichées, on his land by the, road from Fan Ling to San Tin, and near Fan Ling Station an extensive fruit farm has been opened by a Chinese com- pany in Hongkong: with it are combined a distillery and a chicken farin.

In addition to the last named venture, the first steps were taken towards the erection of a new village close to San Wai about a mile eastward from Fan Ling.

The prosperity of the Fan Ling valley was further evidenced by the number of new houses which sprang up; and the demand for these was so large both here and elsewhere throughout the Territory as to cause a considerable boom in the brick-making industry.

Prospecting for tin was carried on in the valley to the S.E. of Au Tau Station, with the result that towards the end of the year steps were taken for the flotation of a tin mining company in Hong- kong.

The development of the Fan Ling Golf Links and the construc- tion of the new Golf House proceeded during the year, and an increas- ing number of members were attracted from Hongkong: but in other respects the Territory showed little sign during 1912 of supplying a much needed outlet for the surplus population of Hongkong.

G. N. ORME, District Officer.

27th February, 1913.

I 5

Table A.

Strength of the Police Force in the Northern District of the New Territories during 1912.

Ping Shan,

Sai Kung,

Sha Tau Kok...............

Kat 0,.......

Tai Po,

Sheung Shui,

Ta Ku Ling,

San Tin,

Au Tau,

Sha Tin,

Stations.

Europeans.

Indians,

2

12

1

3

1

11

(Block House),...

No. 3 Launch, Sergeant Interpreters,

Stations.

Chinese.

Total.

10

9

9

1

4

2

:

- www wwinwo

19

7

14

5

13

14

9

12

12

7

3

15

17

Total,......

10 77

52

139

Table B.

Health of Force.

Ping Shan, Au Tau, San Tin, Sheung Shui, Tai Po,

4

10

21

1

10

29

Sai Kung,

Sha Tin,

Sha Tau Kok,.

2

DO KO

+32 2 N

8

10

3

8

3

10

5

13

:*

3

23

Total,

18

21

50

10

99

Total.

Stations.

— Í 6 —

1

Table C.

Crimes in Northern District, 1912.

་་་

30

1 32

3 1

10

:

:

54

| ::

:

6

-

S

2

6

00 40 00

3000 10:

15

81

11

18

18

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Piracy.

Armed Robbery.

Suicide.

Attempted

Suicide.

Larceny.

Robbery, House-breaking, and Burglary.

Rape.

Total.

Ping Shan, Sha Tin, Au Tau,

San Tin,

Sheung Shui, Sai Kung,

Sha Tau Kok,...

Tai Po,

Total,................

Heading.

No. of

Sales, &c.

No. of Lots.

Table D.

Land Office Returus.

A rea

Crown Rent

or Fee,

Premium.

6.

in acres.

in square feet.

Reduction in Annual Rent.

Compen-

sation.

C

Remarks.

for one month

only.

Auction Sales,

126

155

307.10

5,114.00 |12·73 | 244,320 Total

Private Sales,...

119 134 81.73

672.40

1.74

55,815 =

798,839

131,609

"1

Agricultural land converted to

Building land,...........

1

1.00

4.00

500

500

""

Re-sales of Railway land,

15

4.30 468.45

1.53

66,647

"

Permits to occupy land

(Agricultural)

21

23

55.26

16:48

""

""

""

(Building)

4

4

10.36

.06

2,386

=

717,869

4,996

::

:

::

Permits to occupy Railway land

(Agricultural)

40

77

51.88

9:05

"

""

(Building)

1

1

1.00

300

394,218

300

>>

Matshed Permits,

40

45.00

Permits to quarry stone,

54

208.00

Permits to cut earth, &c.,

66

144.00

Sandal-wood Mill Licences,

10

10.00

Ferry Licences,

7

16.00

Resumptions,

:

410

19.79

45.545,020.20|

Surrenders,

53

1.28 7,680

45.37

Registration of Memorials,

Stamps Sold (for Registration of Seeds),

Stamps Sold (for Fees of Small

Debt Court),

Stamps Sold (for Postage),

Registration of Graves,....

4,036

230

:

:

1,966.20

62.00

124.16

115.00

:

:

:

P:

- 1 7 -

I 8

Table E.

Revenue collected in the Northern District, during the years

1911 and 1912.

1911.

$ C.

1912.

$

C.

Crown Rent,

80.235.88

79,420.78

Kerosine Oil Licences,

266.00

278.00

Distillery Licences,

2,540.75

2,509.50

Chinese Wines and Spirits,

3,706.25

3.943.75

Pawnbrokers' Licences,

1,600.00

1,600.00

Money Changers' Licences,

100.00

120.00

Forestry Licencés,

2.992.91

3,503.86

Permits to cut earth,

96.00

144.00

Fines,

1,767.60

2,487.26

Forfeitures,

219.32

120.32

Distress Warrants,

51.00

68.00

Grave Certificates,

Matshed Permits, Stone Quarries, Certified Extracts, Sun Prints,

Sales of wild trees,

Water Wheels,

203.25

115.00

32.50

45.00

69.00

208.00

130.00

125.00

100.00

150.00

13.50

Pineapple Licences,

989.82

46.47

44.00

10.00

Ferry Licences,

16.00

16.00

Premium on land sales,

4,653.00

5.790.40

Summons Fees,

179.00

House Rent,

155.00

527.67

Liquor Duties,

2,872.32

5.159.16

Distress Warrants (Crown Rent),

20.00

17.00

European Wines and Spirits,

100.00

$ 102,960.60 $ 106,607.67

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

wwwwwcom

I 9

Table F.

Rainfall in 1912.

2.37 inch.

4.14

15

2.35

33

3.72

5.18

13.49

9.76

ag

10.03

""

3.74

""

0.23 7.12

33

*

Total,

62.13

Rainfall for 1911,

106.74

""

I 10

B.-SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

I.--STAFF.

Mr. A. E. Wood acted as Assistant District Officer from January 1st to November 18th.

year.

Mr. G. R. Sayer acted from November 18th to the end of the

One clerk and shroff was transferred from the Northern District in November.

II. POLICE.

Considerable additions were made to the numbers of the force owing to the Cheung Chau piracy and the general unrest. At Cheung Chau one European constable and five Indian constables were added to the establishment; and eight special European con- stables did duty from September 3rd to November 26th. At Tai O the establishment was increased from 10 to 17. Two European constables and eight Indian police constables were added and three Chinese constables withdrawn. Two more Indian police constables were posted to Tung Chung. At Tsin Wàn the strength was reduced by the withdrawal of two Indian police constables and two Chinese constables. Two special constables were posted there from September to November.

The waters of the district were patrolled by No. 4 launch (Western patrol) and No. 2 launch (Eastern patrol). Table A shows the numbers of the force at its greatest strength.

Table B shows the health of the force. It is noticeable that Tsin Wàn has maintained its bad reputation. Both special con- stables were sent to hospital with fever and in all there were six

cases.

There had been a large increase in crime in the district. Eight cases of armed robbery were reported and six of murder or man- slaughter. Details are given in Table C.

III.

MAGISTRACY.

The Assistant District Officer sitting as police magistrate heard during the year 124 cases affecting 179 persons. Of these 150 were convicted or bound over and 29 were discharged. The large increase in the amount of fines over that of last year is due to convictions for illegal possession of arms and dynamite by junk-owners.

- I il

The following table gives a comparison with the year 1911:-

1912.

1911.

No. of cases,..

124

81

No. of persons affected,

179

118

Persons convicted or bound over,..

150

112

Persons discharged,

29

6

Fines (exclusive of opium fines),

$ 2,112.68

$451.00

Persons imprisoned,

33

32

Opium fines paid to the farmer,

$ 67.74

$25.00

Forfeitures (estreated bail and gambling

seizures),

$164.64

£97.91

IV. SMALL DEBTS COURT.

One hundred and thirty-six cases were heard before the Small Debts Court during the year as against fifty-one last year. The Assistant District Officer held regular courts at Tai O, Cheung Chau and, later in the year, at Tsün Wàn.

year.

V.-LAND OFFICE.

Eight hundred and sixty-five deeds were registered during the This is only slightly above the average for the last seven years during which the Land Ordinance has been in force. There is no doubt that much land changes hands without registration; and it is probable that not more than 10 per cent. of mortgages_on land in the less accessible parts of the district are registered. The journey from Lantao is an almost insuperable obstacle and a

stamped paper" is generally considered sufficient security.

<<

Thirty-five auctions were held during the year and 14 sales by private treaty. In all 170 acres were sold with a premium of $1,138.00 and Crown Rent of $156.15. Fifty-eight lots were resum- ed, 41 of these being in connection with improvements at Ap Liu. The total area of resumed land was 11:37 acres at a cost of $4,833.18. Fifty-four lots were voluntarily surrendered and 54 were re-entered for failure to pay Crown Rent.

Nine grave certificates were issued.

VI. REVENUE,

The transfer of Tsün Wàn to the Southern District makes a comparison with last year's returns misleading. Tsin Wàn re- presents a Crown Rental of $3,200. Excluding this amount the Crown Rent collected in 1912 falls short by $860 of that collected in 1911. This is accounted for partly by late payments in 1910 which were credited to 1911 and partly by certain half-yearly payments of which both instalments were credited to 1911 but one only to 1912. It is noticeable that only $27 short of the full collection was collected during the year.

Tsün Wàn is also accountable for the increased revenue from forestry licences, pineapple licences and water wheel licences.

The stone quarry at Chek Lap Kok after its failure last year was re-leased at a more normal rental of $90 a month.

I 12

The number of earth permits points to considerable activity in building. Matshed permits have fallen off proportionately.

Details of revenue collected by this office are given in Table D.

Table E shows the revenue collected through other depart- ments. The increase in Harbour Office receipts is due to the raising of the scale of harbour dues.

Quarry returns from New Kowloon show a falling off owing to the small demand in 1911.

VII.-CROPS.

The first rice crop was an exceptionally good one for a district not essentially a rice growing district. The second crop suffered somewhat from drought in October or, in the case of Cheung Chau and the East of Lantao Island from a serious blight.

Sweet potatoes on vegetable land, were poor; but those planted on padi land after the rice harvest promise well thanks to the timely rains in December. Other vegetables, which are not planted on an ambitious scale and are chiefly for home consumption, were well up to the average. Onions from Tung Chung and bean curd from Tsün Wàn continue to find a ready sale in Hongkong. Pineapples, grown only in Tsün Wàn and Tsing I Island, were a fine crop. Nearly four hundred acres were under pineapples and thirty fresh applica- tions have been received. There is no sugar cane in the Southern District.

VIII-LIQUOR.

The total receipts collected on liquor distilled in the Southern District amount to $100,700.07.

There are ten distilleries in Tsün Wàn representing a revenue of $31,000. This accounts for the great increase over last year's receipts.

Exclusive of Tsün Wàn, there are 8 distilleries on the main- land, including the large distillery at Sham Shui Po from which over $34,000 were collected. There are also 5 distilleries on Cheung Chau giving a revenue of $25,400; 2 at Tai O and 2 at Ma Wan.

There is no doubt that in spite of the heavy tax distilleries can be run at a profit.

A large proportion of liquor distilled is for Hongkong consump- tion.

IX.

OPIUM.

Prepared opium to the total amount of 12,430 685 taels was sold representing, at an average price of $4 a tael, a total of $49,722.74.

Tsün Wàn accounts for 1,938 taels but exclusive of this amount there was an increased consumption of about 3,000 taels over last year.

1 13

-

220 taels of dross opium were sold at Tai O.

These figures do not include New Kowloon.

X.-GENERAL.

The year has clearly been one of general prosperity. The dis- trict as a whole is well-watered and little affected by drought. Salt pans at Tai O proved a financial success. Quarries recovered some- what from a dull season last year. Fish were plentiful and the fishing fleets can command good prices owing to the competition of local markets with those of Hongkong and Macao.

The one dissentient voice is that of Cheung Chau which was beset in turn by plague and by pirates. The attack by pirates, involving as it did the death of three Indian constables, was pro- bably the most serious outrage in the history of the district and showed the necessity of some means of communication with Hong- kong.

Cheung Chau however has sufficient enterprise to rise superior to bad fortune. It has added two storeys to the ill fated pawn shop. It has overcome considerable opposition to its new market run strict- ly on municipal lines. And it has established its own electric light plant and supplies light at a cheaper rate than Hongkong can do.

The transfer of some 20 square miles on the mainland including Tsün Wàn from the Northern District took place during the year. Fortnightly courts have been held since May at the police station and full use has been made of the greater accessibility of the District Officer.

Resumptions and reclamations at Ap Liu were continued but with this exception there were no public works undertaken in the dis- trict. There has however been some activity in the building trade. Several two-storeyed Chinese houses have been built at Tai O and new European houses on Cheung Chau. And there are not wanting signs of a steady natural development from within.

In New Kowloon lands continue to change hands at high prices.

14th February, 1913.

G. R. SATER, Assistant District Officer, Southern District.

I 14

Table A.

Strength of Police Force during 1912.

Station.

Tai O.

Tung Chung,

Cheung Chau, 2 special constables from 3-9-12 to 26-11-12, .....

Lamma,

Tsün Wan, 2 special constables from

3-9-12 to 26-11-12,

Station.

Total,...

:

European.

Indian.

:

Chinese.

Total.

Co

3

13

1

17

7

2

N

1

12

5

10

1

7

2

10

6

41

6

53

Table B.

Health of the Force during 1912.

Total.

Tai O.

Tung Chung,

Cheung Chau,

Lamma,

1

3

...

N

1

3

2

1

1

4

3

...

Tsün Wàn,

3

Total,

6

11

9

10

5

23

I 15

Table C.

Crime in the Southern District during 1912.

Station.

ONE

13

16

2

6626

10

5 20 41

Tai O and Tung Chung, .

Cheung Chau,.

Lamma,

Tsün Wan..

1

1

1

I

3

Total,

6

:.

Table D.

Revenue collected during 1912 ly the Assistant District Officer New Territories, Southern District.

1911.

1912.

$ C.

Land Sales,.

1,421.00

$ c. 1,138.00

Crown Rent,

24,430.32

26,775.62

Assessed Taxes,

8,756.52

8,938.05

Lease of Stone Quarries,

1.795.00

1,080.00

Forestry Licenses,

938.28

1,550.15

Earth Permits,

34.00

109.00

Matshed Permits,

371.00

188.50

Pineapple Licences,

29.72

958.29

Registration Fees,

1,251.80

1,108.40

Distress Warrants, (Crown Rent),

94.00

113.00

Distress Warrants, (Small Debts),

20.00

9.00

Writs of Summons,

79.00

111.50

Fines, (Police Court),

478.85

2.159.03

Forfeitures,

97.91

164.64

Certified Extracts,

9.00

Miscellaneous Receipts,

Grave Certificates,

Interest,

Legal Costs,

Sunprints,

Boundary Stones,

Water Wheel Licences,

$39,823.39 $44,796.11

9.75

3.50

52.00

7.24

23.43

65.00

65.00

150.00

34.00

I 16

Table E.

Revenue collected through other departments from the New Territories, Southern District.

1911.

1912.

$

C.

$

C.

Public Works Department, (Land Permits, etc.), in New Kowloon,

2,042.90

Treasury, (Crown Rent for Inland

Lots),

11,929.82

11.628.60

Treasury, (Quarries in New Kow-

23,156.00

17,781.24

loon),

Harbour Office, (Harbour Dues,

14.391.30

Stake Nets, etc.),

20,860.80

Police, (Licence Fees),

2,801.75

2,880.75

Imports and Exports Office, (Liquor

60,137.86

100.700.07

Duties),

$114,462.63

$ 153,851.46

Appendix J.

REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1912.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 12,660 as against 9,289 in 1911 being an increase of 3,371 or 36 29 per cent. The average for the last five years is 10,223-8.

In the division of these cases into Serious and Minor Offences there appears an increase, as compared with 1911, of 692 cases or 19:31 per cent. in the former and of 2,679 cases or 46 95 per cent. in the latter,

The increase and decrease as compared with 1911 in Serious Offences are shown as follows:

Increase.

Murder,

5

Robbery, -

Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,- Kidnapping and Protection of Women and

28

31

Children,

Piracy,

Unlawful Possession,

Larcenies,

16

4

262

- 400

Total, -

746

Decrease.

Assault with intent to rob,

3

Other Felonies,

51

Total, -

54

Nett Increase,

692

2. Table I shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during 1911 and 1912 and number of persons convicted and discharged in connection with these Offences.

MURDER.

3. Sixteen murders were reported to the Police during the year as against 11 in 1911.

In connection with 8 of these reports no arrest was made; in the remaining 8 cases arrests were made. There were 4 cases in which convictions were obtained (5 persons). In 4 cases there was no conviction (13 persons).

MANSLAUGHTER.

4. Five cases were reported to the Police during the year as against 15 in 1911.

J 2

In one case no arrest was made and in the remaining 4 cases arrests were made. There was one case in which conviction was obtained (one man). In 3 cases there was no conviction (5 persons).

GANG ROBBERIES.

5. Eighty-two gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 51 in 1911.

In 59 cases no arrest was made, in the remaining 23 cases arrests were made. There were 15 cases in which convictions were

obtained (44 persons). In 8 cases there was no conviction (13 persons).

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

6. Twenty-four Street and Highway Robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 31 in 1911.

In 17 cases no arrest was made, in the remaining 7 cases arrests were made and convictions were obtained (12 persons).

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND JUNKS.

7. Twenty-three cases were reported to the Police during the year as against 19 in 1911.

In 19 cases no arrest was made, in the remaining 4 cases arrests were made. There was one case in which conviction was obtained (2 persons) and in the other 3 cases there was no con- viction (10 persons).

OTHER FELONIES.

8. Under this heading are comprised the following:-

1912.

1911.

Arson and attempted arson,

2

2

Cutting and wounding, -

15

12

Demanding money with menaces,

8

6

Embezzlement,

31

34

Forgery,

-

28

16

Housebreaking,

· 125

157

Wounding with

Indecent assault and rape,

Shooting with intent to murder

grievous bodily harm,

Abominable Offences,

Throwing corrosive fluid,

Being armed with intent to commit

a felony,

-

Administering a drug with intent

to commit a felony,

Attempting to discharge a loaded revolver with intent to do grievous bodily harm,

2

1

intent to do

321

11

1

2

ลง

1

1

218

243

J 3

The number of cases in which convictions were obtained was 76 as against 83 in 1911.

GAMBLING.

9. Two hundred and twenty-eight Gambling Warrants were exe cuted and convictions obtained as against 180 în 1911.

Eight were lottery cases.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

10. The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $473,476.77 as against $256,711.32 in 1911 an increase of $216,765.45.

The average for the five years is $281,742.73 an increase on the average report in 1911 of $66,424.56.

The value of property recovered and restored to owners was $43,210.21 as against $51,742.89 in 1911, a decrease over property recovered in the previous year of $8,532.68.

LOST PROPERTY.

11. The following is a return showing property lost or

recovered:-

Year.

Articles reported lost.

Value lost.

Articles recovered and articles found which

Valne

found.

were not reported

lost.

1912

321

$13,587.42

1911

303

$17,961.50

51

$1,105.48

92

$4,256.00

OPIUM WARRANTS.

12. One thousand six hundred and ninety-one Search Warrants for prepared opium were executed by the Police and Excise Officers of the Opium Farmer as compared with 2,110 in 1911.

In 731 cases opium was found and 1,066 persons were arrested as against 1,117 in 1911.

OPIUM DIVANS.

13. One hundred and sixteen Warrants were executed by the Police for keeping Opium Divans. In 104 cases convictions were obtained, 7 cases were discharged and in 5 cases no arrest was made.

J 4

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

14. The Examiner of Weights and Measures made the following verifications:

Examined.

Correct. Incorrect.

Foreign Scales,..........

490

490

nil.

Chinese Scales,..

2,446

2,428

18

Yard Measures,

247

247

nil.

Chek Measures,

270

270

nil.

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance :-

No. of Cases.

Convictions.

Total Amount of Fines.

18

18

$240.00

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

15. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance:-

No. of Cases.

Convictions.

Total Amount of Fines.

nil.

nil.

nil.

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

16. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance :-

No. of Cases.

Convictions.

Total Amount of Fines.

2

nil.

nil.

J 5

Samples purchased and sent to Government Analyst :----

Brandy. Whisky.

Ale.

Rum.

Gin.

Port.

4

4

6

2

2

All the above samples were certified to be genuine with the exception of one sample of rum. A summons was taken out but dismissed, the Magistrate holding that the certificates produced were certificates of origin. A summons was also taken out against a shop for refusing to sell a sample of brandy believed to be adulterated, this summons was also dismissed, the defence being that the purchaser had no authority to demand a sale.

MENDICANTS.

17. Forty-five beggars were dealt with by the Magistrate: 95 were sent to Canton as follows:

Once,

Twice,......

Thrice,

Four Times,

How often sent away.

Canton.

80

12

2

1

Total,....

95

DEAD BODIES.

18. Table II shows the number of the unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year.

LICENCES.

19. The following licences were issued during 1912-

1,100 Hongkong Jinrickshas.

50 Quarry Bay Jinrickshas.

345 Kowloon Jinrickshas.

659 Hongkong Chairs.

J 6

60 Hill District Chairs.

5,880 Drivers.

2,860 Chair bearers.

4,053 Extra drivers and Chair bearers.

1,173 Truck Licences.

12 Private Vehicles.

19 Motor cars.

34 Motor cars drivers.

3 Motor cycle drivers.

2 Auctioneers.

4 Licence to store acetone.

13 Billiard Tables or Bowling Alleys.

2 Brewery.

7 Licence to store calcium carbide.

3 Licence to store Chlorate Mixture.

4 Licence to store Chlorate of Potassium & other Chlorates.

6 Licence to store Compressed Oxygen.

9 Licence to store Detonators.

3 Licence to store Dissolved Acetylene.

13 Distillery (Old Territories).

7 Distillery (New Territories).

26 Licence to store Dynamite.

56 Licence to store Ether and Alcoholic Liquids.

1 Fireworks (Manufacture).

1 Gunpowder (Manufacture).

199 Licence to shoot and take game.

14 Licence to store Gunpowder.

14 Licence to store Kerosine Oil (in Godowns).

1,108 Licence to store Kerosine Oil (Ordinary).

54 Licence to store Kerosine Oil (New Territories). 30 Marine Stores.

400 Money changers.

34 Licence to store Naphtha and Benzine.

4 Licence to store Naphtha and Benzine (in Garage).

2 Licence to store Nitrobenzine or Oil of Mirbane.

82 Pawnbrokers.

8 Licence te store Petroleum in Bulk.

3 Licence to store Phosphorus.

6 Licence to store Rockets.

2 Poison (Wholosale).

223 Spirit (Chinese, Old Territories).

54 Spirit (Chinese, New Territories).

27 Licence to store Sulphuric Acid and Nitric Acid. 7,556 Hawkers.

57

DOGS ORDINANCE.

20. 1,695 dogs were licensed during 1912.

162 watch dogs were licensed free of charge.

110 stray dogs were impounded, 16 were ransomed, 88

were sent to the Dogs' Home and 6 were destroyed.

ARMS ORDINANCE.

21. Five licences to import and deal in arms and two to deal in sporting arms and ammunition were issued during 1912. During the whole year a Proclamation has been in force prohibiting the export of warlike stores from the Colony. The following arms and ammunition were confiscated during the year, viz.:

Ninety-two rifles, 2 incomplete rifies, 340 revolvers, 153 pistols, 11 shot guns, 147,115 rounds ammunition mixed, 19 bayonets, daggers, etc., 83 magazines, 2,190 empty cylinders, 2 holster, 4 bandoliers, 40 springs, 39 cleaning rods, 15 sets loading tools, 91 boxes primers, 1,044 boxes percussion caps, 10 clips, 80 blank ammuuition, 13 muskets, 1 bullet mould, 17 boxes detonators, 48 lbs. gunpowder, 391 sticks dynamite, 80 bags saltpetre and 195 bags sulphur.

EDUCATION.

22. During the year 8 Europeans and 29 Indians obtained cer- tificates for knowledge of Chinese, 2 Europeans obtained certificates for Hindustani, 13 Indians and 3 Chinese obtained certificates for English.

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

23. 501 persons were identified as having previous convictions against them. This number is 234 more than during the year 1911.

189 identifications were those of criminals who had returned from banishment.

CONDUCT.

24. The conduct of the European Contingent (average strength 164) was good. The total number of reports against them was 47 as against 38 in 1911. There were 10 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 4 in 1911, 2 for sleeping on duty-same as last year-and 5 for neglect of duty as against 3.

The conduct of the Indian Contingent (average strength 462) was good. There were 358 reports as against 312 for the preceed- ing year. For drunkenness there were 21 as against 19, for disorderly conduct 23 as against 15, for neglect of duty 35 as against 31, for absence from duty 42' as against 39, for gossiping and idling on duty 97 as against 75, and for sleeping on duty 34 as against 31. 234 men had no report.

J 8

Nine Indian Constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (two dismissed from the Force): 2 for assault, 1 for neglect of duty, 3 for disorderly conduct and assault and 3 for larceny.

The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (average strength 404) was fair. There were altogether 1,105 reports as against 1,311 in 1911. There was no report for drunkenness (same as last year), 152 for sleeping on duty as against 178, 22 for disorderly conduct as against 20, and 396 for minor offences as against 430. Eleven Con- stables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (six dismissed) for the following offences:-1 for behaving in a threatening manner, 2 for misconduct, 1 for giving false testimony, 2 for bribery, 1 for pawning Government property, 1 for assault, 2 for neglect of duty and 1 for being found in a common gambling house. 167 men of this Contingent were not reported during the year.

The seamen, coxswains, engineers and stokers (average strength 143) had 146 reports as compared with 154 for last year. For drunkenness there was no report (same as last year), and 83 for absence from station and late for duty as against 113 in the previous year. Two seamen were convicted by the Police Magistrate 1 for assault and 1 for receiving a bribe and dismissed the Force. 88 had no report recorded against them.

REWARDS.

25. One Inspector was granted a medal for long and faithful service, one European Sergeant was granted a medal for courage and presence of mind on the occasion of the attempt on His Excel- lency's life, one European Sergeant was commended by His Excel- lency the Governor for prompt and intelligent action in connection with a case of kidnapping, one European Lance Sergeant for his skill and perseverance in restoring life by artificial respiration, one Lance Sergeant for good work done in connection with a robbery case and one Constable for prompt and plucky action in saving a woman who fell into the harbour.

}

One Indian Constable was granted a medal for courage and presence of mind on the occasion of the attempt on His Excellency's life, one Indian Lance Sergeant was granted a reward for smart capture of a man in possession of arms, and one Indian Constable was highly commended and granted a medal for plucky act in descending and diving in a well and attempting to rescue a Chinese.

One Chinese Sergeant was granted a medal for prompt and smart capture of four burglars, one Chinese Sergeant was commended by His Excellency the Governor for good work done in connection with a robbery case, one Chinese Constable was commended and granted a medal for plucky act in diving down a well and rescuing a boy, one Chinese Constable was commended and granted a reward for prompt and intelligent action, one Chinese Constable for zeal and intelligence in effecting the arrest of a burglar, one Chinese Con- stable for prompt and smart arrest of a man who committed larceny from the person of an English lady, one Chinese Constable for smart and prompt action in effecting the arrest of a man on a charge of¬ larceny who assaulted him and in the struggle both fell into the

J 9

harbour, and one Chinese Constable was commended for smart capturé of a robber.

HEALTH.

26. Admission to Hospital during last three years were as follows:-

1910.

1911.

1912.

Nationality.

Average

Strength.

Admis-

sions.

Average

Strength.

Admis-

sions.

Average

Strength.

Admis-

sions.

Europeans,

120

76 126

73

164

104

Indians,

358 380 372 336 462

300

Chinese,

525 120 547 153 517

180

Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever from the 1st January to 31st December, 1912-

Old Territories.

New Territories.

Nationality.

Average Strength.

Treated.

Average Strength.

Treated.

Europeans,

150

99

14

5

Indians,

361

262

101

38

Chinese,.

508

169

39

11

J 10

In addition to cases treated in Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever the cases treated for Fever in the various stations in the New Territories without being removed to Hospital were :--

Europeans 8, Indians 40, Chinese 14.

EXECUTIVE STAFF.

27. The Deputy Superintendent (Captain F. W. Lyons) retired on pension on 14th January. Mr. P. P. J. Wodehouse, Assistant Superintendent, was appointed Deputy Superintendent on probation for one year from the 14th January, Mr. T. H. King acting as Assistant Superintendent. Mr. D. Burlingham was appointed Pro- bationer and arrived in the Colony on 6th January.

POLICE FORCE.

28. Forty-one Europeans were engaged during the year, ten were recruited from England and thirty-one enlisted locally. Table III shows changes in the personnel of the Force during the year, and Table IV the strength, expenditure and revenue for the past ten years.

C. MCI. MESSER, Captain Superintendent of Police

25th March, 1913.

ANNEXE A.

Report on the Water Police.

During the year the Police Launches have been strengthened by the addition of a new cruising launch, now No. 4, which was bought from Messrs. Macdonald & Co. on September 3rd and commenced its commission on the 24th idem and was fitted with a small motor boat.

2. A redistribution of the patrols was made as follows:-

No. 1.-Mirs Bay and the included water to Fung Head. No. 2. From Fung Head to Tai Tam Head taking in all waters in Port Shelter, Junk Bay, Kowloon Bay and South of Hongkong to Taitam.

No. 3.-From Taitam Head taking in Lema and all the southern waters of Lantao to Tai O on the west side and Ma Wan on the east side.

No. 4.-Chin Wan and the north coast of Lantao to Tai O

and all Deep Bay and northern waters.

J 11

3. The small launch (formerly No. 4) became No. 8: a new propeller was fitted to this launch and has considerably increased her speed.

4. A simple system of signalling by day and night with both semaphore and morse was introduced between the cruising launches and the various coast police stations, all of which have been supplied with hand flags and a flashing lamp. This works satis- factorily and saves a lot of boatwork and should go on steadily improving with its general practice.

5. The crews of the cruising launches both European and Chinese were practised at a Target with Maxim gun at a range between 600 and 1,000 yards and rifle between 250 and 400 yards. All crews have now completed these practices which should be carried out quarterly. The Chinese crews having now got over their initial nervousness, marked improvement may be expected.

6. No. 2 Launch has been fitted with an upper bridge which improves her efficiency as a sea-boat.

7. Both launches Nos. 1 and 2 have been completely retubed during the year and are now in a good state of repair and should require very little refit during this year from 'fair wear and tear".

"

8. During the year I made 54 visits to the Water Police Station, 43 Harbour patrols, 7 all day patrols in cruising launches carrying out firing, etc., 3 night patrols and 4 quarterly inspections. The European members of the force were examined in Regulations from the Merchant Shipping Ordinance and Rules of the Road while the Chinese coxswains were questioned in handling launches and Rules of the Road.

C. W. BECKWITH, Commander, R.N.,

Assistant Supt. Water Polici

ANNEXE B.

Report on the Police School.

School was held on 85 days in the course of the

Attendance :-

(a.) At the Magistracy,

5,904

(b.) At No. 8 Station,

820

Total,

6.724

Giving an average daily attendance of 79.

year.

J 12

2. Units attending School were composed of :-

E. P. C.'s,

I. P. C.'s,

C. P. C.'s,

Gaol Staff,

Total,

36 150

248

70

504

3. At the Examinations held during the year the following men obtained the necessary marks to receive exemption from attendance at school:-

E. P. C.'s Nos. 22, 120, 119, 60, 118, 121, 80, 131, 104, 125, 22, 136, 132, 3, 134, 127.

E. P. C.'s, Total,

-

I. P. C.'s. Nos. 629, 631, 883, 621, 872, 836, 648,

635, 679, 624, 511, 709.

I. P. C.'s, Total,

16

12.

C. P. C.'s, Total, -

4

C. P. C.'s Nos. 242, 986, 170, 308.

Gaol Staff Nos. 90, 22, 70, 77, 78, 97, 43.

Gaol Staff, Total, -

39

4. Mr. A. W. Grant was temporarily transferred to the Technical Institute in March and I have taken his place.

5. Mr. A. R. Sutherland of Queen's College has been Assistant Master from April 16th.

31st December, 1912.

R. J. BIRBECK, M.A., (Cantab),

Master in Churge.

1912.

1911.

Robbery with Violence and Assault with

intent to rob.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

!

Serious Offences.

J 13

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1911 AND 1912.

Burglaries.

Larcenies and Larcenies in

Dwelling

Other

Felonies.

Assaults and Disorderly

Conduct.

Gambling.

Kidnapping.

Women

and Girls

Protection

Unlawful

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

Possession.

Houses.

Ordinance.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

6

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

со

1

4

K

2

...

:

12 8

5

1

5

LO

20

90

46 45 5

:

15

11

1

:

6

...

:..

:

:

Chinese,

120 38 38 127

36 2 2,674 805 337 260

66

58 537 760144 354 2,407 137

41

Total,

120 38 38 127 36 2 2,692 821 343 269

69

65 603 820 160 355 2,407 143 41

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Europeaus and Americans,

...

:

Indians,

:

:

:

:

13 6 7

Chinese,

145

Total,

145

38

50 41 147

23

5 5

12 6 7 4 3 83,078 1,147 343 218

2

52

t-

1 25

23

54

2

:

:

:

:.

:

22

9

...

...

...

63

51 675 957 135 538 2,950 204

28:5

I

1

:

:

:

::.

:

36

35 26 38 77 61 33 540 520

26

26

11 11

91 18 18

50

41 147

23

8 3,103 1,159 357 227

71

54 752 1,033 146 538 2,950 204

35 26 38 78 62

33 540 520

91 55

33

Minor Offences

Cases.

Convicted.

Miscellaneous

Offences.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Total of

all cases.

15

13

2

1

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:.

1

:

333

34

2

105

6

:

2

2

7

9

1

53

122232

28

56

48

8833

32

28

56

48

15 278 258 79 15 15

15 278 258

79 36 35

973

9733,696 4,107 625

9,131

2

976

9763,736 4,150 623

9,289

4 53

:

:

:

3

31

28

15

133

2

22

24

1

77

1,595 1,595|5,384 7,682 626

12,450

1,600 1,600 5,440 7,784 642

12,660

VICTORIA.

Under

one

⚫ month.

1 month and under

1 year.

nl.

f.

sex

unk.

KOWLOON.

1 year and under

years and under

15

5 years.

years and over.

Under

one

month.

15 years.

1 year.

1 month and under

1 year and under

5 years.

sex

m

f.

m.

f.

7

1

2

3

unk.

:

40

sex unk.

J 14

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1912.

HARBOUR.

5 years 15 years and under

Under

and over.

one

month.

15 years.

1 month and under 1 year.

ELSEWHERE.

1 year and under 5 years.

5 years and

under

15 years and

Under

over.

one month.

15 years.

1 month and under 1 year.

5

1 year and under 5 years.

years

and

15 years and

Total.

under 15 years.

over.

sex

sex

m.

f.

m. f.

sex

sex

m.

f.

Junk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

unk.

m.

f.

sex

sex

sex

sex

sex

m.

f.

unk.

junk.

unk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

unk.

unk.

unk.

unk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

223

18

6

7

4

2

12

12

28 35

...

:

17

25

22

22

7

I

2

13 2

9

21

:

2

5

18

1

4

:

4

4

1,

22

21

13

7

12

537

:

3853

35

24

Year.

Victoria.

Kowloon. Harbour. Elsewhere.

Total,

Males.

Females. Unknown. Children. Adults.

1908,

405

306

117

161

989

601

365

20

718

271

1909,

89

119

83

90

381

261

114

1910,

80

76

63

76

295

192

91

1911,

99

58

31

53

241

146

85

10

1912,

194

171

77

95

537

291

239

**Q*

201

177

9

158

137

171

67

413

124

1

J 15

Tempat

Table III.

Return showing the Establishments and Casualties in the

Force, 1912.

Nationality.

of Casualties.

8888888

80

Europeans.. 164 33 Indians,..... 462 Chinese,.... 547 64

26+

1

5

1

9

7

25

3

41

4

3

14

55

76

Total,.... 1,173 177

12

11

44.

59

126

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments also the Engineers, Coxswains and Stokers, but it is exclusive of :-

1 Captain Superintendent,

1 Deputy Superintendent,

1 District Officer,

1 Assistant Superintendent,

1 Probationer,

1 Accountant,

1 Clerk and Hindustani Interpreter,

5 Clerks,

6 Telephone Clerks,

89 Messengers and Coolies.

6 Indians and 17 Chinese are employed by Private Firms.

Strength on the 31st December, 1912.

Europeans. Indians. Chinese.

Total.

Present,

152

406

539

1,097

Absent on leave,

4

32

44

Vacancies,.......

24

32

Total Establishment,

164

462

547

1,173

....

J

J 16

Table IV.

Table showing the total Strength, Expenditure and Revenue of the Police and Fire Brigade Departments for the years 1903 to 1912.

Total Strength.

Expenditure.

Year

Police Fire Force. Brigade.

Police

Fire

Force.

Brigade.

Revenue Collected by the Police

Force.

1903...

921

97

512,860

25,167

141,491

1904...

993

97

506 008

27,428

133,597

1905... 1,018

97

509,298

28,956

130,873

1906... 1,047

97

515,874

25,499

134,212

1907... 1,048

96

522,406

46.250

138,417

19.8...! 1,046

96

556,607

31,172

124,288

1909... 1,034

97

564,835

72,227*

125,958

1910... 1,042

103†

583,847

41,5481

161,420

1911... 1,102

103

586,985

32,421

162,026

1912... 1,196

105

591,076

41,263§

172,397

NOTE. No revenue is collected by the Fire Brigade.

*

$44,120 was for the New Floating Engine.

Crew for the New Floating Engine.

‡$9,852 was for the New Floating Engine.

$10,237 was for the Motor Tender.

J 17

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE

FIRE BRIGADE.

There were 31 Fires and 93 Incipient Fires during the year against 37 and 66 in 1911. Details are given in Table I.

The estimated damage caused by Fires was $281,095 and by Incipient Fires $4,732.50 as against $291,717 and $1,013.80 in 1911.

The Brigade turned out 52 times during the year (45 in 1911).

2. There was a constant supply of water in the fire mains throughout the year.

3. Three fires occurred in the harbour during the year.

4. There were no prosecutions for arson during the year.

5. There are 32 Despatch Boxes kept in different places in Victoria and 12 in Kowloon, 8 different telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with the Central Station in the event of a fire, and 16 Street Fire Alarms of which 3 are at the Peak.

6. I enclose copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of Fire Engines (Annexe A).

7. The Fire Alarms were used only once, and in that case by a European Constable on duty.

8. The conduct of the Brigade has been good.

C. MCI. MESSER,

Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

ANNEXE. A.

HONGKONG, 15th March, 1913.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on the condition of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1912.

No. 1 Fire Float.

This vessel, which has been in received her annual overhaul in June.

service for nearly 3 years, During the year, in addition

J 18

to attending at various fires and salvages work, the Machinery and Boilers have been regularly tested at monthly drills. Hull, Machinery and Boilers are in good working order.

No. 2 Fire Float.

The machinery and boiler of the No. 2 Fire Float have been tested at monthly drills throughout the year. Annual overhaul took place in August, and the Hull, Machinery and Boiler are all in good working order.

Motor Fire Escape.

This machine was received from the makers and has been in commission from June last. Since that date it has been frequently exercised and has done good work by its prompt arrival at fires. Motor and equipment are in good working order.

Land Steamers Nos. 2, 4 and 5. (Central Station.)

Land Steamer No. 3. (Yaumati.)

These engines have all been overhauled during the year, regularly tested at monthly drills for firemen and drivers, and are in good working order.

All the Manual Engines and Gear, Hose Reels, Ladders, Supply Carts, etc., have been kept in repair and are now in good working order

Fire Alarms (13 Points).

The Fire Alarms are in good order, and same are tested daily.

I have. &c.,

Hon. Mr. C. Mcl. MESSER,

Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

ROBT. HUNTER,

Acting Engineer, Fire Brigade.

J 19

ANNEXE B.

STRENGTH OF THE FIRE BRIGADE.

European, Chinese,

Superintendent,

1

Deputy Superintendent,

1

Assistant Superintendents,

2

Engineer,

1

Assistant Engineer and Station Officer,

Clerk,

1

Engine Drivers,

Assistant Engine Drivers,

со сл

5

Fitter,

Blacksmith,

1

1

Carpenter,

Stokers,

Sailmaker,

Overseers of Water Works,

Inspector of Dangerous Goods,

Assistant to

Do.,

Foremen,

Assistant Foremen,-

Firemen,

Interpreters,

Floating Engines.

2

21

1

22

28

1

3

Foremen and Engine Drivers,

Chief Engineer,

1

Engine Drivers,

2

Coxswains,

Stokers, -

3

Seamen,-

4

Total, 1912,

-

49

56

Total, 1911,

48

55

Table I.

Fires during the year 1912.

No. of Buildings Destroyed.

No.

Date.

Time.

Situation of Fire.

Damage

Cause.

Wholly. Partly.

- Ĵ 20

1 | Jan. 2nd | 10.45 p.m.

14th

1.35 a m.

matshed west of Kennedy Town Hospital, House No. 72 Ko Shing Street,.

1 matshed

3

22nd

10 30 p.m.

Do.

33 Ngau Shi Wan,

4 Feb. 3rd | 12.20 a.m.

Do.

416 Queen's Road West,

1

2,000 | Capsizing of an oil lamp.

8,400 Overheating of a drying pan.

300 Unknown.

1,600 Overheating of kitchen flues.

15

3rd

"2

7.50 p.m.

Do.

113 Wuhu Street, Hunghom..........

1

800 Unknown.

10th

7.15 a.m.

Do.

36 Jervois Street,..

1

4,500

Do.

"

7

11th

5.40 a.m.

Do.

23 Lower Lascar Row,

25

13

172,450

Do.

8

15th

Do.

9 Mar. 19th

6.10 a.m. 2.40 a.m. On board S.S. Paul Beau in Victoria Harbour,

47 Sheung Cheong Wai, Ping Shan,...

1

150

Do.

500

Do.

53

10 19th

11 June 20th

12 July 20th

3.00 p.m.

On board Lighter Tsat Sze in Victoria Harbour,...

:

:

:

3.15 a.m.

House No. 123 Connaught Road West,

7.00 p.m.

House No. 73 Kowloon City Road,

1

1

1,200 Spontaneous combustion.

20,000 | Unknown.

1,400 | Capsizing of a kerosine lamp.

J 21

Table I,-Continued.

No.

Date.

Time.

Situation of Fire.

No. of Buildings Destroyed.

Damage.

Cause.

Wholly.

Partly.

$

13 July 25th

S.15 a.m. A. S. Watson & Co's. Wharf at Whitfield,..

14

Aug. 26th

15 Sept. 3rd

6.15 a.m.

No. 2 Sha Tsoi Village, Tsun Wan,....

1

3.00 p.m.

Godown, Blackhead & Co's. Soapworks, Shau Ki

Wan,

16

14th

10.30 a.m.

"

Fishing Shed on the foreshore near Lung Ku Tau, l'ing Shan,

1 matshed.

...

350

Unknown.

17

17th

1.00 a.m.

Cow House at No. 387 Sheung Shui,

>>

18

Oct. 5th

2.35 p.m.

House No. 89 Mong Po Ting Village, Sham Shui Po,

19

11th

6.15 a.m.

>>

Sanitary Board Contractor's matshed at Shau Ki Wan,

20

13th 11.15 a.m. | Matshed opposite Pokfulam Dairy Farm,

7 matsheds

21

13th 12.55 a.m.

House No. 66 Bonham Strand,

1

700

A quantity of petroleum floating in the harbour ignited and set fire to the wharf.

30 Sparks from cook-house.

22,000 Spontaneous combustion.

100

100

Some live ashes igniting dried grass.

Some grass near the fireplace caught fire.

45 Overburning of a lamp.

250 | A spark from an adjoining cook-house.

41,600 | Unknown,

"}

22 Nov. 6th

10.08 p.m.

House No. 44 Lyndhurst Terrace,

1

300 Overheating of cook-house chimney.

23

21st

10.00 a.m.

Matshed at Cheung Chau,...

1 matshed.

500 Unknown.

}}

24

""

21st 10.25 a.m.

On board Cargo Boat No. 1472v in Victoria Harbour,

700

Do.

25

22nd

>>

6.10 p.m.

Matshed at Tai l'o,.

1 matshed.

250

Do.

No.

Date.

Time.

Table I,-Continued.

No. of Buildings Destroyed.

Situation of Fire,

Damage

Cause.

Wholly.

Partly.

29

31

to & 13 to 1929

26 Nov. 22nd

4.00 p.m. Latrine at Sha Tau Kok.

17

27 22nd 10.00 p.m. | Matshed at Pokfulam,

2 matsheds./

:

28 Dec. 10th

6.00 a.m. Matshed at Portland Street, Yau Ma Ti,

I matshed.

220

Unknown.

50

Do.

200

Do.

10th

""

7.00 p.m.

