Administrative Reports - 1908

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1908

Table of Contents

1 Finances

2 Trade and Shipping, industries, Fisheries, agriculture and Land

3 Legislation

4 Education

5 Public Works

6 Government institutions

7 Institutions Not Supported By Government

8 Criminal and Police

9 Vital Statistics

10 Postal Service

11 Military forces and Expenditure

12 General Observations

A Financial Returns

B Assessment

C Registrar General's Department

D Post office

E Harbour office

F Observatory

G Supreme Court

H Police Magistrates' Court

I Police and Fire Brigade

J Prison

K Medical and Sanitary

L Botanical and forestry

M Education

N Queen's College

O Volunteer Corps

P Public Works

Q Kowloon-Canton Railway

 




HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1908,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, August 27th, 1909.

No. 253.

HONGKONG.

MY LORD,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 27th August, 1909.

I have the honour to submit for Your Lordship's information the following general Report on the annual Blue Book for the year 1908.

I.-FINANCES.

(a.)—GENERAL REVENUE AND Expenditure.

The Revenue for the year, exclusive of Land Sales amounted to $6,034,849 or $407,608 less than the previous year. Land Sales amounted to $69,358 or $86,624 less than in 1907. The total revenue from all sources was therefore $6,104,207 or $498,073 less than in the previous year, and $123,683 less than the Estimate.

Light Dues, Fees of Court, Post Office Receipts, and Miscellaneous Receipts brought in together $150,378 more than was estimated. The receipts under the remaining heads of revenue were altogether $274.061 less than were anticipated when the estimates were drawn up, of which the deficit on Land Sales accounted for $230,642.

The Expenditure for the year was $5,586,138 exclusive of Public Works Extra- ordinary; inclusive of that item, but exclusive of expenditure on Railway Construction (Loan Account) it was $6,573,341 or $816,138 more than the total expenditure for 1907.

The principal cause of this increase of expenditure in spite of a falling revenue, was the loss due to the fall in exchange value of the dollar. The Estimates of 1907 had been calculated ou a basis of 2/- for Sterling Salaries, and 2/1 for other items, while the Estimates for 1908 were calculated at 1/9 only. The expenditure of the year exceeded the Estimate by $394,810, due (inter alia) to a still further fall in exchange, to heavy damages caused by typhoons, and to the purchase of a dredger for the construction of a Refuge for small craft.

The decrease of $123,683 in the Revenue, and the excess of $394,810 in Expenditure make a total shortage of $518,493 to meet which there was an expected surplus of $49,359 only, leaving a deficit on the year's working, to be charged to reserves, of $469,134.

The following Table shows the total revenue and expenditure for the five years 1904-1908 :-

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

1908.

$

Revenue,

6,809,047

Expenditure,

6,376,235

6,918,403 6,951,275

7,035,011 6,832,610

6,602,280 5,757,203

$ 6,104,207 6,573,341

Surplus,

432,812

202,401

845,076

Deficit,.....

32,871

469,134

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF CREWE,

His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies,

&c.,

&f..

&c.

2

(b.)-ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

At the end of the year 1908, the assets of the Colony amounted to $506,437. The total liabilities were $789,532 so that the balance of liabilities over assets amounted to $283,095. Deducting this sum from the re-imbursement due by Railway Construction Account the balance of Assets (General Account) was $1,073,041, a decrease of $460,676 as compared with the previous year, due to the deficit in the year's working.

(c.)-PUBLIC DEBT.

A Loan consisting of Inscribed Stock at 3% interest, £341,799 was incurred in 1893. for Praya Reclamation; Central Market; Water, Drainage and Sewerage Works, &c., to be paid off on 15th April, 1943.

A second Loan consisting of inscribed stock £1,143,933 at 3 per cent. was raised to cover a Loan to the Viceroy of Wuchang of £1,100,000. The Viceroy in accordance with the terms of the Loan had up to the end of 1908 repaid £330,000 which was placed to the credit of a special account for construction of the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

The amount paid into the Joint Sinking Fund with accrued interest reached £74,674. 148.

14s. 8d. on the 31st of December, 1908.

II. TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,

AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.)-TRADE AND SHIPPING.

The total of the Shpping entering and clearing in the Colony during the year 1908. amounted to 532,112 ships of 34,615,241 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1907 show an increase of 24,478 ships and a decrease of 1,413,069 tons.

Of this total 45,437 ships of 22,306,037 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, and were distributed as follows:-

British Ocean vessels represented

""

British River Steamers

"1

1908.

1907.

8.3% in numbers and 33-7% in tonnage.

Foreign

9.2

"

""

19

13.8

33.2 19.2

""

31·4% 33.5 20.1

""

""

21

1)

">

Foreign

11

*1

Trading Junks

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons

2.9 1 8.9

3.3

3.2

11

""

11

*)

""

0.8

0.3

"

""

"}

56.9

9.8,,

11.5

">

>>

,,

>>

19

100.0 %

100·0%

100.0 %

thus:

Steamships not exceeding 60 tous, 91.58% in numbers and 84·98 Junks,

40,951 vessels of 1,848,522 tons were engaged in Local Trade and were distributed

1907. in numbers and 84-98% in tonnage 86.31 %

1908.

8.42

15.02

17

100.00%

100.00%

13.69

"}

100.00%

Seven thousand seven hundred and fifty (7,750) steamers, eleven (11) sailing ships and two thousand and thirty (2,030) steamships not exceeding 60 tons, in Foreign Trade, entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 26.8, as compared with 24-8 in 1907.

The average tonnage of Ocean vessels risiting the Port has again increased, from 2,325.3 tons to 2,448 6 tons. That of British vessels has increased from 2,552-2 tons to 2,593-06 tons, while that of Foreigners has increase I from 2,136.8 toas to 2,309·9 tons.

In this connection, it is interesting to note that, during the past 20 years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the Colony has risen from 1,1869 tons to 2,448 6 tons.

The average tonnage of River steamers entered during 1908 was 665-5 tons, as against 661 tons in 1907. British River steamers have increased in average tonnage from 678 tons- 10 686 5 tons, while Foreigners have again decreased, from 567 tous to 565 2 tons.

2

(b.)-ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

At the end of the year 1908, the assets of the Colony amounted to $506,437. The total liabilities were $789,532 so that the balance of liabilities over assets amounted to $283,095. Deducting this sum from the re-imbursement due by Railway Construction Account the balance of Assets (General Account) was $1,073,041, a decrease of $460,676 as compared with the previous year, due to the deficit in the year's working.

(c.)-PUBLIC DEBT.

A Loan consisting of Inscribed Stock at 3% interest, £341,799 was incurred in 1893. for Praya Reclamation; Central Market; Water, Drainage and Sewerage Works, &c., to be paid off on 15th April, 1943.

A second Loan consisting of inscribed stock £1,143,933 at 3 per cent. was raised to cover a Loan to the Viceroy of Wuchang of £1,100,000. The Viceroy in accordance with the terms of the Loan had up to the end of 1908 repaid £330,000 which was placed to the credit of a special account for construction of the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

The amount paid into the Joint Sinking Fund with accrued interest reached £74,674. 148.

14s. 8d. on the 31st of December, 1908.

II. TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,

AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.)-TRADE AND SHIPPING.

The total of the Shpping entering and clearing in the Colony during the year 1908. amounted to 532,112 ships of 34,615,241 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1907 show an increase of 24,478 ships and a decrease of 1,413,069 tons.

Of this total 45,437 ships of 22,306,037 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, and were distributed as follows:-

British Ocean vessels represented

""

British River Steamers

"1

1908.

1907.

8.3% in numbers and 33-7% in tonnage.

Foreign

9.2

"

""

19

13.8

33.2 19.2

""

31·4% 33.5 20.1

""

""

21

1)

">

Foreign

11

*1

Trading Junks

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons

2.9 1 8.9

3.3

3.2

11

""

11

*)

""

0.8

0.3

"

""

"}

56.9

9.8,,

11.5

">

>>

,,

>>

19

100.0 %

100·0%

100.0 %

thus:

Steamships not exceeding 60 tous, 91.58% in numbers and 84·98 Junks,

40,951 vessels of 1,848,522 tons were engaged in Local Trade and were distributed

1907. in numbers and 84-98% in tonnage 86.31 %

1908.

8.42

15.02

17

100.00%

100.00%

13.69

"}

100.00%

Seven thousand seven hundred and fifty (7,750) steamers, eleven (11) sailing ships and two thousand and thirty (2,030) steamships not exceeding 60 tons, in Foreign Trade, entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 26.8, as compared with 24-8 in 1907.

The average tonnage of Ocean vessels risiting the Port has again increased, from 2,325.3 tons to 2,448 6 tons. That of British vessels has increased from 2,552-2 tons to 2,593-06 tons, while that of Foreigners has increase I from 2,136.8 toas to 2,309·9 tons.

In this connection, it is interesting to note that, during the past 20 years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the Colony has risen from 1,1869 tons to 2,448 6 tons.

The average tonnage of River steamers entered during 1908 was 665-5 tons, as against 661 tons in 1907. British River steamers have increased in average tonnage from 678 tons- 10 686 5 tons, while Foreigners have again decreased, from 567 tous to 565 2 tons.

3

A comparison between the years 1907 and 1908 is given in the following table:-

1907.

1908.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessel.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going, Foreign Ocean-

going,

British River

3,756 7,216,169 3,869 7,505,270

4,621 7,720,875 4,132 | 7,397,836

6,828 4,630,361 | 6,246 | 4,287,482

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

113 289,101

489 323,039

582

342,882

Steamers, Foreign River

1,310

743,992 1,297

733,065

13

10,927

Steamers,

Steamships un-

der 60tons(Fo-

1.581

70,021 4,060

181,142 2,479 | 111,121

reign Trade).

Junks in Foreign

29,564 2,651,470 25,833 2,201,242

3,731 450,228

Trade,

Total,

Steam-launches

plying in waters of the Colony,

17,660 23,032,891 |15,437 | 22,306,037 | 2,592 400,222 4,815 1,127,076

419,202 11,216,532 | 445,724 | 10,460,682|26,522

755,850

Junks in Local

Trade,

+

(40,772, 1,778,887 10,951

1,848,522 179 69,635

Grand Total.... 607,634 | 36,028,310 | 512,112 | 34,615,241 |29,293 469,857 4,815 1,382,926

NETT,

24.473

1,413,069

*

Including 18,090 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 820,958 tons.

† Including 16,808 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 862,256 tons.

There is an increase in British Ocean shipping, entered and cleared during the year, of 113 ships of 289,101 tons (59-26,698 increase in 1907). This increase appears to indicate a very considerable revival of trade during the last quarter of the year after the general depression, for in each of the first three quarters decreases were shown as compared with the corresponding periods of 1907.

British River steamers are shown to have decreased by 582 entries and clearances with a collective tonnage of 342,882 tons. This decrease is due to the loss of two large, regularly running, steamers, the "Powan" and Ying King", and the withdrawal of a third, the "Hoi Sang", from the run, during the year.

"

Foreign Ocean vessels, which increased by 334 ships of 627,380 tons in 1907 due to the resumption of the Japanese carrying trade, have decreased by 489 ships of 323,039 tons. This decrease is general, but is most noticeable under the Norwegian, Japanese and German Flags, and may undoubtedly be attributed to the general trade depression throughout the world.

Foreign River steamers show a falling off of 13 ships of 10,927 tons which is due to the laying up of several of these vessels after the typhoon of July 27, in which they were damaged. Had it not been for this, the number and tonnage would have been considerably in excess of those for 1907. The increase in 1907 was 238 ships of 76,075 tons.

The typhoon, combined with the effects of the trade depression, which certainly has reacted upon Junk traffic as it has upon shipping, may also be held reponsible for the decrease in Junks in Foreign Trade.

The increase shown in Steamships under 60 tons is due to the inclusion of unlicensed, privately owned, steam-launches, which have not previously figured in the returns.

The actual number of individual Ocean Vessels of European Construction entering dur- ing 1908 was 745, being 365 British and 380 Foreign. The figures in 1907 were respect- ively 800, 362, and 438.

These 745 ships aggregated 1,824,237 tons. They entered 3,991 times and gave a collective tonnage of 7,452,498 tons. Thus compared with 1907, 55 fewer ships of 36,008 less tons, entered 191 fewer times and gave a collective tonnage decreased by 13,013 tons.

Thus-

4

Steamers.

No. of Times

entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1907. 1908. 1907. 1908.

1907.

1908.

British

(Steamers... 355

358

1,867 1,923 3,586,5103,730,927

Sailing

7

7

9

10 19,431

21,697

Austrian,

9

9

30

25

106,523

97,789

Belgian,

1

1

1

1

2,903

2,903

Chinese,

20

16

214

229

267,789

291,416

Corean,

2

14

...

21,298

Danish,

9

6

21

15

41,122 34,211

Dutch,

18

15

69

97

142,100 201,014

French,

33

39

202

169

294,461 289,222

German,

137

129

790

Italian,.

3

4

12

Japanese,.

111

93

534

745 1,246,053 1,188,100 12 31,704 31,400 434 1,126,517 1,049,540

Norwegian,

59

39

290

181

265,728 192,278

Portuguese,

2

5

59

87

19,128

23,487

Russian,

10

7

13

13

30,912

34,326

Swedish,

3

3

11

11

12,970

18,099

United Steamers.

20

13

45

38

251,590, 245,280

States Sailing.

1

1

72.

809

Total,

800

745 4,182 3,991 7,467,511,7,452,498

It may not be out of place to draw a comparison here between these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 1888, 2,614 British ships of 3,265.751 tons entered the port, against 10,115 ships of 11,792,752 tons in 1908. For Foreign ships the figures are in 1888, 1,206 ships of 1,252,862 tons and in 1908, 5,429 ships of 8.130,901 tons. These figures are those for Ocean and River Steamers, which were not distinguished in 1888 and Ocean going sailing ships (not junks).

TRADE.

Since Hongkong is a Free Port no accurate returns based on Customs entries, can be given of the exports, imports and goods in transit.

There are however certain items of cargo, dealt with in the Colony, of which, either from their nature and the circumstances under which they are imported, or from the fact that they are required by law to be specially reported, substantially accurate returns can be given. These items are Coal, Kerosene Oil (which includes all products of petroleum), Opium, Morphine, Compounds of Opium, and Sugar.

1,018,753 tons of Coal were imported during the year. This shows a negligible increase of 13,886 tons (1·3%) over the imports during 1907.

This

Of Bulk Oil 61,818 tons arrived, an increase of 17,938 tons, or 40.8%. appears to have no special siguificance, but to be entirely due to the cheap freights ruling, and to the installation, by the Standard Oil Co., of oil tanks at Lai-chi-kok, which required filling.

40,018 tons of Case Oil arrived, being an increase of 3,289, or 8.9%, over the 1907 figures. Here, again, the cheap freights were taken advantage of to fill up stocks.

Liquid Fuel, which has increased from 3,272 tons in 1907 to 13,832 tons in 1908, was probably affected by the same causes as were Bulk and Case Oil, in addition to which, there has been an increased demand for this product, owing to more steamers using liquid fuel having visited the Colony during the year.

Although, as has been said, no reliable figures can be given for General Cargo it would appear from returns received, that there has been a considerable decline in the imports of Rice and Flour. The falling off in Rice is due to the exceptional crop in Northern and Central China as a result of which prices at Shanghai and the Yangtze ports were lower than in Siam and Aunam, and the imports from those countries declined in consequence. It is also stated that the rice merchants of Bangkok instituted a boycott against the Norddeuts- cher Lloyd steamers (late Scottish Oriental) which monopolise the carrying trade between that port and Hongkong. The rice trade from the South having now reverted to its usual conditions, I see no reason to doubt that this year will see it restored to its former channels.

J

Flour shows a large decrease, from 147,000 to 91,000 tons, which appears to be due to the fact that the Colony is ceasing to be the distributing centre for this commodity. Shipments are now made direct from ports on the Pacific Coast of North America to Shanghai, Amoy, Singapore, &c., instead of transhipping here, as heretofore.

There is however a possibility that, the Hongkong Milling Company being in liquidation, some small recrudescence in this branch of trade may occur.

The total reported Imports during the year amounted to 4,170,000 tons, as against 4,366,000 tons in 1907, a decrease of 4.4%. Exports also show a decrease, from 2,354,000 tons to 2,103,000 tons or 10.7%. Transit cargo declined from 3,396,000 to 3,373,000 tons or 0.7%.

Emigration.

Seventy one thousand and eighty-one (71,081) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year, of thesc, 53, 118 were carried in British ships and 17,963 in Foreign ships. These figures show a decrease of 34,886 emigrants, or 32.9%, compared with those for 1907.

It is difficult to account for this large decrease, but there were probably several contri- buting factors, such as the general depression in trade and consequent decreased demand for labour, and the quarantine restrictions placed upon vessels from the Colony to other ports, which probably had a great effect. But the chief causes undoubtedly were:-

!

1. The cessation of Assisted Emigrants to Banka and Billiton. This emigration commenced in 1907, and served to largely swell the figures for that year. The demand for labour in those islands was not very large, and all the plantations there were fully manned before the beginning of 1908.

2. The West River floods checked recruiting during the first six months of the year. 3. There was a considerable demand for labour on the several railways under

construction in China, which restricted the recruiting area.

One hundred and fifty seven thousand eight hundred and nine (157,809) returning emigrants were brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports. This includes 106 returning from South Africa. Of the total number 116,094 arrived in British ships and 41,715 in Foreign ships.

(b.) INDUSTRIES.

Sugar Refining Industry.-The year 1908 was more favourable for the sugar refining industry of the Colony than 1907 owing to the curtailment of supplies of Java White Sugars and of Japanese refined in the China market. As a consequence of this, prices advanced during the year, and the local Refineries were able to market their Sugars under improved conditions. European beets were conspicuous by their absence doubtless owing to the low silver rate of exchange for sterling remittances.

Yarn Trade. The extreme depression during the two preceding years adversely affected the market during the beginning of 1908 and prices continued to rule below the parity of those at the producing centres. Later in the year the demand improved and prices rose steadily. Large sales were effected, leaving a fair margin of profit to Importers while the Chinese dealers did very well indeed on their purchases. Stocks became abnormally reduced and the year closed with an improving tendency. In May last the local Cotton Mill found it advisable to resume full working but the difficulty in procuring adequate labour prevented the Company from taking full advantage of the improvement in demand. The bulk of the production was sold direct to Shanghai and the Northern Ports.

Rope Manufacturing Industry.—The remarks made last year on the Rope Manufactur- ing Industry apply in some measures to the year 1908. Conditions have not altered much in either direction, prices have been reduced to customers, and there is a larger demand with increased output.

Cement Industry.-The conditions under which this industry has been carried on have been much the same as in 1907, and there has been a good demand throughout the year.

Hongkong Milling Company Limited.-The Flour Mills at Junk Bay were not running for a greater part of 1908.

Oriental Brewery, Limited.-A recently established industry is that of the Oriental Brewery, Limited, at Laichikok. This Brewery will shortly place its product on the market and its capacity is about 100,000 barrels per annum.

į

(e.) LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.

The net amount received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights after deducting expenses of the Sales was $69,358, a decrease of $92,101 on the previous year and $218,481 less than the average amount received for each of the past five years. Of this amount $14,665 was received in respect of sales of Pier Rights and the right of extending existing Piers, $7,078 was received in respect of Sales of Crown Land in the New Ter- ritories and the balance from Sales of New Lots of Crown Land and Grants of Extension to exisiting Lots in the Island of Hongkong and Old Kowloon.

The chief items were for an extension to a Soy Factory at West Point (Inland Lot No. 1300) and for a renewal of the Lease of the Dairy Farm Company's premises in Wyndham Street for a period of 75 years, the existing lease of which is about to expire.

The considerable decrease in Revenue from Sales of Crown Land may be partly attributed to the fact that in the City of Victoria there is little available building land left and partly to the fact that at the present time there is no great demand for new houses in the City and in Old -Kowloon, a considerable number of Chinese shops and dwelling houses being now unlet. The general depression in the land market, which commenced a few years ago, still continues and capitalists who invested in land and buildings at the high prices ruling some ten years ago have suffered very considerable losses; in many cases properties have been sold by mortgagees at far less than the amount of their securities while many other mortgagees are holding on awaiting a more favourable opportunity for realizing their securities. There is however a very fair demand in the City for property at reduced prices. There appears to be no lack of money in the Colony and a considerable number of transactions in land have taken place during the past year.

There have been a large number of sales of small lots of Crown Land for native dwellings and industries in the New Territories, and the demand for these is likely to further increase, as the native population now realize the reasonable terms upon which Crown Land can be obtained and the security of tenure afforded by holding under a long lease direct from the Crown.

Three areas of over 40 acres of land at Tai O in the Island of Lan Tao for use as Salt Pans were put up for auction on an 18 years' lease at the upset annual rental of $15 per acre per annum and after considerable competition one Lot of over 21 acres realized as much as $170 per acre per annum which shows that Salt Pans in a good locality are apparently very remunerative undertakings. During the year a second area of one square mile in the New Territories was lease: to Sir Paul Chater for 75 years for mining purposes.

III.-LEGISLATION.

Twenty-two Ordinances were passed during 1908 of which nine were Amendment Ordinances. A Fire Insurance Companies Ordinance (No. 3) was passed to authorize the removal of Fire Insurance Companies from the Register of Companies in certain cases. Ordinances were also passed to enable Foreign Corporations to acquire and hold land in the Colony (No. 7): to provide for the grant of brewery licences (No. 8): to empower a Magistrate to hold a Small Debts Court in the New Territories (No. 22): to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the sale of poisons (No. 12): to regulate theatres and other places of public resort (more especially in regard to precautions against fire) (No. 18): and to transfer the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and its management to the Government of Hongkong (No. 15).

IV. EDUCATION.

There are 73 Government and Grant Schools, the most important of which is Queen's College. Of these 23 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all subjects of the 7th Standard, and above. These latter schools have an average attendance of 3,992, and the medium of instruction in all of them with the exception of one girls' school, is Engish. The 50 remaining Schools are all Lower Grade. They comprise 1 school for British Indians where English and Urdu are taught ; 5 Government and 1 Grant Anglo- Chinese Schools; and 43 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 2,186. The total average daily attendance, at both Grades of School, is 6,178.

The revenue derived from school fees is $54,792 (of which $31,073 is from Queen's College) and is rapidly increasing this is mainly to be accounted for by the increasing numbers of Chinese desirous of an English education.

į

(e.) LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.

The net amount received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights after deducting expenses of the Sales was $69,358, a decrease of $92,101 on the previous year and $218,481 less than the average amount received for each of the past five years. Of this amount $14,665 was received in respect of sales of Pier Rights and the right of extending existing Piers, $7,078 was received in respect of Sales of Crown Land in the New Ter- ritories and the balance from Sales of New Lots of Crown Land and Grants of Extension to exisiting Lots in the Island of Hongkong and Old Kowloon.

The chief items were for an extension to a Soy Factory at West Point (Inland Lot No. 1300) and for a renewal of the Lease of the Dairy Farm Company's premises in Wyndham Street for a period of 75 years, the existing lease of which is about to expire.

The considerable decrease in Revenue from Sales of Crown Land may be partly attributed to the fact that in the City of Victoria there is little available building land left and partly to the fact that at the present time there is no great demand for new houses in the City and in Old -Kowloon, a considerable number of Chinese shops and dwelling houses being now unlet. The general depression in the land market, which commenced a few years ago, still continues and capitalists who invested in land and buildings at the high prices ruling some ten years ago have suffered very considerable losses; in many cases properties have been sold by mortgagees at far less than the amount of their securities while many other mortgagees are holding on awaiting a more favourable opportunity for realizing their securities. There is however a very fair demand in the City for property at reduced prices. There appears to be no lack of money in the Colony and a considerable number of transactions in land have taken place during the past year.

There have been a large number of sales of small lots of Crown Land for native dwellings and industries in the New Territories, and the demand for these is likely to further increase, as the native population now realize the reasonable terms upon which Crown Land can be obtained and the security of tenure afforded by holding under a long lease direct from the Crown.

Three areas of over 40 acres of land at Tai O in the Island of Lan Tao for use as Salt Pans were put up for auction on an 18 years' lease at the upset annual rental of $15 per acre per annum and after considerable competition one Lot of over 21 acres realized as much as $170 per acre per annum which shows that Salt Pans in a good locality are apparently very remunerative undertakings. During the year a second area of one square mile in the New Territories was lease: to Sir Paul Chater for 75 years for mining purposes.

III.-LEGISLATION.

Twenty-two Ordinances were passed during 1908 of which nine were Amendment Ordinances. A Fire Insurance Companies Ordinance (No. 3) was passed to authorize the removal of Fire Insurance Companies from the Register of Companies in certain cases. Ordinances were also passed to enable Foreign Corporations to acquire and hold land in the Colony (No. 7): to provide for the grant of brewery licences (No. 8): to empower a Magistrate to hold a Small Debts Court in the New Territories (No. 22): to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the sale of poisons (No. 12): to regulate theatres and other places of public resort (more especially in regard to precautions against fire) (No. 18): and to transfer the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and its management to the Government of Hongkong (No. 15).

IV. EDUCATION.

There are 73 Government and Grant Schools, the most important of which is Queen's College. Of these 23 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all subjects of the 7th Standard, and above. These latter schools have an average attendance of 3,992, and the medium of instruction in all of them with the exception of one girls' school, is Engish. The 50 remaining Schools are all Lower Grade. They comprise 1 school for British Indians where English and Urdu are taught ; 5 Government and 1 Grant Anglo- Chinese Schools; and 43 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 2,186. The total average daily attendance, at both Grades of School, is 6,178.

The revenue derived from school fees is $54,792 (of which $31,073 is from Queen's College) and is rapidly increasing this is mainly to be accounted for by the increasing numbers of Chinese desirous of an English education.

8

Higher education is represented by the Technical Institute, where instruction is given in the evening in Mathematics, Machine Drawing, Building Construction, Field Surveying and allied subjects; in Chemistry and Physics; in the English and French languages, Book-keeping and Shorthand. There is also a Teachers' Class, at which the junior Chinese masters of Government schools are expected to attend. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped laboratory. The lecturers are chiefly Civil Servants recruited from the Euro- pean staffs of Queen's College and the Public Works Departinent. These officers receive fees for their services.

Hongkong is fortunate in including among its schools two limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Government. In 1908 the combined average attendance at them was 87. As might be expected they have a strong patriotic bias: they are supporters of the Empire League, and the boys' school provides a small but efficient cadet corps.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The principal public works in progress during the year, exclusive of the Railway, were the Kowloon Waterworks and the Typhoon Refuge for small craft opposite Mongkoktsui. The former was completed with the exception of the contract for the main dam, &c. and a few trifling details, but, as mentioned in last year's report, the works are in such a forward state that the reservoir is fully capable of supplying the whole Peninsula with water. Work on the Typhoon Refuge was begun by dredging a trench to form the base for the breakwater, the hopper dredger St. Enoch being purchased locally for this purpose. The Tytam Tuk Waterworks referred to in previous years' reports were fully completed.

The New Law Courts and New Government Offices were still under construction, whilst the following works were completed :-Land Office at Tai Po; Market at Sai Wan Ho;. Extension of Staff Quarters at Government Civil Hospital for Nursing Institute; Extension of Wanchai and Saiyingpun District Schools; Extension of Mount Gough Police Station; Animal Depôts and Slaughter Houses at Ma Tau Kok; four houses at Tai Po for the native clerical staff and the service reservoir at West Point (750′ level) for supplying the High Levels of the City. The lease of One Tree Island to Messrs. Jardine. Matheson & Company for the storage of dynamite having expired, it was decided to require this explosive to be stored in the Government Depôt on Green Island and arrangements were made accordingly, a small building for the storage of detonators being erected. The works of reconstruction of gullies and extension of nullah training were continued, $10,000 being spent on the former and $18,150 on the latter.

The prolongation of Robinson Road, Kowloon, mentioned in last year's report was completed and a further section from Waterloo Road to near Soy Street was undertaken. The extension of the road past Kowloon City to its junction with the Chin Lan Chu Road was completed and new roads from Kowloon City to Shatin Pass and from Castle Peak Bay to Ping Shan were begun. Great improvements in the alignment and grading of several portions of the Shaukiwan Road adjoining the Taikoo Sugar Refinery and Shipyard were in progress and a substantial improvement was made in the portion of Kennedy Road im- mediately west of the Public Laundries.

Works in progress included a new market at Kowloon Point, the deepening of Causeway Bay to enable small craft to gain access to all parts of the Typhoon Shelter at low water, a roof over Blake Pier, an extension of Government Offices for the accommodation of the Public Works Department, the raising of Des Voeux Road, Kowloon, on account of the railway reclamation, and several other works of smaller magnitude.

The extension and reconstruction of the Albany Filter Beds was continued, and good progress was made.

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary, was $1,000,935 and on Works Annually Recurrent, $512,336.

The typhoon of July 27th caused great damage and this together with repairs still being executed on account of the typhoon of September, 1906, formed a very heavy charge

on the recurrent votes.

During the year 1908 considerable progress was made in the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway. About forty per cent. of the reclamation for a site for Kowloon Station Yard was completed and a very large amount of earthwork was done North of the Kowloon Hills.

8

Higher education is represented by the Technical Institute, where instruction is given in the evening in Mathematics, Machine Drawing, Building Construction, Field Surveying and allied subjects; in Chemistry and Physics; in the English and French languages, Book-keeping and Shorthand. There is also a Teachers' Class, at which the junior Chinese masters of Government schools are expected to attend. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped laboratory. The lecturers are chiefly Civil Servants recruited from the Euro- pean staffs of Queen's College and the Public Works Departinent. These officers receive fees for their services.

Hongkong is fortunate in including among its schools two limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Government. In 1908 the combined average attendance at them was 87. As might be expected they have a strong patriotic bias: they are supporters of the Empire League, and the boys' school provides a small but efficient cadet corps.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The principal public works in progress during the year, exclusive of the Railway, were the Kowloon Waterworks and the Typhoon Refuge for small craft opposite Mongkoktsui. The former was completed with the exception of the contract for the main dam, &c. and a few trifling details, but, as mentioned in last year's report, the works are in such a forward state that the reservoir is fully capable of supplying the whole Peninsula with water. Work on the Typhoon Refuge was begun by dredging a trench to form the base for the breakwater, the hopper dredger St. Enoch being purchased locally for this purpose. The Tytam Tuk Waterworks referred to in previous years' reports were fully completed.

The New Law Courts and New Government Offices were still under construction, whilst the following works were completed :-Land Office at Tai Po; Market at Sai Wan Ho;. Extension of Staff Quarters at Government Civil Hospital for Nursing Institute; Extension of Wanchai and Saiyingpun District Schools; Extension of Mount Gough Police Station; Animal Depôts and Slaughter Houses at Ma Tau Kok; four houses at Tai Po for the native clerical staff and the service reservoir at West Point (750′ level) for supplying the High Levels of the City. The lease of One Tree Island to Messrs. Jardine. Matheson & Company for the storage of dynamite having expired, it was decided to require this explosive to be stored in the Government Depôt on Green Island and arrangements were made accordingly, a small building for the storage of detonators being erected. The works of reconstruction of gullies and extension of nullah training were continued, $10,000 being spent on the former and $18,150 on the latter.

The prolongation of Robinson Road, Kowloon, mentioned in last year's report was completed and a further section from Waterloo Road to near Soy Street was undertaken. The extension of the road past Kowloon City to its junction with the Chin Lan Chu Road was completed and new roads from Kowloon City to Shatin Pass and from Castle Peak Bay to Ping Shan were begun. Great improvements in the alignment and grading of several portions of the Shaukiwan Road adjoining the Taikoo Sugar Refinery and Shipyard were in progress and a substantial improvement was made in the portion of Kennedy Road im- mediately west of the Public Laundries.

Works in progress included a new market at Kowloon Point, the deepening of Causeway Bay to enable small craft to gain access to all parts of the Typhoon Shelter at low water, a roof over Blake Pier, an extension of Government Offices for the accommodation of the Public Works Department, the raising of Des Voeux Road, Kowloon, on account of the railway reclamation, and several other works of smaller magnitude.

The extension and reconstruction of the Albany Filter Beds was continued, and good progress was made.

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary, was $1,000,935 and on Works Annually Recurrent, $512,336.

The typhoon of July 27th caused great damage and this together with repairs still being executed on account of the typhoon of September, 1906, formed a very heavy charge

on the recurrent votes.

During the year 1908 considerable progress was made in the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway. About forty per cent. of the reclamation for a site for Kowloon Station Yard was completed and a very large amount of earthwork was done North of the Kowloon Hills.

9

About 3,500 feet of heading was driven in Beacon Hill Tunnel making a total of 5,600 feet out of 7,212 feet and a total of 2,700 feet of tunnel was lined complete and an extra 700 feet excavated to full section ready for lining. The other four tunnels made goo progress, the three short ones being almost completed. The larger one at Taipo had 572 feet of heading driven leaving 350 feet to complete.

Nearly all the bridges were completed with the exception of the iron-work which however is all in the Colony. Only three bridges remain on which no work has been done.

Indents have been sent Home for rails, sleepers and rolling stock.

Malaria, Beri-beri, Dysentery and other diseases were much less prevalent among the railway employés due to better organization.

The expenditure during the year was $3,372,832 making a total of $6,251,639 up to the end of 1908.

The large amount of rock-blasting with high explosives especially in the long tunnel, where moreover drilling is carried on with very powerful compressed air rock-drills, cou- pled with the proverbial carelessness of the Chinese coolie, would lead to the expectation that a large number of accidents would occur among the 3,000 odd coolies employed on the works. It is therefore very satisfactory to record the fact that from the inception of the Railway in 1906 to the end of the year 1908 there were only 19 fatal accidents (1 in 1906, 9 in 1907, and 9 in 1908) and 13 other serious ones (8 in 1907 and 5 in 1908).

The Chinese Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway made considerable progress dur- ing 1908 under the able direction of Mr. GROVE, C.R.E., who has stated that there is every prospect of opening a length from Canton of 30 miles by April, 1910, and anticipates that he will be able to run through trains for traffic with the British Section on or before July 1st, 1911. Negotiations carried on at Peking for a Construction Loan for the Northern portion of the Canton-Hankow line had not resulted in any Loan Agreement by the end of the year. The Southern Section from Canton Northwards made some progress under a Chinese Chief Engineer, and with Chinese Capital. By the end of the year about 40 miles were open to traffic.

VI.-GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS. (a.) HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital, and the hulk "Hygeia" used mainly for the treatment of Small-pox cases.

The Civil Hospital contains 150 beds in 29 wards. 2,527 in-patients and 18,207 out- patients were treated during the year 1908. 279 cases of Malarial Fever were admitted as against 243 in 1907 and 239 in 1906. The Maternity Hospital contains 6 beds for Eu- ropeans and 4 for Asiatics. 60 confinements occurred during the year. The Victoria Hospital at the Peak contains 41 beds. During 1908 234 patients were under treatment. Kennedy Town Hospital contains 26 beds. In 1908 59 cases were treated, of which 3 were Plague. On the "Hygeia" 150 cases were treated, of which 86 were Small-pox.

(b.) LUNATIC ASYLUM.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 3 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds. 212 patients of all races were treated during 1908, and there were 11 deaths.

(c.) THE TUNG WAIL AND OTHER CHINESE HOSPITALS.

This Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this institution. Various other services not appertaining to a Hospital are per- formed by the Institution such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. About half the number are now treated by Western methods. The Hospital is managed by a Committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being submitted to the Governor for confirmation, and is under the supervision of a Visiting Physician who is a member of the Medical Department, whilst a Chinese Surgeon trained in European medicine is a member of the Hospital Staff.

£

10 -

VIL-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged but not to any considerable extent sup- ported by Government may be mentioned the P'ó Leung Kuk, the Hongkong College of Medicine, and the City Hall.

The Pó Leung Kuk is an institution, incorporated in 1893, presided over by "the Registrar. General and an annually-elected Committee of 12 Chinese gentlemen, for the protection of women and children. The inmates of the Home receive daily instruction in elementary subjects and are allowed to earn pocket-money by needlework. During 1908, a total of 403 persons were admitted. Of these, 86 were released after enquiry, 22 were released under bond, 150 were placed in charge of their husbands, parents, or relations, 14 were placed in charge of the French Consul, 20 were sent to charitable institutions in China, 22 were sent to School, Convent or Refuge, 6 were adopted and 28 were married. One died during the year, one absconded, and fifty-three remained in charge of the Society at the end of the year.

An institution named the Eyre Refuge under Mission auspices, for the same general purposes, was re-organised during the year under a strong Committee, and Government con- tributes a small grant. It is hoped that this institution will work in conjunction with the Po Leung Kuk.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, who has always been a Government official, is President. The Lecturers, who are Government officials or private medical practitioners, each receive a small honorarium, the funds being derived from the fees of the students and a Government grant-in-aid of $2,500. The minimum curriculum of study is five years, and a preliminary examination in general accord with the regulations of the General Medical Council of Great Britain is required. 111 students have been enrolled up to date (May, 1909); and of these 37 have become qualified "licentiates". Most of the licentiates have settled in the Colony, and are exerting a most useful influence in the direction of displacing the native medical methods and popularising Western medical and sanitary knowledge, while a considerable number of them are employed as resident surgeons in the hospitals for Chinese, as medical officers in charge of the Public Dispensaries, and as assistant medical officers on the railway works. The work of the College has thus far been carried on in lecture-rooms and laboratories made available in various hospitals, &c., in different parts of the City. Steps were being taken to provide adequate buildings of its own; but action was suspended when the University Scheme was proposed. (See page 11.) If a University is established, the College well be merged into its Faculty of Medicine.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Government. It contains a Theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, &c., a Museum in which are some very fair specimens, and a large Reference and Lending Library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The Building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent ($1.280), the French Convent (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West l'oint Orphanage, the Seaman's Hospital, and other charitable institutions.

VIII-CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,562 being a decrease of 1,978 or 17·14 per cent, as compared with 1907. In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences there is a decrease in the former as compared with the previous year of 64 cases or 1.93 per cent.

The number of serious offences reported was 37 below the average of the quinquennial period commencing with the year 1904. The number of minor offences reported shows a decrease of 1,914 as compared with 1907, and was 1,515 below the average of the quinquennial period.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 4,778 as compared with 5,877 in 1907, but of these only 1,975 were committed for criminal offences, against 2,460 in 1907. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 394 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance and 139 less for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 465, the average for 1907 being 502 and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter was 14 as compared with 14, the average precentage for the last ten years.

10 -

VIL-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged but not to any considerable extent sup- ported by Government may be mentioned the P'ó Leung Kuk, the Hongkong College of Medicine, and the City Hall.

The Pó Leung Kuk is an institution, incorporated in 1893, presided over by "the Registrar. General and an annually-elected Committee of 12 Chinese gentlemen, for the protection of women and children. The inmates of the Home receive daily instruction in elementary subjects and are allowed to earn pocket-money by needlework. During 1908, a total of 403 persons were admitted. Of these, 86 were released after enquiry, 22 were released under bond, 150 were placed in charge of their husbands, parents, or relations, 14 were placed in charge of the French Consul, 20 were sent to charitable institutions in China, 22 were sent to School, Convent or Refuge, 6 were adopted and 28 were married. One died during the year, one absconded, and fifty-three remained in charge of the Society at the end of the year.

An institution named the Eyre Refuge under Mission auspices, for the same general purposes, was re-organised during the year under a strong Committee, and Government con- tributes a small grant. It is hoped that this institution will work in conjunction with the Po Leung Kuk.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, who has always been a Government official, is President. The Lecturers, who are Government officials or private medical practitioners, each receive a small honorarium, the funds being derived from the fees of the students and a Government grant-in-aid of $2,500. The minimum curriculum of study is five years, and a preliminary examination in general accord with the regulations of the General Medical Council of Great Britain is required. 111 students have been enrolled up to date (May, 1909); and of these 37 have become qualified "licentiates". Most of the licentiates have settled in the Colony, and are exerting a most useful influence in the direction of displacing the native medical methods and popularising Western medical and sanitary knowledge, while a considerable number of them are employed as resident surgeons in the hospitals for Chinese, as medical officers in charge of the Public Dispensaries, and as assistant medical officers on the railway works. The work of the College has thus far been carried on in lecture-rooms and laboratories made available in various hospitals, &c., in different parts of the City. Steps were being taken to provide adequate buildings of its own; but action was suspended when the University Scheme was proposed. (See page 11.) If a University is established, the College well be merged into its Faculty of Medicine.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Government. It contains a Theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, &c., a Museum in which are some very fair specimens, and a large Reference and Lending Library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The Building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent ($1.280), the French Convent (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West l'oint Orphanage, the Seaman's Hospital, and other charitable institutions.

VIII-CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,562 being a decrease of 1,978 or 17·14 per cent, as compared with 1907. In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences there is a decrease in the former as compared with the previous year of 64 cases or 1.93 per cent.

The number of serious offences reported was 37 below the average of the quinquennial period commencing with the year 1904. The number of minor offences reported shows a decrease of 1,914 as compared with 1907, and was 1,515 below the average of the quinquennial period.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 4,778 as compared with 5,877 in 1907, but of these only 1,975 were committed for criminal offences, against 2,460 in 1907. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 394 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance and 139 less for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 465, the average for 1907 being 502 and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter was 14 as compared with 14, the average precentage for the last ten years.

11

Owing however to the large floating population which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. A large number of the riff-raffs and thieves of South China found their way to Hongkong, and during the year 895 aliens were banished as undesirables-for the most part after conviction for crime.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punishments per prisoner being 1.27 as compared with 1·50 in 1907 and 1-21 in 1906.

The prison is managed on the English prison system as regards first offenders (star class prisoners) who are when at labour and when located for the night kept apart from old offenders.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including printing, book-binding, washing, carpentry, boot-making, net-making, painting and white-washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, &c. The profit on the work done was $45,420 as against $37,434 in 1907.

There was $5,012 received and credited to Government for non-Government work against $5,790 in 1907.

In consequence of the low number of prisoners in custody at the beginning of the year it was found possible to close the Branch Prison.

The prison was considerably damaged in the typhoon of the 27th July. The work of repairing was immediately taken in hand by the Public Works Department and completed by the end of October.

The total strength of the Police Force for 1908 was Europeans 135, Indians 410, Chinese 501, making a total of 1,046 as compared with 1,048 in 1907 exclusive in each case of the five Superior Officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include Police paid for by the Railway, Private Firms, and other Government Departments. Of this Force the District Officer, 15 Europeans, 112 Indians and 47 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

The force of District Watchmen to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on Police beats and are supervised by the European Police on section patrol.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.) POPULATION.

The population of the Colony according to the Census taken in 1901 was 283,975 while at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories, New Kowloon and the Army and Navy Establishments. The estimated population at the middle of the year under review was 421,499 as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,...

13,200

Chinese Population,

Hongkong, Kowloon,

194,460

74,350

Floating Population,

41,940

Mercantile Marine,.

2,700

316,450

Army, (average strength),

4,483

Navy, (average strength),

2,355

6,838

New Territories (exclusive of Kowloon),................................

85,011

Total,........

421,499

(b.) PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

During the year under review considerable progress has been made in rendering existing domestic buildings rat proof as a preventive of Plague, 103 ground surfaces of houses have been repaired, and 811 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. In addition 49 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated.

New buildings (domestic) to the number of 148 were erected during the year and in these the effect of the present Ordinance is seen in the increased amount of open space about the houses, which the law requires. Scavenging lanes which have to be provided in the rear of new houses also increase the open space about them and tend to reduce crowding.

12

During the year there were 986 deaths from Plague, compared with 198 in 1907 and 842 in 1906.

There were 2,498 deaths from Respiratory Diseases amongst the Chinese, 748 of which were due to Phthisis, a percentage of 8.3 of the total deaths amongst that community.

Beri-beri caused 736 deaths-as against 562 in 1907-a very high figure.

The deaths from Malaria were 499 as against 579 in 1907, and 448 in 1906. The average number of deaths from this disease has fallen from 480 in the quinquennium 1899 to 1903 to 422 in the quinquennium 1904-1908. Military returns of admissions to Hospital for Malaria show an increase in the incidence of this disease, as compared with the year 1907. There were 515 admissions in 1908 being a ratio per thousand of the Garrison of 256 against 287 in 1907 (196 per thousand).

Changes were made during the year in the administration of the Sanitary Department by an Amending Public Health and Buildings Ordinance (No. 14 of 1908) whereby the Principal Civil Medical Officer ceased to be the Administrative Head of the Department and President of the Board, these duties being transferred to a cadet officer whose whole time is given to the work. At the same time the duty of dealing with all private drainage works and with structural defects of a sanitary nature, such as deficient window area, defective ground surfaces, obstructed open spaces, etc., was transferred to certain engineers of the Public Works Department who, as the Building Authority, are now entirely responsible for dealing with all structural defects on private premises.

This Amending Ordinance also reduced somewhat the stringency of the law in regard to the erection of cubicles in Chinese tenement houses and reduced the required floor space. per head from 50 square feet to 30 square feet in all such premises as do not contain cubicles. The Ordinance also made further provision for dealing with blocks of insanitary property (s. 154a) and introduced the principle of an improvement rate for such cases.

The transfer of duties to the Building Authority has greatly lessened the work of the Sanitary Department and as a consequence it has been possible to reduce the Sanitary Staff- one Surveyor, and one Overseer of Drainage have been transferred to the Public Works Department and the number of Sanitary Inspectors has been materially reduced, while further reductions are contemplated as vacancies arise.

it

As a result of the final Report of the Indian Plague Commission, issued in 1908, has been possible to effect a very considerable economy in the matter of the disinfection of plague houses, a cheap pulicide only being now in use whereas formerly both pulicide and disinfectants were employed.

(c.) CLIMATE.

The average monthly temperature throughout the year was 71-8° F. as compared with 72.2° F. in 1907 and 720 F. during the ten preceding years. The mean maximum monthly temperature was attained in August, when it reached 87.3° F., and the mean minimum montbly temperature was recorded in February, when it was 54.9° F. The highest recorded temperature during the year was 92.6° F. on the 16th July, and the lowest 43-7° F. on the 19th February.

The total rainfall for the year was 91.87 inches as compared with an average of 77.31 inches during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was July, with 22-26 inches, the dryest, November, with 0.15 inch. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 70 inches on the 23rd July, while no rain fell on 213 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 79 per cent, as compared with an average of 77 per cent. during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5.2 hours being 47 per cent. of the possible duration.

These figures are those recorded at the Observatory, Kowloon, and there is a very con- siderable divergence between that place and Hongkong (low levels), the Peak district, or Tai Po (New Territories), both in rainfall, temperature and humidity.

X.-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total Receipts paid into the Treasury in 1908 by the Postal Department amounted to $601,967 from which sum $189,535 was transferred to other heads of Genera! Revenue under which fees and duties are pa in postage stamps, which are now sold exclusively by the Post Office, leaving the sam of $412,431 as the approximate Revenue from the Postal Service. The total Expenditure amounted to $371,486 which being deduct- ed from the Revenue of $412,431 leaves a profit of $40,945.

12

During the year there were 986 deaths from Plague, compared with 198 in 1907 and 842 in 1906.

There were 2,498 deaths from Respiratory Diseases amongst the Chinese, 748 of which were due to Phthisis, a percentage of 8.3 of the total deaths amongst that community.

Beri-beri caused 736 deaths-as against 562 in 1907-a very high figure.

The deaths from Malaria were 499 as against 579 in 1907, and 448 in 1906. The average number of deaths from this disease has fallen from 480 in the quinquennium 1899 to 1903 to 422 in the quinquennium 1904-1908. Military returns of admissions to Hospital for Malaria show an increase in the incidence of this disease, as compared with the year 1907. There were 515 admissions in 1908 being a ratio per thousand of the Garrison of 256 against 287 in 1907 (196 per thousand).

Changes were made during the year in the administration of the Sanitary Department by an Amending Public Health and Buildings Ordinance (No. 14 of 1908) whereby the Principal Civil Medical Officer ceased to be the Administrative Head of the Department and President of the Board, these duties being transferred to a cadet officer whose whole time is given to the work. At the same time the duty of dealing with all private drainage works and with structural defects of a sanitary nature, such as deficient window area, defective ground surfaces, obstructed open spaces, etc., was transferred to certain engineers of the Public Works Department who, as the Building Authority, are now entirely responsible for dealing with all structural defects on private premises.

This Amending Ordinance also reduced somewhat the stringency of the law in regard to the erection of cubicles in Chinese tenement houses and reduced the required floor space. per head from 50 square feet to 30 square feet in all such premises as do not contain cubicles. The Ordinance also made further provision for dealing with blocks of insanitary property (s. 154a) and introduced the principle of an improvement rate for such cases.

The transfer of duties to the Building Authority has greatly lessened the work of the Sanitary Department and as a consequence it has been possible to reduce the Sanitary Staff- one Surveyor, and one Overseer of Drainage have been transferred to the Public Works Department and the number of Sanitary Inspectors has been materially reduced, while further reductions are contemplated as vacancies arise.

it

As a result of the final Report of the Indian Plague Commission, issued in 1908, has been possible to effect a very considerable economy in the matter of the disinfection of plague houses, a cheap pulicide only being now in use whereas formerly both pulicide and disinfectants were employed.

(c.) CLIMATE.

The average monthly temperature throughout the year was 71-8° F. as compared with 72.2° F. in 1907 and 720 F. during the ten preceding years. The mean maximum monthly temperature was attained in August, when it reached 87.3° F., and the mean minimum montbly temperature was recorded in February, when it was 54.9° F. The highest recorded temperature during the year was 92.6° F. on the 16th July, and the lowest 43-7° F. on the 19th February.

The total rainfall for the year was 91.87 inches as compared with an average of 77.31 inches during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was July, with 22-26 inches, the dryest, November, with 0.15 inch. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 70 inches on the 23rd July, while no rain fell on 213 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 79 per cent, as compared with an average of 77 per cent. during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5.2 hours being 47 per cent. of the possible duration.

These figures are those recorded at the Observatory, Kowloon, and there is a very con- siderable divergence between that place and Hongkong (low levels), the Peak district, or Tai Po (New Territories), both in rainfall, temperature and humidity.

X.-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total Receipts paid into the Treasury in 1908 by the Postal Department amounted to $601,967 from which sum $189,535 was transferred to other heads of Genera! Revenue under which fees and duties are pa in postage stamps, which are now sold exclusively by the Post Office, leaving the sam of $412,431 as the approximate Revenue from the Postal Service. The total Expenditure amounted to $371,486 which being deduct- ed from the Revenue of $412,431 leaves a profit of $40,945.

13

The Siberian route for transmission of mails to Europe has become increasingly popular with residents in Hongkong as well as in China. The Shanghai Agency commenced to forward mails to Europe vid Dalny and Harbin on September 3rd. The approximate time occupied in transmission of letters by this route from London to Shanghai was 16 to 18 days, to Tientsin 16 days, Wei-hai-wei 18 days and Hongkong 20 to 23 days.

XI-MILITARY FORCES AND EXPENDITURE.

(a.) REGULAR FORCES.

The following return shows the average number and composition of the Forces employed in the Colony during 1908:—

CORPS.

General Staff,

Administrative, Technical, and Depart-

mental Staff,

Garrison Staff,..

Royal Garrison Artillery,

Royal Engineers,

Army Service Corps,

Royal Army Medical Corps,

Army Ordnance Department and Corps,.

Hongkong & Singapore Battalion, Royal

Garrison Artillery,

1

British Infantry,.

13th Rajputs,

105th Mahratta Light Infantry,

Indian Medical Service.

Indian Subordinate Medical Departinent,

Army Pay Department and Corps,

Army Chaplains Department,

Educational Department,

Total,

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINISE.

TOTAL.

Officers.

W. O.'s

N. C. O.

& Men.

Officers.

W. O.'s

N. C. O,'s

3

00

')[{'

N. C. O.'s

& Men.

3

8

5

5

25

690

715

12

231

54

297

29

32

43

50

29

34

11

6

7

369

393

23

$19

842

...

13

16

776

805

12

18

809

839

2

5

5

2

8

1

1

10

}

1

12*

1,860

41

1,959

54

4,042

(b.) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1.250.168 (being the statutory contribution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack Services and Defence Works.

(c.) VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The establishment of the Corps is 432 of all ranks. The strength on the 31st December, 1908, was 287 made up as follows:-Staff 7; Troop 35; 4 Artillery Companies 173; Engineer Company 42; Infantry Company 30.

A 16 days camp for the Artillery, Engineers and Infantry was held at Stonecutters' Island in October, 1908, and a 5 days camp for the Troop in the Kamtin Valley, New Territories, during the Christmas holidays.

The British Cadet Company, started in May, 1906, now numbers 26 boys. A miniature rifle range has been opened and is regularly used. They went into camp on Stonecutters' Island for the 6 days following the period of the. Volunteer Camp.

The numbers of the Volunteer Reserve Association decreased from 230 to 193.

14

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by the Colony, was $45,554 compared with $45,253 in 1907.

XII.-GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The assessment made in July, 1907, for the year 1907-1908 was adopted for the year 1908-1909, the difference in rateable value being the result of interim-assessments and appeals. The rateable value of the whole Colony increased by 0.93%. In the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Shaukiwan, the Hongkong Villages, Mongkoktsui and the Kowloon Villages there was an increase ranging from 0.84% to 2.92%. In Kowlo on Point and Yaumati there was a decrease of 1.21% and 1.45% respectively. New Kow- loon shewed an increase of (77%. Notices of appeal were given against the assessments of 249 tenements with an aggregate rateable value of $452,180. The Court ordered reductions amounting to $36,195.

Throughout the year negotiations were in progress between this Government and the Chinese Authorities both at Canton and at Peking on the subject of the loss and incon- venience caused by the depreciation of the Colony's subsidiary currency owing to the over- issue of small coins by the Mint in Canton, which circulate freely in the Colony at a heavy discount and cause the legal (subsidiary) currency to fall to a nearly corresponding discount. This Government adopted the expedient of withdrawing from circulation $780,000 of subsidiary silver coin and $30,000 of bronze coin. These coins were shipped to London where they were melted down and sold as bullion for £60,501 1s. 4d. and £1,190 1s. Od. respectively. Up to the close of the year the negotiations with the Chinese Government had not produced any satisfactory result. The average annual loss to Revenue from this source as calculated for the last 3 years has been $184,204, including the loss by demonetization of unissued stocks. The average loss on the same period, which would have been incurred by payment of discount instead of demonetization, was $26,777.

The rate of exchange fell from over 2/- to the dollar at the end of 1907 to an average throughout the year of 1/9.6. This involved considerable loss to Government and disor- ganised the budget which had been calculated on a basis of 2/- for salaries and 2/1 for other

items.

Piracy in the Canton Delta was much less rife than it has been during recent years.

Mr. R. Mansfield, Consul General at Canton, handed over charge of the Consulate to Mr. H. H. Fox on the 1st June.

For some years past the disgraceful custom of abandoning corpses in the streets, in waste places, or in the Harbour had been rife, and all efforts to put a stop to the practice had proved ineffective. During the year an attempt was made to enlist the co-operation of the leading Chinese in the suppression of this revolting custom. Suspicions that the practice was in part the result of infanticide have been disproved. It is due to fear of disinfection for disease. The decision that infant corpses could be brought to the dispensaries, and no questions would be asked, and $1 reward given, was the first effective step. In February, 1908, there was a meeting at the Tung Wa, and I addressed representatives of the Chinese Community at Government House. Street Committees were appointed, and the work was entrusted to the Directors of the Tung Wa Hospital, who found funds, and took over the dispensaries. A dispensary committee was formed and met at the Tung Wa. The actual work was however done by the Presidents and Vice-Presidents of three Sub-Committees with the help of the district watchmen. Three lecturers were appointed, and every house supplied with handbills. Each case was fully investigated. Detectives were employed, photographs (except in the case of children) taken of the corpse, and rewards offered for identification. Government midwives informed the people of the decision that $1 reward would be given for every infant corpse brought to the dispensaries and that no questions would be asked. To obviate post-mortem examinations, licentiates of the Hongkong College of Medicine were allowed to issue death certificates in cases they had attended, and the dispensary doctors sent corpses to the medical officers of the Tung Wa Hospital, who after enquiry reported cause of death. Post-mortem examinations were held, however, on all unidentified corpses. members of the Street Committees visited the houses and explained the policy of the Government to the Chinese. In 1907 the total number of corpses abandoned was 938. In 1908 the total was (in spite of plague) only 644, the decrease being continuous. Adult corpses, which have formerly been 50 per cent. of the total number, practically ceased to be abandoned. The number of male and female bodies abandoned was about equal.

The

Mr. H. N. Mody generously offered to present the Colony with the buildings necessary to start a University. His original offer was to give a sum of $150,000 for this purpose

!

14

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by the Colony, was $45,554 compared with $45,253 in 1907.

XII.-GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The assessment made in July, 1907, for the year 1907-1908 was adopted for the year 1908-1909, the difference in rateable value being the result of interim-assessments and appeals. The rateable value of the whole Colony increased by 0.93%. In the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Shaukiwan, the Hongkong Villages, Mongkoktsui and the Kowloon Villages there was an increase ranging from 0.84% to 2.92%. In Kowlo on Point and Yaumati there was a decrease of 1.21% and 1.45% respectively. New Kow- loon shewed an increase of (77%. Notices of appeal were given against the assessments of 249 tenements with an aggregate rateable value of $452,180. The Court ordered reductions amounting to $36,195.

Throughout the year negotiations were in progress between this Government and the Chinese Authorities both at Canton and at Peking on the subject of the loss and incon- venience caused by the depreciation of the Colony's subsidiary currency owing to the over- issue of small coins by the Mint in Canton, which circulate freely in the Colony at a heavy discount and cause the legal (subsidiary) currency to fall to a nearly corresponding discount. This Government adopted the expedient of withdrawing from circulation $780,000 of subsidiary silver coin and $30,000 of bronze coin. These coins were shipped to London where they were melted down and sold as bullion for £60,501 1s. 4d. and £1,190 1s. Od. respectively. Up to the close of the year the negotiations with the Chinese Government had not produced any satisfactory result. The average annual loss to Revenue from this source as calculated for the last 3 years has been $184,204, including the loss by demonetization of unissued stocks. The average loss on the same period, which would have been incurred by payment of discount instead of demonetization, was $26,777.

The rate of exchange fell from over 2/- to the dollar at the end of 1907 to an average throughout the year of 1/9.6. This involved considerable loss to Government and disor- ganised the budget which had been calculated on a basis of 2/- for salaries and 2/1 for other

items.

Piracy in the Canton Delta was much less rife than it has been during recent years.

Mr. R. Mansfield, Consul General at Canton, handed over charge of the Consulate to Mr. H. H. Fox on the 1st June.

For some years past the disgraceful custom of abandoning corpses in the streets, in waste places, or in the Harbour had been rife, and all efforts to put a stop to the practice had proved ineffective. During the year an attempt was made to enlist the co-operation of the leading Chinese in the suppression of this revolting custom. Suspicions that the practice was in part the result of infanticide have been disproved. It is due to fear of disinfection for disease. The decision that infant corpses could be brought to the dispensaries, and no questions would be asked, and $1 reward given, was the first effective step. In February, 1908, there was a meeting at the Tung Wa, and I addressed representatives of the Chinese Community at Government House. Street Committees were appointed, and the work was entrusted to the Directors of the Tung Wa Hospital, who found funds, and took over the dispensaries. A dispensary committee was formed and met at the Tung Wa. The actual work was however done by the Presidents and Vice-Presidents of three Sub-Committees with the help of the district watchmen. Three lecturers were appointed, and every house supplied with handbills. Each case was fully investigated. Detectives were employed, photographs (except in the case of children) taken of the corpse, and rewards offered for identification. Government midwives informed the people of the decision that $1 reward would be given for every infant corpse brought to the dispensaries and that no questions would be asked. To obviate post-mortem examinations, licentiates of the Hongkong College of Medicine were allowed to issue death certificates in cases they had attended, and the dispensary doctors sent corpses to the medical officers of the Tung Wa Hospital, who after enquiry reported cause of death. Post-mortem examinations were held, however, on all unidentified corpses. members of the Street Committees visited the houses and explained the policy of the Government to the Chinese. In 1907 the total number of corpses abandoned was 938. In 1908 the total was (in spite of plague) only 644, the decrease being continuous. Adult corpses, which have formerly been 50 per cent. of the total number, practically ceased to be abandoned. The number of male and female bodies abandoned was about equal.

The

Mr. H. N. Mody generously offered to present the Colony with the buildings necessary to start a University. His original offer was to give a sum of $150,000 for this purpose

!

15

and a further sum of $30,000 towards endowment. Plans of the necessary buildings were prepared and, as the Director of Public Works estimated that the buildings proposed would not cost less than $290,000, Mr. Mody undertook to provide them in accordance with the the plans which he had approved, no matter what the cost might be, stipulating however that he should use on the buildings the $30,000 originally given for endowment, if it should be required. It is intended that the proposed Hongkong University shall have at the outset two faculties, viz., Medicine and Engineering, and that the existing College of Medicine, the Technical Institute, and the local branch of the Sanitary Institute shall be incorporated in it. It is hoped that an Arts Course may be added. A Committee has been formed, with myself as Chairman, to promote the undertaking.

On the 6th May, a telegram was received from Your Lordship to the effect that His Majesty's Government had decided "that steps must be taken to close opium dens in Hongkong, as they recognise it is essential in dealing with the opinm question in Hongkong we must act up to the standard set by the Chinese Government". As the result of this telegram the opium question was debated in the Legislative Council on several occasions during the year, and careful investigations were made by the Government. It had not, how- ever, been decided by the end of the year what steps should be taken in the matter, as the result of the International Opium Commission to be held in Shanghai was awaited.

In the month of June there were very serious floods in the valleys of the West and North Rivers, causing distress and famine in many districts of the Kuangtung and Kuangsi provinces and on the 2nd of July the Legislative Council unanimously adopted a resolution conveying the deep sympathy of the Colony to the Governor General of the provinces concerned, and authorizing the payment of a sum of $30,000 from the General Revenue as a donation for the relief of the sufferers. A cheque for that amount was handed to the Governor General by H. B. M.'s Acting Consul General at Canton on the 15th July, and trans- mitted by His Excellency to the Charitable Guilds to whom the distribution of organized relief was entrusted. In addition to this donation, there was collected by the Tung Wa Hospital the sums of $91,528 locally and $371,069 from abroad: while a Chinese bazaar held in the Colony in aid of the Flood Relief Fund realized $81,690. The bazaar was interesting as being the first of the kind organized and managed entirely by the Chinese community: Chinese ladies took charge of the stalls and both Chinese and European firms sent large quantities of goods, free of charge, to the bazaar committee for sale.

A sum of $1,000 was subscribed by the Colonists of Saigon for the relief of the distress caused by the severe typhoon of the 18th September, 1906, and it had originally been the intention of Sir M. Nathan to appropriate this sum for the erection of a memorial to the French Sailors of the French Destroyer Fronde who lost their lives in this harbour dur- ing that typhoon. As, however, the Committee of the Typhoon Relief Fund unanimously decided that it was not within their power to make any grant from the funds for this purpose nor to appropriate thereto the sum of $1,000 received from Saigon, that money having gone into the general fund, a special subscription of $2,550 was raised to defray the cost of erecting an obelisk in Goscoigne Road, Kowloon, as a memorial to the French sailors in question. The ceremony of unveiling the memorial took place on the 14th of June and Mile. Morel, daughter of the Lieut.-Governor of Tongking, unveiled the obelisk.

The proposal to construct a new Typhoon Refuge at Mongkoktsui, which had originally been made in 1904, and which, since the Typhoon of the 18th September, 1906, had been before the Typhoon Relief Committee, was favourably reported on by the Public Works Committee of the Legislative Council, who further recommended that pending its construction the accommodation in the Causeway Bay shelter should be increased by deepen- ing the area therein which dries at low water. It was estimated that the latter work would cost $70,000 and that a breakwater at Mongkoktsui to enclose 166 acres of sheltered water would cost $1,540,000. The matter was discussed in Legislative Council on the 6th August, and, with a view to financing the works, a resolution was passed by the Council on that day increasing the dues (a) for all river steamers entering the waters of the Colony to 5/6ths of a cent per ton register: and (b) for all other ships entering the waters of the Colony (excepting British and Foreign Ships of War) to 2 cents per ton register. It is hoped by this means to defray half the cost of the Mongkoktsui Breakwater, the other half being paid out of the Reserve Funds of the Colony and in the colonial estimates for 1909 passed by the Legislature on the 15th October a sum of $200,000 is provided for the Mongkoktsui typhoon shelter and a sum of $20,000 for deepening the shallow area of Causeway Bay to one foot below Ordnance Datum.

In the meantime, on the night of the 27th to 28th July, the Colony was struck by another disastrous typhoon in which 26 privately owned buildings collapsed with a loss of

16

59 lives, and damage was done to 77 Government buildings with a loss of one life. The river steamer Ying King foundered with a loss of 424 lives, including those of the Master and 3 European passengers. Inside and outside the harbour limits 17 European and 125 native craft were sunk, inany more being wrecked or damaged. The loss of Government property alone was estimated at $100,000. The storm swept on to Canton where great destruction of river craft and much loss of life occurred.

Under instructions from Your Lordship a bill was introduced into the Legislative Council to provide for the Transfer to the Government of Hongkong of the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and of the Management and Control of the Pensions of Widows and Orphans. The bill was passed on the 30th July and the fund amounting to a sum of $371,321 was transferred to the general revenue of the Colony, out of which the pensions in question will in future be paid.

A riot broke out in the town of Victoria on the 1st and 2nd of November in connection with a boycott of Japanese goods by the Cantonese. This boycott was due to the feel- ing excited in China by the Tatsu Maru affair, and was actively organized by the "National Disgrace Society" at Canton. It soon spread to Hongkong, where the Government from the first took active steps to combat it with the result that by the autumn several Chinese merchants in the Colony had again begun to trade in Japanese goods. This gradual failure of the boycott movement in Hongkong dissatisfied the more violent agitators in Canton, who, thereupon, made this Colony the scene of an organized riot, which had for its object the destruction of the shops and goods of such Chinese merchants as had abandoned the anti-Japanse boycott. The affair was arranged with such secrecy and skill that the Police of the Colony were completely taken by suprise, and for the purpose of restoring law and order it was necessary to call upon the Military Authorities for assistance. A proclamation was forthwith issued declaring the Colony subject to the provisions of the Peace Preservation Ordinance and with the help of the troops order was restored by the evening of the 2nd November. After that date there was no further outbreak and drastic steps were taken to deal with the instigators of the outrage. In no instance was a Japanese shop or a Japanese subject attacked.

I have the honour to be,

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient,

humble servant,

F. D. LUGARD, Governor, &c.

1

45

30′

15

45

CHUKIA NG OR CANTON RIVER

HONG-KONG, KOWLOON AN

14

Sa-tsiang

Wu-shak-ngan

Shak-ku

TUNG KWAN

Kon-lan

Liong-tu

A-po-ki

Long-heu

Chong-hang

-kang

Fuk-yun

Yong-tai-shan

Lung fa Hsin-hi

Pan-ten

Li-long

Ma-ham -ham

Pak-shak-lung

Pukak

Sai-Heung

Moi-lim

Ha-tsai

NAM-TAO

B

TAI-CHAM

HS IN

(SUN-ON

-

NGAN

BAY

Ping Chengs

Tai-san

Ma-chau

Chak-wan

Lung-Au

113 52 E. LONG. OF GREENWICH

&Kwaimiao

Wan-ha

Shut wan

teu

BAY

DEEP

OR HAU-HOI

Sha-tau

Lungtsunhu

Hsin-ten o

Mi-pu

Sam-chan L

Sheung Fań

KOWLOON

Chuk-yen

Lim-chuno

Kam-tin

Ping-shano

Tai-shui-hang

Pet-long o Chin-shan

Nam-long

o Shui-leu

Sa chau

Chon-mun

(Castle Peak Bay

Chu-lu-kok

Un long

Tài Nam chung

Ma-wan

U

A

Tai-m

Tsin -1

Lin-tin

Tai-o

Tung chung

LANTA O

(TAI-U SHAN)

Kap Shui Mun

Ping-chau

Chung

bue Cheung Shu

Kow- (a))

LANTAO M. L. I

Silver Mine

Bay

ILANJA M.L2

Sham-S

Stonecutters

Island

HONG- Green Kennedy

Low. Chate & Lowas

VICTORI

Rung

Tai ku chau

0

Ty-lo

IS

Л

Siu-A-Chau

Tai-A-Chaal

Lap-sap-mi

Is

Cheung-Chau

Victoria Pes

Pokfulum I

Aberde

Ap

LAST

Tai-wan

WWEST LAMMA CHAN

Lamma I.

(Pok-Liu

T

45

HONG-KONG, KOWLOON AND ADJACENT TE

14

15

Piang tid

TUNG

Shak-ku KWA N

Liong-tuho

Tong-lak

Lung-kong

Hsin hi

Kon-lan

Sa-tsiang

Wu-shak-nga

Shak kong

A-po-ki

Long-heu

Chong-hang-

-kang

Fuk yun

Yong-tai-shan

Lung fa Hsin-hi

Wang-kong

Pan-ten

Li-long Sa-wan

Tai-wo-chun

Ma-ham &

Pak-shak-hung

Sai-Heung

Ha-tsai

NAM - TAO

•Ô TAI-CHẠM

BAY

Ping Cheng

Tai-sq

Pukak

Moi-lim

о

HS IN

-

NGAN Len-tong

(SUN-ON Sam-chan Lofong

Lungtsunhy

&Sha-tau

Ma-chau

Chak-wan

&Kwaimiao

Wan-ha

Shut wan

teu

DEEP

BAY

OR HAU-HOI

Lin-tin

Yam-ten &

Sha-taukok

rling

Ci

。 Kuk pu

Laung-kwut-teu

Sheung Shui Fan-ling

KOWLOON

Wo-hang

لئے

Wang-lin

Shon-wan

Tai-po

Un-iu

Plover Cove

TOLO HARBOUR

RAILWAY

White Healt

& Tin kok

Hsin-ten o

Mi-pu

Chuk-yen

Lim-chuno

Un-long

Kam-tin

113 52 E. LONG. OF

GREENWICH

Lung-Au

Ping-shano

Tai-shui-hang

Pet-long Chin shan Chin-shan

Nam-long

o Shui-leu

Sa chau

Chon-mun

(Castle Peak Bay

Chu-lu-kok

Tài Nam chung

O

Ma-wan

Kap Shui Mun

Ping-chau

Chung hue

A

Tai-mo-

shan

Lok Lo Haf

Tsin-

-wat

Lai Chi Kok

Cheung Shawano

Tide Cove

Shatin

Kau-lung-shan

Tai-shui-hang

Pet-kong

Pak-sa way

KOWLOON CITY

Shăm Shi Đao Hàng hót Stonecutters Tauoma Tuwa wan

Island

-tio Royal Naval

HONG-KONG HAR.

Green Kennedy

Kow-Chat & Towar

VICTORIA

Victoria Peak I774

2

LANTAO M. L. I

°Tai-o

Tung-chung

LANTA O Silver Mine Chau-hung

(TAI-U SHAN)

Bay

LANTA M. L.2

Tai-ku-chau

Cheung-Chau

olung-hom

Tsim Sha Tsui

O

Tai pu

Cheung Kwan O Po Kon-tong Ha

Lyee-my

Shauki wan

Sy-wan

Tai tam tuk

Pokfuturo HONG KONG

Aberdeen Shik-pai

Aplishay

-mun-

Junk

Fu-Tau

Bay

-Chan.

C.Co

Ta-

Tai tam

Stanley

Sheko Toti wan

Tai-tam Bay Wong-ma-kok

AST LAMMA CHAN

Tai-wan

Lamma I (Pok-Liu

Skak-ku-wan

WEST LAMMA CHAN

22 9 N. LAT.

Ti

Fr

Lo-chau

Sun

}

Jiu-A-Chau

Tai-A-Charl

y-lo I$

Lap-sap-mi Is

Л

T F M

CHANNE

!

}

Receipts.

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 19

Statement showing the Total Receipts and Expenditure in

Amount Estimated.

Actual Receipts.

More than Less than Estimated.

Estimated.

Payments.

Balance, 1st January, 1908,

HEADS OF REVENUE.

1. Light Dues, .....

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, not

otherwise specified,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments

for specific purposes and Reimbur- sements in aid,

C.

$3 393,541.38

C.

$ C.

79,975.68

975.68

79,000.00

4,186,730.00 4,151,968.56

C.

Ր.

Balance (overpaid) Ist Ja:

C.

483,310.00

4. Post Office,

315,000.00

514,789.49

412,431.60

31,479.49

97,431.60

5. Rent of Government Property, Land

and Houses,

793,750.00 783,091.80

10,658.20||

6. Interest,

1,000.00

1,000.00

7. Miscellaneous Receipts,

TOTAL, Ordinary,

69,100.00 89,592.01 20,492.01!

5,927,890.00 6,034,849.14 150,378.78

8. Land Sales,

300,000.00 69,358.19

230,611.81

31,761.44

HEADS OF EXPEND

Governor,

Colonial Secretary's Dep

Legislature,

Registrar General's Depa Audit Department, Treasury,.

Post Office,

Harbour Master's Depart Observatory,

Miscellaneous Services, Judicial and Legal Depar Police aud Prison Depart Medical Departments, Sanitary Department,.... Botanical and Forestry D Education,

43,119.64 Military Expenditure,

Public Works Departme Public Works Recurrent,

Total Revenue,.

6,227,890.00 6,104,207.33 150,378.78

274,061.45

Charge on account of Pu Pensions,

150,378.78

Charitable Services,................

Less than Estimated, ......

123,682.67

Deposits Available,

*

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins), ...

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Corns) No. 2,

Deposits Not Available......

6,104,207.33

1,680,971.83

Crown Agents,

2,463,431.06

Crown Agents' Advance,

3,383,682.31

Crown Agents' Deposits,.

654,108.45

Bills on Crown Agents Outstanding,.

Advance Account,

3,028,359.90

Family Remittances,

78,109.40

Subsidiary Coins,

266,326.69

Subsidiary Coins, No. 2,

1,589,680.14

Money Order Account,.

Suspense Account,

Suspense House Service,

Exchange,

Total Receipts.............

Public Works Extraordi

Total Expenditure,

More than

62,069.91

4,342,077.05

28.258.32

Deposits Available, Deposits Available, (Sub) Deposits Available. (Sub- Deposits Not Available, - Crown Agents, Crown Agents' Advance Crown Agents' Deposits, Bills on Crown Agents in Advance Account, Family Remittanees, Subsidiary Coins,..... Subsidiary Coins, No. 2, Money Order Acconn', Suspense Account, Suspense House Service, Exchange,....

23.681.273 38

Appendix A.

NCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1908.

the Total Receipts and Expenditure in the Year 1908.

'than ated.

Less than Estimated.

C

Payments.

C.

Balance (overpaid) 1st Jan., 1908,

C.

C.

Amount Estimated.

Actual Payments.

C.

$

C.

27,503.71

TREASURY.

More than Estimated.

Less than Estimated.

C.

$

C.

..

C.

C.

C.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE

075.68

Governor,

77,124.00

91,736.43

14,612.43

Colonial Secretary's Department and

31,761.44

Legislature,

71,621.00

69,761.29

1,859.71

Registrar General's Department,

38,691.00

43,137.41

4,446.41

Audit Department,

19,531.00

23,778.99

4,247.99

479.19.

31.60

10,658.20

Treasury,..

57,654.00 61,659.76

4,015.76

Post Office,

410,514.00

371,486.17

39,027.83

Harbour Master's Department,

159,655.00

163,579.55

3,924.55

Observatory,

18,662.00

21,110.62

2,448.62

Miscellaneous Services,

204,655.00

374,075.62

169,420.62

192.01

......

378.78

1,000.00

Judicial and Legal Departments, Police and Prison Departments, Medical Departments,

Sanitary Department,.

Botanical and Forestry Department,... Education,

43,419.64 Military Expenditure,

Public Works Department,

193,295.00 208,739.22 750,138.00 683,317.77

15,443.22

66,820.23

237,001.00 230,492.43

6,508.57

446,393.00

48,773.00

380,738.19 48.673.20

.....

65,654.81

99.80

200,026.00 20.5,874.74

5,848.74

1,231,494.00

1,295,723.52

64,229.52

268,126.00 266,477.50

1,649.50

230,611.81

Public Works Recurrent,

437,500.00 512,336.29

74,836.29

378.78

274,061.45 150,378.78 | Charitable Services,..

Charge on account of Public Debt,. Pensions,

275,013.00

284,722.18

9,709.18

196,000.00

203,985.19

7,935.19

13,765.00 44,772.66

31,097.65

123,682.67

Total,

5,355,631.00 5,586,137.73 412,126.18

181,619.45

Public Works Extraordinary,

822,900.00| 2,343,340.18 | 1,520.410.18

Total Expenditure,....

6,178,531 00| 7,929,477.91| 1,932,566 36

181,619.45

181,619.45 |

More than Estimated,...........

7,929.477.91

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsi liary Coins),

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins), No. 2,.....

Deposits Not Available,

Crown Agents,

Crown Agents' Advance,

Crown Agents' Deposits,

Bills on Crown Agents in transit,

Advance Account,

Family Remittances,

Subsidiary Coins,...

Subsidiary Coins, No. 2,

Money Order Accomt,

Suspense Account,

Suspense House Service, Exchange,...

462,338.40

1,559,154.58

2,859,307.35

3,383,682.31

84,210.49

2,968,604.69

77,569.50 277,286.68

780,541.41

78,278.71

3,478,805.65 |

20,013 40

Total Payments.... 23,909,305 08 ¦

1,750,946.91

Statement showing the Total Receipts and Expetiture in une

Receipts.

Amount Estimated.

#f

4. Post Office,

5. Rent of Government Property, Land

and Houses,

6. Interest,

793,750.00 783,091.80

Balance, 1st January, 1908,

HEADS OF REVENUE.

1. Light Dues,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, not

otherwise specified,

C.

C.

C.

C.

79,000.00

79,975.68

975.68

4,186,730.00 4,151,968.56

31,761.44

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimbur- sements in aid,

483,310.00 514,789.49

315,000.00 412,431.60

31.479.49

97,431.60

Actual Receipts.

C.

$ (. 393,541.38

More than Less than

Estimated.

Estimated.

Payments.

if

(.

C.

Balance (overpaid) 1st Jan.,

1,000.00

1,000.00

7. Miscellaneous Receipts, .

TOTAL, Ordinary,

69,100.00 89,592.01 20,492.01

5,927,890.00 6,034,849.14 150,378.78

8. Land Sales,

Total Revenue,....

300,000.00 69,358.19

6,227,890.00 | 6,104,207.33

HEADS OF EXPENDITUI

Governor,

Colonial Secretary's Departur

Legislature,

Registrar General's Departm Audit Department,

Treasury,.

Post Office,

Harbour Master's Departmen Observatory,

Miscellaneous Services,

10,658.20| Judicial and Legal Departme Police and Prison Departmen Medical Departments,

Sanitary Department,.. Botanical and Forestry Depa Education,

43,419.61 Military Expenditure,

230,611.81

Public Works Department,. Public Works Recurrent, Charge on account of Public

150,378.78

274,061.45| Pensions,

150,378.78

Charitable Services,.

Less than Estimated,

123,682.67

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins),

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Corns) No. 2,

Deposits Not Available....

6,104,207.33

1,680,971.83

Crown Agents,

2,463,431.06

Crown Agents' Advance,

3,383,682.31

Crown Agents' Deposits,..

654,108.45

Bills on Crown Agents Outstanding,.

Advance Account,

3,028,359.90

Family Remittance-,

78,109.40

Subsidiary Coins,

266,326.68

Subsidiary Coins, No. 2,

1,589,680.14

Money Order Account,...

Suspense Account,..

Suspense House Service,

हे

Exchange,

Total Receipts,..

Total Receipts, with opening Balance,

Crown Agents Balance (overpaid), 31st Dec., 1908,...

Total,

T

Public Works Extraordinary

Total Expenditure,....

More than E.

62,069.91

4,342,077.03

28,258.32

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsi li Deposits Available. (Subsidi: Deposits Not Available, Crown Agents,

Crown Agents' Advance, Crown Agents' Deposits, .. Bills on Crown Agents in tra Advance Account, Family Remittances, Subsidiary Coins..... Subsidiary Coins, No. 2, .... Money Order Account, Suspense Account, Suspense Honse Service, .. Exchange,....

23,681,273.38

24,074,814.76

$24,074,814.76

Total Payments, with op

Balance 31st Dec., 199

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1909-1910.

ASSESSOR'S Office,

Hongkong. 7th June, 1909.

1. By order of His Excellency the Governor-in-Council a new Valuation has been inade of the whole Colony, with the exception of purely Chinese Villages.

2. The City of Victoria :-The Ratable Value has decreased from $8,987,125 to $8,806,805 a reduction of $180,320 or 2 per cent.

3. The Hill District:-The Ratable Value has decreased from $263,265 to $262,445 a reduction of $820 or 0.31 per cent.

4. Shaukiwan:-The Ratable Value has increased from $57,197 to $63,224 an addition of $6,027 or 10:53 per cent.

5. Hongkong Villages :-The Ratable Value has increased from $223 599 to $224,590 an addition of $991 or 0.44 per cent.

6. Kowloon Point:-The Ratable Value has increased from $464,460 to $502,205 an addition of $37,745 or 8.12 per cent.

7. Yaumati:-The Ratable Value has increased from $233,145 to $256,640 an addition of $23,495 or 10·07 per cent.

8. Hunghom: The Ratable Value has increased from $230,715 to $237,520 an addition of $6,805 or 2.94 per cent.

9. Monykoktsui:-The Ratable Value has decreased from $144,565 to $130,490 a reduction of $14,075 or 973 per cent.

10. New Kowloon:-The Ratable Value has increased froin $62,315 to $103,858 an addition of $41,513 or 66.66 per cent.

11. Kowloon Villages:-The Ratable Value has increased from $150,367 to $163,125 an addition of $12,758 or 8-48 per cent.

12. The Whole Colony: The Ratable Value has decreased from $10,816,753 to $10,750,902 a slight reduction of $65,851 or 0.60 per cent.

13. Interim Valuations:-Between the 1st July, 1908, and the 1st June, 1909, 243 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

New and/or rebuilt Tenements, Tenements structurally altered,

Replacing Assessments of,

Assessments cancelled, tenements

pulled down, or being in other

respects not ratable,..........

No. and Increase,

CITY OF VICTORIA.

REST OF COLONY.

No. Ratable Value.

No.

Ratable Value.

395

56

$67,190

67

24

59,925

ཁྱག

$140,920

10

66,580

8,660 12,515

6,655

3,855

60,535

137,065

19

30,280

32,931

99

$30,255 144

$104,134

14. Vacant Tenements :-The number of reported vacant tenements in the City of Victoria inspected under Section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 150 monthly as compared with 180 last year.

15. The following Tabular Statement gives a comparison of the Valuation for 1908- 1909 and 1909-1910:-

District.

Valuation Valuation 1908-1909. 1909-1910.

Increase. Decrease. Percentage.

$

The City of Victoria,

Hill District and Hongkong Villages,

Kowloon Point &c. and Kowloon Villages,...

8,987,125 8,806,805

544,061 550,259

6,198

1,285,567 1,393,838 108,271

$ 180,320

%

2:00

1.13

8.42

$ 10,816,753 10,750,902 114,469

180,320

Deduct Increase,

.$

114.469

Total Decrease,.........$

65,851

0.60

16. Staff:-Mr. Chan Kwok On and Mr. Tai Tin Shang have discharged their duties to my satisfaction.

10th June, 1909.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

Comparative Statement shewing the Ratable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each Year from 1900-01 to 190-1910 inclusive.

4

YEAR.

Decrease as Ratable Value. compared with compared with previous Year. previous Year.

Increase as

Percentage of Increase or Decrease in Ratable Value as compared with

the previous Year.

*

1900-01,

5,856,391

869,557

1901-02,

6,889,752

1,033,361

1902-03,

8,166,613

1,276,861

% 17:43 Increase. 17.64 18.53

"

"

1903-04,

8,788,063

621,450

7.60

1904-05,

9,929,171

1,141,108

12.98

""

1905-06,

10,511,163

581,992

5.86

1906-07,

10,969,203

158,040

4.35

1907-08,

10,716,173

253,030

2:30 Decrease.

1908-09,

10,816,753

100,580

0.93 Increase.

......

1909-10,

10,750,902

65,851

0.60 Decrease.

1

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL.

1.-Revenue and Expenditure.

(See Tables I and II.)

The revenue for the year excluding Refunds etc. was $164,221, being 5 per cent. more than last year, and 6·05 per cent. over the estimate.

Increases. The increase under Emigration House Licences (23 per cent.) is explaine under heading III (ii) below. The increase under Forfeitures (241 per cent.) is accidental. This item is composed principally of bonds, the terms of which have not been kept.

The increase under Markets (7 per cent.) is due chiefly to the re-letting of stalls and reassessment of their rents. The number of markets open at the close of the year was 14, producing a revenue of $117,788, and containing 1,048 shops and stalls. Of these 68 were unoccupied. Sai Wan Ho Market, opened on 1st June, has proved only moderately successful, 17 stalls out of 68 being to let at the end of the year.

Decreases. The decrease under Hawkers' Licences, which was confined entirely to the latter half of the year, is attributed mainly to the boycott of Japanese goods.

The decrease under Householders' Registration is explained under heading 4 (i) below.

Table II shews the ratio of revenue to expenditure during the last 9 years. The comparison however is fallacious for several reasons among which are:-

(a.) The product(work done) varies in amount and value from year to year. Thus the Dispensary work is new and increasing. In 1908 Emigration work has very largely increased.

(b.) Sources of revenue have been transferred to other Departments, e.g., fees for

boat licences to the Harbour Department.

(c.) Fluctuation in exchange, about 40 per cent. between maximum and minimum,

which alters the silver equivalent of gold salaries.

2.-Protection of Women and Girls.

(See Table III.)

Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897.

Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.

The number of women, girls and infants detained under Warrant was 226 as compared with 139 last year. Except 4 cases sent direct to the Refuge or the Convent, they were all sent to the Po Leung Kuk in the first instance, and their subsequent history may be traced in Table III. The numerical increase is du largely to the prevailing trade depression, which has caused many women to leave their homes in search of work and thus fall into bad hands. The floods on the West River were a contributing cause. It has often happened that when the husband is dead his family being no longer able to support his wife sends her out to shift for herself. The proportion of women relea-el after enquiry, that is women whose detention proved to have been unnecessary, has again fallen, and is now as low as 24 per cent., as compared with 28 per cent. last year, and an average of 42 per cent. for the 6 preceding years.

Thirty girls were put under bond and ordered to report regularly. This is a considerable increase over the 12 of last year. There is no doubt that in the great majority of cases these girls are absolutely rescued. Bought as infants by prostitutes or procuresses, they are trained up for the profession. But if they are brought before the Registrar General in time, their "mothers" rather than be at a total loss are glad to marry them decently and pocket the dowry.

There is a considerable traffic in very small children brought to the Colony from Shanghai for sale. A number of such children were detained, sent to the Po Leung Kuk and finally adopted by respectable families.

C.2

+

Towards the end of the year an attempt was made to regulate the traffic in infants with the Straits. It is practically impossible to interfere where the children are more than a year old, but when they are or should be at the breast and are fed during the voyage on tinned milk by ignorant women whose interest in them is purely venal, great suffering and frequent deaths ensue. This traffic which comes chiefly froin the Tung Kun district, and is fed largely by children who would otherwise have gone to the Convent there, has been checked. The Po Leung Kuk suffered from a slight out-break of Beri-beri; there were 4 cases, and one whole floor had to be closed for over 2 months. This caused some overcrowding. The accommodation is barely sufficient for the needs of the Colony. Under a new matron, and thanks largely to the energy of the Directors and especially Mr. Ho Kom-tong, the home is beautifully clean, and the girls look bright and contented. Needlework and lessons give them a great deal of pleasure, and the introduction of an unusual number of babies has given a joyous occupation to the inmates. The absence of a recreation ground worthy the name is a serious drawback. Table III shews the wide usefulness of the Home, a report of which is given in Appendix 4.

During the year, 181 persons were reportel to the Po Leung Kuk as missing, as com- pared with 205 in 1907. Of these, 48 were subsequently reported as having been found. These figures include persons missing from the neighbouring parts of China and from Macao. The actual figures for Hongkong are, Missing 91; reported as Found, 39.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge, which owes its inception to Miss Eyre, and was for some years conducted by her and her fellow workers, has now been reorganized as a Diocesan Institution of the English Church in Hon rkong. It thus acquires a stability so often wanting in the private undertakings of the Colony. This change has been largely due to the action of Lady Lugard, who very shortly after her arrival in the Colony interested herself actively in the Refuge, secured a wider support for it, and generally stimulated its development.

The Refuge has been visited by the Annual Committee of the Po Leung Kuk at intervals during the year, and I have paid surprise visits. The girls appear happy and well cared for. The number of inmates has varie from 35 to 38; the general health has been good and no deaths have occurred. There have been 23 admittances and 6 marriages. The home was under Chinese management (with European supervision) until November when a European lady took up residence..

The Italian Convent continues to do good work. Fourteen women and girls were taken there during the year, including 5 who went there of their own accord.

>

1

3.-Emigration.

Emigration Ordinance, No. 1 of 1889.

(See Tables IV and V.)

(i.)—Female Emigration.

The examination of females and children under 16 is conducted by the Assistant Registrar General, the Registrar General re-examining doubtful cases.

Of the 226 persons detained as given in the first paragraph of the previous secti›n of this report, 62 were intending female emigrants, as compared with 49 last year. Of these, the numbers permitted to leave", that is those unnecessarily detained, was the same, 10. There is no hardship in most of these cases, as they generally involve only half an hour's questioning at the Po Leung Kuk on the evening of detention, and if the result is satisfactory the women are free to leave as they had originally intended, next day. As a rule doubtful cases are sufficiently met by a note on the passage list for the informa- tion of the Protector of Chinese, Singapore.

Table IV shews that over 9,000 female passengers passed through the office. The 10 needlessly detained are only one in 900. It also shews a very considerable reduction in female emigration as compared with last year. This is another sympton of the general trade depression dealt with in Part 19 below.

The proportion of women who go abroad to join husbands (about 33 per cent.), as servants (33 per cent.), with relations (25 per cent.), prostitutes (7 per cent.), remains nearly

constant.

T

1

1

C 3

(ii.) Male Emigration.

At the end of last year an arrangement was come to, by which no immigrant to the Straits Settlements from Hongkong is permitted to enter into a labour contract there unless he shall have appeared before the Registrar General before embarkation. To meet the additional work, the staff of the Registrar General's Office was strengthened by the addition of an Emigration Officer, who was however not appointed till 1st July, of a European Sergeant, a 3rd Grade Interpreter, a Hoinan and Luichau Interpreter and two District. Watchmen.

A number of Chinese gentlemen undertook during the year to sit in turns with the Emigration Officer, and help him in detecting cases of fraud. At first when the work was new their services were of much assistance; but it happens that in work of this nature the official who is occupied with it for hours daily acquires such a quickness in detecting suspi- cious cases as to render him independent of the need of assistance beyond that of his interpreter. The Chinese advisers were towards the end of the year inclined to complain that their office was a sinecure. I could not help feeling that coming as they did but once or twice a month, and being of a totally different rank in life from the coolies whose in- terests they were endeavouring to watch, even speaking a different language, their public spirit was exceeding their real usefulness. I therefore took advantage of the slackness of emigration at the year's end temporarily to relieve them of this duty.

The most difficult question in connection with assisted emigration during the year has been that of the repatriation of those coolies, who have been either rejected by the office or doctor on account of their inferior physique, or induced to leave their homes through misrepresentations. Who was to bear the cost of their repatriation? At first the Tung Wah were called upon to do so, and did so with great reluctance, to the amount of $3,411. This arrangement did not appear to be altogether equitable, and towards the close of the year I arranged that the boarding house keeper should be made responsible for cost of repatriation, leaving him to recover from the broker. The Tung Wah as before has done the actual repatriation and has sent in the bill to this office. The Emigration Officer has then called upon the boarding house keepers to refund the amount, and they have done so without a murmur.

It is hardly necessary to add that if they can escape free of the consequences, that is the cost of repatriation, runner and boarding house keeper have no interest in keeping up the standard of coolie. If he slips through the Registrar General's Office a profit is made. he fails to pass they suffer no loss.

If

The number of Boarding Houses for Assisted Emigrants is 29 as compared with 24 last year, when the business as regulated by the new Ordinance was still in its early stages.

There appears to be comparatively little trickery practised in the trade, and the majority of the boarding house keepers act straightforwardly in their dealings with this office.

Table V shews the number of assisted coolies and the percentage of those rejected- It should be clearly understood that the Singapore rejections are in no way a reflection on the conduct of the medical examinations in Hongkong. They consist of coolies who are not wanted for any reason: they have fallen sick on the voyage, or the demand may have slackened and only picked men be needed at the moment. This last case accounts for the large numbers sent back from Singapore at the end of the year.

4.-Regulation of Chinese.

Ordinance 3 of 1888.

(i.)-Registration of Householders.

The first registration of householders in the Kowloon District, begun in 1907, was practically completed in the early part of the year. There were performed in the office 1,356 registrations and re-registrations of householders, and 2,734 movings in of tenants.

The number of first registrations in Victoria was 44 and of re-registrations 1,012.

(ii.)-District Watchmen. (See Table VI.)

The balance brought forward at the end of the year is $12,151, as compared with $12,900 at the beginning of the year. $2,569 were paid by the fund to Government for

C 4

Inland Lot No. 1,794, on which an addition to the Western District Watchmen's quarters is in course of construction, that will be ready for occupation about the middle of the current year.

Contributions shew an increase of $380 over 1907.

The force numbered 108 of all ranks on the last day of the year, an increase of 13. This is partly accounted for by the additional work thrown on the force by the demands of the Dispensary Committee, in connection with their campaign against the "dumping" of bodies in the streets.

The number of resignations was 5, and of dismissals 19, as compared with 8 and 11 last year. The number of convictions secured by members of the force was 173, or 1.6 apiece. This is better than last year, (15) but is not a very high record, and compares unfavourably with the average of the previous years, 2·6.

The District Watchmen Committee met 9 times.

(iii.)-Permits.

The usual permits to fire crackers were issued.

Permits issued to perform theatricals were only 60 in number as compared with 94 last year, a sign of the prevailing depression.

An important procession was held in connection with the prevalence of Plague

5.-Population.

Marriages.-Ordinance No. 7 of 1875 as amended by Ordinance

No. 15 of 1902 and Ordinance No. 6 of 1903.

The number of marriages solemnized during the year was 158 as compared with 137 in 1907. Thirty-six marriages were contracted at the Registrar General's Office.

Births and Deaths.-Ordinance No. 7 of 1896.

For particulars regarding these, reference should be made to the Annual Report of the Medical Officer of Health.

The total number of Chinese births registered as having taken place during the year is 1,129. It is a striking commentary on the untrustworthiness of this figure that the eight midwives attached to the Alice Memorial Hospital attended no less than 1,033- maternity cases. This shews if additional proof is needed how large a proportion of births are not registered.

Of the total number of births of all nationalities, 1,415, 793 were registered in the Registrar General's Office.

Of the total number of deaths, 9,271, 7,025 were registered in the Registrar General's Office.

Exhumations.

319 permits were issued by the Medical Officer of Health to exhume human remains for removal to China or for reburial in the Colony.

Statutory authority for this very necessary duty is about to be obtained, since a doubt has arisen as to the legality of the system which has hitherto been followed.

Removal of Bodies from the Colony.

666 certificates were issued by the Police for removal of bodies from the Colony.

6.-Vaccination.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1890.

This subject is being dealt with in the Annual Report of the Medical Officer of Health.

7.-Registration of Books.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

Fifty-six books were registered during the year as compared with 53 in 1907.

S

}

- C 5

8.-Copyright in Works of the Fine Arts.

Ordinance No. 17 of 1901.

None were registered during the year.

9.-Certificates of Identity to Chinese Entering the United States of America.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

Eight were issued to Chinese British subjects resident in Hongkong, 6 being for the United States and 2 for Hawaii.

10.-Tung Wah Hospital.

Ordinances No. 1 of 1870 and No. 9 of 1904.

(See Tables VII and XVIII.)

The names of the Directors of the Tung Wah Hospital elected on the 15th November, 1908, are:-

SIN TAK-FAN

LAU PUN-CHIU

Merchant.

of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank.

UE PUN-NAM WONG YIU-TONG

""

Yat Cheung Bank.

Wo Fat Shop.

""

AU CHAK-MAN

""

Chiu Lung Tai Shop.

CHAN CHEUK-FAN

Tsun On & Co.

??

WONG TAK-CHUN

1)

Tak Cheung Shop.

UE YAT-UE

13

Ho NGOK-LAU

"

·

YIU KU-YUEn ChUNG SIK-FAN LO FUK-KI

LAU KING-MAN

*9

19

*

TSOI YIU-FUNG

LI KIU-PAT

Wo Tseung Fat Shop. Merchant.

International Bank.

Wing Shing Shop.

Shang Cheung Fat Shop.

Sheung Yik Pawnshop.

G. Macbain.

Tak Lung Shop.

CHAN TIT-UE

"}

Ming U Tai Shop.

The balance brought forward at the end of the year is $68,532 as compared with $83,309 at the end of 1907.

The expenditure for the year is given as $145,874, an increase of $74,078 over 1907. This increase is mainly due to capital expenditure on new buildings $54,627. It also in- cludes $3,411 expenditure on the repatriation of emigrants, an item which as explained above is not likely to recur. Nearly every item of expenditure shews an increase over 1907, though some increase was only to be expected owing to the increase in the number of patients, nearly 5 per cent., and to the increased number of coffins needed owing to the plague and typhoon. Towards the end of the year a change was male in the method of obtaining stores of Chinese medicines, a change, which will, it is hoped result in a con- siderable saving. The Government annual grant was raised to $8,000 from $6,000.

The capital expenditure alluded to in the preceding paragraph is on account of the new plague wards in course of construction. They will occupy the space coverel by 10 high and crowded houses which abutted on the Tung Wah premises to the north. The new buildings will by letting in light and air enormously improve the hospital an the adjacent property. $5,000 has been subscribed fron the Chinese Recreation Ground Fund towards the cost of this improvement.

To meet the outbreak of Small-pox at the beginning of the year a matshe hospital was opened to the west of Kennedy Town, ani conducted under the mildes: quarantine regula- tions compatible with safety. The total cost of construction was $982. The structure was blown down in the typhoon of July 27th, and has since been rebuilt on a smaller scale.

When Chinese are smitten with Small-pox their dread of being committed to the hulk Hygeia is very strong. This has again been shown by their readiness in subscribing towards a permanent sinall-pox hospital, to be erected on a site granted by the Govern- ment where the matshed now is. A subscription list was opened in the last month of the year, and by the end of the year a considerable sum had been realised.

C 6

The amount subscribed for the proposed Yaumati hospital has reached $76,236 including interest. A site has been granted by the Government and has been levelled; and plans have been submitted by the architect. The estimates however went considerably beyond the means available, and at the end of the year the committee charged with the construction of the hospital was considering how best a compromise might be arrived at.

The typhoon of July 27th has been the subject of a separate report, and is further described in Part 19 below. The Tung Wah as usual did good service in burying the dead and distributing charity among the survivors.

The Tung Wah opened and administered a Flood Relief Fund in connection with the disastrous floods on the West and North Rivers, subscriptions to which were contributed not only locally but also from the Straits Settlements, the Dutch Colonies and many other places. Altogether

Altogether the enormous sum of $427,929 was collected, of which on 22nd November $271.781 had been paid over to the Canton Committees, leaving a balance of $156,148 undistributed. The effect of the flood upon business is dealt with in Part 19.

11.-Chinese Public Dispensaries.

(See Tables VIII to XIII.)

The three Dispensaries in Victoria (the Eastern. Central and Western), were early in the year put under the control of the Tung Wah Hospital, on the understanding that the hospital should be guided by the advice of the Public Dispensaries Committee, a body appointed for this object. The hospital withdrew from this arrangement towards the end of the year, and the Dispensary Committee is now in control. It is composed of the Re- gistrar General as chairman, the Chinese Members of Council and of the Sanitary Board, the three chairmen of the annual committee of the Tung Wah Hospital and a number of the other leading Chinese. The accounts of the Victoria Dispensaries are kept by the Registrar General, who is also charged with the collection of subscriptions.

The three Dispensaries on the Kowloon side (Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon City), are more independent. They collect their own subscriptions, banking the money with the Registrar General, and keep their own accounts. They have separate committees, on which the Chinese Members of Council have seats.

""

The work of the Dispensaries is of a dual nature. On its educational side it is per- formed mainly by the committees with the assistance of a large number of "street com- mittee men (kai-fong chik-lei) who are men of importance in their own streets, and able to bring a good influence to bear on their neighbours. The purely medical and surgical work is done by the doctors with their staffs of clerks and stretcher coolies.

The work of the committee and street committee men in connection with the dis- couragement of "dumping" has been fully reported on in a separate report.

In other propagandist work the committee have been equally public spirited, especially in disseminating literature bearing on the connection between rats and plague. They have also distributed for the Sanitary Department some thousands of traps and have brought about a weekly death rate of rats of over 1,000 at no cost to the ratepayer. They also made wholesale poisoning of rats possible by assuring the co-operation of the mass of the popula- tion. It is no small advantage to have the natural spokesmen of the people as advocates of hygienic measures, and on the side of sanitation.

Details of the actual work, which is of a varied nature, are given in Table VIII. It may be added that the applications for Government midwives through the Dispensaries represent only a fraction of the cases undertaken by the midwives. The total number of new cases treated in the six Dispensaries is 24,353, an increase of over 30 per cent, as com- pared with last year.

12-District Plague Hospitals.

The temporary hospital at West Point was open throughout the Plague season, 69 cases being admitte i, of whom 2 recovered. The treatment was of the Chinese kind, but the Western trained doctor of the dispensary examined each case on admission, to see that it was really a case of Plague.

At Hunghom 40 cases were admitted from the neighourhood and Yaumati, of whom 9 were discharged cured. This hospital is a solidly built structure near the Dispensary.

C 7

G

There were no cases treated at Kowloon City.

The Government having presented the kai fong of West Point with the piece of land held under Inland Lot No. 1,793 for a permanent local plague hospital, a contract has been placed for the erection of a suitable building, which is now under construction, the es- timated cost being $8,700. The collection of subscriptions is in the hands of the kai fong, and the money banked with the Registrar General. The balance of the account at the end of the year was $5,573.

The collection of funds for a permanent plague hospital for East Point is being con- ducted by the Registrar General. The site for a building has been selected, and at the end of the year the purchase was being concluded. At the close of the year the balance. in the hands of the Registrar General on this account was $7,292.

The Government grant of $2,000 under Charitable Allowances Vote for District Hospitals was thus distributed :-

East Point,..

West Point, Kowloon City,

Yaumati,

Hunghom,

$750

500

360

190

200

$2,000

13.-Chinese Recreation Ground.

(See Table XIV.)

The sanction of Government was obtained for contributing $6,000 from the available funds towards the new Plague Wing and adjacent grounds of the Tung Wah Hospital. Unfortunately however the typhoon did great damage to the buildings on the Recreation Ground, necessitating repairs to the sum of $1,288, and it was only found possible to pay $5,000 to the hospital in 1908 on this account.

14.-Passage Money Fund.

(See Table XV.)

This fund is considerably poorer than it was a year ago, the main difference being due to the lessened receipts under heading Passage Money. Formerly the tickets of male emigrants who did not proceed on their journeys were credited to this fund. Under the present system they are returned to the boarding houses.

15.-Registrar General's Office Charitable Fund.

(See Table XVI.)

This fund, which is in process of formation, is intended to help destitute widows and workmen injured by accidents. No disbursements have been male during the year.

16.--Legislation.

The following Ordinances passed in 1908 more particularly affect the Chinese community:-

No. 4.-Chinese Emigration Amendment.”

5.-Chinese Extradition Amendment.

10.-Man Mo Temple.

14.-Public Health and Buildings Amendment.

In course of time to the two classes of emigrants-free passengers and contract labourers- whose needs were legislated for by previous Chinese Emigration Ordinances a third class

C 8

has been added, viz.:-Chinese labourers who intead to labour for hire beyond the limits of the Colony and have received assistance in the way of passage money, &c. These men have entered into no contract in the Colony but intend to do so on their arrival at their destination. The Chinese Emigration Amendment Ordinance now recognises them as a separate class and gives the Registrar General powers to protect them by requiring them to be photographed and examined by him twice before embarkation. These precautions have proved most useful and have resulted in the discovery of 1,360 emigrants who were unwill- ing to proceed on their journey and in their repatriation. Further details regarding the work under this Ordinance are given in Tables IV and V.

The Man Mo Temple Ordinance vested the property of the temple in the Tung Wah Hospital, the original trustees having died or disappeared.

17.-Prosecutions.

(See Table XVII.)

Fifteen persons were convicted of offences against women and girls, and 20 persons charged with such offences were acquitted. The difficulty of obtaining convictions in these cases is well known. The figures of convictions and acquittals under this head last year were 5 and 42 respectively.

18.-Interpretation Sub-Department. (Government Notification No. 581 of 1901.)

During 1908, four student interpreters obtained third class certificates and appoint- ments in the Police Department. The progress of the rest has been satisfactory.

Periodical examinations were held by the Board of Examiners, at which 3 non-student interpreters serving in various departments obtained third class certificates, and three obtained second class certificates. No first class certificates were obtained during the year.

19.-General.

The depression of business which prevailed during the year was no doubt largely attributable to general causes affecting the trade of the world. Its severity was however increased by four local misfortunes :- plague, flood, typhoon and boycott.

The plague epidemic did not differ in kind from the visitations with which the Colony is so unhappily familiar; but the death roll was longer than it has been for several years, being over one thousand. Thanks largely to the efforts of the Dispensary Committee, possibly also to the persistent teaching of hygiene in schools, there has been very little friction between the sanitary authorities and the public.

The incessant rain which fell throughout the two Kwong Provinces during the second week in June caused the North East and West Rivers to rise extraordinarily. At Wuchow the water rose sixty feet in forty-eight hours. Towns and villages were submerged; crops were destroyed, and infinite distress resulted. A meeting was at once held at the Tung Wah Hospital, and a Committee formed for the collection of funds, both locally and abroad as mentioned in Part 10 above. The actual distribution of the funds was made through organizations established in Canton for the purpose; but the local Committee sent delegates from time to time to observe the work of distribution. The reports thus obtained upon the efficiency of the methods employed were of a favourable nature.

The flood was instrumental in bringing the Charity Bazaar to China. Messrs. Fung Wa-chun, Ho Kom-tong and others held one at Kennedy Town in an enormous matshed erected for the purpose between the 10th and 16th July. It was formally

It was formally opened by His- Excellency the Governor. It attracted enormous crowds, and brought a net profit of $81,600 to the relief of the sufferers. It is a significant feature of the times that Chinese gentlemen of standing allowed their wives and daughters to act as saleswomen. Their confidence was not misplaced; for a more orderly crowd-even among Chinese crowds-has never been seen.

While the prosperity of the Colony was thus through the destruction and diversion of capital and the suspension of business being undermined by the flood, the typhoon of the 27th July struck a more direct and a still heavier blow. Although it did not come with- out due warning, 179 native crafts were wrecked or damaged, with a loss of 271 lives..

-

1

1

C 9

More serious still was the loss of the river steamer Ying King, which went down with all hands of the total crew and passengers, 466 in all, only 42 were saved, the lost including the Master and 3 Europeans. The destruction ashore was very considerable, and included the collapse of a number of lightly built tenement houses at Yaumati, and the loss of several lives. A pleasant feature amid so much misery was the rescue of 6 Chinese by the crew of H. M. S. Astræa's cutter. The Committee of the Tung Wah Hospital, speaking on behalf of the Chinese community, addressed a warm letter of thanks to the Government in acknowledgment of this act.

The task of picking up and burying the drowned was, as has been the custom, entrusted to the Tung Wali Hospital, all expenses being subsequently recovered from the Government. This work completed, a Relief Committee was, as in 1906, formed mainly from the Tung Wah Permanent and Annual Committees, with the Registrar General as Chairman, to investigate deserving cases and relieve the necessitous. The result of its labours was the payment of $6,645 to the owners and crew of 75 craft, of $500 to the victims of the collapse of houses at Yaumati, and of $1,000 to the Blindenheim, which had been uuroofed. These sums were defrayed partly from the interest on 30,000 taels deposited with the Tung Wah in trust for such purposes, and partly from the balance of the 1906 typhoon fund, in the

hands of the Government.

The year's misfortunes were crowned by one self-chosen. Acting under the belief that a business transaction blesses only him who gives the goods an not him who takes, the Chinese of Hongkong, following and improving upon the lead given then in Canton, started a vigorous boycott of Japanese goods enforce l as is usual by lampoon and intimida- tion. The Japanese steamship lines were particularly affecte 1. So strong was the move- ment that street hawkers, not the most emotional of people, have been heard to host a comrade as a cold blooded reptile for selling bananas to a Japanese. The weak point in the movement was the Chinese passion for Japanese relishes. By the surreptitious sale of these certain merchants were drawing large profits when, as an act of vengeance an warning, the Society which fostered the movement in Canton sent a gang of about 40 ruffians to Hongkong who, on the evening of the 1st November, and on the morning of the next day wrecked several shops. The Police at once took active measures and a number of arrests were made. The Peace Preservation Ordinance 1886 was brought into force and several persons were banished. The movement then began to subside, and by the end of the year practically collapsed, at any rate in so far as it was of a compulsory nature.

The idea of a University for Hongkong, which has been in the air for a number of years, took definite shape when, at a meeting held at Government House on 18th March, 1908, His Excellency the Governor announced that Mr. Mody had put $150,000 at his disposal for the purpose, a sum since increased to $180.000, or what greater sum the buildings shall cost, by the generous donor. The meeting formed itself into a committee. and a sub-committee was at once formed, to consider what minimum sum would be needed to make a start with two Chairs only, of Medicine and Engineering, upon a site provided cost free by Government. On October 29th and at subsequent meetings the report of the Committee was considered, a special committee was appointed to supervise the erection of the buildings and collect funds. And it was decided that the minimum to be collected for endowment which would justify the inception of the scheme was a sum, the interest on which would be not less than £6,000 per annum.

A Chinese sub-committee was thereupon appointed for the collection of subscriptions, and by the end of the year a considerable sum had been promised.

The Chinese College of Medicine and the Techincal Institute will be merged in the University.

The establishment of a Chair for Arts has since been determined upon.

20.--Staff.

Mr. Brewin left the Colony on leave on 28th March. Mr. Hutchison then acted as Registrar General for 5 days, when I took charge The post of Assistant Registrar General was filled in succession by Messrs. Hutchison, Örme and Wood.

7th April, 1909.

EDWARD A. Irving,

Registrar General.

Heads of Revenue.

Details of Revenue.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1907 and 1908.

Licences and Internal Revenue not other-- wise specified.

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for Specific Purposes, and Reim- bursements-in-aid.

Chinese Undertakers' Licences, Emigration House Licences, . Forfeitures,

Hawkers' Licences, Marriage Licences,..

Money Changers' Licences,

Special Fruit Licences,

Births and Deaths Registration,

Certificates to Chinese entering U. S. A. Chinese Gazette Sales,

Householders' Registration,

Re-registration,

""

Removals,

""

Extracts,..

""

Rent of Govt. Property, Land and Houses.

Interest,

Miscellaneous,

Laundries,

Markets,

Ordinance under which received.

Revenue in 1907. Revenue in 1908.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

$

C.

-~-

No. 8 of 1887.

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908.

480 (1)

3,152

460 (1)

3,862

304

1,036

No. 8 of 1887.

30,386

26,958

710

732

...

(1)

C.

20 (1)

3,428

No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902.

936

1,108

172

No. 8 of 1887.

2,980

3,330

350

1 of 1903.

4,887

4,947

60

No. 7 of 1896.

678

779

101

3 of 1898.

350

400

50

>>

24

24

3 of 1888.

5,661

459

3 of 1888.

1,448

""

1,203

5,202

245

,, 3 of 1888.

20

14

6

3 of 1888.

47

51

4

"}

1,515

1,800

No. 1 of 1903.

110,336

117,788

285

7,452

...

1

1

52

239

187

...

Total,.

163,261.13

164,459.99

10,104.99

8,902

Deduct Decrease, .........$

8,902.00

Total Increase in 1908, $

1,202.99

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Interest accrued on official account,.

Refunds, &c.,

+

C 10

་་་

1

C 11

Table II.

Revenue.

Year.

Total.

Decrease.

Increase.

Table showing the Revenue and Expenditure of the Registrar General's Department since 1900.

Total.

Expenditure.

Decrease.

Increase.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

$

$

$

C.

$

1900,

132,729.63

1901,

127,566.16

4,406.32

5,163.47

C.

12,219.69

$

C.

$

C.

1,870.46

9.28

16.429.62

4,209.93

12.87

1902,

136,888.13

9,321.97

24,230.33

7,800.71

17.70

1903,

1904,

160,351.81

167,083.66

23.463.68

26,755.64

2,525.31

16.68

6.731.85

...

31,339.71

4,584.07

18.75

1905, 1906.

172.947.89

5.861.23

31,761.32

421.61

18.36

...

1907, 1908,

177,284.21

163,261.13 | 14,023.08 164,459.99

...

4,336.32

36,947.46

5,186.14

20.84

35,630.88 1,316.58

21.82

1,198.86

43,848.51

8,217.63

26.66

Table III.

Number of women and girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year

and

the arrangements made regarding

them.

Committed under Warrant from Registrar General's Office.

Committed under Wariant

from Emigration Office.

Pending the opening of the

Registrar General's Office. Sent with their own consent

by Registrar General. Sent with their own con-

sent

from

Singapore,

Manila and Swatow.

Sent with their own con- sent by the Police.

Accompanying parents or guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

Lost Children.

Total.

Placed in charge of hus-

Released after enquiry. Released under bond.

*>TB{

Placed in charge of parents Placed in charge of Consul and relatives.

for France.

Sent to Charitable Institu- tions in China.

Sent to School, Convent or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Total.

In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st Jan-

34

15

10

19

2

5

34 2 2

1

2

3

4

H

:

uary, 1908,

Admitted during

403

155

60

23 104

13

323 16 440386 22 33 117

20 14

22

22

the year,

Total,

Remaining in the Po Leung Kuk on the 31st De-

cember. 1908,.

115

Runaway.

Total.

:

31

6 28

350

1437

170

70

14 27 109

123 16 4437 88 24 34 119

17

21. 26

743

384

53

33

15

27

16

c

?

:

co

53

33333

C 12

Table IV.

Number of Assisted Emigrants and of female passengers and boys examined and passed before the Registrar General under "The Chinese Emigration Ordinances

1889-1908" during the year 1908.

Batavia,

Billiton,

Callao,

Honolulu,

Japan,

Java,

Mauritius,

+

Muntok,..

Whither Bound.

Nanaima....

Salina Cruz,

San Francisco,

Straits Settlements,

Tacoma,....

Vancouver,

Victoria,

Total 1908,.. Total 1907,

WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

Male Assisted

Emigrants. Women.

Girls.

Bors.

Total.

50

49

107

1,250

2

0

1

3

16

46

36

18

54

5

5

22

33

11

13

1,241

1

3

9

0

7

7

0

43

43

11

4

428

443.

11,803

8,241

903

1,933

11,077

1

1

203

203

64

64

14,294 (1) 1,620

8,356

918

2,834

12,108

11,090

1,105

3.376

15,571

(1) Examination of assisted emigrants commenced on 1st November, 1907.

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Examined.

Passed.

Unwilling. R. G. O. as

Rejected at

unfit.

Rejected by doctor.

Sent back from Singapore.

Total rejected.

Percentage of rejection.

16,735

14,294

1,360

1,081

427

361

3,229

19.3

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants.

Sent home by Tang Wah Hospital,

Sent through the Hospital at expense of boarding houses,

1,889

795

Sent away,

Sent to contractor,

508

7

3,199

Recruiting Districts.

Canton,

5,523

Wuchow,

2,756

Hoihow,

1,968

Swatow,

1,070

Other places,

2,977

14,294

C 13

App

Table VI.

Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure of the District Watchmen's Fund

for the year 1908.

C.

C.

To Balance,

12,900

By Wages and Salaries :-

c.

دو

Grant by Government,

2,000

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

2,050

1,567

men,

Contributions,

24,440

District Watchmen,

12.804

Cooks,

432

دو

Payments for Special Services,

53

Coolies,

381

Collector,

300

""

Interest,...

422

Interpreter,

35

Manager,

144

Writer,

60

وو

Fines,.......

26

Special District Watchmen to

prevent the dumping of

bodies.

810

27

Sale of old lamps,..................

5

18,586

35

By Miscellaneous :-

Crown Rent,

245

Water Account,...

156

Premium on Fire Policies,

432

Instructors' Allowance,

196

Uniform and Equipment,

1,809

Stationery and Printing,

141

Photographs,

13

Gratuities and Reward.

252

Furniture.

15}

Fitting and Repairs,

522

Coolie and Conveyance Hire,.

164

Loss on Exchange,

1,574

Oil,

360

Pension to Au Pún's Widow,

120

Premium for Inland Lot No.

1,794,

2,310

Cost of Telephone,

442

Sundries,

265

9,108 06

Total,....

..$ 39,848 56

Disposal of Balance :-

Total Expenditure,.. Balance,

Total.

On Fixed Deposit,

$ 8,000.00

At Current Account,

Advance Account,

3,944.95 209.20

Total,.........

$12,154.15

27,694 41 12,154 15

39,848

56

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

Table VII.

Number of patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1908.

Patients.

Out-patients.

Male, Female,

170 3.370 3,540 2,272 1,100 35 752 787 406 340

1

168 55,351 1,806 57,157 1,223 806 41 32,496 997 33,493 1,125 420

152

205 4,122 4,327 2,678 1,440

Total,

NOTE: In-patients treated by European methods during the year 1908,

Out-patients

""

""

""

209 87,847 2,803 90,650 2,348 1,226

152

}

2,004 2,803

Table VIII.

Work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries in Victoria, Old Kowloon and Kowloon City.

VICTORIA.

OLD KOWLOON.

KOWLOON

GRAND

CITY.

TOTAL.

CENTRAL.

EAST POINT. | WEST POINT.

TOTAL.

HUNGHOM.

YAUMATI.

TOTAL.

1. New Patients visited at their homes,

406

550

407

1,363

237

581

818

559

2,740

""

""

seen at the office,..

3,672

4,101

4,087

11,860

2,128

6,766

8,894

859

21,613

Total,

4,078

4,651

4,494

13,223

2,365

7,347

9,712

1,418

24,353

2. Old Cases-(home),.

45

166

27

238

34

183

217

206

661

(office),

1,292

1,604

827

3,723

156

3,309

3,465

218

7,406

Total,

1,337

1,770

854

3,961

190

3,492

3,682

424

8,067

(3.A.

"}

3. Certificates of nature of disease issued,... given to persons to leave the Colony).

6

2

18

26

2

5

7

0

33

6

0

5

11

2

5

7

0

18

4.

of cause of death issued,

39

54

38

131

98

195

293

155

579

>>

5. Patients sent to hospital, ....

103

157

115

375

36

103

139

28

542

6. Patients removed to hospital in ambulance,

213

143

207

563

56

107

163

11

737

7. Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,

209

192

221

622

73

164

237

8

867

8. Dead bodies inspected at the request of the Sanitary Department or the Police,

1

0

0

1

0

1

9. Plague cases sent out of the Colony,.

2

1

5

8

· 0

0

0

0

8

10. Houses cleansed in presence of clerk, 11. Compensation claims sent in,

325

127

436

888

61

36

97

17

1,002

67

47

39

153

19

19

38

2

12. Applications for coffins,

101

134

220

455

19

29

48

6

13. Applications for midwives,.

0

5

28

33

1

63

64

2

NON

193

509

99

14. Infants brought to office (alive),

7

""

(dead),

99

52

Total,

106

59

ོ|ཀྱབ

207

221

1

6

7

228

268

419

23

117

140

559

475

640

24

123

147

0

787

15. Vaccinations at house,

109

80

118

307

1

0

1

17

325

office,

493

387

520

1,400

155

502

657

105

""

""

2,162

Total,

602

467

638

1,707

156

502

658

122

2,487

C 14 -

Receipts:-

Balance,

C 15

Table IX.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

Statement of Account for the year ending 31st December, 1908.

Subscriptions, Victoria,

""

>>

Interest,....

Hunghom,

Kowloon,....

Yaumati,

Loan from Po Chak Tong,

Miscellaneous,

Expenditure:

Victoria :--

Total,

$

C.

$

6,211.71 13,522.38

1,708.65

1,922.26

1,740.00

116.13 2,000.00 25.05

27,246.18

Salaries and Wages,

12,473.06

Rent,

444.00

Furniture,

167.31

Stationery and Printing,

875.72

Loss on Exchange,

845.93

Drugs, &c.,

2,098.98

Crown Rent,

9.00

Loss on bad coins,

5,55

Miscellaneous,

Hunghom, (through Registrar General),

2,431.54

19,351.09

1,820.00

Kowloon City,

Yaumati,

Balance:

2,010.18

"3

"

"

23

1,970.00

Total,

25,151.27

At Current Account, Cash in hand,

652.90 1,442.01

2,094.91

Total,

27,246.18

Receipts:-

Balance,

Subscriptions, &c.,

Interest,

Loan from Po Chak Tong,

Miscellaneous,

Expenditure

Table X.

VICTORIA DISPENSARIES.

Total,

Maintenance of Dispensaries,

Subvention to Kowloon City Dispensary,

Balance :

Cash in hand,

Total,

$

(.

$

5.378.11 13,522.38

116.13 2.000.00

25.05

21,041.67

19,351.09 297.35

19.648.44

1.393.23

21,041.67

Receipts:-

Balance,

Subscriptions, &c.,

Grant by Government,

C 16

Table XI.

HUNGHOM DISPENSARY.

Expenditure

Through Registrar General's Office,

་་

Local Committee,

Balance :-

At Registrar General's Office,

With Committee,

Receipts:-

C.

$

C.

781.31 3.752.25

Total,...

200.00

4,733.56

1,820.00 2,564.13

1,384.13

338.02 11.41

349.43

Total,..

4,733.56

Table XII.

KOWLOON CITY DISPENSARY.

Balance,

Subscriptions, &c.,

Subscription from Shamshuipo Temple,

Grant by Government,

Grant from Dispensaries in Victoria,..

Expenditure:-

Through Registrar General's Office,

""

Balance:---

Local Committee,

At Registrar General's Office,

With Committee,

Receipts:-

Balance,

Subscriptions, &c.,

Total,.....

Total,...

Table XIII.

YAUMATI DISPENSARY.

Grant by Government,

Expenditure:-

Through Registrar General's Office, Local Committee,

Balance:

At Registrar General's Office,

With Committee,

$3

C.

93.40

2,294.62 353.69

2,648.31 360.00

297.35

3,399.06

2.010.18 1,146.17

3.156.35

209.43 33.28

242.71

3,399.06

$

..

$ €.

580.28

7,289.69

190.00

Total,..

8,059.97

1,970.00 4,781.31

6,751.31

154.23

1,154.43

1,308.66

Total,....

8,059.97

C 17

Table XIV.

Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Chinese Recreation Ground for the year 1908.

Dr.

Cr.

(1)

1908.

(1) 1908.

$

1st Jan. To Balance,

Rent,

6,408

""

1,323

Dr.

1908.

Total,....

$ 7,731.73

By Salary of Collector,

$

24

""

Wages of 3 District

Watchmen,

435

Wages of Scavenger,

Uniforms for Watch-

84

men,.

Hire of Plants,

མ<

27

144

>>

95

Water consumed

at

Cooking Stalls, &c., ..

68

House Service,

2

""

Premium on Fire In-

surance Policy,

8

""

Repairs,

1,288

Purchase of land to be

used as an open space,

5,000

""

Oil,......

12

Brooms,

3

""

""

Balance,..

634

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Table XV.

C.

Total,.....

7,731.73

Statement of Account of Passage Money Fund.

Cr.

c.

1908.

c.

To Balance, Eyre Diocesan Refuge

Endowment Fund,....

Balance, Current Account.

By Refund of Passage Money,...

494.20

*

19

Cash,

$3,250.00 1,299.98 57.96

19

Gifts to 42 women on being married, Allowance for 12months toCheng Ma Shi,

96.00

60.00

་་

""

Chan Cheung,

24.00

11

Passage Money received.

4,607.94 819.87

"

Pang Wa.

36.00

"

Kwong Ho,

24.00

Interest on fixed deposit,

141.57

Fung Ho......

24.00

Interest on Current Account,.

22.56

""

2 months to Chan Ho,

4.00

Subscription from Saigon,

16.42

་་

Annual Subscription to Alice Memorial.

Reward for recovery of emigrant,...

48.42

Hospital,

100.00

>>

Miscellaneous,..

2.00

Annual Subscription to Eyie Diocesan

Refuge,

50.00

**

Assistance to destitutes,.

61.59

""

Travelling Expenses, ricksha, ferry fare,

2.75

Photographs, postage,........

101.07

ད་

Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

130.00

Crown Hent for Tokwawan Lot No. 88

(R. G. trustee for Li Sang),

2.00

Balance -

י

Total,

.$ 5,661,78

Eyre Diocesan Refuge En-

dowment Fund, Current Account, Cash,'........

.....

Total

.$3.250.00

1,127.11

75.06

4,452.17

5,661.78

Dr.

1905

to

1908 To Balance,.

""

Smaller sums,

C 18

Table XVI.

Registrar General's Office Charitable Fund.

Miscellaneous Receipts,

,, Interest,.

Cr.

$

C. 1908

C.

(1)

(1)

245

By Balance,

257

3

8

Total...........

•$ 257.82

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Table XVII.

Total,..................

$257.82

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 1 of 1889, No. 2 of 1890,

No. 7 of 1896 and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

Convicted.

No. of Cases.

Discharged.

M. F.

M.

F.

4

10

...

3

3

12

136

ORDIN E No. 3 OF 1888.

Bills-posting without permission,.

Drums and Gongs-Night noises by beating,

Fireworks-Discharging without permits,.

Chinese Theatre-Breach of conditions of Licence for,

ORDINANCE No. 1 of 1889.

Processions-Organising in the Public Streets without permit,.

Decoying men or boys into or away from the Colony, Keeping unlicensed Emigration Houses, ...

Neglecting to enter names of boarders on register,

Personating Emigrants,.

ORDINANCE No. 2 of 1890.

Contraventions of, and offences under, (failing to produce proper

certificates of vaccination),

ORDINANCE No. 7 of 1896.

Failing to report Death,

Unlawful removal of bodies,

ORDINANCE No. 4 or 1897.

::

13

4

::

13

2:

...

12

Abduction of girls under the age of 18 years, (Sec. 26), Decoying women and girls into or away from the Colony,. Detaining, harbouring or receiving women or girls, Procuration of girls under age to have carnal connection,. Knowingly deriving profits from prostitution, letting women out

for hire, trading in them,.

00

2

1

::

4

1

14

8

5 6 9 3

9

::0

6

4

1

1

1

7

3

3

co:

:

CORD 10

3

4

4

3

1

5

1

}

C 19

Table XVIII.

Statement of receipts and payments of the Tung Wah Hospital for the Mo San year (1908).

RECEIPTS.

PAYMENTS.

0.

C.

19

M

11

Balance brought forward from Ting

Mi year,

To rent of Hospital property,

Annual subscriptions of Hongs,.. Subscriptions of various shops.

collected on steamers,... collected and donations.

Subscribed by charitable persons for the purpose of supplying medicine, quilted clothing and coffins,

By food of Employees,

$ c. 5,713.00

C.

15,031.59

27

Salaries,

12,811.51

28,225.47

12.495.20

1.526 00

5,070.76 1,152.40

Sick room expenses,

12,485.35

19

Drugs,

15,914.96

9)

Sundries,

6,009.41

Stationery,

8,117.53

Expenditure on repatriation of

emigrants.

3,411.40

Repairs,

5.322.87

""

Free cemetery,

4,804.01

1,989.30

Coffins,

6,138.79

""

Subscriptions from wealthy per-

"}

Crown rent,

602.35

sons,

3.400.00

Insurance.

1.113.94

*

**+

Subscriptions by Directors, As-

Quilted clothing,

188.90

sistant Directors and Committee, 20% of subscriptions collected by

the Man Mo Temple,

1.967.50

Furniture,

720.65

J

19

Branch Hospital, wages and food

Government grant,

2.500.00 8,000.00

of employees,

193.55

"

Branch Hospital, plague expen-

";

J'ayments for medicine supplied, sale of kitchen refuse and rent

diture,..

3.863.34

13

Building,

54,627.00

of mortuary,

4,041.42

Burial of bodies from Government

37

Grant from Chinese Recreation

mortuary (Victoria),

1.184.15

Ground Fund,

5,000.00

Coffins for bodies

*

Do,

1.848.85

Loan from Man Mo Temple,

6,000.00

Burial of bodies from Government

13

San Francisco Relief Fund,

5.470.17

mortuary (Kowloon),

643.35

Loan from Cheap Sale of Rice

Coffins for bodies Do..

1,181.80

Fund,

38,887.02

.་

Expenses for Small-pox bos-

19

Loan from Kwong Chau Shiu Hling

pital.

5,907.40

Flood Relief Fund,

5,500.00

Interest,

517,60

Balance,

145,874.19 900.24

#1

131,742.84

TOTAL,...

146,774 43

TOTAL,

$ 146,774.43

Statement of Assets and Liabilities at the close of the year of Mo San year (1908).

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

ASSETS.

AMOUNT.

C.

C.

$

c.

C.

་་

11

17

To Loan from Relief Fund,

Cheap Sale of

Fund, Subscription for Hos-

pital Extension,

Man Mo Temple Fund,...]

Rice

8,440.60

29,681.33

By Bank's balance.....

4,900.23

"

2 houses in Bonham Strand and

Jervois Street,

15.226 69 5,860.49

"1

San Francisco

Relief

11

House property (original value) —

1 house in Wing Lok Street (in- cluding cost of additions to buildings),

10,400.00

8,108.28

Fund,

5,470.17

*

Kwong Chau and Shin

Hing Flood Relief

10 houses in Aberdeen Street and Tung Wa Lane (including cost of additions to buildings),

14,900.00

Fund,

5,500.00

""

Further Loan from Man Mo

"

2 houses in Connaught Road and

Des Voeux Road,

17,386.00

Temple Fund,

6,000.00

11

爷爷

11

D

Cheap Sale of Rice

Fund,

38,887.02

7 houses in Queen's Road West (including cost of additions to buildings)......

30,363.00

"}

Balance.

11

115,066.30 2 houses in Bonham Road West,.

68,533,01 3 bouses in Bonham Strand,

26,000.00

15,000.00

11

10 houses in Po Yan Street and New Street (at present used as Plague Hospital),.

54,697.00

176,854.28

Subscriptions not yet paid,.

5.844.80

Total,.......................... $ 183,599.31

Total........

183,599.31

C 20

Account of Typhoon Relief Fund.-Mo San Year (1908).

Receipts.

To Government Grant for typhoon relief for boat people and for those in Yaumati who suffered damage at the typhoon,..

$

C.

Payments.

By distribution to boat people,................

6.595.00

4,607.00

To Government Grant for collecting

By distribution to sufferers in Yau-

mati, By expenses for collecting dead

500.00

dead bodies drowned at the ty- phoon,

3,046.96

To Interest on Emergency Fund,

2,538.00

bodies.

By Balance,

3,046.96

50.00

Total,

$10,191.96

Total,

$10,191.96

Appendix A.

REGISTRAL GENERAL'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 7th April, 1909.

SIR, We have the honour to report on the Po Leung Kuk for the period 1st April, 1908, to 21st March, 1909, when the annual change of Directors took place.

The incoming Directors are:-

Ho Kom-tong,

Chu Sik-yue,

Siu Yuen-fai,

Lai Chau-tamn,

Lo Kit-ping,

Chịu Chung-hau U Ting-sam, Chau Cheuk-fan,

Tsang Wai-him, Lai Shun-hing, Chan Tsz-tan, Ho Shing-chau.

During the period under review 499 women, girls and young children have been received into the Home, and have been dealt with as follows:

Restored to parents,.

19

19

Sent to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

27

17

School,

**

>1

Italian Convent,

Adopted,

Married,

Released,.

Died, Balance,

218

through charitable institutions in China,

16

......

11

1

12

16

42

112

1

70

499

The balance sheet is attached. Including $3,790 brought forward from the previous year, the balance at Profit and Loss is $4,390, the actual difference between income and expenditure for the year under review being thus $600. Of the balance in hand $900 has been handed over to the Registrar General on account of the Eyre Refuge.

An outbreak of Beri-beri occurred in August. There were four cases and one death. A portion of the Home was closed till October, and thoroughly disinfected.

- C 21

In August the services of the Portuguese matron were dispensed with, and Mrs. Leung Hee from the Italian Convent was engaged. Her management has proved successful; the Home is neat and clean, and the great majority of the girls seem cheerful and happy. Attention has been paid to lessons and needlework. A quantity of the latter found a ready sale at the charity bazaar.

We have, &c.,,

EDWARD A. IRVING,

Acting Registrar General, President.

HO KAI,

Vice-President.

We, Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk, Incorporated Society, do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1908, marked "A" and signed with our names on the fifth May, 1909, is a true statement, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declarations Act 1835".

古輝山

招晝三

Declared by the declarants Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan at Victoria, Hongkong, the fifth May, 1909, through the interpretation of Tang Tat-hung of Hongkong, the said Tang Tat-hung having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly inter- preted the contents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto them.

Before me,

R. O. HUTCHISON, J.P.

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you well understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly, distinctly, and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan, and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to them.

TANG TAT-HUNG.

Declared at the Sanitary Department's Office, Hongkong, this fifth May, 1909.

Before ine,

R. O. HUTCHISON, J.P.

C 22

Statement "A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society on the

31st December, 1908.

Assets.

On fixed deposit in the hands of Sui Kat, Hung Ue, Ming San, Shing Tak, and

Sui Cheung Banks,

At Current Account with the Netherlands

Trading Society,

Total,.

$

C.

15,000.00

4,390.69

19,390.69

Liabilities.

Nil.

This is the statement marked "A" referred to in the Declaration of KU FAI-SHAN and CHIU CHAU-SAM declared before me this fifth day of May, 1909.

R. O. HUTCHISON,

J.P.

PO LEUNG KUK.

PERMANENT BOARD OF DIRECTION.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1908.

C.

c.

EXPENDITURE.

RECEIPTS.

Balance from previous year :-

Elected Committee.

C.

8,600.00

On fixed deposit.......

15,000.00

At Current Account,

3,790.77

18,790.77

Balance:

Interest :-

On deposit,

133.71

On Current Account,

19.21|

On fixed deposit, At Current Account,

15,000.00

4,390.69

Subscriptions,.....

152 92 9,047.00

19,390.69

Total,..........

27,990.69

Total,.....

27,990.69

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from the 1st January to the 31st December, 1908.

RECEIPTS.

EXPENDITURE.

$

..

C.

Balance from previous year,

147.58

Decorations, Food,.

42.00

2,584.42

Received from Permanent Board.......

8,600.00

Grant to Miss Eyre's Refuge,

250.00

Insurance,

321.62

Miscellaneous Receipts,.......

294.29

Light and fire,

1,058.01

Miscellaneous,

458.20

Passage Money,

63.69

Petty Expenditure,

Printing,

Repairs,....

Stationery,

Wages, Telephone,

Balance,

533.71

127.10

586.23

91.46 2,767.92 65.55

8,949.91

Total,....... .$ 9,041.97

Total,.................

91.96

9,041.87

Appendix D..

REPORT OF THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.

STAFF.

1. Of the higher Officers Mr. L. A. M. Johnston, the late Postmaster General, returne from leave on 3rd April and died on 30th September. Mr. E. C. Lewis, the Assistant Postmaster General, acted as Postmaster General from 1st October until my appointment as Postinaster General on the 18th November.

2. Mr. T. H. Martin, Superintendent Registration and Parcel Branch, returned from 9 months leave on 21st April and Mr. R. A. J. Savage, Superintendent of Mails, was granted 12 months leave from March 28th which leave his since been extended for a further period of three months.

3. Mr. S. Moosa, Deputy Superintendent Money Order Office, invalided and pensioned on the 30th April, died on the 30th May.

ments.

4. Among the remainder of the Staff there were nine resignations and 3 new appoint- In Shanghai, there were 4 resignations and two new appointments. Mr. W. J. Solly, Postmaster, Shanghai, was granted 12 months leave from 7th June and his leave has since been extended for a further period of six months. During his absence Mr. J. C. Kaye acted as Postmaster and Mr. Sirdar Khan, Senior Marine Officer, Hongkong, was tem porarily transferred to the Shanghai Office.

MAILS.

5. The number of mail ba ;s and packets dealt with in the General Post Office, Hongkong, amounted to 204,289 an increase of 39,148 compared with the previous year. Further details are given in Table I.

REGISTRATION AND PARCEL BRANCH.

6. Registered articles and parcels handled in Hongkong amounted to 805,503 a decrease of 50,912, compared with the previous year. Fürther details are given in Table

IL

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

7. A statement of Revenue and Expenditure is given in Table III. Revenue amounted to $412,431.60 showing a decrease of $32,989.32 due largely to the decreased rates of postage brought in by the Rome Postal Convention.

8. Table IV shows a comparative statement of the sale of postage stamps at the various British Postal Agencies in China for the years 1907 and 1908. Table V shows the number of stamps of different denominations issued for sale during the years 1907 and 1908. Table VI shows a statement of Revenue and Expenditure for the last nine years.

MONEY ORDERS.

9. Consequent on the depression in trade throughout last year the Money Order business has been correspondingly diminished in nearly all countries except that from the Gerne Possession in Oceana which was double that of 1907. There was a falling off of about £5,000 in the issue of sterling orders and a decrease of £7,000 in the inward orders. The latter is accounted for by the reduction of Japanese Colonists in Queenslan and thereby reducing the amount drawn on Japan by 50,000 Yens and on the other hand, sterling Postal Orders have remained stationary with the sales of 1907. The paid orders have greatly increased by 67%, and local postal orders have also increased by 32%. Further details are given in Table VII.