House No. 49 San Tin Village,.

1

55 | Exploding of a kerosine lamp.

30

10th

8.20 p.m.

Pig Sty at Wong Nei Chung,

1 matshed.

25 Unknown.

28th

9.00 p.m.

House No. 3 Po Kong Village,...

300 Accident.

281,095

- J 22 -

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISON

FOR THE YEAR 1912.

1. The number of prisoners, received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for the year 1911 were as follows:-

Convicted by Ordinary Courts, -

1912.

1911.

- 5,205

3,644

Courts Martial,

7

""

Supreme Court for China and Corea, High Court, Wei-hai-wei,

5

2

Debtors,

-

66

65

On remand or in default of finding

surety,

951

469'

Total,

- 6,236

4,178

There was an increase of 2,058 on the total number of admis- sions as compared with the year 1911. There was an increase of. prisoners convicted for Larceny during the year under review, the number being 1,023 against 737 for the previous year.

2. The number of prisoners admitted to prison for offences not of a criminal nature was 3,418 made up as follows:

Convicted by Courts Martial,

Debtors,

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

7

66

596

29

Opium Divan Ordinance,

757

"

"

27

Gambling

448

*

Market

103

17

Arms

69

17

""

""

Vehicles

36

"}

ܕ܀

})

"

"

Sanitary By-laws,

23

"

>>

Post Office Ordinance,

24

"}

"

多多

"

""

>>

21

23

Harbour Regulations,

Women & Girls Protection

Ordinance, -

Stowaway Ordinance, -

Servants' Quarters Ordi-

nance,

Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance, -

Dangerous Goods Ordi-

15

65

1

11

Carried forward,

- 2,291

nance,

K 2

Brought forward,...

Convicted under the Pharmacy Ordinance,-

"

""

""

""

""

9

21

25

29

1

"J

Chinese Wine and Spirit.

Ordinance, -

Gardens Regulations,

Weights and Measures

Ordinance, -

Stamp Ordinance,

"}

Eating House Ordinance,

Dogs

Lodging

for Asleep on duty, -

17

31

}"

""

21

Posting up notice without per-

mission,

Taking wild birds from trees, Wasting Water,

.2,291

2

10

5

1

1

1

4

1

1

>>

>>

>>

Hawking without a licence,

"1

Extinguishing Gas Lamp,

Bringing a False Charge,

})

"

Using Threatening Language,

2

127

322

1

1

3

>>

A

""

""

""

""

Removing Sand, Stones and Earth

without permission,

Depositing rubbish in the public.

street,

Travelling on the river-steamers without paying legal fare,

Refusing to pay legal vehicle fare, Drunkenness,

Trespassing,

6

19

6

3

13

102

Disorderly Conduct,

103

""

""

Vagrancy,

13

""

27

Contempt of Court,

2

Assault,

95

Obstruction,

132

"

*

29

Cutting Trees,

25

21

Fighting,

3

Mendicancy,

72

15

""

Rogue and Vagabond, -

103

""

Malicious Damage,

14

Breach of Contract,

7

"2

2

Breach of Licence Conditions,

26

">

""

""

""

""

15

31

""

Applying false trade marks,-

Catching fish by explosives,

Offering bribe,

Leaving the service without giving

due notice,

Exposing indecent pictures,-

3

3

Total,-

· 3,418

3. The above figures show that 65 per cent. of the total admis- sions to prison were for non-criminal offences. The percentage in 1911 was 67.

K 3

The following Table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine:

In default of payment of fine.

Without option of fine.

Total.

Served the

Paid full

Paid part

imprison-

fine.

fine.

ment.

1912.

1911. 1,753 1,477

2,315

589

562

5,219

1,350

410

407

3,644

4. There were 162 juveniles admitted into prison 117 of whom were sentenced to be whipped forthwith or in addition to various terms of imprisonment varying from twenty-four hours' detention to 6 months' imprisonment with hard labour.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison. with previous convictions recorded against them was 173 as com- pared with 15 4 for 1911.

6. There were 136 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Police Court in the New Territories against 100 for the previous year (109 in 1910).

7. The following Table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hongkong:-

Year.

Estimated Population.

No. of Convicts.

to

Percentage Daily Aver- Percentage Jage number Population. of prisoners. Population.

to

1903

410,642

245

*059

653

·159

1904

446,217

213

*031

726

•162

1905

462,861

216

046

697

•150

1906

414,049

156

037

518

•125

1907

414,415

146

·035

502

•121

1908

420,741

130

·038

465

·110

1909

428,858

180

*042

560

·130

1910

435,986

208

*048

517

125

1911

464,277

241

*052

595

•128

1912

467,777

222

*047

701

·149

K 4

8. There were 876 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline, being an average of 1'40 per prisoner as compared with 957 with an average of 161 for the preceding year. There were 14 cases in which corporal punishinent was inflicted during the year. There were 305 prisoners whipped by order of the Courts.

9. There was one escape but the prisoner was recaptured by the police.

10. There were 11 deaths from natural causes, and one execu- tion.

11. Constant attention is given to the instruction of long- sentence prisoners of good conduct, who are employed at industrial labour.

12. There were 5,169,235 forms printed and issued to the various Government Departments and 50,220 books bound and repaired during the year under review.

13. The sanitary condition of the prison is good.

14. The buildings generally are in good repair.

15. Owing to the overcrowded state of the prison, it was again necessary, on account of the inadequate cell accommodation, to locate prisoners in the corridors in association. The store room over the Hospital and the old Shoe-makers' shop had also to be used as association wards during the greater part of the year.

16. The conduct of the European Officers has as a rule been excellent and that of the Indian Staff satisfactory.

17. The appliances for use in case of fire are in good condition, and the water supply adequate.

18. The rules laid down for the government of the prison have been complied with.

19. Mr. P. P. J. Wodehouse acted as Assistant Superintendent during the absence on leave of Mr. R. H. A. Craig.

20. I append the usual returns.

12th March, 1913.

F. J. BADELEY, Superintendent.

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1912.

Expenditure.

Amount,

Income.

Amount.

Pay and Allowance of Officers including Uniform, &c.,

Earning of Prisoners,

62,811.97

Debtors' Subsistence,

..

60,976.50

473.25

Victualling of Prisoners,

18,862.99

Wei-Hai-Wei Prisoners' Subsistence,

67.20

Fuel, Light, Soap and Dry Earth, Clothing of Prisoners, Bedding and Furni- ture,

9,056.10 | Shanghai Prisoners' Subsistence, Naval Prisoners' Subsistence,.......

232.75

58.80

6,846.76 | Military Prisoners' Subsistence,

8.40

Subsistence of Prisoners sentenced by Marine Magistrate,

384.90

Waste Food sold,

147.00

Paid out of Colonial Revenue for Prisoners' Maintenance,

35,229.02

$ 97,577.82

Av Average annual cost per prisoner $50.25—in 1911 $66.50 and in 1910 $80.80.

97,577.82

- K 5-

- K 6 -

Table II.

Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Year.

Expenditure. Income,

Actual Cost of Average Cost

Prisoners' Maintenance.

per Prisoner.

C.

C.

C.

C.

1903.

108,139.60

34,136.64

74,002.96

113.33

1904....

113,251.48

37,186.64

76,064.84

104.77

1905.....

1906....

110,687.83 39,444.50

71,243.33

102.21

96,202.08

39,613.-6

56,598.82

109.24

1907......

89,711.39

40,079.99

49,631.49

98.86

1908..

95,537 85

48,066.33

47,471.52

102.09

1909

97,926.80

46,421.13

51,505.67

91.97

1910........

96,302.19

52,104.75

44,197.44

80.80

1911.......

93,458.23

53,889.26

39,565.97

66.50

1912.........

97,577.82 62,348.80

35,229.02

30.25

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1912.

1

2

4

Nature of Industry,

Value of

Stock on

hand

Value of

Articles

Materials

Total Dr.

January 1st Purchased.

or work

1912.

Value of

Manufactured Manufactured

done for

Payment.

(or work done for Gaol or other Departments.

5

6

7

8

Value of

Value of Articles

Stock on

Value of

Earnings

hand

Total Cr.

(Difference

December

31st, 1912.

between

C'olumus

3 & 7).

C.

C.

$

C.

C.

$

C.

Oakum,

Coir,

Netmaking,

Tailoring,

Rattan,

$

C.

C.

396.00

396.00

850.50

421.18

7.47

1,306.19

1,727.37

2,447.98

448.02

99.00

174.88

949.50

3,070.88

553 50

1.343.51

}

60.74

68 21

139.92

24.00

163.92

95.71

718.97

1,539.82

2,258.79

156.69

3,647 46

10 94

3,815.09

1,556.30

K 7

.60

26.70

27.30

14.05

49.90

2.50

66.45

Tinsmithing,..

39.15 1

17.80

217.23

235.03

83.12

224.92

27.14

335.18

100.15

Carpentering,

299.40

459.21

758.61

280.64

929.39

19.30

1,229.33

470.72

Grass-matting,

.72

28.00

28.72

33.00

1.90

34.90

6.18

Shoemaking..

98.62

1,584.61

1,683.2%

445.79

1,310.70

285.58

2,042.07

358.84

Laundry,

Printing and Book-binding,

5.00

10,976.31

1,321.99

1,326.99

6,599.56

342

6,602.98

5,275.99

8,936.61

19,91.92

198.53

59,893.30

10.997.54

71,089.37

51.176.45

Total,.

$| 12,546.07

15,877.10 28,423.17

*4,617.22 | 73,160.25

11,622.20 | 89,399.67

60,976.50

* Paid into Bank during 1912, which sum includes $171.18 for work executed in 1912, $4,636.08. Value of work executed during 1912, for which payment was deferred to 1913, $152.32.

K 8

Table IV.

Return showing the Employment of Prisoners and the Value of their Labour, during the year 1912.

Daily Average Number.

Rate

Description of Employment.

per

Value of Prison Labour.

diem.

Males. Females Total.

Sunday, Christmas Day, Good

Friday, and Chinese New Year Day :-

Cooking.....

Cleaning,

Non-productive,

Debtors. Remands. On punish-

Other Days:

ment, Sick,

Crank, Shot, Shot and Stone,

12 c. 10

9

30

625

$ c.

9

+m

34

59.40 187.00

33

658

664

37

701

58

144

10

63

144

In Manufactories :-

Book-binding.

20

Printing

20

Printing-labourers,

10

Oakum picking,

Coir-matting

15

Shoe-making,

20

Tailoring,

15

Net-making, String-making &

22024

44

44

2,736.80

46

46

2,861.20

13

13

404.30

190

16

206

1,281.32

25

25

1,166.25

14

14

870.80

1

17

22

1,026.30

ships' fender-making..

10

9

279.90

In Building:-

Carpentering, and Fitting,... .

20

18

18

1,119.60

In Service of the Prison :---

Laundry,.

15

Cooking,...

Cleaning,

Whitewashing,

10200

37

41

2,052.60

9

9

335.88

30

34

1,057.40

10

10

311.00

Total,.

664

37

701

$15,749,75

Appendix L.

MEDICAL AND SANITARY REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1912.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

ANNEXE A.-Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department,

ANNEXE B.-Joint Report of the Principal Civil Medical Officer

and the Medical Officer of Health, -

Page.

-

3

7

ANNEXE C-Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon,

31

ANNEXE D.-Report of the Superintendent, Civil Hospital,

10

ANNEXE E-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children,

52

ANNEXE F.-Report on the Lunatic Asylum,

53

ANNEXE G.-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the

Infectious Diseases Hospitals,

55

ANNEXE H.-Report of the Medical Officer to Victoria Gaol,

57

ANNEXE I-Report of the Medical Officer for Kowloon and the

New Territories,

60

ANNEXE J.-Report of the Visiting Medical Officer of the

Tung Wa Hospital,

64

ANNEXE K.-Report on the Alice Memorial and Affiliated

Hospitals, -

ANNEXE L.-Report of the Government Bacteriologist,

76

77

ANNEXE M.--Report on the Public Mortuary, Victoria,

84

ANNEXE N.-Report on the Public Mortuary, Kowloon,

88

ANNEXE O.--Report of the Government Analyst,

91

ANNEXE P.-Report of the Health Officer of the Port,

91

L3

Annexe A.

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY

DEPARTMENT.

STAFF.

Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe went on leave on the 28th of September ; Mr. R. O. Hutchison acted as Head of the Sanitary Departinent till 16th November and Mr. D. W. Tratman for the remainder of the Mr. Adam Gibson, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon, went on leave on April 27th and during his absence Dr. Francis Clark, Medical Officer of Health, performed his duties.

Inspector Fincher returned from leave and Inspectors Ward, Pearson, Coysh, Knight and Kelly were granted leave at various periods. Three temporary Inspectors were engaged for a period of about three months to assist in the Plague work.

ADMINISTRATION.

The Health Districts of Kowloon have been re-arranged and now consist of Districts 11 and 12 which together comprise the whole of Old Kowloon, and the districts of Kowloon City and of Sham Shui Po. This abolishes the 9 Kowloon sub-districts, except that old sub-district 7 still corresponds to the Kowloon City District and old sub-district 8 to the Sham Shui Po District.

Districts 11 and 12 are each in charge of one Inspector, with the exception that the Inspector in charge of the Disinfecting Station is responsible for a number of the scattered villages in District 12 and also for one village (Kau Lung Tong) in the Sham Shui Po District; the rest of this District and the Kowloon City District are each in charge of Police Inspectors who act as Rural Sanitary Inspectors.

EPIDEMICS.

A serious outbreak of Plague occurred during 1912; full parti- culars of which are given in the accompanying reports. Small-pox was also more prevalent than in recent years, 709 cases being re- Typhoid Fever showed a small increase, as did also

corded. Malaria.

BY-LAWS.

The severity of the Plague epidemic made it necessary to institute a vigorous campaign against lath and plaster walls, stair- linings, ceilings and similar harbourages for rats. New By-laws were accordingly passed giving the power (not contained in the previous by-laws) to remove the first and second of these in areas declared to be infected or liable to spread infection and prohibiting the erection of ceilings on all floors except the top, in new buildings outside the European Reservation and Hill District. Such ceilings

-

L4

-

as are permitted (outside these areas) are required to be of tongued and grooved boarding and to have only one opening-that for a trap door to the roof-space.

A new set of Conservancy and Scavenging By-laws and an additional Cemetery By-law were also passed.

CHINESE CEMETERIES.

Exhumations for the purpose of providing additional burial space took place at Tai Wan and Sham Shui Po Cemeteries, Kow- loon. These exhumations were carried out by the Tung Wa Hospital, and following the exhumations the ground was terraced and made available for fresh interments. 322 bodies in all were exhumed for this purpose.

Towards the end of the year it was found necessary to provide new ground in Mount Caroline Cemetery for burials in classes A and Ď and it was decided to allot an area at the south-east end of the Cemetery for this purpose. As this area has already a number of graves upon it, exhumation will be necessary. The usual notification was issued on the 15th November.

The total number of exhumations during the year amounted to 481 as compared with 3,855 in 1911. 172 permits were issued to relatives of the deceased, of which 13 were subsequently cancelled for various reasons, leaving 159 which were acted upon. Of the bodies exhumed 135 were removed from the Colony and 346 re- buried within the Colony,

A new Cemetery for the Fukinese Community was opened near Kowloon City in January.

SCAVENGING.

The scheme for the departmental removal of refuse to sea from the City of Victoria has continued to prove successful.

The cost of the scheme compares very favourably with the charges formerly made by contractors for work which at best was but indifferently performed. The average yearly cost of the refuse disposal contract from 1907 (when a separate contract for the work of removal was first let) to 1910 for the City of Victoria was $21,450.00. The cost of carrying out the work departmentally during 1912 amounted to $15,074.09. The total capital outlay on steam barges and lighters, inclusive of fitting up. amounted to $23,974.41. Allowing 10% of the capital outlay for depreciation, viz., $2,397.44, the total annual working cost, i.e.. $17,471.53 is well below the average cost of this work when done by contract.

The departmental scavenging of Kowloon which was begun in March, 1910, was continued and worked very satisfactorily during the year.

The total working cost including $1.200.00 for deprecia- tion of plant, was $16,364.39 or $1,363.39 per mensem, as compared with $1,416.67 per mensem for 1911, and $1,769.00 per mensem in

- L 5

1910. This may be considered a very reasonable amount, as in addition to the scavenging work formerly performed by the con- tractor it further includes the cleansing of nullahs and the watering of the streets in Kowloon. The average cost of the Kowloon Scavenging and Conservancy Contracts for 9 years, i.e., from 1902 to 1910 when the contract was cancelled, was $7,280.00 or $606.67 per mensem. During 1912 the cost of scavenging was $1,363.70 per mensem less the sum of $1,130.00 per mensem derived from the Conservancy Contract which was let separately as a revenue contract. The net cost of the Kowloon scavenging work performed departmentally in 1912 was therefore $233.70 per mensem as .compared with $606.67 per mensem, the cost of the work under contract. The scavenging work in Kowloon is moreover now being done in a thoroughly efficient manner, provision is made for dealing with larger amounts of refuse as the districts expand, and additional items, already enumerated above, are also included in the work. The abolition of contract scavenging work and the institution of a departmental scavenging scheme for Kow- loon would thus appear to have been completely justified. In view of the success of this system in Kowloon it was decided to adopt similar methods in the City of Victoria from the 1st January, 1913. A sum of $3,777.87 (distributed as shown in Table I attached) was spent in preparations and it was found possible to start the collection of refuse by bullock carts in the Eastern half of the City on the 1st December, and so to reduce the amount payable under the contract by $120.00.

STREET WATERING.

The watering of Kowloon and the lower levels of Victoria by bullock traction was continued throughout the year. One new four- wheeled cart was purchased from England at a cost of $631.92 for service in the City. Towards the end of November the supply of filtered water for this purpose had to be discontinued on the Hongkong side owing to the prolonged drought and the carts had to rely on nullah and well-supplies which are both inconvenient in position and inadequate in volume for an efficient service. The difficulties of the situation were, however, greatly relieved by the fact that, within a few days of the stoppage, the Electric Tramway Company were able to take over from the Department the work of watering their track. A special tank-car has been provided which uses an independent supply connected with their generating station.

COLONIAL VETERINARY SURGEON'S REPORT.

The report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon deals in detail with Markets, Slaughter-houses and Cattle Depôts, and also with cattle diseases. It shows an increase of $4,634.05 in the revenue derived from Slaughter-houses, and an increase of $8,332.40 in rents from the Markets, of which $3,963.60 was contributed by Tsim Sha Tsui (opened in October 1911), $387.00 by Aberdeen (opened in April 1912) and $162.00 by Staunton Street (opened in October 1912).

L 6

P

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The total revenue collected during the year amounted to $249,626.96 as compared with $234,723.37 in 1911. The estimated revenue for the year was $236,230.00. The total expenditure during the year was $324,043.92 compared with $325,963.65 in 1911. The estimated expenditure in 1912 was $342,096.00.

D. W. TRATMAN, Head of Sanitary Department.

3rd April, 1913.

Table I.

Preparations for Departmental Scavenging of the City of

Victoria:

Purchase of additional bullocks (32),

$1,798.00

Drivers,

228.07

Shoer,...

37.74

Fodder, etc., (approximate),

200.00

4 new carts (4-wheeled),

759.40

18 Hand Carts converted for bullocks,

598.41

Bunks, etc., for Drivers,

156.25

$3,777.87

Table II.

Valuation of Bullocks.

Brought forward from 1911,

$1,549.36

1912, Purchases, less sales,

1,809.00

$3,358.36

Less depreciation during 1912 at 20 per cent.

per annum,

671.67

Value of bullocks on 1/1/13,................

$2,686.69

Maintenance of Bullocks. Kowloon.

Average number of bullocks, 33.

Fodder, drivers and sundries,

Depreciation in value of bullocks,

Cost per head,

Hongkong.

Average number of bullocks, 30.

Fodder, drivers and sundries,

Depreciation in value of bullocks,

Maintenance of bullocks,

Cost per head,

$4,308.01

351.83

$4,659 84

141.21

$4,499.71

319.81

$4,819.55

160.65

L 7

Annexe B.

JOINT REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER AND THE MEDICAL

OFFICER OF HEALTH.

AREA.

The Sanitary Board's control extends to the Island of Hong- kong, which has an area of about 32 square miles, and to that portion of territory on the mainland between the shore and the first range of the Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay, on the East, to the village of Kau Pa Hang on the West-with a sea frontage of about thirteen miles and an area of about sixteen square miles. Old Kowloon, with an area of about 2 square miles, has been in British occupation since 1861, but New Kowloon was leased to this Government in 1898, as part of what is known as the New Territories. The remainder of the New Territories comprising an area of about 356 square miles is not under the control of the Sanitary Board.

The City of Victoria, built on the Northern shore of the Island of Hongkong, has a frontage to the sea of nearly five miles and is separated from the opposite mainland of Kowloon by the Harbour, which is rather less than a mile and a third wide opposite the centre of the City and widens out to somewhat over three miles at its widest part, contracting again at Lyemun Pass on the East to little more than a quarter of a mile in width.

The domestic buildings of the City of Victoria number 9,832 (exclusive of Barracks and Police Stations), of which 950 are Non- Chinese dwellings, while there are also 165 European dwellings in the Hill District. The number of new houses completed during the year was as follows:--City of Victoria 131, Kowloon 55, outlying Districts 41 and Peak 4 making a total of 231 as against 155 in 1911.

In addition to the above, miscellaneous buildings such as offices, godowns, etc., were erected to the number of 45 -24 in 1911.

ADMINISTRATION.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten, and Old Kowloon into two urban Health Districts with an Inspector in charge of each. The Inspector in charge of No. 3 Health District of the City (the principal European quarter) is also in charge of the Peak.

There are in addition four Inspectors in charge of the scaveng- ing work, one Inspector of Cemeteries, one Inspector in charge of the City Disinfecting Station, one in charge of the Kowloon Disin- fecting Station, and two for general duties, making 21 in all.

L 8

The supervision of the sanitary work in the various villages of Hongkong, in Kowloon City and in Sham Shui Po is done by the Police Inspectors.

The Inspectors in Hongkong island work under the personal direction and supervision of the Medical Officer of Health while those in Kowloon are under the Assistant Medical Officer of Health.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION.

As will be seen from the figures given on the preceding page, there has been great activity in regard to building operations during the past year, to meet the urgent demands for house-room created by the immigration of some forty to fifty thousand Chinese, who poured into Hongkong during 1911. These people were of all classes, and came principally from the neighbouring provinces of Kwangtung, Kwangsi and Fokien, seeking refuge from the political unrest which ultimately led to the overthrow of the dynasty and the establishment of a Republican Government in China.

Pending the erection of sufficient dwellings for the accommoda- tion of so large an increase in our normal population, the existing dwellings became greatly overcrowded, but any very strict enforce- ment of the overcrowding laws was deemed impossible, while the penalty which had to be paid for this abnormal state of affairs— amounting practically to the conversion of Hongkong into a huge refugee camp was a severe outbreak of Plague, the most probable determining causes of which are discussed under the heading of that disease.

In connection with anti-Plague measures, to render houses as far as possible rat-proof, 168 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired in the City and 29 in Kowloon, (201 in 1911), while 2,821 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement and broken glass in the City and 4,321 in Kowloon, (3,534 in 1911), and 1,711 ceilings have been removed in the City and 2,566 in Kowloon.

A permit for the use of one basement as a kitchen was issued.

Obstructions have been removed from backyards, under notice, in 582 houses in the City and 15 in Kowloon (129 in 1911). Notices to abate sanitary nuisances to the number of 8,433 in the City and 2,337 in Kowloon and building nuisances to the number of 1,722 in the City and 441 in Kowloon, have been applied for during the year (5,462 and 1,743 respectively in 1911), while 142 notices in regard to the breeding of mosquitoes in the City and 15 in Kowloon have also been served (84 in 1911).

In addition to the above improvements in connection with dwell- ing houses carried out under the supervision of the Sanitary De- partment various permanent improvements affecting sanitation have been effected by the Public Works Department. These include the training of additional nullahs to the extent of 6,567 feet (5,251 feet in 1911) and the building of new markets at Aberdeen and in Staunton Street, and new bullock stables at Kowloon.

- L 9.

The total area of lanes obtained for scavenging purposes during the year has been 12.109 sq. ft. (6,191 sq. ft. in 1911); the length being 2,308 ft. (1,098 ft. in 1911), while a further area of 1,093 sq. ft. was resumed for the construction of roadways, etc., (2,178 sq. ft. in 1911).

During the year one well, the water of which was unsatisfactory, was closed by order of the Board.

METEOROLOGICAL RETURNS.

The following table gives the meteorological conditions which prevailed during the year as recorded at the Kowloon Observatory :-

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERA-

TURE.

HUMI- DITY.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Month.

Rain

Max. Mean. Min.

Rel.

Abs.

Direction. Vel.

ins.

O

O

p.c.

ins. p. c.

hours

ins.

points. miles p.h.

January, February.

March,

April, May,

June,...

30.21 | 60,2 | 57,3 | 54.4 30.12 64.459.9 56.4 30.05 67.9 | 64.3 | 60 6 30.03 74.9 | 69.9 65 6 29 85 83.2 78.9 | 75.8 29.71 85 | 81.6 | 78 6

84

79 0.38 75 | 0.40 $60.53 91 81 0.60 63 0.83 79

91

68

39.4 138.8 2.435 104.6 4.345 E

2710

ENE

12.2

E

13.5

15.6

196.5 3.995 E

12.9

85

0.92

88

178 0 3.940 |SE by E 126.0 14.160 S

12.7

12.1

July.

29 76

88.0 83.0 79.5

80

0.01

262.7 7555

SE

10.6

August,

29 70

867 81.8 78.3

83

0.90 70

182.1 15 715

SSE

6.9

September,... 29.82

85.579,6 | 75 5

71

0.72 53

220.5

3 880

ENE

10.2

October,

30 02

81.5 | 76,1 | 72.1

68

0.61 40

241.6

0.015 E

12.3

November, 30.10 74.7 | 69,3 | 64.9 December, 30.19 66.2 61.4 57.2

65 0.48 52

1847

0.285 E by N

12.7

74 0.41 67

143.9

4.90 NE by E

12.0

Mean or

Total,...)

29.96 76.5 | 71,9 | 68.2

780 64

69

2018.8 63.935 E

12.0

The average annual rainfall during the ten years ending 1902 was 779 inches and ranged from 104-25 inches in 1894 to 45 83 inches in 1895; the average for the decade ending 1912 has been 80 84 inches. The rainfall for the last year (63.9 inches) is there- fore considerably below the average of the last 20 years.

POPULATION.

The Non-Chinese population of the Colony comprised, at the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, a white civil population of 6,035: to this must be added an average resident white population of 2,313 belonging to the Navy and an average strength of 2,360 British Troops. The coloured races (Non-Chinese, Civil) numbered 6,040 and included East Indians, Asiatic Portuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians and a few others; in addition there were 2,054 Indian Troops stationed in the Colony. The Table on page 17 shows a similar classification of the Non-Chinese population for the year 1912 and from this it will be seen that the total Non Chinese population-inclusive of Army and Navy-amounted to 21,163 (including 420 Malays and Filipinos). The total Chinese

L 10

population including 50 Chinese sappers and 200 Chinese servants employed in Naval Establishments, equals 446,614 of whom 90,594 resided in the New Territories exclusive of New Kowloon.

The distribution of population at the Census was as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,

12,075

Chinese Civil Population :-

City of Victoria (including Peak),

219,386

Villages of Hongkong, -

16,211

Kowloon (including New Kowloon),

67,497

New Territories (Land),

80,622

Population afloat,

60,948

Total Chinese Civil Population,

444,664

Total Civil Population,

-

456,739

The estimated total population of the Colony at the middle of 1912 is 467,777 but the figures given below in respect to births and deaths relate only to Hongkong and Kowloon (including New Kow- loon), and the rates therefore in respect to these data are calculated on an estimated Chinese population of 356,020 and a Non-Chinese population of 21,163 of whom 12,400 were civilians, the remainder belonging to the Naval and Military services.

The Civil population consists chiefly of male adults. At the Census held in 1911 the proportion of males was 64'8 per cent. of the total Civil population; at the Census taken in 1906 the proportion was 701 per cent. and at the 1901 Census the proportion was 726 per cent., so that there was a steady increase in the proportion of females (which means an increase in family life) during these ten years.

Over half the Civil population (52'9 per cent of the Chinese and 557 per cent. of the Non-Chinese) were between the ages of 20 and 45 years.

The average strength of the Troops in Garrison during 1912 was 153 British Officers and 1,969 British N.C.O.'s and men; and 72 Indian Officers and 3,897 Indian N.C.O.'s and men; and 50 Chinese attached to the Royal Engineers. There were also 424 British women and children, and 48 Indian women and children, making a total of 472.

The average strength of the British fleet was as follows:

British permanently in the Colony 500, British occasionally in the Colony 5,100, Chinese permanently in the Colony 150, Chinese occasionally in the Colony 150,-making a total of 5,900. For the purpose of estimating the population it is considered a fair average to include one third only of those "occasionally" resident in the Colony this gives a total of 2,400 and of these 200 are Chinese.

L 11

The Chinese boat population (exclusive of the New Territories), as given in the Census taken in 1911 was 45,302 while the estimate to the middle of 1912 is 46,070. The number of boats belonging to the Port and the villages of Hongkong is as follows :--

Passenger boats, -

Cargo boats,

Steam-launches,

Lighters,

Harbour boats,

Fishing boats,

Trading junks,

Total,

2.741

1,292

245

304

1,682

3,718

2,173

12,155

This gives an average of 3.8 persons per boat.

In addition there were at the Census 5,791 Chinese employed in the mercantile marine in the Harbour, and the addition of this figure to the estimated boat population gives a total Chinese population afloat of 51,861 exclusive of the New Territories.

The licensed boats in the New Territories numbered 9,931.

9

10

City of Victoria

Health Districts.

The following table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and the inmates

and per

floor

in

the

City

of Victoria as

estimated

for

the

year

1912

One-storey

Dwellings.

Two-storey

Dwellings.

Three-storey Dwellings.

Four-storey Dwellings.

Five-storey Dwellings.

Total

Dwellings.

Total Floors.

per

house

Average number of floors per dwelling.

Number

of persons per dwelling,

Number of persons per floor.

193

436

229

31

འར

3

892

1,891

2.1

13.9

6.5

3

320

658

86

Nil.

1,067

2,961

2.8

24.7

8.9

Nil.

11

18

Nil.

Nil.

29

76

2.6

*

8

48

563

441

11

1,071

3,612

3.4

30.2

8.9

14

135

558

262

Nil.

969

3,006

3.1

27.4

8.8

53

40

384

414

39

930

3,136

3.4

23.9

7.1

13

32

431

410

10

896

3,060

3.4

24.8

7.3

1

75

576

342

14

1,008

3,317 3.2

23.3

7.3

28

472

513

107

Nil.

1,120

2,939

2.6

29.5

11.2

62

368

377

93

Nil.

900

2,301

2.5

20.0

7.8

Totals and Averages 1912,

375

1,937

4,307

2,186

77

8,882

26,299

2.9

25.4

8.6

Totals and Averages 1911.

385

1,938

4,803

2,157

81

8,859

26,198

2.9

24.6

8.3

* Most of the Chinese of this District live in quarters attached to Offices.

*

- L 12-

L 13

wwwc

The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each district as estimated for the year 1912-

Health Districts.

Built Total over Acreage. Arcas

Non-

Non-

Chinese

Chinese

Chinese

Chinese

Dwel-

Dwel-

Popula-

Persons per acre

in Acres.

lings.

tion.

Popula.

(built

lings.

tion.

orer).

1,

531

134

892

163

12,440

1,650

101

880

2,

243

140

1,067

84

26,540

1,234

195

{Troops

3,

232

137

29

431

8,100

3,275

83

1,

56

53

1,071

164

32,350

1,245

614

51.

29

27

969

12

26,600

90

956

6.

30

27

930

19

22.220

150

800

7.

36

31

896

6

22,260

45

695

49

47

1,003

6

23.540

65

435

9,

44

14

1.120

5

33,030

60

727

10,

252

106

900

60

18,120

610

170

Total 1912,..... 1,502

746

8,882

950225,500

9,304

303

Total 1911...... 1,502

746 8,859

916 218,000

8,730

303

The number of Chinese living at the Peak and Stonecutters'

Island is estimated at 1,720.

The following Table shows the distribution of the Chinese population of Kowloon according to houses and floors in the different Districts into which Kowloon is divided:-

Kowloon.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

One-storey Two-storey Three-storey! Four-storey

}

Dwellings. Dwellings. Dwellings.

|

Dwellings.

Total Dwellings.

Total floors.

Average number of floors per Chinese dwelling.

Chinese population.

Number of persons per Chinese dwelling.

Number of persons per Chinese floor.

Old Kowloon, (2 urban Health Districts),

Kowloon City District,

Sham Shui Po District,

802 | 22

733 271 1,172

30 196

605

456

5

936 1 214

4

11

:

:

2

Area in Acres.

3 238| 7,268

2.2 54,940

16.9

7.5

2,012

1,070 1,539

1.4 7,450 6.9

4.8

2,758

1,166| 1,406

1.2

6,510 5.6 4.6

2,068

Total 1912,

Total 1911,.

2,343

23

1,403 280 1,187 30

196

2

5,474 10,213

1.9 68,900 12.6

6.7 6,838

2,340

23 1,388 276 | 1,177

12

196

2

5,430 (10,106 10,106

1.9 67,497 12.4

6.7

6,838

- L 14-

L 13

BIRTHS.

The Births registered during the year were as follows:-

Males.

Females.

Total.

Chinese,

1,501.

827

2,328

Non-Chinese,

186

157

343

Total 1912,

1,687

984

2,671

1911,

1,271

497

1,768

19

This gives a general birth rate of 71 per 1,000 as compared with 47 per 1,000 in 1911 and 4.3 per 1,000 in 1910.

The birth and death rates are based on the estimated popula- tion of the Colony as given on page 10 and this does not allow for the temporary influx of Chinese already referred to; it is to this addition that the increase in the birth rate is no doubt partly due while another factor would be the temporary suspension of the custom which prevails among Chinese women in Hongkong of returning to their native villages for the birth of their children.

The birth rate among the Non-Chinese community was 16-2 per 1,000 as compared with 19.2 per 1,000 in 1911 and 14‍4 in 1910.

The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows:- British 146, Portuguese 73, Indian 66, Malay and Filipino 23, German 13, American 4, Japanese 4, Swiss 3, Dutch 2, Jew 2, and Italian, Spanish, French, Norwegian, Dane, Roumanian, and African 1 each.

The number of Chinese births registered does not give an ac- curate record of the number of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese of not registering births unless the child has survived for a month and often in the case of female children not at all, it is probable that the majority if not all of the infants which are sickly at birth or die before they have lived one month have not had their births registered. It is customary, there- fore, to assume that all children of one month old and under who are admitted to the various Convents (being brought there sick by poor people) and all young infants found dead in the streets, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the Police, have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to the number of the registered births it is assumed that a somewhat more correct number of births is obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth rate.

The number of such children in 1912 was 394 males and 484 females, total 878 which being added to the registered births, makes a total of 3,549 as compared with 2,601 in 1911. The corrected birth rate is, therefore, 94 while amongst the Chinese community alone the rate becomes 9'0 instead of 6·5 per 1,000.

Î 16

---

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked amongst the Chinese, there being 181 males to 100 females; in 1911 the proportion was 328 males to 100 females. With the addition of the 878 above mentioned unregistered births the proportion becomes 144 males to 100 females.

In the Non-Chinese community the proportion of male births to female births for 1912 was 118 to 100, as compared with 114 to 100 in 1911 and 119 to 100 in 1910.

DEATHS.

The deaths registered during the year numbered 9,682 (7,748 in 1911). The general death rate was, therefore, 2567 per 1,000 as against 20'74 in 1911.

As explained however in relation to the birth rate, no account has been taken in these rates of the abnormal influx of people which occurred during 1911, and which would necessarily increase the death rate in the same manner as it has increased the birth rate. It would be legitimate therefore to add another 40,000 to the estimated population when assessing birth and death rates, and the corrected death rate would then become 23:21 per 1,000. It must also be remembered that no less than 1,768 of these deaths occurred from Plague, and if the deaths from this epidemic are excluded, the death rate, based on the estimated population without any correction for the abnormal influx, would be 2098 per 1,000, while with the corrected population it would be 1897 per 1,000.

The total number of deaths among the Chinese community was 9,375 which gives a death rate of 26'33 per 1,000 as against 21:13 in 1911 and 22.50 in 1910.

The deaths registered amongst the Non-Chinese community numbered 307 of which 272 were from the Civil Population, 28 from the Army and 7 from the Navy.

This gives a death rate for the Non-Chinese community of 14:51 per 1,000 as compared with 13:38 in 1911 and 10′04 in 1910.

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-Indian 102, British 69, Portuguese 52, Malay and Filipino 39, Japanese 21, German 8, American 8, Austrian 3, Norwegian, Spanish, French, Russian and Jew 1 each. This gives a death rate of 8'5 per 1,000 for Europeans and Whites (8'7 in 1911), 167 per 1,000 for East Indians (179 in 1911), and 271 per 1,000 for races classed as mixed and coloured (238 in 1911).

The total number of deaths which occurred amongst the Non-Chinese resident Civil population (omitting that is to say the 21 deaths in the Mercantile Marine and Foreign Navies) was 251 and allowing 850 for the Non-Chinese floating population this gives a death rate of 21'7 per 1,000 for the resident Non-Chi- nese Civil population (185 in 1911).

*

£ 17

L

Table I shows the number and causes of deaths registered during the year.

The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purpose of ready comparison with similar Tables given in the reports froin other Colonies:-

Total.

Number of inhabitants in 1912

(estimated).

Exclusive of

the New Territories, other than New Kowloon,......

10,946

6.085356,440 3,710 377,183

Number of Births in 1912, ..

176

66

of Deaths in

93

""

*

102 9.414

2,351 77 2,671

78

9,682

of Immigrants in 1912,..

163,248

of Emigrants in

"

122,657

10,708

14.066

4.066 351,739 3.606 373,121

238

2,019

1,701 | 10+ 1,062

...

Number of inhabitants in 1911

(Census figures and Army and Navy),

Increase,

or

Decrease,

There is an enormous passenger traffic between Hongkong and the mainland of China, the passenger figures by river steamer alone being as follows:

Arrivals 1,727,513; Departures 1,707,722.

It must not be assumed, however, that the excess of passenger arrivals by steamers over the departures (19,791) or the excess of immigrants over emigrants (40,591) represents an in population of the Colony, for thousands of those who arrive by passenger steamers subsequently leave for China by launch or junk and the numbers so leaving are not available.

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 2,271 or 23.5 per cent. of the total deaths, as compared with 318 per cent. in 1911 and 32:9 per cent. in 1910.

The infant mortality among the Non-Chinese community during the year was 113 per 1,000 as compared with 133 per 1,000 in 1911 and 80 per 1,000 in 1910. The corresponding figure for the United Kingdom for the decennium 1891-1900 was 168 per 1,000, but the condition of abject poverty which exists among a percentage of the

L 18

population of the United Kingdom cannot be said to obtain among the Non-Chinese population of Hongkong.

Among the Chinese population the deaths of infants numbered 2,232 (2,419 in 1911) while only 2,328 Chinese births were registered. Taking the corrected Chinese birth figure to be 3,206 as explained on page 15 it would even then appear that more than two thirds of the Chinese children born in the Colony die in infancy. The Census return for 1911 showed however 1,180 Chinese infants under one year of age, and 24,738 Chinese children between the ages of one year and five years; it is very evident therefore that the majority of these children are not born in the Colony but are brought here from the mainland of China.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseascs.

The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 2,379 (2,542 in 1911) of which 62 were among the Non-Chinese community leaving 2,317 among the Chinese population; 561 out of this total occurred in infants under one year of age (801 in 1911).

Pulmonary Tuberculosis (Phthisis) alone accounts for 780 deaths (775 in 1911), of which 757 were Chinese. Pneumonia caused 1,113 deaths (1,322 in 1911) of which 1,091 were Chinese; these figures do not include the few deaths attributed to Pneumonic Plague which are shown under the heading of Plague. 446 of these deaths from Pneumonia occurred in infants under one year of age (647 in 1911).

The death rate among the Chinese from Respiratory Diseases was 6'5 per 1,000 as compared with 70 per 1,000 in 1911 and 79 per 1,000 in 1910; that for Phthisis alone was 21 per 1,000 as compared with 2:1 in the previous year.

The deaths from Phthisis amongst the Chinese were 81 per cent. of the total deaths amongst that community, as compared with 100 in 1911 and 103 in 1910; if other deaths from Tuberculosis are included the total amounts to 1,136 or 12·1 per cent. of the total deaths among the Chinese (157 per cent. in 1911).

Considerable efforts are still being made to put a stop to the inveterate habit of the lower class Chinese of spitting in public buildings and offices and on staircases, footpaths, wharves, etc. Notices have been posted in many public buildings, as well as in tramcars, ferry boats and other public vehicles, while lectures have been given and leaflets distributed, calling attention to the dangers incident to this habit. It is hoped in this way, coupled with the improved sanitary condition of the native dwellings, to gradually reduce the death rate from Phthisis. The fact that the soil in the lower levels (which are the most densely populated) is water-logged during the greater part of the year, has no doubt much to do with the heavy mortality from this disease, but it is to be hoped that the influences of education will gradually effect a further reduction in

L 19

our Phthisis mortality which at present stands at nearly double that of England and Wales, which, in the decennium 1891-1900 was only 13 per 1,000.

Nerrous Diseases.

The number of deaths from this heading for the year 1912 was 501 as compared with 526 in 1911 and 576 in 1910. Of these 419 were of Chinese children under 5 years of age, 300 being infants less than one year old. These deaths of Chinese infants comprise *230 deaths from Tetanus, Trismus, and Convulsions, and 67 deaths from Meningitis; the influence of the Public Dispensaries and of the Public Midwives is however being gradually felt, and these figures show a steady reduction.

Malarial Ferer.

The total number of deaths from Malarial Fever during the year was 432 (as compared with 338 in 1911 and 591 in 1910), of which 18 were Non-Chinese. Of these 414 Chinese deaths, 214 occurred in the City of Victoria (176 in 1911), while there were 80 deaths in Kowloon (26 in 1911), 81 in the villages of Hongkong (102 in 1911), 36 in the Harbour (25 in 1911), and 3 at the Peak. Some of the deaths, however, which occurred in the City were cases brought over from Kowloon or from the Harbour, for treatment in the various City Hospitals; Wanchai (No. 2 Health District) with 36 deaths and Sai Ying Poon (No. 9 Health District) with 37 deaths were again the most infected Districts of the City. The general reduction, however, in the villages suggests that much of the infection was imported and not of local origin, the visitors from the Canton District who crowded into Hongkong last year being already heavily infected with the Malarial organism. The Military figures also show that there has been a steady decrease in the amount of Malaria infection in the Colony. Of the deaths which occurred in the villages 34 were at Shaukiwan (27 from the land population and 7 from boat population) as compared with 54 in 1911; 44 at Aberdeen (25 from land population and 19 from the boat population) as compared with 43 in 1911; and 3 at Stanley (5 in 1911).

Anti-malarial measures were first inaugurated in this Colony in 1899 and during the past year considerable attention has been paid to this work-special visits have been made by the Sanitary Inspectors in search of breeding places for mosquitoes, dense tangles of brushwood in the neighbourhood of houses have been cut down, Quinine has been administered to school-children in certain selected districts, the trained nullahs have been regularly swept to prevent the formation of waterweed and algæ, and standing water has in places been treated with kerosine or with carbolated creasote at regular weekly intervals (including several acres of pools in Kowloon) while such cases of Malaria as have come to the knowledge of the Sanitary Department have been investigated and steps taken to prevent the breeding of mosquitoes in the neighbourhood where they occurred. For this purpose weekly returns of all cases of Malaria admitted to the Hospitals are sent to the Medical Officer of

L 20

Health, while information is also obtained from Private Medical Practitioners as to special outbreaks of Malaria in any portions of the Colony and the death returns are scrutinized for deaths from this disease. Copies of a pamphlet entitled "Advice concerning Mosquitoes and Malaria ", in both English and Chinese, have also been freely distributed to householders and every effort has been made to induce them to take part in the work of mosquito destruction. The amounts spent on nullah training for the years 1910, 1911 and 1912 were respectively $30,628, $24,650, and $27,225, while the total length of trained nullahs and channels built since the commencement of anti-malarial work in the Colony is 53,788 ft., or 102 miles; the total cost of this work has been $273,430.

The Police Admissions to Hospital for Malaria for the past ten years are shown in the following Table:

Year.

From the

From rest of

Total.

City.

the Colony.

Average Strength of l'olice

Percent-

age of

Force. Strength.