DEAD LETTERS.

10. The total number of all articles sent to the Dead Letter Office at Hongkong and despatched from that office during the year 1908 amounted too 99,241, vic., 48,924 of the former and 50,317 of the latter showing an increase of 20,019 on the total of the previous year.

Of the letters etc. returned from abroad it was possible to return to senders 15,567 and of the locally addressed, 2,821. The increase is chiefly owing to the large amount of lottery circulars which are prohibited to pass through the Post. Further details are shown in Table VIII.

D 2

11. Enclosed in 38 unregistered returned letters, there were found articles of value viz., money to the total value of £36. 0. 8 in notes, cheques or drafts and also one large document. These when possible were subjected to registration and returned to the senders.

12. 246 Chinese letters were found to contain coins-49 of them were returned to senders. 182 post cards bearing the imitation of postage stamps addressed to the United Kingdom were withdrawn from the mails as the regulations of that country prohibit their being forwarded. In only a few cases could return to senders be made. 37 ordinary Picture post cards and 3 letters were posted without address.

PILLAR BOXES.

13. The total number of articles collected during the year from all pillar boxes was 161,933 against 168,496 in 1907 and 122,899 in 1906, showing a decrease of 6,563 in the total of the previous year. Special Postmen are detailed to clear these letter boxes.

CHINESE BRANCH.

14. The total number of Chinese registered articles delivered by the Chinese Branch at the General Post Office was 187,090 of which 123,102 were from United States of America and Canada, and 63,988 from China and other countries showing a total increase, compared with the year 1907, of 24,170. The amount of the ordinary correspondence dealt with has also largely increased.

year.

POSTAL HONG LICENCES.

15. 38 Postal Hong licences and 95 licences to letter carriers were issued during the

i he latter number shows a decrease of 25 letter carrier licences.

WESTERN BRANCH POST OFFICE.

16 The amount of correspondence sent between this Branch Office and Canton was :- Despatched 578,453 letters, 4,395 other articles and 7,659 registered articles; Received 741,006 letters, >,592 other articles, and 4,309 registered articles. In comparison with previous years the figures show a large increase of correspondence handled by this Branch. In addition to the above 13,034 Hong Packets were despatched and 18,529 received by this Branch. The revenue from the sale of stamps amounted to $72,174.10 compared with $43,928.38 in the previous year.

TORN COVERS.

17. The number of articles received with covers torn off amounted to 1,423, of which 337 were afterwards forwarded to destinations.

4th May, 1909.

C. Mcl. Messer,

Postmaster General.

D 3

Table I.

MAILS DESPATCHED AND RECEIVED during 1908.

To and from Hongkong.

For H. M. Ships.

For Foreign Fleet.

Sent in transit through Hongkong.

Steamers carrying

Mails.

Loose

Bags.

Packets. Letter

Bags.

Bags.

Bags and Packets.

Boxes.

Arrivals. Departures

Boxes.

է

Received, 1908,

110,797

1,179 2,828

283

144

Received, 1907,

80,317

3,096 2,063

7,630

5,091

7,339 13,650

Increase,

30.480

763

Decrease,

1,917

7,347

4,047

6,311

Despatched, 1908,

84,382

7,931

2,645 1,765

1.372

40,812

335

Despatched, 1907,

74,379

7,331

1,486

6.994

6.597

55.395

7,830

14,760 14,270

Increase,

10,003

€00

1.159

490

Decrease,

5,229

5,225

14.583

7,195

Table II.

STATISTICS OF INTERNATIONAL LOCAL AND AGENCIES REGISTERED

CORRESPONDENCE AND PARCELS FOR 1908.

International & Local.

Comparison with 1907.

Total

Total

Description of Correspondence.

1908. 1907.

Des- patched.

Received.

Increase. Decrease.

1

Insured Letters,

462

Registered Articles,

370,730

606 I 322,891

1,068

706

362

693,621 | 745,349

51,729

Insured Parcels viâ Gibraltar,

1,872

1,857

3,729

3,622

107

Insured Parcels viâ Brindisi,

79

157

236

231

5

Insured Parcels viâ Marseilles,

327

327

313

14

Ordinary Parcels via Gibraltar,

11,423

13,376

24,799

28,174

3,375

Ordinary Parcels viâ Brindisi,

144

444

588

602

14

Ordinary Parcels viâ Marseilles,

1,105

1,105

1,031

74

American, Manila and Honolulu Parcels,

1,639

2,957

4,596

4,668

72

German Parcels by German Steamers,

354

1,814

2,168

2,299

131

French Parcels received by French Steamers,.

929

929

958

29

Indian Insured Parcels,...

960

536

Indian Ordinary Parcels,

1,389

1,996

Australian Parcels,

1,002

555 72,337 68,162

3,875

Japan Parcels,

1,975

Miscellaneous Parcels,

44,453

1,691 17,780

436,482

369,021

805,503 856,415

4,437 | 55,349

Parcels received for China Fleet,. Parcels, Shanghai and Agencies,

Registered Articles, Shanghai,..

Registered Articles, Other Agencies,

2,266 2,266 2,267 23,854 18,369 42,223 34,281 7,942 53,248 32,341 85,589 80,490 5,099 4,365 10,208 14,573 5,053 9,520

.....

1

(Exclusive of Articles also passing

through Hongkong),

81,467

63,184 144,651 122,091

22,561

1

Grand Total for 1908-950,154; decrease of 28,352 against 1907.

D 4

Table III.

REVENUE AND EXPENDIture.

Receipts.

1907.

1908

Increase.

Decrease.

Expenditure.

1907.

1908. Increase. Decrease.

$

$

$

Sale of Stamps,

Hongkong,

289,189 26 260,940.23

1

28,249.03

Carriage of Mails.-

Transit Pay-

Do.,

at the

Agencies,

114,861.67 110,993.23

3,868.44

ments,

$

51,843.82 74,117.12

22,273 30

Gratuities to

Unpaid Postage,

5:375.37

4,582,44

792.93

Shipmasters, }

4,091.38 3,852.05

239.33

Boxholders' Fees,

7,601 20 7,453,00

148.20

Commission on

Money Orders, etc.,

14,045 11

16,393.36

2,348.25

Contribution

towards P. & O. Sub- sidy,....

116,430.19 94,124-35

22,305.84

Commission on

Profit

on

change on Money Order

Transactions,

Ex-

Money Orders,

1,962 27

1,562.77

399 50

12,781.98 10.675.25

:

2,106.73

Working Ex-

penses,

192.124.81 197,829.88 5,705.07

Interest

on

Money Order

1,458.43

1,001.01

Fund,

Void

Money Orders and Postal Notes,

107.90 393.08

285 18

457.42

!

Total Receipts, 445,420.90 412,431 60

2,633.43 35,622.75 Total Expenditure, 366,452.47 371,486.17 27,978-37 22,944 67

Total,

..$ 445,420.92 | 412,431,60

*

Profit,

78,968.45

40,945-43

Total,

445,420 92 412,431.60

Due to fall in Exchange, and further statistics of Trans-Siberian mail charges.

Fourth quarterly payment for 1908 not made by Crown Agents.

Table IV.

Shanghai,.

Amoy,

REVENUE FROM THE SALE OF POSTAGE STAMPS, &C., AT THE BRITISHI POST OFFICES IN CHINA: 1907 AND 1908.

1907.

1908.

$ 65,063.42 $ 65,553.24

9,960.49* 5,829.00

Canton,

10,827,37

10,691.49

Chefoo,

1,609.71

1.734.22

Foochow,

4,783.67

4,801,79

Hankow,

3.925.03

3,777.73

Hoihow,

1,202.33

1,199.78

Lin Kung Tau,

4,424.51

5,440.75

Ningpo,..

527.33

470.41

Swatow,

6,374 50

5,848.52

Tientsin,

6,163.31

5,646.30

$114,861.67 $110,993.23

Of this amount $2,771.42 was in respect of sales during the year 1906.

- D 5

Table V.

POSTAGE STAMPS, etc., issued for SALE in HONGKONG and at the British Post Offices in CHINA during the years 1907 and 1908.

Denomination.

1907.

1908.

Increase + Decrease

Postage Stamps,

1-cent.

426.000

653,276

227.276

2-cents.

2,330,880

2,639,996

309,116

4

2,414,160

2,646,216

"

232,056

879,600

""

1,512,876

633,276

6

17,760

77,756

59,996

8

87,600

92,156

4,556

10

1,108,560

1,100,396

8,164

12

31,440

25,676

5,764

20

139,642

103,196

36,446

30

67,680

56,876

10,804

50

62,520

64.396

1,576

1-dollar.

44,581

40,556

4,025

2-dollars.

18,148

19,446

1,298

3

5,600

4,706

894

5

2,420

2,456

36

10

2,870

2,606

264

Books of Stamps,

I-dollar.

6,075

7,475

1,400

Post Cards,

1-cent.

26,251

32,796

6,545

2-cents.

620

316

4

18,900

14,736

204 4,164

8

450

116

Newspaper Wrappers,

2

1,325

11,166

528

1,346

Postage Envelopes,

925

546

1,620

8,223

2,622 8,742

200

242

200

292

Registration Envelopes,

11

11,070

10,535

+++++ |

331

9,841

818

379

1,002

517

42

92

535

Table VI.

REVENUE and EXPENDITURE of the POST OFFICE for the years 1900 to 1908.

Year.

Total Revenue.

Total Expenditure.

Profit.

Percentage of Expen- diture to Revenue.

C.

S

.e.

%

1900

325,603.33

1901

355,912.74

1902

387,066.19

235,263.08 273,685.51 316 240.12

90,340.25

72.25

82,227.23

76.89

70,826.07

81.70

1903

414,867.20

334,177,40

80,689.80

80.55

1904

408,458.92

316,756.56

91,702.36

77.54

1905

414,838.19

585,449,25

* 170,611.06

141-12

1906

420,454.04

359,484.08

60,969.96

85.49

1907

445,420.92

366,452.47

78,968.45

82.27

1908

412,431.60

371,486.17

40,945.43

90.07

* Deficit.

!

Table VII.

MONEY ORDER TRANSACTIONS DURING 1907 AND 1908.

1903.

1907.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Country.

Orders issued.

Orders Paid.

Orders issued.

Orders paid.

Orders issued.

Orders paid:

Orders issued.

Orders paid.

S. d.

United Kingdom,. Queensland,..... New South Wales,.

Victoria,

13,160 8

102 3 9

£

17,107 5

13,199 14

d.

9

£ S. d.

17,400 2 1

103 18 2

£ S. d.

17,277 18

18,778 8 6

£

S. d.

£

S.

d.

£

S. d.

£

S.

d.

4

811 7 3

2,819 12 10

998 13

3,040 19 10

4,23) 13 11

1 14 5

187 6 6

5,578 14

221 7 0

170 12 7

ة

342 15 10

1,640 17 9

582 19

1,690 1 7

240 3

49 3 10

South Australia,..

103 14 8

1,283 16 11

128 15

1,646 17

3

25 0

363

0

Tasmania,

New Zealand,

Western Australia,

53 18 3

307 15 0

111 2 5

470 7 5

47 18 8

1,401 5 2

376 9 11

2,981 10

9

93 11 7

443 2 11

1,170 1 11 3,236 13 9

5 19 7

25 4 6

231 3 3

68 14 11

17 10 10

305 3

0

Transvaal,

3 13

0

752 I 2

4 19 9

797 17 5

1 6 9

35 16 3

Cape Colony,

5 15

4

85 I 8

3 9 6

167 4 9

2 5 10

82 3 1

United States of America,.

1,049 3 0

3,441 13 5

1,069 6 7

4,192 3 3

Canada,

408 5 11

1,276 6 0

290 7 1

2,425 8 I

117 18 7

Japan,

21,131 16 7

8,646 18 9

26,210 14 5

4,666 13 2

3,980 5 7

20 3 7

5,075 17 10

750 9 10

1,149 2

1

Straits Settlements,

772 15 9

1,684 4 1

465 8 3

2,176 4 1

307 7 6

Federated Malay States,.

58 17 5

1,393 14 9

24 14 9

1,603 17

British North Borneo,

3 15 0

322 16 11

18 14 10

8

683 9 4

34 2 8

492 0 0

210 2 11

14 19 10

860 12 5

·

Sarawak,.

158 18 1

158 18 1

......

Siam,.

30 12 2

54 1 1

9 12 0

Macao,..

Kiautschou,.

102 2 9

223 8 6

19 18 0

Shanghai,

Base Post Office,

India,.

Ceylon,

Germany,

13,795 13 6 223 17 6 1,304 16 2

Agencies in China,.

7,263 12 2

77 4 7

2,545 7 11 4,044 15 5

5 1 10

9,461 2 7 399 0 2 6,119 14 7

17,927 8 9 276 12 0 1,567 16 10

24 14 11 10,171 2 8 314 6 10 3,100 14 5

109 15 0

15 0 1

5,882 16 8

66 14

184 4 7

49 15 8

2,680 5 0

4,472 16

21 0 2

12 13 4

4 17 11

1,380 15 6

42 3 11

27 8 11

7 12 3

....

134 17 1 428 1 0

19 13 1

84 13 4

3,019 0 2

4,141 15 3

52 14 6

263 0 8

710 0 1

D 6 -

61,160 19 7

81,599 2 2

73,609 5 3

85,103 16 9

1,891 18 7

7,568 17 9

14,340 4 3

11,073 12 4

D 7

Table VIII.

BRITISH POSTAL ORDERS ISSUED AND PAID AT HONGKONG AND AT THE AGENCIES IN CHINA.

ORDERS ISSUED.

VALUES.

AMOUNT.

s. d. 0/6

s. d. 1/-

s. d. s. d.

1/5

2/6

s. d. 5/-

s. d. 10,-

s. d. 10,6

s. d. 20/-

£

s. d.

Total in 1908,

Total in 1907,

914 2,766 2,058 2,222 3,313 3,527

701 8,49412,046 16 6

952 2,9442,169 2,132 3,216 3,983

736

7,982 11,764 1 6

ORDERS PAID.

No.

Amount.

Total in 1908,

Total in 1907,

6,980

£ S. d. 5,457 10 6

4,314

3,269

4 9

Table IX.

STATEMENT OF LOCAL POSTAL NOTES ISSUED AT HONGKONG AND AT THE AGENCIES IN CHINA.

VALUES.

25 cts. 50 cts. $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $10.00

AMOUNT.

cts.

Total in 1908,..

Total in 1907,..............

426 518 402 489 561

354 470 375 408 461

828 1,378

536 1,113 1,906 30,197 50

515

22,877 50

D8

Table X.

DEAD LETTERS RECEIVED AND DESPATCHED IN THE DEAD LETTER BRANCH.

RETURNED TO HONGKONG.

RETURNED BY HONGKONG.

PLACES..

Letters. Post Cards.

Other Articles.

Letters.

Post Cards. Other

Articles.

United Kingdom,

2,816

814

292

2,761

357

9,634

India,

968

41

125

3,134

748

501

Straits Settlements,

4,915

50

184

3,175

111

1,189

Ceylon,

152

14

5

75

26

19

Batavia, N.I.,..

126

1

622

302

43

74

Egypt,....

33

6

6

92

27

71

Continent of Europe,

1

1,173

335

3,589

U. S. of America,

3,402

312

129

1,541

191

2,168

Canada,

451

34

16

274

25

257

Mexico,

283

4

36

Honolulu,

194

5

1

Manila,

171

24

5

319

56

88

Japan,

393

172

182

508

210

177

China,

7,971

75

1,865

13,326

288

$39

French Indo-China,

124

2

787

10

71

Foreign Offices in China,

306

27

27

Macao,...

1

41

260

8

Siam,

810

2

1

84

20

4

Victoria,

132

25

13

83

!

54

New South Wales,.

107

26

7

166

23

72

South Australia,

24

1

2

23

!

9

9

Queensland,

45

11

10

45

20

Western Australia,

84

7

16

26

23

Tasmania,

12

1

5

8

3

New Zealand,.

53

12

15

76

25

Natal (inclusive of South Africa),

150

14

Transvaal,

251

22

8

:

:

Other Places............

2,857

673

4,713

124

10

5

Shanghai B. P. O.,

3,139

442

7,181

Other B. P. O.s in China,.

550

58

544

Total in 1908,

30,065

2,834

Total in 1907,

23,969

2,899

16,025 28,818 10,486 22,417

2,558 2,636

18,941

16,815

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER.

1. Shipping.

2. Trade.

3. Revenue and Expenditure.

4. Steam-launches.

5. Emigration and Immigration.

6. Registry of Shipping.

7. Marine Magistrate's Court. 8. Marine Court.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

REPORT.

9. Examination of Masters, Mates and

Engineers.

10. Examination of Pilots.

11. Sunday Working Cargo. 12. New Territories.

13. Commercial Intelligence, Board of

Trade.

TABLES.

I. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels entered at each Port. IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared at each Port.

V. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. VI. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared. VII. Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Summary of arrivals and departures of all vessels.

X. Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XI. Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII. Statement of Revenue.

XIV. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer (Summary).

XV. Return of Emigration.

XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

XVII. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of China

(Summary).

XVIII. Return of Immigration.

XIX. Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

XX. Vessels registered.

XXI. Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII. Comparison in Number and Tonnage of vessels in Foreign Trade entered and

cleared since 1899.

XXIII. Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

XXIV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

APPENDICES.

A. Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B. Report on Import and Export Office. C. Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D. Report on Gunpowder Depôt.

E. Report on Lighthouses.

1.-Shipping.

1. The total of the Shipping entering and clearing in the Colony during the year 1908 amounted to 532,078 ships of 34,614,335 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1907, show an increase of 24,478 ships, and a decrease of 1,413,069 tons.

13

E 2

Foreign

British River Steamers

""

Foreign

,,

19

9.2. 13.8

2.9"

>>

Of this total 45,437 ships of 22,306,037 tons were engaged in Foreign trade, and were distributed as follows:-

1908.

1907.

British Ocean vessels represented 8.3% in numbers and 33.7% in tonnage. 31.4%

33.5 20.1

33.2

"

""

"1

91

19.2.

"

""

59

""

>>

3.3",

3.2

""

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons Trading Junks

8.9

0.8

0.3

""

}}

""

56.9",

9.8

11.5

"

"J

19

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

The movements of Fishing junks are not included in these figures.

2. Seven thousand seven hundred and fifty (7,750) steamers, eleven (11) sailing ships, and two thousand and thirty (2,030) steamships not exceeding 60 tons, in Foreign trade, entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 26.8, as compared with 24.8

in 1907.

3. The average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the Port has again increased, from 2,325.3 tons to 2,443.6 tons. That of British vessels has increased from 2,552.2 tons to 2,593.06 tons, while that of Foreigners has increased from 2,136.8 tons to 2,309.9 tons.

In this connection, it is interesting to note that, during the past 20 years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the Colony has risen from 1,186.9 tons to 2,448.6 tons.

The average tonnage of River steamers entered during 1908 was 665.5 tons as against 661 tons in 1907. British River steamers have increased in average tonnage from 678 tons to 686.5 tons, while Foreigners have again decreased, from 567 tous to 565.2 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1907 and 1908 is given in the following table :-

:--

1907.

1908.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessel.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

3,756

going,

Foreign Ocean-

4,621

7,216,169 | 3,869 | 7,505,270

7,720,875 4,132 7,397,836

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

113 289,101

489 323,039

going,

British River

6,828

4,630,364 6,246 | 4,287,182

582 342,882

Steamers,

Foreign River

1,310

743,992 1,297

733,065

13 10,927

Steamers,..

Steamships un-

der 60tons(Fo-

1,581

70,021 | 4,060

181,142 2,479 111,121

reign Trade).

Trade,

Steam-launches

Junks in Foreign 29,564 2,651,470 25,833

Total,.

plying in waters of the Colony,

47.660 23,032,891 45,437 22,306,037| 2,592| 400,222 | 4,815 |1,127.076

419,202 11,216,532 | 445,724 | 10,460,682 26,522

755,$50

2,201,242

3,731 450,228

*

Junks in Local Į

*

+

Trade,

40,772

1,778,887 40,951 1,848,522 179 69,635

Grand Total,...] 507,634 | 36.028,310 | 532,112 | 34,615,241 |29,293 469.857 | 4.815|1,882.926

NETT,.

24.478

1,413,069

* Including 18,090 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 820,958 tons. Including 16,808 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 862,256 tons.

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean shipping, entered and cleared during the year, of 113 ships of 289,101 tons. This increase appears to indicate a very consider- able revival of trade during the last quarter of the year after the general depression; for in each of the first three quarters decreases were shown as compared with the corresponding periods of 1907.

British River steamers are shown to have decreased by 582 entries and clearances with a collective tonnage of 342,882 tons. This decrease is due to the loss of two large, regularly running, steamers, the "Powan" and "Yingking", and the withdrawal of a third, the "Hoi Sang", from the run, during the year.

- E 3

Foreign Ocean vessels have decreased by 489 ships of 323,039 tons. This decrease is general, but is most noticeable under the Norwegian, Japanese, and German flags, and may undoubtedly be attributed to the general trade depression throughout the world.

Foreign River steamers show a falling off of 13 ships of 10,927 tons, which is due to the laying up of several of these vessels after the typhoon of July 27, in which they were damaged. Had it not been for this, the numbers and tonnage would have been consider- ably in excess of those for 1907.

The typhoon may also be held responsible for the decrease in Junks in Foreign Trade, combined with the effects of the trade depression, which certainly has reacted upon junk traffic as it has upon shipping.

The increase shown in Steamships under 60 tons is due to the inclusion of un- licensed, privately owned, steam-launches, which have not previousiy figured in the returns.

6. It may not be out of place to draw a comparison here between these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 1888, 2,614 British ships of 3,265,751 tons entered the port, against 10,115 ships of 11,792,752 tons in 1908. For Foreign ships the figures are, in 1888, 1,206 ships of 1,252,862 tons and in 1908, 5,429 ships of 8,130,901 tons. These figures are those for Ocean and River steamers, which were not distinguished in 1888, and Ocean sailing ships (not junks).

7. The actual number of individual Ocean Vessels of European Construction entering during 1908 was 745, being 365 British and 380 Foreign. The figures in 1907 were respectively 800, 362, and 438.

These 745 ships aggregated 1,824,237 tons. They entered 3,991 times and gave a collective tonnage of 7,452,498 tons. Thus compared with 1907, 55 fewer ships of 36,008 less tons, entered 191 fewer times and gave a collective tonnage decreased by 15,013 tons.

Thus-

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1907. 1908. | 1907. | 1908.

1907.

1908.

Steamers... 355

3581,867 1,923 3,586,510|3,730,927

British

Sailing

7

7

9

10

19,431

21,697

Austrian,

9

9

30

25

106,523

97,789

Belgian,

1

1

1

1

2,903

2,903

Chinese,

20

16

214

229

267,789 291,416

Corean,

2

14

21,298

Danish,

9

6

21

15

41,122 34,211

Dutch,

18

15

69

97

142,100 201,014

French,

33

39

202

169

294,461 289,222

German,

137

129

790

745 1,246,053)1,188,100

Italian,..

3

4

12

12 31,704

31,400

Japanese,.

111

93

534

434 1,126,5171,049,540

Norwegian,

59

39

290

181

265,728 192,278

Portuguese,

2

5

59

87

19,128

23,487

Russian,

10

7

13

13

30,912

34,326

Swedish,

3

3

11

11

12,970

18,099

Urited Steamers.

20

13

45

38

251,590 245,280

States Sailing...

1

1

1

1

72

809

Total,

800

745 4,182 3,991 7,467,5117,452,498

E 4

OCEAN SHIPPING 1908: 1ST JANUARY TO 31ST DECEMBER.

(a.)-STEAMERS.

No. of

British.

Foreign.

Total.

En-

tries. No. Voyages.

Tons.

Total Tons. No.

Voyages.

Tons. Total Tons. No. Voyages.

Tons.

Total Tons.

1224 1067∞

92

92

254,563

254,563 98

98

219,047

219,047 190

190

473,610 473,610

888

80

160

238,919

477,838 61

122

170,296

340,592 141

282 | 409,215) 818,430

46

138

145,461

436,383 30

90

72,323

216,969 76

228 217,784| 653,352

27

108

87,151

348,604 | 45

180

138,771

555,084 72

288

18

90 44,696

223,480 22

110

82,411

452,055 40

200

225,922 903,688 125,107|635,535

9

54 19,093

114,558 16

96

44,808

268,848 25 150

63,901 383,406

8

56

12,068

84,476 14

98

25,865

181,055 22 154

37,933 265,531

8

16

128

25,069

200,552 21

168

38,082

9

11

99

23,903

215,127 23

207

32,843

10

11

110

27,474

274,740 9

90

10,428

11

4

44

4,425

48,675

66

7,622

304,656 37 295,587 34 306 104,200 20 83,842 10

296

200

63,151 505,218 56,746 510,714 37,902 379,020

110

12,047

132,517

12

36

3,882

46.584 3

36

3,882

46,584*

13

5

65

6,386

83,018

26

2,467

32,071

91 '

8,853|

115,089

14

28

2,523

35,322

42

2,637

36,918

5

70

5,160

72,240

15

15

999

14,985

3

45

5,559

83,985

60

5,698

98,970

16

17

18

19

2 – 2 N

32

2,411

38,576

1

16

1,216

19,456

48

3,627

58,032

17

1,517

25,789

17

952

16,184

34

2,469

41,973

36

2,771

49,878

36

2,771

49,878

2

38

2,088

39,672

2

38

2,088

39,672

20

4

80

2,683

53,660

80

2,683

53,660

21

21

739

15,519 1

21

739

15,519

22

1

22

1,017

23,034

44

1,393

35,046 3

66

2,640

58,080

23

1

23

1,143

26,289

1

23

1,222

28,106 2

46

2,365

54,395

24

***

4

96

2,751

66,024

96

2,751

66,024

25

4

26

27

42

100 5,128 104

128,200

...

100

5,128

128,200

5,311

138,096 1

26

702

5 18,252

130

6,013

156,338

54 2,602

70,254 3

81

2,285

61,695

135

4,887

131,949

30

30 1,307

39,210

··

قسم

1

30

1,307

39,210

32

2

64

2,780

88,960

2

64

2,780

88,960

33

1

33

1,339

44,187 1

33

1,339

44,187

34

2

68

2,450 83,300

2

68

2,450

83,300

35

2

70

2,652

92,960

35

1.536

53,760

3

105

4,188 146,720

36

36

1,468

52,848 1

36

1,468 52,848

37

1 37

1,306

48,322 1

37

217

8,029 2

74

1,523

56,351

38

38

1,177

41,726 1

38

1,177

44,726

41

1

41

636 26,076

1

41

636 26,076

Total

Steamers,.

358 1,923 927,883 3,730,927 379 2,057 876,961 3,699,065 737 3,980 1,806,8447,429,992

|

(4.)- SAILING VESSELS.

12

ظرون

4

3

46

11,471 6 5,113 10,226

11,471

1

1

809

809 5

3

5 12,280 12,280 6 5,113 10,226

Total

Sailing, J

7

10

16,594 21,697 1

1

809

809

00

8

11

17,393 22,506

Grand

365 1,933 946,467 3,752,624 380 2,058 877,770 3,699,874745 3,991 1,824,2377,452,498

8. The 365 British vessels carried 3.570 British Officers and 15 Foreign Officers, the latter consisting of 10 U.S.A., 2 Norwegians and 3 Dutch.

Thus the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British vessels was 0.41 % com- prising 3 nationalities. A decrease of 0.03 % with an increase in number of Officers and Ships.

E 5

The 380 Foreign vessels carrid 2,660 Officers of whom 141 were British as follows:-

In Chinese vessels,

Dutch French

21

""

11

German

>>

""

33

Japanese

>>

United States,

11

1908.

1907.

69

64

2

6

3

3

3

54

58

13

18

141

152

BRITISH CREWS.

Thus 5.3 % of the Officers serving in Foreign vessels visiting the Port were of British nationality. An increase of 0.70 % with a decrease in number of Ships and Officers.

9. The Nationality of the Crews in British and Foreign Vessels was as follows:-

VESSELS.

ASIATICS.

U. S. A. and EUROPEANS.

1907. 1908. 1907. 1908.

1907.

1908.

1907. 1908.

British,

Foreign,

362 365 22,976 23,755

438 380 1,699 1,536

638

29,721

417115,308 118,278

|

27,446 115,474 109,818

Total,

800

745 24,675

25,201 30,359

|

27,863 230,782 228,096

Hence in British vessels :-

And in Foreign vessels :-

1907, 1908.

1907. 1908.

16.5

16.67% of the crews were British.

1.2

0.5

0.29% of the crews were Other

Europeans.

20.2

1.2% of the crews were British.

19.7 % of the crews were Other

Europeans.

83.0

83.03% of the crews were Asiatic.

78.6

79.1% of the crews were Asiatics.

2.-Trade.

10. Hongkong being a free port there are no reliable statistics of other Imports and Exports except as regards certain items of cargo, dealt with in the Colony, of which, either from their nature and the circumstances under which they are imported, or from the fact that they are required by law to be specially reported, substantially accurate returns can be given. These items are Coal, Kerosene oil (which includes all products of petroleum), Opium, Morphine, Compounds of Opium, and Sugar. The figures for the three latter will be found in Appendix B.

1,018,753 tons of Coal were imported during the year. This shows a practically negligible increase of 13,886 tons (1.3%) over the Imports during 1907.

1

Of Bulk Oil 61,818 tons arrived, an increase of 17,938 tons, or 40.8 %. This appears to have no special significance, but to be entirely due to the cheap freights ruling, and to the new installation, by the Standard Oil Co., of oil tanks at Lychee-kok, which required filling. 40,018 tons of Case Oil arrived, being an increase of 3,289, or 8.9%, over the 1907 figures. Here, again, the cheap freights were taken advantage of to fill up stocks.

Liquid Fuel, increased from 3,272 tons in 1907 to 13,832 tons in 1908, and was probably affected by the same causes as were Bulk and Case Oil, in addition to which, there has been an increased demand for this product, owing to more steamers using liquid fuel having visited the Colony during the year.

E 6

The import of Rice appears to have declined from 956,000 tons to 721,000 tons, due to the falling off in the rice trade from Saigon and Bangkok in consequence of the exceptionally good crop in Northern and Central China, with the result that prices at Shanghai and the Yangtse ports ruled considerably lower than in Siam and Annam. Local dealers naturally bought in the cheaper market, and there was no demand for Southern rice. At Bangkok, I understand, there was the further factor of a species of boycott instituted by the rice merchants against the N. D. L. Steamers (late Scottish Oriental) which do all the carrying trade between that port and this Colony. As the greater part of the rice imported here is re-exported by sea to ports in China other than Canton, and the majority of that so imported last year came froin China itself, it is reasonable to presume that, in the absence of the usual supply of Siamese and Annamnese rice in this Colony, those where Chinese ports which usually draw their supplies here went to the North for their rice, a superabundance was available at very moderate prices. The Rice trade from the South having now reverted to its usual conditions, I see no reason to doubt that this year will see it restored to its former channels,-i.e., viâ this Colony.

Flour appears to have decreased from 147,000 tons to 91,000 tons, probably due to the fact that the Colony is ceasing to be the distributing centre for this commodity. Ship- ments are now made directly from l'orts on the Pacific Coast of North America to Shang- hai, Amoy, Singapore, &c., instead of transhipping here, as heretofore.

There is a possibility that, the Hongkong Milling Company being in liquidation, some small recrudescence in this branch of trade may occur.

The total reported Imports during the year amounted to 4,170,000 tons, as against 4,366,000 tons in 1907, a decrease of 4.4 %. Exports also show a decrease, from 2,354,000 tons to 2.103,000 tons or 10.7 %, and transit cargo declined from 3,396,000 to 3,373,000 tons or 0.7 %, but for the reason given these figures are not reliable.

11. The number and tonnage of European and American constructed vessels carrying cargo for import and in transit compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1907.

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

4,172 7,448,008 3,980 7,429,992

River Steamers,...... 4,067 2,688,8853,770 2,510,896

192

|

18,016

297 177,989

Sailing Vessels,......

10

19,503

11

1 22,506

3,003

Total,..... 8,249 10,156,396 7,761 9,963,394 1

3,003

489

196,005

Nett,

:

:

488

193,002

-

í

E 7

12. The number and tonnage of European and American constructed vessels exporting cargo as shown and Bunker Coal compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1907.

1908.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

12

River Steamers,

Sailing Vessels,.....

4,183 | 7,444,856 | 4.001 7,430,882 4,071 | 2,685,471 3,773 | 2,509,651

24,677

9

Total, 8,266 10,155,004 7,783 9,960,259

,155,0

182

13,974

298

175,820

19,726

4,951

:

483

194,745

Nett,

483

194,745

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Bunker

Strs.

Strs.

Coal.

Bunker Coal,

Steamers,

River Steamers,.

4,183 .4,071

Total,...... 8,254

672,000 4,001 53,000 3,773

725,000 7,774

600,000

182

72,000

57,000

4,000

298

657,000

4,000

480 72,000

Nett,.....

480

68,000

13. The River trade in Imports, Exports and Passengers compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1907,.

1908,

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers,

351,000

363,000

307,000

288,000

2,225,982

1,929,436

14. The following shows the Junk trade of the Colony for the year :-

IMPORTS.

.12,956 junks measuring ......1,109,680 tons. ..20,567

"

929,238

29

......2,038,918

Foreign Trade, Local Trade,

Total,

..33,523

EXPORTS.

Foreign Trade, Local Trade,

12,877 junks measuring......1,091,562 tons.

20,384

""

""

Total,

33,261

919,284

...2,010,846

"

">

""

""

E 8

15. The following table gives a summary of the information with regard to the trade of the Port of Hongkong for the year 1903, so far as it is ascertainable from the voluntary returns rendered:-

TONS.

Passengers.

No. of Ships.

Emi-

Dis- charged.

grants.

Shipped.

In Transit.

Bunker Coal shipped.

Total.

Registered Tonnage.

Arrived. Departed.

British Ocean-going,

Foreign Ocean-going,

British River Steamers,

6,246

Foreign River Steamers,...

1,297

280,000 83,000

3,869 1,762,000 1,069,000 | 1,812,000 4,132 | 2,045,000 746,000 1,561,000

216,000 72,000

261,000 4,904,000

7,505,270

165,655

115,346 53,118

339,000

4,691,000

7,397,836

81,176

91,765

17,963

44,000 510,000

4,287,482

865,955

853,662

13,000 168,000

733,065

107,800

102,019

Total,........

Steam-ships under 60

tons, Foreign Trade....)

4,000

Junks, Foreign Trade,

25,833

15,544 | 4,170,000 | 2,103,000 | 3,373,000

4,060

4,000

416,000 597,000

657,000 10,303,000 | 19,923,653

1,220,586

1,162,792

71,081

6,000 14,000

181,142

30,367

27,044

1,013,000 2,201,242

53,674

46,412

Total Foreign Trade,

45,437 4,590,000 | 2,704,000

663,000 11,330,000 | 22.306,037

1,304,627 1,236,248

Steam-Launches, Local

Trade,

* 445,724

5,000

Junks, Local Trade,.

40,951

183,000

4,000

231,000

Total Local Trade,

486,675

188,000

238,000

...

Grand Total, 1908,

532,112

4,778,000 | 2,942,000 | 3,373,000

21

1907,

507,634 | 5,033,000 | 3,256,000 | 3,396,000

多多

41,000 | 10,460,682

417,000 1,848,522 52,487 49,883

32,000 458,000 12,309,201 2,868,706 1,876,776

695,000 11.788,000 34,615,241 4,173,333 3,113,024 71,081 759,000 12,444.000 36.028,310 6.057,869 5,299,743 105,967

* Not including "Star Ferry" Company's Craft.

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

16. The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $357,768.52 as against $348,300.10 collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $9,468.42:-

32,000

2,816,219 1,826,893

1907.

1908.

Increase. Decrease.

Light Dues,

$ 80,389.00 $ 79,975.68 $

$ 413.32

Licences and Internal Revenue, 116,122.40 Fees of Court and Office, Miscellaneous Receipts,

130,594.05

14,471.65

151,746.30

42.40

147,108.19 90.60

...

4,638.11

48.20

Total,... $348,300.10 $357,768.52 $ 14,519.85 $ 5,051.43

Net Increase,...$ 9,468.42

The amount of Light Dues collected was as follows:-

Class of Vessels.

Rate No. of per ton. Ships.

Tonnage.

Total Fees collected.

Steam-launches,

Ocean Vessels,

River Steamers, (Night Boats), River Launches, (Night Boats),

River Steamers, (Day Boats),. Free. River Launches, (Day Boats), Free.

1 cent 4,063

7,482,654

>>

""

""

820 2,350 171 1,420

31,842

$ 74,826.54

318.42

c.

1,439,130

4,797.98

9,806 1,071,766

32.74

724

37,950

Total,

9,548 10,073,148 79,975.68

The principal increases are under Boat Licences, $15,653.80; Medical Examination of Emigrants, $11,480.75; Fines, $3,761.10; Steam-launch Licences, $578.25; Survey of Steam-launches, $405; and Sale of Printed Forms, $219.75. The falling off in Revenue comes under the headings: Sunday Cargo Working Permits, $12,650; Junk Licences, $4,987.50; Storage of Gunpowder, $1,833.33; Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, $680.60; Registry Fees, $610; Examination of Masters, &c., $530; Fishing Stake and Net Licences, $469; Light Dues, $413.32; Sugar Certificates and Permits, $195; Private Moorings and Buoys, $150; Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, $90; and Survey of Steam- Ships, $77.68.

:

E 9

17. The expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1908 was $163,579.54, including $844.42 specially expended on Buoys, but not including Crown Agents' December Account paid this year. Compared with 1907, this shows on increase of $3,190.06.

4.-Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, there were 286 Steam-launches (including 8 Motor Boats) employed in the Harbour, of these, 140 were licensed for conveyance of passengers, &c., 128 were privately owned, 14 were the property of the Government and 4 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of Military Authorities.

Twelve Masters' Certificates were suspended for incompetency or negligence in the performance of their duty, 1 for 6 months, 3 for 4 months, 2 for 3 months, 2 for 2 months, and 4 for 1 month; 2 Masters' Certificates were cancelled, 2 were warned to be more careful in future and 1 was cautioned; 1 Engineer's Certificate was suspended for 3 months.

Five hundred and forty (540) engagements and Four hundred and eighty-six (486) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made during the year.

As in 1907, seven (7) Steam-launches were permitted to carry arms, &c., for their protection against pirates, these were all previously permitted.

5.- Emigration and Immigration.

19. Seventy-one thousand and eighty-one (71,081) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year, of these, 53,118 were carried in British ships and 17,963 in Foreign ships. These figures show a great falling off (from 105,967) of 34,886 Emigrants, or 32.9% compared with those for 1907.

It is difficult to account for this large decrease, but it was probably partly due to the general depression in trade which restricted the demand for labour and partly to the quaran- tine restrictions placed upon vessels from the Colony to other ports. The anti-Chinese feeling in certain parts of the world culminating in legislation against Asiatics, no doubt also had a deterrent effect upon emigration. But the chief causes undoubtedly were:

(1.) The cessation of Assisted Emigration to Banka and Billiton. This branch of the business was commenced only in 1907, and served to largely swell the figures for that year. The demand for labour in those islands was not very large, and all the plantations there were fully manned before the beginning of 1908.

(2.) The floods in Canton and up the West River checked recruiting during

the first six months of the year.

(3.) There was a considerable demand for labour on the several railways under

construction in China, which restricted the recruiting area.

157,809 returning emigrants were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports. as against 145,822 in 1907. This includes 106 returning from South Africa. Of the total number 116,094 arrived in British ships and 41,715 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, &c., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 18 ships were registered under the provisions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 10 Certificates of Registry were cancelled. 134 Documents, &c., were dealt with in connection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $699 ($1,309 in 1907).

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. Three hundred and twenty-five (325) cises were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court (145 in 1907). Breach of Harbour Regulations, Disobeying lawful orders of the Harbour Master, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Using steam-whistles for other purposes than of navigation, and Carrying excess of passengers were the principal offences.

8.-Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

22. The following Courts have been held during the year :-

On the 29th January, 1908, inquiry into the circumstances attending the stranding and loss of the British Steamship Yık Sang, Official number 115,824 of London. William Shadrach Thomas, number of whose Certificate of Competency is 1,392. Hongkong, was Master. The accident was due to a very abnormal set of current and the Officers' Certificates were not dealt with.

E 10

On the 23rd and 27th June, inquiry into the circumstances attending the loss of the British Steam-ship Pow On, Official number 68,387 of Hongkong, Henry Irwin Black, number of whose Certificate of Competency is 1,292, Hongkong, was Master. The Master was found guilty of a grave error of judgment (in keeping the engines at full speed when he was in any way uncertain of his position in thick weather), and he was severely reprimanded and the Second Mate reprimanded.

On the 11th August, inquiry into the circumstances attending the loss of the British Steamship Ying King, Official number 116,031 of Hongkong, Ernest James Page, number of whose Certificate of Competency is 491, New South Wales, was Master. The Master and about 420 others perished in the accident. The cause of the foundering was the Typhoon of July 27th.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers.

23. The following Tables show number of Candidates examined under Ordinance 10 of 1899, for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed:-

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

9

Master, River Steamer,.

1

First Mate,

13

Second Mate,

7

2120 10

3

5

Total,

30

10

First Class Engineer,

28

Second Class Engineer,.

51

10

NO

2

Total,

79

12

(For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons.)

Candidates.

For Master,......

For Engineer,

Total,

Passed.

Failed.

39

48

2

87

10

5

10.-Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

24. One examination for Pilot's Certificate was held during the year. One Licence was issued, 15 Licences were renewed.

11.-Sunday Cargo Working.

(Ordinance No. 1 of 1891.)

25. During the year 282 permits were issued under the provisions of this Ordinance - compared with 348 in 1907. Of these 117 were not used as it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday, and the fees in such cases were refunded. In one case the fee paid was refunded, although the permit was used, on account of bad weather having detained the ship, and in another case half the fee was refunded for the same reason.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $28,600 as against $41,250 in 1907. The general depression in Trade, already alluded to, being the obvious cause of the decrease.

- E 11

12.-New Territories.

(Tenth year of British Administration.)

26. The outstations attached to the Harbour Department, six in number, have continued to perform the work allotted to them, and, during the year, Licences, Port Clearances Permits, &c., have been issued by them as follows:--

Cheung Chau, opened 1899,

1908.

1907.

9,146

7,200

Tai 0,

""

1899,

4,901

3,622

Tai Po,

1900, on Police launch,

6,271

6,365

Deep Bay,

1901,

4,882

5,255

Sai Kung,

17

1902,

4,628 2,413

Long Ket,

1905,

""

""

3,580

4,101

Total,

33,408

28,956

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Territories during 1908 was $22,008.05 as compared with $20,910.00 in 1907.

13.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

27. Fifty-three (53) letters were received during the year from firms principally in Great Britain, requesting information upon various points connected with their respective businesses, asking to be placed in communication with local firms, or submitting samples or price lists. The replies to the several queries have been as full as the information, &c., at my disposal permitted, and wherever necessary, the name of the firm concerned, and the particular branch of trade indicated, have been published, from time to time, in the Government Gazette.

It is greatly to be regretted that no replies to or queries upon these publications in the Government Gazette have ever been received by me from local firms or individuals. Most of my correspondents send catalogues and price lists, and, in many cases, samples, of their goods. These catalogues and price lists cannot, of course, be published, but are open to inspection at any time during office hours by interested persons.

It may be that the publication of the names of the firms in correspondence with me has been productive of direct communication between the local and home firms, but of this I have no knowledge.

HARBOUR OFFICE,

1st March, 1909.

BASIL TAYLOR, Commander, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

TOTAL.

E 12

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED in

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Cochin China.

Continent of

Europe.

Formosa.

Great Britain.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

Tons,

[Crews,

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

goes,

Vessels,..

Tons,

48

9

27

2,814

105,965 14,796 88,801 2,276,002

Crews,...

3,058 687 4,853

135,213

Discharged,

97,000 23,000 | 21,000

470,000

Transit,

10,000

12,000

391,000

essels,.

:

:

:

67

11

88,418

3,861

127,000

7,000

a)

153

145

178

35,325 5,760 | 533,611 389,439 520,150

945 75 10,795 17,934 14,040

5,000 1,000 150,000| 227,000 273,000-

38,000 5,000 | 582,000 144,000 233,000

217

301,099

:

13,368

2

4,819

159

:

:

:

:

7

17,643

360

[Vessels,..

48

9

27

3,031

:

67

11

4

153

145

185

Tons,..

105,963 14,79688,804

2,577,101

88,448

TOTAL.

Car-

goes,

Crews,...

3,058 687 4,853

148,581

Discharged,

97,000 (23,000 | 21,000

470,000

Transit,

Vessels, ......

10,000

12,000

394,000

27

26

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

Tons,

58,948 31,898

:

Crews,...

2,579 1,299

goes,

Discharged,.

20,000 50,000

Transit,

11,000

251,000

35,325 | 10,579 | 533,641| 389,439 537,793

3,861 945 234 10,795 17,934 14,400

127,000 5,000

1,000 159,000 227,000 273,000

7.000 38,000 5,000 | 582,000 144,000 233.000

$66

851 7,917

83

142 79

64 346

822,173 42.518 633,725 SS,756 512,888 | 70,113 46,519 155,931|1,011,444

41,689 8,593 78,995 3,398 16,816 4,908

1,248 4,089 29,828

174,000

386.000 151,000

98,000 1000 19.000 97,000 636,000

7,000 463,000

50.000 177.000 409,000

13

Vessels....

Tons,.

Crews.......

Vessels..

58,948 31,898

:

:

:.

:

:

153,513 29,081 406,937

2

5

4

45

7.107

4.239

11,408

5,317 6,814 51,966

24

298

132

368

27

26

1,006 1,692 12,312

Tons,...

TOTAL.

Car-

Crews,....

2,579 | 1,299

's003

(Discharged,

20,000 50,000

Transit,

11,000

83

$6

975,686 71,599 1,040,662 88,756 512,033 | 77,220

47,006 15,437 1.30,961 3,398

171,000

386,000 151.000

251,000

7,000 463,000

144

13

69

350

46.519 160,170|1,022,852

16,840 5,206 1.248 4,221 30,196

98,000 14,000 19,000 97,000 636,000

Vessels..

75

35

27

150

153

81

50,000 177,000 409,000

166

209

524

140 841 4,395

Tons,...

Crews.....

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

goes,

3,680 851

164,913 46.694 88,804 | 3,098,175 | 42.518

5,637 1.986 4,853 176,902 8,593'

Discharged,. 117,000 73,000 | 21,000 614,000

Transit,

Vessels,....

Tons,.

Crews,...

(Vessels,.

Tons,..

Crews,...

goes,

21.000

:

:

12,000

645,000

7,917

633,725 177,204 548,213 75,873 580,160 545,370|1,531,594

78,995 7,259 17,761 4,983 12,043 22,023 43,868

386,000 278,000 | 103,000 15,000 178,000 234,000| 909,000

14,000 501,000 5,000 632,000 321,000 642,000

357 841 4,395

454,612 | 29,081

406,937

18.685 6.811 51,966

45 11,926

24 457

5

11

4,239

29,051

132

728

150

155

90

166

214

535

4,037 1,692 12,312

3.552,787|71,599 1,040,662 177,204 | 548,258|87,793| 580,160 549,609 1,560,615

195,587 15,437 130.961 7,259 17,785 5,440 12,043 22,153 44,596

641,000

386,000 278,000 | 103,000 | 15,000 178,000 324,000 909,000

12,000 615,000

14,000 501,000 5,000 | 632,000 321,000 642,000

75 35

27

Transit,

161,913 46,691 88,804|

5,637 1,986 4,853

Discharged,. 117,000 73,000 21,000

21,000

India and

Straits

Settlements.

Japan.

E 13

the COLONY of HONGKONG from EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1908.

| Java and other|

Islands in

Archipelago. the Indian

Kwangchau-

wan.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

927

:

to

Ships.

Macao.

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao.

Junks.

Macao.

Mauritius.

America. North

North and

Pacific.

South

Philippine Islands.

Hainan and

Ports in

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Port Arthur.

Russia in Asia.

53

88,968

740,949

2,887

34,236

128,000

$3,000

29,000

:

:

:

:

Siam.

America.

South

South Africa.

Tsintau.

of America.

United States

TOTAL.

1

3

188

93

6

3

7

1

1

76

4,814

1,640 2,386 | 250,516| 116,835| 6,726| 3,630

53

66 13,266

3,000

5,757

363

81,000 181,000 3,000 1,000

182

59

9,133| 2,316| 2,874| 3,301, 255,944 | 5,543,748

310 73

15,000

51 4,759 253,523

6,000

7,000

71,000 6 000 5,000

:

132,000 2,010,000

261,00 1,813,000

1

1,042

39

53

88,968

:

928

7+1,991

:

2,887

34,275

128,000

93,000

:

29,000

:.

T

52 100

138

327

316 1

:

:.

:

:

:

3,159 4,139

$8,000 9,000

98,003 33,324 23,395 18,589 |45,723 | 895

1,766 6,999 3,638 | 39

20,000 4,000 |31,000

74,000 2,000

:

:

:

174

158 13,504

3,000

6,000

7,000 71,000 6,000 5,000

1

4

249

221

:.

:

107

4,083 197,567 7.444 14,178 242,016

41

121 9,746 261 409 12.170

2,000

261,000 7.000 9,000 || 384,000

:

2,000

82,000 5,000 1,000 |

2,000

1

1

1

3,361 1,776 8.438

2,183

121

92

238

46

:

:

1

3.076 3,875

44

128

1

239

2,426

351,733

:

63 14,658

13

4

193

94

6

3

2

5,001 4,362 258,954 119,018 6,726 3,630

363 5,803

81,000 181,000| 3,000 1,000

182

5,033

9,133 5,392 8,749 | 3,301| 258,370 5,895,486

310 117 187 51 4,822 268,181

15,000

132,000 2,040.000

17

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

264,000 1,813,000

89

11,933

6,496 110,859 | 4.6US,222

1

8

4

328

:

907

3,916

124 23,295

38

301

32 5.426

F

:

1

2

2

2.

1

2,338

687

8,334

654

4.677

1,963

1,453

119

38

341

73

119

124

39

:

53

100

146 331 644

1

13

251

8 10

221

ลง

:

98.910 33,324

27,311 18.713 69,018 895 2,338 | 1,094

12,417 198,221| 7,444|19,155| 242,046| 1,963

3,197 | 4,139 2,067 7.031 9,064 39 119

88,000 9,000 20.000 4,000 31,000

74,000 2,000

$2

:

:

105 100 1,065 327 316 1

192

14

462 9,819 261 528 12,170 124

2,000 261,000 7,000 9,000 384,000

2,000 82,000 5,000 4,000 2,000

342

206

14.149 250,288

6,000

83,000 2,549,000

5.000

16.000 1,560,000

5,754

660,678

71,599

6

$9

17,687

7,949 440,859 | 5,268,900

245

:

:

14,149 321,887

6,000 $3,000| 2,549,000

5,000

16.000 1,560,000

11

228

1

1

6

165 16,717

186,971 33,524 764,344 18.589 45,723 | 895 1,640 2,993 | 254.599 314,402 14,170 18,108 251,179 2,316 2,874 9,797 | 696.803 10,151,970

6,046 4,139 36,002| 6,999 3,638 39

53 110

216,000 9.000 113,000 | 4.000 31,000

..

3,000

103,000 2,000

13,387 15,503 624 591 12,480 73

83,000 442.000 10,000 10,000 399,000

6,000 9,000 153.000 11,000 9,000

59 257 18.908 503,811

2,000

:

:

6,000 215,000 4,589,000

5,000 280,000 | 3,373,000

}

9

4 328

2

14

907

:

:

:

3

2

3

2

1

1

4,958

124 23,295

5,699 2,463

16,772

2,837

4,677

38

:

340 32 5.426

240 130

579

119

119

5,039 5,875 1,453

168 128

5,993

2,426 1,012,416

39

63 $6,257

106

100 1,074 331 644

166 22,740

187,878 33,324 769,302 18,713 69,018 895 7,339 5,456 271,371 317,239 14,170 22,785 251,179 7,355 8,749 11,250 699,229 11,164,386

6

206

345

14

13

228

4

6,084 4,139

216,000 9,000 113,000 4,000 31,000

103,000 2,000

39 36,342 | 7,031 | 9,064

293 240

3,000

:

F:..

6,000

13,966 15,622 624 710 12,480

83,000 412,000 |10,000|10,000| 399,000

9.000 153.000 11,000 9,000 2,000

241 187 296 18,971 590,068

6,000 215,000 | 4,589,000

:

5,000 280,000 | 3,373,000

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

"

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

BRITISHI.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES

Australia and

New Zealand.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

Ccast of China

Ships.

E 14

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Vessels, .

Tons,

17

8

37

3,150

56

9

87

108

114

:

40,857 13,152 130,069 2,967,418

:

100,877

Crews,

1,493 720 5,899

162,266

Cargoes,

25,000 2,000 31,000

586.000

3,192

40,000

3,000 82,000 | 145,000

2,816 40,789 | 337,777 | 250,612

39 546 8,596 13,178 8,377

52,000

333,693

Shipped. Bunker

Coal,...

3,000 1,000 3,000

117,000

14,000 1,000 1,000

4,000 19,000

13,000

Vessels,

21

2

1

19

29

1

12

21

:

Tons,

55,387 3,905 1,640

23,989

47,019

1,536

21,999

45,327

Crews,

780

83

36

1,063

:

1,527

51

562

790

Bunker Coal,

7,000

2,000

9,000

:

2,000

5,000

(Vessels,

38

10

33

3,169

85

1

10

87

120

135

Tons,.

96,244 17,057 131,709 | 2,991,407

147,896

2.816 12.324 337,777 | 272,611 | 379,020

Crews,

2,273 803 5,953

163,329

4,719

39 600 8,596 13,740 9,167

Cargoes,. Shipped, Bunker

25,000 | 2,000 | 31,000

5$6,000

40,000

(Vissels,

18

Coal,... 10,000 1,000 3,000

13

8

119,000

23,000

1,000 1,000

3,000 $2,000 | 145,000

4,000

52,000

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,. 1 Shipped, Bunker

Coal,..

1,159 886 9,224

32.899 |17,342 25.253| 1.300,800 | 39.639|$10,517

1,610 837 1,178

10,000 3,000 4,000

61

113

19

22

21,000

62

18,000

160

7,000 4,000

63,071 8,949 | 100,005

340,000

547,000

84,000 5,000

...

Vessels,

11

Tons,

12,755

129 820 3,008

132,499 32,478 | 206,164

93,521 406,332 45,444

3,167 14,027 1,297

20,000 59,000 11,000

16,000 24,000 2,000

76

3

87,471 | 175,682 | 507,257

2,107 4,419 15,036

14,000

49,000

82,000

11,000

31,000

:

12

61

95,891

3,097

17,513 138,023

Crews,

399

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

2,000

6,488 6,613 30,867 2,776

31,000

22,000

185

470

5,000

2,310

11,000

18

24

8

Tons,

Crews,

(Cargoes,

1,610 1,236 1,178

10,000 3,000 4,000

Shipped, Bunker

[Vessels,

Coal,...

7,000 6,000

35

21

45

Tons.

Crews,

Shipped, Bunker

3,103 1,557 7,077

Cargoes,. 35,000 | 5,000| 35,000

Coal,... 10,000 | 5,000 3,000

Vessels,

21

13

1

Tons,

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

(Vessels,

55,387 16,660

780 482

7,000 2,000

56

1,640

36

225,337 8,949 100,005

926,000

547,000

201,000 5,000

148 820 3,008

156,488 32.478 | 206,164 | 142,913

1,238 1,706 12,232

32,899 30,097 25,258 1,433,299 72,117 1,016,681 189,415 | 406,332 48,541 87,471193,195 | 645,280

69,559 15,562 | 130,872 5,943 14,027 1,482 2,407 4,919 17,316

340,000

547,000 20,000 59,000 11,000 14,000 49,000 $2,000

115,000 5,000

38.000 21,000 2,000

16,000 45,000

4,309 886 9,224

73,756 30,494 155,327 4,268,218 39,639 810,517 194,398 409,178 86,232 425,248 426,294 840,950

6,359 14.066 1,843 | 11.003

60,000 59,000 14,000 96.000

30,000 25,000 3,000 | 4,000

137

113

22

22

71

211

117

114

28

109

170

274

17,627

23,413

194,000 | 134,000

105

30,000

24

47,000

72

4,633

39,512 183,350

7,551 6,613 30,867

4,303

239

1,032

3,100

33,000

31,000

7,000 16,000

31

46

4,457 1,706 12,232

222

114

32

109

194

316

Tons,

Crews,

129,143 47.154 156,967 4,424,706 72,117 1,016,681337,311 | 409,178 90,865 425,248 | 465,806 (1,024,300

3,883 2,039 7,113

Cargocs,. 35,000 | 5,000 | 35,000 Shipped, Bunker

Coal,... 17,000 7,000 3,000

322,888 | 15,562 | 130,872

926,000

547,000

234,000 5,000

10,662 14,066 | 2,082 || 11,003 18,659 26,513

60,000 | 59,000 14,000 96,000 | 194.000 134,000

61,000 25,000 3,000 4,000 37,000 63,000

Java and other Islands.

Kwangchau.

wan.

Ships.

Macao.

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao.

Junks. Macao.

Mauritius.

Islands.

Philippine

Hainan and

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Ports in

Russia in Asia.

E 15

in the COLONY of HONGKONG for EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1908.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Siam.

South Africa.

America.

South

South Pacific.

of America.

United States

Wei-hai-wei.

:

:

15

32,203

783

9,000

5,000

...

931

743,234

34,260

72,000

1

201

:

15,000

:

:

:

:

2,149 283,789

83

87,814 5,351

2

2

2

37

6,016 (11,809 3,416|16.719| 114,108

5,418

4,876

5,530,115

37 14,038

4,409

92

130

251

156

389 2.243

262

261,356

4,000 156,000

23,000

1,000

2,000 45,000

8,000

1,286,000

1,000

44,000

9,000 1,000

:

:

3,000

1,000

255,000

22

5

31

5

9

1

1

186

:

59,971

16,496

46,073 7,133

17,812

:

1,033

287

1,774 201

420

13,000

37

92,171

931

743,234

1,000

5,000 1,000

2,000

:

:

:

1,721 4,562

10,885

1,776

367,231

63

57

206

72

9,008

..

:

1

206

114

7

11

4

3,000 1,000

9

1,000

52,000

41

5

5,062

2,149 300,285 133,887|12,484

1,816

34,260

37

9,000

72,000

14,325

4,000 165,000

· 6,183

293

23,000

:

251

1,000

23,82811,809 5,137 21,281 124,993

219 416 550

7,143

5,897,346

2,419

331

270,361

2,000 45,000

8.000

1,286.000

18,000

15,000

:

...

1,000

45,000

14,000 2,000 2,000

:

3,000

4,000

2,000

307,000

31 117

2

516 327

1

17

191

9

68

2

2

67

73,759 50,064

1,415 18,589 66,152

895

2,011 | 5,158

27,000 18,000

64 6,999 | 7,054

2,000 4,000 50,000

47

33,135

1,322

72,838 144,337 | 19,035

493 3,575 6,948

2,338 3,653 347,390

120

115

10,828

7,000

51,000 10,000 47,000

63,000

:

:

:

13,105

8,000 10,000

1,000

1,000

3,000

21,000 2,000

16,000

26

8

140

4 129

7

74

30

52,232 5,757

271

1,268

11,000 1,000

24,324

1,853

1.000

124 8,729

32 1,107

:

:

:..

4,664

84,715

36,915

:.

:

204

3,207

2,240

1,000

13,000

6,000

:

:

:

2,000

3,000

4.375,762

260,767

1,418,000

264,000

1-

1

4,530

417

13,323

869,623

48

270

60,608

104,000

?

...

57 135

125,991 55,821 25,739 18,713 74,881

142 331 645

1

24

265

9

98

2

3

68

3,279 5,129

27,000 18,000

19,000 11,000 1,000 1,000

1,917 7,031 8,161

2,000 4,000 50,000

895

47

46 127

933 327 516 105,962 50,061 714,649 18,589 66,152 3,044 316,924 | 232,151 | 24,386

15,360 2,794 5,158 34,324 6,999 7,054 36,000 18,000 74,000 4,000 50,000 4,000 163,000 47,000 2,000 13,000 10,000 15,000 1,000

1,000

2

1,526

7,000

4,000

218

37,799 229,05219,035 109,753

10,155

51,000 10,000 || 47,000

2,338 4,070 360,713

17,635

5,245,385

493 5,815

120

:

:

163

11,098

63,000

:

:

321,375

34,000 2,000 22,000

2,000

274

11

70

9

3,000

101

1,118,000

358,000

17,981

81

11,357

251 585

3,705

74,000 10,000 47,000 1,000

30,000 3,000 16,000

276

78,854|11,809 | 5,754|20,372| 461,498 13,071 504

8,000 2,000 108,000

6,000 1,000 2,000

5,118

9,905,877

262

522,213

2,704,000

509,000

112,203 | 5,757 24,324

48

8

140

4 129

124 8,729

2,301 271

24,000 1,000

1,853

1,000

32 1,107

94 135

12

105

39

1

3

5

1

4,716

21,160 130,788

7,133 51,727

:

:

491 4,981 201 2,660

1,721 4,979

63 105

24,208 1,776

476

72

1,236,851

69,616

2,000 18,000

615

2

230

331 1,073 218,165 55,821 768,973 18,713 74,881 3,044 | 338,084 | 362.93931,519|| 133,581 |11,809 | 7,475 25,351 | 485,706

379

1,000

16

8,000

3,000

1,000

1,000

156,000

109

4

5

12

109

22,697

7,194

11,142,731

84 15,851 5,095 5,429 36,177 7,031| 8,161 36,000 18,000 74,000 4,000 (50,000 | 4,000| 163,000 49,000 2,000 16,000 1,000 37,000 11,000

...

786 16,338

74,000 10,000

48,000 4,000

251 339 6,365

47,000 1,000

21,000

13,547 609

8,000 2,000 108,000

7,000 2,000 5,000

334

591,739

2,704,000

€65,000

TOTAL.

Aberdeen.. Cheung Chaú,

Deep Bay,

Hungbom,

Long Ket,

Sai Kung, Yaumati,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,

Tai 0, Tai l'o, Victoria,

NAMES

OF L'ORTS

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chaú, Deep Bay, Hunghom, Long Ket, Sai Kung. Yaumati Shaukiwán,

Stanley,

Tai 0,

Tai Po. Victoria,

Vessels.

WITH CARGOES.

Cargoes.

Tons.

Crews.

Discharged Transit.

4,814 5 543,748 253,523 2,040,000|1,813,000|

Total.

4,814 5,543.748 263,523,2.040,000 1,813,000

239

Vessels.

WITH CARGOES.

Shipped.

Tons.

Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Ccal.

Vessels.

BRITISH

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS AND CAR

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crew

Vessels.

Vessels

TOTAL

Cargoes.

Tons.

Chews.

Discharg d Transit.

Vessels.

WITH

Tons.

C1

331

1.322

16

668

271

855

119:

351

20,979

221

815

31

15

112

239 351,738 14,658 | 5,053 5.895,486 268,181 2,040,000 1,813,000) 11,461 4,552,988|| 351,738 14.658 | 5.053 |5,895,486 268,181|2,040,000 1,813,000 11.933,4,608,222;

BRITISH.

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS AND CARC

IN BALLAST.

Tons.

Crews

Bunker

Coal.

Vessels.

Shipped.

Tons.

C:

Bunker

Cargoes.

Loal.

1,8765,530,115 261.3561,286,000| 255,000|

186 367,231| 9,008)

Total,

4,876 5,530,115 261,356 1,286,000 255,000

186 367,231 9,008|

52,000 5,062 5.897346

52,000 5,062 5,897,346)

541,286,000|| 307,000 12

641,286,000 1307,000|13

i

Vessels.]

Table III.

TMMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HỒNGI

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

Cargoes.

Tons. Crews.

Discharged Transit.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Cargoes.

Tons.

Crews.

Discharged Transit.

Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons.

Crews.

TOTAL

Vessels.

Cargoes.

Tous.

Crews.

Discharged Transit

Vessels.

Tons.

33) 1.322

219 1.000

91

19

35 1.416

238

1.000

33/

1.3:

16

668

117

326) 63

15

24

994

180

16:

:

$35

197

1,000

2001

32

32

1055

220

1,000

271

:

61

119

27

721

15

191

42

11

351

20,979

3,127

17,000

86

5,346 1,019

437

26,325

4,146

17,000

351

20.97

22

$15

168

515

108

36

1,360

276

22

81

34

15!

442

201 64)

31

51

25

*

17

506

100

15

16 911

895,486 268.181 2,040,000 1,813,000 11.461|4,582,988|| 246,326|2,530,000|1 560,000 5,633 654,011 70.325| 17.094|5,236,999 317,651|2.5

1.530.000 1,560.000

895,486 268,181 2,040,000 1.813.000 11.933 4.608,222|| 250,288|2,549,000|1.560,000 5,751| 660,678 71,599 17,6875,268,900 321,8872,519.000 1,560,000

16.273 10.126.73

16,717

16,717 10,151.97

'I'

:

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

10

360)

61

14

513

103

151

4391

99

3

106

15

258

14,153 2,188)

12,000

50 188

21 2}

Table IV.

BER, TONNAGE, CREWS AND CARGOES OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKON

Vessels.

Tons. Ci

Shipped.

Cargoes.

Bunker Loal.

Vessels.

WITH CARGOES.

Shipped.

Bunker Coal.

FOREIGN.

Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Bunker

Tons. Crews Coal.

Vessels.

Shipped.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Ccal.

16

3

480 88 159

26

$40 132

22

17

672

125

...

17

616

130

32

1,055

229

51

14

157

29

196

13.300 2,118)

154

27.453

4.336

12,000

27

10

00 5,062 5,897,346) 2

00 5,062 5,897,346

73 3,440 5891 1,000

61,286,000 307,000 12,7244,356,513 257,659 1,405,000 251,000 4,257 853,534 57,877

611,286,000 1307,000 13,1054,375,762 260,767|1,418,000 251,000 1,530|| 869,623 60,608

101,000 17,635 5,245.385 321,375,1,418,000 358,000 1

1,236 256

100

1,676

845

1,000

4

4

3

54

25

243

69

16

131

98

101,000 16,9815,210,017 315,536 1,405,000|| 358,000|1

}

COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1908.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

*goes.

Transit.

Vessels.

Cargoes.

Tons.

Crews.

Discharged Transit.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Cargoes.

Tons.

Crews.

Discharged Transit.

ོསོའམ

1,322

6681

219)

1,000

117

6130

94

3261

63

35

19

35

1,416

238

1,000

24

994

180

:

855

1,000

200

32

32

1.035

229

1.000l

:

119

27

3

72

S

191

42

20,979

3,127

17,000l

86

5.346

1,019)

437

26.325

4.146

17.000

22

815

168

14

545

108

36

1,360

276

34

16

20

9

3.

51

25

15

442

91

64

17

506

100

0 1,560,000

16,275 10.126.736 193.8494,570,000 3,373,000||

5,872

1.005,749)

84.983)

0 1,560,000 16,747 10,151.970 503,8114,589,000 3,373,000)

5,993

22.147 11,132.485 581,832 4.570,000 3.373.000

1.012,416 $6,257 22.740 11,164,386) 590,068 1,589,000 3.373,000

OLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1908.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

ns.

Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Ccal.

Vessels.

Shipped.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal,

Vessels.

Tons. Crews

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Shipped.

Bunker

argoes. Coal.

840 152

10

380

64

16

480

88

26

810

152

672

125

14

513

103

3

...

139

221

17

672

125

1,055

229

15

439

99

17

616

130

32

1,055

220

157

29

7,453 4.336) 12,000

3

106

15

31

51

1+

157

20

258

4,676

845 1,000

73

14,153 3,440

2,188

12.000

196

13,300 2,148

454

27,453

4,336

12,000

5891 1,000

27

1,236 256

100

4,676,

845

1,000

54 431

25 98

50 188

21

1

25

291

10

213

6

16

431

98.

0,017 315,556 1,105,000 358,000 17,600

5,385 321,375 1,418,000 358,000 17,981

9.886,628 519,015 2,691.000 509,000

9,905,877 522,123 2,704,000 509,00

4,443 1,220,765 66,885 156,000 22.043 11,107,393

4,716 1,236,854 69,616|||156,000 22,697 11.142,731

585,900 2 691 00

665,

591,739 2,704,000| 6€

?

E 19

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREws of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1908.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

4,814 | 5,543,748

American,

36

244,084

253,523 8,179

239

3

351,738 2,005

14,658 136

5,053

5,895,486268,181

39

246.089

8,315

Austrian,

25

97,789

1,628

25

97,789

1,628

Belgian,.

1

2,903

502

1

2.903

502

Corean,

Chinese,.