1903,

1901,

1905,

1906,

1907,

1908,

1909,

1910,

1911,

1912,

2995905895

84

167

921

18

67

107

993

11

85

127

1,018

12

37

74

1,047

65

105

1,049

10

76

108

1,018

10

50

87

1,050

8

69

135

1,039

13

30

83

113

1,031

51

88

1,120

The following Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years:

Total Deaths from Malaria.

Deaths in the City

Year.

Total Deaths.

(Chinese only)

1903,

152

300

1904,

90

301

1905, 1906,

...

87

. 287

134

448

1907,

138

379

1908,

133

499

1909,

123

422

1910,

282

591

1911.

. 176

1912,

214

338 432

Average

456.

Average

*888

Average

10·1.

Average

11.5.

L 21

Hygiene is taught systematically in all the schools in the Colony. Lectures have been written for this purpose by the Medical Officer of Health for the information and guidance of school teachers and special attention is paid in the lectures on Malaria to the mode of conveyance of the infection by the mosquito, the manner in which the mosquito breeds, and the measures to be adopted for its ex- termination. Fourteen convictions were obtained for breeding mosquitoes on private premises after warning had failed to effect an abatement of the nuisance, the fines amounting to $54.

The Military return of admissions for Malaria is given below, from which it will be seen that the ratio per 1,000 is the lowest on record. Much of this infection is contracted in rural districts when the men are under training and camping out.

Admissions for Malaria.-European Troops.

Year.

Strength.

Admis- sions.

Invalid-

Deaths.

Ratio

ed.

per 1,000.

1903,

1,220 937

1901,

1.426

390

1905,

1,370

348

1906,

1,515

480

1907,

1,461

287

1908.

2,012

515

1909,

1,943

269

1910,

1,887

334

1911,

1,849 232

1912,

1,797

151

2-O+OON-O-

6

768-0

9

273.5

0

1

254.0

314-7

12

196.0

17

256·0

10

138.4

1

9

177-0

125.5

84.0

Average

Average

158.

349.

The admissions for Malaria amongst the Native Troops during 1912 were 310. The ratio of admissions per 1,000 for the last five years were 102:8 in 1908, 543 in 1909, 89-8 in 1910, 318 in 1911 and 83.2 in 1912.

Beri-beri.

There were 231 deaths (320 in 1911 and 566 in 1910) from this disease during the year of which 1 only was among the Non-Chinese community. During the past few years circulars have been distribut- ed to all large employers of coolie labour calling their attention to the fact that Beri-Beri is produced by the consumption of white rice as the staple article of diet without a sufficiency of other food, and advising that beans should be supplied with the rice when fresh meat or fresh fish cannot be afforded, and it is possible that the dissemination of this information may have had some influence in reducing the mortality from this disease.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The total number of cases of infectious disease notified during the year was 2,757 (702 in 1911) of which 1,847 were of Plague.

Harbour.

New Territories. Villages of Hongkong.

No Address.

Imported.

Total 1912.

Total 1911.

Peak. Kowloon.

The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases :—

City of Victoria: Health Districts.

2

6 7 8 9

10

:

16 1.847 269

23

32

138 107

1

1

I

L 22

10

14 19 709272

1

Co

3888

13

36

}

:.

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

165 195 16 140 84

82

88 85205

74

509 | 104 ·

34

59

10

6 15

10

6

9

27 3

3

31

J

4

เว

:

:

:

Plague,

Typhoid Fever,

Cholera,

Small-pox,

Diphtheria,

Puerperal Fever,

Scarlet Fever,...

Relapsing Fever,

:

:

:

25

26

39 42 44

36

1264

39

4

14

2 4

1

15

8 1

1

48 63 16 32

1 6

1

:

10

:

1

:.

:

::

7

1 1

1

1

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

...

1

3

co

:

:.

}

:

*

L 23

Plague.

The incidence of Plague during 1912 was very heavy, 1,817 cases being reported, of which 16 only were known to be imported.

The cases were generally distributed throughout the City except in the European business quarter, where only 16 cases occurred-and throughout Kowloon, which returned 509 cases; Wanchai and Sai Ying Poon (Health Districts 2 and 9) showed as usual however the heaviest incidence of the disease, which may be accounted for by the fact that these two districts contain a large proportion of old rat-ridden dwellings.

The Medical Officer of Health has suggested elsewhere that last year's severe epidemic of Plague can be directly traced to the great influx of Chinese during 1911, leading to serious overcrowding of almost all the native dwellings of the Colony. The manner in which the overcrowding operated to produce so severe an epidemic of Plague was by largely increasing the rat population and especially the susceptible rat population of the inhabited districts. The number of rats in any area is dependent almost entirely upon the available food supply for these animals, while the most obvious result of the human overcrowding has been a marked increase in the amount of waste food, both in the houses and in the yards and lanes adjacent thereto. Efforts have been inade to keep pace with this increase in the house-refuse by improved scavenging, but it is obvious that where houses are overcrowded with human beings and their many belongings, the cleanliness of the premises falls below the average and refuse of all sorts lies concealed among the general lumber.

Hongkong possesses both the Mus Decumanus or drain rat and the Mus Rattus or house rat and it has been our experience since Plague first started in Hongkong that the Mus Decumanus is Plague infected practically throughout the year while the Mus Rattus only shows Plague infection during the period corresponding to the human epidemic, riz., February to July. Thus during 1912 no Plague rats were discovered during January; 5 were found in February, all of them Decumanus; 7 in March, all Decumanus; 77 in April of which 4 were Rattus and 73 Decumanus; 247 during May of which 69 were Rattus and 178 Decumanus; 107 in June of which 32 were Rattus and 75 Decumanus; and 41 in July of which 8 were Rattus and 33 Decumanus (ride Table III). The monthly incidence of the human cases of Plague was as follows :-

January February March

April

9

24

73

317

May June

759

498

July

111

August

19

September

4

L 24

It follows therefore that while man can and does contract Plague from the Mus Decumanus, principally in warehouses, workshops, basements, stables and outhouses generally, into which these animals are driven by the rain storms flooding their under- ground haunts, yet the bulk of the epidemic is due to the spread of infection to the house rat, and every effort has been made therefore to drive the rats away from human dwellings. According- ly during the epidemic under discussion an area of some ten acres of the City of Victoria was declared Plague infected and the Sanitary Staff proceeded to remove all ceilings, stairlinings, wainscotting and other structures behind which rats could breed, from the dwellings within this area. Nineteen cases of Plague had occurred therein before the area was declared infected; the work occupied two months, and during this period a further 21 cases occurred in that district, while 15 Plague infected Decumanus and 3 Plague infected Rattus were also found. After the completion of the work only two further cases occurred in this infected district both of which were on the boundary line. Other and smaller districts in the City were dealt with in the same manner. and also the greater part of Kowloon, and it is proposed to gradually extend this work so as ultimately to rid the native quarters as far as possible of all such nesting places for rats within the dwelling-houses.

Unfortunately however there is a very large number of old houses in the Colony which possess hollow walls constructed of soft bricks, which form ideal nesting places for the Mus Rattus and enable it to enter the dwelling at night to forage for food, and it is in those districts in which such buildings are most numerous that Plague has displayed its greatest incidence since the infection was first imported into the Colony in 1894. There is no remedy for such faulty construction short of actual demolition of the premises, which is too heroic a measure to be practicable on any extended scale.

Some anxiety was occasioned at one stage of the epidemic by the occurrence of a few cases of Pneumonic Plague-most of these however were secondary to a general Plague septicemia, although a few undoubted cases of primary Pneumonic Plague did occur, one of them being a valued ward attendant in the Tung Wal Hospital. It is noteworthy that no case of Plague occurred among the European community, although some few of the older buildings in the European business quarter were invaded by rats, some of which were Plague infected, and sixteen Chinese office attendants, etc., residing in these premises succumbed to the disease.

The further measures upon which the Colony relies for the prevention of Plague consist in (1) the exclusion of rats from all dwellings by means of concreted ground surfaces, the protection of all drain openings and ventilating openings by iron gratings. and the prohibition of ceilings and of hollow walls in new buildings and in those existing buildings from which they have been removed by order; (2) the collection and bacteriological examination of all dead rats-facilities for their collection in the native quarters are

L 25

provided in the shape of small covered bins attached to lamp-posts, telephone posts, electric light standards, etc. These bins contain a carbolic acid disinfectant, and the inhabitants are invited to at once put into them all rats found or killed by them. There are 650 of these bins distributed throughout the City and its suburbs, and each of them is visited twice daily by rat collectors who take all rats found in them to the Government Bacteriologist. Each rat is at once labelled with the number of the bin from which it is taken, and if subsequently found to be Plague infected, a special survey is at once made of the block of houses in the immediate vicinity of such bin, all rat-holes and rat-runs are filled up with broken glass and cement, defective drains and gratings dealt with, and rat poison freely distributed to the occupants, while the occurrence of several Plague-infected rats in one locality is a signal for a special house- to-house survey and cleansing of that District. The disinfectant in the rat-bins is renewed not less than once a week; (3) the destruction of rats by poison, traps and birdlime boards, special efforts in this direction being made just before the onset of the regular Plague season which in this Colony is March to July; (4) the encouraging of the community to keep cats; (5) the systematic cleansing and washing out of all native dwellings at least once in three months with a flea killing mixture- kerosine emulsion; (6) an efficient daily scavenging of all streets and lanes and the removal of refuse daily from all houses coupled with the provision of covered metal dust-bins for all houses, to reduce as far as possible the amount of food available for rats; (7) the disinfection of Plague-infected premises by stripping them and washing them out thoroughly with the kerosine emulsion coupled with the disinfection of all bedding, clothing, carpets, rugs, etc., by superheated steam. No objection is raised to the treatment of Bubonic Plague cases in native Hospitals, and no restrictions are imposed in regard to the burial of those dead of Bubonic Plague, except the provision of a substantial coffin, while every effort is made by means of lectures, addresses and explanations to induce the native population to participate in the above preventive

measures.

There were 35 Non-Chinese cases-all of them being other Asiatics-and 1,812 Chinese cases. Twenty-seven of the Non- .Chinese cases died, giving a case mortality of 77 per cent., while 1,741 of the Chinese cases died which represents a case mortality of 96 per cent.

It is possible that some undiscovered cases may recover and that therefore the case mortality may not be quite so high as this.

During the year 70,633 rats were caught or found dead in the City of Victoria and 19,337 in Kowloon, a total of 89,970 as against 87,238 in 1911. Those from the City were examined by the Government Bacteriologist, Dr. Macfarlane, at the Public Mortuary and those in Kowloon by Dr. Pearse, the Assistant Medical Officer of Health and Dr. Heanley, with the result that 390 of those from the City or 55 per 1,000 and 102 of those from Kowloon or 53 per 1,000 were found to be infected with Plague.

L 26

Table III shows the monthly distribution of the Plague-infected rats during the year.

Typhoid Fever.

The number of cases of this disease during the year was 138 compared with 107 during 1911 and 67 in 1910: 32 of the cases were imported, namely 24 Europeans, 4 Chinese, 2 Malays, 1 Indian and 1 Japanese. The cases of European or American nationality numbered 33, while the Chinese cases numbered 88, and 17 cases occurred amongst the other Asiatic races in the Colony. Six of the European cases, (4 British, 1 German and I Russian), three Indians and 77 of the Chinese cases died. The case mortality among the European cases was therfore 18 per cent.

In most of the cases of Typhoid Fever that occur in this Colony the infection is probably contracted by eating salads of raw vege- tables, which have been grown in Chinese market-gardens, where it is customary to water and manure the plants with diluted human excreta-both urine and nightsoil. Residents in the Far East should carefully avoid such articles of food as water-cress, lettuce, etc., in view of this danger of contracting Typhoid Fever, Cholera, or intestinal parasites, all of which diseases may be conveyed in this manner. Oysters from neighbouring Chinese ports are also occasionally the source of infection.

It will be seen from the above figures that this disease is much less prevalent among the Chinese than among Europeans in this Colony, the ratio of cases to population being in the case of Europeans 30 per 1,000 and in the case of Chinese 0'25 per 1,000. It is a remarkable fact that no less than 43 of the Chinese cases occurred in children under 5 years of age.

Small-pox.

During the year 709 cases of Small-pox were certified, (272 in 1911 and 31 in 1910) of which 20 were Europeans, 20 were other Non-Chinese and 669 were Chinese; 19 of the cases were imported. Two British children and one Indian child died and all three were returned as showing no signs of vaccination. 562 of the Chinese cases died, and only two of these showed evidences of vaccination.

The number of vaccinations for the year was 16,155 as com- pared with 8,549 in 1911 and 7,584 in 1910.

Efforts are being made to secure the re-vaccination of school children and a memorandum has been issued to all school teachers in the Colony setting forth its advantages, while arrangements are made for re-vaccination free of cost at the schools on ap- plication.

L 27

Diphtheria.

66

>>

Thirty-eight cases of Diphtheria were notified throughout the year, (36 in 1911), one of them being an imported case. Three of the cases were Europeans and eleven were other Non-Chinese leaving twenty-four Chinese cases. Fifteen cases occurred in the month of January and seven in the month of December; the remainder were more or less evenly distributed throughout the year.

Twenty of the Chinese died, the only other death being a Portuguese child, 2 months old.

Puerperal Fever.

Thirteen cases of this disease were notified throughout the year, (7 in 1911). Eleven of these were Chinese while the other two were Europeans; all the Chinese cases died, but both the European cases recovered.

The Government employs ten Chinese midwives, trained in Western methods, to attend the poor in their confinements and during the year 1,937 cases were attended by these women as against 2,076 in 1911. The reduction in the number of cases attended is due to changes in the personnel of the staff; three of the midwives resigned and one died during the year, their places being taken by others who would at first not he so popular as their better-known predecessors. In addition to these changes, one midwife was absent from duty on account of illness during seven months of the year.

There were 47 cases of abortion, thirty still-births and one case of Puerperal Fever. 69 of the infants died during the year, and 290 were taken back to China, or lost sight of owing to removals; the remainder of the infants are well. Seventeen of the mothers died from accidents of child-birth, including the one case of Puerperal Fever.

INTERMENTS.

The following number of interments in the various cemeteries of the Colony have been reported during the year and in 1911:-

General Cemeteries.

1911.

1912.

Colonial,

106

92

Roman Catholic,

1,058

1,351

Mohammedan,

52

106

Jewish,

1

Parsee,

0

Japanese,

0

3

Total,

1,221

1,553

L 28

Chinese Cemeteries.

1911.

1912.

Mount Caroline,

693

639

Kai Lung Wan,

628

1,684

Tung Wah Hospital,

3,483

3,305

Protestant,

40

Eurasian,

4

Shaukiwan,

189

183

Aberdeen,.

Stanley,

151

184

22

12

Shek O,

Ma Tau Wai,

0

5

1,155

2,036

Shai Yu Shek,

118

102

Kowloon Tong,

91

119

Kowloon City (Christian),

11

3

Cheung Leung Tin,

3

0

Chai Wan (Christian),

0

1

Total,

6,584

8,317

There were in addition thirty-four cremations of bodies during the year.

No less than 1,169 of the interments in the Roman Catholic Cemetery were the bodies of Chinese children and of these 760 were infants that had been baptized at the Convents and died there shortly after admission.

DISINFECTING STATION.

During the year the Disinfecting Stations (in Victoria and in Kowloon) dealt with 91,498 articles of clothing, bedding, etc., (50,422 in 1911).

The disinfecting apparatus in Victoria was in use on 314 days, and in addition 12,571 articles were washed, 91 public vehicles were disinfected and 234 articles were fumigated. The Disinfecting Apparatus in Kowloon was in use on 227 days.

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

The free Public Bath-houses, erected by the Government at Wanchai and in Pound Lane, Taipingshan, and also the temporary bath-houses, fitted up in Chinese tenements houses rented for this purpose, at 92 Second Street and 2 Sheung Fung Lane, have been in considerable demand by the poor class of Chinese and the follow- ing figures show the total number of persons who have used these bath-houses during the year 1912-

Wanchai,..

Pound Lane,..

Second Street,..

107,848

177,537

72,489

Sheung Fung Lane,..

29,389

Total,..............

.387,263

1

L 29

The numbers in 1911 were 333,174.

Separate baths, with an ample supply of hot water, are furnish- ed at each of these bath-houses-that at Wanchai is for men only, and is largely used by the coal coolies engaged in coaling ships in the Harbour, and that at Second Street is also for men and boys only. The Pound Lane bath-house has separate buildings for men and for women and children and the Sheung Fung Lane bath-house is for women and children only.

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

Ambulances can be procured not only at any hour of the night or day by telephoning (No. 363) to the Disinfecting Station, Tai Ping Shan, but additional ones are stationed at the following places for use by the Police in all cases of emergency :-

The Bay View Police Station.

No. 1 Police Station.

The Recreation Ground, Happy Valley.

Eastern District Sanitary Office (Queen's Road East).

The Seamen's Institute, Gresson Street.

The City Hall.

The Post Office.

The Central Police Station.

The Fire Brigade Station, Queen's Road Central.

The New Western Market.

The Tung Wah Hospital.

The entrance gate in Queen's Road West to the Govern-

ment Civil Hospital.

The Western District Sanitary Office.

The Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town,

Outside the City limits ambulances are also stationed at the Pokfulam Police Station, at No. 6 Police Station, Peak, at Aber- deen, Shaukiwan and Stanley Police Stations, at the Water Police Station at Tsim-Sha-tsui and at Tai Po. Ambulances may be obtain- ed ta Kowloon by telephoning (No. 44K) to the Kowloon Disinfect- ing Station.

These are all hand ambulances on bicycle or light wooden wheels, with rubber tyres, and of the St. John Ambulance pattern.

Those stationed in the City are in the charge of the various District Inspectors, whose duty it is to see that they are kept clean

L 30

and efficient, and that they are disinfected after use. At the Sanitary Stations coolies are always available for the conveyance of these ambulances, but at the other Stations the Police obtain volunteers or engage street coolies for this purpose, while if the ambulance has been soiled or used for an infectious case, the Sanitary Department is notified so that it may be cleansed and disinfected at once.

Ambulances from the Disinfecting Stations and Branch Stations were used 899 times in Hongkong and 190 times in Kowloon.

ADULTERATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS.

Seventeen samples of fresh milk and two samples of desiccated milk were taken for analysis during the year, all the fresh samples were found to be unadulterated and genuine. The samples of desiccated milk were examined at the request of the seller, to ascertain whether they came under the provisions of Ordinance 20 of 1911 which requires condensed skimmed milk to be labelled in English and Chinese to the effect that it is skimmed milk and that children under one year of age should not be fed on it. One of the samples was found to be desiccated pure milk and the other desiccated skimmed milk and the seller was required to label the latter accordingly.

A number of tins of condensed milk, cocoa and chocolate, various kinds of pickles and sauces, and a quantity of fruit, all of which had become unsound were seized and destroyed. The purity of alcoholic liquors is dealt with by the Police, who periodically submit samples for analysis. During 1912 two samples of Brandy were found to be adulterated.

J. T. C. JOHNSON, F.R.C.S. (Ed.), D.T.M. & II. (Camb.), Principal Civil Medical Officer.

FRANCIS CLARK, M.D., M.R.C.P., D.P.H., D.T.M. & H.,

Medical Officer of Health,

March 20th, 1913.

- £31 -

Table I.-DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING 1912.

:

16

1

27 14

:.

::.

:

:

:

:

:

17

Phthisis.

Enteritis and Gastro Enteritis.

Cirrhosis of Liver.

Peritonitis.

Nephritis.

Other causes.

Unknown.

All causes.

Pneumonia.

6

1

23 20

:

:

:.

:..

:

:

:

::.

223

Co

Q

27 4

10

:

2 6

...

38

51 272

11

:

28

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

2352 117|331| 127 | 26 | 509|110|823 | 416

67 13

12

49

886 127 6255

10

2 45

13

91

Q

ོ་ཚ་ཚེ

34

ст

9

51

69

8

1

8

51

:

84 616

32

54

6

16

46199 | 162

16

00

8

8

20

302 86 1978

30

15

3

62

11

3

1

:

:..

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

17 39

1 23

388888

1

64

19 306

1

38

9 209

11

201

98 1129 217 10

39

123

76

6

1

14

13 104 36

1

3

2

1

30 40482 80

16

11

:.

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

31

624 34

2

7

7

2

14

3

:

...

:

:

:.

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

23925

30

:

:

10

Civil,.

1

British and

Foreign Army,

...

:

Community,

Navy,

1

:

[Victoria and

299

10

5 71 13

Peak,

Harbour,

:

Kowloon,

Chinese

Community,

Shaukiwan,.....

Aberdeen,.......

Stanley,

217 2 1 6

12

i

Total, 1912,

565 8

87 21

1911,

198 10

31 | 15

...

2861811768 432 11 64 140 12 | 157

2378 355 385| 231 | 43 | 5581901113 738

3 244 177253 338 6 45 112 10 188 5 324 291 417 320 | 41 | 377 193|1322|775

97 26 23

80 25

22 23

83 1398330 (9682

88 1542 295 7748

January.

February.

March.

Ĺ 32

-

Table II-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES RECORDED IN EACH MONTII OF THE YEAR 1912.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

...

Plague,

Europeans, Chinese,

9

Others,

Europeans,

Typhoid Fever,

...

Chinese,

5

Others,

1

Europeans,

Chol ra,

Chinese,

Others,

Europeans,

3

Small-pox,

Chinese,

155

235

Others,

5

Europeans,

:|:22::: ས

73

313

750

495 135

19

4

1

1,812

1,847

268

269

4

3

1

10

14

934

13

9

35

1

4

7

2

4

33

40

9

8

6

88

138

50

107

12

149

7

2

Diphtheria,

Chinese,

Others,

Europeans,

Puerperal Fever........................

Chinese,

Others,

Scarlet Fever,..........

Relapsing Fever,

Europeans, Chinese, Others,

Europeans, Chinese, Others,

2

:::: ::::: NÔNG

2

4

2

2

1

17

17

:

5

91

20

3

5

2

...

2

2

3

1

2

3

6

2

2

1

1

3

1

3

2

1

:ཌ :ཙྩེ ནེེཥྭཱ ས ཡསཌ:ཁྱཌ ::

5

5

20

5

669

709

257

272

20

10

3

10

24

38

17

36

9

2

11

13

1

00

8

1

4

3

10

5

1

Total for 1912,

197

| 291

247

429 798

518

169

29

Total for 1911,

18

25

68

60

95

133

75

45

22

22

15

18

24

25

52

28

24

82

:

:

2,757

:

:

702

***

Total. 1912.

1911.

17

Mus Rattus. Mus Decumanus,

Mus Musculus,

Total infected rats

L 33

Table III.

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS

DURING THE YEAR 1912.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

a: ai

Jand

5

: ܗ:

38

61

61

32

*D ON:

:~:

2:

332

2

1

390

3

56

January

February.

March.

April.

June.

May.

July.

August.

September

October.

November.

December.

Total.

5

2

65 200 77 35 2

2 1

Human cases of

Plague,

9

22

61 265513 | 346 | 105

11

1

:

:

:

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS

DURING THE YEAR 1912.

Mus Rattus... Mus Decumanus. Mus Musculus.

Total infected rats,

Human cases of

Plague

:

January.

February.

March.

April.

20

KOWLOON.

May.

June.

July.

August.

30

17

16 13

2

5 12 47 30 6 2

52 246 152 39

00

8

2 12

September.

October.

November.

December.

:

:

Total.

57

44

1

102

514

1,333

L 34

Annexe C.

REPORT BY ADAM GIBSON, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

GENERAL STATISTICS.

The total number of cattle admitted to the Government Depôts for the year was 34,717 an increase on the previous year of 3,343. In Kennedy Town 29,261 cattle were admitted an increase of 3,416 on last year.

There were 72 head rejected alive as unfit for food against 147 in 1911. In Mau Tau Kok 5,456 head were admitted against 5,529 in the previous year and 44 were rejected alive as unfit for food against 60 in 1911.

The total number of pigs admitted to Kennedy Town was 216,359, an increase on last year's total of 19,225.

The total number of sheep admitted to Kennedy Town was 33,608, an increase of 1,388 on 1911.

DISEASE IN DEPÔTS.

Anthrax. Two sporadic cases of Anthrax were discovered and the carcases cremated.

Rinderpest.-Rinderpest was more or less prevalent throughout the year and seven cattle were rejected and destroyed in consequence of this disease. Towards the latter end of the year the disease appeared to prevail throughout the whole of Southern China.

"C

""

Tuberculosis. -Fourteen cases of Tuberculosis were found. They were all in cast cows from Dairies in different parts of the Colony.

Redwater-One animal infected with Redwater was destroyed.

CREMATORIUM.

The carcases, etc., destroyed in the Crematorium for the year

were :-

Cattle including calves,

Sheep and goats,

Swine,

Horses,

Dogs and Miscellaneous,

House,

Condemned meat from Slaughter

49

32

256

41

112

7,844 lbs.

In addition to these a miscellaneous assortment of 15 cart loads of old official papers from Government Departments, and from private firms and a quantity of condemned food goods from different stores were destroyed.

L 35

Under Government Notification No. 31 of 1910 the following fees were collected :--

64 large animals at $2.00 each,

64 small animals at $0.50 each,

Bone ash sold,-

Total Receipts,

-$128.00

32.00

83.00

-243.00

The coal used was 23 tons 2 cwts. 97 lbs. at $9.75 per ton- $225.65.

SLAUGHTER Horses.

Kennedy Town.-The total revenue was 876.381.80 and was made up as follows:-

Slaughtered.

1911.

$

1912.

C.

X

28.259 11,343.60

3,508.00

.

-

17,906 3,581.20

Cattle @ 40 c.,... 25, 25—10,050.00 Sheep @ 20 c.,... 17,540

Swine @30 c.....179,296-53,788.80 195.934-58,780.20

Exported.

Cattle @ 50 c.,...

354= 177.00

Sheep 10 c.....

14,262

1,426.20

15,920

151.50 1,592.00

Swine @ 10 e.,...

8,457-

845.70

9.333- 933.30

Total,

...$69,795.70

76,381.80

Increase on 1911,...$ 6,586.10

Ma Tau Kok.- The total revenue was $13,548.90 and was made up as follows :-

1911.

1912.

Slaughtered.

C.

$

c.

Cattle (u 40 c.,... 5,458

Sheep (20 c.,...

131-

2,183.20 26.20

5,469

2,187.60

271-

54.20

Swine @30 c.,... 38,100-11,430.00

37.679-11,303.70

Exported.

Cattle (@ 50 c.,...

8-

1.00

3.00

Swine @ 10 e.. ..

13=

1.30

1===

0.40

Duplicate of order lost,

.25

Total.

...$13,644.95

$13,548.90

Decrease on 191,...

96.05

L 36

The Slaughter Houses at Sai Wan Ho and Aberdeen were leased to Contractors.

The total revenue from the Animal Depôts and Slaughter Houses including contracts is as follows:-

Kennedy Town, fees collected,

Ma Tau Kok, fees collected,

Kennedy Town Blood and Hair Contract,

Ma Tau Kok

1912. $76,381.80 13,548.90 6,400.00 792.00

1911. $69,795.70

13,644.95

7,272 00

1,476.00

2,232.00

1,980.00

744.00

696.00

Total,

$95,164.65

$99,798.70

Increase on 1911,

- $4,634.05

Sai Wan Ho Contract,

Aberdeen Contract,

The total number of animals slaughtered for food was:

1911. Sheep

1912. Sheep

Cattle.

and Swine. Goats.

Cattle. and Swine.

Goats.

Kennedy Town, 24,913 17,540 179,296

28,359 17,906 195,934

Ma Tau Kok,

5,458

31 37,971

5,402 271 37,661

Aberdeen,

3,075

2,715

Sai Wan Ho,

7,255

6,646

Total of all animals, -

275,639

Increase in 1912,

30,371 17,671 227,597 33,761 18,177 242,956

294,894

19,255

The figures for Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho have been supplied by the Contractors.

The following Table shows the numbers of animals slaughtered during the past ten years:-

Year.

Cattle.

1903,....

28,335

1904,....

30,829

1905,..

1906,

26,758 27,141

..

1907...

27,631

1908.

1909,.

29,612 30,848

1910,

1911,.

30,504 30.371

1912,.

33,761

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

31,019.

28,139.

Sheep and

Goats.

22,918

23,736

19,774

16,403

18,279

18,104

17,855

17,439

17,671

18,177

Average

Swine,

187,265

181,046

186,059

200,586 206,124

185,231

182,791

for 5 years, for 5 years,

17,849.

20,620.

Average

223,705

227,597

242,956

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years, 212,456.

192,216.

1

-

L 37

· Dairies and Cowsheds.

A small oubreak of Rinderpest occurred at the Dairy Farm, Pokfulam, in December which was held in check by serum treat- ment of the infected animals and contacts.

IMPORTATION OF FRESH BEEF AND MUTTON.

The Dairy Farm Company were the only importers and im- ported 424,915 lbs. of beef and 348,888 lbs. of mutton from Australia.

MARKETS.

The following statement shows the revenue derived from Markets :-

Market.

1899 to 1908 (Average for

10 years).

1909.

1910.

1911.

1912.

$

ር.

$

D

Central Market,

Hung Hom Market,

44,949.29

52,801.87

53,714.73

59.457.76

60,850,80

1,940.18

3,817.79

3,935.05

3,940.80

3,756.50

Mong Kok Tsui Market,

Sai Wan Ho Market,.

947.07*

992.40

1,093.80

1,076.00

1,050,00

1,611.37

1,978.88

2,021.95

1,780.60

1,698.80

Sai Ying Poon Market,

10,627.57

13,69-4.99

13,514,32

14,016.94

14,781.60

Shau Ki Wan Market,

875.17

1,404.74

1,564.00

1,643.70

2,036.00

Shek Tong Tsui Market,

381.56

694.80

680.40

750.20

848.10

So Kon Po Market,

1,001.88

1,330.60

1,376.50

1,391.50

1,449.30

Tai Kok Tsui Market,

615.42

652.93

693.70

719.90

620.80

Tsim Sha Tsui Market,.

1,146.20

3,963.60

Wau Tsai Market,

2,987.09

4,303.77

4,140.90

4,435.20

4,770.50

Western Market, (New),

12,959.88*

11,678.71

12,549.30

14,384.80

15,288.20

Western Market, (Old),

23,187.13

17,964.42

20,109.16

21,750.90

22,623.20

Yaumati Market,

4,628.99

6,436.34

6,752.50

7,398.00

7,938.50

Total,

106,712.60

117,752.24

122,446.31

133,892.50

L 38

Aberdeen Market,

Staunton Street Market,

387.00

162.00

Total for 1912,

$142,224.90

* 3 years' average.

L 39

NEW TERTITORIES.

No outbreak of infectious disease among animals was reported.

BULLOCK TRACTION.

The experiment of growing guinea grass on the hillsides around the Kennedy Town Animal Depôts, which was originated in 19 1, continued to be a success, and during the year 1912 some 150 tons of grass were supplied to feed the traction bullocks for the water carts and scavenging carts.

EXPORT OF LARD TO THE PHILIPPINES.

The special factories erected at Ma Tau Kok and near the Kennedy Town Slaughter House by the Chinese lard makers, to meet the requirements of the Pure Food Laws of the United States and of the Philippine Islands have been fairly busy during the year. They are under the constant supervision of the Inspector in charge of the Depôts and Slaughter Houses, and the following quantities were duly certified and shipped from the Colony during 1912-

Lard, -

Dried Meats,

- 1,199,342 lbs.

81,084 lbs.

L 40

Annexe D.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. W. V. M. KOCH, Superintendent.

STAFF.

Dr. Bell took over the duties of the Principal Civil Medical Officer on the departure of Dr. Atkinson on leave on March 8th, and I assumed charge of the Hospital on the same date. Fleet Surgeon O'Leary, R.N.. was engaged temporarily as Assistant Superintendent until the return of Dr. Moore from leave on August 8th.

Sisters Etherington, Richards and Luckman resigned and were succeeded by Sisters Kelsey and Everingham, the third sister being expected out shortly. Sisters Sloan and Gourley went on home leave and the former returned in December.

Wardmaster Regan went on leave and Wardmaster Leigh was taken in from the Police Department in place of Wardmaster Armstrong resigned.

STATISTICS.

The total number of Admissions was 2,731 as against 2,370 in 1911: 6,720 out-patients attended 15,177 times as against 7,128 who attended 15,489 times.

The following Tables are attached :-

I.-Admissions and Deaths under respective diseases from

all Government Hospitals.

II.-Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police

Station.

III.-Number and Class of Patients admitted during the

past ten years, and Deaths.

The Average Daily Number of Sick was 94·8 as against 91′2 last

year.

Women and Children :-There were 333 women admitted as against 285 with a death rate of 69 per cent. Children, 136 were admitted as against 112, with a death rate of 10.9 per cent.

Deaths-The Deaths numbered 194 making a percentage of 71 as against 173 with a percentage of 7.3. Of the deaths 88 died within 24 hours of admission, and 23 within 48 hours.

Nationality of Patients admitted:-Europeans 567 as against 437, Indians and Coloured 639 as against 644, Asiatics 1,443 as against 1,288.

L 41

Diseases.

The most prevalent discases were:

Increase

1912.

1911.

01

Decrease.

Malarial Fever,

198

112

+ 86

Febricula,

198

135

+63

Influenza, -

5

30

25

Dysentery,

51

38

13

Tuberculosis,

68

91

23

Beri-beri,

26

46

20

Rheumatism,

86

59

+ 27

Diseases of Respiratory System, 179

151

+ 25

Diseases of Digestive System, 200

186

+14

Injuries,

636

517

+119

The largest number of deaths occurred in the following

diseases:

Tuberculosis,

- 22 deaths.

Diseases of Respiratory System,

-

- 12

,,

Digestive

- 10

''

}}

Injuries, Plague,

- 51

31

- 30

"}

New Growths--The following cases of malignant disease were under treatment :---

1 Chinese male,

2

females,

1

""

}

male, females,

Cancer of Thyroid.

of Breast.

>>

of Bladder.

""

Sarcoma of Submaxillary Gland.

1

"

male, -

-

Cancer of Uterus.

Sarcoma of Nasopharynx.

Cancer of Stomach.

""

1 European

Fractures :-The principal fractures treated were:

Fracture of Skull,

28, with 17 deaths.

"

Thigh, Leg,

- 12,

- 13,

23

Patella, -

5

Fibula, -

1

Os Calcis,

>"

Toe,

1)

Spine,

2, with

Clavicle,

1

"

Upper Arm,

13

Colles,

"

Radius, -

Metacarpus,

>

>>

Fingers, Maxilla,- Mandible,

""

Ribs,

""

4

1 death.

?

L 42

Malarial Fever:-The number of cases treated amounted to 196 as against 112, 340, 188, and 282 in the four preceding years. These were cases in which the parasite was found; but there were 198 cases of "Febricula", most of which came from malarial, districts and had taken quinine. These were probably malarial.

Appendicitis:--Fifteen operated on successfully.

cases were admitted, eleven were

Typhoid Fever:-Thirty seven cases were under treatment- there were 11 deaths.

Intestinal Parasites:-1,141 cases examined, 40:31 per cent. infected: the large majority were Indians and Asiatics, very few Europeans being infected. The following were the parasites

found-

Round Worm, Whip

Hook Worm,

Amoebæ,

Opisthorchis Sinense,

Tiroglyphus Siro,

Cercomonas,

Thread Worm,

Strongylus Intestinale,

Fasciolopsis Buski,

Hymenolepis Nana,

286 times.

-151

""

72

31

44

"

12

2

""

9

1

"

3

>

1

">

1

"}

107 were cases of multiple infection.

OPERATIONS.

The mumber of major operations performed was 187. There were 12 cases of Appendicitis, 5 cases of Radical Cure of Hernia, 4 cases of Strangulated Hernia, 4 cases of Ovarian Tumour, 1 Vesical Calculus was crushed and 3 removed by suprapubic incision, 4 Fractured Patellas were wired and one Fractured Thigh, 2 cases of Popliteal Aneurysm, one Pyonephrosis, one Omentopexy, 2 Liver Abscess, 3 Trephinings.

VACCINATIONS.

During the year 878 vaccinations were performed.

SICKNESS AMONG THE POLICE, GAOL AND SANITARY STAFF.

Police.

Admission-There were 540 under treatment as against 519

last year.

Deaths-Three Chinese constables from Plague, one European from Dysentery, one Indian from Pernicious Anæmia and another from Ruptured Spleen.

- L 43

Invaliding:-Eleven men were invalided as against four last

year: one European, eight Indians and two Chinese.

Sick Rate:-

Europeans Indians

76 per cent. as against 56′39

74

75.33

12

""

18

30.71

""

""

Chinese

Mortality Rate:-

Europeans

- 0.63 per cent. as against 075

Indians

Chinese

-

- 0:45 - 0·53

""

""

""

0.26

0.19

Malaria :- Cases under treatment amounted to 96 as against 57 last year.

European Police suffered to the extent of per cent. as against 451 per cent.; Indians 122 per cent. as against 1061 per cent.; Chinese 5'5 per cent as against 2:11.

Gaol.

There were 56 admissions as against 38 last year. There were no deaths: two were invalided.

Sanitary Department.

There were 77 admissions as against 31 last year.

and invaliding one.

Death one,

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

There were 144 admissions against 138 last year. One death occurred from Placenta Prævia. Of the admissions 92 were paying patients and 52 free.

Diseases.

GENERAL DISEASES.

L 44

waddyww

Tab

Diseases and Deaths in 1912 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total. Total

Cases

at end of 1911.

Admis-

sions.

Deaths. Treated.

of 1912,

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Chicken Pox,

1

Small-pox,

Measles,

Scarlet Fever,.

5

Dengue,,

12

12

Influenza,

5

3

Diphtheria,

14

16

3

Febricula,

198

198

1

Enteric Fever,

36

37

1

Cholera,..

1

1

Dysentery,

51

51

1

Relapsing Fever,

Plague,

37

3:

1

30

87

1

Malarial Fever,

196

198

1

Beri-beri,.

25

26

2

Mumps,

16

16

Pyæmia,

Septicæmia,..

2

2

2

Tubercle,.

61

22

68

5

Leprosy,

1

Vaccinal Fever,

5

Syphilis,

75

79

6

Do., Inherited,

...

Gonorrhoea,...

50

51

2

Alcoholism,.

42

44

1

Rheumatism,.

85

86

2

Rheumatic Fever,

1

1

New Growth, Non-maliguant,

13

Do., Malignaut,

9

10

Auæmia,

12

14

1

Diabetes Mellitus,

2

Debility,

Carried forward,...........

38

847

69

885

24

,་་་

le I.

L 45

Civil, Victoria and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

at end Admis- of 1911. sions.

Deaths. Treated.

Remain- Remain-

ing in

ing in Hospital Hospital at end at end

of 1911.

of 1912,

...

1

...

11-2

1

:2

10

10

2

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Cases

Admis-!

sions.

Deaths. Treated.

ing in Hospital at end

of 1912.

23

:**

: 10

31

32

12

-::

2:03

...

...

20

8:

...

...

:

I

i ni mi ai i ai

5

:

::

1

23

5

G:

1:22

N: - ai ai mi

5

23

27

:

..

1

2

80

1

85

2

7

88

4

95

2

Diseases.

L 46

Table I,-

Diseases and Deaths in 1912 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Admis- of 1911. sions.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

ing in

Cases

Hospital

Deaths Treated. at end

of 1912.

Brought forward,..

28

847 69

885

24

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System :—

Neuritis,

Meningitis,

Congestion of Brain,

Functional Nervous Disorders:

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,..

Athetosis,

Epilepsy,

Neuralgia,

Hysteria,.

Mental Diseases :-

Mania,

Delusional Insanity, Melancholia,

Diseases of the Eye,

""

"}

""

""

>>

>>

""

19

""

"

""

"

77

"

י,

A

""

* * *

Ear,

Nose,.....

Circulatory System,..

2

:~

321

1

2

321-

- ∞ - J. C

2

10

5

5

2

N

4

61

65

6

1

16

1

178

* IN-2 NO

206

::: +20

4

18

12

179

10

10

211

7

71

75

1

27

5

29

1

1

96

97

27

29

2

19

9

112

6

121

33

སས ི

7

33

""

""

Respiratory System,.. Digestive System,

Lymphatic System,... Urinary System, Male Organs,

Female Organs,

Organs of Locomotion,

Cellular Tissue,

"

Skin,

..

Carried forward,....... 65 1,648

117 1,713 58

-- L 47

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end of 1911.

Yearly Total. Total

Remain-

Cases

ing in Hospital

Admis-

sions,

Treated. Deaths,

at end of 1912.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end of 1911.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Cases

Admis-

sions

Deaths Treated

ing in Hospital at end of 1912.

2

80

1

82

2

7

88

95

:::

:

:

:

N

--N N

:::

−22

1

6

6

2

13

15

15

2

19

30

30

1

1:3921

...

2

8

10

1

27

4

134

3

136

3

7 164

11

171

27

10

5

Diseases.

L 48

-

Table I,-

Diseases and Deaths in 1912 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end Admis-

sions. of 1911.

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Deaths. Treated.

Brought forward, ..

LOCAL DISEASES, Continued.

Injuries, General,..

Effects of Heat,

Abortion

Poisons,

Parasites,

Immersion,

Under Observation,

In Attendance,

Shock,

Nil,

Born in Hospital,.

Pregnancy,

Parturition,..

22

614

51

636

2222332

Remain-

ing in Hospital

at end of 1912.

2223

614

51

636

22

3

3

1

1

10

10

14

14

2

10

10

17

17

14

14

:

1

36

36

8

Total,....

80

2,651

194 2,731 95

L 49

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end of 1911.

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1912.

Remain-

ing in Yearly Total. Total

Hospital at end of 1911.

Admis-

sions. Deaths.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1912.

5

4

134

3

136

3

164

11

171

5

2

2

21 2

13

13

~

2

10

10

170

16

16

21

783

170 804.

:

28

***

33

31

13

221

3

234

28

1,131

11 1,159

41

* Outdoor patients.

No. 6.

Central,

No. 2,

""

7,

Table II.-Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police Station during 1912.

Station.

Bay View, Tsat Tse Mui,

Shaukiwan,.

Stanley,

Aberdeen,

Shek O,

Hung Hom,

Yaumati,

Sham Shui Po,

Sha Ta Kok,

An Tau

Sheung Shui,

Tai Po,

Tsun Wan,

Sha Tin,....

Sai Kung,

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

Decmber.

Total.

Percentage

to Strength.

Increase or

Decrease

over 1911.

2

חל

6

1 2

1

: ::

2

1

...

1

5

:21

3

3

41

12.1

...

2.7

1

2

1

6

8•6

+ 2.7

1

10:0

1

28.6

+28.6

:

29-4

+11.8

2

4

44.4

+44.4

3

1

1

4

21:0

- 19.0

1

1

...

I

***

4

1

1

C7 – 10 20 10 10 – NWN ∞o:

3

13.6

+13.6

4.6

2.9

17.4

+ 17.4

2

13:3

6.7

7.7

+ 7·7

20.0

+.8.3

13.3

+13.3

37.5

+22.2

25.0

+25·0

12.5

+12.5

22.7

+22.7

:

4

1.9

0.6

14.3

- 14.2

16.6

+16·0

Mt. Gough,. Kowloon City,

Water,

Tung Chung, Tai Tam Tuk,

2

...

Total,

7

7

2

3

2

34 10 13 18

21 6

96

17.7

+ 8·0

L 50

Table III.-Number and Class of Patients admitted during the past ten years and the Deaths.

Class of Patients.

1903.

1904.

1905. 1906.

1907.

1908.

1909.

1910.

1911.

1912.

Police,

759

707

726

742

776

660

633

613

519

657

Paying Patients, .....

794

794

866

720

762

724

659

591

631

735

Government Servants,

319

276

271

339

367

315

250

352

188

249

Police Cases,

276

262

329

307

318

285

287

432

313

380

Free,

646

555

512

637

488

543

555

674

719

710

Total,

2,794

2,585

2,704

2,745

2,711

2,527 2,384

2,662

2,3702,731

Total Deaths,

142

128

150

167

170

157

131

147

173

194

Percentage,

5:0

4.1

5'6

6'0

6.2

6.2

5.4

5.6

7.3

7.1

L 51

E

L 52

Annexe E.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

REPORT BY DR. J. BELL, Medical Officer in Charge.

I took over charge in March from Dr. J. M. Atkinson.

7

Admissions.-There were 234 (as against 309) with 3 deaths in 1911. The deaths were all in very young children and were due to Malarial Fever and Broucho Pneumonia. With the exception of 10 all patients paid fees.

Malarial Fever -There were 32 cases as compared with 31 in 1911. This disease accounted for the largest number of admissions.

Confinements. There were 28 as against 41. They were all satisfactory.

L 53

Annexe F.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

REPORT BY DR. B. A. MOORE, Medical Officer.

During the year there were 243 patients under treatment. cases were brought in by the Police.

126

There were 39 paying patients (45 in 1911). The deaths num- bered 24, being 107% of the number under treatment (6.2% in 1911).

Table I.

Nationality and Sex of Patients treated in 1912.

Other

Europeans. Indians. Chinese. Nation-

alities.