384

299,712

25,900

32

Chinese Junks,

8,233

679,148

82,633

4,728

33,866 430,232

1,167

416 |

333,578

27,067

57,392

12,956 | 1,109,680 · 140,025

Danish,

14

34,182

551

1

29

14

15

34,211

565

Dutch,

76

177,542

5,096

21

23,472

770

97

201,014

5,866

French,

460

581,878 21,824

3

1,638

124

463

583,516

21,948

German,

715

1,127,090

45,086

65

70,880

2.666

780

1,197,970

47,752

Italian,

12

31,400

1,151

12

31.400

1,151

Japanese,

417

1,022,655

30,964

17

26,885

976

434

1,049,540

31,940

Norwegian,

143

156,548

4,972

38

35,730

1,184

181

192,278

6,156

Portuguese,

218

44,125

5,253

3

1,070

140

221

45,195

5,393

Russian,

11

29,649

605

4,677

119

13

34,326

724

Swedish,

10

17,110

352

989

35

11.

18.099

387

Steamships

under 60 tons

trading to

1,178

61,107 15,592

845

29,205 6,876

2,023

90,312 22,168

Ports outside

the Colony,

TOTAL, 1908, 16,747 10,151,970 | 503,811

TOTAL, 1907, 17,475 10 374,425 | 517,919

5,993 1,012,416

6,394 1.137.798

86,257

95,213

22,740 11,164.386 | 590,068

23,819 11,512.223 613,150

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1908.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL..

Vessels. Tons. Crows. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British, American,

4,876

5,530,115

261,356

186

367,291

9.008

5,062. 5.897,346

270,364

34

217,893

7,612

5

14,875

382

39 232.768

7,994

Austrian,

21

94,836

1,630

1

2,953

32

25

97,789

1,652

Belgian,

...

Corean,

Chinese,

412

Chinese Junks,

9,740

330,494 876,669

27,737 107,039

*

4,243

3,137

214,593

314 31,974

419 12,877

Danish,

13

34,037

491

2

Dutch,

75

168,070

5,067

23

174 35,388

50

15

384,787 1,091,562 31211

28.051 139,033

541

1,262

98

20,458

6.829

French,

455

575,795 21,114

7

German,

566

964,922 36,024

218

5,594 233,421

330

462

581,389

21,444

11,123

784

1,198,346

47.147

Italian,

12

81,400

1.179

12

31.400

1,179

Japanese,

362

862,647 28,792

72

190,218 3,545

434

1,052,865

32,437

Norwegian,

91

87,011

3,145

93

Portuguese,.

66

23,313

3,880

134

110,053 21.708

3,007

184

197,064

6,152

1,608

22 ›

45,021

5,488

Russian,

13

34,326

746

13

...

31,826

716

Swedish,

1

9

16,121

343

No Flag,

21 10

5

1,978 1,520

61

11

18,099

407

172

5

1.520

172

Steamships

under 60 tons

trading to

1,213

58,228 15,948

824

32,602 6,645 2,037 90,830 22.593

Ports outside

the Colony,

TOTAL, 1908, 17,981 9,905,877 | 522,123

TOTAL, 1997, 17,697 10.045.028 |677,121

4,716 1,235,854 69,616

6,144 1,475,640

22,697 11,142,731 591,739

89,335 23,841 11,520,668 766,436

E 20

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crens, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1908.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Crews. Passen- Discharg-

Cargoes

geis.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

ed. Tons.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

Cargoes Discharg- ed. Tons.

East Coast,... 1,327 110,844 13,990

109

255 83,454

32,811 3,870

10

1,582 143,655 17,860)

119

83,454

San On Dis-

trict, West

River, &c., 6,409 511,128 62,801 12,315 297,112

West Coast, 181 11,753 2,204

Macao,

316 45,723 3,638

2

5,323

30,521

7,278 1,699

328 23,295 5,426

289

4,032 366,848 46,397 41,236 10,441 877,976 109,198 53,551 297,112

108

2

19,031 3,903

644 69,018 9,064

2

5,323

30,521

Total, 1908,... 8,233 679,448 82,633||| 12,426 | 416,410

Total. 1907... 9,536 786,906′101 463 14,348

273,300

4,723 430,232 57,392 41,248 | 12,956|1,109,680 140,025 53,674 416,410

5,246533,936 63,880 40,851 14,7821,320,892 168,345 35,199 473,000

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1908.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Shipped.

Tons.

[

Ves- sels.

l'assen-

Tons. Crews.

Ves- gers. sels.

Tons.

Crews.

Cargoes Passen-

Shipped. gers. Tons.

East Coast,... 1,132 91,151|12,369

138

68,299

406 51,946 5,382

3

1,538 143,097| 17,751

141

68,299

San On Dis-

trict, West

River, &c.,

7,881 703,802 84,517

West Coast,

211 15,564 3,119

10,423 73

26,385 467,804 2,529 150,824 24,846 3,394 639

19,877 9

10,410 854,626'109,363 284 18,958 3,758

46,262

467,804

9

10,423

Macao,......

516 66,152 7,054

Total,,1908... 9,740 876,669|107,059 26,523

50,097 129

8,729 1,107

645

74,881 8,161

50,097

596,623 3,137 214,893 31,974 19,889 12,877|1,091,562 139,033||| 46,412

596,623

Total, 1907,... 9,539 955,758|126,150′ 24,102

691,000 5,243 (376,820 51,950 24,532 |14,7821,330,578 178,100 48,634 691,000

E 21

Table IX.

SUMMARY.

1908.

1907.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. OF VESSELS.

No. OF

TONS.

CREWS.

Toys.

CREWS.

VESSELS.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,

4,814 239

5,543,748 351,738

253,523

5,050

5,588,545

257,192

14,658

238

334,285

14,098

Total,......

5,053 | 5,895,486

268,181

5,288 | 5,922,830

271,290

do.

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

in Ballast,...

4,876 | 5,530,115 186 367.231

261.356

5,0845,525,952

323,278

9,008

212 397,751

11,688

Total,..

5,062 5,897,346

270,354

5,296 5,923,703

334,966

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,.

Do.

do. in Ballast,

2,522 | 3,867,667 186 201,241

152,063

2,579

3,983,173

150,544

7,331

382

249,693

11,111

Total,......

2,708 4,068,908

159,394

2,961 | 4,233,565

161,655

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,

2,152 | 3,440,865

569

137,760

622,128

21,989

2,304 | 3,481,863

666

117,560

649,438

22,295

Total,........

2,721

4,062,993

159,749

2,970 4,131,301

139,855

Steamships under 60 tons entered with

Cargoes, ....

1,178

61,107

Steamships under 60 tons entered in Ballast,

845

29,205

15,592 6,876

260

15,101

5,720

528 19,831

6,142

Total,......

2,023

90,312

22,168

788

34,935

i1,362

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with

Cargoes,

1,213

58,228

15,948

656

29,808

10,804

Steamships under 60 tons cleared in Ballast,

824

32,602

6,645

137

5,278

1,106

Total,....

2,037

90,830 22,593

793

35,086

11,910

Junks entered with Cargoes,

Do. do.

in Ballast,.

Total,......

8,233 4,723

12,956 1,109,680

679,448 82,633 9,536 786,906 430,232 57,392 5,246 533,986

140,025

104,463

63,880

14,782 1,320,892

168,343

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,

9,740 876,669 3,137 214,893

107,059

9,617 1,058,793

228,665

Total,.......

12,877 | 1,091,562

31,974

139,033

5,165 371,785

51,060

14,782 | 1,430,578

279,725

Total of all Vessels entered,

22,740 11,164,386 590,068 22,697 11,142,731 591,739

23,819 11,512,223 613,150 23,841 11,520,668 766,456

45,437 22,307,117 1,181,107

47,660 23,032,891 | 1,379,606

Total of all Vessels cleared,

Total of all Vessels in Foreign Trade,

entered and cleared,

LOCAL TRADE,

Total Junks entered, Do. cleared,

Total Local Trade, entered and cleared,

Total Foreign Trade, entered and cleared, Total Local Trade, entered and cleared,...

Grand Total,.

20,567 929,238 174,421 20,820 £92,818 170,638 20,384 919,284 171,578 19,952 886,069 167,638

40,951 1,848,522 345,999

40,772 1,778,887 338,276

47,660 23,032,891 1,379,606 40,772 1,778,887 328,276

88,432 24,811,778 1,717,882

45,437 22,307,117 | 1,181,807 40,951 1,848,522 345,999

86,388 24,155,639 1,527,806

PLACES.

Table X.

RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES Entered in the COLONY of HONGKONG during the Year 1908.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1908,

131,567 2,818,171 932,122

3,200

91,295 2,412,170 678,338 2,813,019 222,862 5,230,341 1,610,4602,816,219

Do.

Outside the Waters of the Colony

1907,.

120,970 2,872,228 981,578

5,015

88,631 2,736,038 786,1564,526,878 209,601 5,608,266 1,767,734 4,531,923

E 22

Samshui,

Kongmun,

Kamchuk,

}

16

429

112

24

17

4531

119

Wuchow,

121

23

Macao,....

124

32

327

104

18,589

Other Places,

Total, 1908,.

514

17,817 4,024

322

846

42,390

26

6,999 2,216 8,560 27,829

7

225

331 18,713 1,360 60,207

49

7,031 2,216 12,584 28,151

537

18,491 4,191

322

Total, 1907,

Grand Total, 1908,.

103 1,246

132,104 2,836,662 936,313

892

3,522

Grand Total, 1907,.

121,073 2,876,474| 982,470

5,015

1,178 61,107 15,592 30,045 655 29,776 10,793) 11,477 92,473 2,178,277

2,765,814 89,286 2,765,814

1,715 79,598 19,788 30,367

698,930 2,843,061

796,949 4,538,355

4,538,355

758 34,022 11,685 11,477 224,5775,309,939 1,630,243 2,846,586

210,359 5,642,288 1,779,419 4,543,400

Table XI.

RETURN of LICENSED S. EAM-LAUNCHES Cleared in the COLONY of HONGKONG during the year ending 31st December, 1908.

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOLAL.

Vessels. Tonnage.] Crews.

Passen-

engers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passeu-

gers.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1908,.

Do.,

1907,

129,416 2,320,327932,762 | 3,260 122,777 2,876,149 983,770 4,965

Outside the Waters of the Colony :

Samshui,

Kongmun,

Kamchuk,

16

429

112

93,446 2,710,014 677,698 1,823,633 222,862 5,230,341 1,610,460 1,826,893 86,8242,732,117 783,9643,866,358 209,601|5,608,266,1,767,734|3,871,318

24

17:

453

119

:

E 23

Wuchow,

Macao,...

Other Places,

Total, 1908,

Total, 1907,

Grand Total, 1908,

Grand Total, 1907,

7

225

49

...

4

124

32

480

20,747

3,669 2,572

327 18,589 6,999 2,542 880 39,460 8,915 21,930

331

1,360

507

21,525

183

3,862 | 2,572

4,246 892

1,208 58,073 15,921 24,472 655 29,776 10,793 11,432

225 18,713 7,031 2,542 60,207| 12,584 24,502 1,715 79,598 19,783 27,044

49

...

1,359 5,642,298

129,923 2,541,852 936,624 5,832

2,880,39 122,880 2,880,395] 984,662 4,955

752 34,022 11, 15 11,432 91,6542,768,087 693,6191,848,105 224,577|5,309,939|1,630,243 1,853,937

87,479 2,761,893 794,757 8,877,785 201,359 5,642,288 1,779,4193,882,750

2,761,893

E 24

Table XII.

NUMBER of BOAT LICENCES ISSUED AND FEES collected during the Year 1908 ́as

compared with the previous year.

(Under Table U. Section 40 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

1907.

1908.

DESCRIPTION OF BOATS.

LICENCES.

DUPLI-

CATES.

FEES.

LICENCES.

DUPLI-

CATES.

FEES.

Passenger Boats, Class A,

640

538

Passenger Boats, Class B,

853

10,246.00

813

Passenger Village Boats,

1,558

1,454

Cargo Boats,

1,762

2

14,102.50

1,350

10,348.00

25,185.75

Lighters,

175

11

3,346.00

154

M

6,669.00

Water Boats,

83

733.00

81

:

1,493.25

Other Boats,

933

3,919.50

892

1

4,309.75

Cinder, Bum, Hawker and Marine

Dealers' Boats,

376

1

680.70

341

717.25

Fish Drying Hulks,

73

:

478.00

66

416.25

Repainting Fees, $0.25 each,.

81

20.25

TOTAL.

6,453

14 33,505.70

5,689

8

49,159.50

Table XIII.

STATEMENT of REVENUE collected in the Harbour Department during the Year 1908.

Head of Receipts.

Amount 1908.

Amount 1907.

..

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified :-

79,975.68

$ 80,389.00

C.

Boat Licences,

49,159.50

33,505.70

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Emigration Brokers' Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,...

1,305.00

1,395.00

1,000.00

1,000.00

Fine,

6,575.60

2,814.50

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

137.90

177.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from the New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899, Junk Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

2,176.60

2,606.50

45,826.75

52,342.20

Junk Licences, &c., from the New Territories, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Pilots' Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904,........

19,831.45

18,303.50

105.00

80.00

Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

4,476.25

3,898.00

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimbursements-

in-Aid:

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

23,765.80

24,446.40

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

270.00

287.00

2,370,00

2,900.00

Gunpowder, Storage of-Ordinance 10 of 1899,

9,831.43

11,664.76

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

*43,155.75

31,675.00

Printed Forms, Sale of....

278.50

58.75

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for Ordinance 10 of 1899, Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act), Ordinance 10 of 1899,. Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Sugar Certificates and Permits, Ordinance 14 of 1904,.. Survey of Steamships, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,. Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ordinance 1 of 1891, 7. Miscellaneous Receipts-Message Fees for notifying ships,

3,480.00

3,630.00

699.00

1,309.00

3,810.00

3,405.00

1,155.00

1,350.00

29,692.71

29,770.39

28,600.00

41,250.00

90.60

42.40

Total,

$357,768.52

348,300.10

(Estimated.)

Harbour Department, Registrar General's Office,

* STATEMENT OF EMIGRATION FEES:-

Revenue collected by.

$ 43,155.75

Stamp Office, on a/c of Bill of Health, Medical Department,

...

3,862.00 8,928.00

$55,945.75

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,000.00

3,885.40

......

14,634.46

$ 22,519.86

Nett Revenue,.

..$ 33,425.89

E 25

Table XIV.

SUMMARY of CHINESE EMIGRATION from HONGKONG for Ports other than in China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1908.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F M. F

M. F

M.

F.

To Banka,

Billiton,

"

:

1,427

1,427 1,427

1,427

1,420

1,423 1,420

1.423

Callao, Peru,

" German New Guinea,

""

"

Honolulu, Sandwich Is-

lands,

Japan Ports,

666

44

710

666

44

710

:

329

329

329

:

88888

43 28

*

288

50

276

28

54

17

Java Ports,

921

791

28

3

*

Macassar.

Mauritius,

Mexico,

""

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

32 Straits Settlements,

"

19

Tacoma, U.S.A.,.

""

lumbia,

Vancouver, British Co-

949 1,339

13 61 3 858 3,525 13 302 .33,079 7,165 1,691 779 42,714 5,804 861172

71

5,038

49

88 6,925 38,883 8,026] 1,863 867

50 120

71

178 62

6,116 1,622 103

5.938

3

108 | 1,665

:.

Victoria, British Columbia. 1,560

Total Passengers. 1908.... 43,097 | 7,168|2,071|78253,118 16,275|980|602|106|17,963 59,372|8,148| 2,673

Do.

1907....|65,895 | 9,163 | 2,586 | 932 78,576 24,836 1,741 653|161|27,391 90,731 10,904 3,239|1.093|105.967

1,602 162 183 6

76

12000

20 14

LA

315

319

14

1

57

82

75

9 1,762

1,602

76

7

177 162

7 0 196 183 1,352 2,260

6

23,842 4,316

16

བྷྱསྶ ཨསྨཱ ཏཤྩ ཙཝ མསྶཱ སམྦྷ བྷི བྷིཀ

+2000

27

10

:

329

365

85

75

9

1,762

7

177

7

0

196

41

2,301

363

5

4,700

49,639

1

121

178

6,116

65

1,730

888 71,081

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

43.097 7,168 2,071 782 53,118

116,275 980 602 106 17,963

26,822 6,188 1,469 676 35,155

Table XV.

RETURN of EMIGRATION from HONGKONG to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1875 to 1908, inclusive.

YEAR,

NO. OF EMIGRANTS.

1875,

48,152

1880,

50,325

1885,

57,517

1890,

42,066

1895,

. 73,138

1900,

83,643

1905,

64,341

1906,

76,725

1907,

105,967

1908,

71,081

Table XVI.

RETURN OF MALE AND FEMALE EMIGRANTS FROM HONGKONG to Forts other than in China, for 10 Years, from 1899 to 1908, inclusive.

Whither bound.

1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

8,408

Total,

9.628

63,387

40,736 61,057 48,732 49,260 53,759 53,131 45,948 51,589 71,141 40,746

4,930 8,156 8,174

45,666 69,213 56,903 57,668

9,596 9,026 8.731

62.727 51,974 60,320

11,907

8,893

83,048

49,639

Other Ports, Males,.. Other Ports, Females,

Total

15,277 132

113

14,350 12,758 13,967 19,915

80

76

82

13.499 78

9,308 59

16,348 57

22,829 90

21,299

143

15,409 14,430 12,871 14,013 19,997 13,577

9,367

16,405 22,919 21,442

Grand Total,

61,075 83,613 69,774 71,711

$3,384

76,301 64,341

76,725105,967 71,081

E 26

Table XVII.

SUMMARY OF CHINESE EMIGRANTS Returned to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China,

during the Year 1908.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F M. F

M.

F.

M. F.

"

Callao, Peru,

19

From Bangkok, Siam,

Durban, British South

Africa,

Honolulu, Sandwich

164

106

:

::

:

2,814

164

::

2,814 2,814

161

106

:

106

:

Islands,

77

81

970

29 25 18 1.052

1,047

41

::

:

25

2,814 164

106-

26

19

1,133

19

Java & Sumatra,.

5,926

5,926

5.926

5,926.

""

Japan Ports,

1,01

1,015

918

918

1,933

1,933

91

Mauritius,

283

283

283

283

"

Melbourne,

""

Mexico,

994 11 201

1,019

572

572

1.566

11

J

1.591

291] 1,193

1,193

1,484

1,484

New South Wales,

469 13

5

495 252

2

262

721

18

757

#1

New Zealand Ports,.

66

:

66

66

66.

19

Queensland Ports................

555

572 151

151

706

7

723

**

San Francisco, U.S.A..

351

6

360 4,548

86 46

29 4,709

4.899

92

48 30

5,069

•1

Seattle, U.S.A.,

819

849

849

819

:

South Australian Ports,

80

Straits Settlements,

+

>>

[101,092 3,552 1,216804 106,66422,892

">

Tacoma, U.S.A.,...

;"

Tasmania,

""

Victoria, British

Total Passengers, 1908,

Do..

1907,

Vancouver, British

Columbia,

Columbia,.

1.487

1,487

201

20

2,957

31

15 11

3,014

637

9

8

6

660

:: 8:

801

80

80

47

28

19 22.986 123,984 3,599 1,244 823

113

::

:

1,487

20 2,957

129,650 1,487

15

11

20 3,014

637

8

660

572 369

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

110,361 3,630 | 1,266 | 837|116,094,41,368 | 177 | 102 68 41,715 151,729 3.8071,368905

109,760, 2,011

112,742 32,958

21 33,080 142 718 | 2.110

157,809

69 32

604390 145,822

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

110,361 3.630|1,266 837 116,094

41.363 177 102 68

68,9933.453 1.161 769

41,715

74,379

Table XVIII.

RETURN of EMIGRANTS Returned to HONGKONG from Ports other than în China,

for Quinquennial Periods from 1875 to 1908, inclusive.

YEAR.

NO. OF IMMIGRANTS.

1875,

38,502

1880,

51,011

1885,

80,77%

1890,

98,534

1895,

112,685

1900,

121,322

1905,

140,483

1906,

134,912

1907,

145,822

1908,

157,809

- E 27

Table XIX.

RETURN of MALE and FEMALE EMIGRANTS Returned to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China, for 10 years, from 1899 to 1908, inclusive.

Where from.

Straits Settlements, Vales.

1899.

1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1901. 1905. 1906.

1907.

1908.

Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

90.191 98.782 106,923 | 108,362 116,705 | 123,542 | 114.658 | 110.525 4,671 4.586 4.943 3.891 5,778 4,842 6.210 + 043

94.862 103.363 111,866 |112,253 | 122.483 | 128,384 | 120,863 114,568

121.935 2.403

125,228 4,422

124.338129,650

Other Ports, Males,

-

Other Ports, Females,

15.316

270

17,661 16.870 17,826

293

204

233

17.826 20,147

242

364

19.291 820

19 848 496

21.387 97

27.869 290

Total.

15.586

17.951 17,164 17,559

18,068

20,811

19.620 20,.44

21.484

28,159

Grand Total.

110.448 121.322129 030 | 129,812 | 140,551 |149,195 140.483 |134.912

145 822 157,809

Table XX.

RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1908.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Registered

Tounage.

Power.

Horse

Rig.

Built

of.

Where built and when

Remarks.

Hoi Ming, Kwong Fat,

(Str) 123.099

123,100

379 65 65

98.82

Schooner | Wood Hongkong,

1907.

33

Nil

David Gillies,

126.986

92 28

125

Steel

Shiu On....

126,987

227.88

40

Wood

19 8.

Daswin,..

(Sail.) 126,988

12.53 Nil

Chinese

.1903.

Com-

Ilha de Coloane,

50.65 (Str.) 126.989

28

Nil

posite

.1898

Ilha de Dom Joao..

126.990

35.51

28

1897.

་་

liba de Lantao,...Lighter.

126,991

146.00

Nil

Wood

1902.

Ilha de Lappa.

126,992

182 68

Ilha de Taipa.

126,993

175.93

::

1907.

..1907.

Tien Lung,....

Motor. 126,994

Pat Luk,... Pat Isat. Pat Pat.

Pat Kau. Marion,...... Ascanius, Haiyang,

.Lighter. | 125,995

36.05 B. P. 55.01

..1908.

Nil

1907.

*

126 996

55 01

1907.

17

126.997

55 01

1907

126 995

55 01

1907.

(Str.) 126,999

19.27

10

1908.

127,000

14.58

10

.1908.

"

11

127,001 | 1,362.57 1,100 Schooner Sicel Fort Glasgow,

..190S.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

.1906. Sold to Foreigners, 1908.

1908.

Table XXI.

RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1908.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Tower.

i

Rig.

Built of.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

Pow An. Pelayo,

.(Str.)

68,387

""

Ying King,

Chan Wai,

1842.57 1879 70,660 |1099.72| 1899 116,031 459.13| 1904

120

Nil

Iron

"

Wing Hang,...

109,63 277.79! 1901

""

"

St. Enoch,

.....

Hoi Tin,

Syren,..

(Sail.) Kathleen, (Motor.); 123,097

Kwong Fat,...(Str.)| 123,100

120,993 155 12 1906

72,851

211 Schooner

45 Nil 42 Schooner 26 116,052 176.26| 1904

120 120,987 271.67 1906

Smack

40 Schooner Nil 50.67 1907 28.50 1907

>>

30

Nil

11

98.82 1908

33

+3

Linthouse Glasgow....1873 Lost 1908. Berkenhead. Wood Hongkong,

1872 Sold to Foreigners. 1908.

Hongkong, Hongkong, Steel Renfrew,

Wood Clydebank,

Shanghai

Hongkong,

Hongkong,

.1908 Lost 19.8.

1901 | Sold to Foreigners 1908. .1903 | Sold to Foreigners 1908.

1894 Sold to Hongkong Colonial

Government 1908.

1877 Sold to Foreigners 1908. .1896 Sold to Foreigners 1908.

1906 Lost 1908.

.1906 Sold to Foreigners 1908.

E 28

Table XXII.

Number und Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade entered and cleared since 1899, showing

increases and decreases.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

YEAR.

NO. OF VESSELS.

TONNAGE.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Vessels. Tonnage.

1900

40,365

17,274,023

113,692

9,607

1901

46.201

17.825,309

164

1902

48,706

19,514,237

2,505

1,688,928

1903

46,255

21,716,870

2,202,633

2,451

1904

51.173

22.299,582

4,918

582,712

1905*

51,678

22,653,616

405

354,034

19061

44,550

22,453,077

7,028

200,539

1907

47,660

23.032,891

3,110

579,814

1908

45,403

22,305,131

2,257

727,760

10,938 5,521,813

21,507

928,299

Net increase,

Net decrease,

4,593,514

10,569

**

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons in Foreign Trade included for first time.

‡ Decrease due to Typhoon of 18th September, 1906.

Table XXIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

YFAR.

TOTAL REVENUE OF DEPARTMENT.

TOTAL EX-

PENDITURE OF DEPARTMENT.

PERCENTAGE OF EXPENDITURE TO REVENUE.

C.

$

C.

%

1900,.

246,039.12

96,401.59

39-18

1901,

251,597.39

128,061.74

50.82

1902,

266,765.99

187,575.65

51.57

1903,

285,288.42

158,936.52

55.71

1904,

301,128.95

146.951.90

48.80

1905,

302,817.76

147,396.72

48.67

1906,

274,008.78

160,899.99

58.43

1907,

348,300.10

160,389.48

16.05

1908,

357,768.52

163,579.54

15.72

E 31

Appendix A.

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

18,930 seamen were shipped and 18,421 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year. (20,990 and 19,529 in 1907.)

177 distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home, &c., of these 31 were sent Home, 6 to Bombay, 1 to Calcutta, 1 to Honolulu, 1 to Newcastle, N.S.W., 2 to Port Said, 1 to Sydney, N.S.W., 18 to Shanghai, 22 to Singapore, 1 to Townsville, 1 pas- senger to London, 36 to Canton, 2 to Singapore, 11 to Shanghai, 1 taken charge of by French Consul, 1 joined Lighthouse Service at Amoy, 1 employed locally, 5 disappeared, 1 died at Government Civil Hospital, 1 on board Hospital Hulk "Hygeia", 3 remained at Sailors' Home, 2 at Government Civil Hospital and 21 obtained employment. $3,568.22 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distresssed seamen.

Appendix B.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

The following Table shows the quantity of Opium imported and exported during the years 1907 and 1908:-

1907.

1908. Increase.

Decrease.

Chests.

Imported,..

40,842

Chests.

41,8214

Chests.

Chests.

9782

Exported,...

42,702 39,6091

Through Cargo reported, but not landed,..

8,938 10,1361 1,198

Imports and Exports of Opium Skin were reported as follows:-

1907.

1908.

2,9202

Increase.

Decrease.

Ib.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Imported,....

57,742

55,178

2.563

Exported,....

57,926

55,106

VARIETIES OF OPIUM IMPORTED.

2,820

+

MALWA. PATNA. BENARES.

PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1907,. 1908,.

5,119

23,220

10,232

2,217

4

50

40,842

5,607

22,424

10,266

3.4902

5

28

41,8211

Increase,

488

34

1,2733

1,7963

Decrease,

796

22

818

VARIETIES OF OPIUM EXPORTED.

MALWA. PATNA. BENARES. PERSIAN.

'TURKISH.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1907,.

1908,..

5,700 5,681

22,404

10,620

3,675

25

106

42,530

21,093

9,700

3,1021

5

28

39,6091

Increase, Decrease,

19

1,311

920

5723

20

78

2,9203

Through cargo reported in Manifest but not landed {

1907..

1908,.............

8,938 chests. 10,136

""

Increase,............... 1,1981

E 32

PLACES OF DESTINATION IN CHINA OF OPIUM EXPORTED IN 1908.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. Persian. Turkish. Chinese. Total. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Total in lb.

By Steamers to Amoy, Angaur,... Bagdad,

Bandar Abbas,

22

72

2,420

4221

2,9361

459,394

1

1

160

2

2

273

21

21

2,869

Bushire,...

Canton,

Chefoo,

Foochow,

21

21

2,869

777 6,262

1,517

12

$,568

1,349,916

5

5

800

...

1,044

465

263

9162

2,6891

381,034

Hankow via Shanghai,

1

1

160

Hohow,

219

107

326

52,160

Hoihow,

609

101

28

738

117,333

Jamaica,

1

133

Kong Moon,

245

1

246

39,360

Kwong Chow Wan,.

300

300

48,000

London,.

276

276

...

37,720

Macao,

Matupi,

3,183

1

46

3,229

316,640

1

160

Merida,

1

136

...

Namtao,

Newchwang, New York, Pakhoi,.....

39

ai

5

44

7,040

1

1

160

546

110

125

235

37,600

Panama,

14

14

:

2,240

Sandakan,

Shanghai,

1,386

7,789

3,129

Straits Settlements,

+

11

Swatow,

1,982

1,088

709

17

2417

2

273

12,308

1,932.293

12

1,896-

3,796

554,109

Tansui,

61

1.191

1,400

5

2,657

392.320

Tamatave,

2

2

320

Timor,

3

3

480

Tsintau,.

2

2

593

Vancouver,

80

:

80

12,800

Victoria, B. C.,...

Wuchow,

Weihaiwei,

By Steam-launches and

233

4

237

37,920

1

1

160

10:

34

36

5,760

Junks to various ad-

467/

314

28

:

8093

117.053

jarent Ports in China,

Total 1908,

5,681 21,093 9,700

3,102]

5

28 39,6091 6,112,710

多多

1907,

5,700 22,404 10,620 3,675

25

106

42,530

6,563,556

The information in Column 8 above is on the following assumption :-

Patna and Benares, per chest,

Malwa, Turkish and Chinese, per chest,

Persian, per chest.

160 lb. 133

137 ya

Eighteen thousand one hundred and eighty-two (18,182) permits for export and removal were issued from this office during the year being an increase of 148 as compared with 1907 as follows :-

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c., ISSUED.

1907.

1908. Increase. Decrease.

Landing Permit,...(Opium),

377

Removal Export Landing Removal

8,542

332 8,704

45

162

?>

""

8,784

8,827

43

""

"

""

(Opium Skin),

153

140

13

11

19

8

"

""

Export

167

160

19

Memo. of Exports to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs, Memo. of Exports to the Superintendent of Raw Opium

Department, Macao,.....

584

727

143

289

289

:

E 33

A daily memo of exports to Macao and to Chinese Ports was supplied during the year, to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritime Customs and a daily memo of exports to Macao was supplied to the Superintendent of Raw Opium Department of Macao.

114 surprise visits were paid to Godowns during the year.

The question of opium has been much to the fore during the past year or two, and has naturally excited considerable interest in this Colony, a large proportion of the revenue being drawn from this trade.

The report of the International Opium Commission has not yet been published, and it is impossible to forecast what its recommendations are.

It is noticeable that notwithstanding the decrease of 10% in the export of Opium from India,--in accordance with the agreement with China, the exports from the Colony show a decrease of 845 chests only in 1908, viz., 24% (36,471 chests in 1908 as compared with 37,316 in 1907). There is an increase under Persian Opium but it is so small-178 chests-that it would only bring the percentage up to 23% were it added to the total of Indian Opium.

The imports of raw opium into the Colony increased by nearly 1,000 chests during the year. The amount of Morphia and Compounds of Opium imported and exported during the year was as follows:-

COMPOUNDS OF OPIUM.

1907.

1908.

Increase.

Decrease.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Imported,

15,384

10,673

4,711

Exported,

9,454

8,246

Difference,..

5,647

2,709

Imported,

1,208

2,938

MORPHIA.

1907.

1908.

Increase.

Decrease.

Cases. lbs. Cases. lbs. Cases. lbs.

4159,694.10

289-7,053.7

Exported,

398-9,469.0 384-9,129.2

Cases.

lbs.

126 -2,641.3

14-339.14

E 34

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SUGAR.

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong, by vessels of different

nationalities during the year :—

American Steamers,

Austrian

""

British

>>

Chinese

11

Dutch

})

Danish

""

French

31

German

""

Italian

Japanese Norwegian Portuguese

Russian

""

"}

31

""

Swedish

"}

By Junks

Total,

1907.

1908.

Tons

Tons.

2,177

373

415

27

161,788

163,317

723

...

43,601

2,860

55,721

...

2,907 16,278

58,234

102

2,103 22,824 169

71

11

1,100

14

5,897

40

867

1,372

292,527

250,474

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong during the year :--

From

Austria,

Belgium,

China,

Cochin China,

Germany,..

Java,

London,

Mauritius,

New Territories,

Philippine Islands

Straits Settlements,

Total,

1907.

Tons.

1908. Tons.

223

...

7,089 5,808

30 12,101

7,767

584

25

215,486

178,791

20 2,721

33

330

73 58,978

129

50,492

1,540

772

292,527

250,474

One hundred and ninety-three (193) Certificates of Origin for Exportation of Sugar were issued from this Office during the year 1908.

Thirty-nine (39) Permits for Delivery of Sugar arrived at the Colony without Certificate of Origin were issued from this Office during the year 1908.

Imports.

The return shows that during the year the amount of Sugar reported was as follows:-

Imported,

1907.

Tons.

292,527

1908. Ions.

250,475

Increase.

Decrease. Tons.

42,052

E 35

DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888.

MALWA.

Philip- N. & C.

Total

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

1888....

27,090

1889.

16,702

2

1

27,092

16,703

1890..

13,404

13,409

1891..

11,826

11,850

1892.

11,936

9

11,948

1893

10,692

......

10,696

1894.

10,132

53

10

10,197

1895.

10,337

1

2

8

10,348

1896..

7,464

12

1897

5,956

21

7,476

5,964

1898

6,896

6,896

1899

8,999

17

1

9,017

1900.

9,391

i

9,392

1901.

7,124

2

1

7,427

1902.

7,312

1

7,314

1903...

*.999

2

»

1

2

8,004

1904.

8,253

15

12

1

8,281

1905.

5,878

6

2

2

5,888

1906...

5,853

4

1

5,859

1907...

5,700

5,700

1908..

5,680

5,681

ра

PATNA.

Philip

N. & C.

Total

Icar.

China. Formosa. Straits. pines.

America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

1888....

23,951

17

465

437

8

24,878

1889......

23,040

40

879

443

23,902

1890.

22,775

250

260

908

24,193

1891

23,075

315

203

844

3

24,440

1892

18,410

410

174

954

19,948

1893.

16,675

429

301

787

4

18,196

· 1894.

16,758

16

41

330

5

167

3

17,320

1895.

15,033

245

3.

307

20

15,608

1896..

15,783

265

5

334

16,387

1897.

16,721

6

360

6

410

6

17,509

1898.

17,297

444

37

457

18,236

1899.

17,285

432

32

61

2

17,812

1900.

15,892

100

618

17

2

1

16,630

1901.

18,328

150

160

1,073

22

19,733

1902.

21,482

300

163

323

6

22,274

1908..

21,843 309

31

507

8

80

22,787

1904...

20,152

120

520

4

105

2

20,903

1905.......

22,193

602

13

93

5

22,906

1906.....

24,569

312

8

278

10

25,177

1907.

21,271

223

307

9

592

2

22,404

1908..

20,698

61

48

280

6

21,093

BENARES.

Philip N. & C.

Total

Year.

1898.....

86

35

****

1889...

37

29

N

China, Formosa. Straits, pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. 13,390 658 14,625 530

Chests.

7

14,176

874

16,095

1890.

14,011

560

109

38

46

14,764

1891.

15,112

399

24

109

10

15,654

1892.

12,309 157

332

79

4

12,882

1893........

7,418

124

256

92

4

7,894

1894

6,569

179

26

70

13

6,857

1895..

6,209

96

214

139

6,658

1896.

5,195

34

30

129

5,378

1897........

6,747 302

157

10

7,216

1898..

7,316

387

17

7,712

1899........

8,263

330

4

8,597

1900......

7,104 300

543

1

7,948

1901......

7,297 360

42

1,099

6

8,804

1902......

7,606 500

10

555

8,671

1903.......

7,394 566

3

753

1

8,717

1904.....

7,775 1,120

9

578

9,482

****

1905......

1906.....

8,396 880

22

615

4

9,917

11,667 2,000

84

432

8

13,191

1907.

1908..

8,840 8,491 1,191

1,348

428

2

2

10,620

11

6

1

9,700

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY,

The comparison of weather-forecasts issuel daily with the weather subsequently experienced, has been conducted on the same system as heretofore (compare Annual Report for 1896 § 5). The results are as follows:-

Success 59 per cent., partial success 31 per cent., failure 1 per cent., partial failure 9 per cent. Following the method used in Meteorological Offices and taking the sum of total and partial success as a measure of success, and the sum of total and partial failure as a measure of failure 90 per cent. of the weather-forecasts were successful in 1908.

The average results for 1906 and 1907 were as follows:-Success 57 per cent., partial success 33 per cent., failure 1 per cent., partial failure 9 per cent.

2. The so-called typhoon season was unusually prolonged in 1908 as regards the Northern part of the China Sea, it being found necessary to hoist typhoon signals as early as May 26th, while it was not until December 8th that the last signal was given. The number of typhoon centres directly affecting the Colony was greater than usual, but with the exception of that of July 27th to 28th, the gales which resulted were not of great violence in the harbour.

A detailed account of this typhoon has been already publishel. The following is a brief summary:-The disturbance approached the Balingtang Channel from the Eastward on the 25th July and passed through it moving in a Westerly direction on the morning of the 26th. On the 27th at noon it was situated in the neighbourhood of the Pratas shoal. Its course was then becoming more and more northerly. The rate of translation, which had been about 9 miles per hour during the previous day, was increasing and the depression was apparently becoming deeper. It approached the neighbourhood of the Colony towards 11 p.m. when a gale from the North commenced. Typhoon force of wind which was reached near midnight, continued until about 2.30 a.m., the direction during this period veering from NE to SSE. The lowest barometer 28.85 (at M.S.L.) occurred at 1.3 a.m. The central calm area is now known to have passed over the island of Cheung Chau, which is situated about 8 miles to the SW of the city. This was doubtless the point of its nearest apprcach. Subsequently the disturbance moved up the river reaching Canton about 7 a.m.

This typhoon was of similar type to that of September 18th, 1906. The storm area was however larger, probably in the proportion of 5 to 3, and the violence of the wind greater. Unfortunately the velocity spindle of the Anemograph was broken, probably about midnight, but in its disabled condition a maximum hourly velocity of 81 miles was recorded against a maximum of 77 miles in September, 1906. The Aneinograph at Victoria Peak was practically wrecked and the record entirely lost.

3. The authorities in Canton adopted the Hongkong code of signals in the autumn and information is now telegraphed to the Harbour Master there whenever black signals are hoisted in Hongkong.

4. An improvement has taken place in regard to the time of receipt of the meteorolo- gical telegrams from Hoihow and Pakhoi, but they are still received too late to be of any practical value.

5. By the courtesy of the Commissioner of Customs at Wuchow, West River, arrange- ments were made last autumn whereby that port was added to the list of stations reporting ineteorological observations daily by telegraph to this Observatory.

6. The need of a station on the coast between Hongkong and Swatow is often felt and steps were taken during the summer to ascertain whether it would be possible to establish such an one. The Rev. D. Sutherland stationed at Sua Bue, a suitable position about half-way between the two ports, kindly offered to make observations. But as the nearest telegraph office, Hoifung, is situated at a distance of about 16 miles, and it would be neces- sary for the messages to be sent in by runner, it was considered unlikely that the foundation of a reporting station at Sua Bue would prove a success and justify the expense.

7. At the request of the Government, His Excellency Vice-Admiral Sir Hedworth Lambton, Commander-in-Chief, was good enough to arrange for the transmission by wire- less telegraphy to the Observatory of meteorological observations made on board His Majesty's ships on the China station, whenever vessels possessing the necessary apparatus are in suitable positions for communicating by this means with Hongkong.

8. By the kind co-operation of the Commissioner of Customs an extra meteorological observation, made daily at 9 pm. in Swatow, will be forwarded to the Observatory by telegraph throughout the typhoon season, and by the courtesy of the Rev. Fr. Algué, Director of the Philippine Weather Bur au, and of Dr. H. Kondo, Director of the Formosa Weather Service, extra observations will be forwarded from Aparri in Northern Luzon, and

- F 3

Table I.

Errors of Time Ball in 1908.

means too late.

+ means too early.

Date. Jan.

Feb. Mar.

April. May. June. July.

Aug. Sept. Oct.

Nor.

Dec.

+0.2

+0.5

83

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1 -0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

-0.3

0.1

+0.7 +0.2

-0.4

0.1

01 -0.3

0.1

+0.2

+0.9 +0.2 -0.2

333

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.6

0.1

+0.2

-0.2

-0.2 +0.2

0.1

+1.3

-0.3

-0.3

0.1

-0.2

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

+1.7.

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0,1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+2.0

+0.5

0.1

0.1

+0.2

+0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

+0.7

0.1

+ 0.2

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

9

0.1

-0.2

+0.9

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

10

0.1

-0.4

-0.2

+1.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

11

-0.3

-0.8

-0.3

0.1 -0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

+0.2

0.1

12

-1.0

-0.5

0.1

+0,3

0.1

-0.2

+0.6

0.1

-0.3

13

0.1

-1.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.6

0.1

-0.3

+0.2

0.1

14

0.1

- 1.4

-0.3

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1 •

15

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

16

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0,1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

17

! +0.5

+0.2

0.1

...

0.1

0.1

-0.3

-0.2

-0.2

+0.2

18

+0.4

0.1

+0.2

+0.3

+0.2

-0.2

0.1

-0.5

0.1

+0.3

19

-0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

-0.2

-0.7

-0.2

+0.3

20

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

...

21

0.1

0.1

0.1 -0.2

0.1

-0.3

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

+0.5

22

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1 -0.2

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.6

23 +0.2

0.1

24 +0.4

0.1

25

+0.5 -0.2

26

0.1

27

-02

+0.2

28

0.1 +0.2

+0.2

29

0.1

+0.2

30

0.1

31

0.1

-0,2

be: teeee

0.1

-0.2

338 13383:

0.1

0.1

-0.3

+0.2

0.1

+0.2

+0.6

0.1 -0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

+0.3

...

0.1 -0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1 -0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1 -0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

:

::ཀྱང

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

Table II.

Monthly and Annual Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements at the Hongkong Observatory for the year 1908, and departure from the mean of 25 years (+ excess, defect).

Jan.

Feb. Mar. Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

Year.

Bar. Pressure at

M.S.L.*

'Departure

Temperature

62.0

58.3

61.2

Departure

Rel. Humidity 。................

Departure

+ +

+1.9

0.3

1.5

1.6

0.7

78

76

76

89

79

4

h

7+ 4

Vap. Tension (Inches

of Mercury)

0.443

0.383

Departure

+.048.004

Sunshine (Total hours)

Departure

Cloudiness %

Departure

+ 0.4 76 +12+ 7

0.424 0.621 -- .059 -.016 143.2 87.4 146.0 80.8

0.4 + 63.6 · 23.5 + 65.5

83 66 87

17+ 6

62 12+

Rainfall (Total

Inches)

Departare

Wind Direction

76

79

63

2+ 10 + 2

0.717 0.871 0.906 0.912 0 $80 0.723 0.482 0.447 0.651 .056 +.004+.013+.028.078+071+.004 + .058 | +.015 219.3 147.8 227.0 219.9 179.8 174.4 189.8 101.7 1917.1 8.4 + 25.2 +18 3 - 16 8 - 37.9+ 0.2 —77.5+ 8.7

84

65 66 67

69 60

75

72 3+ 2 + 10+18+

2.640 2.830 0.765 11.150

12.065 13.720 5.440 0.145 4.285 91.975 +1.182+1.080 -2.098 +5.268 -10.970 -1.138 +9.495 |—2.136 +4.083 +0.878 −1.307 +3.100 |+7.437 E 120 NE 18° NE 9° NE 5° NE 2o NE 47° SS 12° WE 18° S E 13° NE 19° NE 42° NE 38° NE 1° S

Departure ·N + S... + 2°

Wind Velocity

(Miles per hour)

Departure

1

11.3

C° + 46°

40

-

20

40

-

150

310

14.8

15.4 18.9 0.5 +4.0

12.3 13.0 0.7+ 0.6

9.1 1.8

7.1

2.6

1

2.5 + 0.3

20

13°

13°

-

30

9.0

17.2

11.7

10.5

12.5

2.9+ 2.6

1.4

-

1.9

0.6

88

30.196 30.125| 30,094 | 29.945 | 29.871 | 29.784 | 29.729 | 29.716 29 859 | 29.916 30.086 30 134 +.036

.020¦ + .035 -.012│+ .008 | + .022 .000 .027+.022 069 -.021 -.037 68.5 76.1 $0.2 82.3 82.1 80.9 76.8 70.2 63.3

1.0|+ 0.6| + 0.1

29.955

K

-.005

71.8

0.5 + 0.5 + 0.8 + 0.5 + 0.5+

84

82

1

$3 84

0+ 7+

78

924

1.325 15.243 | 22,265

*Not corrected to Standard Gravity.

F4

Table V.

Number of Days with Wind from eight different points of the Compass during each month of the year, 1908.

MONTH.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July.

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

!

N.

NE.

E.

SE.

S.

SW.

II.

NW.

40+

22

1

19

1

1

23

2

26

21

3

11

7

6

3

11

12

14

5

6

15

2

5

19

4

10

10

9

1

12

3

14

1

Sums,

40

39

196

17

20

223

28

19

Table IX.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered during the year 1908.

BAROMETER.

TEM-

PERATURE.

HUMIDITY,

VAPOUR TENSION.

1

RAIN.

WIND

VELOCITY.

RADIA-

ΜΟΝΤΗ.

Daily

Max.

Min.

Max. Min. Min.

Max.

Min.

Hourly Max.

Sun

Max.

Max.

Max.

TION.

January,

February,

30.365 29.744 75.2 48.9

30.262 29.744 75.2 43.7

March,

30.275 29.608 79.1 46.6

April,

29.967 29.680 79.9 62.0

May,

29.970 29.434 90.3 65.2 47

June,

29.825 29.496 87.9 71.3

July,

29.826 28.825 92.6 74.2

29.709 84.1 53.0

December,... 30.169 29.843 *9.8 51.6 36

August,.

September, 29.905 29.608 90.3 71.6 57

October, 29.979 29.452 86.5 67.0 52

November,.. 30.165

29.820 29.417 92.3 74.9

& & 8+ & A NO HA

43

0.621

0.216

1.510 0.620 38

124.0

25

0.645

0.104

1.600

0.375 39

129.1

40

0.766

0.171

0 405

0.115 45

124.7

58

0.840

0.445

6.225 0.700

42

133.4

0.932

0.393

0.490

0.215

36

144.7

66

0.970 0.658

3.555 1.025

31

143.1

58

1.013

56

0.765

1.066 0.703 3.685

7.000

1.565 81

144.7

1.000 36

143.2

0.981 0.696 4.390

0.928

2.180

1.520 !

37

149.8

0.500

0.745 53

136.9

18

0.806

0.126 0.050

0.035 31

136.3

0.691

0.253

1.290

0.195 30

131.9

Year,

30.365 28.825

92.6 43.7 18

1.066

0.101 7.000 1.565 81

149.8

60.1

58.0 62.7 70.1 76.8

F 5

Table XI.

Monthly and Annual Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements for 25 years (1884 to 1908 inclusive) as determined at the Hongkong Observatory.

* Bar. Pressure at

Jan.

M.S.L.(inches) Mean] 30.160 30.223 30.053

Do. Highest

Do. Lowest

Temperature (de-

grees Fab.)

19

**

Feb. Mar. Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Year,

30.145 | 30.059 29.957 29.863 29.762| 29.729 29.743 29.837 29.985 30.107| 30.171 29.960 30.300| 30.138| 29.993 29.916| 29,862 29.797 29.820| 29.890 | 30.083| 30.178 | 30.237 29.982 29.998| 29.991| 29.917| 29.803 29.679| 29.652|29,658 29.760 | 29.900| 30.030| 30.078 29.926

80.7 81.8 81.3

80.4

76 3 69.2 62.7

71.7

Do. Highest

64.9

63.1 68.1 73.1 79.4

82.4

83.6

83.2

81.9

79.3

71.7 66.2

73.4

13

Do. Lowest

55.6

53.6

58.9

66.5

73.4

78.7

80.1

80.0

78.6

74.5 67.2 58.8

70.4

Maximum Tem-

perature

64.6

62.1

66.8

74.6

81.4

85.0

86.5

86.3

85.3

$0.9

74.4 67.8

76.3

17

Do. Highest

69.0

68.6

72.9 77.7

83.9 87.2

88.7

88.8

87.3

84.3

76.0 71.2

78.2

""

Do. Lowest

60.2

56.4

61.8

"2

71.5 78.6 83.3

84.2

83.6

82.5

78.1

71.8 64.2

74.2

Minimum Tem-

perature......

56 3

54.6

59.3

66.9

73.5 77.3

78.2

77.5

76.6

72.6

65.1

58.6

68.1

*

Do. Highest

62.2

59.2

64,5

69.6

76.0

789 79.9

79.1 78.4

75.6

68.7

62.4

69.6

*

Do. Lowest

51.5

50.5

55.9

63.7

71.8

76.0

76.0

75.9

74.1 70.4

62.1

54.0 66.9

11

Relative Humidi-

ty (io)

74

76

Dio. Highest

83

87

85

83

91

3+

Do. Lowest

63

48

74

19

168

85

83

83

89

87

81

79

888

86

85

79

262

82

79

88888888

83

77

86

$4

78

65 62

8823

71

80

959

65

76

57

88888

66

80

80

52

282

77

75

Vapour Tension

(inches).

0.395

0.379

0.483 0.637

0.773

0.867

0.893

0 884

0.802

0.652 0.478 0.389 0.636

19

Do. Highest

Do. Lowest

0.514 0.479 0.581 0.698 0.849 0.914 0.322 0.215 0.416 0.569 0.712 0.821

0.924

0.866

0.912 0.880 0.796 0.591 0.510 0.663 0.852 0.687 0.543 0.401

0.286

0.597

.

Bright Sunshine

(hours)

Do. Highest

142.8 87.8 82.4 104.3 238.8 207.5 182.3 160.0

Do. Lowest

77.0 16.3 25.0 53.3

153.8 156.2 201.8 201.6 196.6 212.3 189.6 256.0 246.5 259.6 281.2 245.7 281.1 2946

82.5

84.7 130.6 151.8 161.3 150.9 122.9

179.2

254.4

1908.4 2126.2

71.9 1706.2

Cloudiness (%).....

64

76

Do. Highest

90

97

Do. Lowest

35

37

85

83

81

74

76

97

89

$5

57

61

54

216

92

55

888888888

68

64

57

80

78

70

50

53

5895

51

51

51

66

69

73

82

40

27

9

21

25

72

57

Rainfall (inches)

"1

Do. Highest Do. Lowest

0.000

1.458 1.750 2.863 5.882 | 12,295| 16.383 12.770 14.201 9.637 4.562 8.430 7.945 11.485 14.890 48.840 34.375| 28.235| 27.865| 30.595 | 17.870

0.020 0.170 1.235 1.150 2.335 4.575 3.970 0.635 0.015 0.010

1.452

1.185 84.438

7.320

4.285 119.715 0.000 45.835

t

(m.p.h.)

Wind Direction.

Greatest Depar- ture towards N.

Do.

Wind Velocity

Do. Highest Do. Lowest

"

E 28 NE 51 NE 17

"

S.

E 14° NE 14° NE 7° NE 10 NE 13° SE 53° SE 56° SE 49° SE 11° N E 190 NE 29° NE 25° NE 4° S

I NE 14 NE 7 NE 17 SIE 7 SE 3 NE 52 NE 74 NE 61 NE 47 NE 11 N E 11 SE 3 N E E 19 SE 50 SS 22 WS 20 WS 49 WE 10 S E E 10 NE 1 NE 18 S

་་

13.8 14.5 15.9 18.1 18.5

19.2 11.0

11.3

12.5

14.9 13.0 12.4 18.9 16.0 15.6 12.2 10.1 9.9

10.9 14.3 7.8

190

6.9

17.2 11.5

9.7 11.9 14.6 13.1 12,4 13.1 13.2 5.4

17.4 15.1 9.6 10.5

14.8

12.2

Not corrected 10 Standard Gravity.

Table XV.

STATEMENT OF ANNUAL EXPENDITURE ON THE OBSERVATORY DEpartment.

TOTAL EXPENDITURE.

INCREASE.

YEAR.

DECREASE.

$

C.

$

('.

$

C.

1900 1901

18,651.55

18,111.10

540.45

1902

22,480.98

4.369.88

1903

22,780.97

1904

21,937.15

1905

21,220.40

1906

19,995.17

299.99

843.82

716.75

1,225.23

1907

20.110.53

1908

21,110.61

115.36 1,000.08

N.B.-Tables III, IV, VI, VII, VIII, X, XII, XIII and XIV will be found in • Metemological Observations 1908".

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR 1908.

1.-ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1908 was 206, and there were 280 pending at the of that commencement year as against 261 and 162 respectively in 1907. 168 were disposed of during the year, 58 being settled or with- drawn before trial; 1 transferred to Summary Jurisdiction and 1 transferred to Admiralty leaving a balance of 316 undisposed of, as against 143, 39 and 280 respectively in 1907.

The total amount involved was $2,466,274.90, as against $3,276,203.22 in 1907. The debts and damages recovered amounted to $902,846.20, as against $809,049.36 in 1907.

The total fees collected amounted to $15,341, as against $16,201 in 1907.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages (0.2) (0.3) (Ö. 4) and (Y. 3) and (Y. 4) of the Blue Book for the

current year.

2.-SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted was 1.735 during the year and 225 were brought forward from 1907, as against 1,894 and 243 respectively in 1907. 1,838 were disposed of, 724 being settled or withdrawn before trial, 184 being struck out, dismissed, and lapsed Writs, 135 struck out of the Cause-Book as having been standing over generally for more than a year, leaving a balance of 122, as against 1,912, 792, 231 and 225 respectively in

1907.

The total amount involved was $345,051.29, and the debts and damages recovered amount- ed to $111,283.15, as against $474,500.43 and $183,952.21 respectively in 1907.

The total fees collected amounted to $9,261.75, as against $8,705.10 in 1907.

The number of Distress Warrants for Rent issued was 512, representing aggregate unpaid Rents amounting to $60,687.87, of which the aggregate sum of $17,579.95 was re- covered, as against 469, $65,614.26 and $22,122.50 respectively in 1907.

270 Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties, as against 229 in 1907. The total fees collected amounted to $2,729.50 as against $2,770 in 1907.

3.-CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 26 cases and 59 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 34 and 70 respectively in 1907.

The number of persons actually indicted was 53, of whom 26 were convicted and 27 were acquitted. Against 6 persons no Indictments were filed. In 1907 the figures were respectively 56, 48 and 8.

4. APPELLATE JURISDICTTION.

There were 5 Appeals instituted during the year, riz.:-

riz. :-

From the decision of the Chief Justice,

3 as against 5 in 1907.

>>

""

j་

of the Puisne Judge,

1

3

j་

Magistrates......

Award of Arbitrator,

4

""

""

0

">

་་

!

5

13

of which the following were disposel of, riz. :—

From the Chief Justice,

2

""

Puisne Judge, Magi-trates,

1

་ ་

4

9

The decision of the Privy Council in the case of Leuba r. J. Ullmann & Co. (V. J. Action No. 142 of 1902), reached the Colony on the 14th September, 1908. The Appeal was allowed, with costs.

G 2

Leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted in three cases, viz. :-

(1) in Carlowitz & Co. v. Lombard Steamship Co. Limited (0. J. Action No. 153

of 1903).

(2) in Li Yau Sam v. Russo-Chinese Bank, (0. J. Action No. 27 of 1907).

(3) in Tung Lok Tong & others v. Reuter Bröckelmann & Co., (0. J. Action No. 103 of 1907).

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

There were 4 Actions instituted during the year and 3 were pending in 1907; 4 were disposed of, and 1 was settled before trial, leaving 2 pending.

The number of vessels arrested was 1.

The total fees collected amounted to $352 as against $314.50 in 1907.

6.-BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

There were 34 Petitions filed, 23 being Creditors' Petitions, and 11 being Petitions by the Debtors themselves. The figures for 1907 were respectively 51, 34 and 17.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 30, being 21 on Creditors' Petitions, and 9 on Debtors' Petitions. The figures in 1907 were respectively 46, 31 and 15, and 1 Administration Order.

The number of Public Examinations held was 22, as against 34 in 1907.

There were 14 Adjudications; 1 Scheme of Arrangement was approved by the Court. The figures in 1907 were 39 Adjudications, 2 Compositions and 1 Scheme of Arrangement approved by the Court.

There were 2 Discharges, as against 3 in 1907.

The aggregate amount of declared Assets was $776,144.03 and declared Liabilities $1,261,136.27, as against $860,308.99 and $2,383,714.06 respectively in 1907.

The Fees amounted to $6,176.02, including the Official Receiver's commission as Trustee where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors, as against $6,255.25 in 1907.

7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

There were 234 Grants made by the Court, being :-

Probates,.

Letters of Administration,

101

133

234

The figures in 1907 were respectively 82 and 92.

The aggregate value of the Estates was $3,405,400, as against $12,675,740 in 1907. Probate Duties amounted to $81,136.00. Additional Probate Duty paid in 1908- $120.60. Court Fees amounted to $8,236.40 and Official Administrator's Commission to $1,812.13. The figures in 1907 were respectively $368,938.00, $11,820.90 and $1,468.13. No additional Probate Duty was received during that year.

There were 69 Estates vested in, or administered by, the Official Administrator during the year, representing an aggregate value of $14,978.17. The figures for 1907 were respectively 42 and $24,560.78.

28 Estates were wound up during the year, representing an aggregate value of $42,479.69, as against 22 in 1907 representing $20,977.40.

S.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The total number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of 1908 was 25 and the aggregate amount of Trust funds $115,052.42 as against 27 Estates aggregating $116,215.47 in 1907, and certain house property.

The amount of commission collected was $234.99, as against $728.47 in 1907.

9.-REGISTRATION OF COMPANIES.

The total number of Companies registered from the commencement of the "Companies Ordinance, 1865," was 561 with an aggregate capital of $256,761,334.00.

G 3

Of the 561 Companies on the Register 99 are defunct, 2 were not floated, 123 were wound up and 66 were in the course of being wound up, leaving 271 on the Register at the end of 1908 representing an aggregate capital of $353,246,635.

The figures in 1907 were respectively 530, $245,155.03, 530, 94, 2, 120, 52, 262 and $163,434,528.

There were 31 Companies registered in 1908, as compared with 29 in 1907, the revenue from which was:

$4,858.00 as against $4,227.50 in 1907.

Registration Fees,. Filing and other Fees,

...

1,931.20

$6,789.20

2)

$1,969.90

$6,197.40

The number of licences granted under section 4 of "The Companies (Local Registers) Ordinance 1907" (No. 16 of 1907) enabling Companies operating outside the Colony to keep Local Registers of Members was 90.

The aggregate Capital of such Companies was $54,402,012.47.

The fees in respect of such licences amounted to $21,508.21.

The number of Companies authorized under section 5 of the same Ordinance to keep Registers of Members at their Head Offices instead of at their Registered Offices in this Colony was 33.

The fees in respect of such authorization amounted to $62.

10. FEES AND COMMISSIONS.

The total sums collected during the year by way of Fees and Commissions amounted to $46,592.80, as against $56,156.78 in the previous year.

11.-STAFF.

Mr. JOSEPH HORSFORD KEMP, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, was transferred to the Magistracy to act as First Police Magistrate on the 8th April; and was subsequently appointed Head of the Sanitary Department with effect from 18th November.

Mr. JOHN ROSKRUGE WOOD, Assistant Land Officer for the New Territories, was appointed Deputy Registrar and Appraiser in succession to Mr. KEMP, but since he was acting as Second Magistrate at the time his place in this Department was temporarily filled by Mr. Charles Alexander Dick Melbourne, Magistrates' Clerk.

Mr. JOHN WILLIAM LEE-JONES, Deputy Registrar and Accountant, proceeded on 12 months' leave on the 12th December; and Mr. GEORGE ALBERT WOODCOCK, Secretary to the Sanitary Board, was appointed to act in his place.

Mr. JAMES DYER BALL, Chief Interpreter, proceeded on 12 months' leave on the 25th January, and Mr. LI HONG MI, Second Interpreter, was appointed to act in his place. Mr. JOHN ALFRED MACKIE, Third Interpreter, acted as Second Interpreter, and Mr. WONG KWONG TIN, Interpreter in the Registrar General's Office, was appointed to act as Third Interpreter.

Mr. INAYAT ULLAH MIRZA, 2nd Clerk of Court and Clerk to the Puisne Judge, returned from leave on the 27th April and resumed his duties.

Mr. FREDERICK HOWELL, First Bailiff, proceeded on 12 months' leave on the 9th May, and Mr. JOSEPH LEONARD, Second Bailiff, was appointed to act for him, Mr. ARTHUR WILLIAM HILL, Clerk and Usher, replacing him as Second Bailiff and Mr. WILLIAM JORDAN UNWIN, Police Constable, replacing Mr. HILL as Clerk and Usher.

7th May, 1909.

ARATHOON SETH,

Registrar.

Number of Cases.

Number of Persons.

G 4

Table I.

(See Blue Book 1908. p. (Y. 3).)

RETURN OF CRIMINAL CASES tried during the year 1908.

Sentence.

CRIME.

Charges

Cases

abandoned.

postponed.

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Death recorded.

Hard Labour over

one year.

Hard Labour, one year and under.

Solitary Confinement.

Privately flogged.

No. of Cases.

Armed assault with intent to rob

1

2

Armed robbery

1

Assault with intent to rob

1

12

Conspiracy.

12

3

1

5

6

5

12 Robbery

2

3

Uttering forged Bank notes

Falsely applying to goods a certain mark

so nearly resembling a registered Trade

Mark as to be calculated to deceive....

Forgery

Larceny

Manslaughter

Murder

2be stolen goods

2

1

11

- orci i os

Uttering forged Promissory notes..

2

2

Wounding with intent to cause grievous

bodily harm

2

26

53

26

27

Note-Indicted

11

3

2

24

I

Either not indicted or Nolle prosequi entered (included under

the heading of "Charges abandōned ”) ................

53

B5

G

59

:

Co

6

Table II.

(See Blue Book 1908. p. (O. 3).)

COMPARATIVE RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the REGISTRY of the SUPREME COURT, during the years 1907 and 1908, and paid into the TREASURY.

1907.

1908.

REGISTRAR.Court Fees paid by Stamps,

$ (. 42,885.20

$ 36,902.90

OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR.-5% on amounts encashed

and paid into the Treasury,

1.168.13

1.602.79

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2% on amount of Trust on taking

over up to $10,000, above $10,000 Commission 1%, & 2% on income,

728.17

90.91

BAILIFF'S FEES.-(including what was hitherto des-

cribed as Sheriff's Fees),

1,354.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

6.197.40

1.197.00 6.789.20

FINES AND FORFEITURES,

275.00

10.00

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS,

A

Unclaimed Balances of Intestate Estates,

Unclaimed Dividends in Bankruptcy Estates,

20.25 3,228.33

$ 56,156.78

$ 46,592.80

Table III.

(Sec Blue Book 1908. p. (0. 31.)

TABLE showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and EXPENDITURE and REVENUE of the

SUPREME COURT.

Year.

Total No. of Cases dealt

(FROM 1900 To 1908.)

Expenditure.

Revenue.

Total.

with.

Increase. Decrease. Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Percentage of Revenue to Ex- penditure.

$

C.

$

C.

$

$

C.

//

1900,

646 57,091.55

4,948.44

40,234.91 3,172.96

70-47

1901,

764

62,179.09

5,087.5£

39,904.72

33.19

64.17

1902,

1,070

70,617.65 8,438.56

80,275.42

9,629.30

42.87

1903,

968

1904,

1,038

75,544.52 4,926.87 58.681.03

41,758,83 1,483.41

55.27

16,863.49

1905,

1,166 | 66,711,72

1906,

1,039

1907,

1,031

8,030.69 69,667.23 2,955.51 69,592.75

49,108.37 61,984.60 12,876.32

7,849.54

83.68

92-91

52,904.11

9,080.58

75.93

71.48

1908.

1,014 | 87,270.40 17,077.65

56,156.78 3,252.67 46,392,80

80.69

9,563.98

53.3%

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

Appendix H.

REPORT ON THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS.

Mr. H. H. J. GOMPERTZ, who has since been appointed Puisne Judge, acted as Puisne Judge from the 21st March to the end of the year. Mr. F. A. HAZELAND, 2nd Police Magistrate, acted as 1st Police Magistrate from the 21st March to the 7th April: he was absent on leave from the 8th April to the end of the year. Mr. J. H. KEMP, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, Supreme Court, acted as 1st Police Magistrate from the 8th April to the 29th October and from the 13th November to the end of the year. Mr. J. R. Woon. Assistant Land Officer, acted as 2nd Police Magistrate from the 21st March to the end of the year and as 1st Police Magistrate from the 30th October to the 12th November. D. MELBOURNE, Magistrates' Clerk, sat as Magistrate on two days.

Mr. C.

The number of cases was 10,555 as compared with 13,414 in 1907. The revenue was $68,696.43 as compared with $67,133.26 for 1907.

30th April, 1909.

J. H. KEMP,

Police Magistrate.

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Magistracy for the years 1900 to 1908.

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE.

YEAR.

Total. Increase. Decrease. Total.

Increase. Decrease.

Total Number of Cases tried.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

*

C.

(.

C.

('.

%%

20,914.59

1900 1901 23,794.23 2,879.64 1902 29,050.62 5,256.39

1903 38,046.30 8,995.68 1904 38,486.48 440.18

4.38.99

71,834.61 31,159.57 68,764.55 96,723.26 27,958.71 71,310.77

14,081

29.11

3,070.06 14,531

34.60

16,070

30-03

25,412.49

14,268

53.35

95,405.12 24,094.35

14,505

40.34

1905

35,762.86

2,723.62

88,145.26

7,259.86

13,450

40.57

1906

39,303.16 3,540.30

79,557.64

8,587.62

13,871

49.40

1907

40,455.52 1,152.36

67,133.26

12,424.38

13,414

60.26

1908 46,018.18 5,562.66

68,696.43

1,563.17

10,555

66.98

+

I 2 -

of being thrown into the Bay, so he drew his revolver and fired a shot in the air. Two of the three became alarmed, and ran and left the Constable and the third man struggling on the road. The constable fired a second shot which struck the deceased in the abdomen and caused his death.

A Magistrate's enquiry was held-Verdict: Shot by the Constable in self defence.

GANG ROBBERIES.

6. Twenty-six gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 6 in 1907.

In 21 cases no arrest was made, in the remaining 5 cases arrests were made as follows:--

....1 convicted 3 discharged.

In one case,

19

>>

1

""

1

19

1 .3

3

19

1

"

""

1907.

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

7. Fifteen street and Highway robberies were reported during the year as against 22 in

In connection with 9 of these no arrest was made.

In the remaining 6 cases arrests were made as follows:-

In one case,

"

.1 convicted.

""

·

..1

1 discharged. 3

1

39

3

"

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND Junks.

8. Ten cases were reported to the Police during the connection with 7 cases no arrest was made. In te rem follows:-

In one case

as against 4 in 1907. In 3 cases arrests were as

convicted.

>>

discharged.

FELONIES NOT ALREADY GIVEN.

9. Under this heading are comprised the following :

Arson and attempted arson,

Administering Poison,

Malicious damage to property,

Cutting and wounding,

Demanding money by menaces, Embezzlement,......

Forgery.

1908.

1907.

1

1

1

1

9

17

5

11

30

27

11

22

Housebreaking,

151

135

Murder,

15

14

Manslaughter,

7

Indecent assault and rape,

1

...

Shooting with intent to murder,

1

Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm,

5

3

Abominable offences,

2

Total,

232

247

GAMBLING.

10. One hundred and thirty-two gambling warrants were executed and convictions obtained as against 147 in 1907.

Appendix I.

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE AND OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,562 as against 11.510 in 1907 being a decrease of 1,978 or 17-14 per cent.

In the division of these cases into Serious and Minor Offences, there appars a decrease, as compared with 1907, of 64 cases, or 1·93 per cent. in the former, and of 1,914 cases, or 23.24 per cent. in the latter.

The decrease, as compared with 1907 in Serious Offences of 64 is shown as follows:-

Decrease.

Unlawful Possession,

24

Larcenies,

Felonies not already given,

Burglary,

101

16

t

145

Increase.

Murder,

1

Robbery,.....

19

Larceny from Dwelling,

56

Kidnapping and Protection of women and children,

5

81

Nett Decrease,

64

2. Table I shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during 1907 and 1908 and the number of persons convicted in connection with these Offences

3. Fifteen murders w

MURDER.

porte to the Police during the year as against 14 in 1907. In connection with of these reports no arrest was made. In four cases fourteen men were arrested on suspicion but for want of sufficient evidence the charges were withdrawn.

In the remaining six cases, arrests were made as follows:-

In one case

""

....6 convicted.

.1

""

.3

11

""

""

.3 discharged.

""

19

In the last case two were convicted and one discharged, but the conviction was subsequently quashed on technical grounds.

CUTTING AND WOUNDI G.

4. Two reports were made to the Police as against none in 1907.

In each case one arrest was made and a conviction obtained.

JUSTIFIABLE HOMICIDE.