M.

F.

M. F. M. F. M. F.

Remaining at end of 1911,

8

1

13

3

Admitted,

20

4

4

1

114 57

Total number treated,

28

10

5

10

Discharged,

20

19

Died,

3

:

3

5

130 60

113 54

12

Remaining at end of 1912, 5

1

:

:

:

Total.

Q

Q

30

3

213

C

5

243

5

Co

10

2

202

2

Ι

26

10

5

1

1

2

15

L 54

Table II.

Return of Diseases and Deaths in 19.2.

Remaining

Yearly Total.

Diseases.

in Hospital at end of 1911.

Ad- missions.

Deaths.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Alcoholism,

Malaria,

Plague,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous Sys-

tem :-

SUB-SECTION II.

Functional

Nervous

orders :-

Epilepsy,

SUB-SECTION III.

1

17

Dis-

1

113

712

Remaining

Total Cases in Hospital

Treated. at end of

1912.

18

1.

1

2

2

1

6

1

Mental Diseases :-

Imbecility,

2

Idiocy,

1

1

Mania,

13

78.

11

91

Melancholia,

4

31

35

Dementia,

13

21

72 2

9

2

Delusional Insanity,

11

1

12

General Paralysis of the

Insane,

1

2

1

3

Under Observation,

51

51

Total, 1912,......

1911,.

་་

1820

30

213

26

243

15

26

194

14

220

30

85

L 55

www

Annexe G.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITALS, KENNEDY TOWN.

REPORT RY DR. C. W. MCKENNY, Medical Officer in Charge.

Buildings.-The hospital buildings have been well cared for during the year and necessary repairs have been promptly attended

to.

Up to this year the buildings have been colour-washed but they have now been painted both internally and externally.

The new Sisters', Wardmasters' and Servants' Quarters have been completed and are ready for occupation.

Thirty-five cases were admitted to this hospital during the year. The hospital was occupied by patients from 14th January to August 10th.

All patients suffered from Small-pox.

There was one death.

The following were the Nationalities of patients:-English 13, Portuguese 7, American 5, Indian 3, Scotch 2, Japanese 2, Jewish '. Welsh 1, and Malay 1.

In the appended table the relationship between Vaccination and the severity of the disease (as judged by the eruption being Discrete or Confluent) is shown:-

Vaccinated in

childhood and

Vaccinated in

Not vaccinated.

at least once after. childhood only.

Confluent,...

1

6

Discrete,.......

4

10

5

L 56

-

TUNG WA SMALL-POX BRANCH HOSPITAL (CHINESE).

Buildings and Equipment. The buildings have been main- tained in a good condition and repairs performed as required :-

Small-pox only was treated in the Hospital.

Patients admitted,

-

Statistics.

died, discharged, -

146

48

98

Of these cases 139 chose Chinese treatment with 45 deaths (316%) and 7 Western treatment with 3 deaths (428).

Note. The numbers treated by Western methods are so small that comparison is hardly of much value. In addition to above admissions there were 10 private attendants in hospital.

L 57-

Annexe H.

VICTORIA GAOL.

REPORT BY DR. C. W. MCKENNY, Medical Officer.

Buildings. The prison buildings and yards are well cared for and the general sanitary conditions are satisfactory.

Gaol Hospital.--The total number of admissions during the year was 183 (188 in 1911).

The percentage of hospital admissions to the total admissions to the Gaol was 2·94 (450 in 1911).

The number of cases of Malaria treated in the Gaol Hospital was 12. There was one death.

The following is the number of cases of Malaria treated during

the past ten years:-

1903

1904

1905

1906

1907

93

1908

59

1909

52

1910

- 22

1911

56

1912

- 68

- 13

16

3

12

There were twenty-three admissions grouped under the heading of Febricula. In these cases no Malaria parasite could be found and the fever, although in some case high, was always of short duration.

Five cases of Dysentery were treated in hospital, with no death.

In 1911 there were seven admissions with one death.

Three cases of Typhoid Fever occurred, of which one died, one recovered and one remains under treatment.

The following were the

diseases:

Debility, Anæmia,

Tubercle,

admissions on account of other

23 with 1 death.

5

6

Heart Disease, -

Digestive System,

Organs of Locomotion,

Cellulitis,

Lymphatic System, Respiratory System, -

Syphilis,

Urinary System,

-

6 with 3 deaths.

30

2

3

""

15 with 1 death.

3

6

1

29

""

Skin Diseases,-

Local Injuries,

5

13

Two cases of Beri-beri occurred in the Gaol during the year. There were no admissions in 1911.

The total number of patients treated in out-patient department

In 1911 the total number was 803.

was 783.

L 58

The principal diseases treated were:

Scabies,

Ringworm,

Other Skin Diseases,

Digestive Disturbances,

Local Injuries,

Cellulitis,

Ear,

Eye,

Syphilis,

Gonorrhoea,

- 139

- 114

- 116

85

91

7

12

23

84

23

There were twelve deaths in the Gaol during the year.

Eleven

from natural causes and one by hanging in execution of death sentence. Twenty-two prisoners were discharged on medical grounds (11 in 1911). Causes of discharge are as follows:-

Leprosy,

Debility,

Phthisis,

Insanity,

Syphilis,

Pyæmia,

8 (4 in 1911).

3 (4 in 1911).

1 (1 in 1911).

5 (1 in 1911).

1

1

Chronic Bronchitis & Emphyæma, 2

Injury and Debility, -

1

Note:-In connection with discharge of prisoners on medical grounds it is worthy of remark that there were 2,058 more admissions to Gaol than in 1911 and that 13 cases were discharged on account of Leprosy or Insanity (5 in 1911).

Out of 224 cases detained for observation, 9 were admitted to hospital, 50 treated as out-patients and 165 were found to be malingering.

Vaccinations.-3,194 prisoners were vaccinated during the year of which 898 were successful, 563 unsuccessful and 1,733 could not be examined owing to early discharge from Gaol,

Rate of Sickness and Mortality in Victoria Gaol.

Total Number of :-

Daily Average

Number of :-

Rate per cent. of :-

Prisoners admitted

to Gaol.

Admissions to Hospital.

Cases treated as

out-patients.

Deaths due to

Disease.

Prisoners in

Gaol.

Sick in

Hospital.

Hospital

Out-patients.

Admissions to Hospital to total Admissions

to Gaol.

Daily Average Sick in Hospital

to Daily Average of Prisoners.

Daily Average of all Sick in Gaol to

Daily Average of Prisoners.

Deaths due to Disease to Total Admissions

to Gaol.

1911, 4,178 188

803

91595 5.6523 07

4:50

.95

1.82

0.22

1912, 6,236 183

783

11 701

5:08 25

294

*72

4.29

0.18

L 59

In connection with the selection of prisoners to fulfil the duties of cooks, a thorough system of examination (with the assistance of the Government Bacteriologist) since November has been instituted, in order that no typhoid "carrier may be allowed to come in contact with the food supplies. Thus the possibility of any but sporadic cases of typhoid occurring is reduced to a nrinimum.

"}

L 60

Annexe I.

KOWLOON AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

REPORT BY DR. J. C. DALMAHOY ALLAN, Medical Officer.

From January to July 31st the the work of this department was carried out by Dr. J. W. Hartley and for the remainder of the year by Dr. J. C. Dalmahoy Allan.

Mr. P. D. R. Naidu acted as General Medical Assistant for the whole period.

The material for this Report is gathered from the Medical Officer's books for the first 7 months and is based on personal observation during the last five. Dr. J. W. Hartley's health was far from satisfactory during most of the year and at the end of July he retired from Government Service.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

The health of the Staff has been most satisfactory. A number of cases of Malaria occurred throughout the year at Shatin, Taipo and Fanling amongst the Railway servants and a series of routine weekly injections of Quinine were given with excellent results.

There were as usual a number of minor injuries, but only 5 serious accidents occurred in connection with the line of which 4 proved fatal.

A Chinese dresser has attended minor cases along the Main Line from Shatin to Lowu and down the Branch Line to Sha-tau- kok, and the returns given under "Taipo Dispensary" include Railway servants as well as the other cases seen in that district by the dresser.

""

It is a relief to learn that the present springless "carriages on the Sha tau-kok Branch Line are shortly to be replaced by proper Light Railway coaches.

The general sanitary arrangements at the various stations have been quite satisfactory.

KOWLOON AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

The usual epidemic of Small-pox occurred during the earlier months of the year, 31 cases were treated at the new Yaumati Kwong Wa Small-pox Hospital of whom 12 died and 19 recovered.

An increasing number of vaccinations have been performed, 551 are reported to have been done in the Sheung Sui District and 381 in the Tsun Wan District and 351 at the Kowloon Dispensary.

L 61

Besides these another 1,012 cases were done throughout the New Territories by vaccinators sent out by the Tung Wa Hospital, making a total of 2,325, of which nearly 95 % were "successful ".

The Tung Wa Hospital vaccinator only goes out during the epidemic season. Two other men also work in the above mentioned districts and they are supplied with lymph from the Bacteriological Institute through the Police Stations and apparently make what they can by charging a varying small fee for their services. It would seem advisable to encourage vaccination by having it entirely free and by appointing one or two men on a regular monthly salary, who would spend the whole year going round the New Territories in a routine manner under the supervision of the Medical Officer and whose duty it would be to vaccinate all recently-born infants and all new- comers, while at the same they could distribute literature in Chinese not only on the subject of Small-pox, but also on Plague, Tuberculosis and the like.

The Taipo Dispensary was in charge of a Chinese dresser who also visited the surrounding district. He attended a large number of minor complaints under the supervision of the Medical Officer or his Assistant, the returns from the dispensary being as follows:-

Febricula (including Malaria), Ulcers and Diseases of the Skin, Diseases of the Respiratory System, Diseases of the Eve.

Injuries,

244

147

10

15

89

505

and in connection with this Dispensary 573 vaccinations were performed by the Tung Wa Hospital, (included in the above- mentioned returns).

The British School in Kowloon was inspected each quarter, and reports made on such occasions. The general health has been good and the sanitary arrangements quite satisfactoty.

The following Table gives a more detailed account of the new cases treated at or from the Kowloon Dispensary and a general survey will show that the health of Kowloon and the New Terri- tories has on the whole been satisfactory. There seems to have been a slight increase in the number of cases of Malaria. A number of operations have been performed including radical cure for Hernia, Hydrocele, Varicocele and Fistula-in-Ano, Circumcision, Excision of Tubercular Glands, Buboes, Tubercular Testicle, Hæmorrhoids,

etc., etc.

Amongst the more modern therapeutic methods gratifying results have been obtained in a number of cases by the Intravenous Injection of Arseno-benzol in Syphilis, by the Intramuscular Injec- tion of Emetine Hydrochloride in Amoebic Dysentery and by the use of Solid Carbon Dioxide Snow in Trachoma.

L 62

Throughout the year at the Kowloon Dispensary 4,231 cases were treated, of whom 1,418 were Old Cases and 2,813 were New, while 3,995 prescriptions were dispensed.

TABLE OF New CASES FROM KOWLOON AND THE NEW TERRITORIES

GENERAL DISEASES :

Anæmia,

Beri-beri,

-

Chicken-pox,

Debility,

TREATED DURING 1912.

15

47

8

45

Dengue,

7

Diphtheria,

5

Dysentery,-

- 178

Enteric Fever,

- 2

Febricula (including Malaria),

- 608

Gonorrhoea,

- 138

Influenza, -

62

Rheumatism,

41

Rheumatoid Arthritis,

6

Small-pox,-

Syphilis,

37

74

Tubercle:-

Phthisis Pulmonalis,

Tuberculosis of Glands,

Other Tubercular Disease,

New Growths, Benign,

""

Malignant,

LOCAL DISEASES :--

Circulatory System:-

Valvular Disease, Other Diseases,

Digestive System:---

Diarrhoea,

Hepatitis,

Jaundice. Catarrhal, Sprue,

Diseases of the Ear,

Diseases of the Eye,

Generative System:-

Male,

Female, -

Lymphatic Systein, Nervous System,

Nose, Diseases of the,- Respiratory System,

1

1

1

-

- 27

10

16

29 30

4

27

66

254

6

16

112

10

42

24

39

24

- 312

Skin-

Scabies, Ringworm, Eczema,

-

Other Diseases,

Urinary Systein,

Injuries:-

Sunstroke,

Other Injuries,

Parasites:-

L 63

Ascaris Lumbricoides,

İ

Oxyuris Vermicularis, Ankylostoma Duodenale, Tapeworm,

Poisons:-

Vegetable Alkaloids, Other Poisons,-

37

27

24

38

17

2

- 279

42

14

В

2

26

Surgical Operations,

46

Total,-

2,813

L64

Annexe J.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. C. W. MCKENNY, Visiting Medical Officer.

The Chairman and Directors have been most generous in sup- plying the varied wants of the hospital and have also been most helpful in the many problems of management which arose during the year. The fact of two distinct systems of therapeutics being present in one institution would appear certain to cause many difficulties-some almost insuperable-and yet such difficulties have only arisen to a very minor extent. I need hardly say that such a pleasant state of affairs has caused me the most lively satisfaction and I feel that it is almost entirely due to the tactful and impartial attitude which the Chairman and Directors have continually obser- ved. I am sure the University medical students must feel deeply grateful to the body which supplies-as the Tung Wa does--such a wide field for them in which great wealth of clinical experience may be gathered.

Buildings and Equipment. The hospital buildings during the year have been well maintained and much care has been shown by the Staff in attending to the cleanliness and general sanitation of the various departments.

The hospital contains 326 beds and in addition the Refuge, which is attached to the hospital, affords much needed shelter to many destitutes. It can accommodate 60 persons.

The value of the Operating Theatre to the hospital has been definitely proved and this year's Directors have met its demands in a most liberal spirit. The number of operations performed has increased from 23 to 86 and it may fairly be judged by these figures alone that the native dislike to Western surgical procedures is dis- appearing to a considerable extent.

Staff-Dr. To Ying Kwan resigned the position of House Surgeon in August and was succeeded by Dr. S. H. Thomas. The post of Assistant House Surgeon is held by Dr. Song Cheong Chai who has recently become qualified. There are in addition one Dispenser and one trained female nurse. The latter is of especial use in the midwifery department.

Statistics.-The total number of admissions to hospital num- bered 4,119 as against 3,897 in 1911.

There were 159 patients under treatment remaining over from 1911, so that the total number of cases treated during the year was 4,278.

Of this total (4,278), 2,616 were discharged, 1,459 died in hospital and 203 were under treatment at the end of the year.

L 65

S

}

Two hundred and forty-eight were admitted in a moribund condition. If this number is deducted from the total of admissions there remains a balance of 4,030 who were able to take their choice of treatment. The number of patients under Western (European) and Chinese methods of treatment were as follows:-

Chinese, Western,

- 2,545 - 1,485

} 4,030

This gives a percentage of 63-2 Chinese treatment and 36-8 Western. In 1911 68.6% were Chinese and 314 Western. There is thus an increase of 5·4% in Western treatment over 1911 but the figure for 1910 (50% Western treatment) is still far in advance. Considering, however, that a large number of patients (over 300) take mixed treatment and are classified since 1911 as Chinese treat- ment it would seem that the decrease is more apparent than real.

The number of visits to the Out-patient Department was 102,333 (109,790 in 1911).

Of this number 93,395 selected Chinese treatment and 8,938 Western.

Vaccinations.-There were 1,627 Vaccinations during the year at the hospital or in connection with it (813 in 1911.)

Two thousand eight hundred and seventy (2,870) destitutes (2,868 males and 2 females) were sheltered till they could be sent to their native villages or be otherwise provided for.

One thousand five hundred and fifty (1,550) bodies were brought to the hospital mortuary for burial (1,398 in 1911.)

Where the history, as regards cause of death, was not satisfac- tory the bodies were transferred to the Public Mortuary for post mortem examination. The total number thus sent amounted to 236 (304 in 1911.)

Free burials were provided by the hospital for 3,347 poor persons (3,483 in 1911).

Note. I have inspected the Chinese Mortuary (Yee Chong) which the Directors of the Hospital have established on the South side of the Island for the reception of Chinese who have died abroad or in Hongkong but whose bodies for various reasons, cannot yet be permanently buried. The various rooms (3) of the Mortuary are for the most part free from unpleasant odours and throughout the building, as far as may be, much effort has been made to ensure sanitation.

Malaria.-368 cases of Malaria were admitted with 125 deaths, ¿.e., mortality 33·9%.

:

L66

The details of this mortality are of interest as the percentage, though lower than 1911, i.e., 37.3%, is still too high:

Chinese treatment,

Western treatment,

306 with 114 deaths

=

62

11

37.2%. 17·7%.

Of the 368 admissions, 63 were in a very advanced stage of the disease. Of these 63, 16 were treated by Western methods and 47 by Chinese. Considering these facts it is evident that the Western mortality percentage is comparatively satisfactory and the Chinese is not in fact so high as it would appear. It must be understood that a malarial patient always receives mixed treatment, i.e., Chinese treatment with the addition, if possible, of Quinine.

The Malaria admissions were for the most part Malignant Mala- ria (345) as against Benign Tertian (23).

Beri-Beri.-There was for Beri-Beri a total admission of 292 cases with 52 deaths, i.e., 178 % mortality. In 1911 with 481 ad- missions there was a mortality percentage of 247 and in 1910 the percentage was 35 %.

The details of the treatment are as follows:-

Chinese,. Western,.

.229 cases with 43 deaths-18·7 %

63

9

""

"

11

=14·2%

Although there is a death rate percentage of 4'5 % in favour of Western treatment, I do not think the steadily decreasing death rate can be attributed to this cause. It may possibly point to a lessened

virulence of the disease.

Phthisis. There were total admissions of 317 cases and deaths 245, i.c., 772 %.

Of these the treatment was as follows:-

Western,........ Chinese,

33 with 13 deaths

284

232

""

"

39.3%. 81.6%.

The terribly high mortality I can only attribute to (1) the ad- vanced state in which cases come into hospital and (2) the unsuit- ability for the treatment of Phthisis of any hospital situate, as the Tung Wa is, in the centre of a closely built and densely populated

area.

Plague.--There were 547 admissions (97 in 1911) with 526 deaths (82 in 1911).

This gives a death rate percentage of 96·1% as against 845 % for 1911.

Operations.-The following general operations were performed during the year. They number 86 (23 in 1911).

}

L 67

GENERAL OPERATIONS.

Removal of female breast for Malignant dis-

ease, -

Removal of Tumours-Simple & Malignant,- Amputations-Fingers and Toes,

Hands and Legs, -

Injections of Salvarsan and Neo-Salvarsan

for Syphilis,

Q

Hæmorrhoids, -

Necrosis of Jaw,

Skin Grafting,

Circumcision,

Wiring ununited fracture,

Abscesses opened under anesthesia,

Removal of Tuberculous Glands of Neck,

Inguinal Hernia (Radical Cure),

Fistula in Ano,

Dermoid Cyst of Ovary,

Femoral Aneurysm--Ligature of Femoral

Artery, -

Total,

Cures. Deaths.

3

4

I

12

11

5

8

13

3

1

85

1

86

Eye Department.-The Eye Department, as in previous years,

has been under the care of Dr. Harston.

The following were the operations performed :--

EYE OPERATIONS.

Excision of Fornix Conjunctivae,

Pterygium,

Peritomy,

Cures. Deaths.

1

5

1

Cataract by Smith's Intracapsular Method,- 10

Cataract by Ordinary Method,

-

12

Iridectomy for Leukoma, Corneal Ulcer, etc.,

32

Advancement of External Rectus,-

Entropion (Snellen),

Enucleation of Eyeball,

69

nil.

2

Cases),

CO, Snow applications for Trachoma (New

138

$

- L 68

The number of eye operations was 69 (48 in 1911).

The number of patients who attended the Outpatient Depart- ment for eye treatment was 722 (683 in 1911).

The following Tables are appended :-

I.-Return of Diseases and Deaths.

II.-Proportion of Cases treated by Western and Chinese

methods.

III.-Vaccinations.

IV.-General Statistics.

L 69

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1912 at the Tung Wa Hospital.

Remain-

Remain-

ing in

Yearly Total.

Total

DISEASES.

Hospital

Cases

ing in Hospital

at end of

1911.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Treated. at end of

1912.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox,

Scarlet Fever,

Puerperal Fever,

Diphtheria,

6

+

1

1

4

4

1

1

Febricula,

4

88

92

Typhoid Fever,

1

14

15

Dysentery,

187

50

189

3

Relapsing Fever,

1

1

I

Plague,

547

526

547

Benign Tertian Malaria,

Ι

23

2

21

Malignant Malaria,

5

345

123

350

Malarial Cachexia,

1

18

4

19

Beri-beri,

17

292

52

309

Erysipelas,

4

1

4

Septicemia,

35

21

35

Tetanus,

}

10

6

11

Tuberculosis,

14

23

15

37

5

Tuberculous Glands of Neck,

10

10

1

Leprosy,

1

6

7

...t

Syphilis :-

(a) Primary,

(b) Secondary,.

(c) Tertiary,

8

170

355

13

12

18

178

273

13

12

5

Gonorrhoea,

8

8

Gonorrhoeal Rheumatism,

21

21

6

Chronic Rheumatism,

11

190

201

9

Acute Rheumatism,

20

5

20

Rheumatoid Arthritis,.

1

1

...

Benign New Growths,

4

4

Malignant New Growths, Anæmia,

2

5

2

3

17

2

Seuile Debility,

113

80

120

220

1

11

Carried forward,...

नै

76

2,192

922

2,268

58

*Outside Cases.

Sent to Canton.

L 70

Table 1,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1912 at the Tung Wa Hospital.

Remain-

ing in

Yearly Total

Remain-

Total

DISEASES.

Hospital

Cases

ing in Hospital

at end of

Admis-

Deaths.

Treated. at end of

191!.

sions.

1912.

Brought forward,................

76

2,192

922

2,268

58

LOCAL DISEASES

Diseases of the Nervous System

Meningitis,

Myelitis,

Apoplexy,

Hemiplegia,

Infantile Paralysis, .

Epilepsy,

10

2

11

7

11

41

30

46

10

1

1

5

1

83833

53

699

63

5

Diseases of Eye,

Diseases of the Circulatory System:-

(a) Vaivular Disease,

(b) Aneurysm,

Disenses of the Respiratory System :-

:

སྣུམ

86

20

86

2

1

2

: :

(a) Asthma,

1

1

(b) Phthisis,..

5

317

245

322

21

(c) Pneumonia,

130

94

130

3

(d) Acute and Chronic Bronchitis,

145

26

145

16

(e) Pleurisy,....

48

48

1

Diseases of the Digestive System :-

(a) Diarrhoea,

() Gastro-Enteritis,

(e) Cirrhosis of Liver,.

(d) Cancer of Liver,

(e) Gastric Ulcer,

(f) Tonsillitis,

(g) Inguinal Hernia,

(h) Hæmorrhoids,

Diseases of the Urinary System :—

(a) Bright's Diseases,

(b) Cystitis,

Diseases of the Male Organs :-

13

263

16

276

7

161

33

161

3

0∞∞ + 6 a

9

2

9

2

2

3

3

4

2

6

80

42

86

4

6

6

(a) Phimosis,

3

(b) Orchitis,

2

Q

::

Carried forward,....... 118

3,587

1,446

3,705

132

-

L 71

Table I,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1912 at the Tung Wa Hospital.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total Cases

at end of Admis-

Deaths.

Treated

1911.

sions.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of

1912.

Brought forward,

118

3,587

1,446

3,705

132

Diseases of the Female Organs

(a) Cancer of Uterus,

(b) Dermoid Cyst of Ovary, (c) Vaginitis,

Hip Joint Disease,

Diseases of Cellular Tissues :-

(a) Cellulitis,

(b) Abscesses,

(c) Ulcers,

Necrosis of Jaw,

Scalds and Burns,

Local Injuries,..

Opium Poisoning, Opium Habit, Parturition,

3

2

3

1

1

2

2

15

14

29

6

**

3

109

8888888 co

1

3

68

68

::

112

37

8

8

:

12

12

21

208

229

26

2

2

51

10

51

51

53

Total,.....

159

1,119

1,459

4,278

203

L 72

Table II.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1912, with the proportion of cases treated by Western and Chinese methods respectively.

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT,

DISEASES.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Sinall-pox,

Scarlet Fever, Puerperal Fever,

Diphtheria,

Febricula,

1

10-

5

3

1

:

2

61

Typhoid Fever,

1

10

Dysentery,..

38

6

151

14

Relapsing Fever,

1

1

Plague,

241

233

306

293

Benign Tertian Malaria,

19

5

Malignant Malaria,

43

11

307

112

Malarial Cachexia,

3

1

16

3

Beri-Beri,

63

9

246

43

Erysipelas,

3

1

Septicemia,

8

1

27

20

Tetanus,

5

Tuberculosis,

18

လက

6

4

19

Tubercular Glands of Neck,

10

Leprosy,

(Sent to Canton.)

Syphilis :-

Primary,

Secondary,..

Tertiary,

Gonorrhoea,.

Gonorrheal Rheumatism,

Chronic Rheumatism,

Acute Rheumatic Fever, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Benign New Growths,

Malignant New Growths,

Anæmia,

Senile Debility

13

12

169

17

1

8

13

8

47

154

14

5

1

8

22

:

12

12

22 398

1

2

68

Carried forward,

806

303

1,462

619

L 73

Table II,-(Continued).

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1912, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT.

DISEASES.

Admis-

Deaths.

sions.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Brought forward,..

806

303

1,462

619

LOCAL DISEASES.

Nervous System:-

Meningitis,

نت

Myelitis,

Apoplexy,

Hemiplegia,

4

3

6

11

6

35

24

1

10 2

Infantile Paralysis,

Epilepsy,

Diseases of the Eye,

63

:

:

Circulatory Systein :-

Valvular Heart Disease,.

17

4

69

16

Aneurysm,

1

1

Respiratory System :---

Asthma,

1

Phthisis,

33

13

289

232

Pneumonia,

49

31

81

63

Acute and Chronic Bronchitis,

43

4

102

22

Pleurisy,

9

39

Digestive System :

Diarrhoea,

Gastro Enteritis,

Cirrhosis of Liver.

Cancer of Liver,

Gastric Ulcer,.........

Tonsillitis,

Inguinal Hernia,..

Hæmorrhoids,

55~~~~ COLO

97

179

12

57

104

24

2

7

1

2

2

2

1

3

1

6

Carried forward,.....

1,217

380 2,391 1,024

L 74

Table II,-Continued.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1912, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT,

DISEASES.

Admis-

Deaths.

sions.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Brought forward,..

1,217

380 2,391

1,024

LOCAL DISEASES,-Continued.

Urinary System :-

Bright's Disease,

Cystitis,

2010

28

11

58

5

1

ལ:

31

Generative System :-

Phimosis,

3

Orchitis,

Caucer of the Uterus,

2

1

1

1

Dermoid Cyst of Ovary,

1

Vaginitis,

2

Hip Joint Disease,

13

16

:

Cellulitis,.

2

1

1

Abscesses,

31

37

Ulcers,..

54

58

Necrosis of Jaw,

8

Scalds,.....

11

1

Local Injuries,.

42

187

Opium Poisoning,

Opium Habit,

9

2

42

Parturition,

53

Total,...

1,485

394

2,793

1,065

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Western Treatinent,

1,485

394

Chinese Treatment,

2,793

1,085

Net Total,......

4,278

1,459

;

L 75

Table III.

Vaccinations done at Tung Wa Hospital and Branches.

Males. Females. Total.

Tung Wa Hospital,

647- 745

1,392

Aberdeen,

32

43

75

Shaukiwan,

21

11

32

Shum Shui Po,

18

21

39

Yaumati,

14

16

30

Stanley,

36

23

59

Table IV.

768 + 859 1,627

General Statistics.

1912.

Males.

Females. Total.

1911.

Remaining in Hospital on 1st January, 1912.

125

34

159

248

Admissions during 1912,.

3,219

892

4.119

3,897

Discharged

2,022

594

2,616

2,438

Deaths

1,041

418

1.459

1.211

"

Under treatment on 1st January, 1913,

154

19

203

Total number of in-patients treated during

1912,

3,341

926

1,278

4,147

Cases admitted in dying condition,

217

31

248

220

Bodies brought in dead,

926

624

1,550

1,321

Bodies sent to Public Mortuary for post

mortem examination,

18*

218+

286

304

Free burials, .

3,347

3,433

Out-patients Native Treatment,

59,022

34,378

93.395

97.648

呼喃

Western Treatment,

5.847

3,091

8,938

12,142

Destitutes sheltered, ...

2.868

2.870

4 303

Eye Cliniques (Mondays and Thursdays),

531

191

722

683

Vaccinations,

984

643

1.627

813

General Operations under anesthesia,

59

27

86

23

Eye Operations,

42

27

69

48

In-patients.

+ Brought in.

L 76

Annexe K.

ALICE MEMORIAL AND AFFILIATED HOSPITALS.

1912 AND 1911.

Total in-patie its

Deaths

treated

1912.

1911.

1912. 1911.

Alice Memorial Hospital, ...

117

133

Ho Miu Ling Hospital,

355

357

23

Nethersole Hospital,

567

564

12

Alice Memorial Maternity

489

345

20

= 25.

15

57

11

Hospital,

Total,

1,528

1,399

85

83

L 77

Annexe L.

BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

REPORT BY DR. H. MACFARLANE, Bacteriologist.

Staff. Mr. Chan Tsun Kon, L.M.S., Hongkong, the Bacterio- logical Assistant, resigned on the 21st February on appointment as Bacteriologist to the Government of Canton.

It was decided to abolish this post and to create in its place the post of Laboratory Assistant. Mr. Leung Kwok-tai, 4th Grade Clerk, Colonial Secretary's Office, was accordingly appointed on July 1st. These changes naturally much disturbed the work of the Institute.

Other Workers.-Captain Arthur, M.B., B.SC., I.M.S., has carried on research work daily throughout the year. He has also given a great deal of assistance in the Investigation of the Mosquitoes of Hongkong, which is at present being carried out.

Staff-Surgeon Rutherford, R.N., has also worked in the Institute from time to time.

Dr. J. W. Hartley received two months instruction in Bacterio- logical methods.

The Preparation of Calf Lymph.—Twenty calves were inoculated (24 in 1911). The methods used were similar to those detailed in previous reports.

The total number of tubes of Lymph issued was 16,042 (9,802 in 1911); the value of the Lymph by Government Notification No. 380 of 1910 was $7,095.20. The large increase in the number of tubes of Lymph issued was due to the epidemic of Small-pox which prevailed early in the year.

With the exception of the Lymph issued to the Army and Navy, which is used by fully qualified Medical Officers, practically the whole of the vaccination is done by unqualified persons. It is therefore difficult to get accurate reports on the results of the Lymph, but during the first quarter of the year, when most of the Lymph was used, much trouble was taken to obtain as many reports as possible.

The results for this period may be briefly summarised:-11,886 persons were reported vaccinated, of these 3,933 were primaries and the percentage of successful cases was 96% 6,395 were returned as secondaries and gave a percentage of 65% successful. On the

L78

other hand, 701 cases reported by the Naval and Military Authorities as secondary vaccination during the same period and using the same Lymphs gave a case success of 81%.

Investigations.-In addition to the routine work of the Institute and Mortuary an investigation as to whether Stegomyia fasciata exists in the Colony has been carried on since July 1st. The question as to of which Anopheline Mosquitoes in the Colony carry Malaria is also being studied as this at present is quite unknown and the question is of considerable practical importance.

Inspector Alexander Watson, Cattle Depôt, has been appointed assistant for this work in his spare time and has done very valuable work.

The investigation will be continued during the whole of 1913.

Routine Examinations.-Under this heading are collected the examinations formerly grouped under "Materials sent for examina- tion" and also other examinations previously noted in different parts of the reports.

New Growths,--Examination by section, Widal's Reaction for Bacillus Typhosus,

Examination by culture for Bacillus Dysenteriæ,

35

167

Paratyphoid B.,

24

11

"

Diphtheria,-

72

99

""

""

11

Vibro Cholera,

Bacillus Anthracis, Typhoid Carriers,

Microscopical examination for Gonococcus,

1

10

7

Tubercle Bacilli,

"

Anthrax Bacilli,

""

>>

12

27

Plague Bacilli,

3

Leprosy Bacilli,

""

19

Treponema Pallida, Malarial Parasites,

1

13

"3

"

23

Miscellaneous, -

Animal Inoculation for Tubercle Bacilli,

Examination of material for Anthrax,

Pus of Organisms, Clothes for Spermatozoa, Urine for Schistosomum,

Differential count of Leucocytes,

Total count of R. B. C.'s, -

Preparation of Autogenous Vaccines,-

Rideal Walker Estimation of Disinfectants,

Wasserman's Syphilis Reaction,

Breeding out and generic determination of Dipterous

Larvæ,

10

2

538

74

70,633

9

Total,-

71,652

Bacteriological Examination of Water,

Examination of Rats for Plague,

4

Anthrax Bacilli,

1

5

1

2

L 79

Examination of Ruts.-The results are given in Table I. The total number of Rats examined was 70,633 compared with 65,927 in 1911. 390 were found to be Plague-infected (269 in 1911).

Bacteriological Examination of Water.-The three chief water supplies of the Colony (Kowloon, Tytan and Pokfulum) were examined quarterly and the results are given in Tables II, III and IV.

In every case the sample was taken at its source, i.e., either directly before or directly after filtration.

The methods used in carrying out the examinations were the the same as those described in my "Report on an investigation of the Pokfulum Water Supply" (No. 20 of 1911) and the results obtained closely follow the conclusions arrived at in that report.

Table II showing the Kowloon water is a good example of the value of storage to a water, the Kowloon Reservoir being sufficiently large to admit of effective storage which the two other sources are unable to afford.

January,

February,

March,..

April,

May,

June,

July,...

August,

September,

October,

November.

December,

Table I.

Month.

Total.

Males. Females.

Plague-

infected.

Phosphorus Pregnants. Poisoning.

Newly born

and not

classified.

5,529

2,749

2,780

336

617

465

6,462

3,216

3,246

435

1,487

474

6,375

3,173

3,202

2

427

635

6,862

3,372

3,490

65

550

720

9,298

4,691

4,607

200

848

1,027

6,051

3,006

3,045

77

471

694

L 80

4,383

2.183

2,200

35

316

398

4,082

T

2,108

1,974

439

326

4,331

2,142

2,189

354

299

5,062

2,516

2,546

400

418

5,969

3,174

2,795

347

415

6,229

3,025

3,204

335

421

Total,.....

70,633

35,355

35,278

390

3,258

2,101

6,310

Table II.

The Kowloon Water.

MacConkey's Bile Salt Lactose Peptone Water.

Total Colonies

Rate of

on Agar in 1 cc

Sample.

Date.

Filtration.

at 37° C. for

24 hours.

To cc.

1 cc.

2 cc.

5 cc.

10 cc. 20 cc. | 50 cc.

414

Unfiltered,

11-1-12.

200

Filtered,

11-1-12.

470

5

Unfiltered,

13-1-12.

180

L

Filtered,

13-1-12.

470

20

Unfiltered,

15-1-12.

250

Filtered,

15-1-12.

455

20

Unfiltered,

16-4-12.

50

Filtered,

16-4-12.

460

10

Unfiltered,

18-4-12.

45

Filtered,

18-4-12.

450

8

Unfiltered,

20-4-12.

50

Filtered,

20-4-12.

450

8

Unfiltered,

9-7-12.

50

Filtered,

9-7-12.

529

10

Unfiltered,

11-7-12.

70

Filtered,

11-7-12.

529

10

Unfiltered,

13-7-12.

60

Filtered,

13-7-12.

514

20

Unfiltered,

8-10-12.

50

Filtered,

8-10-12.

498

10

Unfiltered,

10-10-12.

50

Filtered,

10-10-12.

498

15

Unfiltered,

12-10-12.

60

Filtered,

12-10-12.

498

15

F

+

+1+1+!

+1 +1 +1

F+F+ | +

L

Presence of Coli Group.

III 74 in 5 cc.

in 50 cc.

III 74 in 5 cc.

in 50 cc.

III 74 in 5 ec.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

in 50 cc.

in 20 cc.

+1 +1 +1 +¦ ¦ + | + | + | + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1

FT

in 50 cc.

- L81-

+ Acid and Gas ;

xamm.com

I

Acid only;

No change.

The Classification of the Coli Group is that of MacConkey. The rate of Filtration is given by the Water Authority in gallons per square yard per day.

L 82-

Table III.

The Tytam Water.

MacConkey's Bile Salt Lactose Peptone Water.

Total Colonies

Sample.

Date.

Rate of

Filtration.

on Agar in 1 ce

at 37° C. for

24 hours.

ΤΟ

To cc.

1 cc.

2 cc.

5 cc.

Unfiltered,

8-1-12.

70

Filtered,

8-1-12.

606

10

Unfiltered,

10-1-12.

70

Filtered,

10-1-12.

630

20

Unfiltered,

12-1-12.

70

...

Filtered,

12-1-12.

612

12

Unfiltered,

15-4-12.

80

~..

Filtered,

15-4-12.

593

10

Unfiltered,

17-4-12.

60

...

Filtered,

17-4-12.

811

30

Unfiltered,

19-4-12.

70

Filtered,

19-4-12.

861

35

Unfiltered,

8-7-12.

70

Filtered,

8-7-12.

800

15

Unfiltered,

10-7-12.

60

Filtered,

10-7-12.

800

15

Unfiltered,

12-7-12.

70

Filtered,

12-7-12.

800

20

Unfiltered,

7-10-12.

85

Filtered,

7-10-12.

570

15

Unfiltered,

9-10-12.

100

..

Filtered,

9-10-12.

530

20

Unfiltered,

11-10-12.

90

Filtered,

11-10-12.

520

20

+

Acid and Gas;

Acid only;

+

+ 1 + 1 +4 | | + | + | + | + | + | + | + | + |

+1 +1 +1 1

1 + 1 1 1 + 1 + 1 + 1

10 cc. 20 cc. | 50 cc.

[ + ! + F+ 1 + 1 + F + 1 + 1 + 1 + F + F + F +

++++++ i +++++++++ | + |+++ |+

++++++++++++++++++++++++

+++

Presence of Coli Group.

I 4 in 1 & 2 ces. II (indole-)in 20 ccs. Group III in 2 ccs. II 34 in 10 ccs. Group IV in 1 & 2 ccs. III 71 in 20 ccs. II 34 in 10 ces.

II 34 in 50 ccs.

III 71 in 2 ccs.

No change.

+

+

III 71 in 10 ccs. III 71 in 2 ees.

II 34 in 10 ccs. Group III in 2 ces. up to 10 cc. Group III in 2 cc.

up to 10 cc.

up to 2 ces. in 10 cc.

Group1.II. IIIin12ccs. Group III in 10 cc. Group III in 2 cc.

Group III in 10 cc. Group I in 2 cc. Group I in 10 cc.

The Classification of the Coli Group is that of MacConkey. The rate of Filtration is given by the Water

Authority in gallons per square yard per day.

Table IV.

The Pokfulum Water.

MacConkey's Bile Salt Lactose Peptone Water.

Total Colonies

Sample.

Date.

Rate of

Filtration.

on Agar in I cc.

at 37° C. for

24 hours.

cc.

1 ce. 2 cc.

5 cc.

10 cc. 20 cc. | 50 cc.

Unfiltered,

8-1-12.

200

Filtered,

8-1-12.

400

40

Unfiltered,

10-1-12.

230

Filtered,

10-1-12.

400

25

Unfiltered,

12-1-12.

220

Filtered,

12-1-12.

150

35

Unfiltered,

15-4-12.

150

Filtered,

15-4-12.

400

35

Unfiltered,

17-4-12.

120

Filtered,

17-4-12.

325

25

Unfiltered,

19-4-12.

130

Filtered,

19-4-12.

400

35

Unfiltered,

8-7-12.

150

Filtered,

8-7-12.

358

20

Unfiltered,

10-7-12.

100

Filtered,

10-7-12.

620

20

Unfiltered,

12-7-12.

130

Filtered,

12-7-12.

580

15

Unfiltered,

7-10-12.

120

Filtered,

7-10-12.

848

20

Unfiltered,

9-10-12.

80

Filtered,

9-10-12.

328

10

Unfiltered,

11-10-12.

80

Filtered,

11-10-12.

458

25

+

P

Acic only;

++

F + F + + + 1 + + + − + 1 + 1 + ++++++ F+

+1 +1 +++++ | + | + | + | + | + + + i + i

1 + 1 + ! +1 +1 +1 + !+ !+++++ i + 1 +

+1 1+1 | + 1 + 1 + ¦ ¦ | + | ¦ ¦ +I +1+1+++++ | +1 +1 +1 +1 | | + 1 + 1

1 1 1 1 1

Presence of Coli

Group.

L 83

I 7 & IV 167 in 2 cc. in 50 cc.

I 7 & II 24 in 5 cc. up to 20 cc. Groups III&IV in 2 cc.

up to 5 ce. III 71 in 2 ces. III 71 in 5 ces.* III 71 in 2 ccs. !II 71 in 50 cc. II 34 in 2 ces. II 34 in 50 cc. Group III in 2 cc. in 20 cc.

M

up to 2 ce.

up to 20 cc.

Group III in 1 cc.

up to 50 cc. Groups I-III in 5 cc. Groups I, II & IV in 10 cc.

Group IV in 1 cc. in 20 ccs.

Groups I & III in 2 cc. in 20 ccs.

+

+++++++

Acid and Gas ; 1

-No change.

The Classification of the Coli Group, is that of MacConkey.

gallons per square yard per day.

The rate of Filtration is given by the Water Authority in

* This had been changed. Only commenced filtering three days previously.

ļ

L84

Annexe M.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA.

REPORT BY DR. H. MACFARLANE, Bacteriologist.

Report on Post Mortems.

Male bodies examined,

Female bodies examined,

Sex undetermined,

Total......

1912.

1911.

...

1,354

1,065

1,126

1,045

4

2,480

2,114

Claimed bodies sent from Hospital and

other places,

1,757

1,723

...

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned,

723

391

Total,.........

2,480

2,114

Epitome of Causes of Death.

I-General Diseases,

1912.

1911.

1,480

984

II.-Local Diseases :-

(a) of the Nervous System,

3

(b)

""

Circulatory System,

43

49

(c)

""

Respiratory System,

491

666

(d)

Digestive System,

232

178

(e)

Genito-Urinary System,..

13

8

III.-Death from Violence,...

71

68

IV. Decomposed bodies,

*50

158

Total,..

2,480

2,114

L 85

General Diseases.

(b.) Of the Circulatory System,-Contd.

1912. 1911.

1912. 1911.

Small-pox,

251

108

Brought forward,

40

48

Plague,

475

88

Hæmopericardium,

1

1

Atheroma of Coronary

Cholera,

3

Beri-Beri,

28

14

Arteries, ...

2

Malaria,

64

54

Total,

43

49

Septicemia,

17

3

Diphtheria,...

7

3

Typhoid,

53

9

Tuberculosis,

97

101

Prematurity,

104

105

Marasmic Condition,

313

415

Syphilis,

4

3

(c.) Of the Respiratory System :-

Broncho-Pneumonia

1912. 1911.

Still Born,

40

43

and Bronchitis,

340

471

Atelectasis

1

Pleurisy,

5

3

Leprosy,

1

Pulmonary Tuber-

Congenital Syphilis,

17

20

culosis,

74

95

Senile Debility,

4

Empyema,

22

19

Icterus Neonatorum,

5

Lobar Pneumonia,

46

74

Noma,

Abscess of Lung,

1

2

Gangrone,

Pulmonary Hæmorrh-

Skeletons,

འས

4

age,

Sarcoma of Lung,

Total,

1,480

984

Pulmonary Infection,..

1

Emphysema,

1

Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System :-

Total, ...

491

666

(d.) Of the Digestive System :—

1912. 1911.

1912.

1911.

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

Total, ..

(b.) Of the Circulatory System :-

Tabes Mesenterica,

47

48

Peritonitis,

8

5

Gastro-Enteritis,

15

25

Abscess of Liver,

1

2

Diarrhoea,

118

72

Dysentery,

33

19

Strangulated Hernia,.

1

3

1912. 1911.

Cancer of Stomach,

1

Cancer of Liver,

1.

Pericarditis,

7

9

Cholecystitis, ...

1

Aortic Aneurism,

4

Appendicitis,

1

Abdominal Aneurism,

Tubercle of Intestine,..

6

1

Fatty Degeneration of

Hæmatemesis,

1

Heart,

1

1

Acute Intestinal

Valvular Disease of

Obstruction,

1

Heart,

26

30

Total,

232

178

Carried forward,

40

48

L 86

1

(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System :-

Acute Nephritis,

Chronic Nephritis,

Abscess of Kidney,

1912. 1911.

1

1

1

(b.) Local,-Contd.

Post Partum Hæmor-

rhage,

Rupture of Extra Uterine

Pregnancy,

1

1

""

Total,

13

8

Stab in Liver,...