While

5. On the 12th of July C.C. 343 Cheng Chau while on duty in plain clothes at Stanley shot and killed one Chan Sui while acting in self defence. On the day in question the C.C. was sent out to arrest persons found trespassing on Crown Land and cutting trees. on the Stanley road overlooking Tytan Bay he saw three men coming towards him. One was carrying a parcel. He stopped the men and examined the parcel which he found contained dynamite. He attempted to arrest the man carrying the parcel, when all three set upon him. The Constable was getting the worst of it and thought there was a danger

11,500,000

11,300,000

11,200,000

11,000,000

10,000,000

9,900.000

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600.000

9,500,000.

9,400,000

9,300.000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000

8,900,000 1

8,800,000

8,700,000

$,600.000

8.500,000

TONS.

1067.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 io.

RE

LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

DOTTELU BLACK LINE represents German Shipping Tonnage on! DOTTED RED\LINE represents Japanese Shipping Tonnage only. BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only. GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage. YELLOW LIN represents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Tr VIOLET LINE represents Steam-launch Tonnage only, excluding L THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in British and Forei

1577.

~

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881. 1882.

1883.

1834.

1895.

ISSO.

1887.

*8381

1889.

1800.

1891.

1892.

9,100,000

9,000,000

8,900,000 |

8,800,000

8,700,000

8,600.000

8,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

..5,900,000

'5,800,000

3,700,000

5,600,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4.900.000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

.4,100,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

BLACK

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

འཛུགས

3,000,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

BLACK

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000.

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

YELLOW

1,300,000

GREEN 1,200,000

1,100.000

1,000,000

900.000

RED

800,000

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

400,000

༣༠༠,༠༠༠

200,000

DOTTED

BLACK

LIVE

100.000

90,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

BLACK

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000.

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

YELLOW

1,300,000

GREEN

.1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900.000

RED

800,000

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

400,000

300.000

200,000

DOTTED

100,000

BLACK

LINE

90,000

VIOLET

$0.000

50,000

40,000

30,000

DOTTED

20,000

RED

LINE

"

Table

Hongkong, from 1867 to 1908 inclusive.

›ping Tonnage only.

› German Shipping Tonnage only.

panese Shipping Tonnage only.

hipping Tonnage only.

and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

launch Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

і

: entire Trade in British and Foreign Ships, Janks and Steam-launches.

1883.

1884.

185.

IS86.

1887.

ISES.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

190!.

1903.

1906.

1907.

1908.

TONS.

11,500,000

|11,300,000

11,200,000

11,000,000

10,CCC,000

9,900,000

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000

9.100,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000 000

9.-100,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000 000

8,900.000

8,800,000

8,700,000

8,600,000

8,500,000

8,400,000 |

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7.400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000 |

}

¿

6,600,000 !

F

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

| 5,900,000

14

ས་

མ་

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7.100,000

7,200,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000 |

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,500,000

5.100,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

+,900,000

4,800,000

+,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000!

4,400,000

+,300,000

+,200,000

+,100,000

ཀཎཱ

བ་མས་

5,500,000

5,100,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

+,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000 }

+,400,000

4,300,000

+,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900.000

3,800 000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,co?

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,500,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,100,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

اسم

4

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,100,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

.1,400,000__|

1,300,000

1,200,000...

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,400.

800,000

700,009

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000..Į

90,000.

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

I 3

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

11. The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $199,211.10 as against $141,353.98 in 1907.

The value of property recovered by the Police and restored to owners was $20,711.19 as against $18,787.02 in 1907.

LOST PROPERTY.

12. The following is a return showing property lost or recovered :—

Year.

Articles reported lost.

Value lost.

Articles recovered and Articles found which were

Value found.

not reported lost.

1908

309

$19,043.26

1907

293

19,870.72

115

149

$6,898.58

1,870.24

OPIUM WARRANTS.

13. One thousand eight hundred and twenty-one (1,821) Search Warrants for prepared opium were executed by the Police and Excise Officers of the Opium Farmer, as compared with 2,781 in 1907. In 499 cases opium was found and 672 persons were arrested as against 1,057 in 1907.

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

14. The Examiner of Weights and Measures made the following verifications :-

Examined.

Correct.

Incorrect.

European Scales, Chinese Scales, Yard Measures,

Chek Measures,..........

334

332

2

2,433 254

2,411

22

254

435

435

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance:-

No. of Cases.

24

Convictions. 23

Total amount of Fines.

$267.00

One Summons was withdrawn owing to Defendant having absconded.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

15. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance:-

No. of Cases.

10

Convictions. 10

Total amount of Fines. $76.00

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

16. No prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance. Samples collected and sent to Analyst were as follows:-

Brandy.

4

Whisky.

18

All these samples were certified to be genuine.

Port Wine. 3

Ale.

6

*

I 4

MENDICANTS.

17. Thirty-nine beggars were dealt with by the Magistrate, and two sent to Tung Wah Hospital. 135 were sent to Canton as follows:-

Once, Twice,

Thrice,..

How often sent away.

Four times,

Five times,

....

Canton.

128

42

4

2

1

135

·

Total,..

DEAD BODIES.

18. Table II shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year.

LICENCES.

19. The following licences were issued during 1908 :--

1,175 Hongkong Jinrickshas. (Reduced by 100 on 1st June, and 75 on 1st

December, 1908.)

50 Quarry Bay Jinrickshas.

250 Kowloon Jinrickshas.

25 Private Vehicles (16 Carriages, 5 Motor Cars and 4 Hearses).

1,118 Truck Licences.

589 Hongkong Chairs.

60 Hill District Chairs.

3 Gharis.

17,350 Drivers and Bearers. They are continually coming and going, hence the

large number.

DOG ORDINANCE.

20. 1,760 dogs were licensed during 1908.

17 watch dogs were licensed free of charge.

114 dogs were destroyed.

134 stray dogs were impounded and restored to owners or ransome 1.

ARMS ORDINANCE.

21. Four licences to import and deal in arms and two to deal in sporting arms and ammunition were issued during 1908. During the whole year a Proclamation has been in force prohibiting the export of warlike stores from the Colony. The following arms and ammunition were confiscated during the year, viz. :-

Sixteen rifles (1 incomplete), 5 muskets, 5 shot guns (1 incomplete), 29 revolvers, 10,694 rounds ammunition (mixed), 35 boxes primers, 6 boxes caps, 20 swords, 3 choppers, 4 fighting irons, 40 lb. gunpowder, 20 lb. dynamite, a small quantity of fuse, 19 lb. shot, 2 ammunition belts, 6 re-filling machines, 5 boxes detonators, 450 cartridge cylinders, 1 hunting knife, 1 life preserver, and 2 holsters.

EDUCATION.

22. During the year 6 Europeans and 78 Indians obtained certificates for knowledge- of Chinese and 10 Indians obtained certificates for English.

MUSKETRY.

23. The Europeans and Indians were put through the usual course of Musketry, 65 Europeans (56.52 of strength) and 99 Indians (26.25 of strength) qualified as marksmen.

1

I 5

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

24. 158 males and one female were identified as having previous convictions against them. This number is 26 less than during the year 1907. 66 identifications were those of criminals who had returned from banishment: 19 were on record as having paid fines in lieu of going to gaol.

CONDUCT.

25. The conduct of the European contingent (average strength 126) was very good. The total number of reports against them was 37 as against 56 in 1907.

There were 6 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 16 in 1907; 2 for sleep- ing on duty as against one, I for disorderly conduct and 8 for neglect of duty.

The conduct of the Indian contingent (average strength 388) was on the whole good. There were 401 reports as against 465 for the preceding year. For drunkenness there were 38 as against 61, for disorderly conduct 30, as against 23, for neglect of duty 33 as against 52, for absence from duty 38 as against 51, for gossiping and idling on duty 77 as against 91 and for sleeping on duty 24 as against 40. 178 men had no report. Fourteen Indian Constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (10 dismissed from the Force):-1 for obtaining money by false pretences, 1 for allowing a prisoner to escape, 3 for giving false testimony, 2 for disorderly conduct, 5 for assault, 1 for receiving a bribe, and 1 for larceny.

The bahaviour of the Chinese contingent (average strength 328) was fair. There were altogether 1,044 reports, as against 1,086 in 1907. There were two reports for drunkenness as against 5, 112 for sleeping on duty as against 104, 17 for disorderly conduct as against 11, and 374 for minor offences as against 356. One Sergeant Interpreter was convicted by the Police Magistrate for larceny and 11 Constables (9 dismissed) for the following offences:-1 for allowing a prisoner to escape, 3 for assault. 2 for robbery, 2 for larceny, 1 for absence from Station and duty, and 2 for misconduct.

96 men of this contingent were not reported during the year.

The Seamen, Coxswains, Engineers and Stokers (average strength 114) had 215 reports as compared with 228 for last year. For drunkenness there was no report (same as last year), 106 for absence from Station and late for duty as against 192 in the previous year.

Three seamen were convicted by the Police Magistrate, one for assault and two for larceny.

45 had no report recorded against them.

His Excellency the Governor was pleased to highly commend the Police for services rendered by them during the typhoon of the 27th July, the boycott riots of the 1st and 2nd November, and on several other occasions during the year.

REWARDS.

26. One Inspector was granted a medal for long and meritorious service, one luspector and one European Sergeant were commended by His Excellency the Governor and granted medals for services in the Sha Tin murder case and the robbery at Tailong Bay. One European Sergeant was granted a reward for plucky arrest of an armed burglar after receiving severe injuries.

One Indian Sergeant was granted a reward for zeal and intelligence displayed in a case of larceny.

One Chinese Sergeant was granted a medal for good work done in connection with an assault case, one Chinese Sergeant was granted a reward for zeal and activity shown in recovering stolen property and six Chinese Constables were granted rewards for plucky conduct, zeal and activity shown in the discharge of their duties.

STRIKE.

27. All the ricksha coolies went on strike on the 6th January in consequence of a notice issued by ricksha owners raising the fee charged by them per diem.

Matters appear- ed threatening in the morning and Inspectors Gourlay and Collett in the Eastern and Western Districts had hard work to keep order. The Police in the Central District were confined to Barracks to meet any emergency.

The ricksha owners and some representatives of the coolies were sent for by the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police and taken by him to the Registrar General's Office, where he, with the Hon. Dr. Ho Kai, Hon. Mr. Wei Yuk, the lion. Registrar General and the District

Appendix J.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISON.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the correspon ling number for the year 1907 were as follows:-

Convicted by Ordinary Courts,

Courts-Martial,

1908.

1907.

4,005

5,027

18

9

17

>>

71

the Land Courts,

1

་་

""

17

,, Capt. Supdt. of Police....

Commodore, R.N.,

1

6

1

.....

Supreme Court for China and Corea,

6

High Court, Weihaiwei,

3

Debtors,...

86

94

On remand or in default of finding surety,... 665

733

4,778

5,877

There was thus a decrease of 1,099 on the total number of admissions as compared with the year 1907. There was also a de rease of prisoners convicted for Larceny during the year under review the number being 845 against 963 for the previous year.

2. The number of prisoners admitted to prison for offences not of a criminal nature was 2,803 made up as follows

Convicted by Courts Martial,

18

3)

"}

the Captain Superintendent of Police,

1

Debtors,

86

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

630

"2

11

Gambling Ordinance,

452

::

"}

Market Ordinance,

309

"}

Arms Ordinance,

20

71

Vehicle Ordinance,..

43

91

1

Sanitary Bye-laws,.

43

*

""

Harbour Regulations,

138

"

Weights and Measures Ordinance,

1

for

Drunkenness,

33

"

""

Cruelty to Animals,

4

""

Trespassing,

82

15

""

Disorderly conduct,

318

Vagrancy,

30

""

Contempt of Court,

2

"?

""

Assault,

137

""

Obstruction,

77

Cutting trees,

63

>>

??

Fighting,

16

""

Mendicancy,

40

under the Post Office Ordinance,

2

Police Ordinance,

1

"

for Rogue

and Vagabond,

95

under the

Women & Girls' Protection Ord.

24

>>

""

Stowaway Ordinance,

116

..

""

Servants' Quarters Ordinance,

17

7

""

Chinese Wine & Spirit Ordinance,

5

Total,

2,803

The above figures show that 68% of the total admissions to prison were for non- criminal offences.

J 2 -' _

3. The following Table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine :-

IN DEFAULT OF PAYMENT OF FINE.

WITHOUT OPTION

TOTAL.

OF FINE.

Served the imprisonment.

Paid full fine. Paid part fine.

1,414

1,604

522

487

4,027

4. There were 143 juveniles admitted into prison 44 of whom were sentenced to be whipped in addition to various terms of imprisonment varying from twenty-four hours' detention to one month's imprisonment with hard labour. There was an increase of 37 juveniles convicted during the year 1908, as compared with the year 1907, (62 more than 1906).

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 12.0 as compared with 150 for 1907.

6. There were 151 prisoners adınitted who were convicted by the Magistrates' Courts in the New Territories against 141 for the previous year (152 in 1906).

7. The following Table shows the number of prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage borne by this number to the estimated population :-

Daily average number of Prisoners.

Percent- age to Population.

Year.

Estimated Population. Convicts.

No. of

Percentage

to

Population.

1899

344,323

96

⚫027

432

•125

1900

347,689

141

·040

486

•139

1901

385,671

180

*046

499

•129

1902

396,835

215

*054

576

•145

1903

410,642

245

·059

653

•159

1904

446,217

243

*054

726

•162

1905

462,861

216

•046

697

•150

1906

414,049

156

⚫037

518

*125

1907

414,415

146

•035

502

•121

1908

420,741

130

·038

465

•110

8. There were 593 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline, being an average of 1.27 per prisoner as compared with 755 with an average per prisoner of 1.50 for the preceding year. There were 6 cases in which corporal punishment was awarded during the year, five of which were with the birch sentenced by the Assistant Superintendent alone and one with the Cat-o'-nine-tails sentenced by the Superintendent in conjunction with a Justice of the Peace.

There were also 74 prisoners whipped by order of the Courts.

9. There was one escape.

10. There were 10 deaths from natural causes, 2 suicides and 1 birth. Thirty prisoners were released on medical grounds.

11. Owing to the low number of prisoners in custody the Branch Prison was temporarily closed on the 31st January, 1908.

12. Prisoners employed at Industrial Labour were fully employed during the year and the output was quite satisfactory.

13. There were 5,521.332 forms printed and issued to the various Government Depart- ments and 16,873 books bound and repaired during the year under review.

J 3

J

14. The rules and regulations for the government of the prison have been duly carried out.

15. The sanitary condition of the prison is good.

16. All minor repairs to Gaol have been carried out by prison labour.

17. On the 19th August 1908 I returned from leave and resumed my duties as Superin- tendent.

18. From 15th January 1908 to the end of the year Mr. C. D. Melbourne acted as Assistant Superintendent during the absence on leave of Mr. R. H. A. Craig.

19. The conduct of the Staff has been good.

12th January, 1909.

F. J. BADELEY,

Superintendent.

J 4

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1908.

Expenditure.

Amount.

Income.

Amount.

$

$

C.

Pay and allowance of Officers including

Earning of prisoners,

45,420.48

uniforms, &c., ....

67,030.32

Victualling of prisoners,

13,935.10

Paid by Military for subsistence of Military

prisoners,.

72.90

Fuel, light, soap and dry earth,

8,923.00 Paid by Navy for subsistence of Naval

prisoners,

197.40

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, furniture,

&c.,

5,649.48 Debtors' subsistence,

808.25

Weihaiwei prisoners' subsistence,

648.90

Shanghai prisoners' subsistence,

709.90

Vagrants' subsistence,

77.70

$ 95,537.85

Waste food sold,

Actual cost of prisoners' maintenance,.

130.80

47,471.52

>

$

95,537.85

Average annual cost per prisoner,—$102,09—in 1907, $98.86.

Table II.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Year.

Expenditure.

Income.

Actual cost of prisoners' inaintenance.

Average cost per prisoner.

C.

C.

1900.....

63,946.94

19,721.70

44,225,2 1

90.99

1901.......

73,102.37

29,033.70

44,048.67

88.27

1902....

96,311.53

33,523.09

62,788.14

108.92

1903....

108,139.60

34,136.61

74,002.96

113.33

1904

113,251.48

37,186 64

76,064.81

:

104.77

1905........

110,687.83

39,414.50

71,243.33

102.21

1906.....

96,202.08

39,613.26

56,588.82

109.24

1907......

89,711.39

40,079.90

49,631.49

98.86

1908.....

1

95,537.85

48,066.33

47,471.62

102.09

Oakum,

Coir,....

Net-making,

Tailoring....

Rattan,....

Tin-smithing,

Nature of Industry.

1.

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the Year 1908.

Value of Stock

on hand

3.

2.

Value of

January 1st,

1908.

Material

purchased.

Total Dr.

4.

Value of Articles manufactured or work done for payment.

5.

Value of Articles manufactured or work done for Gaol or other Departments.

6.

Value of Stock

7.

on hand December 31st,

1908.

Total Cr.

Carpentering,

Grass-matting,

Shoe-making,

Laundry,.

Printing and Book-binding,

8.

Value of

Earnings

(Difference

between columns 3 and 7.)

(.

8

(.

$

$

2,875.76

2,875.76

1,475.82

56.25

1,559.36

3,091,43

215.67

1.411.81

921.54

2,333.35

2,378.27

172.95

886.63

3,437,85

1,104.50

3.46

161.24

164.70

425.80

28.00

453.80

289.10

228.90

1,527.05

1,755.95

104.74

1,621.38

148.70

2,174.82

418.87

12.87

40.60

53.47

30.35

178.20

208.55

155.08

3.50

75.67

79.17

10.39

158.28

1.60

170.27

91.10

604.93

503.64

1,108.57

238.45

665.61

587.87

1.491.93

383.36

36

150,27

10.40

10.76

10.80

1.60

12.40

1.64

9.97

4,461.13

3,379,54

844.45

9,335.37

3,529.81

269.55

3,550.55

144.29

3.964.39

434.58

854.42

11.15

4,456.56

3.20

4,470.91

3,616.49

13,796.50

178.65

-47,893.64

4,434.30

52.506.59

38,710.09

Total,

9,762.96

16,799.50

26,562.46

*

* 5,123.17

58,764.22

8,095.55

71,982.94

45,420.48

* Paid into Bank during 1908 which sum includes $103.10 for work executed in 1907, $5 012 57.

Value of work excented during 1908 for which payment was deferred to 1909. $213 70,

+

J 6

Table IV.

Return showing the Employment of Prisoners and the Value of their Labour, during the year 1908.

Description of Employment.

SUNDAYS, CHRISTMAS DAY, GOOD FRIDAY AND

CHINESE NEW YEAR'S DAY :-

Cooking,

Cleaning,

Non-productive,

Totals,....

Daily Average number of Prisoners.

Value of Prison Labour.

Males.

Females. Totals.

1.0

10

23

1

24

419

12

432

152

13

465

GA

C.

66.00 132.00

OTHER DAYS :-

Debtors, Remands, On punishment, Sick, Crank, Shot, Shot and Stone,

36

36

57

57

In Manufactories :-

Book-binding,..

11

41

2,550.20

Printing,

46

46

2,861.20

Printing labourers,.

18

18

559.80

Oakum picking,

63

65

404.30

Coir-matting,

36

36

1,679.40

Shoe-making,

13

13

808.60

Tailoring,.

13

N

15

699.75

Net-making, String-making, and Ships'

48

48

1,492.80

In Building: --

fender-making,.

Carpentering and Fitting,

In Service of the Prison :-

Laundry,....

Cooking, Cleaning,..

White-washing,

&&58

13

13

808.60

30

38

1,772.70

10

10

373.20

23

1

24

746.40

5

155.50

Totals,...

152

13

465

$15,110.45

Appendix K.

MEDICAL AND SANITARY REPORTS.

ANNEXE C.-REPORT OF THE

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Page.

ANNEXE A.-JOINT REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER AND THE

MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH,.....

ANNEXE B.-REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

2

.29

SUPERINTENDENT, CIVIL HOSPITAL,

.29

ANNEXE D.--REPORT OF THE

MEDICAL OFFICER IN CHARGE OF VICTORIA HOSPITAL

FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN,..

.40

ANNEXE E-REPORT ON THE

LUNATIC ASYLUM,

ANNEXE F.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER IN CHARGE OF THE HOSPITALS

FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASES,

ANNEXE G.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER TO VICTORIA GOAL,

··42

....45

..47

ANNEXE H.-REPORT OF THE

RAILWAY MEDICAL OFFICER,

.50

ANNEXE I. REPORT OF THE

MEDICAL LICENTIATE AT TAIPO,

53

ANNEXE J.-REPORT OF THE

....

INSPECTING MEDICAL OFFICER OF THE TUNG WAH

HOSPITAL,

..57

ANNEXE K.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ALICE MEMORIAL.

NETHERSOLE AND HO MIN LING HOSPITALS,............64 GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST, PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA,

ANNEXE L.-REPORT OF THE ANNEXE M.-REPORT ON THE ANNEXE N.-REPORT ON THE ANNEXE O.-REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT ANALYST,

PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON,

ANNEXE P.-REPORT OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE PORT,

ANNEXE Q.-Report of the COLONIAL VETERINARY SURGEON,

.67

..69

.72

.75

.78

...84

K 2

Annexe A.

JOINT REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER AND THE

MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

AREA, ETC.

For administrative purposes the part of the Colony under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board is divided into two primary divisions, viz., the Island of Hongkong and Kowloon-including only a portion, known as New Kowloon, of the New Territories.

The Island of Hongkong is divided into 5 districts, namely, the City of Victoria, the Peak District, and the outlying districts of Shaukiwan, Aberdeen and Stanley.

In the last 3 districts the sanitary inspection is carried out by the Police Officers of those districts.

The City of Victoria is divided into 10 Health Districts with a Sanitary Inspector in charge of each.

The Inspector of Health District III which includes most of the European quarter of the City is also in charge of the Peak.

There are also four Inspectors in Victoria in charge of disinfecting work in the district, and of the special anti-plague measures such as house to house cleansing, rat-collecting, etc., and two Inspectors in charge of the overseeing of the Scavenging and Conservancy Contractor's work.

The Disinfecting Station at Victoria has a special Inspector in charge while in Kowloon the duty is attended to by the Plague Inspector in addition to his duties in the district. There is a special Inspector in Victoria in charge of the Cemeteries at Happy Valley and Mount Caroline. Old Kowloon is still divided into two Health Districts with an Inspector in charge of each. There is also an Inspector in charge of the Scavenging and Conservancy Contractor's work in Old Kowloon.

The sanitary work in Kowloon City and in Sham Shui Po, villages in New Kowloon, is looked after by the Police Officers in charge there.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION.

In connection with anti-plague measures to render houses less liable to rat infestation, 103 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired, and 811 buildings, have had rat-holes filled in with cement under notice from the Sanitary Board. Rat-holes in houses are always filled in by Sanitary Department employees if such are found when houses are being disin- fected, instead of calling on the owners of the property to fill them in under Sanitary Board notice. The actual number of houses thus treated is therefore very much langer than appears from the above figures. In addition 49 basements illegally inhabited were vacated under notice, 33 basement living rooms and 118 basement kitchens were granted permits for occupation and 5 basements were altered to meet the legal requirements.

Open spaces in the rear have been provided to 7 houses, while modifications with respect to the areas of such open spaces have been granted in 36 houses. Exemption from provision of a backyard has been granted in 15 houses and obstructions from back- yards have been removed in 231 cases under notice from the Board. Scavenging lanes have been provided to a total length of 756 feet and an area of 5,078 square feet. Under the direction of the Public Works Department 5,750 lineal feet of nullahs have been trained as an anti-malaria measure and the subsoil drainage of Wong Nei Chung Valley has been much improved.

Three public latrines have been erected during the year, vic., one at Wong Nei Chung, one at Chuk Hing Lane in Victoria, and one at Tai Kok Tsui.

Two markets have been completed during the year, viz., the vegetable market at Yaumati and the market at Sai Wan Ho (Shaukiwan). The new market at Tsim Sha Tsui was begun during the year.

K 3

METEOROLOGICAL RETURN.

The following Table records the meteorological conditions which prevailed during 1908:-

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERATURE,

HUMIDITY.

Max. Mean. Min.

Rel.

Abs.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

Rain.

WIND.

Dir.

Vel.

ins.

0

о

p. c.

ins.

p. c.

January,

30.19 66.8 62.4

58.1 78

0.44

76

hours. 143.2

ins.

Points.

m. p. h.

2.640 E by N

11.3

February,

March,

30.12 62.3 58.3

30.09

54.9

65.9

61.2

57.0 76

19

76 0.38

83

0.42

66

April,......

29.94 71.7

68.5

65.5

May,.

June,.........

29.87 80.8

76.1 72.1

29.78 83.6 80.2 77.2

July,

29.73 87.0 82.3

78.7

August,

29.72 87.3

September, 29.86 85.7

October,......... 29.92 80.8

82.1 78.5

80.9 77.3

76.8 73.4

November,...... 30.09 75.8

70.2 65.6 63

December,....

30.13

67.9

63.3

59.5

Mean or Total, 29.95 76.3 71.8 68.1 79

8 P * N * ✡ ∞ 822

89

0.62

87

79

0.72

84

0.87

82

0.91

83

0.91

84

0.88

78

0.72

0.49

8 8 2 8 8 * 8 Co

88888

87.4

2.830 ENE

14.8

146.0

0.765 E by N

15.4

80.8 11.150

E

18.9

62

219.3

1.325

E

12.3

84

147.8 15.245 SE

13.0

65

227.0 22.262 | S by W

9.1

66

219.9 12.065 ESE

7.1

67

179.8 13.720 | E by N

9.0

69

174.4

5.440 ENE

17.2

60

189.8

0.145 NE

11.7

76

0.45

75

101.7

4.285 N E by E

10.5

0.65

72

1,917.1 91.875 E

12.5

The average rainfall for the decade ending 1897 was 92.6 inches, and for that ending 1907, 77.3 inches.

POPULATION.

The population of the Colony is primarily divided into Chinese and Non-Chinese. The Non-Chinese comprised at the Census of 1906 a white population of 12,925 of whom 6,085 were Civilians while 4,429 belonged to the Navy and 2,411 to the Army. The coloured races (Non-Chinese) numbered 8,500 and included East Indians, Asiatic Por- tuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians and a few others.

The following Table shows the distribution according to nationality of the population as estimated for the year 1908.

European and Americans.

11,252

Africans.

10

East Indians. 4,116

Chinese and

Malays. 316,850

Mixed and Coloured.

Total.

4,260 336,488

The population exclusive of the Army and Navy consists chiefly of male adults. At the 1906 Census the male population was 70.1 per cent. of the total civil population; at the 1901 Census the percentage was 72.6 so there has been as increase in the percentage of females during the past few years.

Of the Chinese population in 1906 70.3 per cent. were males, and over half the civil population (56.9 per cent. of the Chinese and 52.6 per cent. of the Non-Chinese) were be- tween the ages of 20 and 45 years.

The estimated population to the middle of 1908 is as follows:-

Non-Chinese, exclusive of the Army and Navy,

13,200

Chinese :-

City of Victoria (including Peak and Stonecutters' Island), Villages of Hongkong,

177,130

17,330

Kowloon,

74,350

Floating Population,

44,940

Mercantile Marine,..

2,700

316,450

Army (average strength),.. Navy (average strength),

4,483

2,355

Total population of the Colony in 1908 exclusive of the New Territories (except New Kowloon),...

336,488

- K 4

The Chinese population of the New Territories (exclusive of New Kowloon) was 85,011 at the Census taken in 1901 but there are no data as yet on which to base an estimate of increase in population (if any) in this portion of the Colony since that date.

The average strength of the troops in Garrison during 1908 was 141 British Officers and 2,201 British N.C.O.s and men with 35 Indian Officers and 1,664 Indian N.C.O.s and men, and 54 Chinese attached to the Royal Engineers. There were also 348 British women and children, and 40 Indian women and children, making a total of 388.

The average strength of the British Fleet was as follows:-Europeans permanently in the Colony 336, Europeans occasionally in the Colony 5,464, Chinese permanently in the Colony 143, Chinese occasionally in the Colony 164-making a total of 6,107. For the purpose of estimating the population it is considered fair to take as an average only one- third of those "occasionally" resident in the Colony; this gives 2,355.

The Chinese boat population is estimated for 1908 as 44,940 and the number of boats belonging to the port and the villages of Hongkong is as follows:-

Passenger boats,. Cargo boats,

Steam-launches,

Lighters,

Harbour boats,

Fishing junks,

Trading junks,

2,805

1,350

268

151

1,348

4,773

1,760

12,458

In addition there belong to the New Territories:-Passenger boats 493, Fishing junks 8,631, and other boats 31-making a grand total of 21,120.

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and the inmates per house and per floor in the City of Victoria as estimated for the year 1908:-

One Two Three Four Five Health Storey Storey Storey Storey Storey District. Dwell-Dwell- Dwell- Dwell- Dwell-

ings. ings. ings. ings. ings.

Total Dwell- ings.

Average Total No. of Floors. Floors per

Number of Persons per

Number of Persons per

Dwelling.

Dwelling.

Floor.

1...... 161 425 221 2......

32 Nil.

839

1,802

2.1

3 351 573

82

Nil. 1,009

2,752

2.7

15.0

20.1

6.9

7.3

3...... Nil.

11

18

Nil.

Nil.

29

76

2.6

Most of the Chinese of

this district live in quarters

attached to offices.

4...

8

48

562

434

11 1,063

3,581

3.3

22.1

6.5

8......

5...... 14 6..

51 7...... 13 61

1 9.

13 425 457 199 10...... 62 361 341

135 547

283 Nil.

979 3,057

3.1

18.3

5.8

47

455 351

25

929

3,053

3.2

17.0

5.1

443

399

9

925 3,105

3.3

20.2

6.0

75

576

335

14

1,001 3,289

3.2

18.0

5.5

87

4 1,093 Nil.

3,035

2.7

22.8

8.2

851

2,149

2.5

16.7

6.6

*

Total and Averages 1908. Toral and Averages 1907.

3261,939 4,188 2,202

63 8,718 25,899

2.9

20.1

6.7

346 1,980 4,174 2,049

107 8,696 25,719

2.8

20.0

6.8

}

K 5

The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each such district as estimated for the year 1908 :-

Health Districts.

Total Acreage.

Built over Areas in

Acres.

Chinese Dwellings.

Non- Chinese Dwellings.

Chinese Population

Non- Chinese

per Acre Population (built-over).

Persons

531

134

839

159 12,594

1,012

101

2.......

243

140

1,009

73

20,285 {

1,659

163

989 troops.

3...

232

137

29

423

9,070

2,800

86

4.....

56

53

1,063

163

23,564

1,165

466

5........

29

27

979

22

17,975

395

680

6........

30

27

919

10

15,832

342

599

7......

36

31

925

7

. 18,750

104

608

8

49

47

1,001

5

18,110

239

390

9.......

44

44

1,093

16

24,990

146

571

10.......

252

106

851

54

14,260

322

137

Total 1908.

1,502

746

8,701

932

175,430

9,173

247

Total 1907.

1,502

746

8,696

976

174,085

9,803

246

The following Table shows the distribution of the Chinese population of Kowloon according to houses and floors in the different sub-districts into

Kowloon Sub- Districts.

One Storey Two Storey Three Storey Four Storey Dwellings. Dwellings. Dwellings. Dwellings.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Total Dwellings.

Total Floors.

which Kowloon is divided:-

Average Number of Floors per Chinese Dwelling.

Chinese Population.

Number of Persons per Chinese Dwelling.

Number of Persons per

Chinese Floor.

Area

in Acres.

1......

2......

3......

4......

2

5...... 20!

6...... 49

178

:.

:

8

00

:

:.

188

382

1 1,180

:

108

17

69

:

74

6 166 561

:.

:

:

7.

595

:

S.....

940

9...... 636

1 48

306

2 382

78 1 322

160

13

11

163 69292

451

5

1227 4

4

1

91

17

790 2.137

408 1,152

3.4 3,597 25.1

2.7 19,306 24.5

7.1

126

9.0 198

2.8 9,180

22.5

7.9

163

204

399

1.9 5,017

26.2

13.4

319

:.

23

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

F:..

596 1,481

2.5 11,951

22.4

8.9 323

:

1,055 1,519

1,168 1,395

1.4 (10,702

10.0

7.0 2,758

1.2 8,572

7.3

6.0, 2,068

686 735

1.1 4,845

7.0

6.3.

732

Total 1908 2,250 Total 1907 2,250

21,433 290 1,080 |1,415 | 285 1,069

9 195

6 5,261 9,761 8 193 6 5,226 9,677

1.8 74,350 1.8 71,950

15.0

8.1 6,795

14.6

7.9 6,795

K 6

BIRTHS.

The births registered during the year were as follows:—

Chinese, Non-Chinese,

Total 1908,

Total 1907,

Males.

Females.

Total.

788

338

1,126

149

137

286

937

475

1,412

897

523

1,420

This gives a general birth-rate of 4.2 per 1,000 as compared with 4:31 per 1,000 in 1907 and 401 per 1,000 in 1906.

The birth-rate amongst the Non-Chinese Community was 14:43 per 1,000 as compared with 1595 per 1,000 in 1907 and 1495 in 1906.

The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows:-British 107, Indian 39, German 13, French 3, American 1, Portuguese 87, Filipino andalay 20, Jewish 5, Dutch 3, Brazilian 1, Danish 1, Arabian 1, Persian 1, Mauritian 1, Spanish 1, Finnish 1, African 1.

The number of Chinese births registered does not give an accurate record of the number of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese of not registering a birth unless the child has survived for a month, and often in the case of female children not at all, it is probable that the majority if not all of the infants which die before they have lived for.one month have not had their births registered. It is customary therefore to assume that all children not more than one month old who are found d ad in the streets, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the Police and those brought in a sickly or dying condition to the various convents have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to the number of registered births a somewhat more correct number of births is probaby obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth-rate.

The number of such children in 1908 was 342 males and 509 females and one of unknown sex, total 852, which being added to the registered births makes a total of 2,264 as compared with 2 803 in 1997. The corrected birth-rate is therefore 6·72 whilst amongst the Chinese Community alone the rate becomes 6-24 instead of 3 55 per 1,000.

The preponderance of male over female births registered is very marked amongst the Chinese, there being 233 males to 100 females; in 1907 the proportion was 189 males to 100 females. When taking into consideration the above mentioned assumed unregistered births the proportion of males to females is 133 to 10 for 1908 as compared with 99 males to 100 females in 1907.

'

This suggests that even the "corrected birth-rate" is too low to approximate to the truth.

In the Non-Chinese Community the proportion of male births to female births for 1998 was 108 to 10) as compared with 119 to 100 in 1907, 122 to 100 in 1906, 103 to 100 in 1905, and 83 to 100 in 1904.

DEATHS.

The deaths registered during the year numbered 9,271 (7,286 in 1907). The death-rate was therefore 27.55 per 1,000 as against 22:12 in 1907. These deaths included 986 from Plague, (198 in 1907).

The total number of deaths amongst the Chinese Community was 8,978 which gives a death-rate of 28-35 per 1,000. (as against 22:52 in 1907).

The deaths registered a n ng the Non-Chinese Cnnunity numbered 293 of which 266 were from the Civil population, 20 from the Army and 7 from the Navy.

Thus gives a death-rate for the Non-Chinese Community of 1478 per 1,000 as com- pared with 15:46 per 1,000 in 1907.

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 75, Indian 68, P Portuguese 54, German 11, Japanese 27, American 7, Malay 10, French 3, Italian 2, Spanish 2 Aus- trian 1. Sweedish 3, Danish 4, African 4, Norwegian 3, Dutch 1, Jewish 3, Filipino 5, Ciu- galese 2, Hawaiian 1, Russian 1, Parsee 1, Polynesian 1, Unknown 4.

K 7

The total number of deaths which occurred amongst the Non-Chinese resident population was 234, and allowing 1.500 for the Non-Chinese floating population this gives à death-rate of 20 per 1,000 for the resident Non-Chinese Civil population estimated at 11,700.

Table I attached gives the number and causes of deaths registerel during 1908.

The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purpose of ready comparison with similar tables given in reports from other Colonies :-

Europeans and

Chinese

East

Africans.

and

Indians.

Whites.

Malays.

Mixed and Coloured.

Total.

Number of Inhabitants in 1908

11,252

10

4,116

316,850

4,260

336,488

of Births

in

"

35.

130

1

30

1,137

105

1,412

of Deaths in

33

24

117

68

8,988

94.

9,291

of Immigrants in

33...

157,809

of Emigrants in

""

...

71,081

of Inhabitants in 1907

10,025

13

4,102

311,057

4,160

329,357

Increase or Decrease, +1,227

-3

+14

+ 5,793

+100

+7,131

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEaths.

The number of known deaths of infants under one year of age was 2,099 or 22.6 per cent. of the total deaths, as compared with 22.9 per cent. in 1907 and 19.4 per cent. in 1906.

The infant mortality amongst the Non-Chinese Community during the year was 90-9 per 1,000 as compared with 91-2 per 1,000 in 1907.

Chinese Infant Mortality:-The corrected number of Chinese births in 1909 was 2,264 and the deaths under twelve months numbered 2,073. This gives a Chinese infant mortality of 915 per 1,000.

At first sight this would appear to indicate that only 85 children per 1,000 born in the Colony survive one year.

In the census year 1906 it was found that there were 1,329 children living in the Colony under 1 year of age and 14,980 between 1 and 5 years of age. It must be the e'ore that many of the children who die under one year of age are not born in the Colony, or that comparatively few children born in the Colony have their births registered.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 2,553 of which 55 were among the Non-Chinese Community, leaving 2.498 among the Chinese population ; 186 out of this total occurred in infants under one year of age.

Phthisis alone accounts for 769 deaths of which 748 were Chinese, viz., 8.3 per cent. of the total deaths amongst the Chinese as compared with 9.6 per cent. in 1907.

Pneumonia caused 1,130 deaths of which 1,106 were amongst Chinese.

The Chinese death-rate fron Respiratory Diseases was 78 per 1,000 as compared with 5.8 per 1,000 in 1907; that for Phthisis was 23 per 1,000 as compared with 21 in

1907.

Nervous Diseases.

The number of deaths under this healing for the year 1908 was 419 as compared with 522 in 1907. Of these 304 were Chinese children under 5 years of age, as compared with 424 In 1997, and 219 of these were amongst children of 1 year old or less. The principal causes of these latter deaths were Convulsions, Tetanus and Trismus which accounted for 178 and Meningitis which accounted for 41 deaths.

A

K 8

Malarial Fever.

The total number of deaths from Malarial fever during 1908 was 499, as compared with 579 in the previons year, a decrease of 80; of these 7 were Non-Chinese, 6 being from the Civil population, and one, an Indian, from the Troops.

The deaths registered as belonging to the ten City Health Districts number 133, Health District II shows 33 and Health District X 15 deaths.

Amongst the Kowloon land population there were 141 deaths amongst the Chinese- from Malaria, and 14 from the Kowloon boat population.

Shaukiwan showed 27 from the land and 40 from the boat population, and Aberdeen 40 rom the land and 66 from the boat population.

This makes a total of 173 deaths from Malaria in the outlying villages of Hongkong as compared with 203 in 1907.

The amounts expended on nullah training for the years 1907 and 1908 were respect- ively $23,617 and $9,998.

The following Table shows the admissions for Malaria to our two largest Hospitals during the past ten years :-

Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

YEAR.

Government Civil

Tung Wa

Total.

Hospital.

Hospital.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Case-mortal-

ity per cent.

Deaths.

Govt. Civil

Hospital.

Tung Wa

Hospital.

1899,

475

5 305

58 780

63

1.0

19.0

1900,

679

4 541

159 1,220

163

0.6 29.4

Average admis-

sions 922.

1901,

787

10

507

122 1,294

132

1.3 24.1

Average deaths

109.

1902,

349

9

403

119 752

128

2.6 29.5

1903,

347

2、

221

61 568

63

0.6

27.6

1904,

221

2

212

56 433

58

0.9

26.4

1905,

266

6

153

48 419

1906,

233

7 248

96

481

103

1907,

247

8

305

87 552

1908,

282

3 355

93 637

ཞ ཎྜ ི ཚ

54 2.2 31.4

Average admis-

3.0 38.5

Average deaths

95

3.2

28.5

sions 504.

81.

96 1.0 26.2

AL

·K 9

The Police admissions to Hospital for Malaria are shown in the following Table :-

Police Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

Average

From the City. the Colony.

From rest of

Total.

Srength of Police Force.

Percentage of Strength.

1899,

239

770

31

1900,

167

223

390

929

42

1901,

243

164

107

920

41

1902,

121

55

176

919

19

1903,

83

84

167

921

18

1904,

40

67

107

993

11

1905,

42

85

127

1,018

12

1906,

37

37

74

1,047

7

1907,

40

65

105

1,049

10

1908,

32

76

108

1,018

10

Average

Average

10.0

The next Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years :-

Total Deaths from Malaria.

Year.

Deatns in the City (Chinese only).

Total Deaths.

1899,

218

546

1900,

242

555

1901,

281

574

Average 480.

1902,

189

425

1903,

152

300

1904,

90

301

1905,

87

287

1906.

134

448

Average 422.

1907.

138

579

*

1908,

133

499

These Tables all show a steady diminution in the number of Malaria cases coincident. with the establishment of anti-malarial measures.

The Military return of admissions for Malaria also shows a marked reduction in the incidence of this disease as will be seen from the subjoined Table, when the quinquennial periods are considered. With reference to the increase in 1908 the Principal Medical Officer informs me that a third of these admissions came from Lyeemun.

8.08

K 10

Admissions for Malaria, European Troops.

Year. Strength. Admissions. Deaths. Invalided.

Ratio per 1,000.

1899

1,643

829

5

25

504.6

1900

1,484

629

4

16

423.8

1901

1,673

1,010

4

15

603.7

1902

1,381

1,523

6

24

1,102.8

1903

1,220

937

1904

1,426

390

1905

1,370

348

1906

1,525

480

1907

1,461

287

1908

2,012

515

Q1=400

2

6

768.0

9

273.5

1

254 0

15

314-7

12

196.0

17

256.0

Average

9.089

Average

258-8

There was a marked reduction in the admissions for Malaria amongst the Native Troops at Kowloon, the ratio of admissions per 1,000 falling from 574 in 1907 to 102-8 in 1908.

Beri-beri.

There were 736 deaths from this disease during 1908 (562 in 1907 and 561 in 1906), of which 8 were Non-Chinese. Of these four were Japanese and two Indians from ships calling at the port. Two other Japanese cases occurred in the City.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The total number of infectious diseases notified during 1908 was 1,668 of which 1,073 were Plague and 472 Small-pox.

The following Tables show the number and distribution of the cases, and their monthly prevalence :-

Infectious Diseases Return for 1908.

CITY OF VICTORIA HEALTH DISTRICTS.

2 3 4

10

5

6 789 10

Kowloon.

Harbour.

New

Territories,

Villages of Hongkong.

Imported.

Peak.

Stonecut-

ters' Island.

Green

Island.

Plague,

29 108 12 118

75 78 88 59206

68 124 41

54 11 1

Typhoid,

1 3 4

I

~

~

:

2

7

:

12

4 6 4 6

CO

3

CC

Cholera,...... 1 12 2 7 2

Small-pox, 12 9 4 37 16 22 30

Diphtheria,

Puerperal

1

2

:

:

52132 35 55 36

2 2 2 1

Fever, 1

1

:

:

1

1

1

1

...

:

2

6

23

H

:

:

:

3

TOTAL.

...

11,073

38

56

472

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

...

:

14

15

K 11

Cases of Notifiable Diseases recorded in each month of the

Diseases.

Nationality,

January.

February.

March.

year

1908.

Total.

Grand

Total.

Plague,.

European, Chinese,

Others,

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. 2 Nil. 9 5 15 92 403 390 102 Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. 13 13

1Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. 3

18 2 Nil. 2 11,039 1,073

3

2

Nil Nil Nil. Nil. 31

European,

Typhoid,

Chinese,

Others,

2 Nil. 1 2 4 Nil. Nil. 1 Nil. Nil. 2 Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil.

2

2

7 2 1 Nil. 3 26

1

2

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. 1

38

4

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil.

European,

Cholera,

Chinese,.

Others,

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. 6 Nil. Nil. Nil.

1

Nil. Nil.

4

I

Nil. Nil.

1

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. 19 12 12 Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. 1 Nil Nil. Nil.

1

53

56

European,.

Nil. 3 6

4

2

2

Small-pox,

Chinese,

Others,

71 144 112 2 2 3

75

31

Nil. 1

Nil. Nil. Nil. | Nil. Nil. Nil. 10 4 Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil.|Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. | Nil.

17

447

472

European,.

Nil. Nil. 1

Diphtheria,

Chinese, Others,

3 1 2

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. ļ

2

3 Nil. Nil.

1 Nil Nil Nil. Nil. Nil. | Nil. | Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. NII. | Nil.

I

co co co

i4

Puerperal Fever,

European,. Chinese,

Others,.

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil.

1 1 Nil. 1 1 Nil. 3 5 2 Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil.

14

15

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil.

1

TOTAL,..... 93156 147 175 1455 426 | 141 45

19

01

30

8

1,668

Plague.

There was a recrudesence of this disease during the year 1908, the total number of cases recorded being 1,073 as compared with 240 in 1907 and 893 in 1906. It has frequently happened that years of mild and severe Plague in the Colony have occurred alternately so that the 1908 epidemic may perhaps be more justly compared with the 1906 than the 1907 outbreak.

Although in 1908 an excess of 180 cases over the number of known cases in 1906 were notified it is quite possible that the 1908 epidemic was in reality not so severe as the 1906 one as in 1908 it appeared on enquiry that many fewer cases of Plague left the Colony.

If this be true it may be explained by the establishment of plague hospitals under Chinese management and by the adoption of less severe measures in disinfection, causing less disturbance of family life and business.

The total number of deaths from Plague was 986 of which 29 were from the Non- Chinese population and 957 amongst the Chinese. This gives a case mortality of 91·9 per cent. for Chinese and 90.6 per cent. for the Non-Chinese cases.

The following Table shows the number of cases and deaths according to Nationality:-

Cases.

Deaths.

Chinese,

1,041

957

British,

3

1

Eurasian,.

2

2

Indian,...

4

Japanese,.

5

5

Malay,

1

1

......

Portuguese,.

10

10

Filipino,

2

2

Jewish,

4

3

Cingalese,

1

1

1,073

986

K 12

Of the total cases only 3 were returned as Pneumonic Plague.

The distribution of the disease over the different months of the year is shown together with that of other notifiable diseases in a table on page 11 as also its distribution according to locality (page 10).

The special staff of rat-catchers was abolished at the end of January, 1908, as it had been found that the co-operation of the Chinese could not be thereby obtained and it was not till near the end of the epidemic that a substitute scheme was adopted by which some 2,000 traps were distributed to the Chinese and several hundred special rat-bins put up throughout the City and Kowloon for the reception of rats caught by the people.

The rats are collected daily from these bins and sent for examination and if any are infected, the locality they come from is known though not the individual house. This enables the Sanitary Department to watch for warnings of Plague in the different localities. and if necessary to adopt special measures.

The reports of the Indian Plague Commnission have been duly followed with the result that former measures of disinfection of houses with disinfectants of the coal tar derivative series have given place to special washing of houses with a flea-killing mixture of water and an emulsion of kerosene oil with soap. Late in the year a large quantity of rat poison was obtained from India and it was decided to endeavour to keep down the numbers of rats about houses by laying down a very large number of poison baits at one time and to continue to systematically lay down poison throughout the City and Kowloon.

This wholesale laying down of poison did not begin until the last few days of 1908, but has so far given encouraging results in increasing the daily destruction of rats.

Cholera.

The cases of this disease a European, one a Japanese and and all the Chinese cases died.

No spread of infection was traced to these nine imported cases. After the great floods which occurred during 1908 in the neighbourhood of Canton, Cholera was more or less pre- valent there, and it is very probable that in the cases, which could not be definitely con- sidered as having been imported into the Colony, the infection was due to the arrival in the Colony of a person or persons from the neighbourhood of Canton infected-possibly so mildly as to escape detection-with the disease.

recorded during the year numbered 56. One of these was one an Indian. The rest were Chinese. The Japanese case

Nine cases were imported, six in one ship.

The six cases imported from one ship occurred in the last week of March, and the next case recorded was not till the 19th of June and occurred in a prisoner who had been 3 months in Victoria Gaol. Four new cases occurred in the Gaol on the following four days.

No Cholera was known to be occurring in the Colony outside the Gaol at this time or since the six cases imported three months previously, but shortly afterwards cases began to crop up in the City and continued through July, August and September.

An enquiry into the outbreak of Cholera in the Gaol formed the subject of a special re- port by the Medical Officer of the Gaol and the Medical Officer of Health and the conclusion arrived at was that in all probability the infection had been brought in by a short sentence prisoner suffering from a very mild infection of the disease.

Typhoid Fever.

The number of cases of this disease in 1908 was 38 as compared with 73 during 1907 and 66 in 1906. Ten of these cases were imported.

The European cases numbered 26, the Chinese 7 (one Eurasian included), and 5 cases. occurred among the other Non-Chinese races. Four Europeans died and all the Chinese. The European case mortality was therefore 15.3 per cent.

The source of infection of this disease and one which is always present is most proba- bly, in the majority of cases, in native grown vegetables which are manured with diluted human excreta. Raw vegetables, salads, etc., from Chinese sources should therefore never be eaten. Oysters also should be looked upon with suspicion and not eaten raw.

Small-pox.

The number of cases of Small-pox during 1908 was 472 as compared with 341 in 1907. An Epidemic may be said to have started in December, 1907, with six cases during the month, and it extended to July 15th, 1908, since when no further case was recorded.

K 13

Of these cases 20 were Europeans, 446 Chinese, and 6 of other races. Six of these cases were imported. Three Europeans and one other Non-Chinese case, and 376 Chinese cases died.

The number of vaccinations during 1908 was 7,655 as compared with 6,799 in 1907.

Diphtheria.

Fourteen cases of Diphtheria were notified during the year as compared with forty- three in 1907. Four were European cases and two "other Non-Chinese" cases, leaving eight Chinese cases. All the Chinese cases died.

Puerperal Fever.

Fifteen cases of this disease were recorded during 1908, 14 of which were Chinese and one Portuguese. Twelve of the Chinese cases died.

ALICE MEMORIAL MATERNITY CHARITY.

Eight Chinese midwives were employed during the year as against six in 1907, the two additional ones were employed at Kowloon, one at Hunghom and the other at Yaumati. Six pupil midwives were in training during the year, three passed the Govern- ment Examination and were registered as midwives.

1,043 confinements were attended as against 578 in 1907, Dr. Alice Sibree being called into consultation in 49 of them.

INTERMENTS.

The following number of interments have been recorded during the year :-

Colonial Cemetery,

Roman Catholic Cemetery,

165

818

Mahommedan Cemetery,

Jewish Cemetery,

55

5

1,043

Chinese Cemeteries.-Mount Caroline Cemetery,

Kai Lung Wan

642

221

Tung Wah Hospital

>>

3,845

Cheung Sha Wan

955

"1

Protestant

33

Shaukiwan

Aberdeen

Stanley

Shek O

Ma Tau Wai

406

221

20

21

3

11

31

1,177

Shai Yü Shek

192

31

Sham Shui Po

167

Christian (K'loon City)

14

11

Eurasian

0

""

Chung Ling Tin

6

""

7,902

There were also fificen cremations during the year.

DISINFECTING STATIONS.

The following articles were received for disinfection during 1908.

K 14

Victoria Station.

Articles from Private Houses,

42,186

Kennedy Town Hospital,

2,060

Tung Wah Hospital,

1,175

>>

Government Civil Hospital,

1,510

""

Alice Memorial Hospital,

339

Convents,.

90

""

Police Stations and Gaol,

4,157

""

Government Clothing lent to Contacts,

Clothing and Bedding of Staff,

Military Hospital and Barracks,..

256

1,404

3,975

57,152

The disinfecting apparatus was in use on 241 days. The number of articles fumigated owing to disinfection by steam being unsuitable was 227. An additional tctal of 45,699 articles was disinfected at the Kowloon Station during 1908.

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

These conveniences have been largely used by the Chinese during the year, the numbers bathing therein being as follows :—

Wanchai Bath-house (men only), . Second Street Bath-house (men only),...

151,065

57,724

Pound Lane

17

(men and women),.............

110,056

Sheung Fung Lane Bath-house (women only),

30,722

Total,

349,567

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

Ambulances are kept in readiness at the Disinfecting Stations in Victoria and Kow- loon, at the Eastern and Western Sanitary Offices in the City, the Water Police Station at Tsim-sha-tsui, the Kowlon-Canton Railway Camp, and at the following Stations :-

Bay View Police Station.

No. 1 Police Station.

The Recreation Ground, Happy Valley.

The Sailors' and Soldiers' Home, Arsenal Street.

The City Hall.

The Post Office.

The Central Police Station.

The Fire Brigade Station, Queen's Road Central.

The New Western Market.

The Government Civil Hospital.

The Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town.

Also outside the City limits in Hongkong at Aberdeen, Shaukiwan and Stanley Police Stations.

At the Disinfecting Station and the Eastern and Western Sanitary Offices in Victoria coolies are always in readiness to respond to ambulance calls, but at the other stations, which are specially for emergency use it is necessary for the Police or other persons using the ambulance to hire coolies or obtain volunteers for the traction of the ambulance.

The ambulances at the Disinfecting Station and the Eastern and Western Sanitary Offices in Victoria were used 941 times during 1908, while the emergency ambulances in the City were used 72 times.

K 15

The ambulances at Kowloon were used on 216 occasions, those in Old Kowloon being called out 135 and those in New Kowloon 81 times.

OVERCROWDING.

During 1908 a modification of the law regulating overcrowding was effected.

For this offence there were 44 prosecutions with 32 convictions.

Five prosecutions were undertaken for overcrowding of Opium Divans in contraven- tion of the byelaws regulating these premises.

ADULTERATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS.

During 1908 sixty-five samples of milk were taken for analysis under the Foods and and Drugs Ordinance. None were found adulterated.

A large quantity of salt beef-119 barrels-found in a godown were seized and destroyed as unfit for human food.

19th April, 1909.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B. (Lond.), M.R.C.S., L.S.A., D.P.H.,

Principal Civil Medical Officer.

W. W. PEARSE, M.D., D.P.H.,

Medical Officer of Health.

K 16

TABLE 1.-RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

I.-General Diseases.

A.-Specific Febrile Diseases.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

a Zymotic.

Small-pox,

Measles,

4

12

9

1

12 10 26 20 19

1

Whooping Cough,

Diphtheria,

37

79

1

3

41 8

28

...

...

...

Fever, Scarlet,

...

""

Typhoid (Enteric),

3

1

1

Cholera,

2

12

4

5

4

6

3

3

...

9

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

1

1

Diarrhoea,

4

2

10

87 99 18

Dysentery,

4

13

....

Plague,....

28

1

12 101 23 93

Influenza,

2

...

:88:

1

11 8

7 8 9

87 68 65

2012:

ထာ

18

17 31

8

22

30

9

9 7

3

16

8

56 145 119

18

27

Total,...... 50

4

40 226 142 136 136 103 116 128 269 175

68

94

B Malarial.

Fevers, Malarial, .

7

Total,......

7

Y Septic.

Erysipelas of Scalp,....

Pyæmia,

Septicemia,

Puerperal Fever,

Cellulitis of Neck,

Acute Necrosis of Femur,

Suppuration of Thigh,

Necrosis of Jaw,

& Venereal.

Syphilis (Acquired),

1

5

...

Total,......

1

::

-1

:

11

33 10

10 11

Co

13 13 15 12

11

33 10 10 11

8

9

13

13 15

12

1

1

2

7

3

3

:

1

1 | 3

?)

(Congenital),

Total,.....

Total Group A.,

64

B.-Diseases dependent on Specific

External Agents.

:

n

5

1

...

:

8

9 7 3

:

10

5

:

:

...

::

:69:

:

10

5 9

2 1

:

9

9

...

:

125

8

1 1 1

1 1

2 1 1

1

43

33333

27

1

6

1

1 1 41 27

2 55 311 188 153 152 |112

2

1

2 1 7

:

2

1

2

132 147 298 194

82

121

1

:

1

...

•••

:

:

:

...

..

:

:

:

...

:

...

...

3

311 188 153 152 112 132 147 298 194 82

a Parasites.

Worms,...

...

Total,......

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

...

Carried forward, Group A,......

Group B,......

쟁:

64 5 2

55

...

1

...

...

:

:

121

438

4

:

4

4

~]

438

34

Mand

66

: 8:

:g|:

:

ཁ:

:

:

:

1

1:

J

:

13

:

3

6

141 14 45

27 40

66 4

141 14

15

27 40 66 4

:

:

:

51

:

:

165 11219

1

~}

:

:

:

:

1...

2

3411 1...

...

Kow- SHÁUKI- ABER-

LOON Dis-

WÁN DIS-

DEEN

STANLEY DIS-

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

· K 17

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1908.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

Under I

69

w

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

month.

Non-Chinese.

1 month and

25 years and

1201

72

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

ここ

Chinese.

under 12

inonths.

under 5

1 year and

years.

under 15

5 years and

years.

15 years and under 25

yeais,

26

1

33

39

126

-100.

- C

CJ NO N

21

if

20

6/120

31

34

24

85

143

19

11

7

17

5 60

2 24

11 1 3 1

1 531

234

8208

6308

2100

277

18 53 43 11

2

3

151

9145

3363 9356 9289 17533 4192 3119

:

по

100

:

:

11 1

مر

CC

...

3

со

:

I l

:

12

12...

58

58... 9

2

21

Co

1

1 65 11219 3411 9426 14402 23718

8...

7270

...

3172...

N

سر

...

2...

2

...

2...

9426 14402) 23748

་་་

2233

:

:

7270 3172

:

...

2,785

5

6

28

60] 2102 3179 2 63

23... 60 2,102 3179

2 63

201

83

100

2,785

H

J

00

H

H

E

59

12

2

66F

199

Nou-Chinese.

Chinese.

under 15

Non-Chinese.

15 years and

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

| Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

under 60

years.

60 years | and over.

Age

Unknown.

11

55

5

486

156

986

2

2,103

380

GRAND

TOTAL.

K 18

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Brought forward, Group A,... 64

"

Group B....

General Diseases,— Continued.

B Poisons.

Mineral,

Vegetable Opium,

Irritant Poisoning,

Corrosive Poisoning,

Carbonic Oxide Poisoning,

Arsenic Poisoning,

Fish Poisoning,

10

5

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

Nc. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

2 55 311 188 153 152 112 132 147 298 194

: ܗ

1

82

Total.......

1

y Effects of Injuries.

Laceration of Brain,

Burns,

::

3

Bullet wound through Brain,.

1

Scalds,

Crushed Foot,

Sunstroke,

2

Laceration of Spinal Cord,

1

Heat Apoplexy,

1

Multiple Injuries,

1

Drowning,

8

1

Wound (Self-inflicted),

Strangulation,

N:

Hæmorrbage,

Fracture of Skull,

Overdistension of Stomach with coarse

food,

Shock,

Bullet wound of Pelvis,

Hanging (Execution),..

Internal Injuries,...

Fracture of Thigh,

Dynamite Injuries,

Asphyxia caused by Carbon Monoxide,.....

Fracture of Spine,

Cut Throat,

Asphyxia,.

Rupture of Spleen,

Injury of Brain,

Penetrating wound of Liver,

Bullet wound of Skull,

2

:

:

:

...

2

1

10

5

:

:

1

1

:

2:

1

::

[121

...

2

1

2

1 1

3

1

...

2

2

1

1

2

1

1

co

3

1

12

:

1

1

2

3

1

1

1

1

...

2

1

2

2

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

2

1

...

Suffocation,

Bullet wound of Abdomeu,.

Bullet wound of Chest,

Dislocation of Neck by fall into dry

dock,

...

1

1

:

Total,......

27

1

...

:

& Errors of Diet.

Alcoholism (Chronic),

(Acute),

221

2

...

:

4 17 7

:

:

4

6

6

:

2

:

3 1

...

65

2

co:

3

...

...

...

:

6

:

1

::

1

2

2

1

...

...

LO

5

8

::

:

::

:

:

...

:

::

Total,...........

4

:

...

:.

...

Total Group B.,........

31

2

4 17 8 4 11

6

3

4 11 6

6

Carried forward, (Groups A and B),

95

7 2 59 328 196 |157 163 |121 135 151 309 200 91

...

...

74

:

76

199

98

536

...

29

لسم

:

H

.9

:::::

เง

::

:

:

:

...

: ::

:

:

...

:

:

:

:|ལཱ

69

***

~

་..

:

***

:

: :

+

10:

64

:

::

:

:

:

: :

:

:

1

51

2 19

h

123

...

:

:

...

:

-

H

::

6 54 12153

5 35

1

1...

:

:

3...

-

...

CO

6

2 21

125

7 58 15161

5 36

3 26

1 66 11225

5432 10451 21 460 38909] 12306.

38909

6198

...

::

...

...

:

...

1

4

421

5

3,156

...

:

...

·

:

:

...

·

N

·

:

:

:

:

+1

:

2 26...

:

:

:

VI

·

میں

-

33

-

...

...

438

4

34

Kow-

LOON

WÁN SHACKI ABER-

STANLEY

DEEN

DIS-

DIS-

DIS-

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

:

888

7

:

:

:

23 2

11

26

2

1

1

1

397

I

10

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

10

18

السمر

1

19

41 63

2

Co

10

:

:

19

J

:

>

K 19

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1908,—Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT Age Periods.

1

Under 1

Chinese.

month.

Non-Chinese.

1 month and

6:

J

-

-

cod

C

00

:

10

OF OI

H

3

17

1

6

5

1

1

2

4

16

14

·

55

127

1

5

13

22

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinesc.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

under 12

months.

year and under 5

years.

5 years and under 15

years.

15 years and under 25

years.

25 years and under 45

years,

45 years and under 60

years.

3411

2 ...

g

:

9426 14402 23748

2...

7270

:

21.3

:::

1

10

14

1

Chinese.

60 years

and over.

Non-Chinese.

Age

3172

1

1

Chinese.

2,785

5

Unknown.

TOTAL.

GRAND

·K 20

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

Brought forward, (Groups A and B), 95

7 2 59 323 196 157

163 121 135 151309

General Diseases,— Continued.

C.-Developmental Diseases.

Immaturity at Birth,

Debility,

Old Age,

Marasmus and Atrophy,

Tabes Mesenterica,

Imperforate Auns,

Total Group C........

D.-Miscellaneous Diseases.

Rheumatic Fever,....

Articular Rheumatism,

Malignant New Growths:

Cancer of Breast,

of Liver,

**

of Cervix,..

of Uterus..

**

of Stomach,

,ན

of Lungs,

of Bowels,

""

of Mamma,

General Tuberculosis,

Epithelioma of Face and Neck,

Anæmia,

Carcinoma of head and foot,

Leprosy,

Exophthalmic Goitre,

Diabetes,

Necrosis of Jaw,

Beri-beri,

Sarcoma (Mediastinal),

""

of Back,........

10

:

1

1

: :

38 27

1

3

20

3 217 140

8 9

200 91

199

}

5

2

1

4

5

3

2

14

10 M

3

CON ::

::

|

8 301 179 12 12 11 11

61 17 18

:༢

:

:

:

20

20

1

58

3

3

26 4 6

12

5 '107

1

10

1

9

1

1

1

:

1

18 70 13 54

1

:::

53 40 33

32

60 29 53

64

::

Total Group D.,...... 36

II. Local Diseases.

E. The Nervous System.

Meningitis,

Apoplexy,

Paralysis (Undefined),......

Hemiplegia,

Infantile Convulsions,...

Tetanus, Traumatic,

Oedema of Brain,..

Trismus,

Subphrenic Abscess,

Eclampsia,

Epilepsy, Insanity,

Mania,

-

24 179 71

59 56

44

10

40

90 33 59

77

60 25

...

7

2

7.

1

NNN

1

20 2

3

21 50

3

2

2:

11

2

4

3 2

2 15

1

-850:

2

3

N

9

5

3

10

71

3

1

66

2

1

1

35

5

:::::

1

Dementia,

2

1

3

1

Anterior Poliomyelitis...

...

1

Softening of Brain,

1

: :

:

:

Total Group E.,...

29

I

10 148 73 14 13 7

13 14 40 14 5

:

Carried forward, (Groups A to E),...... 165

9

|101

3 101 890 519 242 244 183 199 209 503 264 173

304

*

53

152

Co

206 12

48

LO

:

His

873

Co

6

4

:

91 240 321 65 105

1105 14

اسم

pand

:

::

to

6

31

...

3

::

قسم

...

OIN

75

49...

:

105

to:

:

2

- K 21

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31sT DAY OF DECEMBER, 1908,—Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

536

63 138

77

52

27

1211

69

166 11 225 5432 10451 21‍460, 68909, 12306

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Bout

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Kow- SHÁUKI- ABER-

STANLEY

LOON DIS-

WAN DEEN DIS-

DIS-

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

Under 1

month.

1 month and

under 12

months.

1 year and

under 5

years.

Non-Chinese. | 5 years and

under 15

Chinese,

years.

Non-Chinese.

15 years and under 25

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

years.

25 years and under 45

years.

15 years and under 60

years.

:::

σ x .

31

Co

113

...

...

27

15

45 14 10 34

6

234 ... 309 105

2

...

:

N

:

...

...

2 70 2118

: :

...

119... 277

00

3

...

:

تت

30

20 5148 3'385

270 2122 167 12159 14422

5 3sl 52

5 321

co

19

:

...

...

N

* --

333

CO

Co

30 1

8 801

7 85 #17 1 14 6 22 711 2. 26

1441 21694 14744 12540 34 629 58 30 22 469 15553

...

ලය

...

171

5,596

...

:

:

:

2

...

...

10

CC

137 366

18

91

80

ନା

2

52

1

1

1

99

CO N

3

91...

I

المصدر

pound 10

15

مر

:

6

1

4

1

736

1

2

522

3.194

10

19

and over. 60 years

Agc

Unknown.

1861;

:

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

5

4243

3

931

י 21

296

12

1

R - NO CON ~

12

10 00

19

3,156

GRAND

TOTAL.

- K 22

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

*[udg

Harbour.

Brought forward, (Groups A to E), ....165 9 3 101 890 519 242 244 183 199 209 503 264 173

Local Diseases,-Continued.

F.-- The Circulatory System.

11

19

5

11

3

2

1

1

Heart Disease,

10

Aneurysm,

Pericarditis,

Syncope,

Adherent Pericardium,

Mitral Regurgitation,

Degeneratio Cordis,

1

Thrombosis,

1

Morbus Cordis,..

1

Total Group F., 20

6 25

1-2

7 10

1

=

1304

12 1 9

2:

2

CO

6

9 12

3 9

10

13 11 12

1 11

G.-The Respiratory System.

Congestion of Lung,

Bronchitis,

Pneumonia,

Phthisis,

Pleurisy,

Empyæma,

Asthma,

Atelectasis,

Tubercle of Lung,.

Stenosis of Larynx,..

Abscess of Lung,.

Pulmonary Hæmorrhage,

Hæmoptysis,..

4 6

4

Ι

8

164 121

11

1 1 22

2

20

24

358 212

26

20

1

22 68 14

42

8 14 9 42 25 43 31 56

28 14 9 58 33

16

44

27

31 40 46 64

29 32

60

2

12 8

2

1

1

2

5

2

1

6

1

: : :

2

1

2 3

2 1

}

Oedenia of Lung,

Total Group G......... 46

H.-The Digestive System.

1

I

1

2

t-

7

2

54 614 371

80 137

:

:ལྷ

67 100 92 153 80 85

...

1

:

105

Cancrum Oris,

1

Tonsillitis,

Gastritis,

Gastro Enteritis,

2

1

15

6

1

1

2

1

Colic,.....

...

Hepatitis,

1

Hepatic Abscess,.

1

Cirrhosis of Liver,

6

6

Ι

1

1

Ascites,

1

Peritonitis,

2

1

6

1

1

2

3

Gastric Tetany,

Hernia,

Intestinal Strangulation,

1

...

Icterus Neonatorum,

I

Infantile Tuberculosis,

Jaundice,

Ulcus Ventricule,

1

2

Fatty Liver,

1

Dyspepsia,

Intussusception,

Abscess of Liver,..

Appendicitis,

Intestinal Obstruction,

Chronic Catarrh of Stomach,

Distomiasis,

:༢༠:༥

2

2

1

Total Group H,...... 19

4

3

30 20

4

1

46 4 3 2

Carried forward, (Groups A to II),...... 250 20

6 164 1,628 916 335 384 254 312 317 670 358 272

1 437

1

to

-

:

0.

313 41

63

68

...

N

7

36

N2

C

:

:

3

:

N

...

:

:

3

:

TO

...

K 23

J

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31sT DAY OF DECEMBER, 1908,—Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

Kow- SHÁUKI- ABER-

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

873

91 240 321

65 105

14

29

2

:

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese,

STANLEY

LOON DIS-

TRICT.

WÁN DIS-

DEEN

DIS-

TRICT.

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

Under 1

month.

1 month and

under 12

months.

year and

under 5

years.

under 15

5 years and

years.

15 years and] under 25

years,

25 years and under 45

years.

...

****

2

:

...

41...

Co

2

:

1441 21684 14744 12 540 34629 581,370 22469] 15533

19

1

2... 40...

2

1...

184...

128

711 33601

13...

2

1 16

22

CT

5 2 45...

68 5 27 9 60

2 87 16371

[186 2612

1

...

1,244142 313 199

...

:

:

91 154

...

:

15 1

12 1 15

2 10 3 812 25

2 16 2 9

1

3 1644 241,342 19 1,234 14666 457711101,938 31794 40801|... 12

N

3

10 10 10

:

...

6

6

:

:

of 1

1

4468

110 7113 31486) 3255

N

134

8,478

:

13

6

NO

"

...

·

+ 1

:

CA

26

27

Ja Ja O) 01 01 N CO NOT COM COTNI

1

3

1

:

الجسر

44 3 50

4

00

27 2

1 11 10 53

5 54

5 32

68 2 261

3128

4

1156

1 89

1

2WNN

w

2,553

17

1

1

1

I

J

27 17

8

Non-Chinese.

45 years and under 60

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

and over. 60 years

Non-Chinese.

Age

Chinese.

Unknown.

1

1

1

.

6

163

8

18

1

I

5,596

GRAND

TOTAL.

K 24

RETURN SIEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

Army.

Navy.

2 No. 1.

20 6 164 1,628 916 335 384 254 312 317 670 358 272

1 437

No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Ilarbour.

Brought forward, (Groups A to H), ... 250

Local Diseases,- Continued.

J.--The Urinary System.

Nephritis (Acute),

5

1

4

2

Bright's Disease,

3

3

3

13

3

Cystitis,

Epithelioma of Bladder,

2

3

2

1

4

1

1

Uræmin,

1

1

...

Total Group J.,......

9

1

1

10

7

6

10

5

4

2

10

5

2

4

1

:

M.-Affections connected with Pregnancy.

Premature Labour,

Difficult Labour,

Total Group M.......

N.-Affections connected with

Parturition.

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,..

Placenta Prævia,

Child Birth,

Hydatiform Mole of Uterus,

Total Group N,......

I

1

1

:

:

::

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

O.-The Skin.

Carbuncle,

Total Group 0....................

P.-Diseases of Organs of

Locomotion.

Hip Joint Disease,

Psoas Abscess,....

Total Group P,......

III.-Undefined.

:

-

::

:

5

::

:

...

:

2

1

1

÷

:

:

::

:

N

:

:

ลง

2

:.

1

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

::

:

1

3

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

Abscess of Thigh,

Undiagnosed,

6

20 76 14

Total Group III.......... 6

20 77 16 4

7

3

3

10

10

13

1274

5 5 10 13

274

TOTAL, ALL CAUSES,.............. 266

20!

7 185

1,716 939 346

399 260 318 328 679 375 286 1 707

Dropsy,

Tumour (Abdominal),.

2

2

170

44

11

173

44

13

1,444 188 333 208

91 154

CC

:

1

10

2

~:

:

:

:

:

...

:

5

8

:::

14

2

2

00

:

:

J

1,244 141 313 199

91 154

18

K 25

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31sT DAY OF DECEMBER, 1908,-Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE Periods.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population,

Land

Population,

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Kow- SHAUKI-

ABER-

STANLEY

DIS- LOON

WÁN

DEEN

DIS-

DIS-

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

Under 1

month.

1 month and

under 12

months.

1 year and

under 5

years.

Non-Chinese. 5 years and

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

under 15

years.

15 years and under 25

years.

25 years and under 45

years.

Non-Chinese. 15 years and

: ::

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

.

:

:

: :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

::

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

لات

10

::

:

...

:

:

:

...

30

1 54

1134

* N

62

54

4198...

12

30

:

...

:

1 54 1136

63

...

561

41991...

57

60....

12

3

1675 25 1,398 20 1,376 14736 46840123

| 2,184]

33 867

31878

241

:

CONV

10

2

:

:

...

...

:

0C 1

122

مسر

112

...

:

:

نت

34

:

I

13

17

:

...

:

3

Co

21 10

1611 241,342 19 1,284 14666] 457711101,93 31794 40801]

12 8,478

7 22

13

1 17.

80

JN

TO - CO

35

39

under 60

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-

years.

60 years,

and over.

-Chinese.

Age

Unknown.

Chinese.

GRAND

TOTAL.

K 26

RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDERMENTIONED INSTITUTIONS During the Year ended 31st December, 1908.

Mortuary,-Continued.

The Government Civil Hospitals.

Tung Wa Hospital,—Continued.

Causes.

No.

Causes.

No.

Causes.

No.

Brought forward,... 1,143

Brought forward,... 1,035

Diphtheria,.

Mania,

Debility,

Anæmia,

Bronchitis,

25 27A

Tuberculosis,

15

Meningitis,

1

Meningitis,

6

Cholera,

14

Plague,

439

Injury of Brain,..

1

Septicemia,

18

Bright's Disease,

6

1

Bright's Disease,

18

Hernia,

3

Atrophy,

1

Syphilis,

13

Aneurysm,

2

Dementia,

2

Cancer of Liver,

1

Heart Disease,

9

Appendicitis,

2

Small-pox,

36

Nephritis,

Phthisis,

11

Scalding,

1

Leprosy,

Ι

Internal Injuries,

Fracture of Skull,

Congestion of Lung,

2

Apoplexy,..

3

Diphtheria,

1

Syphilis,.

1

Fracture of Skull,

Infantile Convulsions,

5

Debility,

3

Nephritis,.

Tetanus,

2

Pleurisy,

1

Pneumonia,

Cholera,

31

Child Birth,

1

Tuberculosis,

2

Puerperal Fever,

4

Tuberculosis,

8

Epithelioma,

1

Erysipelas,

]

Erysipelas,

Plague,

19

Apoplexy,

13

Enteritis,

2

Beri-beri,

7

Typhoid Fever,,....

4

Puerperal Fever,

6

Psaos Abscess,

1

Sarcoma,..

Empyæma,

Malarial Fever,

1

Drowning,

88

Difficult Labour,.

Pericarditis,

Multiple Injuries,

2

Typhoid Fever,

2

Meningitis,

4

Rupture of enlarged Spleen,...

Old Age,

1

Bright's Disease,

Marasmus,

Pericarditis,

Peritonitis,

Cellulitis of Neck,.

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

Septicemia,

Nephritis,

Intestinal Obstruction,

Dysentery,

Hepatic Abscess,

Rupture of Spleen,

1

...

Cancer of Lung,..

1

Leprosy,

Hemiplegia,

1

Exophthalmic Goitre,

I

Cancer of Stomach;

Undiagnosed,

18

Heat Apoplexy,.

1

Peritonitis,

4

Heart Disease,

Old Age,

Sunstroke,

1

Pleurisy,

Total,.........1,128

Typhoid Fever,

1

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

CLo'era,

1

Opium Poisoning,

Aneurysm,

1

Uræmia,

Cirrhosis of Liver,..

1

Undiagnosed,

1

147

Enteritis,

1

A telectasis,.

1

Uræmia,

Total,

........

2,015

Empyæma of Lung,

Cancer of Uterus,

1

Gastritis,...

1

The Alice Memorial and Nethersole Hospitals.

Total,

115

Causes.

No.

Mortuary.

Septicemia,

3

Debility,

1

Causes.

No.

Pneumonia,

a 7

Bright's Disease,

3

Plague,

254

Bronchitis,

1

The Tung Wa Hospital.

'Immaturity at Birth,.

17

Arsenic Poisoning,

1

Beri-beri,

154

Anterior Poleomyetitis,

1

Causes.

No.

Pneumonia,

190

Meningitis,

2

Infantile Convulsions,.

51

Shock,

1

Rupture of Intestine,..

1

Bronchitis,

56

Child Birth,

1

Debility,

2

Phthisis,

156

Hydatiform Mole of Uterus,.......

1

Pyæmia,

1

Small-pox,

4

Beri-beri,

4

Shock,...

Malarial Fever,

31

Dysentery,

1

Beri-beri,

364

Diarrhoea,

83

Tuberculosis,

1

Phthisis,.

295

Septicæmia,

3

Nephritis,

1

Dysentery,

74

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,

3

Phthisis,

4

Hæmorrhage,

1

Intussusception,

1

Diarrhoea,

118

Peritonitis,

2

Marasmus,

Eclampsia,

i

1

Heart Disease,

52

Dysentery,

Heart Disease,

1

*

Bronchitis,

52

Fracture of Skull,

Appendicitis,

1

Pneumonia,

75

Apoplexy,

Placenta Prævia,

Atrophy,.

2

Tetanus,

2

Cirrhosis of Liver,.

Hemiplegia,

12

Diphtheria,

Necrosis of Jaw,

1

I

1

Malarial Fever,

93

Marasmus,

14

Total,.........

40

Carried forward, ... 1,143

Carried forward,... 1,035

The Italian Convent.

Causes.

No.

- K 27

RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDERMENTIONED INSTITUTIONS,—Continued.

The Italian Convent,-Continued.

L'Asile De La Ste. En- fance,-Continued.

Causes.

Causes.

No.

No.

Brought forward,... 845

Brought forward,... 960

Marasmus,

159

Malarial Fever,

5

Bright's Disease,

1

Trismus,

51

Internal Strangulation,

1

Small-pox,

1

Heart Disease,

3

Dropsy,

1.

Syphilis,

37

Diarrhoea,

Tuberculosis,

98

Gastro Enteritis,

3

Pleurisy,

11

63

Abscess of Lung,

1

Atelectasis,

4

Bronchitis,

119

Paralysis,

1

Empyæmia,

2

Atelectasis,.

2

Jaundice,

1

Pyæmia,

1

Immaturity at Birth,.

30

Undiagnosed,

Heart Disease,

6

Meningitis,

25

Dysentnry,

Pneumonia.

190

Diarrhoea,

62

Internal Injuries,

1

Total,

863

Plague,

10

Small-pox,,..

4

Beri-beri,

3

Syphilis,

31

Peritonitis,

5

Stenosis of the Larynx,.

I

Erysipelas.

1

Abscess of Thigh,

1

Phthisis,

11

Erysipelas,

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

7

Beri-beri,

2

Pericarditis,

3

Pleurisy,

8

Intussusception,

1

Enteritis,

4

Oedema of Lung,

Septicemia,

3

L'Asile De La Ste. Enfance.

Rheumatism,

1

Plague,

9

Congestion of Lung,

Empyæmia,

4

Causes.

No.

Burns,

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

10

Convulsions,

6

Icterus Neonatorum,

1

Marasmus,

205

Icterus.

1

Congestion of Lung,

3

Tuberculosis,

103

Diabetes,....

1

Oedema of Lung,

2

Meningitis,

57

Carcinoma Mamiæ,

1

Tetanus,

4

Tetanus,

70

Intestinal Tuberculosis,.....

1

Phthisis,

5

Old Age,..

13

Enteritis,

6

Cirrhosis of Liver,

}

Bronchitis,

148

Jaundice,

Fatty Heart,

1

Pneumonia,

305

Beri-beri,

Dysentery,

3

Immaturity at Birth,

44

Nephritis,

Convulsions,

3

Malarial Fever,

10

Gastro Enteritis,

Worms,

1

Diphtheria,

1

Tumour (Abdominal),

-Old Age,

2

Septicæmia,

Undiagnosed,.

46

Carried forward,... 845

Carried forward,...

960

Total, 1,218

W. W. PEARSE,

Superintendent of Statistics..

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong.

A. W. BREWIN,

Registrar General.

Offence.

K 28

Table II.-PROSECUTIONS FOR 1908.

HONGKONG.

Sum-

Con-

Penal-

Remarks.

monses.victions.

ties.

$

1.00

3

1

2.00

1 Withdrawn. 1 Discharged.

1

10.00

25

25

257.00

1

100.00

24

22

80.00

2 Discharged.

5.00

7

62.00

20.00

5.00

5.00

15.00

Both Withdrawn.

22214

15.00

1 Dismissed. 2 Withdrawn.

15.00

10.00

2.00

Assaulting a servant of the Sanitary Department,

Illegal use of Basements,

Failing to cleanse surfaces of bathrooms,

T

remove illegal cubicles,

Dirty Cowshed,

Dumping nightsoil into streets, Failing to provide dust bins, Dirty Premises,...

Keeping decomposing matter... Failing to remove house refuse,

provide glazed area,

"

notify Infectious Disease,

Illegal occupation of rooms,

Failing to provide gratings and make good kitchen

surfaces,

Housing more than 2 caretakers in Laundries,

Failing to limewash,

Carrying nightsoil buckets without covers,

Keeping a Latrine filthy,

Failing to provide open space,

Obstruction of open space,

Overcrowding in Opium Divans,

Failing to cleanse Poultry Stalls.............

remove illegal partitions,

་་

17

fill in rat runs,

Overcrowding,

Failing to repair waste pipes,

provide window area,.

">

11

cleanse and make good yards,

Obstructions of yards...

10.00

92.00

20 00

Adjourned, since dead.

Dismissed.

One 14 days and two 1 month imprisonment. 8 Cautioned.

5.00

7 26

65.00

195.50 22.00

18 Absconded. 3 Withdrawn.

18 Cautioned. 1 Dismissed.

4000 10.00

1 Withdrawn, 1 Dismissed. 2 Withdrawn. 1 Dismissed. 1 Withdrawn.

Total,.....

182

140

$1,063.50

Offences.

KOWLOON.

Sum- Con- Penal- monses. victions.

ties.

Dumping refuse,

Overcrowding,

Carrying Urine through public streets during

prohibited hours,

Selling poultry without licence,

Failing to comply with a Magistrate's order,

Breaches of Byelaws.

Offensive Trades,

Common Lodging Houses, Matsheds,.

3

21

*

23

ου

I Cautioned.

1 Withdrawn.

25 1 Withdrawn.

1

22

20

20

Total,....

21

18

$153

Remarks.

- K 29

Annexe B.

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

1. During the year 1908 several important alterations were made in the working of the Department by the amendment of the Public Health and Buildings Or.linance which was passed in July, 1908.

2. By the amen ling ordinance the Principal Civil Medical Officer was replaced as President of the Sanitary Board and Head of the Departinent by an officer of the Cadet class who could devote the whole of his time to the Department.

3. All drainage and all builling nuisances under Part III of the Ordinance are now dealt with by the Public Works Department The work of the Sanitary Departinent under this head is confined to reporting the existence of such nuisances.

4. The survey of the City of Victoria and Kowloon which was started in 1907 for the purpose of recommending modifications for cubicles under $151 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance has been practically completed. On the recommendation of the Board modifications have been granted in 8.767 floors by the Governor-in-Council. To discourage the erection of cubicles the amending ordinance provides that where there are no cubicles in a floor the habitable space required for each person is 30 sq. ft. as compared with 50 sq. ft. in floors where cubicles have been crected. Both these measures have done much to make the law press less hardly on the poorer classes of the Chinese community.

5. As will be seen from the Medical Officer of Health's Report the outbreak o Plague during the year was severe, there being 1,073 cases as compared with 240 in 1907 and 893 in 1906. Further attempts have been made to secure the co-operation of the Chinese in anti-plague measures. This has been fairly successful largely owing to the work of the Public Dispensaries and Street Committees in explaining to the people the reasons for these measures The advantage of keeping cats as an anti-plague measure has been impressed on the people, and now practically every house in the Colony possesses one or more cats. The Chinese are also now doing their own rat-catching, the Sanitary Department merely providing materials and cllecting the rats. This system was not in working order till September, but since then the number of rats returned has been very satisfactory. The recommendations of the Indian Plague Commission are being carefully followed and several changes have been made in the use of disinfectants, etc. All these changes tend to make disinfection less distasteful to the Chinese.

6. There were 56 cases of Cholera, 38 cases of Typhoid, 472 cases of Small-pox and 499 cases of Malaria, during the year. These are all discussed in the Medical Officer of Health's Report.

7. The Hon. Dr. J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer, was President of the Board and Head of the Department till July 2nd, when Mr. C. McI. MESSER was appointed Head of the Sanitary Department. On November 24th, Mr. MESSER was transferred to the post of Postmaster General and Mr. J. H. KEMP was appointed Head of the Sanitary Department. As Mr. KEMP was unable to take over his duties I was appointed to act for him. Dr. W. W. PEARSE acted as Medical Officer of Ilealth for the City of Victoria and Dr. H. MACFARLANE for Kowloon.

31st March, 1909.

R. O. HUTCHISON, Head of the Sanitary Department.

K 30

Annexe C.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, CIVIL HOSPITAL.

STAFF.

Miss Barker, Matron, returned from home leave in September and Sister Gourlay in May. Sister Lee left for home in October. Sisters Allaway, Shelbourne and Young resigned during the year.

Aurses Geary and Holmes resigned and were succeeded by Probationer Nurses Kennett junior and Gourdin. Probationer Nurse Kennett senior joined the service in place of Nurse White promoted to Staff Nurse.

The private nursing scheme was taken over by Government in July when Sister Sloan joined here for duty. Sister Richards junior resigned shortly after her arrival and was succeeded by Sister Etherington from home.

Mr. Franklin, Assistant Analyst and Apothecary, returned from home in February. Wardmaster E. Brown joined the service vice Wardmaster West who resigned.

BUILDINGS.

The second annexe to the nursing staff quarters was completed and handed over.

STATISTICS.

The total number of admissions was 2,527 as against 2,711 last year and 18,207 out- patients were treated as against 17,032.

The following Tables are attached :-

Table I.-Admissions and Deaths during each month.

"}

"}

II.-Admissions and Deaths under respective diseases. III.-Operations.

IV.-Admissions and Deaths in the Materinty Hospitals.

The following Table gives the number and class of patients admitted during the past ten years and the deaths:-

Police,

YEAR.

Paying Patients,.

Government Servants, Police Cases, Free,

Total,

Total Deaths, Percentage,

1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908.

692 920 937 938 759 707 726 742 776 660 789 928 858 956 794 794 866 720 762 724 208 266 339 460 319 267 271 339 367 315 306 347 348 300 276 262 329 307 318 285 739 569 466 454 646 555 512 637 488 543

2,734 3,030 2,948 3,108 2,794 2,585 2,704 2,745 2,711 2,527

114 155 153 140 142 128 150 167 170 157 4.1 5.1

5.2

4.5 5:0 4.1 5.6 6:0 6.2 6.2

Free". Of the free patients 46 were

This shows a decrease under all headings save "Free".

Europeans as against 49 last year.

Death. There were 157 during the year making a percentage of 6.2. Of this number 61 were moribund on admission and died within 24 hours.

The average daily number of sick was 88.6 as against 103-4 last year.

Women and Children.-There were 185 women admitted of whom 19 died and 49 children of whom 7 died.

Nationalities-Europeans-594 against 715. Indians and Coloured-874 against 843 Asiatics-1,059 against 1,153.

K 31

The death-rate amongst the nationalities was European 3.2 per cent., Indians 4.8 and Asiatics 9.

The most prevalent diseases were :-

DISEASES.

Increase or

1908.

1907.

Decrease.

Malarial Fever,

282

against

247

+

35

Febricula,

93

265

172

Influenza,

140

11

+ 129

Dysentery,

84

80

+

4

Tuberculosis,

45

56

11

""

Rheumatism,

60

$9

29

39

Anæmia,

24

42

18

Diseases of Respiratory System, 123

140

17

Diseases of Digestive System, 226

238

12

"}

Injuries,

482

457

+

25

**

The largest number of deaths occurred in the following diseases :--

Plague, Tuberculosis,

1S

17

Diseases of Respiratory System, 10.

Injuries,

47

New Growths.-The following cases of malignant diseases were under treatment :-

Indian, Male, aged 40, Sarcoma of neck.

,,

44,

Portuguese, Female, 31,

??

Carcinoma of cervix.

11

11

32,

Chinesc,

26,

Epithelioma of uterus. Sarcoma of shoulder.

"9

70,

arm.

">

""

""

50,

Scirrhus of breast.

>>

21,

Sarcoma of axilla.

40,

""

""

Male 54,

>>

51,.

Carcinoma of stomach.

}}

bladder.

jaw.

41,

Carcinoma of liver.

>>

་་

53,

Sarcoma of jaw.

40,

Epithelioma of scalp..

30,

Sarcoma of orbit.

11

""

11

??

32,

Epithelioma of cervical glands.

Fractures.-The following were the principal fractures treated :-

2 with 1 Death.

Spine,

Skull,

Jaw,

Clavicle,

Arm,

Forearm,

Ribs,...

Thigh,

Leg, Patella,

16

12

""

3

7

11

4

13

11

1

39

2

Malarial Fever.-There was again an increase under this disease, 282 against 247 in 1907 and 239 in 1906.

·

K 32

Febricula.-There was a marked decrease under this heading, 93 as against 265.

Dengue Fever. Also shows a marked decrease, 13 as against 77.

Influenza.-There was a large increase under this heading 140 against 11. Many of the cases were very serious more especially as regards the lung complications and no doubt several deaths under Respiratory System were due to sequela of this disease.

Typhoid Fever.-Only 12 cases were under treatment with 1 death as against 38 with

7 in 1907.

Appendicitis.-5 cases were under treatment with 2 deaths, both Chinese. Of the others two recovered without operation and one after operation.

OPERATIONS.

A total number of 147 operations were performed during the year (203 in 1907). Chloroform was administered 148 times whilst a few minor operations were done under Cocaine and Adrenalin Chloride. No casualties occurred as a result of the administra- tion of the anaesthetics. For the first time for many years no liver abscess and no ruptured spleen were treated. Two cases of radical cure of Hernia were operated on success- fully by Dr. Koch, Assistant Superintendent, as also one case of suprapubic lithotomy, one case of ovarian tumour, one of resection of the knee and one Appendicitis.

VACCINATIONS.

During the year 627 were performed as against 505 in 1907-336 primary vaccinations

of which 221 were successful and 291 re-vaccinations with 151 successful.

SICKNESS AMONG THE POLICE, GAOL AND SANITARY STAFFS.

Admissions.-660 cases were under treatment as against 776 in 1907 a decrease in all sections of the Force, more especially amongst the Chinese (61) and Europeans (42). The Indians (13) shewed a less marked decrease.

Table V shows admissions and deaths from various sections of the Force for the last ten years.

Table VI gives the sick and mortality rate in percentage of strength for the last ten years. Table VII gives the admissions and deaths in the Civil Hospital during each month of the year.

Table VIII gives the admissions for Malarial Fever from each station.

Table IX gives the percentage admissions for Malaria from the more important stations of the New Territories.

Deaths.-There was only one death during the year, a Chinese who died from heart

disease.

Invaliding.-One European for Mental Debility; five Indians. three for Tuberculosis, one for Paresis of legs and one for Anæmia; and three Chinese all for Beri-beri.

Malaria.-108 cases occurred as against 105 last year and 74 in 1906. The Europeans suffered to the extent of 8.5 per cent., Inliaus 21.7 per cent. and Chinese 4.2 per cent. The percentage incidence of the whole Force shows an increase of 0.9 as compared with last year.

There were 15 re-admissions for this disease as against 6 last year, 11 coming in twice, 3 three times and one four times.

Of the important stations in the New Territories (Table IX) all show an increase except Au Tau.

Of the other stations Bay View stands first with 100 per cent., Tsat Tse Mui next with 80 per cent., Sham Shui Po, Aberdeen, Shaukiwan and Pokfulum following with 46-6, 43-7 and 33-3. The healthiest station is No. 8 with only 2.6 %.

Dysentery.-13 cases were under treatment as against 19, the Indians furnishing most cases (8).

Appendicitis. Two cases both in Indians and both recovered.

Other ailments call for no comment.

£

K 33

Gaol.-There were 53 admissions as against 68 (62.9% against 56.2). There were no deaths and no invaliding.

Sanitary. There were 50 admissions against 72 last year. One death occurred from Beri-beri and one coloured foreman was invalided for Tuberculosis.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

There were 82 admissions as against 87. There were 3 deaths due to Plague, Chronic Nephritis and Shock following Cæsarian Section. The second case of Cæsarian Section did very well. Of those admitted 15 were wives of Government servants, 36 private paying and 31 free.

Of the children born alive 32 were boys and 16 girls. There were 7 still-births. False Pains, Chronic Albuminuria, Miscarriage, Plague and Eclampsia account for the other cases.

FEES.

The total amount of fees received from the Civil Hospital and its annexes (excluding Victoria Hospital) was $26,970.30 as compared with $33,771 in 1907.

6th January, 1909.

J. BELL, Superintendent.

Table I.-Admissions and Deaths in Civil Hospital during each

month of the year 1908.

EUROPEANS, INDIANS, &C.

ASIATICS.

MONTH.

TOTAL ADMISSIONS.

TOTAL DEATHS.

A.

D.

A.

D.

A.

D.

Remaining at end of 1907,

25

January,

33

February,

41

March,.

26

****

1231d

13

April,

40

48

52

52

54

May,

30

48

June,

37

84

July,

ΤΟ

101

August.

67

103

September,

66

96

October,

67

95

November,

50

66

December,

42

62

123 |

00 + 00 00 10 0 0 -

35

73

2

79

160

10

49

142

11

82

160

9

74

6

168

7

116

17

194

25

74

8

195

12

9.5

16

266

21

93

263

11

113

101

73

275

13

263

14

189

12

75

179

10

Total in 1908,.

594

19 874

Total in 1907.............

715

31 843

42 1,059 96

45 1,153 94

2,527

157

2,711

170

* A. dmitted. D.-deaths.

K 34

Table II-Admissions and Deaths in Civil Hospital in 1908 under respective Diseases.

DISEASES.

Remaining in Hospital at

end of 1907.

Yearly Total.

Total Cases Treated.

Admissions

Deaths.

Remaining in

Hospital at

end of 1908.

Remarks.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox,

Whooping Cough,

Dengue,

Influenza,

Diphtheria,

3

3

1

1

F

13

13

...

139

4

12

140

2

4

Febricula,

1

92

93

I

Enteric Fever,

10

12

Cholera,

1

Dysentery,

84

6

84

Ι

Mumps,

8

8

Plague,

22

18

22

Malarial Fever :-

1. Quartan,

9

1

2. Simple Tertian,

49

3. Malignant,

3

220

223

4

Mixed infection,

1

ལྒ་

49

1

1

1

Beri-beri,....

56

56

1

Erysipelas,

2

1

Septicemia,

3

3

Tubercle,.

4

41

17

45

6

Leprosy,

2

2

Phagedena,

3

-16

Syphilis,

Gonorrhoea,

2 2

45

63

65

Alcoholism,.

Rheumatism, Cyst,

New Growth, non-malignant,

New Growth, malignant,

Anæmia,

37

1

37

60

60

~ * ~

2

4

1

6

6

5

5

18

1

23

Debility,

LOCAL DISEASES.

3

103

311 ∞

3

18

1

7

24

106

2

Diseases of the Nervous System.

SUB-SECTION 1. Diseases of the

Nerves:-

Neuritis, Meningitis,

2

010

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous

Disorders -

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

سرا

1

2

Epilepsy,

Neuralgia,

Hysteria,...

Shock,....

Convulsions,

13128 NH

7

SUB-SECTION 3. Mental Diseases :

10

1

10

5

4

1

5

2

1

12

3

2

2

1

1

Melancholia,

4

Dementia,

:

41

Carried forward,........... 24

77

1,194

31

K 35

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908,-Continued.

DISEASES.

Remaining in

Hospital at

end of 1907.

Yearly Total.

Admissions Deaths.

Total Cases Treated.

Remaining in

Hospital at end of 1908.

Brought forward,........

24

1,170

77

1,194

31

LOCAL DISEASES,- Continued.

Diseases of the Eye,

""

""

"

""

""

"

""

*

"

""

""

""

"

>>

"?

""

Ear,

Circulatory System,

Respiratory System, Digestive System, Lymphatic System,. Urinary System, Male Organs, Female Organs,

Organs of Locomotion, Cellular Tissue,

Skin,.......

Breast,

:

:

::

4

56

60

10

5

14

14

2262

19

6

21

121

10

123

220

6

226

49

51

29

4

29

N

47

49

- 10 10 0 2 2

11

11

:

* CO

71

75

3

41

44

38

38

1

3

Malformations,

Injuries,

Effects of Heat,

Immersion,

Poisons,

Parasites,

In Attendance,

Under Observation,

23

459

47

482

21

23

3

23

M

1

5

6

11

11

8

8

6

6

49

49

TOTAL.

73

2,454

157

2,527

81

1

Remarks.

J

REMOVAL OF TUMOURS :-

Cyst of Neck,

Head,

""

Face,

""

27

K 36

Table III-Operations.

OPERATIONS.

Chondroma of Shoulder,

Lipoma of Shoulder,

Carcinoma of Scalp,

""

Breast,

Sarcoma of Eye,

""

Neck,

Papilloma of Rectum,

OPERATIONS ON TRACHEA :—

Tracheotomy for Diphtheria,

for Cut Throat,.

OPERATIONS ON CHEST

Empyema, with Resection of Ribs,

OPERATION ON VASCULAR SYSTEM :-

Excision of Varicose Veins,.. OPERATIONS ON LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Excision of Glands,

OPERATIONS ON BONES :-

Excision or Gouging:

Caries of Skull,.

Humerus,.......

Femur,.

Tarsal Bones,.

Resetting Fractured Thigh,

Sequestrotomy of Femur,

Wiring, etc. Recent Fracture-Tibia, Trephining Skull,.

AMPUTATIONS :-

At Shoulder Joint,

....

Forearm,

Hand,.....

Fingers,.

Supernumerary Thumb,

Thigh,

Leg,

t

Foot,

Toes,....

OPERATIONS ON JOINTS:

For wound of Knee Joint,..

Removal of Semilunar Cartilage,

Resection of Knee Joint,

Scraping Tuberculous Joints,

OPERATIONS ON MUSCLES, FASCIÆ, ETC.:-

Breaking down Contracted Knee Joint, Suturing divided Tendons,....

OPERATIONS ON CUTANEOUS SYSTEM :-

For Ingrowing Toe-nail,

Scraping Sinuses and Ulcers,

OPERATIONS ON CELLULAR TISSUE :-

Incision of Abscesses of :-

Abdominal Wall,

Back,

Bursal Abscess of Knee,

Chest,.

Psoas,.

Iliac,

TOTAL.

DEATHS.

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

21.00

1

3

1

1

:

1

17

1

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

3

<< ∞ = HNNNH

4

2

9

...

1

...

2

2

2 1

2

1

1

1

•••

1

4

1

...

1

1

3

::

1

1

1

...

1

NN

2

2

Carried forward,..

98

10

OPERATIONS.

K 37

TOTAL.

DEATHS.

Brought forward,.....

98

10

:-

1

1

1

...

2

OPERATIONS ON GENITO-URINARY ORGANS :-

Cystotomy for Sarcoma,.... Lithotomy-Suprapubic, Urethral Calculus,

Stricture of Urethra,

Ruptured Urethra,

Excision of Varicocele,.. Hydrocele-Radical cure, Hæmatocele-Radical cure,

Fungus Testis-Castration, Perineal Sinus, Paraphymosis,

Circumcision,

Ovariotomy,

OPERATIONS ON ALIMENTARY CANAL:-

Enterectomy-bullet wound,..

Hare-lip,

Liver Exploration,

""

Sinus after Abscess, Resection of Ribs,.

Hernia-Radical cure,

Hæmorrhoids-Whitehead,

Fistula in Ano,

Appendicitis-Abscess,

MISCELLANEOUS OPERATIONS:-

Reduction of Dislocation :-

Jaw,

Shoulder,

Hip,

Dissecting out Callus in Fracture of Humerus,

Plague Bubo-opening,

Extraction of Bullet,

....

MONTH.

Remaining at end of

2

1

1

1

1

10

...

...

1

1

...

1

2

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

Total,.....

147

12

Table IV.

Monthly Admissions and Deaths in Maternity Hospital in 1908.

OTHER NATION-Į

EUROPEANS.

JAPANESE.

CHINESE.

ALITIES.

Total Ad-

Total Deaths.

A.

D.

A.

D.

A.

D.

A.

D. missions.

1907,.

January,

February,

March,

April,

2

May,

June,

1

1

July,

2

August,...

1

September,

2

October,

1

November,

2

3

December,

Total in 1908,

27

1907,

20

2557585

12

72

3

2 2 2 --

1

2

2

1

1

1

9

2

...

12

3

9

1

10

1

2

46

2

9

35

13

* A-admitted. D-deaths.

::

82

87

ون سر

3

1

*

K 38

Table V.-Admissions into and Deaths in the Civil Hospital from the Police during the last ten years.

YEAR.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

Total Admissions.

Total Deaths.

1899,

117

421

151

699

1900,

183

522

215

920

16 4

1901,

202

521

214

987

1902,

150

479

307

936

1903,

130

431

198

759

5

1904,

118

342

247

707

4

1905,

109

416

201

726

10

1906,

106

381

190

677

3

1907,

144

429

203

776

6

1908,

102

416

142

660

Table VI.-Sick Rate and Mortality Rate in the Different Sections of the Police for the past ten years.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

YEAR.

Sick Rate.

Mortality Rate.

Sick Rate.

Mortality Rate.

Sick Rate.

Mortality Rate.

1899,

140.46

3.57

151.98

1.08

47.09

2.75

1900,

135.50

147.40

.57

57.02

.40

1901,

160.31

3.17

147.17

.56

*52.97

.49

1902.

126.00

0.88

131.90

.80

76.90

1903,

115.04

...

124.56

.57

54.69

.82

1904,

92.91

1.57

96.33

.28

54.52

.82

1905,

81.96

2.26

117.51

.84

41.61

.81

1906,

79.70

93.00

.24

37.47

.39

1907, 1908,

114.27

.....

87.52

105.66 117.51

.73

41.51

.61

28.98

.20

Table VII.-Monthly Admissions and Deaths from the Police Force in the Civil Hospital in 1908.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

A.

D.

A.

D.

A.

D.

Total Admis- sions.

Total Deaths.

Remaining at end of 1907,

9

5

19

January,

February,

March,.

21

5

30

18

3

30

34

11

51

April,.

May,

10

31

11

52

10

20

13

43

June,

5

35

10

50

July,

10

47

7

64

August,

9

46

16

71

September,

48

22

79

October,....

10

49

13

72

November,

34

16

58

December,..

24

10

41

Total,...

102

416

142

1

660

1

Station.

K 39

Table VIII.--Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police Station

during the Year 1908.

Strength.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

Strength.

Percentage to

Decrease

over 1907.

Increase or

Central,

297

1

gend

1

1 5

4

6 2

4 24

No. 1,

13

22:3

8.08

0.32

7.6

No. 2,

38

1

4

10.50

2.6

No. 7,

65

1

1

3 4.60

+

1.5

No. 8,

38

1

2.60

+

2.6

Bay View,

10

3

2

1

10

100.00

+ 60-0

...

Tsat Tse Mui,

5

1

4

80.00

34.2

Shau-ki-wan,

9

3

33.30

-

55.5

Stanley,..

11

Aberdeen,

16

...

Pokfulum,

6

Kennedy Town,

7

Yaumati,

41

:

Hung Hom....... 19

Sham Shui Po,.

15

1

1

3

2

1

1 1

2

1

9.09 43.70

17.11

33.30

14.20

4

9.70

+1 1+

+ 14.3

5.1

1

5.20

+ 5.2

7

46.60 + 25.2

Kowloon City, .

16

1

6.20

6.2

Ping Shan,

15

1

2

13.30

6.7

Au Tau,.

14

1

2

14.20

50.0

Sheung Shui,... 11

1

2

1

Tai Po,

11

2

2

104

5

45.40

+ 38.8

36.33 + 18.23

Sha Ta Kok,.

13

1

1

2

15.40

7.8

Tung Chung,

7

2

2

28.50

28.6

Sha Tin,

8

1

1

1

2

6

75.00

Sai Kung,.

4 50.00

Ping Chau,.

Ta Ku Leung,

5

Green Island,

5

Water,

161

Total,

1

...

:

1

3

10

20.0

2

1

1

2

7

4.30 + 25.7

5

5 21 10

19

20 14 10 108 11.20

+

1

~::

...

14.30

+ 60-8 + 35.8 {Station.

New

20.0

Table IX.-Admissions for Malarial Fever from the most important Police Stations

in the New Territories compared with Strength.

Stations. 1901. 1902. 1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907. 1908.

ShaTaKok,

30.7

15.38

13.3

57.1

7.7

7.6

15.4

Ping Shan,

62.2

7.1

45.45

13.3

20.0

6.6

13.3

Sai Kung,.

28.2

16.6

16.6

50.0

42.8

14.2

50.0

San Tin,...

25.0

10.0

10.0

...

...

...

...

...

Tai Po,...

70.0

50.0

33.3

27.2

16.6

9.0 i

18.1

36.3

Tai 0,

10.0

10.0

11.1

10.0

...

Sha Tin,... 25.0

12.5

33.3

14.2

75.0

Au Tau,...

121.4

7.6 61.5

50.0

71.4

35.7

64.2

14.2

Sheung

Shui,

63.6

20.0

9.0

14.3

6.6

45.4

...

K 40

Annexe D.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER IN CHARGE OF THE VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

There were 234 admissions during 1908 as compared with 211 in 1907, an increase of 23. From the 24th November, we took over all the European women and children belong- ing to the garrison needing hospital treatment.

Table I gives in detail the diseases and causes of death during the year, from this it will be seen that there were 8 deaths, a percentage of 3·3, as compared with 3 deaths in 1907 (1·4%).

The admissions may be classified thus:-

(1.) According to age:-

1908.

1907.

1906.

Under 3 years....

66

Between 3 and 12 years..

44

}

60

110

29

}

65

89

42

| 107

Over 12 years.

124

122

171

(2.) Nationality:

Europeans

208

166

241

....

Asiatics

26

45

37

(3.) Class of Patients :-

Paying patients

108

108

13

Government servants

3

9

41

Wives & children of Government servants,

65

26

134

Free......

58

68

90

Malarial Fever.-There were 23 admissions as compared with 12 in 1907.

They are classified as follows:-

Quartan,

Simple Tertian,

Malignant,

-99

Mixed Infection,.

1

10

10

2

The Quartan case was from the Diocesan Girls' School.

Of the Tertian one was from Sai Kung Police Station, two were from Kowloon, two from Tai Po Police Station, and five from Quarry Bay all in the month of November.

The Malignant cases were from Bay View (5) and one each from Sai Kung Police Station, Aberdeen Police Station, Magazine Gap, Babington Path and Lyeemun.

The cases of mixed infection were from Lai Chi Kok and Quarry Bay.

Operations.--The following were performed during the year:—

Curetting,

Perincorrhaphy,

Intrauterine fibroids, removal of,..

Amputation of breast and removal of lymphatic glands

from axilla,

Mastoidectomy,

Circumcision,

Carbuncle (incision),

Abscess (incision),

2

1

1

1

1

2

1

5

Vaccinations.-There were 20 vaccinations during the year (in 1907—21).

Confinements. There were 22 confinements during the year, one pair of twins, all

did well.

Staff.--Sister Moir was on duty all through the year. Sister Stollard from 1st January to 22nd July, and Sister Richards from 23rd July to 30th September.

Sister Millington resumed duty on 1st October when the Matron returned from leave. Two Nurses and three Probationers were on duty at different periods of the year when required.

Fees.-$5,119.89 were received in fees during the year as compared with $5,812

in 1907.

J. M. ATKINSON,

Medical Officer in Charge.

Influenza,

K 41

Table I.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN,

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1907.

Remain-

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

ing in Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1908.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Enteric Fever,

Dysentery,

Malarial Fever

1. Quartan,

2. Simple Tertian,

3. Malignant,

4. Mixed Infection,

Malarial Cachexia,.

Beri-beri,

-

Pyæmia,

Tubercle,

Alcoholism,

New Growth, non-malignant,

""

Anæmia, Debility,

malignant,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System.

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Nerves :—

Meningitis,

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders :—

Neuralgia,

Diseases of the Eye,

17

17

1

VAS

4

1

1

10

10

2

2

4

1

10

10

2

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

12

13

2

1

2

4

""

**

Ear,....

3

"2

""

Circulatory System,

1

1

"

Respiratory System,

2

8

1

10

"

Digestive System,

13

3

13

Lymphatic System,

2

2

29

"

Urinary System, ...

2

**

Male Organs....

1

1

Female Organs.

12

12

Cellular Tissue,...

Skin,

11

11

1

8

9

Injuries, Local,.

1

3

Parasites,

Parturition,

Under Observation,

In Attendance,

2

2

26

26

29

22

222

2

29

22

Total, 1908,....

7

227

00

234

12

Total, 1907,......

22

189

3

211

7

K 42

Table II.

Average daily number of Inmates of the Victoria Hospital during each month of

the Years 1906, 1907, and 1908.

January, February,

March,

April,.

May,

June,

Month.

Average daily

A

verage daily

Average daily

number in

number in

Hospital, 1906.

Hospital, 1907.

number in Hospital, 1908.

7.23

19.29

6.22

5.90

13.05

4.45

9.36

12.61

8.97

5.47

6.63

7.27

10.81

7.58

10.74

17.10

14.13

18.23

14.00

16.77

23.39

....

19.00

18.48

21.58

21.47

23.16

24.26

19.88

15.67

14.26

17.37

13.66

13.20

18.68

5.45

18.90

July,

.....

August, September, October,.... November,

December,

Annexe E.

REPORT ON THE LUNATIC ASYLUM.

During the year 139 males and 52 females were admitted, and these together with 16 males and 5 females remaining on December 31st, 1907, make a total of 212 patients under treatment during the year. The total admissions 191, are fewer than in the previous year,

204.

Of the patients under treatment there were:-

Paving Patients,...

Police Cases,

Police, Members of,

Free Patients,.

Government Servants,

39

114

4

52

3

212

Of these cases there were repatriated or discharged 132 males and 51 females; 10 males and 1 female died, and there remained under treatment 13 males and 5 females on December 31st.

Acute cases were as follows:-Acute Mania 21 males and 9 females; cholia 20 males and 5 females. Alcoholism was accountable for 35 cases. the details of birthplaces and diseases.

Acute Melan- Table II shews

The Deaths numbered 11, slightly more than 5% of the number under treatment. Causes of Death :-Acute Mania 6 inales, 1 female; Alcoholisın 1 male; Dementia 1 male; Heat-Stroke 1 male.

All Buildings and Grounds were in good repair and order. The Staff continued un- changed during the year.

W. V. M. KOCH, Medical Officer in Charge.

Diseases.

K 43

Table I.-RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Alcoholism,.

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System :-

SUB-SECTION II.

Functional Nervous Disorders :-

Epilepsy,.....

Heat Stroke,

SUB-SECTION III.

Mental Diseases

Idiocy,

Mania,

Melancholia,

Dementia,

Delusional Insanity,

Poisoning,

Under Observation, Immersion,

Attempted Suicide,

Remaining in Hospital at end of

1907.

YEARLY TOTAL.

Remaining

Total Cases in Hospital

Treated.

Admissions.

Deaths.

at end of

1908.

1

34

1

35

1

3

1

1

CO -

1

1

5

5

12

78

90

2

23

25

6

9

2

15

11

11

1

1

24

24

1

1

17341

1

...

Total, 1908,.

21

191

11

212

18

""

1907,...

18

204

13

222

21

1

Table II.-Birthplaces and Diseases of those under Treatment.

OBSERVA-

ACUTE

MANIA.

CHRONIC

MANIA.

MELAN- DELUSIONAL

DEMENTIA.

IDIOCY.

ALCOHOLISM.

TION.

OTHER

DISEASES.

TOTAL.

CHOLIA.

INSANITY.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. ¡

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

2

.....

1

England,

Scotland,..

Ireland,

Germany,

Australia,

U. S. A.,

China,

India,

Japan,

Hongkong,

Straits Settlements,

Macau,

Manila,

Chili,

France,

Norway,

Sweden,

Portugal,.

....

Bagdad,

Russia,.

Switzerland,

Austria,

West Indios,

1

1

15

36

15

17

3

6

4

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

:

2

1

1

...

23

20

10

41

18

20

10

...

...

...

1

1

1

1

:

5

4

11

:

2

...

...

...

10

2

9

1

1

15

1

2

17482

1

3

1

2

— 30 Q

1

1

10

1

96

48

1

8

...

1

1

:

...

1

...

1

2

:

1

1

:

...

4

1

2

1

...

1

1

1

3333

2

15

...

1

4931

1

...

:

1

...

1

I

K 44

1

155

57

*

· K 45

Annexe F.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER IN CHARGE OF THE HOSPITALS

FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

During the year there were 59 admissions to Kennedy Town and 100 to the Hospital Hulk Hygeia as against 62 and 167 respectively in 1907.

A list of the diseases treated is shown in Tables I and II.

Only 3 cases of Plague were admitted, two Eurasians and one Chinese. All died within 48 hours.

The cases of Malaria and Beri-beri were all admitted from the Japanese steamer Wakamiya Maru, which arrived from Bombay with the majority of the crew suffering from fever, several having died on the voyage. The disease started shortly after the ship left Bombay and it spread so rapidly through the crew that the Japanese ship's Surgeon diagnosed it to be Dengue. Seven were suffering from both diseases on admission, and four from Beri-beri alone.

The three cases returned as Choleraic Diarrhoea exhibited all the clinical signs of true Cholera, but were negative to Bacteriological tests.

SMALL-POX.

On referring to Tables I and II it will be seen that eleven cases of Small-pox were admitted to Kennedy Town Hospital and eighty-six to the Hygeia, but as seven of the cases admitted to Kennedy Town were subsequently transferred to the Hygeia, the actual number of cases treated was 90 and of these 26 died as against 97 with 33 deaths in 1907.

According to Nationality these were :—

European,

Chinese,

Japanese,

Eurasian,

VARIETIES OF SMALL-POX.

Discrete.

Confluent. Hæmorrhagic. Males.

Females.

15

4

1

12

8

40

22

+

29

37

I

0

0

1

0

2

NO

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

1

58

27

10

5

43

47

3233

5

72

25

Indian,

Total, 1908,....

Total, 1907,............ 59

DEATHS.

Discrete.

Confluent.

Hæmorrhagic.

European, Chinese,

0

1

1

3

17

4

Total, 1908, 3

18

5

=26

Total, 1907, 1

27

5

=33

The three fatal cases of Discrete Small-pox were children under one year.

WILLIAM B. A. MOORE, L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S., (Ireland).

K 46

Table I.-DISEASES TREATED at KENNEDY TOWN HOSPITAL.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1907.

1908.

Beri-beri,....

Cholera,

Cholernic Diarrhoea,

Diarrhoea,

Dengue,

Leprosy,

4

3

3

+22

4

- 00 00 -

1

1

1

1

1

Malaria :-

(a) Simple Tertian,

(b) Malignant,....

Malarial Cachexia,

2

+

24

1

24

1

1

Plague,

3

3

3

Small-pox,

11

2

11

No Appreciable Disease,

5

5

Total,

59

14

59

Table II.-DISEASES TREATED ON BOARD the HULK “HYGEIA”.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Cases

ing in Hospital

Remarks.

at end of

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1907.

1908.

Small-pox, ...

Acute Lobar Pneumonia,

No Appreciable Disease, In Attendance,

Total,

86

24

86

1

1

1

12

12

100

24

-100

Suspected Small-pox, transferred to the Government Civil Hospital,

Tung Wah Small-pox Hospital.

This hospital, which consists of a large matshed, was opened on March 6th and re- mained in use till July 28th when it was blown down by the Typhoon, the two patients then under treatment having been transferred to Kennedy Town Hospital for safety.

69 cases of Small-pox were admitted, which includes 8 convalescents transferred from the Hospital Hulk "Hygeia", so that only 61 fresh cases were admitted, and of these 30 died-49.1 % as compared with 90 cases admitted to the Government Hospitals with 26 deaths 28.8 %.

Discrete.

Confluent. Hæmorrhagic. Total.

33

5

69

Died,.... 0

25

5

30

Varieties and Deaths.-Admitted, ....31

10 10

WILLIAM B. A. Moore,

Visiting Medical Officer.

· K 47

Tung Wah Plague Hospital.

During the year there were 280 admissions as compared with 61 in 1907.

J

Plague. There were 275 admissions for Plague and of these 1 escaped and 240 died-87.5%.

Bubonic.

Septic.

Pneumonic.

Varieties.-Under European treatment,

15

0

0

Chinese

253

6

1

33

>>

Total,

268

6

Co

1

Bubonic.

Septic.

Pneumonic.

Deaths.- Under European treatment,

12

Chinese

221

O CO

0

0

6

1

Total,

233

6

1

Analysis of Deaths.

Died within 48 hours after admission,

""

""

between 2nd and 5th day after admission, after 5th day after admission,

187

42

11

Therefore of the 45 patients who lived for more than five days after admission, 34 recovered 75.5%.

Diseases Treated:-* Plague,

Cholera,

Malaria,

Syphilis,

Admitted.

Died.

Recovered.

275

240

34

3

3

0

1

1

0

1

0

1

280

244

35

* One case escaped from the wards.

WILLIAM B. A. Moore,

Visiting Medical Officer.

Annexe G.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER TO VICTORIA GAOL.

The general health of the prisoners has been good. The admissions to Hospital numbered 432, but of these 152 were admitted for observation and found to be malingering, so that there were only 280 admissions for genuine illnesses, a percentage of 5·8 (3 in 1907) on the total admissions to the Gaol.

There were only 17 cases of Dysentery with no deaths as compared with 20 last year with 3 deaths and 38 in 1906, with 3 deaths.

The replacing of the old drinking tins, by vessels made of zinc, having covers, will probably further reduce the incidence of this disease in the future.

Malaria shows an increase of 12 as compared with last year. The following figures show the number treated in the Gaol Hospital for the past 9 years:-

1900,

1901,

1902,

1903,

1904,

163

1905,

98

1906,

63

1907,

93

1908,

59

52

22

56

68

K 48

There were 13 cases of Beri-beri as compared with 10 last year. The disease was in all cases contracted before admission to the Gaol. The total number of out-patients was 750. The principal diseases were Syphilis 31 (Primary, 11), Diseases of the Respiratory System 158, Scabies 57, Ringworm 98, Gonorrhoea 12.

One birth occurred in the Female Prison. Mother and child both did well.

Twenty-eight prisoners were discharged on medical grounds. (For operation, 5. Insanity, 5. Infectious diseases, 9. Pulmonary Consumption, 5. Broncho-pneumonia, 1. Beri-beri, 2. Paralysis, 1.)

Six cases of Cholera occurred in August. In conjunction with Dr. W. W. Pearse, Acting Medical Officer of Health, I investigated the cause of the epidemic and we submitted a special report. The disease started amongst the prisoners whose duty it was to clean the cells of the newly admitted prisoners, and we concluded that the infection was introduced by some prisoner who only spent one night in gaol, and who was in an early stage of the disease or recovering from a mild attack.

There were 10 deaths from natural causes and 2 suicides by hanging.

No case of corporal punishment required any after treatment.

I append the following Tables:-

I.-Diseases and Deaths in 1908.

II.-Rate of Sickness and Mortality for 1908.

III.—Vaccinations in the Gaol during the past ten years. IV.-General Statistics of the Gaol during the past ten years.

WILLIAM B. A. MOORE, L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S., (Ireland).

K 49

Table I.-DISEASES and DEATHS in VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL.

DISEASES.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1907.

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1908.

Febricula,

9

Cholera,

6

Influenza,

3

Dysentery,

17

17

Beri-beri,

13

13

06353

9

Malarial Fever:-

Simple Tertian,

17

Malignaut,

51

51

==

17

Syphilis :-

Secondary,...

Go orrhoea,

Rheumatism,

Debility,

Anemia,

Scurvy,.

Alcoholism,

ласовалс

3

1

2

6

1

20

20

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System

Functional Nervous Disorders :-

Epilepsy,.

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Mental Discases:-

Mania,......

Melancholia,

Dementia,

Co - co

1

Diseases of the Circulatory System,

27

27

""

"

>

Respiratory Digestive

24

4

24

""

29

29

""

Lymphatic

2

Urinary Cellular

59

13

13

59

Injuries, Local,

Under Observation,.

9

152

132

****** * a

2

3

9

Total, 1908,

432

10

432

6

1907,

9

424

14

433

Table II.-RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL.

Total Number of:

Admis- sions to Hos- pital.

due to

I

Cases treated Deaths

as

Out-patients. Disease.

Daily Average

Number of:-

Prisoners in

Gaol.

Sick in

Hospital

Hospital

Out-

patients.

Admissions to

Hospital to Total Admis-

sions to Gaol.

Rate per cent. of :-

Daily Average DailyAverage of Sik in of Alt Sick Hospital to in Gaol to DailyAverage Daily Average of Prisoners. of Prisoners.

Deaths due to Disease to Total Admissions

to Gaol.

Prisoners Jadmitted to Gaol.

1908 4,778

432

750

10 465

6:18

23.11

9:00

1.32

6.29

0.2

1907 5,977 424

670

14 502 6.27 17.26 7.21

1.24

4.54

0.23

K 50

Table III.-NUMBER and RESULTS of VACCINATIONS in VICTORIA GAOL during the past ten years.

Years.

Number of Prisoners

Successful.

Unsuccessful.

Vaccinated.

Not inspected, owing to early discharge

from Gaol.

1898,

4.507

2,875

1,252

380

1899,

3,378

2,004

1,063

311

1900,

2,638

1,765

666

207

1901,

2,880

2,150

337

393

1902,

3,973

2,552

872

549

1903,

2,887

1,781

611

495

1904,

2,578

1,667

357

554

1905,

2,984

2,106

288

590

1906,

2,659

1,910

326

423

1907,

2,696

1,756

472

468

1908,

1,653

915

372

466

Table IV.-GENERAL STATISTICS connected with VICTORIA GAOL and the GAOL HOSPITAL

during the past ten years.

Admission to

Years.

Daily Average Number

the Gaol.

of Prisoners.

Number of Cases treated in Hospital.

Number of | Out-patients.

Deaths due to Disease.

1898,

5,427

511

298

1,033

6

1899,

4,789

434

503

1,778

1900,

5,432

486

495

1,523

6

1901,

5,077

499

348

1,316

9

1902,

5,988

576

516

1,760

6

1903.

7,273

653

568

1,715

16

1904.

7,464

726

893

1,173

17

1905,

6,323

697

441

1,020

13

1906,

5,799

518

355

681

18

1907,

5,877

502

424

670

11

1908,

4,778

465

432

750

10

Annexe H.

REPORT OF THE RAILWAY MEDICAL OFFICER.

Mr. Naider has been stationed at North Face Camp (No. 2 Tunnel) throughout the year. Mr. Chan Tsan Kun was appointed as an extra Assistant Medical Officer on August 13th and has been stationed at Taipo Kau. Mr. Kelly, Sanitary Inspector, has been stationed at North Face Camp (No. 2) Tunnel and has ably carried out the sanitary work at the various camps.

The general health of the Railway Staff shows a distinct improvement during the year, more especially in the camps at Beacon Hill No. 2 Tunnel where there has been a reduction of approximately fitty per cent. of cases of Malarial Fever.

A similar reduction has also taken place in entries for Dysentery and Beri-beri.

The railway work has proceeded without hindrance on account of sickness throughout

the year.

The camps at No. 5 Tunnel, Taipo Kau, have been very unhealthy since work began there, but are now showing great improvement.

The Europeans especially suffered badly from Malarial Fever in the summer in spite of the administration of prophylactic doses of quinine.

K 51

The ground is very wet and soft and with the repeated land slides which occurred on -opening up the South end of the tunr e', pool formation could not be prevented.

The workmen moreover, in consequence of the extremely wet nature of the ground, have had to work under most trying conditions, almost always being knee-deep in water or soft mud and this no doubt has been a responsible factor in the incidence of sickness.

Now that the work is well in hand drainage and scavenging are being carried out as thoroughly as possible, coolie houses are frequently cleansed with disinfecting fluids, and the result has been a remarkable improvement.

Oil is used freely all over the line as a means of destroying mosquito larvæ in pools impossible to drain.

Case books have been kept at the two main camps at Beacon Hill Tunnel and since the appointment of a resident Assistant Medical Officer at Taipo Kau, at that place also.

It is impossible to record every case of sickness occurring amongst the coolies living in outlying matsheds but speaking generally, there has been a great decrease in all cases occur- ring in places not attached to main camps as well as in the main camps themselves.

Quinine has been dealt out freely, though perhaps not so freely as formerly as I found that a considerable amount was wasted by being thrown away into the nullahs or hartered at the small stores for food, etc., the natives, especially when new to the territory not taking kindly to the drug, and it has often to be given under compulsion. As soon as the practice was discovered steps were taken to stop it.

Serious accidents have, fortunately, been rare during the year.

One of the most troublesome ailments at present is the effect of the dynamite fumes in the big tunnel.

The heading is about three thousand feet from the entrance at each face. Ventilation will however be much improved when the headings meet in the course of a few months allowing a free current of air through the whole length of the tunnel.

Most of the workers, especially at South Face, suffer constantly from severe irritation of throat and lungs as a result of breathing the air heavily charged with dynamite fumes.

Occasionally coolies have to be carried out from the workings being overcome by the fumes after blasting operations. A few minutes in the fresh air however, always revives them and there have been no serious results.

The total number of cases treated at North and South Face Camps, No. 2 Tunnel, during the year is 2,064 and for 1907 3,667.

Of these the following are the principal diseases :—

Malaria, Dysentery, Beri-beri, Injuries,

1908.

1907.

556

1,168

53

124

58

81

354

371

The following table shows the monthly Malaria returns at the two camps and the comparative percentages for 1907 and 1908 :-

Jan. Feb. Mar. April. May. [ June. | July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

Number of 1907

cases of

60

59

48

59

166 185

203 117

85

62

65

59

Malaria, 1908

56

25

32

16

37

89

65

42

55

55· 51

33

Percentage 1

to total

1907

1.9

3.7 1.7 2.03

7.4

8.5

11

6.8

3.4

2.3 2.1

2.6

number

of coolies

1908

2.3

1.2 1.04

.6

1.2

2.8

2

1

1.1

on the

1.5

1.3

0.9

line,

K 52

The total number of patients seen at the No. 5 Tunnel camps from August (when a resident Assistant Medical Officer was appointed and records could be kept) to December

31st was 403.

Of these the following were the principal diseases :-

Malaria,

Ulcers, etc.,

Skin Diseases,

Dysentery and Diarrhœa,

Beri-beri,

Injuries,

Cases of Malaria,.

Percentage,

147

75

42

22

4

19

Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. ..48 41 32 18 .2.2 2.2 1.4 1

The following table shows the cases sent to Hospital during the year :—

1908.

1907.

Malaria,

37

89

Dysentery,

11

12

Beri-beri,

16

0

Injuries,..

21

12

Cellulitis, Ulcers, etc.,......

7

12

Debility,....

3

3

Chest Diseases,

4

6

Eye Diseases,

2

2

Venereal Diseases,

8

Alcoholism,

Hepatitis,..

Snake bite...

1

1

1

1

...

Quinsy,

Leprosy,

Plague,

Ademitis,.

Lumbago,

Pleurisy,

Rheumatism,

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Total,..

..113

146

During the year 44 deaths occurred on or near the Railway Works. The following were the causes :-

Malaria, Beri-beri, Injuries,..

D、 sentery, Heart failure,.

Small-pox,.

Plague,

Pneumonia,

Phthisis,

نا

1908.

..14

1907.

5

13

7

7 (1 murder).

3

1

2

1

1

1 3

A great many of these cases are unknown wanderers (not Railway employees) who attach themselves to a camp when sick in the hope of finding shelter.

Five Europeans have been invalided to Englan for the following diseases :-Abscess of Liver, Malaria; Paralytic Stroke; Malaria, peripheral neuritis; Chronic Bronchitis, peripheral neuritis; Periueal abscesses, boils, etc.

The preventative measures adopted against disease, viz., scavenging, frequent cleans- ng of coolie-lines, drainage, and the free use of quinine have obviously resulted in diminishing considerably the incilence of the three most prominent and dangerous diseases, viz., Malaria, Dysentery and Beri-beri, as well as others of a less serious nature, and the results of these measures have I think quite justified their adoption and consequent expense. The population is however a floating one and fresh cases are constantly being introduced from without, a serious factor to contend with in the attempt to eradicate disease.

K 53

A noticeable feature of the dispensaries is the frequency with which the neighbouring villagers bring their sick children for medical advice and Western treatment.

J. W. HARTLEY, M.B.,

Railway Medical Officer.

Annexe I.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL LICENTIATE AT TAIPO.

I was on leave from the 8th September until the 7th October. During my absence the Assistant Railway Medical Officer at Tai-po-kau attended cases in the New Territories when called upon.

Statistics. The total number of new cases during the year was 2,361 as against 1,895 for the previous year. There was an increase in the number of patients as compared with last year.

year. This was chiefly due to the active growing of works in the Railway near l'aipo. The number of patients might have yet been greater but for the month's leave of absence which I took in September during which time the Government Dispensary was closed.

The total number of Old Patients was 468 as against 438 for the previous year. There were 921 cases of Malarial Fever as against 742 last year.

The Dysenteric cases were 29 in number as against 17 last year, and the Beri-beric 24 against 13.

The Railway.-Out of the total register of 2,361 patients 812 were Railway employees. At the earlier part of the year and before the arrival of the Assistant Railway Medical Officer at Tai-po-kau, I was called out almost daily to attend patients in the Railway matsheds often many miles away; but only occasional visits are now paid to such places by me.

Leper Asylum.-There were 14 lepers at the beginning of this year. Two of them died in the course of the year. In August two leprous women living in a village not far from the Asylum were admitted on the same day. The older one aged 65, died about a month after admission. 13 lepers were left at the end of the year and 10 of them were supplied with rice every day.

Cottage Hospital.-The total cases treated during the year were 51 as against 32 last year.

There was only one woman in this number. The Chinese patients constituted 43 of the whole and Indians 8.

All with the exception of 4 were drawn from the vicinity of the camps on the Railway. Almost four-fifths of the cases admitted were destitute.

Out of the 8 patients suffering from Respiratory Diseases as mentioned in Table III, 5 were with Pneumonia and 3 Phthisis. The Pneumonia cases were admitted in March and April. As they were all in a serious condition on admission, the mortality is very high, i.e., 80 %.

There were 15 deaths in the Hospital during the year. Most of these were admitted in a moribund condition as is shown by the following list:-

Cases which died within 24 hours of admission,

""

11

"}

over

48 48

""

""

"J

""

Total,.

3

4

.15

Five serious cases were sent to the Tung Wah Hospital. These were as follows:-

One case each of Phthisis, Beri-beri and Dysentery, and Ulcer of the foot; and

two cases of Multiple Injuries.

Police Stations.-Seven Stations were visited by me once every two weeks.

f

K 54

J

Vaccination. The total cases of vaccination were 375 as against 96 last year. The increase in the number was caused by the sudden outbreak of Small-pox in a village at Ping Shan, the residents of which were consequently called up to be vaccinated. The 6 cases of Small-pox which happened in that village were not fatal. Only 22 cases of vaccination were unsuccessful.

Tables. The following Tables are attached :-

·

Table 1. Shows the different classes of diseases treated at the Dispensary

during the year.

Table II-Gives the monthly number of cases as compared with that of last year. Table III-Shows the admissions and deaths in the Cottage Hospital.

Table IV.-Gives the number of sick Police treated in the Stations and the number of those sent into the Government Civil Hospital for Mala- rial Fever and other diseases.

LI HO CHING,

Medical Licentiate, New Territories.

Table I.

RETURN OF CASES TREATED AT THE DISPENSARY.

Nature of Disease.

Number of Cases.

1908.

1907.

Small-pox,

7

...

Febricula,

16

30

Dysentery,

29

17

Malarial Fever,

921

742

Beri-beri,

24

13

Syphilis,

39

22

Gonorrhoea,

7

9

Rheumatism,

58

64

Anæmia,

32

26

Debility,

7

19

Tumour,

1

Diseases of the Nervous System,.

9

2

"?

""

Circulatory System,.

16

17

..

""

Respiratory

114

132

"}

""

Digestive

241

145

Lymphatic

3

5

""

""

وو

Urinary

3

1

>>

11

"}

Eye,

74

124

"

""

Ear,

21

6

""

Male Organs,

1

1

">

>>

Organs of Locomotion,.

2

6

""

22

Cellular Tissue,.......

279

213

91

99

Skin,

322

123

Effect of Heat,

10

13

Injuries,

125

162

Other Cases,

3

Total,........

2,361

1,895

K 55

Table II.

Number of cases each month for 1908 in comparison with that for the previous year.

Total for

Jan.

Feb. March. April. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Νου. Dec.

the

Year.

1907...... 197 142 163 149 140 169 154 127 118

209 192 135

1,895

1908...

178 118 170 155

190 173 305 295

45

248 291 193

2,361

Table III.

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in the Cottage Hospital during 1908.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end of

Yearly Total.

Total

Admissions Deaths.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital!

Remarks.

at end of

1907.

1908.

Febricula..

General Diseases.

Dysentery

Malarial Fever

Beri-beri

Syphilis..

Debility..

Local Diseases.

Diseases of the Nervous System:-

Diseases of the Nerves :-

Meningitis...

Functional Nervous Disorders:-

Tetany....

Diseases of the Ear......

Respiratory System

""

"

2)

""

Circulatory

""

"

"

Alimentary

Cellular Tissue

"

**

Skin

2"

Injuries

Total,......

2 2

14

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

213 —

22

14

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

8

4

3

1

5

3

1

1

1

49

15

51

6

- K 56

Table IV.

Return of Cases at the various Police Stations.

Name of Station.

Nationality.

Cases of Malarial Fever treated in

the Station.

Cases of Malarial

Fever sent to the Government Civil Hospital.

Cases of other diseases treated in the Station.

Cases of other diseases sent to the Government Civil Hospital.

Sha Tin,

Sha Tau Kok,

Ping Shan.

Au Tau.

San Tin.

Sheung Shui,

T'ai Po.

European.

6

Nil.

6

Nil.

Indian.

30

6

55

Chinese.

Nil.

10

5

Nil.

European.

Nil.

Nil.

1

Nil.

Indian.

5

49

8

Chinese.

3

Nil.

1

1

European.

Nil.

Nil.

1

Nil.

Indian.

4

Nil.

7

4

Chinese.

1

1

3

1

European.

Nil.

Nil.

5

Nil.

Indian.

3

1

15

Chinese.

1

1

Nil.

Nil.

European.

1

Nil.

1

Ι

Indian.

8

4

Chinese.

2

Nil.

1

Nil.

European.

Nil.

Nil.

2

C

Nil.

Indian.

21

22

3

Chinese.

Nil.

Nil.

1

Nil.

European.

1

1

Nil.

1

Indian.

Nil.

2

9

10

5

Chinese.

Nil.

Nil.

1

1

K 57

Annexe J.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTING MEDICAL OFFICER OF THE

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

STAFF.

Dr. W. B. A. Moore was Inspecting Medical Officer of the Tung Wah Hospital during the first half of the year; Dr. J. C. Thomson resumed this duty on 7th July.

A Second Licentiate trained in Western Medicine was ad led to the staff in August, and Mr. Leung Chik Fan, of the Hongkong College of Medicine, was appointed to the new office. Mr. Leung had already acted as House Surgeon from 1st March to 21st June, when Dr. Jen Hawk was absent on leave; and from 3rd December to the end of the year he was again in sole charge during Dr. Jeu Hawk's absence on sick leave.

Another medical student has been added to the dressing staff: three students of the Medical College are now resident in the hospital as surgical dressers.

An important advance was resolved on by the Directors in December, and will take effect at the opening of the next session of the Hongkong College of Medicine in March. It was decided to permit the teaching of Clinical Medicine in the wards of the hospital; and the students of the College will thus become available as clinical clerks for duty in the institution. The Directors at the same meeting voted a sum of $500 for the purchase of clinical apparatus.

BUILDINGS.

The mortuary has been enlarged for the accommolation of the greatly increased numbers of bodies being brought in dead.

Property in New Street to the North of the present buildings has been acquired for the erection of additional wards, to be used specially for the treatment of Plague when that disease is present in the Colony, and demolition of the houses on it is now proceeding.

STATISTICS.

There is steady advance in the number of admissions, and during some parts of the year many who desired admission, and would with advantage have been treated in the wards, had to be dealt with as out-patients; while repeatedly a number of more chronic cases had to be transferred to a hospital in Canton, by arrangement with the Directors of it, to relieve overcrowding in this hospital.

The admissions to the Tung Wah Hospital during the past ten years have been as follows:-

1899

1900

1901

1902

1903

1904

1905

1906

1907 1908

2,542

2,981

2,989

2,576

2,457

2,667

2,833

3,200

3.796

4,122

At the beginning of the year 1908 there were 205 remaining in the wards from the previous year; 4,122 patients were admitted during the year, making a total of 4.327 cases; 2,678 were discharged; 1,440 died; leaving 209 remaining in the hospital at the close of the year.

Of the 4,327 cases, 427 were transferred elsewhere for treatment, as follows:-- 23 to the Government Civil Hospital, 238 to the Infectious Diseases Hospitals, and 166 to Cauton.

Of the fatal cases, 450 were in a dying condition at the time of admission, and died within 24 hours.

There remains a net total of 3,245 patients actually treated in the Tung Wah Hospital, of whom 1,611, i.e., 496 per cent., were under treatment by European methods, and 1,634, ¿.e., 50°4 per cent., under Chinese native treatment. The percentages in the pre- ceding year were: European 51, Chinese 49.

K 58

The number of visits to the Out-Patient Department was 90,650 (70,843 in 1907). 87,847 were seen by the Chinese native doctors, and 2,803 by Drs. Jeu and Leung.