Heart & Liver,

Brought forward,

Fracture of Skull and

Spleen,

Fracture of Pelvis,

Bullet Wound in Heart,

1912. 1911.

22

1

61 61 61 60 TAH

15

Brain,

Groin,

Cut Throat,

Injuries (Death from Violence):---

(a.) General:-

Multiple Injuries,

Asphyxia,

by Earth,

by Water,

1912. 1911.

Opium Poisoning,

Burns,

Delayed Shock follow-

ing Injuries,

Strangulation,

CO. Poisoning.'

Cocaine Poisoning,

Charrie,

95

13

I co

784773

Hæmorrhage from Stab

Wound,

Asphyxia from Ligature

of Neck,

Bullet Wounds,

Rupture of Heart and Fracture of Liver, Hæmorrhage

Brain,

3

1

2

1

on to

1

3

Total,

34

26

Nationality of Bodies.

1

1912. 1911.

Total,

37 42

(b.) Local:-

Chinese, Indian, European, Portuguese, German,

2,463 2,095

7

3

1

1

English,

142

5

4

2

Scotch,

|

British,

1

1912. 1911.

American,

1

Sandwich Islander,

5211-

Rupture of Spleen,

5

""

Kidney, Liver, Skull,

13

119

122

5

10

""

Total,

.. 2,480 2,114

Carried forward,

22 15

L 87

Total Plague bodies,

475

112 unclaimed. 363 claimed.

Total Small-pox bodies, ....

251

209 unclaimed.

42 claimed.

Number of bodies sent

to Mortuary (Victoria) during 1912.

Victoria.

Harbour.

Old Kowloon.

New Kowloon.

Shankiwan.

Other Villages.

1

1

54

12

:

:

Chinese, 2,463 2,395

Portuguese,....

|

:

1

1

German, ....

English,

:

European,......

1

:

Indian,

4

British,............

1

1

American,

1

:

1

Total,...........2,480 2,402

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

1

3

:

:

:

2

1

1193

55

:

15

- L 88

Annexe N.

PUBLIC MORTURARY, KOWLOON.

REPORT BY DR. C. M. HEANLEY, Medical Officer in Charge.

The total number of Post Mortem Examinations made during the year was 1,491 as compared with 959 during 1911.

The nationalities of the bodies were as follows:-

:-=

Chinese 1,482, Japanese 2, British 1, Indian 5, Portuguese 1.

The causes of death may be classified as follows:-

1912.

1911.

General Diseases,

- 1,012

429

Natural Causes,

2

Diseases of Circulatory System,

28

32

""

Digestive Respiratory

37

49

>>

345

370

""

Nervous

3

7

"

""

Urinary

4

6

""

Malignant Disease,-

1

Reproductive Systern,

2

2

Developmental Disease, -

2

1

Diseases of Organs of Locomotion,

1

1

Injuries (general), -

34

43

""

(local),

20

17

Diseases of Hæmopatic System,

2

1,491

959

General Diseases.

L 89

Digestive System :-

1912. 1911.

Plague,

399

4

Small-pox,

225

64

Icterus Neonatorum,

اہے

4

Enteric Fever,

1

1

Diphtheria,

6

7

Hepatitis,

1912. 1911.

3

Cirrhosis of Liver,

Septicemia,

6

1

Beri-Beri,

29

25

Septic Peritonitis,

:

2

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

3

Dysentery,

4

8

Noma,

Malaria,

21

12

Gastro-Enteritis,

1

Syphilis,

1

3

Cancer of Liver,

1

General Tuberculosis,

15

14

Marasmus,

66

Prematurity,

Still-birth,

65

Old age,

Congenital Syphilis,

152500

Diarrhoea,

4

4

111

Enteritis,

10

19

8

Abdominal Tumour,

1

53

Strangulated Hernia,

6

Tubercular Peritonitis,

1

Peritonitis,

8

5

Measles,

1

Intestinal Obstruction,

1

Puerperal Fever,

2

Acute Yellow Atrophy

Toxæmia,

2

of Liver,

1

Pyæmia,

1

Ulcer of Stomach,

1

Senile Decay,

1

Biliary Cirrhosis,

1

Debility at birth,

Inanition,

Decomposed bodies,...

Choleraic Diarrhoea,...

2

...

Parotid Abscess,

150

105

Total,..

37

49

1,012

429

1912. 1911.

Nutural Causes,

Respiratory System :-

2

0

Local Diseases.

1912. 1911.

Circulatory System :-

1912. 1911.

Pericarditis,

Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Tubercular Abscess of Lung, 1 Empyema,

38

52

1

8

11

Anæmia,

11

17

Pleurisy,

15

17

Fatty Degeneration of

Capillary Bronchitis,

3

1

...

Heart,

1 Atelectasis Pulmonum,

22

25

Myocarditis,

1 Bronchitis,

45

69

rhage,

Aortic Aneurysm,

Intra-Pericardial Hæmor-

Atrophy of Heart,

Emphysema,

3

1

Bronchiectasis,

1

3

2

4 Pulmonary Hæmorrhage,

1

1

Lobar Pneumonia,

53

63

Chron. Val. Dis of Heart,

8 Broncho Pneumonia,

160

124

Aneurism,

345

370

Total,....

28

32

Nervous System :--

Intracranial Hæmorrhage,

Convulsions,...

Tetanus,

Tubercular Meningitis,

A

1. 90

Diseases of Organs of Locomotion :-

Cellutitis of Leg,

7 Gangrene of Foot,

1912. 1911.

1

1

Urinary System :--

Nephritis,

Chronic Nephritis,

Cystitis,

7

Injuries.

General:-

1912. 1911.

2

2 Drowning,

1

4 Burns,

Malignant Disease:—

Asphyxia,

Multiple Injuries,

6 Scalding,

Compression, Poisoning, Strangulation,

Sarcoma of Humerus,

1912. 1911.

1

1

Local:-

1912. 1911.

1

1

1

18

1912. 1911. 37

1

251

1310

4

34

43

Reproductive System :-

1912. 1911.

Concussion of Brain,

1

1912. 1911.

Cut Throat,

2

1

Child-birth,...

1

2

Dislocation of Neck,

1

Ectopic Gestation,

1

Fracture of Skull,

Rupture of Spleen,

...

2

Hanging,

COCO OU 100

3

2

Developmental Diseases :-

2 Hæmorrhage from Wound,..

1912. 1911.

Congenital Diaphragmatic

Hernia,

Congenital Malformation of

Heart,

2

Rupture of Stomach,

Gunshot Wound,

Hæmorrhage from Gun and

Incised Wound,

Injuries of Head,

3

4

1

Heart,

1

Brain,

2

...

1

20

17

1 Wound of Neck,

1

L 91

Annexe O.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

REPORT BY FRANK BROWNE, F.I.C., Government Analyst. The number of analyses performed was 5,887 (5,566 in 1911). The following classification shows the nature of the work done :-

I.—Chemico-legal.

VI. Opium Ordinance.

1912. 1911.

Toxicological (including 20

Substances,...

stomachs),...

43

44

Opium Pills,

1912. 1911.

33 37

1

Articles for stains,

61

7

VII.-Pharmacy Ordinance.

II-Potable Waters.

Medicines for Poisons,

0

4

Public Supplies,

Wells, &c.,

36

36

VIII.-Mineralogical, &c.

14

15

Coins,

Metals,

III.-Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Ores,

Coal,

4

6

300

71

11

26

11

0

Petroleum Oil,

.......

66 91

Liquid Fuel,....

30

19

IX.-Liquors Ordinance.

Lighthouse Oil,

3

0

Crude Petroleum,..

1

European Liquor,

0

3

Petrol,

1

3

Chinese Liquor,

..5,099 5,020

Vaseline Oil,

1

0

Denatured Spirits,

3

2

Ships for inflammable vapour,

Substances for Explosives,...

IV.-Food and Drugs Ordinance.

ة

12

13

15

X.-Miscellaneous.

Aërated Waters,.

Coal Tar Disinfectants,.

Condensed Milk,

Brandy,..

Milk,

Whisky,

Port Wine,

Beer,

Stout,

Rum,

Lard,

Gin,

Tea,

Coffee,

Sherry,

Flour,

10

8

25

52

Spirit of Wine,

Soy,

10

11

Wood Oil,

10

6

1

9

1

Rice,

Beans,

Boiler Deposits, Tallow,

Chemicals,

1

Linseed Oil,

Urine,

Cotton Wool,

V.-Building Materials.

Concrete,

Cement,

Colour Wash,

0

4

each),

Other Substances,

Battery Fluids, Wire, Ointment,

Rat Paste,

Powder, Salt, Brine, Deposit,

Cassia Oil, Varnish, (one

OPONOWCOND NONNNO00

10.003310qnoooboOONNN

2

5

6

0

G

5,887 5,566

A

L 92

TOXICOLOGICAL.

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations were 21 cases of suspected human poisoning. Opium was present in 10 enquiries, and Japanese Star Anise in two others.

WATERS.

3. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month from the Pokfulum, Tytam, and Kowloon Reservoirs, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

4. Of petroleum oil and liquid fuel 96 samples were tested during the year. The Clowes-Redwood apparatus for detecting

inflammable air has been used on 13 ships.

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

5. The following Table gives the results of 43 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Department :-

Description.

Number of Samples.

Number found | Number found

Genuine.

Adulterated.

Beer,.. Brandy,...

Coffee,

Gin,

Milk,...

Port Wine,

Rum,...

Whisky,..

4

© TIO2 INN

6

5

18

18

2

2

1

ONNEN-H

6

0

4

0

2

3

Many other samples were examined for the public, mostly at the low fee prescribed by the Ordinance.

MINERALOGICAL.

6. The 300 metals examined were:-tiu 252, tin compound 28, antimony 10, bronze 5, zinc 4, bearing metal 1.

L 93

LIQUORS ORDINANCE.

7. The figures given include only those samples tested in the Government Laboratory; the results of very many examinations made by the First Assistant Analyst at the various godowns, etc., are not taken into account.

PHARMACY ORDINANCE.

8. On account of its noxious properties, and of its substitution for the harmless Chinese variety, Japanese Star Anise was placed on the list of poisons.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

9. The public continue to take advantage of the Laboratory and have forwarded a great variety of samples for examination on payment. The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amount- ed to $10,260.50 as against $4,565 in 1911.

SPECIAL REPorts.

10. Special reports have been supplied on:-Japanese Star Anise, Chlorate of Potassium and other Chlorates, Acetone, Steelite, Reciprocity in Pharmacy Certificates, and Definitions of Port and Sherry.

11. The value of the year's work as determined from the tariff of fees (Government Notification No. 285 of 1907, and No. 360 of 1910) is $20,096.50 ($13,793 in 1911). The amount does not include anything for the special reports mentioned above, there is much other work for which nothing has been set down, and all samples examined under the Liquors Ordinance have been calculated at the merely nominal rate of $1 each.

LIBRARY.

12. Several standard works of reference have been added.

RESEARCH

13. With a view to obtain further knowledge of Chinese Wood Oil, and in order to stop its adulteration, a heat test was worked out, and particulars were published in the Chemical News of July 12, 1912.

*

L 94

Annexe P.

THE HEALTH OFFICE OF THE PORT.

REPORT BY DR. G. P. JORDAN, Health Officer of the Port.

During the year the work of the Department has been carried on by Dr. Jordan, Dr. Keyt, Dr. Forsyth, Dr. Gröne and Dr. Lindsay Woods at various times owing to changes involved by two of the medical men going home on leave during the year. Dr. Keyt went home on 9 months leave of absence on May 14th and was succeeded by Dr. Gröne. Dr. Forsyth went home on the 15th November and was succeeded by Dr. Lindsay Woods.

The work of this Department may be described under the three headings :-

(a.) Daily Inspection of Ship.

(b.) Medical Examination of Emigrants.

(c.) Quarantine Duty.

(a.)-THE DAILY INSPECTION OF SHIP.

This duty consists in regularly boarding all ships as they arrive in port between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.

During the year there were 4,154 arrivals in port an increase of 112 over the returns of 1911. Of this number 2,177 were British and 1,977 Foreign Ships. These figures are exclusive of the River Steamers which are only dealt with when cases of an epidemic disease are reported.

(b.)-EXAMINATION OF EMIGRANTS.

During the year there has been a decrease in Emigration as compared with last year's figures, being 136,895 in 1911 and 122,657 in 1912. If however we take into account the number of through passengers, the aggregate total for 1912 would be 126,393. Of this figure the largest numbers were from the Straits Settlements as usual, namely 84,024. There were 3,736 passengers recruited from other ports, passed through Hongkong in transit.

Table I shows the numbers of Emigrants passed and rejected by us for the year 1912 with their respective ports.

Table II shows the monthly statement of Emigration figures as well as the numbers rejected and the numbers of the crews of the steamers. The largest monthly total was 14,067 for April while in February as customary for the China New Year, the figure was reduced to 3,069.

L 95

The total number of rejections for 1912 was 2,476 as against 1,745 for 1911, the increase being 731.

Table III gives the causes of Rejection of Emigrants under the various diseases quoted.

(c.)-QUARANTINE DUTY.

During the year 13 ships were placed in quarantine, namely :—

Small-pox,

Plague,

Cholera,

7

-

+

Bangkok continued as an infected port till August 25th when after a prolonged period the notification was withdrawn.

Hoihow and Swatow were declared infected, the former on July 2nd and the latter on July 22nd, both for cholera. The restrictions were, however, removed on the 16th August and 22nd August re- spectively.

During the year two important additions have been made to the quarantine regulations for the better control and expediting of dis- infection of vessels developing any infectious disease while in the harbour. These regulations were made by the Officer Administer- ing the Government in Council on the 4th day of June, 1912, under section 23 (1) of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance, No. 10 of 1899, and are as follows:-

1. Should any vessel in the waters of the Colony, while being attended by any private medical practi- tioner be found to have any infectious disease on board, such vessel shall at once be considered as an "infected" ship and come under these regulations. It shall be the duty of such private medical practi- tioner to inform the master of the vessel of the nature of the disease and notify the same in writing to the Health Officer of the Port. All further action as regards the patient, the members of the crew, the passengers, or the vessel shall be under the direction of the Health Officer of the Port. The master of such vessel shall at once take such steps as are necessary to inform the Health Officer of the Port of the facts of the case and hoist the Quarantine Flag; he shall not permit any further communica- tion with the shore, but wait for instructions from the Health Officer of the Port.

2. In case of a vessel in the waters of the Colony not having a private medical attendant and having any sickness on board, the nature of which the master is unable to make out, he shall at once hoist the call flag for medical assistance and take such other measures as may be necessary to inform the Health Officer of the Port and wait for his decision,

L 96

As these additions to the Quarantine Regulations do not seem to be sufficiently or generally known, I have deemed if advisable to quote the whole fully in this report, so that there may be no mis- understanding in the matter.

Table IV.This gives the numbers of ships detained in Quaran- tine with causes, dates and periods of detention.

Table I.

Emigration Passes and Rejections for 1912.

Ports of Destination.

Passed.

Rejected.

Australian Ports,

Honolulu...

Mexico,

South America,

Straits Settlements,

Java Ports,

Mauritius,

San Francisco,

British Columbia,

Caroline Islands,.

Timor,

Japan,...

Fiji,

Tahiti,.....

2,062

46

1,553

3

3,542

29

684

9

84,024

1,500

12,1 11

218

1,236

20

4,461

82

12.790

569

357

119

97

83

308

Total,

122,657

2,476

L 97

Table II.

Monthly Returns of Emigrants, Crews and Rejections.

Months.

Emigrants.

Crews.

Rejections.

January,

7,941

2,337

55

February,

3,069

1.962

59

March,..

8,799

2,289

102

April,

14,067

3,785

301

May,

12,235

3,101

351

June,

8,599

2,784

289

July,

11,316

3,138

313

August,

10,460

3,211

300

September,

12,181

3,004

260

October,

12,311

3,836

198

November,

10,630

2,991

152

December,

11,049

3,656

96

Total,

122,657

36,094

2,476

Skin Diseases :-

Scabies,

Tinea,

Other forms,

Eye Diseases—

Trachoma,

L 98

Table III.

Causes of Rejection of Emigrants.

Diseases.

Ophthalmia and Blindness,

Fevers,.....

Syphilis,....

Tuberculosis, Phthisis and Glandular Enlargement,

Jaundice,........

Leprosy,

Beri-Beri with Ataxia and Dropsy,.

Deformities, including Curvature of the Spine and

marked Lameness,

Numbers.

333

39

41

59

36

1,672

16

62

16

2

2

128

Heart Disease,

3

Enlarged Spleen,

15

Anæmia and Debility,

40

Whooping Cough,

Chicken Pox,

1

1

Other Causes including Old Age and Emaciation,.....................

10

Total,....

2,476

Appendix M.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY

DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1912.

Botanic Gardens.-The weather during the first three months of the year was very unfavourable to flowering plants and trees, particularly the winter flowering annuals. Only 40 hours of sun- shine were registered during January against an average of 150 hours.

The third quarter of the year was exceptionally free from wind and rain storms, much to the benefit of all the trees, particularly the young street trees.

The most noticeable trees and plants which flowered during the year were Bauhinia Blakeana, Bauhinia variegata, Rhododendron indicum, Dombeya calanthus, Brunfelsia calycina, Poinsettias and Brunfelsia Hopeana. Phaius grandifolius made a very fine show in the open ground and in pots.

The Bromelia hedge inside the wall running down Garden Road was removed, as it had become unsightly, and replaced with plants of Hibiscus Lambertianus, which are doing well.

Spaces where trees had been removed in the gardens were filled with Bauhinia Blakeana, Cassia siamea, Spathodea nilotica and others. A row of Cassia Fistula was planted between the trees forming the Grevillea Avenue, and when they have grown suffici- ently, the Grevilleas, which have been irreparably damaged by typhoons, will be removed.

The Amaryllis bulbs are improving every year, and the richly- coloured flowers make a fine show in the Old Garden.

Many of the Agaves on the Lower Terrace flowered during the summer months, the flower spikes going in some cases to a height of 25 feet. These plants are of great interest to most of the visitors to the Gardens.

The two useful creepers, Bignonia venusta and Antigonon leptopus, flowered magnificently in various places on walls and fences.

The whole of the turf on the Upper Terrace was taken up and relaid, as it had become uneven.

The groups of Lycoris aurea flowered well, and those on grass bank in the New Garden made a fine show, being visible from the Albany Road,

M 2

The Orchids in the Plant Houses and Pot Nursery were repotted, and have since greatly improved.

The beautiful scarlet orchid, Renanthera coccinea, flowered well on several of the large trees, to which it firmly attaches itself.

A number of Nepenthes (Pitcher Plants) were raised from cut- tings, and hung in wooden baskets from the roof in No. 9 House.

The bank above the College Gardens entrance was planted up with Hydrangeas, which will be seen from the Upper Albert Road when in flower.

The seedling Gloxinias were a great success, and many of the beautifully shaded and also "self" colours were much admired by visitors.

The Roses in pots and beds were exceptionally good, chiefly owing to the absence of storms which damage them whilst in bud.

A great deal of labour was expended in supplying the plants in pots, beds, and a large number of young trees with water during October and November, but the effect of the drought was not felt so much as was anticipated.

A stand of cement and green tiles was placed under those seats in both Old and New Gardens standing on the grass under shade trees, and has much improved the appearance of the Gardens, as formerly the turf surrounding the seats was much worn and ragged.

The walks were repaired where necessary, and the one leading from the Bandstand to the large Plant House was entirely taken up and relaid with cement granite.

The surface of the Nursery Yard near the Office was concreted, and small brick divisions erected to accommodate the various sizes of flower pots. This will greatly facilitate work and enable the yard to be kept clean and tidy.

Arrangements were made on two occasions during the summer months for the band of the K.O.Y.L. Infantry to give concerts in the Gardens, but unfortunately the weather was too wet on the dates appointed.

Fourteen persons were arrested and convicted for disorderly conduct and theft of plants and flowers.

Government House Grounds.-The large Camellia in the centre of the walk near the main entrance was taken up and planted else- where. This plant was always in the way when any large function was on at Government House.

M 3

Several young plants of Camellia were planted on the side of the new tennis lawn, and at the top of the small bank near the stables.

The large Banians, in front of the house, were cut back, and the grass immediately below them repaired where required. The large Eugenia at the corner of the new lawn was treated in a similar man- ner and the bare patches beneath it planted with Blue Grass.

The new tennis lawn having become very unsightly, the turf was removed and the ground dug to the depth of 2 feet and exposed to the sun and rain. A new lawn was formed later with fresh turf, but the result has not been satisfactory, the turf apparently gets too much shade, and the drain-pipes from the house which run along a little way below the surface do not improve the soil.

All banks were kept clear of undesirable undergrowth and a sharp lookout kept for tins and other receptacles which might contain water and allow mosquitoes to breed.

Vacant places in the bamboo hedge were filled with Chrysalido- carpus, and a line of this palm was planted to divide the Plant Compound from the coolie quarters.

The trees near the entrance from the Lower Albert Road were cut back, to give more growing space to the Bauhinias planted beneath them.

The walks were repaired where necessary with disintegrated granite.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-Extensive alterations were carried out under the direction of His Excellency Sir Henry May.

A number of large Chinese Palms were removed from the beds in front of the house, and the bare spaces filled in with Blue Grass.

The plants in the bed at the bottom of the large retaining wafl were all taken up and entirely re-arranged, and the shape of the bed altered to enable the turf in front to be kept in a straight line.

A path was made up the side of the small mound west of the house, and a space cleared for a seat about half way up, by the side of the path.

The conifers on the bank east of the tennis lawns were thinned, so that the flowering plants among them could be plainly seen.

The Hydrangeas and other plants in the valley were kept clear of weeds and the soil about them loosened.

All undergrowth near the house, which might shelter the breeding-places of mosquitoes, was cut as required.

M 4

The bamboo fences were repaired and the walks relaid with disintegrated granite as required.

Blake Garden.--The trees and shrubs were pruned, staked and kept in order as required.

The banks of turf and Blue Grass were weeded and repaired.

A great deal of wanton damage was done by visitors of the coolie class and the amount of fencing has been gradually increased to protect the plants.

Peak Garden. --The Privet hedge which surrounds the well was replanted and a fence erected to protect it from damage.

The plants of Ficus on the walls were kept in order and pro- tected with wire-netting.

The grass on the two small lawns were cut and kept clear of weeds.

West End Park.—The barded wire fences, which were erected to prevent coolies from making paths across the grass, were kept in good order and increased.

The Azaleas planted on the slopes flowered well.

The Camphor trees were treated with Jeyes' Fluid when neces- sary to keep off the attacks of white ants.

All the undergrowth was cleared and the Mimosa taken up by the roots, and afterwards burned on the rocks in the Park.

King's Park.-A large number of Chinese Palms, planted during the last three years, are doing well, and also the Eucalyptus and other trees, which receive constant attention.

The large patches of Lantana are kept down as far as possible by gangs of women working under the supervision of the Park Keeper.

A number of Chinese Palms were scorched by grass fires.

Colonial Cemetery.-The trees and shrubs were washed with Carbolineum where necessary to keep off the attacks of white ants. Pruning was carried on, and plants which were obstructing the view of headstones were removed.

A large number of graves were covered with good turf.

The walk leading from the main entrance to the fountain was relaid with disintegrated granite.

M 5

Royal Square Garden.-One of the Bauhinias in a circular bel was removed and replaced by a more shapely plant.

Cannas were removed from the two corner beds to make room for the shrubs.

Government Pavilions.-The grass on the banks and lawns was weeded and cut and Hydrangeas and other plants kept in order.

Government Civil Hospital.-These grounds were placed under this Department on the 1st January last.

The lawns were given a thorough weeding and kept constantly cut, and are now slowly improving.

Shrubs and palms were planted in suitable places, chiefly at the edges of the lawns.

The whole of the bank under the pine trees was planted with Poinsettias. These will be visible from the windows of the various wards.

The bamboo hedges were pruned as required, and the creepers on the fences and walls trained and kept in good order.

Roadside Banks and Rockeries.-The rockeries at Glenealy were kept clear of weeds, and the plants which had died were replaced.

A small rockery was made at the top of Battery Path.

Several large tree ferns were planted on a bank above Robinson Road where there had been a landslip.

Old and unsightly growths of Alpinia were cut out.

Flowering trees were planted near roads in various places.

District Officers Quarters, Taipo.-The upper part of the grounds which was in a very neglected condition was taken in hand and laid out under the supervision of this Department.

The undergrowth was cleared and the trees thinned by coolies working under an officer of this Department and a large number of pine tree seeds sown to fill up the banks.

The plateau to the west of the quarters was laid out with lawns and shrubberies, and the walk at the western end diverted so as to allow a sufficient area for a tennis court.

The grounds were visited by the Superintendent from time to time, and slight alterations made.

Lower Albany Nursery.—All the level ground was laid out with annuals, Russelia and other flowering shrubs.

M 6

The banks were cleared of undergrowth, and planted with Poinsettias and Antigonons.

Signal Hill. An effort is being made to cover the unsightly wall with Ficus and Vitis, but the plants have made little progress, and have been blown down on several occasions.

University Bazaar.—About 1,400 plants were lent under in- structions from His Excellency the Governor to the Committee for use in making a roof garden.

Herbarium. Small collections of local plants were added and several specimens presented by Mr. C. T. Bowring, Wenchow.

Mr. S. T. Dunn has kindly examined and named the Hongkong collection of Milletias.

Specimens of plants from which drugs are derived were lent on exhibition to the Medical Congress held in January. At the close of the Congress, the Tung Wa Hospital Committee presented a collection of the vegetable drugs exhibited by them.

Six specimens of the Kwangtung flora were presented by Pro- fessor Mell of Canton.

Dr. Voretzsch sent specimens of orchids collected in various parts of the island for identification.

Specimens of 209 species of Kwai Chau plants were purchased from Mr. Souvey of the Mission Etrangères.

out.

An alphabetical list of specimens in the herbarium was made

FORESTRY.

Demarcation.-All numbers of forestry blocks and paths were repainted, also those on the graves.

Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.--The two areas felled near the Aberdeen Paper Mills and west of the village, were sown with pine tree seeds.

The newly sown pine seedlings were thinned and transplanted during every spell of wet weather.

The bare places at 9A & 9B on the low hills near the south face of the Kowloon tunnel were planted with some 10,000 Banian trees

At the same place about 175,000 pits have been sown as an experiment with seeds of broad-leaved trees, such as Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Melastoma sanguineum, Melastoma candidum, Psidium Guajava, Rhus hypoleuca, Mallotus paniculatus and Lucæna glauca.

M 7

For next year's planting in 9A & 9B on bare ground some 60,000 or 70,000 seedling pines were raised in the nursery near the south face of the tunnel.

Approximately 65,000 pits were dug for planting during 1912.

In 5B, on the spur of a hill between Wongneichong Gap and Deepwater Bay, 200 Azaleas were planted on the suggestion of His Excellency the Governor.

The plantations above and below Taipo Road having become too thick a considerable quantity of trees were felled to enable the

rest to mature.

The whole of the pine seedlings at 6E, Aberdeen, were closely inspected, and any which had failed to germinate were replaced with young trees from other pits.

300 pounds of pine seeds were obtained from cones which were collected.

Care of trees in plantations.-Creepers covering trees were cut in plantations above and below Taipo Road, Bowen Road, Aberdeen New Road, and other parts of the Colony.

The pine tree caterpillars, which fortunately made their appear- ance only in small numbers on trees at Kowloon, were collected and destroyed whenever possible.

Trees which had died, badly damaged by fire in Plantations or by the roadside, were removed.

Protection from fire.--Fire barriers were cleared to the extent of 212,213 feet at a cost of $458.61 and a new barrier measuring 770 feet was made at a cost of $2.38.

Fortunately the weather during the time of the Tsing Ming and Chung Yeung Festivals was wet, and no serious fires occurred.

The Honourable the Registrar General kindly allowed 10 Dis- trict Watchmen to assist the Forest Guards and Foresters in watch- ing the various cemeteries and isolated graves.

Altogether 29 fires were reported during the year. The largest were at 6D, Aberdeen, 7G, Tai Ho Wan and 7E, Telegraph Hill.

Forest Guards Services. -Forestry Offences were about the same as last year. The number of cases was about 60% more than the previous year, and the number of convictions about 50% greater. See Tables II & III.

A few weeks previous to the Chinese New Year, several of the Forest Guards were badly assaulted. The Chinese make a practice

M 8

of cutting the New Year Flower, Enkianthus quinqueflorus, in large quantities for sale in the streets. As the wild flowers in the Colony had been badly damaged throughout the year, it was decided to stop the cutting as much as possible, and a number of persons were with much difficulty arrested, and in each case a conviction was obtained.

Many of the Wyndham Street flower sellers and their agents were also arrested and convicted for being in unlawful possession of flowers and ferns taken from Crown land.

Timber felling.-The only timber now felled is a proportion of trees in plantations which have been too thick, or those which have been badly damaged by fire or insect pests.

The total revenue derived from this source was $1,976.90.

Planting and cure of Roadside Trees.-Approximately 1,051 young trees were planted in the streets and roads and on banks in Hongkong and Kowloon. The varieties used were Camphors, Albizzias, Poinciana and Aleurites.

The majority of the larger street trees were pruned to keep them in good shape and clear of telephone wires and street lamps.

All the young and newly planted trees were staked, guarded, and closely watched for insect pests.

The amount spent on the general upkeep of these trees was $51.90.

Forestry Paths.-The cost of the general upkeep of these paths amounted to $268.40.

Clearing Undergrowth around Houses. -An area of approximate- ly 3,208,479 square feet of undergrowth was cleared in various parts of Hongkong and Kowloon, Police Stations and other public build- ing in the New Territories at a cost of $961.91.

For the Public Works Department an area of approximately 1,962,010 square feet was cleared to enable surveys and general measurements to be made, at a cost of $522.55.

In addition 1,025,600 square feet were cleared for and the cost borne by the Military Authorities.

Commercial Investigations.-A quantity of Camphor Oil was sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute, who is submitting samples to several firms in England. The Camphor Oil manu- factured in Hongkong is of good quality, and there is a probability of considerable trade being done in this product.

- M 9-

Reports on the following products were received from the Director of the Imperial Institute:--

1. Chinese Gall Nuts.

2. Peppermint Oil.

3. Sandalwood Oil.

4. Camphor Oil.

5. Andropogon (Citronella) Oil.

6. Rose Oil.

7. Oil of Artemesia vulgaris.

8. Mixed essential oil :-UI Yau & Tau Kau Yau.

Local Crops. The first and second rice-crops were fair only.

Lichis were plentiful and cheap.

Presentations to Gardens.-The following persons presented seeds and plants :-Superintendent, Royal Botanic Gardens, Cal- cutta; Superintendent, Botanic Garden, Sibpur; Government Botanic Gardens, Saharanpur; United States Department of Agriculture; Botanic Gardens, Durban; and Messrs. M. H. Logan; F. Franceschi ; R. T. Baker; H. Green; Cheung I; A. Milroy; W. R. Price; E. D. Merrill; Jos. Clemens; H. Humphreys; A. E. Rowrie ; J. Barton; F. Soares; L. Gibbs; Captain Hodgins; Dr. Voretzsch and Miss Wallace.

Mr. O. Sakai presented a Korean stork and Mr. T. Hunter a Chinese stork.

sants.

Mr. V. B. de Souza and Mr. J. Ross presented Chinese phea-

Staff-The Superintendent, Mr. W. J. Tutcher, proceeded to England on a year's leave on April 9th, 1912. The Assistant Superintendent, Mr. H. Green, acted as Superintendent during his absence.

Mr. Wong Shiu Ki, 5th. Grade Clerk in this Department, absconded at the end of March.

Mr. Mak Kun was transferred from the Harbour Office to this Department as 5th Grade Clerk on May 16th, 1912.

2nd April, 1913.

H. GREEN,

Superintendent.

Table I.

RAINFALL, 1912.

Botanic Gardens.

- M 10 -

DATE.

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct.

Nov.

¡ ec.

inch.

inch.

inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch.

inch. inch.

inch.

inch.

.82

3.45

.74

.02

.08

.02

1.36

.08

4

6.

7

8.

9

1.09

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

:::ཙ:༄རྩེ ::3ཀྑཏྟི་ྲ

...

.06

.82

.01

.21

.55

.06

རུ::༄

.01

::༄37:དྷུ:དྭྱཙ

.03

.76

.02

.11

.06

.01 1.12

.02

.81

.42

.75

.53

.01

.84

3.06

.02

.05 .34

.82

.14

1.50

.15

.03

288 : :

.10

.22

2.40

.95

.70

.70

.02

.03

.02

.07

.04

.50

.13

...

.04

.84

.05

.01

2:::ཨྰཿརྱ

.02

.07

.75

:

.03

.10

.04

.11

.23

.54

...

.03

.95

.58

.82

.05

.58

.3i

6.00

.01

.02

.03

1.97

Table I.-Continued.

DATE.

Jan. Feb. Mar.

Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept.

Oct. Nov. Dec.

inch. inch. inch.

inch. inch. inch. inch. inch.

inch,

inch.

inch. inch.

17.

.03 .28

.30

.33

.06

18.

.03

.02

.21

.03

.01

.02

.15

19.

.36

.03

.02

20.

.05

21.

20

23

24.

26.

26.

27.

28.

29.

30.

31

::སྤྱི:སྐྱུ282:5 ;

1.90

1.32

.30

2.05

.70

75

.34

.27

.97

.03

.05 .52

1.22

.05

.06

2.56

.32 .18

.II

.03

.01

.08

.36

.04 .36 1.51

.20

.03

.09

.02

.01

.78

.03

.02

.02 1.14

.01

.02

1.38

.06

.11

.08

.30

.05

.28

1.56

.05

.06

.04

.09

.02

.01

.35

.03

.11

Total..

3.28

2.63

4.36

1.75 5.81 14.49 7.00

|16.4.5

4.85

.04

.44

6.27

Total for the year 67:37 inches

Average for the last ten years at the Botanic Gardens 86-77 inches.

Total rainfall registered at the Hongkong Observatory for the year 59 96 inches.

- M 11 -

Table II.

FOREST GUARDS SERVICES: OFFENCES.

- M 12 -

Reports of

Village or District. Block.

Compartment.

Pine tree Pine tree Pine tree stealing. branches needles stealing. stealing. stealing.

Brush- Grass Wild Roots wood cutting. flowers stealing. stealing.

Cattle

grazing in

plantations.

Victoria,

1

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

Wongneichong,

2

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

Shaukiwan,

3

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

Tytam,..

-1

A.B.

Nil.

Stanley,

5

A.B.C.F.

Aberdeen,

Pokfulum,

6

A.B.C.D.E.F.

11

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

Kowloon,......

8

A.B.C.E.

Harbour Belt,

9

A.B.C.

Cheungshawan,

10

Nil.

Kowloon Reservoir,

698W3H712LW

6

10

6

1

Nil.

Nil.

1

1

1

1

Nil.

5

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

monga-r20+~

46

22

2

Nil.

26

8

2

23

Nil.

15

13

4

Nil.

1

2

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

3

Nil.

5

2

Nil.

11

1

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

7

12

12

8

3

5

6

2

1

2

6

Nil.

12

2

Nil.

7

4

Nil.

1

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

3

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Total for 1912,

47

26

34

120

66

45

13

Total for 1911,.

103

43

129

285

Nil.

Nil.

3

M 13

Table III,

POLICE COURT RESULTS.

Cases.

1912. 1911.

50 cents to $1 fine,

53

10

$2

60

10

""

$3

41

29

""

$4 to $5

29

27

$10 to $25

10

22220

""

$30

""

>>

""

27

"3

15 to 31

"

""

1

6 weeks'

""

3

""

2 days' imprisonment,

5 to 7 days'

8 to 14

4

16

74

33

15

3

0254

3

0

Withdrawals,

6 strokes of the birch,

Discharges,

Bail forfeiture,

Personal bond for $25,

1

0

26

28

3

1

2

Total,

· 360

166

Kang Hau,

East Point,

Locality.

Kowloon Tsai, -

-

Table IV.

NURSERIES.

Expenses.

C.

390.60

74.40

Total,

1,079.20

$1,544.20

Timber Sales,

Revenue.

Loan of Plants,

Sale of Old Tools,

Interest on Current Account,

M 14

Table V.

1912.

1911.

$

C.

1,976.90

307.44

5.50

15.07

4,694.90 360.72

3.48

4.17

Total,.....$

2,304.91

5,063.27

Table VI.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

FROM THE YEAR 1903 To 1912.

Year.

Total Expenditure.

$

C.

Total Revenue.

$

C.

Percentage of Revenue to Expenditure.

%

7.24

1903

31,924.04

2,311.58

1904

49,688.98

25,201.44

50.72

1905

46,670.14

3,468.94

7.43

1906

46,796.19

6,898.64

14.74

1907

14,131.14

7,730.52

17.52

1908

48,973.20

11,586.43

23.66

1909

13,694.46

11,441,51

26.12

1910

41,707.95

13,230.59

31.72

1911

45,750.85

7,769.82

16.98

1912

39,865.18

2,304.91

5.78

Appendix N.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION FOR THE YEAR 1912.

NUMBERS AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS.

(Table I.)

1. Government Schools.—The number of Government Schools romaius unchanged at 12. Of these 7 are Upper Grade Schools and 5 are Lower Grade Schools. Three of the Lower Grade Schools are situated in the New Territories (Tai Po, Ping Shan and Cheung Chau).

(Table III.)

2. Grant Schools.-The number of Grant Schools remains unchanged, at 51.

NUMBER OF PUPILS.

3. Government Schools. The total number in average attend- ance at Government Schools is 1,974 (last year 2,120). This falling off was almost entirely confined to Queen's College. The other Government Schools were practically full throughout the year.

4. Grant Schools.-The total number in average attendance at Grant Schools in 4,064 (last year 4,183). The slight falling off is probably due to the severity of the Plague epidemic and has no special significance.

VERNACULAR BOARD SCHOOLS,

(Tables I and III.)

5. The Chinese Vernacular Primary Education Board opened 2 Vernacular Schools during the year which were controlled by the Education Department. They had a combined average attendance of 50. Grants were also paid to 10 schools on the recommendation of the Board. The first named 2 schools can hardly be distin- guished from the departmentally controlled schools: the figures for them are given at the bottom of Table I. The other 10 are Grant Schools in all but name, and the figures for them are appended to Table III. Proper attendance registers were unfortunately not kept for these schools; but the number present at examination was 245.

6. Government and Grant Schools together.-Including the Vernacular Board Schools the total average attendance at the schools which are under the control of the Department is 6,333 (6,285 in 1911).

N 2

PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

(Tables II and IIIA.)

7. The work done in the private schools of the Colony, other than at four under English control, has been recently inspected by the Supervisor, Mr. Barlow, whose report is given in paragraph 11. He classified the schools under 3 headings A, B and C. The A Schools are up to the standard required by the Grant Code, but not necessarily thoroughly efficient. The B schools are inefficient by Code standards; but contain a spark worth fanning. The C schools are such as appeared to be hopeless. The total enrolment at these schools is-9,764 pupils in 312 schools. Last year the total attendance was 9,813. There is a marked falling off in the number of pupils attending night schools, 469, (861 in 1911).

8. It is believed that many refugees from Canton at the time of the trouble there opened night schools as a temporary means of subsistence.

9. Of these 312 schools no less than 143 or 46% are in the Cor hopeless class. 130 or 42% are in the inefficient class but could with a little handling be enormously improved. If the 3,726 children attending C schools could be brought into improved B schools or A schools, i.e., into schools approaching the standard of the Government and Grant Schools, an immense advantage would accrue to the Colony.

10. Fees.--The average fee charged at the English Day Schools is $44 per annum. This high fee includes board and lodging in many cases. The average fee charged at the Night Schools is just over $12. The fees at the Vernacular Schools appear to have increased and average $14.25 per annum. There are 16 free schools with an average attendance of 577.

Report by Mr. Barlow.—English Day Schools.—(Boys.)

11. The standard taken for purposes of classification is about that of a Lower Grade School, say Praya East.

In some cases these schools are run by mere boys, who ap- parently have been forced to leave school on account of poverty, and are attempting to turn their 3 or 4 years education to account. "work done is very poor.-

The

In many of the English Day Schools a Syllabus and Time-table are kept, but more for ornament than for use. At others, useful work is done.

Quite a number of these schools are practically within a stone- throw of Queen's College. At Yaumati there are three within one minute's walk from the District School there.

N 3

English Night Schools.—(Boys.)

Most of the English Night Schools visited were of a poor class; in many cases the Master had no idea of teaching, and in one or two instances spoke a bad "pidgin" English. Some of the teachers in these schools attend English Schools during the day, and probably depend upon their own night-schools to raise the fees for their own tuition. Many of the pupils at the Night Schools are day scholars at some school or other and simply revise their work in the evening. One would expect to find that the majority of the night school pupils were those who had some sort of employment or other during the day; but such is not the case.

The opening of one or two good night schools would mean the closing of most of those now in existence.

The best of these schools are clean and lighted by incandescent or electric light. The poorer schools are not over-clean and lighted in some cases by a flickering lamp; and in more than one instance the school room was also the bedroom.

Vernacular Day Schools.—(Boys.)

During the recent inspection of the Private Schools (Chinese) in Hongkong and Kowloon I was, with two or three exceptions, courteously received, and had very little difficulty in obtaining the information I sought; the exceptions were inclined to be suspicious and gave particulars unwillingly. 1 or 2 schools closed very early, no doubt to avoid the inspection.

In many cases the pupils were under the impression that Hong- propagandhe kong was Chinese Territory, and apparently no effort has been made to enlighten them; it would appear in some instances that the idea had been fostered. It would be quite an easy matter to imagine some of these schools to be situated in the heart of Canton. During the trouble in Canton many people came to Hongkong for shelter and opened schools, and it seems as if they did not wish to recognise that they were under British protection. Some of the children were quite amazed at the idea of a foreigner being able to speak and read a little Chinese. The disrespectful terms applied to foreigners were heard on a few occasions.

Several of these schools appear to be run by people, who, for the time, are out of employment, and have therefore turned to teaching. In some cases the teachers appeared to have outside ́employment, and ouly spent a short time in school; not that this makes much difference, as in many cases the children would have been better off left to theinselves.

In many schools not the slightest effort is made to advance with the times; the methods employed 100 years ago being consi- dered quite good enough. A number of teachers thought that if

por qualify

of teachers

metham

N 4

they included 1 or 2 Kwok Man Readers and a little badly-taught arithmetic in their course of studies, they were quite abreast of the times generally in these cases the Kwok Man Readers were scarcely used; sometimes it was difficult to find them, or the boys- who were supposed to study them. Many of the teachers had not the slightest idea of classification.

Little or no explanation of reading matter is given; the main idea being to memorise as much as possible. Pupils in their second year, could not, with any degree of certainty, explain the meanings of such simple characters as ▲, : the matter seemed to be understood by those who were naturally intelligent, who at the inspections were generally pushed forward.

>

In the matter of composition, the exercises done were probably written from memory; this subject as a rule is not taken up until the pupil is in his 2nd or 3rd year. Boys of the poorer class do not receive anything approaching a useful education. They spend 3 or 4 years at school, and it may be safely said that some of them would gain more by attending a Grant School one hour daily for 2 years. The amount of time wasted in the average Private School (Vernacular) is appalling, and when work is in progress it is done in a very lackadaisical manner. The boys leave school to take up, in many instances, some menial position, and their only asset is an ability to recite a hundred pages or so from the Classics-to them practically meaningless. In schools where the inethod inclined to be modern, the children appeared to be more intelligent and less hostile to foreigners. In 4 or 5 cases the teachers had formerly been in Government or Grant (Vernacular) Schools, and much better work is done at these few schools, than at the average Private Vernacular School..

A very noticeable feature in many cases was the part taken by parents or guardians of pupils; they decide what books shall be studied by their children. In some schools all sorts of books were in use; the teacher is often unable to explain even a small portion of the reading-matter, and I may add that he is not at all put about by this fact. In many instances the teacher did not know what work his pupils were doing. The average parent would appear to be quite satisfied if the children are kept in school for a certain number of hours each school day, and can repeat from memory, cach week, a few more sentences from the Classics.

The parents should be made to see very clearly that their children are wasting about three-quarters of their school-time, and wasting it in some cases in dark, evil-smelling places. In many instances little effort had been made to keep the places clean; and in some great effort had been made to exclude the light of day. It may be safely said that some of the premises are only cleaned when the Sanitary Board "cleansing" takes place. Some of the schools were positively unhealthy, being used as living and sleeping apart- ments, and in some cases coolies were asleep in the bunks that

N 5

occupied 2 or 3 sides of the room; some of the premises are also used as workshops. In some instances it was noticed that the teacher was not at all particular about his appearance, and his pupils followed his example.

Supervision is very badly needed in the majority of the Private Schools; with even a casual supervision and a workable and useful syllabus many of these schools would improve by 50 per cent. in a short time.

I was under the impression that the average Chinese boy required value for his money, and if he thought he was not receiving it at one school, he would at the first opportunity try another. The results of the recent inspection contradict this impression.

Vernacular Day Schools.-(Girls.)

On the whole more work is done at the Girls than at the Boys Schools; the discipline and organisation is better; they are also more inclined to modern methods. To a casual observer they have more the appearance of Grant Schools than the Boys Schools have, and are usually cleaner.

The Kwok Man Readers (both new and old) seem more popular with the girls than with the boys.

Vernacular Night Schools.

In one or two of these schools very little work appears to be done, and that badly. They are chiefly attended by school-boys, as in the case of the Day Schools. Nothing approaching a regular syllabus is followed, and consequently a lot of time is wasted. Some do not appear to have regular school nights, as in some cases 2 or 3 visits had to be made before an inspection could be held.

There is only one Chinese Girls Night School. It is perfectly respectable.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables IV and V.)

12. The total expenditure, excluding fees remitted to free scholars ($4,008), was $239,361 ($237,942 in 1911). The expendi- ture less revenue, i.e., fees collected, was $170,165 ($161,886 in 1911).

13. The percentage of this nett expenditure to the Total Revenue of the Colony is 2:14. This is the lowest since 1907. The highest percentage was 2:47 in 1908. 21 per cent of the revenue for 1912 is $198,693, and exceeds the nett expenditure by $28,500.

N 6

ange

14. The percentage of Departmental Revenue to Departmental Expenditure is 37 94 and has fallen from 43.84 in 1909. The decrease is due to the increase in the English Staffs of schools, the reduction in the numbers permitted under one master, and generally to the improvement of the schools.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

15. Queen's College. -The Staff of the College is composed of one Headmaster, one Second Master, 13 English Assistant Masters including a Translation Master, an increase of 1; 10 Chinese Masters teaching English, a decrease of 1; and 10 Vernacular Masters, 5 of whom teach for a part of the school hours only. There are also 15 pupil teachers who are being trained with a view to future employment at the College or the District Schools.

16. The average attendance was 555 (667 in 1911). This falling off is attributed to the prevalence of Plague. It is probable that the competition of other schools which charge lower fees has something to do with it. The only reply to such competition, if any is needed, is to give a better education. The primitive organisation to which I alluded in my report for 1910 still requires much development. This matter is at present receiving the serious attention of the Headmaster.

17. The College appeals to two classes of boys at least, those that desire a higher secondary education leading very possibly into the University, and those who want a less ambitious secondary education, one which will take them for a year or two beyond the District Schools curriculum before they settle down as clerks or in business. It should be the aim of the College to offer clear and distinct courses to each of these classes. While the boys are being taught what they most need, an endeavour will be made to let each master confine himself mainly to the subjects in which he is most interested, and to which he is therefore best suited.

18. Turning to the studies as they are, it is satisfactory to learn that the proportion of boys who "passed" the test examination admitting them to higher classes was low compared with what it was a few years ago: in the Upper School it was only 665 per cent. It is satisfactory, as indicating that a genuine effort is being made to raise the standard of the Classes. The rejected boys usually leave; and this combined with the rejection of backward boys mentioned in the Headmaster's report tends also to keep the numbers down. On the other hand it is impossible to exaggerate the importance of making the College an honest and solid organisation; and this it could not be called so long as each Class had a tail of boys whose only claim to their presence in it was one of long residence at the College.

19. Extracts from the report of the Headmaster, Mr. T. K. Dealy, are given below:

Attendance:-Queen's College was open 230 days during the year ended 31st December, 1912, as against 221 in the preceding

N 7

year. The maximum enrolment was 1,049, of whom 623 were on our Register at the beginning of the year, while 426 were new boys.

The average attendance in the Upper Classes was,

""

31

"

35

19

وو

לי

32

Remove Lower

-

"

""

-313 -183

- 59

Cost:

The gross Revenue, Fees and Refund was,

$32,777.52

The gross Expenditure,

$79,199.14

41.39%

50.00%

Proportion of Revenue to Expenditure,

for the last five years, -

Average cost per pupil in average attendance $83.75. Had Free Scholars and the Student Interpreters of the Registrar General's Department paid fees during the time of their actual stay in school, this item would have read $78.88. For varying periods during the year, 74 boys, either as Student Interpreters attached to the Registrar General's Department, or as Free Scholars, have paid no fees, the sum thus remitted being $2,635.00. The gross expen- diture, owing to economies effected, was $3,733 less than in 1911: the Revenue from Fees, owing to the fall in our attendance, showed a reduction of $8.715.00.

Discipline continues excellent. The Prefects still continue their valuable aid.

Studies. Of the 487 boys examined at our Annual Examina- tion, last July, 361 or 74% passed. In the Upper School, out of 260 boys examined, 173 or 665% passed. In the Remove Classes, of 164 boys examined 132 or 80'5% passed, and in the Lower School, 63 boys were examined and 56 or 89% passed. The low percent- ages are accounted for by the effects of the irregular attendance already mentioned, by a continued "speeding-up" in work generally necessitated by educational requirements, and by the severity of the tests now applied.

The weakest sections were 1 Lower C and 2D, which passed 43% and 37% respectively: but, if we had submitted these boys to the tests which we used three years ago, the former Class would have passed 78.5% and the latter 65%. Every boy carried on the roll at the time of the Annual Examination is examined and classified even though he has been with us for only a short time.

At an open examination held at Canton last July, for travelling studentships to America and Europe, and for which between three and four hundred candidates competed, Queen's College boys were placed 3rd, 7th, 9th and 12th respectively in the successful list com- prising 20 names: while the 1st and 3rd places in a Supplementary List of 5 names were also won by two other of our boys. The value of these studentships will be understood when it is stated that each student will have to graduate in the faculty selected, and pass a further year in post-graduate work-which means five or six years

1

N 8

abroad. All expenses incurred during this lengthy period are to be borne by the Chinese Government, which also provided $120 for outfit per student, as well as passages to and fro. Two of our successful boys were brothers, and their father is also one of our old boys.

At the first Entrance Examination, to the University of Hong- kong held in August last, 41 students entered their names, and 39 actually attended: the Final Pass List contained 22 names, and of these successful candidates 9, i.e., 41% of the entire list, were Queen's College boys. 22 Queen's College boys are now at the University 9 in the Faculty of Medicine, and 9 in Engineering : the other 4 are studying for an Arts degree.

General:-The Register of Boys Married shows that 33 boys applied for Leave from School in order to be married during the year. The average age of these applicants was 17 years and 7 months, the youngest being 14 years and 10 months and the oldest 21. 28 of them were in the Upper School, and 5 in the Remove Section.

Our Library numbers roughly 2,500 volumes classified accord- ing to subject matter into some 15 sections. During the year 3,040 borrowings were effected, chiefly from the section of Fiction, History and Geography. 236 different boys borrowed books, and of these, 86 were regular borrowers. Mr. Brawn, who has control of the Library, tells me it is gratifying to note the care that boys have taken of the books loaned to theni.

A word here concerning the recipients of Scholarships may not be out of place. It will give some idea of the substantial help that these benefactions afford. A Chinese boy, the son of parents in very humble circumstances, in March, 1910, was admitted as a Government Free Scholar from one of the District Schools. He got his Class Prize in 1910, the Blake Scholarship in 1911 and the Wright Scholarship in 1912. At the last Oxford Local Examina- tion, he passed as a Senior, getting distinction in Classical Chinese and an

extra certificate exempting him from Responsions at Oxford. The latter document would have given him entrance without examination, to our local University. Before the results had been received from Oxford, the boy, eager to enter the Hong- kong University, sat for the Entrance Examination, and passed. He is now entered and is a member of the Engineering section.

20. Extracts from the report of the Normal Master, Mr. B. Tanner, are given below:--

I must in the first place point out that owing to several promotions to assistant masterships, two deaths from Plague, one resignation on account of ill-health, and two dismissals, more new appointments have been made during the year than usual, so that at the examination held in July there was no Third Year Pupil Teacher examined; one only had completed his Second Year of service, and of the rest-those taking First Year papers-not one

N 9

had reached the end of a full year's service, some having signed articles as recently as four, three, and two months before the examination.

Notwithstanding this, it gives me much pleasure to say that all the Pupil Teachers examined have done good work in the Class Room, and have done their best to benefit from instruction received in the Normal Class and at the Technical Institute, most of them showing quite a creditable amount of promise.

In the papers set at the annual examination in July, very satisfactory marks were obtained in most subjects by all candidates, the percentage of passes ranging from 75 to 100; the only poor papers sent in were those in Physical Geography, the percentage here obtained being only 25. In Practical Teaching, also, the marks obtained (awarded by the Headmaster) were very creditable; in two cases. 120 marks being obtained out of a possible 150, while the most recently articled Pupil Teacher received 60. Of the 8 candidates examined, 6 passed, thus giving a percentage of 75.

21. Extracts from the report of the Translation Master, Rev. H. R. Wells, are given below:-

Vernacular studies are the most important in this branch of the College work, as progress in translation work must depend largely on proficiency in Vernacular.

The introduction of Vernacular Classes in the Upper School has already borne fruit, as seen in the translation work; fewer wrong characters are written, and the boys learn to express them- selves more readily and correctly in Chinese.

Perhaps the Revolution and the establishment of the Republic have had some effect on the boys in the matter of Vernacular studies in any case there seems to be a growing desire to benefit by the instruction given.

:

Some boys in the Upper School ask to be excused from Verna- cular studies as their work is already in advance of our highest standard it should be our aim to establish a higher grade Class in the near future for boys who have obtained over 75% in our highest class (5th).

The percentage of boys in the higher Chinese Classes in the Upper School has increased largely during the twelve months; a table of the numbers of boys in different Classes is given below :—

Table showing Percentage of Boys in Vernacular Classes (Upper School) in September, 1911 and 1912.

1911.

per cent.

1912. per cent.

Class 1 (lowest)

6

2

Class 2

22

15

Class 3

- 36

28

Class 4

22

32

Class 5 (highest)-

14

23

N 10

If we can gradually eliminate Classes 1 and 2 and establish at least one higher Class, it will confer a very great benefit on the best scholars.

The translation work is also improving, and we may look for better results as the improvement in Vernacular continues.

DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade.

22. The combined average attendance at the 3 schools (Saiying- pun, Wantsai and Yaumati) was 720 (728 in 1911). The maximum enrolment was 899 (885 in 1911.) The amount collected in fees was $22,971 ($22,529 in 1911) and the nett cost to Government was $16,640 ($16,252 in 1911). The average cost per pupil was $23.11 ($22.32 in 1911).

23. Saiyingpun had the highest attendance since 1909, after which year the numbers were intentionally reduced. A matshed extension has been made in the playground to seat 40 boys, and this has been full throughout the year.

Further extensions are in con- templation.

24. Plague seriously affected Wantsai School. The Headmaster estimates that between 30 and 40 of his pupils died.

25. Yaumati School probably suffered considerably from the prolonged and serious indisposition of the Headmaster. The average attendance fell to 164 (191 in 1911). A second English master has been sanctioned for Yaumati in 1913. The additions to the school building were completed in July last.

26. The condition of the District Schools as a whole appears highly satisfactory. The work of the top Class in each School was severely tested by the scholarship examination into Queen's College, which is conducted by masters of the College. Their report is given. Referring to it, I am not altogether convinced as to the desirability of teaching geometry to Class 4 at all, except perhaps to such boys as intend to go on to the University.

27. Report of the Examiners:-

ENGLISH.

Dictation. Satisfactory. Shews distinct improvement. Reading. Shews evidence of careful teaching, and is very good all round, notwithstanding the difficulty of the "Reader" used.

Conversation. Taken in three sections dealing with :-

(a.) passage read,

(b.) object lessons,

(c.) general conversation.

N 11

Very satisfactory indeed, all except a very few boys possessing quite a good vocabulary, the only noticeable weakness being in connection with the tenses of verbs.

Recitation.-Saiyingpun-delivery too rapid-articulation and pronunciation consequently faulty. Knowledge of subject matter excellent. Wantsai and Yaumati delivery much more deliberate and much greater at- tention paid to small points of pronunciation; but knowledge of subject matter not so good as Saiying- pun,

Grammar. Although marks were obtained sufficient for a pass by many candidates, this subject was badly done. There is no improvement on former years.

Correspondence.--All boys have evidently been carefully instructed in the correct arrangement of the different parts of a letter. In each school a small proportion of the letters submitted were distinctly good, while the rest fell a long way behind.

Essay. Throughout the results were most satisfactory. Geography. Very satisfactory, the papers giving evidence not only of careful teaching but in many cases of in- dependent thought on the part of the boys.

MATHEMATICS.

Geometry. Thoroughly unsatisfactory.

The great ma-

jority of the boys seem to have no reasoning power.

Arithmetic.-A distinct improvement is shewn here in method and in arrangement, but the marks obtained were below the expectation of the examiners.

Algebra.-Very satisfactory. A distinct improvement in

every way on former years.

CHINESE.

. Wantsai and Saiyingpun.

Yaumati.

Results very good.

Results good.

Discipline and General Behaviour. Excellent.

LOWER GRADE.

28. Praya East School, the sole survivor of an attempt to establish Government Lower Grade English Schools for Chinese in Victoria, continues to do well. The average attendance was 65 (67 in 1911). It has the privilege of using the Victoria School football ground, and takes full advantage of it.

29. Ping Shan School has been removed to Uen Long its original home, a far more central situation. The attendance has

N 12

fallen to 14 (34 in 1911). This falling off was due in the first instance to the unfriendly action of the Elders of Ping Shan village, which led to its removal. It is now doing considerably better.

30. Tai Po School is evidently meeting an increasing demand for English. The average attendance was 31 (20 in 1911, and 11 in 1910).

31. Cheung Chau School has fallen in numbers to 21 (32 in 1911). This is attributed to a general departure during the Plague

season.

32. The work done in these outlying schools is fair.

33. The School for Indians continues to advance. The average attendance was 58 (50 in 1911). It would seem that this

school is capable of considerable development.

BRITISH SCHOOLS.

34. Kowloon British School. The attendance shewed an in- crease to 52 (46 in 1911). Most of the increase took place towards the end of the year and a much greater advance seems probable. The attendance at the British Schools is greatly affected by the general state of prosperity in the Colony, falling after a period of depression and rising in consequence of extended employment or better remuneration of Europeans.

35. Miss Anderson, a trained teacher from home, joined the Staff in the course of the year, and the Staff now consists of the Headmistress (also trained and specially qualified to teach French and Singing), Miss Anderson, Miss Neave and Miss Robson: the two last named have passed the 2nd and 1st year's examinations respectively for the Women Teachers' Course.

36. The work of the school as a whole reaches a high standard. Unfortunately parents seem unwilling to put this to the test by allowing their daughters to enter for the Oxford Local examinations.

37. The Headmistress continues to lament the lack of a playground.

38. The quarterly medical inspections took place as usual. Reports are sent to parents in cases where the health of their children requires attention.

39. Particular attention is paid to the physical training of the pupils. There is a daily lesson in Swedish drill, followed by marching and simple dancing step exercises.

40. Victoria British School.--A great improvement has taken place in the Upper School, which consisted at the end of the year of some 15 boys. They are being prepared for the Oxford

N 13

Examinations, Senior, Junior and Preliminary. Last July one boy passed the Junior and 2 the Preliminary, which is at least a beginning. The bigger boys are respectful and well under control; indeed, the whole school is.

41. It was decided in the course of the year to permit girls over 13 to remain at the school. They are kept quite apart from the bigger boys.

42. The drilling of the girls, conducted by Mrs. Bishop, is un- usually well done. The boys unfortunately have been doing no drill. Miniature rifles have now been ordered, and a range is to be laid out. It is hoped that all the big boys will join the Cadet Corps now re-formed.

43. The average attendance rose to 47 (30 in 1911) and is. rapidly increasing.

44. The Staff consists of the Headmaster, Mrs. Bishop (trained) and 2 local Mistresses. The school has a good playing field. The medical inspection is the same as at Kowloon School.

The nett cost of the two British Schools was $6,790, or $68.50 for each unit of the average attendance. These figures shew a great decrease as compared with 1909, when the nett cost was $12,094 and the cost of each unit $151. In that year the combined attendance was only 80.

GIRLS' SCHOOLS.

45. Belilios Public School for Girls.—Mrs. Tutcher was on leave throughout the greater part of the year, Miss Pearce acting as Head- mistress. The addition to the building has been begun. Pending its completion the two lowest Standards of the Vernacular School are still housed at Taipingshan.

46. The work done by the school whether regarded by the results of examinations or the tone and conduct of the girls is very satisfactory. Two Junior and four Preliminary candidates passed the Oxford Local Examinations. These six were the only girls who were from their position in the school fit to go up for the examinations. In the course of a few years the number of Chinese girls in the Upper School will be greatly increased: the school is rapidly becoming a High School for Chinese girls.

47. This present small attendance in the Upper Classes is due partly to the fact that the study of English by Chinese girls is a thing of recent growth: possibly also because their Chinese studies, which are very thorough, occupy too great a proportion of their school life. This matter is being investigated.

UNIVERSITY OF HONGKONG.

48. The University is entirely independent of the Education Department; but the Director of Education is a member ex officio

N 14

of the Court, Council and Senate, and thus forms a connecting link between the Secondary Schools of the Colony and the University.

49. Every effort is made to keep the connection as close as possible.

50. I am indebted to the Registrar for the following informa- tion:-

The University of Hongkong is situated at West Point, Victoria, and contains seventy-two students. The ages vary from 16 to 37 with one exceptional case of 56 years. 85% of the students are between 16 years and 24 years of age, and the average is 19 to 20 years. Thirty-seven of the students take Engineering and twenty- one take Medicine. There is a Provisional Arts Course which gives Courses in Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Chinese, English, History and Economics. The Degree is modelled on the London Pass Degree. The students come from the Schools of Hongkong for the most part, and from Canton. Mission Schools of various Denominations send many, and the Free School at Penang sends a few. There is every prospect that the number of students from the Straits will increase considerably in the near future. As the University is only just founded we cannot tell where the students will go after graduating, but it is expected that they will become Engineers and doctors on the Coast and later in China itself. The Arts students will most probably enter the Chinese Govern- ment service.

HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

(Tables XI, XII und XIII.)

51. Tables XII and XIII shew a cost to Government of $6,730 as compared with an average of $6,063 for the previous 4 years. This increase is due to the withdrawal of the Li Shing Grant of $1,100 which now goes to the University. The College of Medicine contribution of $300 was also withdrawn in the fourth quarter of the year. Meanwhile expenditure has remained stationary.

52. Table XIII shews a great apparent increase in the number of students to 421: (average 302 for the past 4 years). The attendance has been swelled by a new First Aid Class of 106 students paying very small fees: without these there would be no increase in numbers, and the average cost per unit would be very considerably increased.

53. The University has not only hurt the purse of the Institute: it is certain that it will withdraw students from certain sections. This is in no wise a matter for despondency. Only it becomes the inore necessary to take stock of what the Institute has done in the past, and to consider the lines it can now follow most profitably.

54. One of the original aspirations of the Institute has proved impossible of realisation. It was hoped that each student would take a group of allied subjects as suggested in the syllabus; and that he would follow his group for two or three years, and thus eventually acquire certificates showing a respectable sum total of

N 15

qualifications. But excluding the First Aid Students, out of 315 on the roll, only 160 took an examination at all in 1912. Of these 106 passed. Of the 106, only 9 passed in 2 subjects: the rest passed in 1 subject only. On the other hand it is satisfactory to find that out of 115" passes 65 were for Second or Third Year's Courses.

55. A rough statement of the cost of the various classes here follows, arranged in descending order of the nett cost, excluding general charges:-

Subject.

No. of Passes.

Net cost (salaries less fees).

<<

Cost

'Pass

per

Remarks.

Shorthand,

25 $298.00 $11.90

Sanitation,

Co

42.00

14.00

Mathematics,

12

174.00

14.50

Teachers (women),..

8

128.00

16.00

Physics,

7

164.00

23.40 Discontinued.

English,

21

641.00

30.50

Building Construc-

4

145.00 36.25

tion,.....

Applied Mechanics,..

3

123.00 41.00

Teachers (men),

20

992.00 49.60

Electricity,

3

163.00 54.30

Field Surveying,

1

57.50 57.50

French,.

172.00

57.50

Chemistry,

6

373.00

62.10

Machine Drawing, ...

0

174.00

Discontinued.

Book-keeping,

78.00

A new class :

Steam,

60.00

German,

0

34.00

Chinese,

0

16.00

not examined. Discontinued.

A new class:

not examined. Discontinued.

Total,...

116

N 16

56. The Shorthand "passes " are mainly for theory; but a few low speed certificates have been obtained; and a good many other students have undoubtedly obtained a valuable knowledge of Shorthand, who have been unable to sit for examination. On the whole I am satisfied that the Class is doing very valuable work. It is handicapped by the ignorance of English which some of the students display, and by the dilettantism of others. Remedies are being applied to these obstacles to good work.

57. The passes in Mathematics include 4 in Stage II and 1 in Stage III.

58. The work done by the Teachers' Classes is very satisfac- tory. The fees of successful candidates in these Classes amounting to $333 were refunded to them. These Classes are compulsory for "local" teachers in Government Schools. The cost of the Teachers' Class for men seems somewhat high; but it appears that this is mainly owing to the stiffness of the examination, no less than 11 of the 31 candidates failing. There were 11 passes in Stage III.

59. The Physics Closs has been absorbed by the University.

60. The English Class is doing good work. A Stage III including Logic and Political Economy was started in the year under review, and obtained 6 passes.

61. The Chemistry Class has done valuable work. 2 of the 6 passes were in Stage III and 2 in Stage II.

62. There is a very good laboratory furnished mainly out of the Li Shing Grant.

63. A course of lectures on Sanitation by Dr. W. W. Pearse, M.D., D.P.II. (Aber.), was conducted during the June term under the auspices of the Royal Sanitary Institute, London. 3 candidates out of 6 obtained Certificates from the Royal Sanitary Institute as Inspectors of Nuisances.

64. 19 Senior and 11 Junior Certificates were distributed in October as the result of the 1911 Examination for First Aid to the Wounded. A class was again formed in October, 1912. The former lecturers have again kindly voluntarily consented to conduct the course, Dr. Fitzwilliams and Dr. Dalmahoy Allen conducting the Senior and Dr. Leung Chik-fan the Junior Course. The average attendance so far has been 38 in the Senior and 24 in the Junior. An examination will he held in January, 1913. The fee is $1 for the course for students belonging to the Institute or Queen's College, and $2 for others.

65. To test the Classes by studying the cost of passes as has been done, is a very hard test indeed, and only a fair one if its severity is borne in mind. There is no compulsion upon students to attend at examination, and I am assured that many will not do so who could pass if they cared to try.

:

N 17

66. Since the opening of the Institute several Classes, e.g., a Chinese Class for non-Chinese, have been opened upon an apparent demand, have lasted a short while and proved failures. It is desirable in an institution of this sort that such experiments should be made, so far as funds admit, in order that it may keep abreast of the needs of the community.

HYGIENE.

67. Hygiene is a compulsory subject in the Remove and Upper Classes of all schools where English is taught, and in Vernacular Schools in all Standards above the Third. It was decided in the current year to abandon the annual competition for the Nathan Shield, there being a general feeling among the Heads of Schools that it led to overmuch cramming. At the same time it must be said that the competition during the years it has been in existence has done good work, in impressing a number of very essential facts concerning the health of the Colony on a very large number of pupils. The most important of these are in connection with the spread of Malarial Fever and Bubonic Plague. In every school arrangements are made for the observation of the larve of the anopheline mosquito and its development. It is unfortunately impossible to make a practical demonstration with the carriers of Plague; but there is little doubt in the minds of the Chinese of its connection somehow or other with the rat. Special attention during the current year will be paid to Tuberculosis and Beri-Beri; their causes and prevention.

68. The "First Aid" Class at the Technical Institute started in 1911 has proved popular and numbered 106 students in 1912.

69. A teacher is employed under the Department of the Registrar General who spends his time in delivering out-of-door lectures on Hygiene.

70. Steps are being taken to ensure the vaccination of all pupils in Government and Grant Schools.

71. I append the following Tables:-

I. Statistics relating to Government Schools (staff,

attendance, fees, cost, etc.).

II. -Statistics shewing the total attendance at schools in

the Colony for each year from 1899.

III. Statistics relating to Grant Schools and payment of

Grant in Aid.

IIIA.-Statistics relating to Private Schools.

IV. Table shewing expenditure, revenue and average number of pupils under instruction in the Edu- cation Department during the period from 1902 to 1912.

N 18

V.--Table shewing the percentage of the Colonial Revenue spent on Education during the period from 1902 to 1912.

VI. Oxford Local Examination Results, 1912.

VII.-Table shewing the number of passes obtained in the Oxford Local Examinations during the period from 1905 to 1912.

VIII. Table shewing results of the Hygiene Shield

Competition (July, 1912).

IX-Table shewing the amount of fees remitted to Free

Scholars in Government Schools during 1912.

X.-Table of Scholarships held at Queen's College.

XI. Table of Examination Results: Technical Institute

June, 1912.

XII.-Table of Revenue and Expenditure in the Technical

Institute.

XIII.-Comparative Table of Statistics for five years

(1908-1912) in the Technical Institute.

72. The following Annexes will be found following the above Tables:-

(a.) Lists of Chinese Teachers who hold certificates from the Technical Institute for attending the courses and passing the prescribed examinations in the Classes for Teachers.

(b.) Addresses at Prize-givings by His Excellency the

Governor.

(c.) Table of Government Scholarships sanctioned for

1913.

(d.) Table of new Government Scholarships.

73. During the first 10 months of the year Mr. Wood acted for me, while I was acting as First Police Magistrate.

E. IRVING, Director of Education.

HONGKONG, 29th March, 1913,

X

N 19

Table I.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.—[The figures in I

STAFF.

No.

NAME AND NATURE.

Number of Classos.

Number | M

of School 1

*

Days. Et

English.

Local.

Vernacular.

221

1

Queen's College, (Boys),................

15

10 Masters, **5 and 5 Visiting

Masters.

2

Kowloon British School--Children of European British

Parentage, (Boys under thirteen and Girls),

3

Victoria British School-Children of European British

Parentage, (Girls under thirteen and Boys),

230

192

6 and Infant Class!

196/2

1934

6 and Infant Class.

198

195/

4 Saiyingpun English School, (Boys),

8 Masters, **

4

10

5

228

196

5

Yaumati

do.,

do.,

i

6

Wantsai

do,

do.,

1

7 Masters, **

2

191

222

7 Masters,

**

5

232

3 Masters.

197

11 Mistresses.

2 Pupil Teachers.

7

9

Belilios Public School, (Girls),

Praya East English School, (Boys),

English School for Indians, do.,

2

206

3 Needlework Tea-

chers.

200

1 Drawing Master.

1

1933

!

10

Tai Po English School,

do.,

-

"}

Uen Long or Ping Shan

do.,

do.

12 Cheung Chau

do..

dv.,

CHINESE VERNACULAR PRIMARY EDUCATION

BOARD SCHOOLS.

:

:

:

:

227

28

4

240

205

1

1

208

210

1

212

212

1

1

3

230

13

West Point School, (Boys);

2

2

90

14

Tang Lung Chau School, (Boys),

N

2

91

* "English" Teacher includes all teachers of European parentage.

"Local" Teacher includes all teachers of other than European parentage teaching in English. Indians.

** The pupil teachers at Queen's College and the District Schools are now charged to the office of the Director

of Education. Their number was increased from 11 to 15.

N 19

OOLS.-[The figures in Red are those for last year.]

Ditto for

Net Cost to each unit in

Govern- ment.

Average Attendance.

(.

(.

(.

Number Maximum

Number of

Average Rate of

Classes.

of School Monthly Ar-

Days. Eurolment. tendance. per mensem.

Fees

Gross Cost,

Fees Collected.

r.

221

790

667

82,490.93

40,435.00 42,055.93

63.05

iog

230

661

555

$5

79,254.93

32,720.00 46,534.93

|

83.85

192

61

46.

4,214.30

1,507.50 2,706.80

58.84

6

1961

64

52

$2 to $5

4,655.52

1,672.00

2,983.52

57.37

and Infant Class.

193

38

36

5,244.35

1,077.50

4,166.85

138.90

6

198

74

47

$2 10 $5

5,189.54

1,683.50

3,806.01

80.93

and Infant Clas

195

355

285

17,259.09

8.947.00

8,012.09

29.17

10

5

228

383

318

$3

17,186.62 10,107.00

7,079.62

22.26

196

229

191

8,980.64

5,872.00 3,108.64

16.28

5

1911

213

164

$3

10,081.97

222

301

252

5,199.00 4,882.97

12,541.60 7,710.00 4,831.60

29.77

19.17

5

232

303

238

$3

12,342.58, 7,665.00

4,677 53

19.65

197

484

427

16,685.04

4,528.00 12,157.04

28.47

ners.

Tea-

2061/

520

411

$1

17,957.77

4,635.00

13,322.77

32.12

200

87

67

2,641.24

1,484.00

1,157.24

17.24

ster.

3

1933

101

65

$2

2,923.63

1,448.00

1,475.63

22.70

237

66

50

2,027.41

543.00 1,484.41

29.69

240

70

58

$1

2,107.31

615.00 1,462.31

25.21

205/

32

20

1,031.08

113,50

917.58

45.88

208

43

31

50 cents.

1,039.16

179.50

879.66

28.38

210

48

34

1,286 28

154.00

1,132.28

33.30

212

21

14

50 cents.

1,504.69

77.00

1,427.69

101.98

212

43

32

723.21

179.50

.543.71

16.99

230

38

21

50 cents.

$25.93

141.50

684.43

32.59

Է

2,494

1,974

155,389.60 66,172.50 89,217.10

|

2

90

58

37

Free.

373.89

2

91

18

13

d.

370.15

2,554

2,120

English.

2,570

2,024

he office of the Director

REMARKS.

373.89

10.11 Opened in Sept., 1912.

370.15

28.32

Do.

155,948.30 72,597.00 83,351.30

156,133.64 66,172.50 89,961.14

|

:

Number of

Pupils.

7,800

1899.

Table II.

STATISTICS SIEWING TOTAL ATTENDANCE AT SCHOOLS IN THE COLONY FOR EACH YEAR FROM 1899 TO 1912.

1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. | 1909. | 1910. 1911. 1912.

7,700

7,600

7,500

7,400

7,300

7,200

7,100

7,000

6,900

!

6,800

6,700

6,600

6,500

6,400

6,300

6,200

6,100

6,000

5,900

5,800

5,700

5,600

5,500

5,400

5,300

5,200

5,100

}

5,000

4.90

7,821

!

L

5,300

5,200

5,100

5,000

4,900

4,800

4,700

4,600

4,500

4,400

4,300

4,200

4,100

4,000

3,900

8,800

3,700

3,600

3,500

3,400

3,300

3,200

3,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

2,600

2,500

2,400

2,300

2,200

2,100

2,000

1,900

1,800

1,700

1,600

1,500

1,400

1 300

8,865

3,827

"190577

2,506

:

8,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

2,600

2,500

2,400

2,300

2,200

2,100

2,000

1,900

1,800

1,700

1,600

1,500

1,400

1,300

1,200

1,100

1,000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

RED Line

BLACK Line

DOTTED RED Line

2,

2,506

19377

861

Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction principally in English, (including Queen's College). (Average Attendance.)

Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction principally in the Vernacular. (Average Attendance.)

=Private Schools, giving instruction in the day time in English. (Max. Enrolment.)

DOTTED BLACK_Line=Private Schools, giving instruction in the day time in the Vernacular. (Max. Enrolment.) BLUE Line

VIOLET Line

Private Night Schools. Maximum Enrolment.

Technical Institute. Maximum Enrolment.

The population of the Colony increased between 1906 and 1911 from 319,803 to 456,739.

1,334

609

421

:

N 23

TABLE III.

ANNUAL GRANT

(Code of 1910.)

ENGLISH

SCHOOLS.

Code Section 38 A. & B.

Average Attendance.

No.

Name and Nature of School

Mission.

183

2

St. Joseph's College, (B.) Italian Convent, (G.) * French Convent, (G.)

*

*

4 English School for Portuguese (M.)

School, (G.) *.

Diu

9

St.

13

St. Fi

11

Ellis k

9

.)

, (G.)

*

*

R. C. M.

22

C. of F

""

R. C. M.

">

Secular.

∞ ON-CO 0. 00 00 1 - 00

Total.

Bato for the Upper

and Remove Class

251

642

216 170

295 270511 440

201

374

83

80

208 200† 293 280

219

117

25

71

65 † 96

95

244

88

14

55

50 † 69

65

207

69

26

31

248

348

161 150

118

† 279

200

117

17

76

93

240

111

15

67 65 † 82

800 22

115

818 141

375

516

* HNNNIINNN

22

22

24

22

22

2,684 700

1,296

1,996

VERNACULAR

SCHOOI

Under Section 39 A. & B.

No.

Name and Nature of Schoo.

Mission.

171

Berlin Foundling House, ( G.) **

Ber. M.

18

Fairlea, (G.)

C. M. S.

19

20

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.) ** Training Home for Girls, **

>>

L. M. S.

4

Number of

Standards.

PR 1−

Number

of

Maximum School Enrolment.

Attendance. Rate.

Days.

257

2061/ 244

228

828

82

† 76 60

9

67

53

11

76

68

11

89

† 76 60

11

314

273

VERNACULAR SCHOO

Under Section 39 A.

22

Bridge Street, (G.)

Holy Infancy, (M.)

*

R. C. M.

>>

25

Hunghom. (G.) *

"

26

Yaumati, (G.)

28

Aberdeen, (M.) *

3

12 12 12 10 2

237

239

2421

241

259

2

No 109 Second Ste 4. (B) *

**

LM S

f

218

61

NASRSE

82

59

80

63

60

14

75

57

56

44

18

R. C. M.

*

__1N 23 ---

TABLE III.

JAL GRANT LIST.

(Code of 1910.)

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

Code Section 38 A. & B.

Average Attendance.

Missiou.

Total.

Rato for the Upper

and Remove Class

Total.

Rate for the

Lower Classes.

Total.

Total Capita- tion Grant.

Rent Grant.

Oxford Local,

Grant.

Total Grants,

$

ورد

*

R. C. M.

8

""

22

6

""

C. of A

>>

R. C. M.

"

Secular.

0270 0. 00 00 1 - 00

251

642

216 170

295 270511 440

24

4,080 15

4,050 8,130

9

201:

374

85 80

208 200 † 293 280

22

1,760 14

2,800 | 4,560

219

117

25

71

65 96 95

22

550 14

910 1,460

$

CA

1,170 | 9,300 160 4,720 75 1,535

244

88

14

55

50 † 69

65

22

308 15

750 1,058

480

1,538

+

207

69

26

31

324- 15

405. 1,089

600

248

348

161 150

118

† 279

24

3,600 15

1,770 5,370

150 1,839 1,155 | 6,525

200

17

76

93

22

374 14

1,064 1,438

240

111

15

67 65† 82

80

22

330 14

115

818

141

375

516

22

1,551 · 14

F

2,684 700

1,296

1,996

13,177

910 1,240 2,625 4,17C

10 1,448

10 1,250

220 4,396

15,344 28,521 | 1,080| 2,950 32,551

RNACULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A. & B.

Mission.

Number of

Standards.

Number

of

Maximum School Enrolment.

Days.

Attendance.

Rate.

Total Capita-

tion Grant,

Rent Grant.

$

Ber. M.

C. M. S.

257 206

""

L. M. S.

244 228

2528

† 76 60

9

540

540

67

53

11

583

583

76

68

11

748

748

89

† 76 60

11

660

660

314

273

2,531

2,531

RNACULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A.

L. M. S.

4

1、。 Y 1、ཀྱི རཀ ལ ཡ །

237/

82

59

266

266

5

239

80

63

378

378

5

242

60

44

308

! 308

241

75

57

399

399

3

259

56

14

180

180

218

61

48

240

240

1

254

40

32

128

136

264

>

219

19

16

4

64

120

184

Total Grants.

1231 ROU

No.

Name and Natue of Schoo.

Mission.

Under êCLIVI

Number of

Standards.

Number of School

Maximum Enrolment.

Attendance.

Rate.

Days.

17!

Berlin Foundling House, ( G.)

**

18

Fairlea, (G.)

**

Ber. M. C. M. S.

257

82

F

2063/

67

† 76 60

53

9

11

19

20

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (C.) ** Training Home for Girls, **

244

76

68

11

L. M. S.

228

89

† 76-60

314

273

4

VERNACULAR

Under Section 39 A.

SCHOOI

22

Bridges Street, (G.) *

R. C. M.

Holy Infancy, (M.)

25

Hunghom, (G.) *

26

Yaumati, (G.)

ཨ་མ་ང

10 10 10 10

237

82

59

239

80

63

242

60

44

244

75

آن

28

29

30

Aberdeen, (M.) *

No. 109 Second Street, (B.) * * Bridges Street, (G.) **

259

56

14

""

L. M. S.

""

218

61

48

251

10

32

31

No. 5 Clarence Terrace, (G.)

**

219

19

16

وو

33

No. 199 Queen' Road East, (G.)

**

217

84

65

22

31

35

No. 156 Reclamation Street, Yaumatis (B.)** No. 28 D'Aguilar street, (G.) ****

226

121

† 97 60

225

38

30

22

36

Wanchai Chapel, (B.) * *

210

59

38

22

37

Hospital Chapel, (B.)* *

232

70

54

25

38

No. 84 Canton Road, (G.)

#

*

249

49

† 33 30

40

No. 343 Queen's Road West, (B.) *.*

212

59

44

42

Tanglungchan Chapel, (B.) *

210

11

21

13

43

No. 171 Portland Street, Yaumati, (B.) * *

208

31

23

""

44

No. 20 Aberdeen Street, (G.) * *

223

44

36

33

45

Tanglungchau Chapel, (G.) * *

216

45

35

46

Wanchai Chapel, (G.) * *

218

62

40

25

47

Bridges Street, (B.)

***

A. B. M.

239

62

19

48

Shamshuipo, (M.) * ́*

B. M.

205

67

49

19

Shaukiwan, (M.) **

223

60

49

50

Tokwawan, (B.) **

51

High Street, (G.) **

53

No. 218 Hollywood Road, (B.) **

C. M. S.

55

No. 36 Lyndhurst Terrace, (G.) * *

57

No. 6 Western Street, (G.)

59

60

61

62

63

*

61

68

69

70

Kowloon City, (G.)

Yaumati Chapel, (G.) * *

*

Nos. 44 & 46 Queen's Road West, (G.) **. No. 20 Pokfulam Road, (G.) Shaukiwan, (G.) Stanley, (M.) *

**

No. 263 Queen's Road West, (B.) ** Yo 5 Elgin, Tact., (*) * *

No. 35 Pottinger Street, (G.) **

WL M.

མ ༢ འབྲུ ནིམ

213

57

42

5

2303/

100

57

237

73

49

245

45

40

244

71

† 55 45

243

62

† 45 40

22

2201

59

48

22

**

238

43

40

ލ

2391

36

27

22

""

Rh. M.

224

46

† 38 35

209

140

† 90 80

235

65

50

213

66

† 62 60

71

Kowloon City, (B.)

* *

C. M. S. B. M.

228

69

53

A L

2093

87

72

2.384

1,795

38

I

Total.......

5,382

4,064

3L 4

CHINESE VERNACULAR PRIMARY E.

BOARD SCHOOLS.

""

19

No. 122 Hollywood Road,

No. 253 Queen's Road West,

Temple Yaumati (Kai Foig),

(Tang Wa),

No. 124 Hollywood Road,

No. 68 Queen's Road West (2nd A. or),

No. 10 Ladder Street,

A P

!

M. M. T.

>>

32

">

77

25

27

23

IS

33

1

(3rd flor),

27

25

25

Cont" Sur

27

A 00 00 00 00 F

THE

Mission,

Under Section 9 11.

Number of

Standards.

Number

of Maximum Attendance. School Enrolment..

Days.

Rate.

Total Capita-

tion Grant.

Rent Grant.

Total Grants.

$

Ber. M.

257

82

† 76 60

9

540

540

C. M. S.

2063

67

53

11

583

583

244

76

11

748

748

>>

L. M. S.

228

89

+ 76-60

11

660

660

314

273

2,531

...

2,531

RNACULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A.

1

R. C. M.

>>

دو

72.

10 10 10 10 M

237

82

59

266

266

239

80

63

378

378

2424

60

44

308

308

244

75

57

399

399

259

56

44

180

180

L. M. S.

218

61

48

240

240

254

40

32

128

136

261

21

219

19

16

64

120

184

217

84

65

325

120

445

*

226

121

† 97 60

240

240

225

38

30

120

160

280

""

210

59

38

190

190

""

232

70

54

162 !

162

>>

249

49

† 33 30

120

80

200

མ ན མ བ བ ང མན

212

59

44

220

220

210

41

21

63

63

208

31

28

4

92

92

11

223

41

36

144

160

304

22

216

45

35

140

140

22

218

62

40

160

160

""

A. B. M.

239

62

49

221

221

B. M.

205

67

49

147

147

223

60

49

196

196

**

213

57

42

168

163

""

230

100

57

171

171

""

C. M. S.

237

73

49

245

245

245

45

40

160

216

376

244

71

† 55 45

180

136

316

22

243

62

† 45 40

160

160

220

59

48

192

192

238

43

40

160

116

276

239

36

27

135

72

207

224

46

† 38 35

175

175

""

Rh. M.

W. M.

22

C. M. S. B. M.

209

140

† 90 80

320

320

༡35

65

† 51 50

201

176

376

243

66

† 62 60

300

200

500

228

69

53

275

90

365

Fད"

2093

87

72

360

120

480

2,384

1,795

7,704 : 1,902

9,606

Total,......

5,382

4,064

38,756 2,982 2,950 14.688

M. M. T.

1

""

ERNACULAR PRIMARY EDUCATION

BOARD SCHOOLS.

""

25 27

23

18

33

27

25

25

* 00 00 00 00 4 þ

100

108

92

51

99

75

100

48

49

36 Wanchai Chapel, (B.)

Hospital Chapel, (B.)* *

37

38

No. 84 Canton Road, (G.)

10

***

No. 343 Queen's Road West, (B.) * *

42 Tanglungchan Chapel, (B.) * *

43

41

45

46 47

1

F

No. 171 Portland Street, Yaumati, (B.) *

No. 20A Aberdeen Street, (G.) * *

Tanglungchau Chapel, (G.) **

Wanchai Chapel, (G.)

Bridges Street, (B.)

Shamshuipo, (M.) * ́*

Shankiwan, (M.) **

****

210

اره

-4

232

70

54

""

249

49

† 33 30

2124

59

44

27

210

11

21

>>

**

208

31

23

27

223

36

>>

216

45

35

""

218

40

"

A. B. M.

239

49

B. M.

203

67

49

223

60

49

50

Tokwawan, (B.) * *

>

17

213

57

42

51

High Street, (G.) **

2305

100

57

53

No. 218 Hollywood Road, (B.) **

C. M. S.

237

73

49

55

No. 36 Lyndhurst Terrace, (G.)

215

45

40

""

57

No. 6 Western Street, (G.) **

2445

71

59

Yaumati Chapel, (G.)

22

**

243

62

† 55 45 † 45 40

1959 195

+

60

61

No. 20 Pokfulam Road, (G.) **

Nos. 44 & 46 Queen's Road West, (G.) **

"2

220

59

48

""

238

43

40

62

63

Stanley, (M.)*

64

68

Shaukiwan, (G.) **

No. 263 Queen's Road West, (B.) **

No. 5-Elgin, Staret, (G) **.

2893

36

27

69

No. 35 Pottinger Stre t, (G.)

*

70

Kowloon City, (G.) *

74

Kowloon City, (B.)

**

"}

"

Rh. M.

HL M.

C. M. S. B. M.

224

46

† 38 35

209

140

† 90 80

235

65

† 51 50

243

66

† 62 60

228

69

53

ས "

209

87

72

38

2,36 {

1,795

Total,... 5,382

1,064

CHINESE VERNACULAR PRIMARY :

BOARD SCHOOLS.

-

No. 253 Queen's Road West, Temple Yaumati (Kai Fong),

(Tung Wa), ......... No. 124 Hollywood Road,

No. 68 Queen's Road West (2nd flior),

M. M. T.

""

""

"

""

(3rd floor),

No. 122 Hollywood Road,

1

8

No. 10 Ladder Street,

""

9

No. 76 Bonham Strand West,

Conf. Soc.

10

Tai Hang Village,

""

53 (191) Total Number of Graut Schools,

(19127 "

10

25

27

23

18

33

27

1

25

25

27

15

245

Grand Total,.........

4,309

""

""

Chinese Vernacular Primary Education Board Schools.

NOTE.-R. C. M.Roman Cathol Mission.

C. of E.

Church of England.

C. M. S.

=

Chure's Missio'ary Society.

Ber. M.

Berlin Mission

L. M. S.=Londen Missitary Society. A. B. M.-American Bord Mission. Rh. M. S. Rhonish Missonary Society.

B. M.

= Base. Mission

W. M.

=W¢

B.