2,348 persons were vaccinated at, and in connection with, the hospital (1,405 in 1907). Vaccinations are performed by Dr. Leung Chik Fan, who attends at the villages named on Table IV for this purpose.

2,425 destitute persons were temporarily sheltered and fed, until they could be sent to their native villages or otherwise be provided for (950 in 1907).

1,258 dead bodies were brought to the Hospital Mortuary to await burial (696 in 1907). For purposes of registration, diagnosis of the probable cause of death is made in all possible cases by inspection of the body and cross-questioning of relatives as to the symptoms preceding death. Where internal examination is considered necessary for medico-legal or public health reasons, or because of contradictory statements regarding the fatal illness, such examination is made at the Public Mortuary. During the past year 131 bodies of persons brought in dead, and also 108 bodies of persons who died in the hospital, chiefly of persons who were moribund at the time of admission, i.e.. 239 in all, were sent to the Government Public Mortuary for post-mortem examination (199 in 1907).

Free burial was provided by the Hospital for the bodies of 4,112 poor persons (2,756 in 1907).

Table III shows in outline the foregoing statistics, and reveals a remarkable increase in the work being done by this institution.

The Infectious Diseases branches of the Hospital were under the supervision of Dr. Moore throughout the year (see separate report page 45). The registers show admissions as follows:

Plague Branch.... Small-pox Branch,

...275

69

Cases requiring operation are so far as possible persuaded to go to the Government Civil Hospital, and this is more easily done than in earlier years, few cases where such transference is urged by the Inspecting Medical Officer refusing consent.

Dr. G. Montagu Harston continues to attend at the Hospital on Mondays and Fridays at 4.30 p.m. to see Eye Out-Patients. 687 new cases were seen (487 in 1907), and 2,550 visits were made to this department. Of the new cases, 292 were Trachoma. 62 pupils were sent from various schools to be examined for this disease, and of these 44 were found to be cases of Trachoma, the remainder suffering from other diseases of the eye. 103 eye operations were performed, of which the following were the more important :-

Excision of fornix in bad Trachoma, Jaesche-Arlt operation for Trichiasis, Snellen's operation for Entropion,

Hess's operation for Ptosis,

.....

Mules' operation for Evisceration of the eyeball,

Extraction of Cataract,.

Iridectomy,

Irido-lysis for Glaucoma,

Pterygium,

2

2

.14

1

5

.25

.23

2

9

Paracentesis for Hypopyon or Corneal Ulcer,

Tenotomy for Squint,..

8

1

Some of the worst cases were taken into the wards and dealt with as in-patients, but the frequent congestion of the hospital, already referred to, limited the possibilities in this direction.

Table V is a classification of the diseases treated in the Eye Department.

Dr. Leung Chik Fan assists Dr. Harston in the ophthalmic work of the hospital, and acted for him during a short absence from the Colony.

K 59

Beri-beri continues to increase in the Colony. Admissions and deaths during the past ten years have been as follows:-

Admissions.

Deaths.

%.

1899

279....

.123..

..44

1900.....

.361.....

.214....

...59

1901....

.412..

..219..

..53

1902..

.414..

217..

..52

1903..

277..

.170...

.61

1904.

.742..

329..

44

1905..

731...

.344.

.47

1906..

.517.

257.

.49

1907.

...812.

.282.

.34

1998.....

.941.....

..368....

.39

Malaria also shows an increase; but this is due almost entirely to the large number of admissions from the railway works, and is the result of conditions that will disappear when these works are completed, and when the permanent railway employees will be doubt- less adequately protected from Malaria. The admissions and deaths from this disease during the past ten years have been as follows:-

Admissions.

Deaths.

%.

1899.

305...

58....

.19

1900.....

541..

.159.....

29

1901....

..507.....

..122..

.24

1902....

.403..

.119....

29

1903....

.221..

61.

.27

1904.

212..

56.....

.26

· 1905..

153.....

48....

.31

1906..

248...

96....

38

1907.... 1908

.304...

87.

.28

.355...

93..

..........26

The Hospital has been duly inspected by the Visiting Justices twice monthly, and has been certified by them to have been found on all occasions clean and in good order.

The Directors of the Hospital, both the past year's Directors and the recently elected Board, have been unfailingly most courteous in reference to matters submitted to them by the Inspecting Medical Officer, whose suggestions have been carefully carried into effect.

The following Tables are appended :-

I.-Return of Diseases and Deaths.

II.-Proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

III.-General Statistics relating to the Hospital.

IV.-Vaccinations.

V.Eye Out-Patients.

6th February, 1909.

J. C. THOMSON,

M.D., (Edin.), D.T.M. & H. (Camb.), v.r.ii., (Edin.),

Inspecting Medical Officer.

Small-pox,

- K 60

Table I.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of

Remain-

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

ing in Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1907.

1908.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Measles,

Influenza,

Diphtheria,

Febricula,

Enteric Fever,

Cholera...

Dysentery,

Plagne,

Malarial Fever

1. Simple Tertian,

2. Malignant,

Malarial Cachexia,

Beri-beri,

Erysipelas,

P'yæmia,

Septicemia,

Tetanus,

Tubercle,

Leprosy,

Syphilis:-

(a.) Secondary,

(7.) Tertiary,

Rheumatism,.

New Growth, Non-malignaut,

Do., Malignant,

Anemia,

Debility,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Discases of the Nervous System

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Nerves:

Neuritis,

Meningitis,

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders :-

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Epilepsy,

Neuralgia,.

SUB-SECTION 3.

Mental Diseases :-

25

1

:

3

2

4

25

3

1

31

:

4

4

4

35

30

35

2

162

77

164

CC m

8

:

350

128

350

CH

5

192

197

11

163

93

163

8

1

8

49

941

368

990

53

1

11

1

12

1

1

1

20

20

20

2

2

2

11

11

11

14

3

14

3

18

21

3

1

50

12

51

12

88

100

cc co co

3

2

2

1

14

3

15

I

34

34

4

2

20

3

22

:

::

1

11

16

13

12

35

14

33

6

1

1

11

16

47

6

Mania,

16

5

Dementia,

2

2

Diseases of the Eye,

57

65

Circulatory System,

111

51

113

12.00

"

**

Respiratory

35

731

427

769

35

""

"

""

Digestive

6

312

125

318

10

19

-

Lymphatic

3

23

1

26

་་

Urinary

Male Organs,

""

77

Female

:::

46

23

46

26

7

:

7

3

3

**

.་

""

Organs of Locomotion,

2

18

20

:

Cellular Tissue,

12

88

3

100

5

""

Skin,

29

167

:

146

21

Injuries :--

General,. Local,

Poisons..

13

27

6

226

2

2-IN

40

2

232

15

2

Parasites,

11

11

Parturition,

9

9

Total 1908,................

205

4.122

1,440

4,327

209

"

1907,

161 3,796

1,206

3,960

205

- K 61

Table II.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wah Hospital during 1908, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

European Chinese Treatment. Treatment.

Total.

European Chinese Treatment. Treatment.

Total.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox,

25

25

Measles,

1

Influenza,

Co

3

::

Diphtheria,

2

2

1

Febricula,

34

31

Enteric Fever,.

4

4

4

4

Cholera,..

35

35

30

30

Dysentery,

47

115

162

21

56

77

Plague,

350

350

128

128

Malarial Fever :-

1. Simple Tertian,.

79

113

192

:

2. Malignant..

83

80

163

23

70

93

Malarial Cachexia,.

5

3

8

1

1

Beri beri,.......

342

599

941

94

274

369

Erysipelas,

11

11

1

Pyæmia,

I

1

1

1

}

Septicæmia,

10

10

20

10

10

20

Tetanus,

1

1

2

1

I

2

Tubercle, General,

8

3

11

3

11

Leprosy,

14

14

3

Syphilis :-

(a.) Secondary,

16

2

18

(b.) Tertiary,

37

13

50

Rheumatism,

38

50

88

New Growth :-

(a.) Benign,

2

2

(6.) Malignant,

9

5

14

ลง

:

:

:

00

:

:

4

12

:

1

Anæmia,

13

21

34

:

:.

:

3

Debility,

11

9

20

N

LOCAL DISEASES :-

Diseases of the-

Ne vous System,

33

43

76

13

25

38

888

Eye,......

57

67

...

Circulatory System,

50

61

111

21

30

51

Respiratory System,

255

479

734

133

294

427

Digestive System,

105

207

312

41

84

125

Lymphatic System,

17

6

23

1

Urinary System,

19

27

46

10

18

23

Generative System :-

(a.) Male Organs,

3

(b.) Female Organs,

2

Organs of Locomotion,

Cellular issne,

46

Skin,

Injuries :-

General,

Local,

Poisons,

79

88

411028

3

18

88

~

1

167

20

113

113

3~

7

27

226

- 10

1

5

2

2

27

Para-ites,

9

11

Parturition,

9

9

Total,

2,004

2,118

4,122

500

880

1,440

Less Moribund cases,....

104

346

450

104

346

450

1,900

1,772

3,672

456

531

990

Less Transferred elsewhere,..

289

138

427

Net Total treated, 1908,....

1907,..

1,611

1,634

3,215

486

534

990

1,711

1,743

3,354

330

522

852

"

Patients.

Remaining in

Hospital at end of

previous year.

Male,

Female,

Table III.-GENERAL STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during 1908.

Dead Bodies

Free Burials

Remaining in

Destitute

Admissions.

Total Cases

Treated.

Discharged.

Died.

Hospital at Out-Patients. Vaccinations. end of year.

brought to

Persons

Hospital

provided

Sheltered.

Burial.

Mortuary for Poor Persons.

for

170

3,370

3,540

2,272

1,100

168

57,157

1,223

2,420

832

35

752

787

406

340

41

33,493

1,125

5

426

Total, 1908

205

4,122

4,327

2,678

1,440

209

90,650

2,348

1907

164

>>

3,796

3,960

2,549

1,206

205

70,813

1,405

2,425

950

1,258

696

4,112

2,756

Table IV.—VACCINATIONS at, and in connection with, the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during 1908.

Victoria.

Shaukiwan.

Aberdeen.

1908,

1,410

60

49

1907,

1,051

90

63

33833

Stanley.

Shek O.

Yaumati.

Samshuipo.

Ping Shan.

28

20

98

15

Nil.

34

135

152

548

Nil.

Total, 1908

2,348

1907

1,105

K 62

Disease.

K 63

Table V.

Eye out-patients treated.

Eyelids :

Ptosis,

Blepharitis,

Meibomian Cysts,....

Trichiasis,

Entropion, Ectropion,

....

Muscles of the Eyeball:

Squint,

Lacrymal Apparatus :

Dacry o-Cystitis,

Conjunctiva and Cornea :

Follicular Conjunc'ivitis, Koch-Weekes' Conjunctivitis,.

Gonorrheal Ophthalmia,

Trachoma,

Pterygium,

Phlyctenular ulcers,...

Hypopyon ulers,..........

Simple ulcers (non-Trachomatous),

Corneal Opacities,.............

Staphyloma of Cornea,

Conical Cornea,

Ectasia Corneæ,

Perforation of Cornea,

Interstitial Kerati is, Kerato-Iritis,

Iris and Ciliary Body :

Irido-cyclitis,

Mydriasis,

Choroid:

Choroiditis,

Retina and optic nerve:

Optic Atrophy,...

Number of Cases.

1

5

3

1

17

1

1

11

46

8

1

292

15

14

8

18

35

3

1

3

1

14

11

12

1

3

Lens:

Cataract (senile ),.

(traumatic),

19

3

Panophthalmitis,

11

Glaucoma,

2

Shrunken Eyeball,

4

Ametropia,

.119

Total, 1908,......

.687

Total, 1907,.

.487

K 64

Annexe K.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ALICE MEMORIAL, NETHERSOLE AND HO MIU LING HOSPITALS,

Table I.

ALICE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908.

DISEASES.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Malarial Fever,....

Beri-beri,.

Syphilis, Tertiary,

Rheumatism,..

New Growth, non-malignant,...........

LOCAL DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain-

YEARLY TOTAL.

Total

Cases

ing in Hospital

Remarks.

at end of

Treated. at end of

1907.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1908.

2146O

1

1

F

2146O

1

Diseases of the Nervous System.

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders :-

Neuralgia,

Diseases of the Eye,......

1

1

6

223

22

28

دو

">

Nose,

1

>>

27

Respiratory System,

1

1

""

"

Digestive System,

1

1

"

Urinary System,

1

1

>>

"

Male Organs,

11

11

27

Organs of Locomotion,

2

2

""

"2

Cellular Tissue,

60

60

Skin,

2

11

93

Injuries, General,. Injuries, Local,.. Poisons, Arsenic,

Opium Habit,.

Undefined,...

9

9

2

24

26

1

1

1

3

2

Total, 1908,

11

152

2

163

1907,

15

268

2

283

11

Table II.

ALICE MEMORIAL MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1907.

Remain-

Yearly Total.

Total

ing in Cases Hosnital Treated. at end of

Remarks.

Admissions Deaths.

1908.

Obstetrical Cases,

Other Cases,..

Total, 1908,

"3

1907,

4

183

7

187

3

15

15

1

4

198

7

202

4

125

*

126

Out-patients attended at their own houses by tu lent Midwives (Chinese) under the superintendence of Dr SIBREE:-53. Out-patients attended at their own houses by Government Midwives (Chinese) under the supervision of Dr. SIBREE -1,033.

K 65

Table III.

NETHERSOLE HOSPITAL.

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1907.

1908.

Dysentery,

GENERAL DISEASES.

Malarial Fever,.

Malarial Cachexia,

Beri-beri,

Tubercle,

Syphilis, Tertiary,

Rheumatism,

9

1

9

16

1

16

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

2

7

7

New Growth, Non-malignant,

New Growth, Malignaut,

Anæmia,

Diabetes Mellitus,

12

12

1

7

7

1

1

1

Debility,

1

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of Nervous System.

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Nerves :-

Meningitis,

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders :--

Chorea,....

2

3

1

1

Epilepsy,

1

1

Diseases of the Eye,

6

98

104

2

Ear,

2

2

""

""

"

י

Circulatory System,.

39

>>

Respiratory System,

45

12

"

A

Digestive System,

23

17

"9

Lymphatic System,

3

15

""

99

Urinary System,

18

2322

46

2

23

18

2

18

""

Male Organs,

1

2

3

Female Organs,

12

13

Organs of Locomotion,

2

13

15

2

Cellular Tissue,

32

35

1

""

Skin,

15

15

99

Injuries, General,......

Local,..

Malformations,

Poison Kerosine,

:

Undefined,.

1

1

1

17

18

7

1

2

3712

Total, 1908,.

21

374

25

395

15

1907,.

22

364

31

396

12

14

21

K 66

Table IV.

HO MIN LING HOSPITAL.

RETURN of DISEASES and DEATHS in 1908.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1907.

1908.

Plague,

GENERAL DISEASES.

Dysentery,

Malarial Fever,

Malarial Cachexia,

Beri-beri,.......

1 00 00 20 0

4

Tetanus,

1

1

Syphilis, (Tertiary),

5

5

Rheumatism,

4

New Growth, Non-malignant,

11

11

New Growth, Malignant,

2

2

Anemia,

1

1

LOCAL DISEASES.

""

75

"}

""

Diseases of the Eye,

Circulatory System,

Nose,.

--- N

82

"}

""

Respiratory

""

39

""

Digestive

3

15

27

"

Lymphatic

1

A

Urinary

1

33

""

"

>>

Male Organs,

2

""

>>

"

Organs of Locomotion,

""

Cellular Tissue,

5

Skin,

2421232:20

84

4

3

13

2

9

2

10

18

5

3

34

1

35

5

12140

2

5

:

""

>>

Injuries, General,

Local,

Malformations,.

Opium Ilabit,.

1

2

1

10

10

13

සපය

3

13

1

12

13

:::

Total,

18

290

11

308

23

R. MACLEAN GIBSON, M.D., C.M. (Edin.), Superintendent, Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals.

K 67

Annexe L.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST.

The Bacteriologist, Dr. Hunter, has been on leave during the whole year.

Unfortunately I was taken ill in the early summer with an acute attack of neurasthenia after influenza and the research work of the Institute has suffered in consequence but the routine duties have been most ably carried on from August to November by Staff-Surgeon Gilmour, R.N., who has a considerable knowledge of bacteriology. Owing to the change of Officers some of the records of the routine work which has been done are incomplete.

A saving will be effected in future by the decision of Government to appoint a graduate of the Hongkong College of Medicine in place of the European Assistant Bac- teriologist.

BUILDINGS.

The buildings have been maintained in good repair. The typhoon of July took away the roof of the North verandah and did other minor damage.

THE PREPARATION OF VACCINE LYMPH.

The increasing importance of this work is shown in Table I. See also Table II.

THE BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER SUPPLIES.

The routine examination of the Tytam, Pokfulam and Kowloon services has been continued regularly throughout the year. These upland surfac waters are of high bacteriological purity. A few other waters have been examined.

THE EXAMINATION OF PATHOLOGICAL MATERIAL SENT FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF

INFECTIOUS DISEASES OF MAN.

This work is shown in Table III. The table covers eight months only.

TUMOURS AND OTHER MATERIAL SENT FOR EXAMINATION.

Table V shows the tumours examined.

Nine disinfectants have been examined for their Carbolic Acid Coefficient, and about twenty-five other reports have been issued on various materials sent for diagnosis.

Research reports are sent at six monthly intervals to the Secretary of State, a report was sent in February and another in October.

Table I.-Vaccine Statistics.

Year.

1902,

1903,

1904,

1905,

1906,

1907,

1908,

Tubes.

4,616

..5,361

.6,893

.7,639

.8,797

.13,666

..17,536

- K 68

Table II.—Issues of Vaccine Lymph, 1908.

Tubes.

1908.

1907.

Victoria Goal,

2,141

1,450

Tung Wah Hospital,.....

.1.644

1,345

Government Civil Hospital,

390

550

Nethersole Hospital,

192

336

Alice Memorial Hospital,

550

288

Victoria Hospital,

34

11

Kennedy Town Hospital,

20

Sanitary Department,

98

234

Railway Medical Officer,

102

Colleges and Convents,

110

Chinese Public Dispensary, Hunghom,

125

50

Do.

Central,

540

265

Do.

Eastern,

695

292

Do.

Western,

540

285

Do.

Kowloon,

155

144

Do.

Yaumati,

355

275

Tai Po Dispensary,

923

...

Other Public Vaccinators,

95

Other issues,

..8,827

450

17,536

5,975

A small revenue is derived from the last item of the list.

Table III-Material Examined for Infectious Diseases of Man.

1908.

1907.

Examination for Typhoid,

17

58

Examination for Diphtheria,

7

37

Examination for Cholera,

10

1

Examination for Tuberculosis,

6

16

40

112

Table IV.-Examination for Rat Plague.

NUMBER.

FOUND INFECTED.

WHENCE OBTAINED.

1907. 1908. 1907. 1908.

Victoria,

25,265 22,227

16

117

Kowloon,

13,255 3,017

12

40

Total,

38,520 27,244

28

157

Source of Tumour.

-K 69

Table V.-Tumours Examined.

Nationality.

Nature of Growth.

1. Leg,

2. Anus,

3. Back,

4. Penis,

5. Breast,

6. Bladder,

7. Cæcum,

Chinese.

""

3

>1

$1

་་

Chinese.

8. Liver,

9. Scalp,

10. Breast,

11. Finger,

Chinese.

12. Lymphatic Gland,

?

Fibroma.

Non-malignant Papilloma.

Fibro Sarcoma. Granulation Tissue.

Spheroidal-celled Carcinoma. Mixed-celled Sarcoma. Inflammatory.

Diffuse Carcinoma with Cir-

rhosis.

Squamous Carcinoma.

Spheroidal-celled Carcinoma. Round-celled Sarcoma. Inflammatory.

C. M. HEANLEY,

M.B., B.S. (Lond.), D.T.M.H. (Camb.), M.R.C.S., L.K.C.P., D.P.H.,

Annexe M.

Bacteriologist.

REPORT ON THE PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA.

During six months of the year the work at the Mortuary has been done by myself. During the other six months Drs. Moore, Thomson, and Koch have done the work for reasons stated above,

Report on Post Mortems.

1908.

1907.

1906.

Male bodies examined,

1,329

993

1,259

Female

1,373

749

837

Sex undetermined,.

3

9

14

Total,

2,705

1,751

2,140

Claimed bodies sent from Hospitals and other places, 2,006 Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned,

963

699

788

2,705

1,751

There is a large increase in the number of bodies sent by the Convents.

K 70

Table I.-Epitome of Causes of Death.

1908.

I. Total General Diseases, See Table I (a),

1,165

1907. 914

II. Local Diseases :-

(a.) Of the Nervous System,

3

7

(b.) (c.)

(d.) (e.)

III. Deaths from Violence,

Circulatory System,.

33

24

17

Respiratory System,

865

348

"}

Digestive System, Genito-Urinary System,

260

68

10

10

106

113

IV. Decomposed Bodies,

263

267

....

Total,

2,705

1,751

Table I (a.)—General Diseases.

Small-pox,

245

184

Plague,

300

69

Cholera,

9

9

Beri-beri,

65

83

Malaria,

50

44

Septicæmia,

18

31

Diphtheria,

6

16

Typhoid,

2

3

General Tuberculosis,.

63

61

Prematurity,

113

....

58

Marasmic Condition,

287

238

Pyæmia,

2

Cellulitis,

2

Syphilis (mostly Congenital),

21

2

Abscess,

2

1

Still Birth,

48

70

Tetanus,

Erysipelas,

Old Age, Atelectasis, Convulsion,

9

1

3

1

15

29

....

1

1

Leprosy,

Tuberculosis of Joints,

Other Diseases,..

1

2

4

1,165

914

Table I (b.)-Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System.

Softening of the Brain,..

Epilepsy,.

Meningitis,

Other Diseases,

1

1

1

3

Total,.

3

(b.) Of the Circulatory System.

Pericarditis,..

Aortic Aneurismı,

Cardiac Failure,

Heart Disease,

Fatty Degeneration of Heart,

Mitral Regurgitation,

Aortic Regurgitation,.

10

11

6

6

4

4

5

2

1

2

Congenital Heart Disease,

1

Total,....

33

24

*

K 71

(c.) Of the Respiratory System.

Broncho-Pneumonia and Bronchitis,

Tuberculosis of the Pleura,

Pleurisy,

Pulmonary Tuberculosis,.

Empyema,.

Pneumonia (including some Broncho-Pneumonia),

Oedema of the lung,...

Congestion of the lung,

Chronic Bronchitis,

Abscess of lung, Other Diseases,

1908.

1907.

620

254

1

24

3

48

25

15

19

130

46

9

...

15

2

1

1

Total,......

865

348

(d.) Of the Digestive System.

Tabes Mesenterica,

Peritonitis,....

Worms,

Gastro Enteritis,

24

...

8

5

1

26

3

Diarrhoea,

Liver Abscess,

Dysentery,

Imperforate Anus,.

Intussusception,

1

173

&

6

30

1

2

Intestinal Obstruction,

Intestinal Strangulation,

Overfeeding with King Sze,. Gastric Tetany,.

Jaundice,

Cirrhosis of the liver,

Cancer of liver,

Other Diseases,

2

3

125

1

3

6

2

1

1

10

2

1

10

Total,.......

260

68

(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System.

Nephritis.

Chronic Nephritis,

Child Birth,

Other Diseases,

Total,....

Table I (c.)-Injuries (Deaths from Violence).

(a.)-General.

Asphyxiation,

Opium poisoning,

Hanging,...

Burns,

Drowning,..

Multiple Injuries,.

Electrocution,

Arsenic poisoning,

Scalding, Other Injuries,

CO 10 01

3

cc

5

2

1

1

10

10

27

72430

1

6

1.

265

45

8

1

2

1

1

1

6

...

Total..

.73

70

(b.)-Local.

- K 72

1908.

1907.

Dislocation of the neck,

Hæmorrhage from wound of Brachial artery,

1

1

Concussion of the brain,

Bullet wound of the head,

Spinal Hæmorrhage,

Ruptured Intestine,

4

5

2

I

2

Bullet wound,.

Ruptured spleen,

1

2

4

Laceration of the brain,

Bullet wound of chest,

2

...

1

Fractured skull,

12

13

Fractured spine,

2

1

Abdominal Injury,

1

2

Bullet wound of abdomen,

1

Other Injuries,....

18

Total,......

.33

43-

Table II.-Nationality of Bodies.

Chinese,

-2,678

1,732

Canadian,

1

Indian,

3

6

Spaniard,

I

...

European,

11

9

German,

2

Japanese,

1

2

Malay,

1

...

Portuguese,

3

1

Norwegian,.

1

American,

I

1

Filipino.

1

Polynesian,

1

Total,..

2,705

1.751

Table III.-Cancer at Autopsies.

Female Autopsies.

Male Autopsies.

1908.

1907.

1908.

1907.

Chinese,..

1,372

749

1,303

Other Races,...

1

26

Cases of Cancer. 1908.

1907.

1 Male aged 40

Nil.

1 Nil.

974

19 C. M. IEANLEY,

M.B., B.S. (Lond.), D.T.M.H. (Camb.), M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., D.P.II.,

Annexe N.

Bacteriologist.

REPORT ON THE PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

The total number of Post Mortems made during the year 1908 amounted to 1.137 as against 838 in 1907. They may be divided up as follows:

General Diseases,

Table I.

Do.

Diseases of the Nervous System,.

Circulatory System,

Do.

Respiratory System,

Do.

Digestive System,

Do.

Urinary System,

Do.

Hamopatic System,

Do.

Do.

Reproductive System,.

due to internal l'arasite,

Injuries, General, .

1908.

1907.

684

579

25

24

259

179

12

3

3

6

142

39

1,137

838

K 73

Table I (a).—General Diseases.

1908.

1907.

Plague,

Small-pox,..

Enteric Fever,

Diphtheria,

98

53

84

59

1

4

1

Puerperal Fever,

Septicæmia,

Leprosy,-Nodular,

2

6

3

1

...

Beri-beri,

31

19

Amoebic Dysentery,

Malaria,

63

Syphilis,

General Tuberculosis,

29

Enteritis,

Marasmus,

69

Prematurity,

Still-born,

47

PONONOL

9

4

98

2

10

2

10

62

14

38

28

Senile Decay,

Decomposed,

2

199

205

Other Diseases,

10

684

579

Table I (b).-Local Diseases.

Circulatory System.

Acute Pericarditis,

Septic Pericarditis,

Valvular Disease of Heart,

Aortic Aneurysm,

Other Diseases,.

5

3

1

16

10

1

...

5

25

24

Respiratory System.

Lobar Pneumonia,

65

42

Broncho Pneumonia,

158

93

Septic Pneumonia,

3

1

Pulmonary Tuberculosis,

28

33

Empyema,

2

2

Pulmonary Hæmopytsis,

2

3

Pulmonary Embolism,

1

Other Diseases....

5

259

179

Digestive System.

Abscess of Liver (Amoebic),

1

Multiple Abscess of Liver,

1

Peritonitis,

1

...

Septic Peritonitis,

4

Tubercular Peritonitis,.

1

Obstruction Biliary Cirrhosis,

Tabes Mesenterica,

Other Diseases,.

3

1

12

Urinary System.

Acute Nephritis, Chronic Nephritis,

Hæmopatic System.

- K 74

1908.

1907.

12

3

2

3

3

2

Abscess of Spleen,

...

Miliary Tuberculosis of Spleen, Other Diseases,...........

I

.....

2

Reproductive System.

Placenta Prævia,

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,

Diseases Due to Intestinal Parasites.

Ascaris,

Distoma Sinense,

Table I (c). Injuries.

2

1

1

5

6

1

1

3

1. General.

Strangulation, By fire,

Axphyxia,

245

2

...

Do.

caused by CO. poisoning,

2

Do.

caused by ligature,

1

...

Do.

caused by hanging,

Burning,

4

Bullet in Brain,

1

...

Cut Throat,

1

...

Drowning,...

25

23

Multiple Injuries,

1

Opium poisoning,.

1

Shock following Multiple Injuries,

1

1

Typhoon Cases,..

79

Other Injuries,

3

128

29

2. Local.

1. Of the Head.

Fractured Skull,

Of Abdomen.

Hæmorrhage following Rupture of spleen,..

17

from Rupture of viscera,

following stab wound,

6

9

4

1

14

10

Note-Bodies found abandoned 645 (569 in 1907); removed from houses 492

(269 in 1907).

HAROLD MACFARLANE,

L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S. (Edin.) and D.P.H (Oxon.).

W

K 75

Annexe O.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT ANALYST.

The number of analyses performed was 517 (436 in 1907).

The following classification shows the nature of the work done :---

I.-Chemico-legal.

Toxicological (including 14 stomachs),

No. of Articles

examined.

1908. 1907.

58 41 19 70

Articles for stains,

Articles for fire enquiry,

4

...

II-Potable Waters.

Public Supplies,

Wells, &c.,..

19 00353

36 42

25

2223

III.-Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Petroleum Oil,

82

54

Liquid Fuel,

8

5

IV.-Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Brandy,

5

Flour,

1

12

Milk,

67

54

Whisky,

20

8

Port Wine,

3

4

Beer,

7

7

Opium,

56

11

Other Articles,

V-Building Materials.

Cement,

Concrete,

Powder for waterproofing concrete,

30 pond pl||

3 1 1

1

...

VI.-Prepared Opium Ordinance.

Substances,

Opium Pills,

8

2

Powders,

1

132 ∞ I

1

6

3

Lozenges,

Wine,..

VII.-Pharmacy Ordinance.

Medicines for Poisons,

4

VIII-Mineralogical, &c.

Coins,...

1

3

Metals,

11

14

Ores,

17

30

Coal,

5

IX.-Miscellaneous.

Aërated Waters,....

Coal-tar Disinfectants,

....

Rat Destroyers,..

Codeine Phosphate,

Crucibles,

Chloride of lime,

Chemicals,

Condensed milk,

Public Gas Supply,

3

3

4

3

2

3

3

2

22

2

12

4

1 00 00

Lotion, Lime Juice, Linseed Oil, Medicine, Spirit of Wine, Pyrolig- neous Liquid, Acetate of Lime, Turpentine, Scum, Magpie

Dung-one each,

Other Substances,......

10

26

Total,.

517

436

1

K 76

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations conducted were 14 cases of suspected human poisoning. Realgar was separated in one case, Lysol in one, Arsenic in three, and Opium in three cases. The head of a fish was sent for examination as it was suspected to belong to a poisonous kind. It was identified as a species of Tetrodou. It has on several occasions caused death in the Colony. Probably only a prolonged investigation would isolate the poisonous principle of this fish, but the undertaking of this, or of any other similar subject of enquiry, would interfere with necessary routine work, and is therefore indefinitely held over. The fish is known to the Chinese as Ki Pau. It is stated that it requires particular preparation for food and that certain other kinds of food should never be cooked with it, as these latter may fix the poison. From these statements it appears, that the poison is probably of a volatile nature, present only in certain parts of the fish, and which by well boiling may be dissipated.

Lysol is a preparation containing about 50 per cent of cresols. Several deaths in other countries have occurred from taking this disinfectant.

WATERS.

3. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month, from the Pokfulum and Tytam Reservoirs, and from the Cheung Sha Wan supply, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

4. Of petroleum oil 90 samples were tested during the year. All the samples of liquid fuel flashed at temperatures exceeding 150° F. Most of the oil that now arrives here, is already covered by certificates so that there has been a large decrease in recent years in the number of oil examinations.

On February 9th, on the tankship Nerite, there occurred an explosion which killed and badly burned two men and injured another so severely that he died later. Evidence showed that in the forehold there was a paint locker containing about 30 open tins of paint and an open drum of turpentine. Work was going on with naked lights at the bottom of the hold. There was no petroleum on board and all the tanks and pipes had been ventilated. An explosion occurred first in the paint locker and afterwards in the hold itself causing injury as stated. No damage was done to the vessel. I pointed out at the enquiry that a paint locker containing dangerous articles should not form part of a hold.

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINance.

5. The following table gives the results of 66 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Board :-

Beer, Brandy,

Milk,

Port Wine,

Whisky,

Description.

No. of Samples.

No. found genuine.

No. found adu Iterated.

6

6

4

4

35

35

3

3

...

18

18

Many other samples were examined for the public, mostly at the low fee prescribed by the Ordinance.

PHARMACY ORDINANCE.

6. This Ordinance was passed during the year, and under its provisions the sale of certain poisons is confined to registered chemists or to persons specially licensed. Informalities were proved in the sale of Lysol, Chlorodyne, Tonic Pills and Fellow's Syrup, and four prosecutions successfully sustained.

·

K 7.7

MINERALOGICAL.

7. A less number of ores was examined than in 1907. When business is bad the Chinese do not seem to care to support mining enterprises. Very little tin seems to be coming through. It seems that on account of low prices there is a reluctance at the mines to part with the metal.

MISCELLANEous.

8. Gas Examinations.-The amount of carbon monoxide in the public supply is limited by the Government to 16 per cent. The following table shows the proportion present for each month :-

Percentage by volume of

Carbon Monoxide.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

·

December,

11.2

11.0

13.4

13.0

10.6

7.4

9.8

15.5

14.0

16.0

9.4

7.6

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

9. The public continue to take advantage of the Laboratory and have forwarded a great variety of samples for examination on payment. The fees paid into the Treasury dur- ing the year amounted to $2,010 as against $2,422 in 1907.

SPECIAL REPORTS.

10. Special reports have been supplied on :—

A Pharmacy Ordinance and Regulations thereunder.

Opium, its Nature, Composition, Preparations, and Methods of Consumption. Ki Pau.

Importation of Naphtha.

Explosion on S.S. Nerite.

Lard Specification.

Platinum Ore. Concrete.

11. The value of the year's work as determined from the tariff of fees (Government Notification No. 285 of 1907) is $7,085 ($6,160 in 1907). The amount does not include anything for the special reports mentioned above, and there is much beside for which nothing has been set down.

LIBRARY,

12. A few standard works of reference have been added.

STAFF.

13. Mr. A. C. Franklin, F.L.C., Assistant Analyst, returned from leave on March 27.

FRANK BROWNE, Ph. Ch., F.I.C., F.C.S.,

Government Analyst.

10th February, 1909.

K 78

Annexe P.

REPORT OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE PORT.

During the year the work of this Department was carried on by Dr. Jordan, Dr. Keyt, Dr. Gröne and Dr. Aubrey. There were no changes on the staff.

The work of the Department may be comprised under three separate sections, viz.:—

(a) The Daily Inspection of Shipping Arriving in the Port.

(b) The Inspection of Emigrants.

(c) Quarantine Duty.

(a.)-The Daily Inspection of Shipping.

This work consists in boarding all steamers as they arrive in Port between the hours of 6 a.. and 6 p.m. During the year there were 3,991 arrivals of which 1,933 were British, and 2,058 were Foreign, while the departures amounted to 4,010 of which 1,936 were British and 2,074 were Foreign. These figures include sailing ships but are exclusive of the Canton and Macao River steamers; these latter as well as Junks and smaller craft are not boarded by us except in the event of any infectious disease being present on arrival here. Table I gives the total numbers of all arrivals and departures, both British and Foreign, and also the numbers of Emigrants in each class, but exclusive of the Canton and Macao steamers.

His Majesty's Ships and Foreign Ships of War are not boarded by us.

(b.)-The Inspection of Emigrants.

The total number of emigrants during the year amounted to 71,081 and shows a decrease of 34,886 as compared with the figures for 1907.

Of this total the majority were for the Straits Settlements, viz. :-49,643 while the remaining 21,438 were for other ports such as San Francisco, Victoria, Seattle, Salina Cruz, Mauritius, &c. Table II shows the total numbers for the different ports and the number of rejections.

The wave of emigration reached its maximum during the month of March when 8,882 emigrants left the Colony while the minimum occurred during the month of February when only 2,994 left; this can be accounted for by the fact that the Chinese New Year in February kept back a great many who postponed their departure till after the holiday season. This wave is shown in graphic form in Table III where two periods of increased emigration are seen in March and September, and two periods of a corresponding depression in the months of February and August.

The total rejections amounted to 882 which may be classified under the following headings:-

1. Skin Diseases.---Chiefly Scabies, Ringworm and Chronic Ulcers.

2. Tuberculosis.-Phthisis, Enlarged Cervical and Inguinal Glands.

3. Eye Diseases. Such as Pronounced Trachoma, Purulent Ophthalmia and Blindness. 4. Syphilis. With well-marked Secondaries.

5. Jaundice.-From various causes.

6. Beri-beri.-With well-marked Ataxia or Dropsy.

7. Fevers.-Malaria, Small-pox, Plague, &c.

8. Deformities.-Such as Kyphosis, Scoliosis or Paralysis.

9. Old Age.-Including great Physical Debility and Émaciation.

The male emigrants are divided into two classes: (1) Assisted, and (2) Free.

"Assisted" emigraints are labourers whose passages are wholly or partly paid for them, in return for which they are bound to work for a certain period for the person who engages them, this is generally 360 days in the Straits Settlements, North Borneo and all the Java Ports with the exception of Billiton where the term is extended to two years. These labourers require to have certificates and photographs, and they travel in charge of an agent. Assisted" emigrants for the Java Ports undergo an examination for fitness and disease by a private medical practitioner prior to the official examination on board the steamer.

K 79

The "Free" labourers pay their own passages and are not bound in any way to the employers of labour.

There is a constant stream of returning emigrants from various ports, chiefly Singapore, and many thousands arrive annually. Thus during the year, 489 steamers arrived, with a total of 157,809 persons.

These are not usually examined by us on arrival, except in the event of epidemic disease occurring on the voyage, when the course of procedure is in accordance with rule 3 under section 19 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.

Table IV shows the numbers of departures and arrivals of emigrants going and returning during the year by British and Foreign Vessels. These figures show an excess of 86,728 in those returning over the emigrants.

(c.) — Quarantine Duty.

During the year there were in all fifteen vessels detained in quarantine for the following

reasons :-

1. Small-pox,

2. Cholera,

3. Plague,

4. Dengue,

5. Anthrax in Cattle,..

1908.

1907.

10

5

2

1

2

2

1

1

Total,.......

15

9

Table VI gives the details for Quarantine Detention.

Several vessels were fumigated and disinfected for Enteric Fever cases landed here from time to time, and these being solitary cases which were isolated on board, the ships. were not dealt with as under 3 of the Quarantine regulations. Thus the S.S. Newchwang which landed a case of Enteric on January 1st and the Yawata Maru which had another case on May 11th were disinfected while discharging cargo at their berths.

Several cases of Parotitis occurred on the Trooper Northbrooke from Bombay; these were treated on board and were convalescent on arrival in Hongkong where satisfactory disinfection was carried out by the ship's Surgeon. A single case of Parotitis also occurred on the Empress of Japan on June 24th.

On October 3rd the S.S. Wakamiya Maru arrived in Port with 29 cases of Dengue. 37 cases occurred on the voyage from Bombay and these were entirely confined to the Japanese crew. There were 3 deaths, 5 recovered on the voyage and the remaining 29 cases were landed and admitted to the Kennedy Town Hospital. Several of these cases appeared to be suffering from Beri-beri as well, as evidenced by symptoms of extreme Paresis, with exaggerated reflexes and well-marked Hyperesthesia.

During the year the following Ports were declared to be infected :--

I.-Amoy for Cholera from August 19th to October 3rd.

II.-Manila

""

III.-Singapore,,

""

September 25th to November 20th.

December 5th.

""

""

IV.-Bangkok

December 19th.

Both Singapore and Bangkok were under quarantine restrictions at the end of the year.

General.

On July 28th the Health Officer of the Port's launch Sybil was considerably damaged by the typhoon. Although she was sent away for shelter behind Stonecutters' Island in ample time, the crush of drifting junks and launches smashed in her awning supports, cabin and sides, to such an extent that she had to be laid up for repairs.

Observation Station at Lai Chi Kok.

The South African Emigration Camp was purchased by Government with the object of establishing an observation station for the detention of persons arriving on board vessels subjected to quarantine.

G. P. JORDAN, M.B., C.M., M.R.C.S. (Englaid),

March, 1909.

Health Officer of the Port.

+

- K 80

Table I.

Vessels arriving at, and leaving the Port, with the Number of Emigrants.

Arrivals.

Departures.

Emigrants.

Ship's Flag.

1908.

1907.

1908.

1907.

1908.

1907.

British Vessels...

1,933

1,876

1,936

1,880 53,118 78,576

Foreign Vessels,

2,058

2,306

2,074

2,315

17,963 27,391

Total,

3,991

4,182

4,010

4,195

71,081 105,967

Table II.

Emigrants examined with Rejections: and the Various Ports of Destination.

Ports of Destination.

Number of Emigrants.

1908.

Number Rejected.

1907.

1908.

1907.

Straits Settlements,..............

49,643

83,048

740

236

San Francisco,

5,105

1

3,843

5

British Columbia,.

7,888

7,314

32

!

121

Java Ports,

4,789

67

82

German New Guinea,

329

Salina Cruz,.

2,301

4,903

Callao,

710

2,703

28

3 13

Seattle,

42

12

Tacoma,

48

109

Honolulu,.

30

316

Mauritius,.

196

543

Other Ports,.

3,107

1

Total,

71,081

105,967

882

386

9,000,.

8,500,..

8,000,.....

7,500,....

7,000,.

6,500,....

6,000,...

5,500,.

5,000,...

4,500,......

4,000,..

3,500,..

3,000,...

2,500,......

2,000,....

1,500,............

1,000,..........

500,.....

Numbers in

Thousands.

K 81

Table III.

Showing Monthly Fluctuations in Emigration during the

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

year

1908.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

K 83

Table IV.

Arrivals and Departures of Emigrants (outwards and returning).

Nationality.

Arrivals.

Emigrants (returning).

Departures.

Emigrants (outwards).

British Vessels,

221

116,094

110

53,118

Foreign Vessels,

268

41,715

77

17,963

Total,.

489

157,809

187

71,081

Table V.

Number of Emigrants from January to July for 1906, 1907, and 1908, and also the Crews of Steamers.

1906.

1907.

1908.

Month.

Crew of Steamers.

Crew of

Emigrants.

Steamers.

Emigrants.

Crew of Steamers.

Emigrants.

January, February,

1,313

2,831

2,394

7,936

1,894

5,794

1,671

3,786

1,097

1,242

1,523

2,994

March,

2,630

10,418

2,241

14,065

1,415

8,882

April,

2,131

9,002

2,405

13,714

1,612

7,626

May,

2,722

8,480

2,247

15,488

1,865

7,901

June,

1,930

4,600

2,064

7,874

1,790

4,785

July,

2,013

4,810

2,206

8,213

2,064

5,048

14,410

43,927

14,654

68,532

12,163

43,030

Table VI.

Quarantine Table.

Name of Vessel.

Port.

Number of Cases.

Date.

Cause.

Detention.

Rajaburi,.... Ovid,

Bangkok.

1

Jan.

Moji.

1

3rd. 19th.

Small-pox.

28 hours. 23

""

>>

>

Welmington,

Canton,

1

6th.

12

99

>>

Kaifuku Maru,

Moji.

1

28th.

31

19

55

""

Triumph,..

Mee Foo,....

Antenor,

Haiphong. Canton. Shanghai.

1

30th.

24

17

وو

"

1

Feb.

4th.

23

""

"

22nd.

20

""

21

""

Hopsang,.

Lightning,

Saigon. Singapore.

March 3rd.

24

دو

1

24th.

""

Dagny,..

Dalny.

1

April 16th.

Yawata Maru,..

Manila.

May 11th.

Taishan,

Saigon.

1

June 1st.

Siberia,

Shanghai.

1

21st.

29

Plague. Small-pox.

Cholera.

Small-pox.

Enteric Fever.

24

48 "

Cabins disinfected.

24 hours.

""

20

Wakamiya Maru,

Bombay.

29

Oct. 3rd.

Catherine Apcar,

Singapore.

1

Nov. 12th.

Hong Wau I,

Singapore.

1

Dec. 31st.

Dengue. Plague. Cholera.

24 19

24

24

1

K 84

Annexe Q.

REPORT OF THE COLONIAL VETERINARY SURGEON.

General Statistics.

The total number of cattle admitted to the Government Depôts for the year was 42,098, a decrease on the previous year of 17,901. In Kennedy Town 37,982 were admitted, a decrease of 17,837 on last year, due to the fact that during July, August, and September no cattle were exported to Manila owing to restrictions imposed by the Manila Government. In Kowloon 4,116 cattle were admitted, a decrease of 64 on last year. In Kennedy Town 151 cattle were rejected alive as unfit for food and in Kowloon 6 were rejected.

The total number of pigs admitted to Kennedy Town was 168,682 against 186,728 in 1907. The dealers attribute the falling off to the floods on the North River from which district many pigs come.

The total number of sheep admitted to Kennedy Town was 30,118 against 28,349 in the previous year.

Disease in the l'epôts.

Foot and Mouth Disease.-This disease was more or less prevalent during the year. In the early part of the summer the disease was of a very virulent type but it became inuch more mild towards the end of the year.

Anthrax.-Four cases of Anthrax occurred, three of them in June and one in October. The three cases in June were all in one shipment and all died within three days of arrival. The case in October was in a bullock that had been in the Depôt for 10 days.

Rinderpest.-Cases of this disease were met with throughout the year and the Chinese importers state that the disease was prevalent on the mainland. As a rule the dealers send down only those cattle that appear to them to be healthy but as these cattle have been in contact with sick cattle, some develope the disease after arrival. On the 5th and 7th September two lots of cattle were admitted in the Depôt suffering from Rinderpest and these were slaughtered by order of the Sanitary Board. No compensation was payable as the cattle were sick on arrival in the Colony.

Black Quarter-One calf, about nine months old, died from this disease in the Depôt. Parasites. A few cases of whipworm (Tricocephalus affinis) were found in young animals but probably many more exist as this worm owing to its small size is not easy to find unless by careful searching. It does not appear to be of much economic importance.

Large numbers of filaria were found in the walls of the aortas of both Chinese cattle and water buffaloes. These have been described by Lingard as occurring in India and have also been found in cattle in the Straits Settlements. They give rise to an atheromatous condition of the blood vessels but do not appear to be fatal. I have not been able to find the embryo form in the blood.

The following biting flies have been identified and are the two most common flies in the cattle sheds: (1) Stomoxys Calcitrans and the (2) horn fly (Lyperosia Irritans). Both flies cause cattle a good deal of annoyance. One specimen of the Tabanida was caught but has not yet been identified. These flies are not common in Hongkong. The identification of these flies was done by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.

Buildings.

There were no alterations or new buildings at Kennedy Town.

In March the new Slaughter House and Animal Depôt at Ma Tau Kok was completed and occupied and the old buildings at Hung Hom hauded over to the Canton-Kowloon Railway. The new building while satifactory is not so easily accessible as the old one.

K 85

Cattle Crematorium.

The carcases, etc., destroyed in the crematorium for the year was :--

Cattle including calves,

Sheep and goats,

Swine,

....

112 head.

105 "1

..101

19

Condemned meat from slaughter-house,...14,358 lbs.

Tinned goods (condemned),

102 cases.

In addition to these items all dogs destroyed by the Police Department in Victoria are cremated.

Post Office,

Old papers from the Colonial Secretary's Department, the Treasury, Magistracy, Sanitary Department and the Telegraph Companies were also destroyed.

The total amount of coal used was 57,740 lbs.

Slaughter Houses.

Kennedy Town.-The total revenue was $67,931.50, a decrease on last year of $7,638.00. The revenue was made up as follows.-

1908.

Slaughtered 24,812 cattle @ 40c. $ 9,924.80

17,391 sheep @ 20c. 3,478.20 149,234 swine @30c. 44,772.90

Exported

13,378 cattle @ 50c.

6,689.00

Exported

12,243 sheep @ 10c.

1,224.30

18,453 swine @ 10c.

1,845.30

$67,934.50

1907.

Slaughtered 22,645 cattle @ 40c. $ 9,058.00

16,637 sheep @ 20c. 169,476 swine @30c. 30,842 cattle @ 50c. 11,712 sheep @ 10c. 17,252 swine @ 10c.

3,327.40 50,842,80

15,421.00

1,171.20

1,725.20

$81,545,60

The total housing fees

Ma Tau Kok.-This slaughter house is let to a contractor. collected was $463.39 a decrease of $35.14 on last year's revenue.

Shaukiwan and Aberdeen are also leased to a contractor.

The total revenue from Animals Depôts and Slaughter Houses works out as follows:-

Kennedy Town fees collected,

Hung Hom

""

Blood and Hair contract,

Contractors' tender for Ma Tau Kok,

Aberdeen and Shaukiwan,

1908.

.$67,934.50

463.39

6,888.00

1907. $ 81,547.35 428.25 6,888.00

12,066.60

12,066.60

$87,352.49

$100,930.20

The total numbers of animals slaughtered for food were:-

Kenndey Town, Ma Tau Kok,

1908. Cattle. Sheep & Goats. 24,812

1907.

Swine.

Cuttle. Sheep & Goats.

Swine.

4,800

17,391 713

149,243

22,645 16,637

169,476

25,652

4,986

1,642

27,756

Aberdeen,

3,242

2,850

Shaukiwan,......

...

7,094

6,042

29,612

18,104

185,231

27,631 18,279

206,121

Grand total of all animals,................. 332,947

252,034

Appendix L.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT.

GARDENS AND Grounds.

Butanic Gardens.-The year was marked by the flowering of two trees which formed important additions to the decorative plants of the Gardens. One of these was Prunus Ungeri which flowered profusely in the middle of January. This tree, which came originally from Japan, is deciduous and has pretty drooping pink flowers which appear before the leaves. The other tree, Paulownia Fortunei, also flowers before the leaves appear. The flowers are sweetly scented, white and manve in colour and about 4 inches long. The tree forms a charming picture when in full flower. The seeds from which this specimen was raised were obtained by Mr. MURRAY SCOTT from Mr. GREISER on the North hiver and very kindly presented by him to the Botanic Gardens in May 1905.

Another feature of the year's gardening was the flowering of Ornithogalum, bulbs of which were sent through the kindness of our frequent benefactor Mr. WALLACE of Amoy. Lycoris aurea which had been planted in masses in several parts of the lawns was very effective in October.

The daily rainfall in the Gardens is stated in Table I.

The zoological collection was increased by the presentation by Capt. MATHIAS of the S.S. Kai Fong of two small deer. It was especially satisfactory to obtain these as deer thrive well under the conditions of the Gardens and as these particular animals had been inade pets of on the ship and were accustomed to captivity.

The flower show was held as usual in the Gardens towards the end of February and produced some of the finest exhibits that have yet been seen in the Colony. The roses were especially good. The attendance was unfortunately small in consequence of the bid weather.

As, after exhaustive researches in London and other collections, it cannot be discovered that the large flowered Bauhinia of our Gardens has been previously noticed by botanists, a description has been published in the Journal of Botany (1908, 325). The tree is there named Bauhinia Blakeana after Sir Henry and Lady BLAKE.

Birds. In last year's Annual Report extracts were printed from letters from Mr. KERSHAW of Macao written in answer to enquiries from the Hongkong Government as to the best means of encouraging the increase of singing birds in the Island. Mr. KERSHAW'S advice to endeavour to keep down the magpies which are the principal enemies of all small birds has been energetically followed during the year under report. During the 6 months ending in March 1908 the Police alone accounted for 679 magpies shot in various parts of Hongkong and Kowloon (with an expenditure of only 750 cartridges); the total for the year under report was 594.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-The tennis ground was partly returfed and some other repairs which were necessary were carried out on the paths.

Blake Garden. A welcome change was introduced by the provision of a fence and gates enabling the Garden to be closed after dusk and rendering it secure against damage by mischievous visitors during the night. The filling up of the banks with Rhododendrons and other flowering plants was continuel. Some returfing was done but hardly had the lawns and slopes been put into good order before it was discovered that a large proportion of the grass was undermined by cockchafer grubs. The usual means of dealing with turf pests were useless: the only effectual remedy was proved to be collecting the insects by hand. But before this could be completed extensive damage had been done, and the returf- ing of a large proportion of the Garden will be necessary. An inscribed stone was set up near the summer-house according to the Chinese custom bearing the names of those who subscribed to its construction.

Rockeries.-The side rockeries in Glenealy were altered and put into good order, while the island rockery which formed an obstacle to chair traffic was altogether removed. The decoration of the large slope opposite the Hongkong & Shanghai Bank was continued according to the pre-arranged annual plan. A large number of Rhododendrons which were among the shrubs added this year should form a fine mass of colour when fully developed.

Tai Po Garden.-Some planting was carried out around the new Land Office Quarters when first built; during this year'a small sum was expended in cleaning up the ground and cutting away the undergrowth which impeded the development of trees.

}

L 2

THE TYPHOON.

The typhoon of the 27th and 28th of July probably did more damage to the trees and other Government property under the charge of this department than any previously on record.

The damage may be summarised as follows:-

Buildings. The roofs were blown off 4 of the plant houses: the end of one of the hot houses was blown in and many matsheds in the outlying forestry stations were demolished.

Botanic Gardens.-The majority of the big trees were so severely damaged that it will be many years before they regain their ornamental appearance while many were blown down and killed.

Blake Garden -Six of the banians were blown down, one of them being carried into a neighbouring street; the remainder were subsequently raised and saved.

Most of the young trees planted during the last 3 years were destroyed,

Government House Grounds.-Many of the large trees in the immediate neighbourhood of the house were badly damaged or destroyed: with special regret must be recorded the snapping off at a few feet from the ground of the fine Poinciana (Flame of the Forest) on the west of the house and the disfigurement of one of the great banians at the entrance.

Colonial Cemetery.-200 of the large trees which made the beauty of this cemetery justly famous were broken short off by the wind and killed.

Banks.-The majority of the large pine trees which added so much to the picturesque appearance of the main entrance of Government House were killed.

Street Trees. The large banians bordering the roads especially in the central district received unprece lentel punishment. The litter of branches was in some places a dense tangle 12 feet deep filling the whole road. It took about 100 men with axes and saws from daylight until 11 o'clock on the morning following the typhoon to clear narrow passages for traffic in some of the principal thoroughfares. Even with the co-operation of the Sanitary Department it was more than a week before all the debris was removed from the streets. It was not possible to save more than a small proportion of it for sale and recourse had to be taken to the unusual expedient of issuing general permission through the Police for anyone to take away what they wished for fuel. The smaller twigs and leaves which were of no use as fuel and were therefore left on the roads, were collected into heaps and burned.

Pine Plantations.-In contrast to the great havoc produced among the shade trees is the curious fact that the plantations outside Victoria suffered little; only 2,000 pine trees blown down by the wind have so far been found and sold.

HERBARIUM.

The new species from the Fokien collection of 1905 were published during the year in a paper by the Superintendent in the Journal of the Linnean Society. A collection of plants from the Salwen Valley ma le by Mr. FORREST of the Edinburgh Botanic Gardens was pur- chased. No specimens from this region previously existed in the collection and it thereforǝ fills a gap in our series of Chinese plants. The only collections made by members of the Departinent were one made in Northern Formosa an I one in the mountains round Hakone Lake in Japan by the Superintendent. A large number of local specimens were presented by Mrs. GIBBS.

Fleet-Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N.. has continued his work upon the local ferns and has published the results as "Notes on the ferns of Hongkong and the adjacent mainland", a most valuable contribution to the botanical literature of the Colony. The ferns of this part of China have indeed during the year received an unprecedented amount of attention, for Mr. COPEL AND recently published an account of the ferns of Southern China in the Philippi Journal of Science, dealing especially with those collected by Dr. MATTHEW on the Lieh Chau River, by myself on the Min River in Fokien Province and by Mr. KEMP's collectors in the neighbourhood of Swatow. In addition to the above publication the Department is indebted to Dr. MATTHEW for the time and trouble that he has expended in furnishing notes on the specimens of ferns already placed by him in the Herbarium.

A considerable amount of time was spent during the year in collecting and investigat- ing the plant products used commercially in Hongkong whether of local or other origin. Most of them are well known Chinese drugs. Each was as far as possible identified botani- cally and specimens with distinctive numbers preserved in the Herbarium, pending their in- vestigation by the medical and other departments concerned.

The list thus prepared has been subjected to exhaustive examination by Dr. Ho Kai: the Government has indeed been exceedingly fortunate in securing his co-operation for

pro-

1

L 3

bably by no one but himself could so much interesting information upon the subject have been collected from Chinese sources.

Captain HODGINS of the S.S. Haiyang has once more to be thanked for the various specimens of scientific and economic interest which he has collected at his ports of call and presented to the Department.

The usual list of the year's additions to our flora has been prepared by Mr. Tutcher and is annexed. (Annexure A.)

FORESTRY.

A.--Demarcation.-Owing to the number of Farm Lots and other alienated ground intermixed with Crown Land in the Pokfulam (7) Block it was found necessary during the year to prepare a series of maps and photographs of the various areas, the rights of the Go- vernment with regard to each being carefully ascertained. Both here and in other parts of the Colony where they had been made, the Forestry Service Paths (see below) have proved of the greatest value in demarcating forestry boundaries. Numbers and letters have been plainly painted at their proper places along these paths so that the Forest Guards in their patrols can make no mistake about the localities upon which their reports are inade. All the main roads regularly traversed by the Forest Guards have already been marked with figures at the points where they cross compartment boundaries.

The last three compartments of the Harbour Belt (9c, 9D & 9E) were demarcated during the year by a top and bottom line and a Forestry Service Path was made through them and marked throughout with the numbers of the planting sections. Some progress was also made with the determination of unmarked boundaries in and near the town of Victoria.

A summary of all the forest areas in the Colony follows:-

Block.

Name.

FOREST AREAS.

Government Pine Licensed Pine

Plantations.

Plants.

Natural Mixed Woods.

Acres.

Acres.

Acres.

Victoria, Wongneichung,

610

660

Shankiwan,

680

Tytam,

864

Stanley,

766

*

Aberdeen,

770

Pokfulam,.

1,346

Yaumati,

450

9

Harbour Belt,

2,500

356

10

Kowloon Reservoir,.

200

11

Sha Tin,

400

1,797

160

12

Tsun Wan,.

2,513

13

Tsing I,

1,680

14

Shing Mun,

1,183

15

Tai Lam Chung,

4,047

240

16

Castle Peak Bay,

1,350

17

Deep Bay,

2,030

18

Shap Pat Heung,

2,142

19

Pat Heung,

4,196

20

San Tin,

1,341

21

Sheung Shui,

1,404

*22

Lo Shui Ling,

1,192

80

23

24

Sha Tan Kok,

Double Haven,..

2,552

400

1,932

800

25

Plover Cove,

2,120

320

26

Tai Po, N.,

1,590

160

27

Lung Yeuk Tan,.

1,028

160

28

Tai Po, S.......

2,074

960

29

Turret Hill,

1,207

960

30

Ma On Shan,..

1,758

640

31

Long Harbour,

1,748

32

Sai Kung,

4,681

33

34

Hebe Haven,

Junk Bay,

2,735

320

1,619

35

Tai 0.

2,152

36

Tung Chung,

2,150

37

Mui Wo.....

3,090

38

Pui 0,

1,280

Total,......

9,246

58,947

5,200

L4-

B.-Formation of Pine Plantations.-The planting of Tytam and Pokfulam reservoir catchments with pine was continued, replanting of areas felled during the year was carried out on Mount Kellet and near Aberdeen, while another 400 acres of the Harbour Belt was sown (in sites) between Customs Pass and Lyemun. An area of about 300 acres in the lower valley of the Shingmun stream was sown broadcast with pine seeds in anticipation of future planting. In all 621,554 pits were planted or sown, while 50 pounds of pine seeds were sown broadcast, at a total cost of $2,478.

C.-Care of Trees in Plantations.-Thinning was carried out on the Island in 3B (Tsat Tze Mui) and in all the compartments of Stanley (5). Considerable thinning was also done on the Tai Po Road (9A and 10). The Revenue from these sources amounted to $565.

In many parts of the Island the pine trees have become incumbered with abundant undergrowth. This was at first given away to the older-established and more respectable families of the neighbouring villages, who cut it under the superintendence of foresters. The competition for this privilege was found to be great, and the villagers proved to be willing to do additional work for the Department in return for the fuel removed. A regular system of payment for forestry work in brushwood has now been established but as it only came into full operation after the end of the year an account of it will be left for my next report. The cleaning of the plantations was carried out principally in 6A (Aberdeen) and 3B (Tsat Tze Mui).

D.-Protection from Fire.-The fire barriers comprising some 4 miles in all were cleaned in the Autumn at a cost of $453. New barriers were made to protect the newly formed plantations in Tytam Block and the Harbour Belt. Some small fires occurred.

E.—Forest Guard Service.-The Forest Guard Service has been maintaine l in an efficient condition during the year. An improvement has been made by the cutting of the Forestry Service Paths (see below) through places where stealing hal been prevalent. It is under- stood also that the supply of brushwood obtained by the villagers has been the cause of ́ ́ reducing thefts of pinewood in neighbourhood of the villages concerned.

A pamphlet, drawn up and printed in English and Chinese during the year with a view to circulation to the Chinese Schools throughout the Colony and containing elementary information upon the sowing and raising of trees and upon the advantages which follow afforestation, should in time have the effect of creating an intelligent appreciation of and respect for the plantations.

The additional rate imposed upon the village of Tai Hang under Ordinance 14 of 1888, which was to be discontinued owing to cessation of stealing in January, had to remain in force during the year owing to a report of further damage to the Crown plantations round the village in March.

A case of some importance to the Department was decided in November in which the lessees of two Farm Lots at Wongneichung were required to pay a hundred dollars on account of unauthorized removal of trees blown down by the typhoon and of others froin their lots. In the leases of these (like the great majority of Farm Lots) all trees are reserved to the Crown.

One fuel stealer was banished during the year in consequence of a second conviction for unlawful removal of trees from a Government plantation.

Efforts were made during the year to make it easier for the protective service to deal with the occupants of matsheds situated in or near Government plantations. Such people have always proved a thorn in the sile of the service because, being on the spor night and day, they can, if so inclined, steal pine fuel with comparative safety.

A form of agreement bas now been drawn up by which the owners of matsheds give surety in a suffi- cient sum for the safe keeping of trees within 500 yards of their matshels from dunage by their people. This should have a good effect.

A considerable number of cases has recently been brought before the Magistrates in which Chinese have been arrested for removing large quantities of flowering shrubs, ferns and other plants from Crown Land round the town and at the Peak. As it became evident that some of our more beautiful wild flowers were likely to become exterminated it this were allowed to continue the procedure was adopted, which has been used and found effective in country districts in England, that is to say a notification was published pointing out what plants might and what might not be taken from public land. The same notifica- tion has been used with success to check damage to the newly planted pine seedlings near the villages in New Kowloon. See Tables II and III.

-

1

L 5

F.-Revenue Felling.-The timber sold during the year was small in quantity and consisted chiefly of small patches of trees whose removal was necessary for public or other works. A revenue of $1,367 was obtained by the sale of 1,695 mature trees and $1,647 from thinnings.

G.-Planting and care of Road-side Trees.-The planting programme was continued in the new roads at Kowloon. The planting of bamboos on the more exposed roads at the Peak was confined this year to Mt. Kellet where about 2,300 clumps were added. Further planting was carried out in May and Con luit Roads and some vacancies were replanted in Des Voeux Road West. The chief trees used were "Flame of the Forest (Poinciana), "Candle Nut" (Aleurites triloba), and Celtis. The fine avenue of banians in Nathan Road, Kowloon, has at last been broken into by the removal of 19 trees in front of the new buildings at the junction of Elgin Road.

127 Poinciana (Flame of the Forest), 90 Aleurites (Canille Nut) and 12 banians were used in the formation or repair of avenues, 88 trees of various kinds were planted on the banks of May Road, while 2,315 clumps of bamboos were planted along Black's Link and Mt. Kellet Road. $605 were spent on new plantings, $915 upon repairs-mostly of damage done by the typhoon.

H.-Nurseries, Agriculture and Economic Planting.-In June 1904, 2,000 bulbils of Sisal Hemp were planted in exposed barren situations in the Government nursery at Kang Hau

corresponding as far as could be judged to the best sisal lands in Yucatan. In the Autumm of 1905, the plants were about 12 inches high, 1906, 19 inches, 1907, 21 inches. It will be seen that the growth though rapid at first has fallen off. The usual method of cultivation is by suckers 18 to 20 inches high taken from mature plants. Leaves from these usually reach a marketable size in 5 years. I have no statistics of the usual rate of growth from bulbils, but as they are now of the height at which suckers are planted, I presume that we must be satisfied if the marketable size is reached in about 5 years. more. The plants are in a healthy state and I see no reason to doubt the success of the experiment. Table IV.

Among the most valuable products of China which have so far remained a monopoly of the Chinese Empire is the beautiful and valuable wood known as Nanmu (Chinese Coffin-tree). Many efforts have been made to obtain a supply of living plants for other countries interested in Forestry and with suitable climates but so far, to the best of my knowledge, without success. There is an old tree in the Hongkong Botanic Gardens which was sent by Mr. WATTERS, then British Consul at Ichang, some 30 or 40 years ago. A few score of layers were taken from it while young and planted on Mt. Gough in 1882. It is impossible to find these trees again with the scanty information preserved and if still surviving they probably resemble the tree in the Gardens in not ripening fruit and in being too old to provide layers. During the last 2 years a considerable amount of correspondence has been carried out with Consuls and others in Szechuen and Yunnan, the provinces in which the tree occurs, with the object of getting seeds. Through the kindness and perse- verance of Mr. Fox (until recently British Consul at Cheng-tu) and of Mr. TYMAN, and after some failures, two consignments of seeds have during the year been received by this Department. The length of time occupied in the journey from Cheng-tu is evidently, from the condition of the seeds, nearly the limit for its safe transport and they were imine liately sown on arrival. Two crops have thus been raised and it is hoped to transmit living plants in due course to various other Colonies which require them.

I.-Forestry Service Paths. -Now that so much of the pine forest has grown up in the Island of Hongkong and such large extensions of planting have been authorized and partly carried out in the New Territories, it has become imperative to secure a better and easier means of reaching those plautations which do not lie along the roads. A series of Forestry Service Pathis has therefore been planned and partly constructed. These paths follow the contours and vary in height above sea level from 500 to 800 feet according to the position of the densest part of the plantations. The convenience that they have already provided amply justifies the small outlay upon them (2 to 3 cents per yard). They enable the Forest Guards to penetrate with ease into certain areas which have hitherto been difficult of access. In the plantations which are now in process of formation the paths have formed a convenient base for measurement and for marking up the numbers of the planting sections, etc., in positions where they can readily be found by the foresters in charge of the work. The positions and the approximate length of the paths already constructed are given below. Paths are under construction from Peak Road to Hatton Road; from Wanchai Road to Wongneichung Gap (N. side) and from Wanchai Road to Wongneichung-Aberdeen Road (S. side).

L 6

FORESTRY SERVICE PATHS.

Description of Path.

Hatton Road,

From

Peak-Pokfulam Road,

Aberdeen New Road,

Quarry Bay-Tytam Road,..

Wongneichung-Tytam Road,

Tai Po Road,

""

Shatin Pass,

Customs Pass,

Lau Tong Ravine,.

Total,

to

Peak-Pokfulam Road,

Aberdeen New Road,

Wanchai-Aberdeen Road,...

Wongneichung-Tytam Road,

Reservoir Damı,

Shek Li Pui,

Shatin Pass,

Customs Pass,

Lau Tong Ravine, Lyemun,.............

Length in Miles.

Cost of Construction.

$

Ng~∞ IO A LO Coco if

87

135

111

2

130

13

107

2

69

239

7

325

6

175

2

90

35

1,468

K.— Clearing undergrowth round houses. It was decided in the Autumn that this Depart- ment should undertake the keeping down of the growth of brushwood in the upper part of the town and in the plantations immediately surrounding it. Considerable progress has already been made with this work and from the experience thus gained it is anticipated that the whole can be completed at least once a year without extra expense to the Government. It has always been easy to get coolies to cut thick undergrowth near the town without payment on the understanding that they keep what they cut as fuel. If the same ground is cleared every year the fuel obtained from it is not sufficient payment for the work involved, it is necessary, therefore, to arrange that the coolies shall be allowed to cut a certain area every year where the brushwood is of several years' growth and as it is beneficial to have the pine and other woods cleared of undergrowth every 5 or 6 years the Government secures in this way a double advantage.

FORESTRY LICENCES.

A re-arrangement of the forestry licensing systein was made during the year by which the issue of the licences and all matters not of a technical forestry nature are managed for the Northern District by the District Officer at Tai Po, and for the Southern District by the Assistant Land Officer in Hongkong. This change will cause a considerable saving of time and expense to the Government as well as to the licensecs. A table of the area and licence fees is appended. In consequence of the date of issue being changed from January to July one and a half years' fees have been collected during the year. The two issues are detailed below. The first shows an increase in the licensed area of 540 acres, the second of a further 413 acres. All the cases of non-renewal are due to negligence on the part of the licensees and will probably be adjusted as usual during 1909.

Private Forestry Licences,

Village Private Village

""

""

"

>>

">

Private Forestry Licences,

Village

""

Private Village

"""

""

"}

>>

FORESTRY LICENCES. January to June 1908.

7,616.90 acres $ 380.84 37,604.67

1,880.27 unrenewed.

41

.393

39

1

126 40

:>

45

5,306.00 540.00

""

July 1908 to June 1909.