= Boy

G.

Gir

M.

Mis

= School year ends

= School year ends Nos. 27 #

In the case of these sc

(shewn in black) h

(shown in red). estimated number.

210

190

IMU

>>

232

70

54

162

162

249

49

† 33 30

120

80

200

5

212

59

44

220

220

210

41

21

63

63

י.

208

31

23

92

92

""

5

223

44

36

144

160

304

"

3

216

45

35

140

""

3

218

62

40

160

160

""

A. B. M.

3

239

62

49

221

221

B. M.

4

203

67

49

147

IG

223

60

49

196

196

>:

213

57

42

168

168

>>

2303

100

57

171

171

"

C. M. S.

237

73

49

245

215

1

245

45

40

160

216

376

* * *

244

71

55 45

180 136

316

>>

>>

22

>>

Rh. M.

M M.

>>

C. M. S. B. M.

10 + 10 20 10 10

243

62

45 40

160

160

220호

59

48

192

192

238

43

40

160!

116

276

2393/20

36

27

135

72

207

224

46

† 38

175

175

209

140

† 90 80

4

320

320

?༣5

65

† 51 50

202.

176.

376

243

66

† 62 ̄60

300

200

500

228

69

53

275

90 i

365

2091

87

72

360

120

480

2,384

1,795

· 7,704 ¦ 1,902

9,606

Total, 5,382

4,064

38,7562,982 2,950 44,688

ERNACULAR PRIMARY EDUCATION

BOARD SCHOOLS.

M. M. T.

23

23

17

>>

Conf. Soc.

""

25

27

23

18

33

27

25

25

27

15

245

Grand Total,....

4,309

r Primary Education Board Schools,

sion.

Society.

W. M.

B.

G.

M.

CO COIA CO CO DO CO IA ID IN

3

=Wesleyan Mission. =Boys. -Girls.

=

Mixed.

ociety.

sion.

Society.

School year ends 30th June, 1912.

School year ends 31st December, 1912.

Nos. 27 and 72 closed.

In the case of these schools the actual average attendance (shewn in black) has exceeded the estimated number (shewn in red). The grant is calculated On the estimated number.

100

108

92

54

99

81

75

100

81

45

835

45,523

}

DESCRIPTION

AND

CLASSIFICATION.

N 25

Table IIIA.

English Day.

St. Stephen's College, St. Paul's College, St. Stephen's School, C.M.S. High School,

SCHOOLS.

PUPILS. (Local Enrolment.)

Boys.

Girls.

Boys. Girls.

2

:

320

:

Q

165

2

2

320

165

ABO

A Schools,

В

do.,

do.,

6

353

10

151

6

345

22

849

English Night.

ARBO

A Schools,

do..

C do..

2008

56

10

204

16

209

469

Vernacular Day.

ABO

A Schools,

В

do.,

C

do.,

16

11

730

592

91

16

2,773

622

113

4

2,859

245

220

31

6,362

1,459

Vernacular Night.

B Schools,

3

C

do.

22883

72

60

6

1

132

8

Grand Total,..

278

31

8,132

1,632

312

9,764

Table IV.

Table showing Expenditure, Revenue and Average Number of Pupils under instruction in the Education Department, for the years 1902 to 1912.

Total Expenditure on

Education excluding

Grant Schools.

Total Revenuc.

Average Number of Pupils under Instruction.

Average Net Cost per pupil.

Percentage of the Departmental Revenue to Departmental Expenditure.

- N 26

Year.

Govern- Techni- cal In- ment Schools stitute.

Govern-

Total.

ment

Schools.

Techni-

cal In-

stitute.

Govern-

Total.

ment

Schools.

Grant

Schools.

Techni- cal In- ment stitute. Schools.

Govern-

Techni-

Grant

Excluding

Including

cal In-

Technical Technical

Schools.

stitute.

Institute.

Institute.

$

$

".

C.

0.

No.

No.

No

$ c.

$ c.

c.

1902,.

73,291

73,291

32,422.35

1903,

112,780

112,780

34,366.30

32,422.35

34,366 30

1,664 3,107

24.56

6.14

%

44 23

%

1,618

3,542

48.48

5.37

34.45

:

1904,

115,701

115,701

36,251.59

36,251.59 1,665

3,305

47.71

10.86

31.33

:

. 1905,

118,785

118,785

41,201,50

41,201,50

1.797

3,526

43.17

11.31

34.68

1906,

118,952

2,731 121,683 | 46,436.07

645.00 47.081.07

1 932

3,561

191

37.53

11.34

10.92

39.03

38.69

1907,

142,072

7,755 | 149,827

49,238 002,184.50 | 51,422.50

2,144

3,780

253

43.30

11.10

22.01

34.65

34.32

1908,

157,366

9,891 | 167,257

54,791.11 3,742.00 | 58,533.11

2,251

3,927

317

45.57

12.35

19.39

34.81

34.99

1909,

154,626

9.379164,005

68,204.25 | 3,699.50 | 71,903.75

2,326

4,234

256

37.15

13.07

22.18

44.10

43.84

1910,

163,955* 10,607 | 174,562

71,952.50 | 3,141.50| 75,094.00

1,960

4,337

327

46.94

11.77 22,83

44.00

43.01

1911...

173,292*| 9,130 182,422 72,597.00 3,459.25 76,056,25

2,120

4,183

310

47.50

13.27

18.29

41.89

41 69

1912,

171,968* 10,387 182,355 66,172.50 3,023.50 69,196.00 * Including Head Office charges.

2,024

4,309

421

52.27

14.14

17.49

38.47

37.94

Years.

- N 27

· Table V.

Percentage of Colonial Revenue spent on Education.

Total

Revenue Total spent

Total spent

excluding on Educa-

Fees

Land Sales tion (Gross Collected. and School

Fees.

C'ost).

on Educa- tion (Nett

Cost).

Percentage.

$

$

$

$

$

%

1902,

4,297,290 92,356

32,422

59,934

1.39

1903,

4,694,326 130,620 34,366

96,254

2:05

1904,

6,286,697 151,589

36,252

115,337

1.83

1905,

6,484,942 158,678

41,202

117,476

1.81

1906,

6,574,989 159,373

47,081

112,292

1.71

1907,

6,391,107 184,028

51,423

132,605

2.07

1908,

5,976,316 205,875

58,533 147,342

2:47

1909,

6,214,929 219,359

71,904

147,455

2:37

1910,

6,553,089 225,606

75,094

150,512

2.30

*1911, 6,723,169 237,942

76,056

161,886

2.41

†1912,

7,947,714 239,361

69,196

170.165

2.14

* Fees remitted to "Free Scholars" ($4,124) are not included in this table.

Do.

($4,008)

do.

y

$

L

Table VI.

Oxford Local Examination Results: 1912.

PRELIMINARY.

JUNIOR.

Honours.

Pass.

Honours.

l'ass

Honours.

SCHOOL.

Diocesan Boys', Ellis Kadoorie,

Queen's College,

St. Joseph's,..

St. Stephen's,

St. Paul's College,

Victoria British School,.. Belilios Public School, C.M.S. Girls' High School,

Diocesan Girls',

French Convent,..

Italian Convent,..

Kowloon British School,. St. Stephen's, (G.),

St. Mary's,

St. Francis'. Private Tuition,

Total,

2-10 01 - -

23

2

19

13

:

23

85

...

10 2 2 004211

212130

1

1st Class.

...

...

...

3

34

7

1

Oxford Local Higher Examination.

No of pusses.

St Joseph's College...

Diocesan Boys' School,..

2

Total

1

}

2nd Class.

:

SENIOR.

3rd Class

༥ :

Pass.

Special.

1st Division (within age limit).

2nd Division (over age).

Total.

41

12

30

11

40

4

17

9

1

1

3

33

2

191

N 28

Diocesin

Boys'.

Ellis

Kakonie

School.

Year.

Table VII.

Oxford Local Examination Results: 1905 to 1912.

:

:

:

:

N

9 17 34

9 16 27

I

...

14 20 39

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Special.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Preliminary.

Junior.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

| Preliminary.

Junior.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Preliminary.

Senior. Junior.

Special.

Senior.

Preliminary.

Junior.

Special, Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

College

H

Que n's

St.

Joseph's.

St.

Stephen's

St

Paul's

Victoria Belilios Public

British

C.M.S.

Kowloon

St.

Diocesan

French

Italian

St.

St.

Private

Girls' High

British Stephen's

Total.

Girls'.

Convent.

Convent.

Boys'. College. School.

School.

School.

School.

Girls'.

Mary's.

Francis'.

Tuition.

Junior.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Preliminary

Special.

Junior.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior,

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

:

:

:

:

1905, ....

2

1906, ....

5

4

3

2

3

... ...

6

3 4121 1

***

8

4 11

2

to

8

N

01

2

...

...

...

1907, ....

Co

4

8

2

3

...

00

715

4

6 3

1908, ....

3

411

فت

3

6

6

6

16

...

:

...

:

:

"

1909, ....

6

16

-

6 19 10

7.1415

6

9

...

:

1910, .... 5

Or

9

...

..

:

1911,.... 8

7

19 | ...

7

8

رحیم

1912, .... 9 7 25

ลง

2

N

30

8

9 11112 8 1216

7 26

00

+91 9

6 19

3212 10 | 18

:

со

8

2

7

G

تات

:

:

:

:

00

I-

~

I

:

Էն

...

2

ا

:

*

+

:

نت

:

:

...

:

M

2

2

:

:

:

e;

2

ลง

...

3

:

:

J

མ་

8

2

9

Oxford Higher Local Examination.

St Joseph's College..... Diocesan Boys' School.

No. of passes.

J

2

Total

3

A

...

2

2

N

9

***

:

...

...

+

تن

:

...

..

I

1

N

N

- N 29

12 25 35

..

3041 33

En

51...

-00

3143 57

7336) 113

-4

30144 108

..

:

Position.

N 30

Table VIII.

Result of the Hygiene Shield Competition (July, 1912).

NAME OF SCHOOL.

No. of Competi- Percentage.

tors.

%

1st

. Wanchai District School,

2nd

Diocesan Boys' School, 4B,

Belilios Public School,...................

2010

10

75.1

10

74.2

10

3rd

73 8

St. Joseph's College, 4A,.....

10

5th

Do.,

4B,

10

72.9

6th

Saiyingpun District School,

10

70.5

7th

Italian Convent,

10

69.9

8th

Diocesan Boys' School, 4A,

10

64.8

· 9th

Queen's College, 4A,

10

58.5

10th

St. Mary's,.....

5

56.7

11th

Yaumati District School,..

10

53.7

12th

French Couvent,

5

53 4

13th

Queen's College, 4c,

10

52.8

Diocesan Girls' School,

5

14th

16.2

Queen's College, 4B,

10

16th

Kowloon British School,

10

41-2

17th

St. Francis',

34.2

Note:-1. The highest individual mark was obtained by Chau Chun Him, Diocesan

Boys' School, Class 4B, i.e., 96'%.

2. Victoria British School only sent in two pupils and gained 59.2 per cent.

of marks.

No.

N 31

Table IX,

Amount of Fees Remitted to Free Scholars in Government.

Schools during 1912.

SCHOOL.

Amount of School Fees remitted to Free Scholars in

1912.

$

C.

1

Queen's College,

2,635.00

2

Kowloon British School,

3

Victoria British School,

4 Saiyingpun English School,

555.00

5

Yaumati

do.,

369.00

6

Co

Wantsai

do.,

297.00

7

Belilios Public School,

75.00

8

Praya East English School,

72.00

9

English School for Indians,

10

Tai Po English School,

11

Ping Shan

do.,

5.00

12

Cheung Chau do.,

Total.

$4,008.00

Table X.

TABLE OF SCHOLARSHIPS PRESENTED TO QUEEN'S COLLege.

The following scholarships are held at Queen's College and are awarded on Results of Annual Examination.

Name of Scholarship.

Awarded

to

Value.

How awarded.

- N 32

Senior Morrison,.

Belilios,

"

Stewart,

$100 a year for 3 Highest aggregate in all subjects.

Class 1.

years. $ 50 for 1 year,

Subjects

$100

75

"

$150

""

13

>>

$100

3

25

99

""

Blake,

Wright,

"

IIo Kom Tong,

Class II.

$ 60

"

Ho Tung,

$100

Junior Belilios,

Class III.

$ 25 a year for 2

Ho Fook,

>>

years. $100 for 1 year.

Junior Morrison,

Class IV.

$50 a year for 3

years. $60 for 1 year.

Subjects

Alfred May,

5 Government Scholarships,

9 Government Scholarships,..

5 Government Scholarships,.

59

""

""

Dictation, Composition, History and Shakespeare.

Elocution. Dictation, Grammar, Com- position, History and Translation from and into Chinese.

English Conversation, Composition and Special Translation from and into Chinese.

Hygiene, Geography and Translation from and into Chinese.

Reading, Conversation, Dictation, Com- position, History, Chinese to Eng- lish, English to Chinese.

Hygiene, Geography and Translation from and into Chinese.

Dictation, Composition, Grammar and History.

Hygiene, Chinese to English, Geo- graphy, English to Chinese.

Highest aggregate in all subjects.

Reading, Conversation, Dictation, Com- position and Translation from and into Chinese.

$60 fees a year for To the 5 top boys in Class 4 at Queen's College.

3

years.

$60 fees a year

4 from Saiyingpun Government School.

for 3 years.

3

Wantsai

""

|| 2

Yaumati

""

"}

"

2

Saiyingpun

"

""

2

Wantsai

""

Yaumati

59

"

$30, i.e., half

fees a year

for 3 years.

Appendix P.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS FOR THE YEAR 1912.

Expenditure.

1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings, were as follows:

Amount voted.

Actual Expenditure.

In Estimates.

Supplemen- tary Votes.

Total.

(i) Personal

$

Emoluments and Other Charges,...

353,958.00

9,530.39 363,488.39 313,731,15

(ia) Special Expenditure:-

Typewriters.......

575,00

292.68

867.68

867.68

(ii) Annually Recurrent

Works,

429,100.00

(iii) Extraordinary Works,. 1,147,980.00

55,027.63 484,127.63 147,650.18

380,859.00 1,528,839.00 1,056,034.44

Total,..

$1,931,613.00

445,709.70 2,377,322.70 1,818,283.45

Detailed statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B.

With regard to (i), the saving is due to vacancies in the Staff, lapsing pay of Officers on leave, refunds on account of supervision of work executed by the Department for various public companies and the prevalence of a higher rate of exchange than that assumed in preparing the Estimates (average rate 1/113 against estimated rate 1/9).

In the case of (ii), savings occurred under the following sub- heads as set forth below:-

Maintenance of Buildings,

$4,042.81

Maintenance of Lighthouses,

1,039.21

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in Kowloon,

654.00

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in New

Territories,

1,732.69

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

4,172.49

Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers,.

814.12

Maintenance of Public Cemetery,..

460.34

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,

1,371.13

Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds,

2,627.05

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages, Maintenance of Shaukiwan Water Works,

13,657.48

691.08

Maintenance of Lai Chi Kok Water Works,

488.04

P 2

The saving on Maintenance of Buildings was largely due to inadequacy of the Staff owing to sickness or death; whilst the savings on most of the other items were due to the moderate weather and low rainfall experienced generally throughout the year.

The savings were more than counter-balanced by excesses on other sub-heads, the principal of which were as follows:-

627.83

Maintenance of Buildings in New Territories,...$ 3,925.21 Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City, Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City, Maintenance of Telegraphs and Telephones, Maintenance of Telegraphs in New Territories,.. Gas Lighting, City and Hill District, Dredging Foreshores,.

721.24

1,091.56

4,853.86

1,659.81

3,390.05

6,505.27

Maintenance of City and Hill District Water

Works,......

27,951.85

Stores Depreciation,

The excess on Maintenance of Buildings in New Territories was due to extensive repairs to the Quarantine Station, Lai Chi Kok, which was let to the Military Authorities for occupation by one of the additional Indian Regiments stationed in the Colony; that on Main- tenance of Roads and Bridges in City to the purchase of a scarifier for attachment to one of the steam rollers and to additional repairs. due to the use of the Ice Company's steam lorry; that on Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City to the improvement of the surfacing of some of the roads, chiefly in the Hill District; that on Maintenance of Telephones and Telegraphs to exceptionally heavy repairs to the Waglan Cable, including a new shore-end 400 feet long and the transfer of the Cable to a new landing place on Waglan Island; that on Maintenance of Telephones in New Territories to the reconstruction of the line to Shataukok with iron poles and the addition of 4 new wires in connection with the light railway between Fan Ling and Shataukok; that on Gas Lighting, City and Hill District, to replacing stolen fittings, stamping fittings to render identification possible in case of thefts, lighting additional lamps and granting a refund in connection with the lighting of a private street; that on Dredging Foreshores to the fact that no hiring of the dredger occurred during the year, more dredging having thus to be defrayed from the vote whilst uno income was derived from hiring, and to the expenditure on repairs being somewhat greater than usual; that on Stores Depreciation to writing off the value of obsolete stores which were disposed of and to defraying certain expenditure by the Crown Agents on account of retention money under the Con- tract for the heating apparatus for the Law Courts and that on Maintenance of City and Hill District Water Works to the adoption of special measures for conserving the supply and to the necessity of more pumping consequent on the low rainfall during the year.

The saving on item (iii), amounting to about 8%, was due to delays in commencing some of the works for which provision was made in the Estimates. In some cases, the delay resulted from extensive alterations which were made in the plans.

P 3

2. Comparison of Expenditure, 1911 and 1912.

The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1912 as compared with that of the previous year :-

(i) Personal Emo-

1911

e.

luments

and

Other Charges,...

308,408.12

(ia) Special Ex-

penditure:-

1912.

0.

313,731,15

Increase.

C.

5,323.03

Decrease.

C.

Typewriters,

867,68

867.68

(ii) Annually Re-

current Works,...

486,940 80

447,650.18

39.290.62

(iii) Extraordinary

Works,

1,094,817.93

1,056,034.44

38.733.19

Total,...... $1,890,166.85

1,818,283.45

6,190.71

78,874.11

Item (i). The increase is due partly to the fact that Duty Pay to Executive and Assistant Engineers was paid during the whole year as compared with only a portion of 1911 and partly to the fact that there were fewer vacancies in the Staff owing to resignations or the absence of officers on leave. Two Assistant Engineers were added to the Staff in connection with the carrying out of the Tytam Tuk Scheme, Second Section. The average rate of exchange for 1912 was 1/112 against 1/92 for 1911.

Item (ii).-A new item "Stores Depreciation

appears under this heading, the "Stores Account" being now treated as a Suspense Account and provision being made under "Public Works Recurrent" for any sums which it may be necessary to write off. On the other hand, the item "Exhumation of remains in Cemeteries" disappears, having been combined with the item "Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries".

The decrease under item (ii) is principally due to decreased expenditure under the following sub-heads:-

Maintenance of Buildings,

$11,383.31

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City,

10,968.47

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in New

Territories,

7,703.54

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

1,148.58

Gas Lighting, City and Hill District,

2,903.87

Electric Lighting, City,-

1,789.32

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries, including

exhumation, -

7,972.77

Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds,

1,601.05

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,-

38,688.52

P 4

The principal increases under item (ii) were as follows:-

Maintenance of Buildings in New Territories,- $ 4,096.34

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside.

City,

1,163.74

Maintenance of Telephones in New Terri-

tories,

-

5,005.66

Maintenance of Public Cemetery,

1.362.72

Dredging Foreshores,

4,181,89

Stores Depreciation,

6,705.27

Maintenance of City and Hill District Water

Works,

21,125.45

progress

Item (iii). The decrease in this item may be ascribed to the completion of some of the large works which have been in during recent years and to delays in starting other works owing to material alterations in the plans, &c.

}

P 5

Land Sales and Surveys.

3. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, &c.—The following tabulated statement gives particulars of these :-

No. of Lots.

Area in Sq. Feet.

Annual Rent.

Premium.

Total.

Total.

Total.

Total.

Sales by Auction.

Island of Hongkong,

27

398,300

$ 2,854.00

C.

$ C.

$ C. $ C.

|126,346.00

Kowloon Peninsula,.

1

5,400

50.00

2,160 00

N. T., New Kowloon,..

33

Southern District, Northern District,

37

1,022,788

1,166.65

1,065.00

171

873,736

333.40

5,830.45

236

2,300,224

4,404.05

135,401.45

Sales without Auction.

11

Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula,... N. T., New Kowloon,

Southern District, Northern District,

Extensions Granted.

1

12,570

14.00

500.00

13

6,098

13.50

90.00)

134

131,609

81.73

672,40

118

150,277

109.23

1,262.40

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula,.

New Territories,

31

1

25,341 281

1,030.00

1,160.00

4,225.78 12.15

32

25,622

2,190.00

4,267.93

33

}}

Conversions and

Exchanges.

Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula,.. N. T., New Kowloon,

Southern District, Northern District,

Grants on Nominal

Terms.

Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula,.

New Territories,

Grants on Short Leases.

78,512

244.00

4,306.90

5

10

1

323,680

43.00

720.00

27,878

500

1.00

4.00

285

20

430,570

288.00

5,030.90

100,370 33,000

4.00

1.00

4,125.00

A

5,184

1.00

138,554

6.00

4,125.00

Island of Hongkong,

3

31,156

20,332.00

Kowloon Peninsula,..

New Territories,

14

242,628

258.50

17

273,784

20,590.50

Permits to occupy Land

for Short Periods.

Island of Hongkong,

456

8,199,17

Kowloon Peninsula,.

160

9,254.99

New Territories,

205

3,339.47

N. T., let by A.D.O., S.

250

295.50

N.

226

515.50

59

12

1,297

20,604.63

:

Extensions of Short

Period Leases to

75 years. Island of Hongkong, ..... Kowloon Peninsula,.. New Territories,

Quarry Leases. Island of Hongkong,.... Kowloon Peninsula, New Territories,

Prospecting and Mining Licences.

N. T., Northern District,

Total,.........

:

2

1,750.00

1,758

3,319,031

1,750.00

49,942.41

150,087.68

P 6

The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $167,492.68 or very much more than the Estimate which amounted to $100,000.00. It included the following sums which do not appear in the above tabulated statement:-

Premium derived from sale of right to

erect piers,

Premium on Kowloon Marine Lot No. 90 sold in 1909 (two instalments and interest amounting to $651), Fees for Boundary Stones to mark lots, Premium for permission to build upon portion of K.M.L. 11 (281 sq. ft.), Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co.'s property,

$6,450.00

8,566.00 1,501.00

666.90

A sum of $84.28 was refunded in the case of Inland Lot No. 1892, adjoining Square Street, Taipingshan, as the area of the lot proved to be less than that sold at Public Auction.

In some cases, the premium for land sold in one year is not received by the Treasury until the following year, thus causing an apparent discrepancy between the Treasury figures and those given by this Department.

The following is a comparative statement of the Revenue derived from Land Sales, etc., for the years 1910-1912:-

1910.

1911.

1912,

$ C.

Sales by Auction,

4

17,555.00

$ C. 247,507.00

c.

135,401.45

Sales without Auction,

5,302,67

1,797.00

1,262.40

Extensions granted,

3,571.20

10,175.69

4,267.93

Grants on Nominal Terms,

4,125 00

Grants on Short Leases,

Permits to occupy land for short periods,

etc.,

Extensions of short period leases to 75

years,

Quarry leases,.......

Mining licences,.............

Premia derived from sale of rights to

erect piers,

28,373,04

4.741.77

6,450.00

Re-adjustments

Fecs for Boundary Stones to mark lots....

in Hongkong and

1,501.00

Kowloon,

170.81

Re-adjustments in New Territories,

176.60

Conversions and Exchanges,

1,323.56

3,228.50

5,039.90

Premium for Encroachments,

Premium on Kowloon Marine Lot No.

90, sold in 1909,...

3,957 50

3,957.50

8,566.00

Total..........

...$ 63,730.38

271.407.46 166,604.68

Actual amount of premium paid into

the Treasury.................

$ 63,848.26

271,804.46 167,192.68

P 7

4. Sales by Auction,--Only one lot in the New Territorics was sold by the Public Works Department,-it realized $248.00. The Assistant District Officer at Taipo sold 170 small lots which realized $5,582.45 and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 37 lots, most of which were small, which realized $1,065.00.

The following are details of the principal Land Sales:-

No. of Lot. Area in sq. ft.

I.L 1918..

I.L. 1919,.

59.700

.12,900

Crown Rent. Premium.

$686.00 90.00

$47.500.00 13.000.00

Rate realized. $0 80 per sq. ft.

1.00 39

*9

}

5. Sales without Auction.-There was only one item under this heading in Hongkong, viz., Inland Lot 1924, containing an area of 12,570 square feet, which was sold to the Rhenish Mission as a site for a Church and School. The Assistant District Officers sold 147 lots in the New Territories by private treaty.

6. Extensions granted.-The extensions granted in Hongkong comprised small areas to Inland Lots 1883, 1917, 1896, 1757, 1895, 1544, 1712 and 1677, Rural Building Lot 78, Garden Lots 29, 34 and 37, Tai Hang Inland Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 19, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 33, 34, 42 and 47. In Kowloon an extension was granted to Kowloon Marine Lot No. 91.

There were no extensions granted by the Assistant District Officers.

7. Conversions and Exchanges.-There were four exchanges in Hongkong, viz.:-Inland Lots 1926 and 1927 granted in ex- change for Farm Lot 52, Wong Nei Chong; Shaukiwan Inland Lot 433 granted in exchange for Shaukiwan Inland Lot 37 and an extension to Inland Lot 1913 granted in exchange for Garden Lot No. 7, Hau Fung Lane.

In New Kowloon, New Kowloon Inland Lot 53, Tai Wan, was granted in exchange for lots 1574 to 1578, S. D. II, and lots 2 to 4, S. D. III; New Kowloon Inland Lots 55 and 56, Sham Shui Po, were granted in exchange for lots 2516 to 2518 and 2535, S D. IV; New Kowloon Inland Lot 52, Sham Shui Po, was granted in exchange for section A of Lot 804, S. D. IV; and New Kowloon Inland Lot 57, Sham Shui Po, was granted in exchange for Lot 2648, S. D. IV. Particulars of the conversions and exchanges in the New Territories, Northern and Southern Districts, will be found in the Land Officer's Report.

8. Grants on Nominal Terms.-In Hongkong, these consisted of four lots, viz.:-Inland Lot 1920, containing an area of 75,170 square feet, granted to the Japanese Consul for the Japanese Community as a site for a Buddhist Temple; Shaukiwan Inland Lot No. 432, containing an area of 10,000 square feet, granted to the Roman Catholic Mission for the purpose of erecting a chapel and a residence for the priests assigned to that district; an addition (area 15,000 square feet) to Inland Lot 1572, Sandy Bay, granted to the Tung Wah Hospital Committee for the purpose of

P8

extending the mortuary there, and Aplichau Inland Lot No. 29, containing 200 square feet, granted as a site for the Tai Wong Temple. In Kowloon, Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1281, containing an area of 33,000 square feet, was leased at the nominal rent of $1.00 per annum for the purpose of erecting a Diocesan Girls' School. The lot in question occupies part of a triangular area of land between Jordan and Gascoigne Roads which was taken over by the Colonial Government from the War Department as part of the King's Park. Any portion of such area used for building purposes is subject to payment of premium to the War Department, but, as the land was to be utilized for a charitable purpose, the War Department was approached on the question of waiving the premium. They declined to do so however and the amount charged, namely, $4,125.00, was accordingly paid by the Diocesan School Authorities and credited to the War Department in the account relating to such matters. In the New Territories, New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 54, containing an area of 5,184 square feet, situated at Sham Shui Po, New Kowloon, was granted as a site for a Chinese Temple and Public Dispensary.

9. Grants on Short Leases.-Three such grants were made in Hongkong, viz.:-

(i.) The old Land Office building, area 3,170 square feet, which was let by tender for a period extending from 3rd April, 1912, to 30th June 1913, at a monthly rental of $280.00.

(ii.) Inland Lot 1689, opposite the Central Market, containing an area of 23,520 square feet, which was let by tender for two years from 1st November, 1912, at a monthly rental of $1,406.00.

(iii.) Garden Lot No. 40, containing an area of 4,466 square feet, which was let to the Young Men's Christian Association for a period of 5 years at an annual rent of $100.00.

Fourteen lots, containing an area of 242,628 square feet, were let for terms varying from one to five years by the Assistant District Officer, South.

10. Permits to occupy land, &c. for short periods.-These were of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of individual mention; most of them were for small areas to be held on half-yearly permits.

11. Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75 years.-There is nothing to report under this heading

12. Quarry Leases.-Quarrying rights in the case of Tsat Tsz Mui Quarry Lot No. 1 and Shaukiwan West Quarry Lots Nos. 3 and 4 were let by public auction for a period of 3 years commenc- ing from 1st January, 1913. The occupation of To Ti Wan Quarry which was under a monthly tenancy was determined on 15th November, 1912, as the quarry was required in connection with the Tytam Tuk Water Works Scheme, Second Section. The leases of Ngau Shi Wan Quarries Nos. 1 to 4 were surrendered on 30th

!

4

P 9

September, 1912, the quarries being re-let on permit for the remain- der of the year.

Tai Wan Quarry Lot No. 6 was re-entered on 4th April, 1912, for non-payment of Crown rent and has not been re-let.

Representations having been made to Government that, owing to the disturbed state of affairs in the neighbouring provinces of China, great depression had been caused in the quarrying trade, the annual Crown rents of the following quarries were reduced by about 33% commencing from 1st July, 1912, riz.:-

Lyemun Group.

Cha Kwo Liang Group.

Ngau Tau Kok Group.

Sai Tso Wan Group.

Nos. 3 and 4 Shaukiwan West.

No. 6 Hok Un.

Nos. 7 and 8 Ma Tau Kok.

No. 9 Ma Ti.

No. 10 Jordan Road, Kowloon.

No. 11 Yaumati.

No. 12 Fuk Tsun Heung.

Nos. 1 to 4 Ngau Shi Wan.

The lease of the last-mentioned quarries was permitted to be surrendered at the end of September, the quarries being re-let for the remainder of the year.

13. Prospecting and Mining Licences.-A prospecting licence was issued for Un Long District for a period of 6 months from 23rd October, 1912, and a mining licence for an area of 5 square miles in the same District was subsequently issued. The latter is for a period of one year commencing from 14th November, 1912.

14. Resumptions. A small portion of Inland Lot 757, contain- ing about 909 square feet, was surrendered to Government free of charge for the purpose of improving a sharp bend in Bonham Road. Inland Lot 805, containing an area of 6,000 square feet, was re- sumed at a cost of $2,100.00 for the purpose of extending West End Park. It was subsequently decided, however, to utilize the area re- sumed and an adjoining portion of the Park in connection with the erection of quarters for Subordinate Government Officers. A small strip of Inland Lot 1095 was surrendered to Government free of charge for improving Pokfulam Road. House No. 164, Aplichau, which was in an insanitary condition and obstructed the line of a proposed road, was resumed, the amount of compensation paid being $50.00. Three cultivated areas known as Tsat Tsz Mui Lots Nos. 2, 9 and 14, containing a total area of 51,300 square feet were resumed at a cost of $199.88, as it was found that the methods of

P 10

cultivation adopted caused the area to become a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Lots 13 and 16 (Washing Tanks, Tai Hang Stream) were re-entered for non-payment of Crown rent. Houses Nos. 46 to 51, Mong Kok Village, occupying an area of 2,306 square feet, were resumed in connection with the extension of Nathan Road, the sum paid amounting to $2,575.00. Lots Nos. 5114 and 5092 S.D. I, Kowloon City, were resumed at a cost of $1,263.64 as they were on the line of a proposed Public Road.

In the Southern District of the New Territories, 24 lots con- taining 495,277 square feet were resumed for various reasons at a cost of $865.03 and 108 lots were either surrendered voluntarily or were re-entered on account of non-payment of Crown rent.

In the Northern District, 410 lots containing about 862,052 square feet were resumed for various reasons at a cost of $5,020.20, and 53 lots containing about 63,436 square feet were voluntarily surrendered.

15. Lease Plans. Plans and particulars (in duplicate) of 75 lots and 4 piers were forwarded to the Land Officer in connection with the issue of leases.

16. Boundary Stones.-Boundary stones were fixed for 15 lots in Hongkong (including 11 stones for Mt. Caroline Cemetery) and for 18 lots in the New Territories.

17. Surveys.-Numerous surveys were undertaken for the purpose of defining the boundaries of lots or for preparing sale or lease plans, etc.; and, whenever practicable, such surveys were plotted direct on to the Ordnance Sheets. A portion of the Western District of the City, containing an area of about 73 acres, was surveyed in detail and plotted on the Ordnance Sheets. Surveys were made of Kowloon Farm Lots Nos. 3 and 4 and of Inland Lot 84, Morrison Hill, to determine the correct boundaries.

Two Surveyors were engaged for six weeks in setting out new roads in the New Territories and one Surveyor, assisted by a native Surveyor, was engaged for nearly four months on a survey of Shek O Village and District. The latter embraced some 1,577 lots and 231 houses and was undertaken for the purpose of settling the claims of old inhabitants, the only record of whose holdings has been the entries in the Village House Rent Roll.

Very little progress was made with Ordnance Survey Work in Kowloon owing to lack of staff and to the numerous surveys necessitated by applications for land. A certain amount of triangulation work was carried out, chiefly to check existing trian- gulation and to lay down minor points from which to commence traverses.

The Surveyor stationed in the New Territories, in addition to triangulation and other work, surveyed the Villages of Taipo Market,

- Pil —

Pan Chung, Tsung Pak Lung and Tsung Hom Tong, containing about 360 houses, and most of this work was plotted on the Ord- nance Maps.

18. Sites for Booths at the Race Course.-A sum of $5,683.50, was realized by the letting of sites for the erection of booths and stands at Happy Valley during the Race Meeting.

19. Squatters. As mentioned in last year's Report, the Squat- ters' Board has completed the work for which it was formed. The issue of leases still remains to be done in many cases.

20. Military Lands.--It was found that there were a number of small encroachments of a miscellaneous nature by the War Depart- ment on Colonial Government land for which in most cases authority had been obtained from time to time, but of which no systematic record had been kept. To place these on a proper basis, the ne- cessary Encroachment Forms were prepared or entries were made in the Colonial Encroachment Book, such forms or entries being signed by Military Officers on behalf of the War Department.

21. Naval Lands.-Permission was granted for the following encroachments by the Naval Authorities on Colonial Government land, viz.

Test Huts, Tanks, D.R.F. Cells and Tide Gauges at Cape

Collinson, Kennedy Town and Junk Island.

22. Piers.-The right of erecting piers under long leases was granted in two cases in Hongkong. Licences for the following temporary piers for various periods were issued:-10 in Hongkong, 12 in Kowloon and 9 in the New Territories. Licences were also issued or renewed for 10 Slipways in Hongkong, 2 in Kowloon and 2 in the New Territories, the total fees for which amounted to $5,327.50. The premia derived in respect of permanent pier rights amounted to $1,500.00 and temporary piers to $4,950.00.

23. Cemeteries.-An area of 10,000 square feet in Demarcation District No. 453 near Tsün Wan, was set apart as a burial ground for Chinese Christians.

Work under the Buildings Ordinance.

24. By-laws and Regulations.-An additional by-law relat- ing to the erection of ceilings in buildings outside the European Reservation and the Hill District was adopted, whilst the by-laws relating to the Removal of Ceilings and Stair Linings were repealed, others being substituted therefor.

Regulations governing the design and size of signboards were framed with a view to preventing excessive encroachments over foot- paths and roadways.

- P 12 -

25. Plans. The number of plans dealt with shows a consider- able increase as compared with 1911, the greatest difference being in the number deposited for new houses, both European and Chinese. The following is à tabulated statement showing the number of build- ings, etc., for which plans were deposited during the year, the figures of 1911 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:-

1911. 1912. Increase. Decrease.

European Houses,

Chinese Houses,

39 138

99

151

281

130

Buildings and structures other

than the above,.....

73

79

6

Alterations and additions to

existing buildings,.

1,994 1,998

4

Verandahs,

57

81

24

:

Balconies,

101

154

53

Sunshades,

25

17

8

Areas,

4

6

N

Piers,

6

Total,...................

2,450 2,760 318

26. Certificates.-The following Certificates for new buildings. were issued :--

115 for 231 domestic buildings under Section 204 of Or-

dinance 1 of 1903.

36 for 45 non-domestic buildings or works.

These figures show increases of 76 in the number of domestic buildings and of 21 in the number of non-domestic buildings certified as compared with 1911, or a total increase of 97.

27. Notices and Permits.-The following is a tabulated state- ment of the notices served and permits issued during the year, the

P 13

figures for 1911 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:-

1911.

1912. Increase. Decrease.

Dangerous Structure Notices,

330

140

190

Miscellaneous Notices,..

340

554

214

Nuisances reported by officers of

the Sanitary Department,...... 1,816

2,186

370

Permits,........

.1,276

1,029

247

Fees collected on account of the

CA

$

issue of permits to obtain sand

and stone from Crown land, 1,460.80 1,293.00

167.80

Legal proceedings were taken in 12 cases for removal of stone from Crown foreshore without permission. In each case a conviction was obtained, and fines amounting to $475 were imposed.

Legal proceedings were also taken in connection with blasting operations in 5 cases in which the precautions prescribed by Ordinance had been omitted. In 4 of these convictions were secured, the fines amounting to $350.

28. Resumptions for Scavenging Lanes, &c.-A statement of the work done will be found under the heading "Public. Works Extra- ordinary".

29. Private Streets.-Re-surfacing and other repairs under the provisions of Section 186 of the Buildings Ordinance were carried out by this Department at the cost of the frontagers in the following

streets:

Leung Wa Fai Lane. Kui Yan Lane.

Leung 1 Fong.

Tit Hong Lane. Portion of Sheung Fung

Lane.

Lane extending from be- tween 82 & 86 Second Street to between 99 & 101 Third Street. Gilman's Bazaar. David Lane. Wing On Street. Lai On Lane. Mee Lun Lane.

Chinese Street.

Lane extending from be- tween 13 & 15 Queen's Road Central to be- tween 12 & 14 Des Voeux Road Central.

Lane in rear of 1 to 17

Catchick Street. Torsien Street. Reinaecker Street. Lane between 472 & 474 Queen's Road West. McGregor Street. Ko Shing Street. Sun Wai Lane.

- P 14

Wing Sing Street.

Tung Tak Lane.

Lane in rear of 26 to 34 Cochrane Street & 7 to 17 Lyndhurst Terrace. Sai On Lane.

On Ning Lane.

Lane extending from be- tween 7 & 9 Chater Road to between 7 & 8 Connaught Road Cen-

tral.

30. Improvements, &c., of Public Streets.-The policy of requir- ing houses, when undergoing reconstruction, to be built at a higher level where necessary in order to provide for the future raising of certain low-lying areas in Hongkong and Kowloon has been con- tinued. In some cases, arrangements are made with owners whereby the ground floors of their houses are retained at their former levels upon their giving an undertaking to raise such floors when the raising of the street is carried out.

31. Footways.-Attention has been given to the footways under balconies and verandahs, notices having been served upon owners to repair such footways. In the following cases the necessary work has been carried out by this Department at the cost of the owners :—

2, 6, 8, 10-Li Yuen Street

West.

1-25-Centre Street.

297-Queen's Road West.

39 & 41-Wongneichong

Road.

474-Queen's Road West. S.I.L. 429-Sai Wan Ho.

32. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage.-Practically no damage was done to buildings in the Colony by typhoons and rainstorms.

33. Landslip.-A serious landslip, resulting in the death of 4 persons, occurred during the course of excavations for the formation of a building site on I.L. 1898, Conduit Road, on December 7th. It was due, to some extent, to heavy rains having loosened the soil.

34. Collapses.-There were no collapses worthy of special men- tion.

35. Tests of Mortar.- Attention was given to the testing of mortar, 296 samples being taken from works in progress. In 2 cases where the mortar was found to be much below the accepted standard, prosecutions were taken which resulted in fines amounting to $150 being imposed.

36. Prosecutions for Defective Building Work.-Legal proceed- ings were taken on account of defective work in 8 cases in each of which a conviction was secured, the fines imposed amounting to $280.

37. Prosecutions for other nuisances.-Legal proceedings were taken in 148 cases for non-compliance with notices issued in connec- tion with nuisances reported by officers of the Sanitary Department. In 131 of these cases, fines were inflicted amounting to $1,051.

-

P 15

38. Testing Drains.-Fees amounting to $80 were collected on account of additional inspections of drains necessitated by care- lessness or negligence on the part of the parties concerned in carry- ing out the work.

39. Modifications.-Written modifications of various sections of the Ordinance were granted in 221 cases under the powers con- ferred by Section 265B. This shows an increase of 147 over the previous year.

40. Applications and Appeals to the Governor-in-Council under Section 265B.-Applications for modifications of various sections of the Ordinance were made to the Governor-in-Council in 17 cases, 11 of which were granted,

In 8 cases in which dissatisfaction was felt with the manner in which the Building Authority had exercised his discretionary powers, appeals were made to the Governor-in-Council. Two of the appeals were partially granted, the remaining 6 being refused.

41. Cemeteries.-Surveys in connection with the Chinese Cemeteries have been continued but, owing to vacancies in the staff and pressure of other work, the progress made was not very great. The survey of the Kailungwan Cemetery was, however, brought up to date. The necessary surveys for keeping the records of new grave spaces in the Colonial Cemetery up to date were made.

Work in connection with forming new terraces, etc., to afford additional grave spaces was carried out at the following cemeteries:-Mount Caroline (Sections A, B, C and D), Kailungwan (Sections A, B and C), Ma Tau Wei (Section A) and Kowloon Tong (Section B). In addition, some paths were surfaced and retaining walls were erected at Mount Caroline.

The necessary formalities in connection with the carrying out of extensive exhumations at Mount Caroline Cemetery, by which a large area will be rendered available for burials during 1913, were complied with.

The following additional cemeteries were set apart during the year:-

The Fukinese Cemetery, Lots 582 and 583 S.D. I, near

Kowloon City.

The Tsün Wan Cemetery, near Tsün Wan.

42. Theatres and Public Performances Regulation Ordi- nance. In all 21 buildings were licensed under this Ordinance during the year for the holding of various public performances. In some cases the licences were for performances in buildings specially erected for the purpose and in other cases for existing buildings which were altered as required prior to the granting of the licences.

P 16

was

A sum of $1,474 was derived from fees paid in connection with the issue of licences. This includes the following cases in which the imposition of a nominal fee of $1 per annum sanctioned by the Governor-in-Council:-the City Hall, the Seamen's Institute, the Hongkong University, the Hongkong Volunteer Headquarters and the theatre at Mount Austin Barracks.

The old Land Office building, which was licensed for a Scenic Railway, and the Hall in the Seamen's Institute were altered to comply as far as possible with the requirements of the Ordinance prior to the issue of licences. The necessary alterations to the Yaumati Theatre were practically completed at the end of the year.

The old Tsung Hing Theatre (I.L. 700) was closed and pulled down, the site being utilized for the erection of tenement houses.

Sanction was given for the erection of two Cinematograph Theatres in Kowloon but in neither case had any steps been taken towards the erection of the buildings before the close of the year.

43. Fires.--An extensive fire occurred on February 11th in Upper and Lower Lascar Rows, extending as far as Hollywood Road. Altogether 40 houses were affected, those enumerated in the following list, numbering 16, being so seriously damaged as to necessitate reconstruction whilst the remaining 24 were capable of reinstatement :-

19*, 21*, 23, 25, 27*, 29*, 26, 28, 30*, 32* — Lower

Lascar Row.

25, 27, 29*, 31*, 30*, 32*- Upper Lascar Row.

No. 73, Kowloon City Road, was burnt out on July 21st, but was capable of reinstatement and the necessary work has been carried out.

Two houses, Nos. 66 and 68 Bonham Strand, were destroyed, whilst a third (No. 64) was extensively damaged, by fire on October 13th. Steps are being taken towards rebuilding or reinstating the premises affected.

Several other fires occurred in the Colony, but none were of large dimensions.

44. Reclamations.-The following is a statement of the private reclamation works which were in progress, all of them being com- pleted during the year :—

Area in sq. ft.

N.K.I.L. 39, Shamshuipo,

46, 47, 48, 49 and 50, Shamshuipo,

.11,880 .66,890

""

* These houses were completed and certified during the year 1912.

P 17

The areas stated are those of the lots, which extend further inland than old high-water mark and are therefore not exclusively reclaimed from the sea. Additional areas beyond those stated have been reclaimed for roads.

45. Principal Works of a Private Nature.-The Hongkong University buildings, including three residences for the Principal and Professors and an entrance lodge, were completed and the erection of a block of Students' Quarters on I.L. 1877 was begun.

The Hostel known as St. John's Hall, situated on I.L. 754, Bonham Road, belonging to the Church Missionary Society and intended for the accommodation of Students attending the University, was completed.

The erection of a somewhat similar Hostel on I.L. 1874, Hatton Road, belonging to the London Missionary Society was commenced.

A School of Anatomy in connection with the University, on I.L. 1859, Pokfulam Road, was commenced.

The erection of a large building for the Chinese branch of the Young Men's Christian Association was begun on 1.L. 1757, Tai Ping Shan.

Extensive additions to the Ellis Kadoorie Schools on I.L. 1244, Hospital Road, were being carried out during the year.

A large fat-boiling establishment with quarters, &c., was erect- ed on M.L. 239, Belchers Street.

The Star Ferry Company's Wharf opposite the end of Ice House Street was completed.

The Christian Science Church on I.L. 1855, Macdonnell Road, was completed.

Further additions were made to the Peak Hotel Annexe on R.B.L. 77, Chamberlain Road.

Additions were made to the premises of the Peak Club on R.B.L. 62, Plunketts Road.

Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co.'s new Aerated Water Factory on M.L. 293, North Point, was completed.

Some further additions, comprising an oil tank, a case oil godown and a fire wall, were made to the Standard Oil Co.'s pre- mises at Lai Chi Kok.

The erection of the new Diocesan Girls' School on K.I.L. 1281, Jordan Road, was commenced,

P 18

Some extensive works at Tai Wan, in connection with a pro- posed Glass Factory, were commenced. The premises include a factory, mixing house, offices, quarters, stores, &c. In connection with these works, the extension of an old quarry pier was completed.

A Knitting Factory on K.I.L. 1076, Reclamation Street, Mong- koktsui, was completed.

Work was continued on a large block of buildings on K.I.L. 574, Carnarvon and Mody Roads, Tsim Sha Tsui, comprising 18 flats. Six of these flats were completed and occupied during the

year.

Amongst other works, which have been commenced or com- pleted during the year, the following may be mentioned :-

Works commenced.

8 Chinese houses, I.L. 797, Pokfulam Road.

22

"}

23

5

12

""

""

5

"J

>>

11

""

13

8

31

""

""

,

J:

14

""

12

>>

23

M.L.'s 266 and 267, Praya, Kennedy Town. I.L. 800, Second Street.

I.L. 640, Eastern and Second Streets.

I.L. 38 and M.L. 185, Queen's Road West. I.L. 1272, Ki Lung Lane.

I.L. 700, Po Hing Fong.

I.L. 1901, Tank Lane and Rozario Street. M.L.'s 31 and 36, Praya East.

I.L. 388, Tai Yuen and Cross Streets and

Stone Nullah Lane.

S.I.L. 407, Shaukiwan.

K.L.L. 1076, Canton Road and Reclamation,

Street.

8 European houses, I.L. 1095, Pokfulam Road.

9

1

10

8

12

I.L. 606, Hospital Road.

I.L. 605, Bonham Road.

""

I.L.'s 704 and 1661, Robinson Road.

"}

""

I.L. 150, Caine Road.

21

1

3

(large) I.L. 1875, Kennedy Road.

""

I.L. 1909,

""

""

M.L.'s 122 and 123, Wanchai Road.

6

2

1

9

13

""

R.B.L. 50, Barker Road.

21

""

>>

^

""

(large) R.B.L. 61, Peak Road.

>>

>>

K.I.L. 575, Mody Road.

20

9

"

J

6

22

Club Pavilion,

Nurses' Home,

>>

K.I.L. 1172,

'K.I.L.'s 410 and 1215, Ashley and

Hankow Roads.

K.I.L. 540, Kimberley Road.

""

M.L. 239, Li Po Lung Path.

I.L. 1897, Breezy Path.

P 19

Extensions to Electric Light Co.'s premises, I.L. 1210, Star Street. Crematorium and Chapel, I.L. 1879, Soo Kun Poo.

Block of 9 flats, I.L. 445, Wanchai Road & Heard Street.

Works completed.

6 Chinese houses, M.L. 299, Connaught and Des Voeux Roads C.

I.L. 1896, Shin Hing Street.

5

6

7

10

5

5

ما

5

n

5

6

4

26

31

>>

""

17

32

23

23

""

9

15

5

6

13

13

""

34

""

"

""

"

""

**

""

وو

13

23

39

""

I.L. 1895, Shin Hing and Mee Lun Streets. P.R. to M.L. 57 R.P., Connaught and Des

Voeux Roads West.

M.L. 68, Queen's Road West and Queen

Street.

I.L.'s 102, 856, 857, 866 and 867, Jervois

Street.

M.L.'s 153, 154, 155, 168 and 169, Bonham

Strand.

M.L.'s 168 and 169 and I.L.'s 46, 47 and

1325, Wing Lok Street.

I.L.'s 70, 166, 246 and 247, Lower Lascar

Row.

I.L.'s 246, 247 and 252, Upper Lascar Row. Various lots, Tai Hang,

S.I.L.'s 418, 423, 428 and 429, Sai Wan Ho. K.I.L.'s 964, 1079 and 1169, Shanghai Street. K.I.L.'s 1183, 1192, 1198 and 1199, Portland

Street.

K.I.L. 1269, Waterloo Road.

N.K.I.L. 39, Shamshuipo.

5 European houses, I.L. 767, High Street.

6

11

24

I.L.'s 1878 and 1880, Prospect Place, Bon-

ham Road.

I.L. 796, Pokfulam Road and Third Street. I.L. 1892, Kui In Fong.

11

"1

6

""

""

424

""

""

I.L. 757, Hing Hon Road.

"

"1

I.L. 1881, Kennedy Road.

I.L. 591, Bonham Road.

>>

"

4

I.L. 423, Caine Road.

8

4

وو

""

I.L.'s 444, 446, 668 and 668A, Wood Road. K.I.L.'s 547 and 549, Cameron Road.

1

Extension to Ice Factory, I.L.'s 524, 749 and 781, Pennington

Street.

Dry cleaning works, I.L. 1891, Kennedy Town.

Chapel and Caretaker's Quarters, I.L. 1900, Causeway Bay.

Pavilion for the Chinese Recreation Club, Crown land, Cause-

way Bay.

P 20

-

Extensions to the Kwong Wah Hospital, K.I.L. 1213, Yaumati.

There were numerous other buildings besides those mentioned above, which were either commenced or completed during the year, but they were not of sufficient magnitude or importance to justify special mention.

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

46. Maintenance of Buildings:-The buildings upon which any considerable sum was expended were the following:-

Government Civil Hospital:-

"A" Block- General repairs and

painting throughout,

-$2,434

"B" Block-Reconstructing ver- andah floor in reinforced concrete and laying same with encaustic tiles, &c.,

Staff Quarters-General repairs

and painting throughout,-

-

Quarters for Chinese Staff-Gen- eral repairs and limewash- ing throughout,

863

2,057

228

Lunatic Asylum-Repairing Com-

pound,-

438

Approach-Repairing Ramp from

Queen's Road,

386

Various minor repairs to build-

ings generally and mainten- ance of fans, lights, &c.,

1,478

-$7,884

Central Police Station

-

3,135

Main Block-General repairs and

colourwashing throughout,

D.S.P.'s and Married Inspectors' Quarters General repairs and painting throughout, Special Repairs-Reinstating floor of Charge Room. Providing and fixing new lightning conductor. Reconstructing floor and stairs to balcony of Single Inspectors' Quarters with reinforced concrete, Various minor repairs, -

1,595

852

77

5,659

Mountain Lodge:-

P 21

General repairs and painting

throughout,

-

Repairs and alterations to Chair

Shelter, &c., -

3,433

362

-$3,795

Water Police Station, Tsim Sha Tsui,- General repairs

and painting throughout,

Government House-Scraping and varnishing or painting jalousies in front of house and walls of several rooms, installing one

Victoria Gaol :

bath, repairing lightning conductor, and maintaining fans, lights, &c.,

Supplying materials,

3,441

1,937

$748

Assistant Superintendent's Quar- ters-General repairs and painting throughout, -

739

Warders' Quarters-Repairing

Compound, &c.,-

155

Various minor repairs to build-

ings generally,

114

1,756

Central Market:-

General repairs and limewashing

throughout, -

Constructing new Vegetable Stall

of reinforced concrete,

Kennedy Town Depôts and Slaughter Houses :-

Cattle Depôt-General repairs and limewashing throughout,

Sheep and Swine Depôt-General repairs and limewashing

884

671

1,555

742

throughout,

-

251

Slaughter House-General repairs

and limewashing throughout,

398

Inspector's Quarters-Repairs,

-

141

Various minor repairs to build-

ings generally, -

11

1,543

P 22

Shaukiwan Police Station:-General repairs and

painting throughout,-

- $1,487

Kennedy Town Hospital-General repairs and paint-

ing throughout,

Kowloon School :-

General repairs and painting

throughout,

-

Relaying verandah with rein-

forced concrete,-

-

1,368

1,133

129

1,262

1,091

Kowloon Disinfecting Station-General repairs and

painting throughout, -

No. 8 Police Station-General repairs and painting

throughout, -

1,056

New Government Offices--Repairing tiling to floors,

maintaining 3 lifts, fans, lights, &c.,- 1,000 Public Laundries Repairing and colourwashing

throughout, -

Yaumati Market Painting and colourwashing

934

throughout,

-

846

Government Offices-Repairs to roof, &c., and main-

taining fans, lights, &c.,-

740

Bay View Police Station--General repairs and painting

throughout, -

669

washing throughout,

City Disinfecting Station--General repairs and colour-

Hunghom Market-General repairs, painting and

limewashing throughout,

Kowloon Cattle Depôt and Slaughter Houses, &c., Mataukok,--Limewashing and tarring

-

597

557

internally,

541

Pokfulam Police Station-General repairs, painting

and colourwashing throughout,

474

City Public Mortuary-General repairs, painting and

colourwashing throughout, -

465

Saiyingpun School-General repairs, painting and colourwashing throughout.

461

New Western Market-General repairs, limewashing

and colouring throughout,

426

Saiyingpun Market-General repairs limewashing and

tarring internally,-

394

Queen's Statue-Repairing and cleaning canopy and

coating same with a preservative fluid

382

Wanchai Market :-

P 23

General repairs, limewashing and

tarring internally, -

Constructing fish stalls of rein-

forced concrete,-

$131

181

$312

264

247

Kowloon Post Office-General repairs, colourwashing

and painting throughout,

Kowloon Public Mortuary-General repairs, painting.

and limewashing throughout,

-

Sookonpoo Market-General repairs, limewashing and

tarring internally,-

246

47.-Maintenance of Buildings, New Territories.—In the case of the New Territories Buildings, the following are those which entailed considerable expenditure:-

Lai Chi Kok Segregation Camp-Constructing concrete staircases, forming channels and general repairs, -

$3,271

Taipo Police Station-General repairs, painting and

colourwashing throughout, -

1,708

Sheung Shui Police Station-General repairs, painting

and colourwashing throughout,

1,563

Taipo Island Quarters-General repairs, painting and colourwashing throughout,

1,056

Taipo Rest House-General repairs, painting and

colourwashing throughout,

Shatin Police Station-General repairs, painting and colourwashing throughout,

617

-

669

Shataukok Police Station-Renewing flooring des-

troyed by white ants, -

209

Cheung Chau Police Station-Sundry small repairs, -

156

Ping Shan Police Station-Renewing verandah timbers

131

destroyed by white ants,-

The Lai Chi Kok Segregation Camp was let to the Military Authorities in May for barracks for one of the two additional Indian Regiments sent to Hongkong.

48. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-The following sums were expended upon the various lighthouses:-

Waglan:-

General repairs, painting and

limewashing throughout.- -$1,028

Repairs to masts, signalling

apparatus, &c.,

633

$1,661

P 24

Gap Rock:-

General repairs, painting and

limewashing throughout,- -$ 719

Repairs to lightning conductor,

landing derricks, &c.,-

635

$1,354

Cape Collinson :-

General repairs, painting and

limewashing externally, - -$ 219

Relaying concrete in Compound,-

162

381

Green Island-General repairs, painting and colour- washing externally and repairing sun- shades,

Signal Hill, Kowloon Point,-General repairs, painting

and colourwashing throughout,

357

198

49. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City. - The road surfaces were maintained generally in a satisfactory condition. The surfacing of macadaniized roads was considerably damaged by heavy rains on the 15th August and following days. A scarifier for attachment to one of the steam road rollers was obtained for facilitating the breaking up of macadamized surfaces to enable roads to be re-coated with macadam. As the steam lorry belonging to the Ice Company caused a good deal of damage to some of the roads, it was found necessary to restrict it to certain routes.

Ricksha Stands were formed in Pedder Street, Chater Road and Connaught Road, the cost of their formation being defrayed from the Vote "Miscellaneous Works".

The eastern portion of Pedder Street, between the kerb and the new ricksha stand, was surfaced with tar macadam and that portion of Connaught Road in front of the Post Office was similarly surfaced. Jackson Road was also surfaced with tar macadam throughout the extent of the New Law Courts. A small portion of Connaught Road Central, near the Macao Steamboat Wharf, was laid with granite setts.

In Kennedy Road the tar macadamı surfacing was extended for a distance of 170 lineal feet eastward of the Union Church and a considerable portion of Robinson Road was laid with the same material.

Upper and Lower Albert Roads and that portion of Magazine Gap Road extending from Bowen Road to May Road were painted with tar and sanded.

The Tramway Co. relaid that portion of their track between the Post Office and the City Hall with tar macadam, finished with a layer of asphalt, for the purpose of reducing the noise caused by the running of their cars. Strips of teak were also laid under- neath the rails with the same object.

P 25

50. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City.-The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner. The tar macadam surfacing of Barker Road was extended a further distance of 1,090 yards and at the end of the year there remained but a very short length of this road to be done. A considerable length of cement concrete channelling was laid along Victoria Road.

51. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in Kowloon. The roads generally were maintained in good condition.

In Wuhu Street, Hunghom, cement concrete surfacing, 4′′ thick, was substituted for macadam and that portion of Kowloon City Road extending from Wuhu Street to the main entrance to the Green Island Cement Co.'s Works was similarly dealt with. In the case of the latter road, surfacing with inacadam was extended over that portion not formerly macadamized, the whole of the road being now surfaced either with concrete or macadam. The macadamizing of that portion of the road from Yaumati to Kowloon City hitherto surfaced with decomposed granite was completed during the year. A strip of Jordan Road, 15 feet in width, was macadamized from Gascoigne Road to Shanghai Street and Mody Road was macadamized throughout its entire length. Tar macadam was put down on a portion of Carnarvon Road, 220 feet in length.

The temporary road from Taikoktsui to Shamshuipo was coated with macadam in lieu of decomposed granite.

52.-Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in New Territories.— The road surfaces generally were maintained in a satisfactory condi-

tion.

An old bridge on the road from Tai Po to Fan Ling having been destroyed by floods, it was considered expedient to make a diversion of the road so as to improve its alignment and obviate the risk of a recurrence of the damage. The diversion extended over a quarter of a mile and necessitated resumptions costing $121 91. It included the construction of a bridge (5 spans of 5 feet each) and a culvert 4 feet diameter. The cost (exclusive of resumptions) of the work, which was completed in December, was $2,127.70, of which $381.46 remained to be paid in 1913.

53.-Maintenance of Telegraphs und Telephones.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order. Owing to the collapse of a godown wall in Russell Street, about a quarter of a mile of the main Government telephone route to North Point was carried away. The cost of making good the damage was paid by the owners of the godown.

It was found necessary to splice on a new shore-end to the cable connecting Hongkong with Waglan Lighthouse and, as this portion of the cable has always given trouble owing to the pre-

*

P 26

cipitous and rocky nature of the shore of Waglan Island at the point of landing, a new and apparently more suitable landing-place was selected. It is consequently hoped that interruptions of the service with the lighthouse will be less frequent than formerly. The necessary work was carried out departmentally.

Gough Hill and Pokfulam Police Stations were connected direct- ly with the Central Police Station instead of passing through a sub- exchange at No. 6 Police Station, Victoria Gap.

Telephonic communication was established between the Royal Observatory and the Time Ball Tower and various minor extensions of telephones and installations of electric bells, etc., were carried out, some of which were charged to other votes than that which forms the heading of these paragraphs.

The necessary lines were run to connect the Public Works Office with the Typhoon Refuge Works at Mongkoktsui, the cost being defrayed out of the vote for these Works.

A line was also run from the Public Works Office to the sub- exchange at No. 1 Motor House to afford more direct communication for water works purposes. The cost of this was defrayed out of the Vote "Miscellaneous Water Works".

54. Maintenance of Telephones in New Territories.--The lines and instruments were kept in good repair.

By arrangement with the Railway Administration, the mainten- ance of the telephones and electrical signalling apparatus was taken over by this Department.

The line to Shataukok was reconstructed with iron poles and 4 wires were added for Light Railway purposes. The line to Takuling Blockhouse was also reconstructed with iron poles.

55. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, etc.--The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs were systematically cleansed and maintained in good condition and the flushing tanks, with the ex- ception of those in the Hill and High Level Districts supplied from the water mains, were periodically worked at low tides.

The use of the flushing tanks supplied from the mains was discontinued in September in consequence of the drought. Sand deposits were re- moved from most of the trained nullahs, more especially from those in Kowloon owing to the gradients there being in many cases flat. The normal flow pipes of the sewer outfalls at Eastern and Wing Lok Streets were cleared of silt by the employment of a diver. Several old and disused drains in Queen's Road East, Praya East, St. Francis Street, etc., were traced and filled up, thus doing away with possible rat runs.

P 27

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations,

Repairs.......

Tools for cleansing operations, General incidental expenditure,

as against $17,976.09 in the previous year.

.$11,836.40

4,255.27

735.84

nil.

$16,827.51

56. Gus Lighting, City of Victoria and precincts and Hill District. The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City and its precincts was 1,050, an increase of 14 over the previous year and in the Hill District 127, an increase of 8.

The positions of the various additional lamps and a note of any lamps removed will be found in paragraph 107 of this Report.

57. Electric Lighting, City.—The number of arc lamps in the principal roads and of incandescent lamps in Bowen Road remains unaltered, namely, 75 are lamps and 10 incandescent.

58. Gus Lighting, Kowloon.--The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year was 255, an increase of 4 as compared with the previous year. Particulars of the positions of additional lamps erected will be found in paragraph 107 of this Report.

59. Flectric Lighting, Kowloon. - The number of electric lamps in use, all of which are incandescent, remains unaltered, namely, 39.

60. Maintenance of Praya Walis and Piers.-The following is a statement of the principal items of expenditure under this vote:-

Praya East Sea Wall-General repairs,

$2,035

Water Police Pier, Kowloon Point-General repairs,

520

Shaukiwan Stone Pier-General repairs,

513

Murray Pier-General repairs

460-

Arsenal Street Pier-General repairs,

445

Sea Wall at end of Watson Road-General repairs,

278

Cheung Chau Pier-General repairs,

175

Statue Square Pier-General repairs,

168

Kennedy Town Pier- General repairs,

119

115

Green Island Pier-General repairs,

61. Maintenance of Public Cemetery.-A new terrace was formed in the western portion of the Cemetery involving the construction of a reinforced concrete culvert and of a masonry retaining wall.

62. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has already been alluded to in paragraph 41 of this report.

P 28

63. Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds.-The various grounds were maintained in good order. Some considerable repairs were carried out at Blake Gardens, the amount spent up to the end of the year being $153.54.

64. Dredging Foreshores.-The dredger was employed at the following places and removed the quantities of material stated during the year

Causeway Bay,

Stormwater Outfalls,

Typhoon Refuge, Mongkoktsui, Castle Peak Pier,

Bowrington Canal Outlet,

Site for new slipway for Government

Launches, Yaumati,

Opposite M.L. 301, Kennedy Town,

Sulphur Channel,

Total,

29

24,410 cubic yards.

10,202

J5

"}

5,606

2,649

""

1,519

>>

1,270

"

""

1,258

>>

"2

92

""

47,066

The vessel was slipped and overhauled during the year at a cost of $1,252.00 and is in good working order and condition.

65. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The Colony escaped visitation by typhoons during the year and the considerable ex- penditure ($18,342.52) incurred under this heading was partly for the removal of large landslips which occurred on the Kowloon Catchwater in August, 1911, and for the reinstatement of the catch- water itself ($4,676.29), the remainder being for damage to roads, etc., caused by the rainstorm of August 15th, 1912, when fully 6 inches of rain fell. Numerous small landslips occurred during this rainstorm and many of the roads were scoured, necessitating repairs to the surfacing. Accumulations of sand had also to be removed from some of the trained nullahs and a drain connecting "Hazel- dene", Robinson Road, with the public sewer, which was carried away by a landslip, had to be reconstructed.

66. Town Clock.-No repairs to the Clock were necessary during the year, the only charges being those incurred for winding and regulating it.

67. Stores Depreciation.-As already mentioned (vide para. 2), this is a new vote to which losses on stores may be charged. In addition to such losses, a sum of £151. 9s. 9d. ($1,563.74) paid by the Crown Agents in connection with a contract for the supply of the heating apparatus for the New Law Courts was charged to this vote. The sum in question had been retained as security for the fulfilment of the contract mentioned.

68. Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks.—With the exception of two days at Chinese New Year when a constant supply was given, an intermittent supply of water by the rider main

P 29

system was in force from the commencement of the year until the 14th April when constant supply was restored. Owing to deficiency in the rainfall, however, it was found necessary to revert to intermit- tent supply by rider mains from the 28th May until the 5th June. From the latter date until the 3rd September, a constant supply was maintained, after which recourse was again had to intermittent supply. The rainfall during the wet season proved to be so deficient (63 92 inches against an average of 83 15 inches) that Tytam Reservoir and the Byewash Reservoir never filled up and, as only 3.88 inches of rain fell in September as compared with an average of 9:50 inches and October was practically rainless (0015 inches), it became evident that some more stringent measures for the conserva- tion of the water supply than the operation of the rider mains, which was then in force, would have to be adopted. After full consideration of the matter, it was decided that street fountains, from which the people would be able to obtain a supply of water by carrying it, should be erected throughout the Rider Main Districts. supply to the houses by the rider mains being entirely suspended. The erection of the necessary fountains was commenced on the 25th October and completed on the 20th November, the rider mains being disconnected as the erection of the fountains in the various districts proceeded. In all 203 new fountains were erected whilst 124 old ones were reinstated.

Though a constant supply throughout the whole 24 hours daily was given by public street fountains, the consumption was reduced. to about 12 gallons per head per day, as against 16 ́6 gallons in the case of a 2-hours' supply daily by rider mains.

The quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoirs on 1st January amounted to 527-93 million gallons and it reached a minimum on the 1st June when it amounted to 182 95 million gallons.

The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow levels for the following periods:-

Reservoir.

Capacity to permanent overflow level.

Period.

Million gallons.

Tytam,

Tytam Byewash,

384.80 22.36

Nil. Do.

Tytam Inter-

mediate,........

195.91

Wongneichong,

30.34

Pokfulam,

66.00

24th Aug. to 5th Sept. (13 days). 23rd Aug. to 3rd Sept. (12 days). 15th Aug. to 15th Sept. and 21st

Sept. to 30th Sept. (42 days).

The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 288 47 million gallons.

P 30

The pumps at Tytam Tuk were in operation from 1st January until 4th February, from 4th May until 10th June and from 17th August until the end of the year (a total of 210 days). The quantity of water pumped by this plant amounted to 273:43 million gallons.

In addition to the permanent pumps already mentioned, the tem- porary pump referred to in last year's Report was in use from 1st January until 4th February and from 17th August until the end of the year (a total of 172 days). The quantity of water pumped by it amounted to 99 59 million gallons.

The gross quantity of water pumped during the year by both the permanent and temporary pumps amounted to 373-02 million gallons.

The following is a comparative statement of the cost of pump- ing during the years 1911 and 1912-

Tytam Tuk Pumping Station-Permanent Pumps.

1911.

1912.

C.

C.

Coal,

4,887.15

6,324.00

Wages,

3,074.93

3,985.94

Miscellaneous, including repairs and

stores other than coal,

2,002.81

2,584.98*

Coal,

Wages,

Total,...... $9,964.89

$12,894.92

Tytam Stream-Temporary Pump.

Miscellaneous, including repairs and

stores other than coal,

Total,.....

1911.

1912.

$ c.

$ C.

5,234.65

5,087.10

1,228.96

1,123.65

1,676.62

$21.58

$8,140.23

$7,032,33

* Includes a sum of $700 for repairs to buildings.

P 31

M

A comparative statement of the total rainfall for the year at various points is given in the following table:-

Month.

January,... 2.71 2.32 3.25

2.36

1.19

2.44

3.37

February,...

2.43 2.40 2.63

2.28

3 22

2.26

4.14

March...

4.35 3.91

4.36

3.49

3.76

3.37

3.35

April,

3.99

3.20

5.20

4.46

5 24

5.30

3.72

May,..

3.94

6.25

2.36

5.18

6.55

2.70

5.18

June,

14.16 15.26

11.49

14.25

15.67

13.00

13.49

July,...

7.55 10.75

7.00

6.80

6.07

6.15

9.76

August, 15.71 11.31

16.45

18.31

14.66

17.88

10.30

September, 3.88 3.45

4.85

3.75

3.91

3.48

3.74

October,.... .02

.02

.04

.00

.00

.03

.00

November,.

.28

.25

.44

.42

.25

.15

.23

December, 4.90

5.48 6.27

4.60

5.22

5.78

7.12

Total 1912, 63.92 64.60

67.34

65.90

65.74

62 54

64.40

23

1911, 90.55 98.16

87.78

86.45

88.59

75.12 107.28

Increase,....

...

Decrease,... 26.63 33.56 20.44 20.55 22.85 12.58 42.88

The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 1,675 35 million gallons filtered and 24:47 million gallons unfiltered, making a grand total of 1,699.82 million gallons, or 22.94 million gallons more than in 1911.

The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes amounted to 18 3 gallons, taking an estimated. population of 250,519.

Full details of consumption, contents of reservoirs, etc., will be found in Annexes C and D.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst show that the water was of good quality throughout the year and the results obtained by the Bacteriological examinations were also satisfactory.

The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District during the year amounted to 81.38 million gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of 022 million gallons whilst 33.33

P 32

million gallons were pumped to the Hill District giving an average daily consumption of 0'091 million gallons. As compared with 1911, there was an increase of 5.23 million gallons pumped to the High Level District and of 2:35 million gallons pumped to the Hill District.

The grand total pumped during the year amounted to 11471 million gallons as compared with 107 13 milion gallons pumped during 1911.

Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities pumped to the High Levels and to the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E.

All engines, motors and station buildings were kept in a good state of repair throughout the year.

The number of meters in use at the end of the year amounted to 1,280 in the City and 171 in the Hill District or a total of 1,451 as compared with 1,222 and 174 in 1911 or a total of 1,396. The figures do not include 9 meters in use at Pokfulam.

The quantity of water supplied by meter was as follows:-

Filtered-Trade,

Domestic (City),

...189 71 million gals. ...170.65

23

19

,

(Hill District),

33.33

""

>>

Unfiltered,

24:47

""

Total,

...418.16

::

These figures show an increase of 2-58* million gallons in the quantity of water supplied by meter as compared with 1911.

New services were constructed or old ones altered, improved, repaired or connected to the mains to the number of 533 and 77 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The number of inspections of private services was 887. All defects were made good after the usual notices (33 in all) had been served. The number of inspections made was far below the usual, partly on account of the absence on leave on medical certificate of overseers and partly on account of the services in the rider-main districts being disconnected.

69. Maintenance of Kowloon Waterworks.—A constant supply of water was maintained throughout the year, the quantity supplied amounting to 365 62 million gallons, which gives a daily con- sumption of 100 million gallons or, taking an estimated average population of 91,100, say, 11 gallons per head per day. Details are given in Annexe F.

*The_total_metered supply for 1911 was erroneously given as 415-28 million gallons in the Report for that year. It should have been 415 58. The figures for the Hill District appeared as 30-68 instead of 30 98.

P 33

The quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoir on 1st January amounted to 318 66 million gallons and it reached a minimum on the 31st May when it amounted to 199·10 million gallons. The reservoir did not overflow during the year, a large portion of the catchment area intercepted by the catchwater being rendered unavailable owing to repairs required to the catchwater. The water impounded reached a maximun on the 21st September when it amounted to 31130 million gallons. The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoir at the end of the year amounted to 243:30 million gallons.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst and examina- tions made by the Bacteriologist were satisfactory.

the

The various buildings were kept in good repair throughout

year.

There were 396 meters in use at the end of the year, an increase of 2 over 1911.

House services were constructed, altered or repaired in 99 instances and 18 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

70. Maintenance of Aberdeen and Shaukiwan Waterworks.--Á satisfactory supply was maintained throughout the year at both places. The works referred to in last year's Report for augmenting the supply to Shaukiwan were sufficiently advanced to admit of the waters from certain streams in Saiwan Valley being turned into the mains in October, the supply being thus substantially increased.

At Aberdeen, arrangements were made for rendering a supply of water available for waterboats. This supply was instituted on the 1st October and, up to the close of the year, 1:39 million gallons of water had been disposed of, the water being paid for as supplied.

The total consumption at Aberdeen amounted to 11:08 million gallons and at Shaukiwan to 23:03 million gallons or about 30,000 and 63,000 gallons per day respectively. Details are given in Annexes G. and H.

The supply to Saiwan Battery which is included in the Shauki- wan returns amounted to 5'59 million gallons for the year.

There were 5 meters in use at Aberdeen and 5 at Shaukiwan.

71. Maintenance of Laichikok

Laichikok Waterworks:

Waterworks: Water Boat Supply.-- The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 73.66 million gallons or about 200,000 gallons per day. Details are given in Annexe J.

There were 13 meters in use.

72. Water Account. The fixing of meters to properties not supplied by the rider mains was continued and, at the end of the year, the work still remained incomplete.

P 34

The number of meters examined and repaired during the year amounted to 973.

The following is a statement of expenditure under the vote:

New meters fixed (difference in value

between issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters,

Meter boxes,...

Miscellaneous,

..$3,008.64

4,367.69

734.26

1,823.66

Total,

$9,934.25

j

73. Waterworks Revenue.--The following is a statement of the revenue derived from Waterworks during 1912 :-

Excess Con- sumption.

Rates 2%.

Total.

s

c.

$

C.

C.

City including

Wongneichong

Village and properties border-

ing Shaukiwan Road,

121,849.15194.415.07 | 316,264.22

Hill District,....

5,189.08

5,717.31

10,906.39

Pokfulam District,

2,296.25

2,296.25

Kowloon, including Shamshuipo

and Kowloon City,

32,943.80

26,588.34

59,532.14

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwan,

Laichikok,...

831.00 190.50 18,305.50

330.15

1,161.15

1,945.44

2,135.94

18,305.50

Total,.....$181,605.28 228,996.3! | 410,601.59

74. Comparison of Waterworks Revenue, 1911 and 1912.-The following is a comparative statement of the revenue derived from Waterworks during the years 1911 and 1912:

City (as above stated),

Hill District,

Pokfulam District,.

Kowloon (as above described),.

Aberdeen,

Shankiwan,

Laichikok,

1911.

1912.

$

C.

C

269,687.78 316,264.22

8,756 48

10,906.39

1,129.50

2,296.25

50,055.99

59,532.14

358.68

1,161.15.

2,003.99

2,135.94

18,929 00 18,305 50

Total,... 350,921.42 | 410,601.59

}

P 35

The receipts during 1912 under the heading "Excess Con- sumption were somewhat inflated owing to the Accounts for 1911 having fallen into arrear through insufficiency of staff.

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

75. Law Courts-Superstructure and Joinery, Fittings, &e.- The work comprised under these contracts was completed in the beginning of the year, the Courts being formally opened by His Excellency the Governor (Sir Frederick Lugard, G.C.M.G.) on the 15th January.

76. Law Courts-Lighting and Lifts.-As mentioned in last year's report, the contracts for the installation of these items were completed by the Hongkong Electric Co. before the close of 1911.

77. Law Courts-Furniture.-The furniture and fittings of the Courts, offices, etc., were all completed.

78. Law Courts-Herting Apparatus.-The heating apparatus was in working order by the date of the opening of the Courts.

After the Courts had been occupied, it was found that the acoustics were defective and that the fans which had been installed round the walls were unsatisfactory in their working. alterations in these and in other matters had to be subsequently carried out.

1912 Estimates, .$10,000.00 1912 Sup. Vote,...... 12,051.00

$22,051,00

1912 Expenditure,... 22,050 27

Total Estimates, ...$856,310,00 Expenditure to

31/12/12,......... 889,879.17*

79. Law Courts-History.—The following is a brief account of the circumstances connected with the erection of this building.

The Committee which was appointed in September, 1894, to consider the question of erecting new buildings for the Government Departments generally included within its purview the pro- vision of new Law Courts, the old Supreme Court building, which had been originally erected by a private firm for office purposes and subsequently acquired and adapted by Government for judicial purposes in 1847-48, heing no longer considered suitable or worthy of the Colony. The Report of the Committee in question was not received until November, 1896, but the Govern- ment had been informed in September, 1895, that a majority of the members were in favour of inviting competitive designs for the various buildings contemplated. In April, 1896, the Committee approved of certain Conditions of Competition which had been drafted by the Director of Public Works, the Government being notified that they were in favour of restricting the competition to

* The accounts had not been completed by the close of 1912,

- P 36

architects in Hongkong. Shanghai and Singapore. Under the approved Conditions of Competition, provision was made for the erection of new courts and affiliated offices on the plot of land immediately to the westward of the Hongkong Club (M.L. 274).

The Committee's proposals were submitted to the Secretary of State for the Colonies who, in June, 1896, requested to be furnished with a copy of the Committee's Report, intimating that he was not prepared to approve the proposal to invite competitive designs and that, when the erection of the new Government buildings had been decided upon, it would be desirable to employ the Consulting Architects to the Crown Agents for the Colonies, Messrs. Aston Webb & Ingress Bell, who possessed considerable experience in designing buildings for the tropics. Plans embody- ing the Committee's recommendations, which had in the meanwhile been prepared in the Public Works Office, were forwarded to the Secretary of State and were by him submitted to Messrs. Aston Webb & Ingress Bell, who, in September, 1897, made a report, recommending inter alia that the Law Courts should be erected on the plot of land immediately west of the Cricket Ground, the plot west of the Club being in their opinion too restricted to admit of the accommodation required being satisfactorily furnished.

Owing to discussions which arose locally regarding the sites for the Law Courts and other Government Offices referred to in the Committee's Report, it was not until February, 1898, that it was finally decided to adopt the recommendation of Messrs. Aston Webb & Ingress Bell as regards the site for the Law Courts, a resolution to that effect being passed by the Legislative Council on the 28th February, 1898. The necessary particulars were then sent to England and at the end of November, 1898, sketch plans, prepared by the firm already mentioned, were received in the Colony. These were returned in January, 1899, with some criticisms and the architects then commenced the preparation of the necessary drawings for the construction of the building. The general plans were received towards the end of the year, with the exception of those relating to the foundations, which were prepared by the Public Works Department, a contract for the foundations being let in July, 1900.

The construction of the foundations involved the removal and reconstruction of the old Praya Reclamation Office, a matshed being erected for temporary occupation until the new office, which was located to the north of the Queen's Statue, had been completed. A portion of old Praya wall, which crossed the south-east angle of the site, had also to be demolished and a basement to contain the heating apparatus had to be constructed under a portion of the building. It was found necessary to pile the foundations over the entire site. The contract was finally completed in April, 1903.

Tenders for the superstructure had been received in December, 1902, but, with the exception of one, which could not be accepted. as it was from a Contractor, who, in making up his tender, displayed his ignorance of the class of work intended and who

#

P 37

was very unfavourable reported on by one of the leading local architects, they were so much in excess of the estimate that it was considered inexpedient to accept any of them. Under these circumstances, it was decided that the only practicable course was to carry out the work departmentally, the principal difficulty with regard to this being insufficiency of staff. Whilst arrange- ments were being made to enable this course to be followed, a reasonable tender was received from Mr. Chan A Tong, who had previously been unable to submit one, and, after some negotiation, a contract was entered into with him in July, 1903, a foundation stone being laid by His Excellency the Governor (Sir Henry Blake) on the 12th November, 1903. As already mentioned, the Courts were opened by His Excellency Sir Frederick Lugard in January 1912, the construction of the superstructure thus extending over a period of 81⁄2 years.

The chief causes of the work extending over so long a period

were :-

(a.) The difficulty of obtaining a sufficient supply of

suitable granite.

(b.) The difficulty of obtaining a sufficient number of

masons.

(c.) The death of the Contractor, which occurred in November, 1904, whilst the work was in its early stages, the contract being then taken over by Mr. Chan A Tong's son.

With regard to (a), owing to the importance and prominence of the building, great attention was paid to the quality and colour of the stone used, much of the granite in general use in Hongkong being subject to discolouration, after being dressed and fixed, owing to the presence of minute particles of iron in it. It was found that the sources from which a supply of reliable stone of suit- able colour could be obtained were very limited and, as the lessee of one considerable quarry in the New Territories, which was selected as affording suitable stone, displayed great indifference in the con- duct of his quarrying operations, the Contractor experienced great difficulty in obtaining the necessary stone. Many of the stones were of exceptional size, weighing up to fully 5 tons each, and, as those in the various courses in many cases varied in size, it was not possible, when a stone met with an injury in dressing or setting, to replace it with one from the next course and proceed with the work. Progress in such cases had to be suspended until a new stone could be quarried and dressed.

With regard to (b), in addition to considerable activity in general building operations, including the erection of several of the large blocks of buildings on the Praya Reclamation, both the Naval Yard Extension and the Taikoo Shipyard Works, which absorbed a great many masons, were in active progress from 1903 to 1907. The class of labour particularly required for the construction of the Law Courts was thus in exceptional demand and it is unnecessary to

P 38

point out that the supply of such labour is by no means unlimited. The workmanship required in the case of the Law Courts was of ex- ceptional quality, which tended to further limit the supply of labour.

With regard to (c), the death of the Contractor, who had successfully and expeditiously executed previous large contracts for Government, was obviously a serious loss, especially as it occurred whilst the work was still in its early stage. Mr. Chan A Tong's son carried it on until the middle of June, 1912, when it was, by Agreement, taken over and completed by Government.

80. Law Courts--Description of Building.—The building oc- cupies a site, measuring 230′ 0′′ × 125′ 6′′, immediately to the west of the Cricket Ground and north of the City Hall. Practically the whole of it had been reclaimed from the harbour under the Praya Reclamation Scheme (Ordinance No. 16 of 1889). The site is bounded on the east by Jackson Road, 50 feet wide, beyond which lies the Cricket Ground, on the south by Des Voeux Road, 75 feet wide, on the west by Royal Square 265 feet wide, and on the north by Chater Road, 75 feet wide.

In addition to a small basement, which contains the heating apparatus, the accommodation afforded is as follows

Ground floor, Land Office (2 large rooms, each 41' × 26', and strong-room for records); Supreme Court Registry (5 rooms, varying from 43' x 34' to 41' x 15', and strong-room for records); prisoners' receiving room. and 2 cells and store-rooms.

First floor, First or Great Court, 72 × 43', Second and Third Courts, each 54′ 6′′ × 42′ 3′′, Library, 73′ 6′′ × 22′ 0′′, three Judges' rooms, Witnesses' rooms, Jury room and Bar robing room.

Second floor, Attorney General's and Crown Solicitor's offices, (5 rooms, varying from 39' 0" x 21' 6" to 21′ 6′′ × 16' 0") and two store-rooms.

There are two electric lifts at opposite corners of the building, one of which ascends to the first floor and the other to the second floor. There are also three granite staircases, only one of which extends to the second floor. Spacious corridors and lavatory accom- modation are provided on all floors.

The building is raised on granite steps, by means of which some slight inequalities in the levels of the surrounding roads are overcome. Surrounded by a massive colonnade, except at the central portions of the east and west elevations, the building is entirely faced with granite throughout. The colonnade and central portion of the east elevation are finished with a heavy granite cornice and balustrade whilst the central portion of the west elevation terminates . in a large pediment surmounted by a statue of Justice, carved in granite. The pediment contains the letters E.R. and the Royal Coat of Arms, all executed in granite. Above the Great Court, which

P 39

occupies the central portion of the building, is a massive dome, springing from a drum which is raised above the level of the adjoining roofs. The drum is surrounded by an open colonnade, the whole being constructed in granite. The height from the ground to the finial on top of the dome is 132 feet.

The whole of the floors throughout the building are of cement concrete, covered, in the case of the corridors, verandahs, lavatories, etc., with tiles. The verandahs on the ground floor are laid with finely-dressed granite slabs. In the case of the courts and offices, the floors are finished in teak nailed to fillets embedded in the con- crete.

The internal walls, with the exception of the four main piers supporting the dome, which are of granite, and the backing of the external walls are of brickwork, the bricks being obtained from the Green Island Cement Co. The roofs over the Second and Third Courts, which have an overhang of 6 feet, supported on massive carved teak brackets are of the ordinary pitched type, covered with pan and roll tiles, those of the dome and behind the pediment on west elevation are covered with granolithic slabs, specially manufac- tured by Stuart's Granolithic Co., London, and those over the verandahs and other portions of the building are of cement concrete, covered with asphalt and granolithic. All the roofs are supported on steel principals or beams; the dome is framed in steelwork, sup- ported on steel girders, and the floors are supported on steel beams.

The internal walls of the Courts are panelled with teakwood for a height of 12' 0" in the case of the First Court, and of 9′ 6′′ in the case of the two other Courts, those of the corridors, staircases and lavatories are tiled for a height of from 9' 6" to 4′ 0′′ with ivory white glazed tiles with green skirting, band and capping mould. The remainder of the walls are plastered.

The whole of the woodwork throughout the building, including all the fittings in the Courts and Library, is of teakwood.

The building is heated throughout with hot water on the low- pressure system and, in addition to being provided with radiators, all offices and rooms are fitted with fireplaces. The lighting is by means of electric light, and, in addition to ordinary electric fans, special fans are fitted above the ceilings of the various courts for the extraction of vitiated air.

As previously mentioned, the architects who designed the build- ing were Messrs. Sir Aston Webb & Ingress Bell, of London.

81 New Magistracy.-Preliminary plans for this building were prepared but the requirements were subsequently altered, entailing the preparation of new plans. These were prepared and tenders were called for but the contract had not been let at the close of the

year.

1.

1912 Estimates, $38,000.00 | Total Estimates, 1912 Expenditure,

Expenditure to

31,12/12,

{

P 40

82. Sanitary Inspectors' Office, etc., Wantsai District.—The buildings were roofed in and were otherwise well advanced at the close of the year, but, owing to dilatoriness on the part of the Con- tractor, a good deal of internal finishing remained to be done. The buildings are of Canton red brick pointed in cement, the roofs being of double pan and roll tiling.

The main building, which is partly one-storied and partly three-storied, contains 2 cart sheds, each 30′ × 25', an office 30′ 9′′ × 17' 0", a dressing room 9' 0" x 8′ 0′′, lavatory 7′ 0′′ × 8' 0", store 17' 7" x 8' 0", 2 rooms for non-Chinese foremen, each 15′ 0′′ × 12′ 9′′, a room for Chinese foremen, 12′ 3′′ × 9′ 0′′, besides kitchens, bathroom, etc. Verandahs, 8 feet wide, extend along the north front of the three-storied portion and access to the upper floors is provided by a granite staircase. The Coolie Quarters, which are one-storied, contain 2 rooms for coolies, each 25 '0′′ × 12' 0" and a kitchen, bathroom and latrine, each 12' (" × 8′ 0′′.

1912 Estimates,

...$16,000.00 Total Estimates, ...$18,000.00

1912 Expenditure,... 8,216.58 | Expenditure to

31/12/12,

8,216.58

83. Old Western Market-Reconstruction.-Very satisfactory progress was made with this work during the year. In addi- tion to completing the piling and the concrete foundations for walls and stanchions, the whole of the brickwork of the main building was completed and about 210 tons of constructional steelwork obtained from England were fixed. The façades to Bonham Strand and Morrison Street were built up to the level of the top of the main cornice. The three granite staircases giving access to the first floor were completed, the whole of the first floor concrete was laid and the cement concrete casing of all exposed steelwork was completed. Wrought iron grilles were made and fixed to all openings requiring same.

A small detached building containing latrines, coolie and care- taker's quarters was built up to the second floor level, all door and window frames being fixed. The concrete floors of same were laid and two concrete staircases were completed.

The necessary alterations of the drainage of properties adjoin- ing the market were completed during the year.

|

1912 Estimates, $76,000.00 Total Estimates, ...$240,000.00 1912 Sup. Vote, ... 17,000.00 Expenditure to

$93,000,00

1912 Expenditure,... 92,718.04

31/12/12,

100,148,62

84. Yaumati English School-Additional Storey.-The Con- tract for this work, which comprised the construction of an addi- tional storey over the main building,-making the building a two-storied one, and of a new wing and latrines, was completed in June. The new upper floor contains five class-rooms, two measur-

- P 41

ing 27′ 6′′ × 21′ 6′′, two 30′ 0′′ × 14′ 3′′ and one 30′ 0′′ × 22′ 0′′, a teacher's room, 16′ 9̸