37

newly licensed.

6,138.10 acres $ 613.81

.373

36,634·00

3,666.5+

10

2,366·40

unrenewed.

69

7,119-70

12

""

413-70 newly licensed.

The roads recognized as "main roads" in the New Territories for purposes of forestry reservation are as follows:-

From

L7

MAIN ROADS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES.

To

Distance in Direct Line. Miles.

Yaumati, Kowloon City,

Tai Po,

Tai Wai,

وو

99

"

"9

Tai Wan Tau, Tai Po, Fung Un, Shün Wan,

ÚAng Chung,.

Tai Po,

29

"

وو

99

Sha Tau Kok,

"

Sheung Shui,

24

Tai Lam Chung,

Tsün Wan, Tin Mún,

Un Long,

Tai O,

Sha Tin,

Mau Peng viâ Kun Yam Shan,

Sai Kung,

Hang Hau,

Sha Tin viâ Sai Kung, Shun Wan,

Sha Lo Tung, ÚAng Chung, Kuk Po, Luk Keng...

Sha Tau Kok viâ Wan Shan Ha, Sha Tau Kok viâ Lung Yeuk Tau, Sham Chun viên Shenng Shui,..... Un Long via Lam Tsün Valley,.. Tsun Wan via Shing Mun Valley, Sham Chun viâ Lin Ma Hang, Sham Chun viâ Man Uk Pin,. Un Long via San Tin,... Un Long via Tai Shek U, Un Long via Pak Kung Au, Un Long viâ Fan Shui Au,.. Un Long và Ma On Kong, Un Long viên Kop Lung,... Un Long,

Lung Ku Tan viâ Peng Shan and Ha Tsun,

Shek Shun viâ I 0,

Shek Pik via Keong Shan,

Mui Woa viâ Tai Ho,

Tüng Chung, Mui Woa,

Pui O,

8/3/2

3

-dor

WHA

2/1/1

mere

-6)=163

6

6

6

—6—6/6)-e-a-a

135 60 65 10 1 in a ∞ H~~27TN∞∞OONFOOONBI-M2M 2

5

9

3

6

6

6

AGRICULTURE AND OTHER INDUSTRIES.

Bamboo Ropes.-Some good series of bamboo ropes both plaited and twisted were secured through the kindness of Mr. PLAYFAIR and Mr. HIGGS of H. M. Consulate, Foochow, and of Mr. CURRIE of the C.I.M. Customs at Swatow and were sent to the Imperial Institute and to Kew.

COMMERCIAL INVESTIGATIONS.

With a view to placing the botanical resources of this Department as far as possible at the service of the mercantile community of Hongkong His Excellency has requested me to collect all possible information upon the vegetable products of this neighbourhood or for which Hongkong is an emporium. This information is to refer chiefly to the raw or partly manufactured products exported from China and to include the locality of their production, quantity available, country to which exported, price at port of export and in the markets to which they eventually go.

The Director of the Imperial Institute of London has already on several occasions used the wide resources of his establishment for the investigation of vegetable products in which Hongkong is interested as has been recorded on several occasions in these Annual Reports. His aid would certainly be sought in certain parts of these commercial investigations and the additional details so obtained as well as others obtainable through official sources would perhaps be of sufficient use to firms interested in the trade of the Colony to enable them to take up new products or at any rate to handle some of the older ones to greater advantage.

The chief subjects of correspondence with the Institute during the last year have been oils and oil seeds, bamboo products and Chinese medicines (collected in connection with the request of the British Pharmacopoeia Committee). The following vegetable products have been selected for preliminary investigation as being among those of most importance to this Colony-China Root, Galangal, Abutilon Fibre, Ramie, Apricot kernels and Melon seeds.

L 8

STAFF.

The Superintendent was absent on privilege leave from August 10th to September 28th.

REVENUE.

Details of Revenue are given in Table V.

A comparative statement of Revenue and Expenditure for the last nine years is given. in Table VI.

10th May, 1909.

Table I.

RAINFALL, 1908.

Botanic Gardens.

S. T. DUNN,

Supt., B. & F. Dept.

Date.

Jan. Feb.

Mar. Apr. May June July Aug.

Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov.

Dec.

inch

inch inch inch inch inch inch

inch inch inch inch inch

1934

1,

.34

2,

.33

3,

.04

.02

5,

...

6,

.07

12,

13,

7,

8,

9,

10,

11,

...

...

.05

.04

.04

14,

...

.01

:

...

52:::སྐྱུ ཙ: སྤྱཌྭ2ས::::

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

.03

2.74

.03

.01

.14 |

.36

.05

...

.69

.03

.32

4.11

1.40

::

.05

.88

.01

.06

.10

.10

.78

.15

:

1.03

.12

.65

.24

.25

.52

.07

.71

.06

1.60

.02

1.68

.01

.12

.35.

.12

.04

.06

.60 5 38

.02

.06

.71

.02

15,

16,

.02

.65

17.

.02 .90

.32

18,

.32

.34

.18

2.42

...

19,

.12

.36

...

20,

21,

.01

22,

.04 .23

.26 1.56 .79

.45

1.37

.10

23,

.27 5.56

.14

...

...

24,

.57

.15 6.19

.01

.03

...

...

25,

.51

.37 2.43 .01

26,

27,

.02

3.19 .02 4.28

.22 .27

...

.47 .57 .12 .82

28,

.02

.08

29,

30,

1.44

1.04 .07 .48 3.16

.24 .27

.51 1.44 .06

.51

.28

.90 .31

.51

.61

.01

2.42

31,

.10

.03

.28

Total,

2.83

2.70 .98 11.99 1.6019.47 28.32 10.47

9.88

8.64

.29

4.49

1.50

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

1.39

.02

.06

.30

1.54

.02

...

...

.58 .41

.07

.01 .31

.01 .01

1.60

.03

...

.12

.79 2.4.7 .95 .08 .03 .03 1.12 1.16 .14 .19 .49 3.62 .70

: ུ ཡ ཝཱ ཾ =

.02

.11

.14

.22

VILLAGE OR DISTRICT. Block.

- L 9

Table II.

FOREST GUARD SERVICE: OFFENCES.

Compartment.

Conviction of residents.

Conviction of per-

sons, address un- known, arrested in neighbourhood.

Reports of pine tree stealing in neigh- bourhood.

Reports of pine branch stealing in neighbourhood.

Reports of pine needle stealing in neighbourhood. Reports of brush wood stealing in neigh- bourhood.

Reports of grass cut- ting in neighbour- ing plantation. Cattle grazing plantations neighbourhood.

in

in

Pokfulam,

A. C. E.

D.

7

17

7

nil

nil

nil

3

nil

G.

West Point,......

1

A.B.C.}

25

14

6

2

1

19

Central,

1 A.E.F.

2

5

4

nil

""

Wongneichung,

2

{

B.C.D. |

9

2

10

2

1

3

3

E. F.

99

Tsat Tze Mui,

Shaukiwan,

B.

1

1

nil

nil

nil

nil

N

99

3 D. E. F.

3

15

26

1

3

22

19

22

1

Wanchai,

Fi

E.

1

nil

nil

nil

nil

"

G.

Aberdeen,

6

17

10

41

7

10

Stanley,.....

5

E. F.

nil

2

1

3

1

2

29

B. C.

Tytam,

4

nil

1

4

nil

nil

D. E.

Tai Hang,.

ะ เง

2

A.

9

7

15

1

1

3

A.

91

Cheungshawan,

A.

2

10 j

Shek Li Pui,..

10

Co

B. C.

Kowloon City Villages,

9

מו

D. E.

Total,.

00

9

1

6

11

nil

""

14

3

~

3

nil

1

1

88

103

142

17

3.

26

71

4

Table III.

POLICE COURT RESULTS, IN 1908.

5-7 days' imprisonment, 8-14 days' imprisonment, 15-31 days' imprisonment, 50 cents to $1 fine,

$2 fine,

$3 fine.

$4 to $5 fine,

$10 to $25 fine, Discharged,..

Punishment.

Number.

79

51

10

17

48

15

31

2

85

Total,....

338

- L 10

Table IV.

Kang Hau,.

East Point,

Nga Iu Tau,

Locality.

NURSERIES

Cost of Typhoon Other Expenses.

Damages.

$

50.00 175.00

C.

$9

365.60

236.00

244.51

Total.

C.

$

C.

415.60

411.00

244.51

Total,.....

$225.00

$846.11

$1,071.11

Table V.

REVENCE FOR 1908.

Timber Sales,

Sales of Plants,

.$ 3,733.44 648.05

Loan of Plants,

Sale of old tools,

....

Forestry Licences in New Territories,

Interest on Current Account,...

Total,

Table VI.

205.17

4.46

6,986.03

9.28

$11,586.43

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FROM 1900 To 1908.

Year.

Total Expenditure. Total Revenue.

% of Revenue to Expenditure.

$

C.

$ c.

1900

21,519.95

1,819.10

8.45

1901

25,560.70

1,716.29

6.71

1902

31,446.11

1,208.80

3.84

1903

31,924.04

2,311.58

7.24

1904

49,688.98

25,201.44

50.72

1905

46,670.14

3,468.94

7.43

1906

46,796.19

6,898.64

14.74

1907

44,131.14

7,730.52

17.52

1908

48,973.20

11,586.43

23.66

L 11

Annexure A.

ADDITIONS TO THE FLORA OF HONGKONG AND THE NEW TERRITOries.

Senebia pinnatifida, DC.-A cosmopolitan weed found in Hongkong and Kowloon, in waste ples.

Clitorid Hanceana, Hemsl.-Growing abundantly near the rifle range, Kowloon City. Previously only known from the North River, Kwangtung, and Cochin China.

Quisqualis indica, Linn.-Collected behind the Buddhist Temple, Causeway Bay. Perhaps an escape from cultivation. Widely dispersed in tropical Asia.

Eugenia sp.-Found on the east side of the road leading up from Quarry Bay to the Sanatorium at Mt. Parker. A shrub about 12 feet high.

Wendlandia sp. ?-Trailing over rocks and trees on the hill above Tytam Reservoir; also on Taimoshan.

Ardisia chinensis, Benth.-Rediscovered, on the western spur of Mt. Parker. known from Hongkong and Formosa.

Only

Alniphyllum pterospermum, Mats.-Found on the south side of Lantao. Previously collected in various parts of China, and in Formosa.

Ehretia acuminata, R. Br.-Collected by Mr. Ford in 1893 on the west side of the stream leading from Wongneichung Gap to Deepwater Bay, but not previously determined. A common tree in China; also found in India, Malaya, and North Australia.

Veronica Tournefortii, C. C. Gmel.-An European wood found in the Albany Nursery. Probably introduced with flower seeds from Europe.

Lindera glauco, Bl.-A few trees growing near the top of the path leading from May Road to Barker Road. Common in China; also found in Japan, but not previously re- corded from Hongkong.

Acalypha australis, Linn.-Found in the Albany Nursery. Frequently met with in China but not hitherto in Hongkong. Also known from Japan.

Burmannia Wallichii, Hook. f.-Found in Hongkong 50 years ago, but not again until this year.

Cyanotis Kewensis, C. B. Clarke.-Growing alongside the stream leading from Wong- neichung Gap to Wongneichung Village. Previously collected at Travancore, and in China in Kwangtung and Fokien.

Pandanus forceps, Martelli.-Discovered on a hill north of Kowloon Tong. Only previously known from a few drupes from which the species was described.

Lemna polyrhiza, Linn.-Collected in swamps at So Kun Po.. Found in the warm and temperate regions of the old world, and in the Northern United States to Venezuela and Cuba. Recorded from Hongkong for the first time.

Cyathea spinulosa, Wall.-Several plants found by Mr. Dess on the north side of Lantao in a ravine above Tung Chung. An interesting addition to the tree ferns of the Colony. Known from India and Japan, and recently collected by Staff-Surgeen C. G. MATTHEW, R.N., up the Lien Chau River, in Kwangtung.

Appendix M.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.

NUMBER AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS.

1. The number of Government and Grant Schools (including Queen's College) is 73 as compared with 79 in 1907. One Government school, at Uen-Long, N.T., was closed early in the year owing to the poor attendance and 4 Grant Schools were also closed. Of these two were closed voluntarily by the managers and two were closed as inefficient. the Grant Schools closed were Vernacular Lower Grade Schools.

All

2. The Upper Grade Schools (with a staff competent to give instruction in all the subjects of Standard VII) are 23 in number and the Lower Grade Schools under native management number 50. The Lower Grade Anglo-Chinese* Grant Schools have not proved a success and only one now remains on the Grant List.

3. The total Average Attendance at Government and Grant Schools (including Queen's College) was 6,178 as against 5,924 in 1907. Of these 1,340 were in Government and 3,927 in Grant Schools. The larger attendance at the Government District Schools and at the Ellis Kadoorie Anglo-Chinese Grant School is responsible for the general increase in the average attendance during the year (shewn in Table III). The decrease in the actual number of schools as compared with 1907 therefore merely indicates that inefficient schools are disappearing while the efficient ones are growing rapidly. The Anglo-Chinese schools in particular shew a marked improvement in attendance. In 1907, 3,569 pupils received instruction in English. This number rose to 4,029 in the year under review. Pupils receiving instruction in the Vernacular have decreased from 2,355 in 1907 to 2,149 last year. The proportion of boys to girls is 3,640 boys to 2,538 girls a slight increase in the number of girls as compared with 1907. The attendance suffered owing to a severe outbreak of Plague in the early summer otherwise the figures would have shewn a very much larger increase over those of 1907. Table II shews that while the number of pupils receiving an education in English has nearly doubled within recent years, those receiving a vernacular education are stationary. When the average cost per unit under instruction is considered, this point should be borne in mind, the difference between the educational value of the two classes of schools being at least as great as the corresponding difference between English Public and County Council schools. The average amount of the Educational Vote for the past few years is moreover swollen by the amount spent on the Technical Institute. Conclusions should be drawn from Table IV only with great caution.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

4. The revenue derived from School Fees amounted in 1908 to $58,534 as compared with $18,780 in 1907. To this amnouut the Education Department (including the Technical Institute $3,742) contributed $27,409 and Queen's College $31,125. The fees collected by the Education Department increased by $6,443 (including an increase of $1,557 in the fees of the Technical Institute) and those of Queen's College by $667 during the year. The increase is chiefly due to the larger attendance at the District Schools and also to the raising of the fees at the Belilios Public School, Vernacular Side, from 25 to 50 cents per mensem early in the year. The fees at the Technical Institute were raised at the beginning of the Winter Session (October 1908) from $4 to $6 per mensem. The fees show an increase at all schools excepting (i) the Anglo-Indiant School where Plague in the neighbourhood of the school interfered with the attendance, (ii) Tanglungchau which was absorbed by Wantsai District School in August, and (iii) Aberdeen School where the attendance has been falling off for some time past for no assignable reason.

5. The expenditure on Education including Queen's College and the Technical Institute amounted to $205,874.74 or 3'41% of the total ordinary Revenue of the Colony as compared with an expenditure of $184,028 or 2.85% of the total ordinary Revenue of the Colony in 1907.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

6. A list of Government Schools with the usual statistics is given in Table I.

7. The average attendance of pupils in Government Schools (excluding Queen's Col- lege) was 1,340 as compared with 1,153 in 1907. There were 945 boys and 395 girls in

22

* The term "Anglo-Chinese means a school for Chinese in which the medium of instruction is English.

"Anglo-Indian " is similarly employe 1.

}

M 2

attendance at Government Schools and of these 1,207 were in the Upper Grade and 133 in the Lower Grade. The Upper Grade shows an increase of 16.5% and the Lower Grade an increase of 13·67 %.

8. The cost of each pupil to Government ranges from $5.24 at Belilios Public School Vernacular Side to $166.00 at Victoria British School. At the three District Upper Grade Schools the cost per pupil is $18.66 as compared with $43.46 at Queen's College. There are now two European masters at both Yaumati and Saiyingpun District Schools.

9. The Uen-Long Lower Grade District School was closed early in the year owing to its lack of patronage. Tanglungchau School was absorbed by Wantsai District School in August, when the extensions to the buildings begun early in the year were completed, and a new lower grade school was opened as a temporary measure at Cheung Chau Island in response to repeated and largely signed petitions from the inhabitants. This school has maintained an average attendance of 28.17 since it was opened in June and in consequence the Government has agreed to keep the school open for another year, at the end of which time it will be possible to gauge whether it should be permanently retained or not.

10. Kowloon British School.-The attendance is slightly lower than in 1907 being 46.28 as compared with 47 in 1907. The average cost per pupil is $143.15 as compared with $115.58 in 1907. An outbreak of measles reduced the attendance early in the year and the general trade depression and the consequent withdrawal of children whose parents could no longer find employment in the Colony kept the numbers down throughout the remainder of the year. A much needed playground has been temporarily secured thanks to the Vestry of St. Andrew's Church which has placed the portion of land between the school and the Church at the disposal of the school authorities for one year.

11. Victoria British School.-As at Kowloon British School and for almost identical reasons the average attendance at this school dropped from 44 in 1907 to 41 last year. The cost per pupil has in consequence risen to $166 as compared with $124 in 1907.

One candidate for the Preliminary Oxford Local Examination was presented in July, 1908, but failed. The results for the past 3 years are:-

1906, 1907, 1908,

Entries.

1

4 1

Passes.

1

4 0

The school buildings have been improved during the year by the addition of a storey to the headmaster's quarters. A new playground has also been made below the school. No cases of Malaria have been reported during the year. The Cadet Corps numbered 28 in 1908 as compared with 16 in 1907. Boys from other schools are now eligible for admission, and there are at present Cadets representing the Garrison School and St. Joseph's College. The Cadets attended camp in November and spent a week of strenuous useful work at Stonecutters' Island.

12. Belilios Public School, Anglo-Chinese Side.--The re-arrangement of the classes has proved a marked success and has led to very much better results in the school work. The average attendance is 106 as compared with 108 in 1907. The free scholars have done. very good work as a whole. Unfortunately a number of the more promising ones have been withdrawn as they were required in their homes.

The District Schools, Upper Grade.

13. The three Upper Grade schools are Yaninati, Saiyingpun and Wantsai District Schools. They are intended as preparatory schools for Queen's College and as such have no upper school. The classes are numbered IV to VIII. Promotion from Class IV is made to Class III at Queen's College and all boys who obtain 50% of marks at the annual examination are entitled to admission to Queen's College where the ordinary admission is now by competitive examination. The average attendance at all these schools has increased as the following figures chew :-

Average Attendance.

Yaumati, Saiyingpun,

Wantsai,

1

1907.

1908.

185

225

204

297

210

249

The fees also shew an increase of $3,957 for the three schools to which Saiyingpun School aone contributed $2,208.

M 3

14. The large increase in numbers during the past three years made it necessary to enlarge the school premises of two of the schools, Saiyingpun and Wantsai. The additions which consisted of a second storey containing three class rooms at Saiyingpun School and three new class rooms and an office for the headmaster at Wantsai were begun early in the year and finished in August. Meanwhile it was found that the addition of three school rooms at Saiyingpun School would not suffice for the increasing number of pupils. Furthermore it had been decided to reduce the numbers at Queen's College from 1,100 to 1,000. Extra accommodation at one or other of the District Schools was therefore essential and the Government decided to add two more school rooms to the Saiyingpun building. The school premises had to be vacated for four months. They were re-occupied in September and the final additions were completed in October. Saiyingpun School can now accommodate 520 boys and Wantsai School 443.

Twenty-nine boys were admitted from these schools to Queen's College this year as compared with 33 in 1907. This number includes four free scholars selected by com- petition between the top boys of the three District Schools. The four free scholars selected all came from Yaumati School last year. The third boy on the list, a Saiyingpun boy, was unfortunately unable to accept a free scholarship which therefore went to the fifth, a boy who only one year previously had obtained a free scholarship from Tai Po Lower Grade District School to Yaumati.

These have

All three schools have been provided with playgrounds during the

year. become a necessity owing to the increasing interest taken by the boys in sports and more especially in football. There is also a gymnasium at Wantsai School which is fitted up with parallel bars and rings. The apparatus is not complete.

The District Schools, Lower Grade.

15. The Anglo-Indian School. The school again underwent a change owing to the transfer of the headmaster Mr. Mohamed Akbar to another branch of the Government service. Mr. Bishen Singh succeeded him. It is a matter of regret that the average attendance shews no signs of improving. Plague in the vicinity of the school accounted for the

poor attendance during the summer months but even after the temporary transfer of the school in July to the Belilios Reformatory, a healthy building in a good locality, the numbers did not improve to an appreciable extent. The average attendance is 27 for 1908 as compared with 34 in 1907. The grant of a free scholarship to Queen's College tenable for four years has so far also failed to attract more pupils to the school.

Anglo-Chinese Schools, Lower Grade.

16. There are four of these schools, one at Aberdeen in Hongkong, one in the island of Cheung Chau and two on the mainland (at Tai Po and at Ping Shan). The attendance shews an improvement for the year excepting at Aberdeen where the numbers fell from 21 to 13. The new school at Cheung Chau has the best average attendance namely 28. The Lower Grade Schools suffer from the fact that the masters have no facility for improving their knowledge either of English or of methods of instruction. In Hongkong Chinese masters can improve themselves by taking courses at the Technical Institute in a large variety of subjects which are of practical utility to them, chief among which is the English course for masters. Attendance at this class is compulsory in the case of all Assist- ant masters in or below Grade III.

Vernacular School.

17. Belilios Public Girls' School.--This school still continues to increase in popularity. The average attendance was 243 as compared with 237 in 1907 and this in spite of the fact that the school fees were raised early in the year from 25 cents to 50 cents per mensem. The total fees collected were $1,363 as against $763 in 1907. It is satisfactory to note that a gradual rapprochement between this division and the Anglo-Chinese Division is being effected, due mainly to the introduction of Chinese as a compulsory subject in the latter division. Five girls were admitted from the Vernacular to the Anglo-Chinese Division at the end of the year as against four in 1907. This is the only Government Vernacular School, viz., school in which the medium of instruction is Chinese.

1

M 4

GRANT SCHOOLS (vide Table III.)

English Schools (Non-Chinese).

18. There are nine of these with a total average attendance of 1,140 as against 1,059 in 1907. Four schools, St. Joseph's, the Italian Convent, the Victoria Anglo-Portuguese School and the Diocesan Boys' School earned the full grant of 35/- per caput reckoning by the average attendance, the remainder, excepting the French Convent which obtained the lowest grant, earned a grant at the rate of 30/-. The numbers have increased considerably during the year both at St. Joseph's and at the Diocesan Boys' School.

Anglo-Chinese Schools.

19. There are two of these schools. One, the Ellis Kadoorie (Upper Grade) school, has now an average attendance of 500 and has an English staff of 5, the other-St Stephen's-a lower grade school has a purely Chinese staff. The Ellis Kadoorie School was returned as thoroughly efficient for the first time this year.

Vernacular Schools.

20. The number of schools in the A Class (i.e., earning a grant of $7 or over) has increased considerably. Nine Boys' and six Girls' Schools are now in Class A as compared with four Boys' and three Girls' Schools in 1907. The general standard of efficiency of these schools continues to improve now that the inefficient ones have been eliminated.

21. One new Grant School (for Hakka boys) was opened during the year at Kow- loon City. It is under the management of the Basel Mission. During the year four vernacular schools were closed. Two of these, both girls' schools, were closed by the management as they were not working satisfactorily. Two schools, one for boys and the other for girls, were closed as inefficient under Section 29 of the Grant Code, having been returned as inefficient for two years in succession.

GENERAL.

Private Schools.

22. Table II shews that while the number of pupils receiving a western education in the Vernacular is practically the same as in 1907 the number receiving instruction in English has considerably decreased. The somewhat noticeable decrease in the numbers at private schools where English is taught is accounted for by the fact that the Chinese have begun to realize that the Government and Grant-in-Aid English teaching schools are very much more efficient than the private schools and they therefore patronize the latter very much more than they did formerly. This is borne out by the large increase in the attendance at the Government and Grant-in-Aid Schools which give instruction in English.

23. Tabulated Results of Passes in Hongkong at the Oxford Local Examinations

for 1908.

4

1200 HO COD

3

5

6

7

Schools.

Diocesan Boys', Diocesan Girls', St. Joseph's College, Queen's College,..... St. Stephen's Boys', St. Stephen's Girls', Private Tuition,.

...

4

забранет

5

1

1

3

...

1

1

WN AN

:-

Note.-F. Lopez, a St. Joseph's Senior, got Distinction in Spanish.

...

1

4123

7

18

3

14

31

3

12

1

9

1

M 5

Scholarships.

24. Free scholarships are granted annually by Government,

(a.) to encourage pupils from the Vernacular Grant-in-Aid Schools, both boys and girls, to continue their studies and acquire a knowledge of English at the Anglo-Chinese Government Schools,

(b.) to enable pupils from Lower Grade Government Anglo-Chinese Schools throughout the Colony to continue their studies in the Upper Grade Government Anglo-Chinese Schools, and also pupils from the latter at Queen's College, and

(c.) to encourage pupils in the junior classes at the Belilios Public Girls' School to remain long enough at school to complete their English education. In the ordinary course they are usually withdrawn at the age of 16 just at a time when they are acquiring a useful knowledge of English.

In 1908, 29 scholarships were renewed and 19 new ones granted. Of the scholarships renewed 24 were granted to boys and 5 to girls. Of the 19 new scholarships 14 went to boys and 5 to girls.

(a.) The six scholarships granted annually to Vernacular Grant Boys' Schools tenable at the Upper Grade Government District Schools were awarded as a result of a competitive examination for boys selected from all the nine "A" Class schools, and three scholarships to the Belilios Public School Anglo-Chinese Side were awarded to pupils from the Vernacular Girls' Schools.

(b.) Three scholarships tenable at Yaumati and Wantsai Upper Grade Government District Schools were awarded to pupils from Aberdeen, Tai Po, and Ping Shan Lower Grade Government District Schools, and four scholarships tenable at Queen's College were awarded to pupils from the Upper Grade Government District Schools as the result of an examination held by the Headmaster of Queen's College. All the scholars selected came from Yaumati School. One new scholarship tenable at Queen's College for four years was granted to the top boy of the Anglo-Indian School.

(c.) At the Belilios Public School Anglo-Chinese Side one new scholarship tenable for four years and one for one year were granted and one scholarship tenable for one year was converted into a four years scholarship.

Visual Instruction.

25. The series of lectures prepared by Mr. H. J. MacKinder, M.A., were taken at the Victoria School, Belilios Public School, at the Ellis Kadoorie School, and also at several private schools in the Colony, during the year. No lectures were delivered at the remaining English Schools as they had already taken the course twice. It is to be hoped that the new series, at present in course of preparation, will be ready shortly.

Hygiene.

26. Elementary Hygiene is taught in Standards IV and V and Advanced Hygiene in VI and VII at all schools under the Education Department. All the English and Anglo- Chinese Schools excepting Kowloon and Victoria British Schools entered teams for the Annual Team Competition in Elementary Hygiene and the results were with few exceptions satisfactory. The Ellis Kadoorie School and the Victoria Anglo-Portuguese School were bracketed first, followed by the Diocesan Boys' School a close third. Seven schools obtained over 50% of marks and six under 50%. Papers in the advanced course were set to eleven schools. The results on the whole might have been better.

The upper standards of all English and Anglo-Chinese schools, including Kowloon, British School and Victoria British School, were set a paper in Advanced Hygiene. The results were disappointing. More attention will have to be devoted to the advanced course. in the new year.

The Vernacular Grant Schools were examined orally. In almost all schools the subject had been carefully studied and if only children will bear in mind what they have learnt when they leave school the teaching of this subject should materially assist in securing the co-operation of the Chinese in the matter of sanitation in the Colony."

M 6

Empire Day.

27. Victoria Day as it is called by local Ordinance was celebrated by a picnic kindly given by the Governor to the pupils of the two British Schools, 100 in all, during which His Excellency delivered a short address on the British Empire and on the duties and responsibilities of all British subjects.

The Technical Institute.

28. Appendix A contains the Report of the Director together with Tables shewing the results of the certificate examination and a statement of the revenue and expenditure of the Institute.

Education Department,

27th March, 1909.

TABLES.

I.-Government Schools.

II. Educational Chart.

E. D. C. Wolfe,

Inspector of Schools.

III-Annual Grant List.

IV.-Expenditure, Revenue, and Average of Pupils under instruction of the Education

Department for the years 1899 to 1908.

APPENDICES.

A.-Report of the Director, Hongkong Technical Institute.

B.-Summary of speeches made by the Governor at the Annual Prize Distributions.

No.

ture

Table I.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.—[The figur

STAFF,

English. Anglo-Chine-c.

Vernacular.

Number of Standards, Classes or Forms.

NI of t

D

1

Kowloon British School-Chi, 'ren of

Parentage. Boys under thireen and

ropean British ris,

4

Victoria British School-Children of European British

Parentage. Girls under thirteen and Boys,

3

Behlios Public School-English ar

Boys under twelve and Girls,

Anglo-Chinese Side.

5

4 Saiying pua Anglo-Chinese School toys),

5

Yaumati

do.

do

6

Wantsai

do.

7

Auglo-Indian School (Boys),,

8 Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese Schoo

:

6

and Infant Class

sc

6

and Infant Class

1

2

-

2

1 (Needlework).

2

1 and 2 Tempo-

3

rary

Masters.

2

4

8

2

1

1

1

2

5

1

2

6

2

5

I

9

Tanglungchau

do.

1

10

Ven Long

do.

do.

}

11

Tai Po

da.

do.

1

12 | Ping Shar

do.

do.'

#

13

Belilios Public School-(Vernacula Sile).

1

3 Masters

3 Mistresses.

3 Pupil Teachers.

I Needlework Teacher."

14 Cheung Chau Anglo-Chinese School (ays;

Note.--The schools italicised are Lowerade, the rest

Schools.

1

1

:

:

:

31

:

2

NO NO

I

20

2122

2

རཱ

3

2

心心

1

1:

* Ind

The figures in Red are those for last year.]

Ditto for

ber of

ses or

Number Maximum Average dards, of School Monthly

At- Days. Enrolment. tendance.

Rate of Fees.

Gross Cost.

Fees Collected,

Net Cost to each unit in

Govern-

ment.

Average Attendance.

REMARKS.

rms.

C.

$ C.

C.

$

C.

186

88

47

6,925.43

1,493.00

5,432.43

115.58

6

202

63

46

$2 to $5

8,300.49 1,715.50

6,584.99

143.15

fant Class

177

71

44

6,628.84

1,167.50

5,461.34

124.12

6

201

59

41

$2 to $5

8,125.80

1,307.50

6,818.30

166.30

fant Class

197

204

108

8

201

133

107

7,606.62 50c. to$1.50 8,835.56

1,479.00 6,127.62

56.73

1,646.00

7,189.56

67.19

1911

383

204

1981

381

297

$2.00

6,642.95 12,428.73

4,496.00

2,146.95

10.52

6,704.00

5,724.73

19.27

1961

213

185

5

194

278

225

$2.00

10,499.08 4,079.00 6,420.08

10,514.37

34.70

4,977.00 5,537.37

24.61

230

290

210

10

5

239

304

249

$2.00

6,455.56 7,994.31

4,176.00 2.279.56

5,027.00

10.85

2.967.31

11.91

206

50

34

223

43

ོ་བ

1,637.61

504.00 1,133.61

33.34

27

50c. to $1.50

1,796.78

389.50

1,407.28

52.12

216

23

21

776.06

99.50

676.56

32.21

2

2091

17

13

50 cents.

789.75

66.25

723.50

55,65

191

55

30

810.52

325.00

485.52

16.18

123

:

:

37

29

$1.00

678.72

183.50

495.22

17.07

2021/

23

10

1,322.25

59.00

1,263.25

126.32

:

26.50

4.50

Removed to Wantsai Anglo-Chinese School in August, 1908.

Closed at end of Janu-

ary, 1908.

2021

2

205

38938

14

693.57

87.00

606.57

46.66

26

18

50 cents.

753.05

110.50

642,55

35.69

209

13

3

2021

32

9

615.19

52.00

563.19

62.57

21

18

50 cents.

705.49

87.75

617.74

34.32

243

470

237

7

234

361

243

50 cents.

2,342.58 763.50 1,579.08

2,638.80 1,363.50 1,275.30

6,66

5.24

1

1261/

35

28

50 cents.

285.25

84.00

201.25

7.18 Opened in July, 1908.

1,922

1,153

1,758

1,341

52,956.26 18,780.50 34,175,76 63,847.10 23,666.50 40,185.10

29.66

29.96

* Indian.

Asdia

M 7-

Number of

Pupils (Average

Attendance).

Table II.

CHART.

1899. 1900. | 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. | 1905. | 1906. 1907. 1908.

4,000

3,900

3,800

3.700

3,600

3,500

ļ

3,400

3,300

3,200

3,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

2,600

2,500

2,400

2,300

2,200

2,100

2149

2,000

1,900

1,800

1,700

1,600

1,500

1503

1,400

1,300

1,200

1,100

1,000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

4029

3723

RED Line

BLACK Line

DOTTED RED Line

-Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction in English (with Queen's College). -Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction in the Vernacular.

=Private Schools, giving instruction in English (Max. monthly enrolment).

DOTTED BLACK Line=Private Schools, giving instruction in the Vernacular (Max. monthly enrolment).

!

1

M 11

TABLE III.

ANNUAL GRANT LIST.

DESCRIPTION.

No.

Name and Nature.

Mission.

}

St. Joseph's College, (B.)

F

2

Italian Convent, (G.) *

French Convent. (G.)

Victoria Anglo-Portuguese School, (M.) *.

Bridges Street. (G.) *

School (B.) **

Diocesan Girls,

Do.

St. Mary's, (G.) *

13

St. Francis, (M.)

Standards.

Number of

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

Number

Maximum

of

School

days.

Monthly Eurolment.

Attendance.

Average

Rate

GRANT.

PRINCIPAL GRANT.

S

d.

ENGLISH

SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade (Code Sec 34 ii.).

Non-Chinese.

Grant in

aid of

Rent.

RE

Total

R. C. M.

241

413

336.94

35/- 58)

6,120

206

260

>>

218.41 35/- 32

222

72

י,

55.91 25|-

69 17

224

78

""

61.71

107

35:-

208

38

29.07

30/-

19

43 12

10

400

3.967

6,120

3,967

66

725

723

1,121

360

1,481

Thoroughly efficien "Thoroughly efficien Last year's Grant at "Thoroughly efficient

453

453

C. of E.

2075

87

72.00 300

10

1,121

320

1,441

237

281

242.46 35-

421

4,682

4,682

R. C. M.

"Thoroughly efficien

200

128

96.65

30/-:

141 19

1,505

1,505

11

207

34

27.04 30

40

421

421

1,394

1,140.19

20,115

680

20,795

Ellis Kadooric School, (B.)

K

| Secular. | 9 |

228 |

658

Anglo-Chinesi.

1 498.22 | 30- | 77 | 6 | 7 | 7,756 |

Lower Grade (Code Sec 34 1.).

Anglo-Chines.

St. Stephen's, ! B.) "

| C. M. S.] + [

2313 |

221

139.63 | 7 |

7,756 | “Thoroughly efficien

977

977

Anglo-Chinese

Ellis Kadoncic School, (B.)

Sceulat. 9 1

228 |

658

498.22 | 30= | 77 | 6 | 7 | 7,756 |

Lower Grado (Code Sec 34 i.).

Anglo-Chines?,

St. Stephen's, (B.)

| ..... C. M. S. [

231 |

221

139.63 | 7

977

:

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS

Upper Grade (Code Sec. 35 ii.)

7,756 ¦ » Thoonghop a thien

977 |

17

Berlin Founding House, (G.)

Ber. M.

230

42

39.60 17/6

4

382

382

18

Fairlea School. (G.)

C'. M. S.

218

63

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage, ((.)

52.43 17/6

306

506

*

233

70

59.37 17/6

573

573

20

Training Bome for Girls, (G.) * *

L. M. S.

214

337

82,86 20/-

363

363

31

High Street

{G.)

BM

2015

4

83

30./1 176

189

189

"Thoroughly eflieren Last year's Grant at a

295

281.87

2,313

2,313

Lower Grade (Code Sec. 35 i.).

21

Italian Convent, (G.)

*

R. C. M.

267

83

73.49

514

514

22

Bridges Street, ((.) *

252

72

༥+

46.47

325

325

24

Holy Infancy, (M.)

252

62

ין

46.78

421

421

25

Hunghom, (G.)

"Thoroughly efficient

254

65

41.11

370

370

Do.

26

Yaumati, (G.)

253

53.19

372

5

372

Shaukiwan, (G.)

253

33.14

282

282

Aberdeen, (M.)

254

48

26.03

183

183

""

29

No. 109 Second Street, (B.)

*

L. M. S.

205.

81

56.99

513

80

593

30

No. 22 Taipingshan, (G.)

2145

53

37.86

227

136

363

31

N.. 5 Clarence Terrace, (B.)

236

14

27.42

192

120

312

32

No. 370 Queen's Road West, (G.)

1979

30

17.39

87

112

199

· Inefficient.

Reatt

No. 199 Queen's Road East, (G.)

230

69

51.20

461

124

[

585

Thoroughly efficiens

34

No 154 Reclamation Street, Yaumati, (B.)

227

92

41.91

293

65

358

Last year's Grant at

No. 28 d'Aguilar Street, (G.) *

212

47

31.74

222

160

382

Last year's Grant at

36

Want an Chapel, (B.)

202

77

53.12

374

374

Last year's Grant at

37

Hospital Chapel, (B.)

201

71

56.55

338

338

No. 8 Macdonnell Road, (C.) Hahom, (B.).

2335

31

20.69

121

80

08

204

Last year's Grant at There are no pupil-

Bridges Spect, (B.)

*

LiQueen's Road West, (B.) Tanghungebaut Chapel, (B.))

No. 171 Portland Street, (B.) No. 20 x Aberdeen Street, ({x.)

Tanglungehan Chapel, (G.)

Wani-ai Chapel. (G.)

>hupe M

212

53

24.93

150

150

י

220!

75

17.91

09/

!

512

208.

48

32.79

197

197

""

243

48

34.27

206

61

270

[

No pupils in Standar 1

220

68

41.25

289

160

119

2023

55

38.80

272

272

Last year

י,

206

99

66.15

163

163

A. B. M.

220

96

66.30

398

398

B. M.

282

102

85.01

590

599

**232

70

50.01

350

350

92

-224′′

85

58 52

4W

410

• Thoroughly othe

C. M. S.

229

60

5369

178

244

722

Thoroughly fliesen

{

250

106

73.67

516

416

932

Last vem

236

14

"y

27.42

42

No. 370 Queen's Road West, (G.)

"

197

"

30

17.39

༦༩ ༤] ༤

T

227

136

363

192

120

312

87

112

199

No. 199 Queen's Road East. (G.)

230

63

51.20

No. 154 Reclamation Street, Yaumati, (B.) No. 28 d'Aguilar Street, (G.)

461

124

585

227

92

41.91

293

65

358

*

212

47

31.74

222

160

382

36

Wantsai Chapel, (BJ)

202

י,

77

53.42

374

37

Hospital Chapel, (B) -

374

201

"

74

56.55

338

ད་

No. 81 Macdoneli Road, (G.) * Hunghom, (B)

338

238,

31

>>

20.69

124

80

204

-K

242

Incilictout.

Thoroughly efficien Last year's Grant at Last year's Grant at Last year's Grant at Last year'- Grant at z There are no papils m

53

">

24.93

Road West, (B.)

150

150

2995

75

Fanghungelan Chapel, (B.)

47.94

996

512

208.

48

32.79

Wantai Chapel. (G.)

No. 171 Porʻland Street, (B.) No, 20、 Abadeen Street, (Gx.) Tanglongehan Chapel, (G.)

dges Snect. (B.)

-huipo 4 M.)

33

197

197

*

243

48

34.27

24

206

64

270

No pupils in Standard !

220

68

11.25

289

160

449

202!

55

38.80

272

272

'Last vi

Grant at 8

206

99

66.15

463

463

A. B. M.

220

96

66.80

398

398

B. M.

232

102

85.61

599

599

232

ΤΟ

50.01

350

350

224

-85

58 52

440

110

No

No. 36

M.

229

68-

53 69

478

241

722

250

106

78.67

516

416

932

No. 291

Vœux Road West, (G.)

253

53.

82.73

196

136

382

Yaumati

235

52

35.53

213

213

559

Do.,

(G)

285

71

41.83

29,

298

60

No 282 Holly wood Roa 1, (G.)

*

241

67

41.27

289

289

61

No, 22 Pokłulam Road, (G.)

Last yea

•Thoroughly adherent “Thoroughly offìeis at.

Last year

Grant ac

· Last year » Grant at Thoroughly efficient

- Grant at S

254

62

37.27

221

101

328

62

Shaukiyan, (G)

242

40

30.2

212

69

281

: Last year

ཁ་་

63

Stanley, (M.)

252

**

37

25.51

153

153

61

No. 265 Que-m's Road West, (B.)

*

R. M.

221

116

72.91

510

272

782

68

No. 5 Elgin Street, (G.)

W. M.

241

55

34.16

239

192

431

69

No. 35 Pottinger Street. (G.) **

¦ Last year's Giant at

233

70

>>

54.38

489

200

689

70

Kowloon City, (G.) *

· Thoroughly efficient

C. M. S.

251

29

17 22

103

90

193

72

No. 11 Station Street, Mongkok, (B.) Kowloor City, (B.)

Secular.

226

48

35.6F

249

61

313

B. M.

227

101

6661

166

56

522

Thoroughly thereat, Thoroughly efficient

B

2,826

1,914.00

13,518

3,120

16,668

59

(1908.) Total Number of Schools.

65

(1907.)

5,891 3,926.91

5,015

3,779.88

44,709

37,842

3,500

48,509

4,114 41,956

NOTE. R. C. M.=Roman Catholic Mission. ('. of E.=Church of England.

C. M. S. Church Missionary Society. Ber. M.=Berlin Missiou.

1. M. S. London Missionary Society.

L.

A. B. M.=American Board Mission.

Rh. M. S.

R. M.

Rhenish Missionary Society

Basel Mission.

W. M.

R

G

M

Wesleyan Mission,

=Boys.

Girls.

Mixed.

*

School year ends 30th June, 1908.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of Is. 1147

* *

School year ends 31st December, 1908.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of 1-

yje.

No. 6 Close 1.

12

Do.

73

Do.

"}

15 Do

""

41

Do.

"

54 Do

军事

56 Do.

74 Opened in January

M 11

TABLE III.

ANNUAL GRANT LIST.

IPTION.

HTC.

Mission.

Standards.

Number of

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

Number

Maximum

of

School

days.

Monthly Eurolment.

baby

Attendance.

GRANT

FRINCIPAL GRANT.

Rate

Grant in

aid of

REMARKS

Total

Rent.

s .

d.

ENGLISH

SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade (Code Sec 34 ii.).

Non-Chinese..

R. C. M.

241

413

336.91 35j- 58) 12

6,120

6,120

206

260

218.41

35/- 32

3,967

3,967

222

72

53.91

25|-

17 9

725

725

·hool, (M.)

224

61.71

35;-

107 19

10

1,121

360

1,481

46

208

38

29.07

30|-- .

+9

"Thoroughly efficient. "Thoroughly efficient." Last year's Grant at 30'-, "Thoroughly efficient,`

"

3 years running. 5 years running.

3 years running.

12

453

453

C. of E.

207

87

72.00

30

18

,121

320

1,441

237

281

212.46 35-

421

4,682

4,682

R. C. M.

200

"Thoroughly efficient."

128

96.65

30;-

141

1,505

5 years running.

""

2071

34

27.01 30

4

421

1,505

421

1,394

1.110.19

(20,115

680

20,795

Anglo-Chinesi.

| Secular. | 9 |

228 |

658

498.22 | 30'- | 77 | 6 | 7 | 7,756 |

! 7,756 "Thoroughly efficient."

Lower Grade (Code Sec 34 i.). Anglo-Chinese.

C. M. S. T

2313 |

221

139.63 7 1

་་་་、

977

977

E

Appendix N.

REPORT ON QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

1. The average daily attendance was 911 the scholars enrolled during the year num- bered 1,270. The corresponding figures for 1907 were 991 and 1,401 respectively. The difference is mainly due to a reduction in the size of classes, and in a lesser degree, to the introduction of an age limit. Henceforward, no boy over 15 years of age will be admitted to Class VI: 20 is the limit of age for Class I.

2. More stringent rules with regard to leave are being gradually introduced.

3. School was in session on 224 instead of 231 days. The typhoon which passed over the Colony in the night between 27th and 28th July unroofed the central part of the Hall, and so damaged the West wing, that it was deemed advisable to end the term, and hand the building over to the Public Works Department for immediate attention. The Summer Vacation accordingly began on 31st July, eight days earlier than had been originally arranged, and continued until the 8th September inclusive.

4. A revised list of School Holidays was approved by His Excellency the Governor. The Summer Vacation has been extended a week, and is now 38 instead of 31 days. Four whole-day holidays have been abolished, so that the nett increase is one of 3 days. The change is one that is much appreciated both by Staff and students.

5. The total gross expenditure, including a bonus of $600 for Colloquial Cantonese to Mr. de Martin, was $70,761, or $9,766 more than in 1907, aud attributable to the low market rate of the dollar during the year.

6. The revenue of this Establishment, in spite of reduced numbers, shows an increase of $667 over that of 1907. Fees contribute 44%, and the Government 56% of the total cost of maintenance.

7. The general health of our scholars has been good. 17 boys have been off the Roll, for varying periods, on account of Scabies, and 22 for Beri-beri. Pursuant to Government orders, any boys suspected of eye-trouble have been sent to the Tung Wa Hospital for report. 11 cases were returned as suffering from Trachoma in a mild form, and underwent treatment extending from 1 to 6 months; 4 cases were returned as Trachoma in a vi- rulent form, and 3 as not Trachoma. Boys suffering from the mild form of this disease, provided they submit to treatment, are allowed to attend School: the virulent cases are sent away until cured. Examination and treatment of Trachoma at the Tung Wa. Hospital are free of charge. As recommended by the Notification, our floors are regularly mopped with a weak solution of Jeyes' Fluid to lay dust and destroy germs.

8. At the last Oxford Local Examination our candidates obtained 12 certificates, the same number as in 1906. The percentage of passes was: Seniors 30%, Juniors 33% and Preliminaries 67%. One of our Junior Candidates was the only Junior in the Far East to pass in Higher Mathematics. The Oxford Delegates are now prepared to examine Senior Candidates in Classical Chinese, and a pass in this subject, taken in conjunction with several other subjects, will exempt such a candidate from Responsions. They are also prepared to examine Preliminary, Junior and Senior Candidates in Modern Chinese. This extension of the curriculum for Chinese students ought to give them a larger chance of success in the future, enabling them to compete on more level terms with boys in England.

9. Class VII, the last remnant of the Preparatory School, was abolished in 1907. The use of slates in the Lower School was also abandoned towards the end of the year.

10. The Results of the Annual Examination, for Prizes and Promotion, held by me under Standing Orders from the Governing Body, are as under :-

Upper School, Lower School,.

Total.....

% passed.

.319 boys examined, 284 or 89

..514

470

91

""

19

""

...833

**

754 90.5%

""

17

1)

11. With the exception of Classes I B, IC and IV E, the total results, although not equal to those of last year, are nevertheless highly satisfactory. They are better than those of 1905 and 1906. The English subjects of Reading, Conversation, Dictation, Grammar, Composition and History, in the higher sections of each class, show evidence of careful teaching, and of equally careful attention on the part of the boys; the lower sections. reach a satisfactory level. Increased attention is being given to the study of Phonetics, especially in the Lower School, in order to enable boys to thoroughly master the compara- tively few new sounds which are necessary to a correct pronunciation of English, before

N 2

they reach the higher classes. In Geography, questions were set that called for an applica- tion rather than for an enumeration of geographical facts: the results were most gratifying. Mathematics in I A and throughout Class III are good. Elementary Algebra and Geome- trical Drawing in Class IV gave excellent results. Mensuration, in all sections of Class II, attained a high standard; in Class I this subject was poor. The General Intelligence Paper set to Class I was well answered by the A section only. Hygiene throughout was more than satisfactory. Non-Chinese boys, in the Upper School, take Physiology and Elementary Science, and are divided into two sections. The results can only be described as fair.

12. Optional Classes vary considerably from year to year. This year, the two classes for Model and Freehand only comprised four students each. All passed creditably in Free- hand; one boy failed in Model, the test being about equal to that of the Junior Oxford Local. Boys taking Trigonometry were divided into three sections. The single Senior did creditably, gaining 88%; 2 Juniors, out of 9, failed; and 5 beginners all

got through. The percentage for the entire class works out at 87%, which is highly commnendable.

13. The Queen's College Team of 10 for the Annual Hygiene Competition was placed fourth.

14. The Normal Master, Mr. Tanner, reports that the Articled and Acting Pupil Teachers under his charge show the greatest eagerness in their work, and I am able to endorse this myself. The training of Pupil Teachers, however, is much hampered by the constant unavoidable changes, and the question of establishing a Normal School for the training of teachers for the whole Education Department, is now under the consideration of the Government, in view, moreover, of the demand for teachers with a working knowledge of English throughout China.

15. In Vernacular School, 473 boys, in 15 sections and 5 classes, were examined: 90% passed. Of these, 172 in 6 sections, are in the 5th or highest class; 96, in 3 sections, are in the 4th Class; 105, in 3 sections, are in the 3rd Class; 70, in 2 sections, are in the 2nd Class; and 30, in a single section, are in the 1st or lowest Class. The proportion of boys in the highest vernacular class steadily increases, year by year, and is gratifying testimony to the splendid efficiency of this side of our work. His Excellency the Junior Amban of Tibet, and the Consul General for China in Australia and New Zealand-both of whom are distinguished old pupils of this College-visited the school during the year, and quite independently of each other, expressed to me their intense gratification at the res- toration of vernacular studies to our curriculum.

16. During the past year 18 boys obtained employment in different departments of the local government, 23 under the Chinese Imperial Government, 47 in professional and mer- cantile offices, and 74 in posts outside the Colony. These 162 boys are practically all from the Upper School. Two other facts also attest the utility of our work. In September last, examinations were simultaneously held, in Chinese and English, at Pekin, Hankow, Shanghai, Foochow and Canton, for 36 scholarships tenable for 4 years, at the newly established Customs' College in Pekin. There were, in all, several thousand candidates. When the list of successful candidates was published, it was seen that 14 of the 36-or 40% of the list-were Queen's College boys, 13 appearing on this year's roll, while one had left us in September, 1906. This unlooked-for success is one of the most remarkable recommendations we have ever received, and one of which we can feel emphatically proud.. More recently, at an examination of Candidates for prospective Pupil Teacherships under the local Education Department, 5 of the 6 successful competitors were from Queen's College. The drain on our most promising pupils will, it is to be hoped, be less when the proposed University is inaugurated; and Queen's College, therefore, is keenly interested in

its success.

17. The Tennis, Cricket, Football and Bathing Clubs continued a lusty existence. The Reading Club, unhappily, is temporarily discontinued. Gunner White, R.G.A., is a capable and enthusiastic Drill instructor.

18. Tables of statistics are appended.

13th January, 1909.

T. K. DEALY,

Head Master.

N 3

Table I.

ATTENDANCES IN 1908.

Number

Number

Month.

of Scholars.

of

Number of

Áverage Daily Attendances. School Days. Attendance.

Remarks.

January,

1,050

16,994

17

1,000

February,

1,103

8,606

8

1,076

March;

1,097

26,649

26

1,025

April,

1,078

14,152

14

1,011

May,

1,953

23,810

25

952

June,

941

18,956

24

790

July,

925

16,958

20

848

August,

September,

986

15,671

17

922

October,

958

22,826

26

873

November,

908

20,443

24

852

December,

858

18,920

23

823

203,985

224

Total Number of Attendances during 1908,..

203,985

Number of School Days during 1908,

224

Average Daily Attendance during 1908,

911

Total Number of Scholars at this School during 1908,

1,270

Table II.

AVERAGE EXPENSE OF EACH Scholar at Queen's College during 1908.

Expenditure:-

Cash Book as per Estimates,.

Do. Exchange Compensation,

.$ 45,223.44 17,881.20

Do.

Language Bonus,..

Do.

Crown Agents...............

Deduct :-

School Fees,

Refund of Salaries,

Sale of Books,

Average Expense of each Scholar :---

Per Number on Roll,

Per Average Daily Attendance,

.$ 31,073.00 40.16

11.45

600.00 7,056.10

$ 70,761.04

31,124.61

$ 39,636.43

.$31.21 43.51

N 4

Table III.

TABLE SHOWING AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE, EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE FOR THE YEARS 1900 To 1908.

Average

Year.

(Gross.)

Daily Number Expenditure. Total Income. Expenditure. Attend- enrolled.

(Fees, etc.)

(Net.)

ance.

Average Annual Cost of each Scholar.

1. Average Attendance.

Percentage of Revenue to Expen- diture.

2. Enrolled.

$

C.

C.

$

1900

990

1,440

43,734 65

29,081.85

C.

14,652.80

$

C.

$ c.

%

14.80

10.17

66.49

1901

894

1,483

44,144.69

28,669.65

15,475.04

17.31

10.73

64.94

1902

990 1,434

48,693.06

29,889.85

18,803.21

18.99

13.11

61.38

1903

940 1,453

55,528.35

29,375.30

26,153.05

27.80

18.00

52.90

1901 1,000 1,501

60,411.50 29,074.09

31,337.41

31.34

20.88

48.12

1905

1,015

1,416

60,535.84 31,418.00

29,117.84

28.69

20.56

51.89

1906

1,005

1,418

E

56,132.74

31,531.07

24,601.67

24.45

17.35

56.17

1907

991

1,401

60,995.41 30,457.50

30,537.91

30.82

21.80

49.93

1908

911

1,270

70,761.04

31,124.61

39,636.13

43.51

31.21

43.99

Appendix O.

REPORT ON THE HONGKONG VOLUNTEER CORPS,

by Major General R. G. BROADWOOD, C.B., Commanding the Troops, South China Command, for the Year 1908-09.

MOUNTED TROOP.

A great deal of good work has been done in gaining knowledge of the surrounding country and in general exercise in the duties of the mounted soldier.

All the training has been carried out in a practical and soldier-like way.

The O.C. Troop proposes to do away with a standing camp during the Christmas exercises in future. I consider this sound both in the score of economy and efficiency.

ARTILLERY.

(1.) Good results were obtained by the adoption of the suggestion of Commanding Royal Artillery that :-

(i.) All practices should be carried out under tactical schemes.

(ii.) That instruction in the field, of Battery Commanders and their Staffs, should

be given by the use of gun sight tripods.

(2.) The following remarks apply to the training generally

(a.) Fire discipline and fire tactics require more attention. In former years marks were only awarded for fire discipline and fire effect. This year, marks were allotted for fire tactics also. Such points as appreciation or situa- tions, selection of positions, etc., being duly allotted marks. B.C.s were new to these conditions, and a marked improvement was noticeable during the latter practices.

(b.) The Battery Staffs require more training and are also in some cases not complete. It is almost impossible to lay too great stress on the importance of a well trained staff, failing which a battery is a "ship without a rudder". (c.) The gun drill was good, layers and fuze setters accurate, and the actual

service of the guns showed careful training.

ENGINEERS.

The technical inspection of the Engineer Company was satisfactory, all but one or two being qualified for their duties.

The attendance at the R.E. searchlight mannings and at the weekly practices at the drill emplacement at Kowloon has been poor.

It is regretted that the Engineer Company find themselves unable to adopt the sugges- tion to organise a telephone section which would include operators and linemen..

INFANTRY.

A satisfactory start has at last been made with the infantry company and it is hoped that it may eventually reach its full establishment.

The musketry training has been conducted on sound lines but would benefit by increased range facilities. The Tai Hang range is inconveniently situated and unpopular in the hot weather. I recommend that the King's Park Range become the volunteer range and that the Volunteer Reserve Association be allowed the occasional use of it.

At present this range is in the hands of the association, which is of small value from a military point of view, while the Volunteers are only allowed to use it occasionally.

GENERAL.

Although a great deal of useful work is done at the annual camp at Stonecutters and though every credit is due to the men who do this work in their leisure time, often at the end or beginning of a hard day's civil work, it cannot be said that the military value of the camp is equal to the expenditure involved. Most men are only present at irregular inter- vals for an hour's work in the morning and afternoon so that units seldom work at full strength, a system which is most unsatisfactory both for the instructors and instructe 1.

:

=

0 2

I recommend that future cainps should be held in the New Territories for a week or eight days and that endeavours should be made to get employers to allow men to be present continuously for at least three or four days of that time. If such a camp were run on lines which bore some resemblance to service conditions an economy could be effected and the training improved. All preliminary drills and instructions of gun layers etc. should be done in the fortnight preceding camp so as not to waste time while out.

It is a regrettable fact that the Corps cannot be recruited up to its establishment. An incentive would be given to the movement if the Government could see its way to bring pressure to bear on its employees to join the Corps.

From a general point of view there can be no doubt as to the value of encouraging all the able bodied citizens to fit themselves to take a part in the defence of the Empire but as regards the actual addition to the fighting strength of the Colony it must be remembered that a large number of members of the Corps are in employments from which they could not be spared in War.

Hongkong, 23rd March, 1909.

R. G. BROADWOOD, Major General,

Commanding the Troops, South China.

REPORT ON THE HONGKONG VOLUNTEER CORPS,

for the Year April 1st, 1908, to March 31st, 1909.

1. On April 1st, 1908, the total strength of the Corps was 295 and on March 31st, 1909, it was 284.

Table I shows the inspection state on 27th March, 1909.

2. During the past year 3 members died, 5 were struck off the strength (having left the Colony) and 76 resigned (1 on medical certificate, 34 on leaving the Colony and 41 in the Colony).

3. 73 new members have been enrolled.

Table II shows the strength of the Corps, total expenditure on the Corps and the cost per head for the years 1900 to 1908.

APPOINTMENTS, ETC., OF OFFICERS AND STAFF.

4. The changes amongst the Officers and Staff of the Corps have been as follows :—

STAFF.

Major A. Chapman, V.D., Commandant, promoted Lieut.-Colonel 15th April, 1908. Major D. Macdonald transferred to the command of the Artillery Companies 15tlr April, 1908.

Corps Sergeant-Major W. Higby granted 9 months leave of absence from 13th January, 1909.

1909.

Staff-Armourer G. W. Avenell appointed acting Corps Sergeant-Major 13th January,

No. 3 COMPANY H.K.V.A.

Company Sergeant- Major J. I. Andrew appointed 2nd Lieutenant 12th October, 1908.

No. 3 COMPANY H.K.V.A.

2nd Lieutenant G. Blood died 14th July, 1908.

Sergeant L. C. Rees appointed 2nd Lieutenant 2nd October, 1908.

ENGINEER COMPANY.

Mr. W. Russell appointed 2nd Lieutenant 2nd October, 1908.

#

O 3

INFANTRY COMPANY.

Mr. L. A. M. Johnston appointed Captain 20th May, 1908.

Captain L. A. M. Johnston died 30th September, 1908.

Captain G. G. Wood (attached H.K.V.C.) appointed to the command of the Infantry Company temporarily 8th October, 1908.

CADET COMPANY.

Mr. W. H. Williams appointed 2nd Lieutenant 16th April, 1908.

ORGANIZATION.

5. A new establishment providing for the formation of an Infantry Company was approved and came into force on 15th April, 1908.

The Corps now consists of a Mounted Troop, four Companies of Artillery, an Engineer Company and an Infantry Company.

EQUIPMENT.

6. In April, 1908, the equipment of the Corps consisted of four 15-pr. Q. F. guns on loan from C.R.A. On completion of the annual practice on 13th February, 1909, these guns were all withdrawn and the present equipment consists of two 5" B.L. howitzers and two 2.95" Q. F. guns on loan from C.R.A.

DISCIPLINE, TRAINING, ETC.

7. The general discipline of the Corps has been entirely satisfactory. 8. The following table gives the number of efficients, etc:-

ས་

Non-Efficients.

Efficients Efficients

with

with

STAFF.

more

than 30 drills.

less than 30 drills.

On

Medi-

cal!

Re-

ficate.

with- cently Leave. Certi- joined.

Non- Absent Effici- Total.

ents

out

leave.

to pay fine.

Staff,

6

Troop,

8

19

6

No. 1 Company,.

20

10

9

No. 2 Company,

29

7

2

No. 3 Company,

22

5

7

No. 4 Company,

25

10

4

Engineer Company,

30

1

Infantry Company,

19

8

Total,

159

66

29

6

35

47

43

37

43

N

2

42

31

N

15

13

284

With reference to the above table four members, (exclusive of the Staff) have attended over 100 drills and 71 between 50 and 100 drills. The highest number of drills attended was 126 by Sapper I. E. Chunnutt.

9. An ambulance class was formed in May, 1908. In the absence on leave of Surgeon Captain Forsyth, and as Surgeon Lieutenant Hartley was unable to attend on account of ill health, the instruction of this class was very kindly undertaken by Doctor W. V. M. Koch, M.D., of the Government Civil Hospital. At the conclusion of the course the class was examined by Captain Ranken, R.A.M.C., and seven members passed a satisfactory examination.

10. On 11th May, 1908, a semaphore signalling class was formed under the Staff Officer.. This class was examined during July and seven qualified.

04

TROOP.

11. Frequent mounted parades were held during the drill season.

ARTILLERY COMPANIES.

12. On 31st August a preliminary training before camp was cominenced.

This training was divided into three periods. The first period of a fortnight's duration. was devoted to training men to qualify as specialists.

The second period, lasting one week, was for Officers, N. C. O.'s and specialists only. The third period, of four weeks, was devoted to company training, each company having one drill night per week.

Recruits' drills were held during the summer months and after camp until the end of the drill season there were drills at Headquarters several times a week for all members.

ENGINEER COMPANY.

13. Technical drills have been held fortnightly through the summer months and weekly during remainder of the year. Members have also attended the all night running of lights

at the various forts.

INFANTRY COMPANY.

14. There were weekly drills at Headquarters during the drill season and week ends were utilized as much as possible for musketry.

15. Field operations consisting of the defence and attack of Mount Parker were carried out on December 19th, but owing to the very bad weather the muster was unsatisfactory.

16. A general mobilisation of the Garrison took place in March, 1909. The Artillery and Infantry Companies occupied the posts allotted to them on mobilisation, but not in full strength owing to sufficient numbers not being able to obtain leave for two consecutive days. The Engineers assisted in working the searchlights at the Eastern entrance.

GUN PRACTICE.

17. 15-pr. Q. F. practice was carried out on 21st, 24th, 28th and 31st October, 1908, and on 13th February, 1909. (See narrative of practice attached to the Camp Report.)*

303" Maxim Gun practice was carried out at Stonecutters' Island on 24th and 26th October, 1908, (See Camp Report) and on Chinese New Year's Day 1909 at a moving target from a position near the Jubilee Road and again on 27th February, 1909, near Tai Hang in competition for the Gascoigne Shield:

MUSKETRY.

18. The musketry course for the year comprised the practices detailed in Table B Trained Soldiers Course Regular Forces pages 40 and 41 Musketry Regulations 1905.

The Troop and Engineer Company fired Part 1 and the six practices in Part II laid down for Royal Engineers. The Artillery Companies fired Part I and the Infantry Company the whole of Part I and Part II. I attach manuscript returns for each unit shewing the points obtained by individuals at each practice.*

.19. I have received a copy of the musketry course for the Territorial Force and I propose to put all units (including Artillery Companies) through this course during the present year. This can be managed provided that the Corps is granted a inore extensive use of the King's Park Range at week ends during the drill season.

CAMPS OF INSTRUCTION.

20. The Annual Camp for the Artillery, Engineer and Infantry Companies was held at Stonecutters' Island from 17th October to 2nd November, 1908.

The Artillery Companies carried out practice with the 15-pr. Q. F. guus on four afternoons and practice with maxims on two occasions. The Engineer Company operated the searchlights connected with the forts at the Eastern end of the island. The Troop Camp was held in the Kamtin Valley in the New Territories from 24th to 29th December, 1908. The paths in the mountains between Kamtin and Tai Po were thoroughly explored and on the 28th December a tactical exercise was carried out near Shingmun.

* Not printed.

0 5

*

Appendices A and B contain the remarks of the G. O. C. and C. R. A. on the Corps Camp and those of G. O. C. on the Troop Camp together with full reports on the camps. 21. Owing to the change of armament and the formation of an Infantry Company Stonecutters' Island is no longer a suitable locality for the annual camp.

I propose to hold the next camp in the New Territories near suitable practice ground. for 2.95" Q.F. guns and 5" B.L. howitzers. Such a plan will only be possible if a fair proportion of members can obtain leave to attend camp for at least half a week at a time. The present custom of members returning daily to Hongkong to their ordinary work would be impossible owing to distance of proposed camp.

COMPETITIONS.

22.-(1.) Sir Matthew Nathan's Cup for Efficiency.

This was won by No. 4 Artillery Company.

The following is the order of efficiency :-

1.-No. 4 Artillery Company. 2.-The Troop.

3.-Engineer Company.

4.-No. 3 Artillery Company. 5.-Infantry Company. 6.-No. 2 Artillery Company. 7.

No. 1 Artillery Company.

(2.) The Blake Musketry Shield for teams of 8 from each unit at ranges 200, 500 and 600 yards.

This competition took place on 6th February, 1909, and was won by No. 2 Artillery Company.

(3.) The Gascoigne Shield for Maxim Gun Practice was competed for on 27th February, 1909, and was won by No. 3 Artillery Company.

(4.) A Cup presented by His Excellency Sir Frederick Lugard for individual rifle competition at unknown ranges.

This competition took place on 17th April, 1908, and was won by Private Lapsley, Infantry Company.

MISCELLANEous.

23. The Corps took part in the King's Birthday Parade with the remainder of the Garrison on November 9th, 1908.

24. The present strength of the Cadet Company is 24.

The miniature rifle range erected near the Victoria School is regularly used and many of the cadets make excellent shooting.

INSPECTION.

25. The Annual Inspection of the Corps was carried out on 27th March, 1909, by His Excellency Major General R. G. Broadwood, C.B., Commanding the Troops, South China, who expressed his entire satisfaction with the turn out and parade.

SERVICES.

26. The standard of efficiency has been well maintained during the past year owing to the assistance and loyal co-operation I have invariably received from the Staff Officer, other members of the Staff and all the Officers and Senior N.C.O.'s. Since Sergt.-Major Higby left the Colony on 13th January, 1909, on leave of absence, the duties of Corps Sergt.- Major have been very ably performed by Staff-Armourer G. W. Avenell in addition to his ordinary work.

27. In my report* on the camp I have already referred to Lieutenant R. M. Crosse's services. I should like to place on record my indebtedness to this officer who, at much personal inconvenience, has devoted so much of his time to the interest of the Corps during his tenure of the appointment of Instructor in Gunnery and Range Finding, South China.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN, Lt.-Col.,

10th May, 1909.

* Not printed.

Commandant, H.K. Vol. Corps.

Year.

Strength of Corps on 31st March.

07

Table II.

Total Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December.

Average cost per head.

1900

311

$39,096.33

1901

366

49,824.66

1902

318

41,143.94

$125 136 129

1903

274

37,965.58

138

1904

230

44,332.13

191

1905

269

1906

274

58,311.12 47,351.34

217

172

1907

290

45,253.95

156

1908

295

45,554.86

155

Appendix A.

HEAD QUARTERS, SOUTH CHINA COMMAND,

HONGKONG, 18th December, 1908.

YOUR EXCELLENCY, I have the honour to forward herewith the report on the Hong- kong Volunteer Corps Camp.

The camp gave an opportunity of useful instruction of which thorough advantage was

taken.

I attach the remarks of the C.R.A. on the Gunnery Practice, with which I concur.

I have, &c.,

His Excellency

R. G. BROADWOOD, Major General, Commanding the Troops, South China.

SIR FREDERICK D. LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.,

Governor and Commander-in-Chief.

Subject-Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

G.S.O.

The gun practice was conducted in accordance with the Instructions for Practice Horse and Field Artillery, and on the general lines adopted at Okehampton Artillery Practice Camp. Working throughout on a tactical scheme was novel to the Corps, but I think all ranks appreciated it.

The Officers were keen and readily grasp situations, but require more instruction as to the value of time in dealing with fleeting targets and taking up positions under the fire of the enemy's guns.

The N.C.O.'s and men also worked well. The drill was good but the range takers were very slow and require much practice.

Hongkong, 11th December, 1908.

C. D. CHAMIER, Lieut.-Col., R.G.A., Commdg. Royal Artillery, South China.

08

Appendix B.

HEAD QUARTERS OFFICE.

HONGKONG, 11th February, 1909.

YOUR EXCELLENCY,-I have the honour to forward herewith the report on the Practice Camp of the Hongkong Volunteer Troop.

I was present at the tactical exercise described by Lieut. Ross at Shingmun on the 28th December, and consider that the Troop was very well handled by Lieut. Ross.

The energy and interest displayed by the members of the Troop is much to their credit.

I quite approve of Lieut. Ross's intention to dispense with a permanent camp next year; because apart from the saving of expense, which would be considerable, the members of the Troop will probably profit more by the experience of manoeuvring in rough country if they are not pinned down to any particular locality.

The matter of the perishing of the headstalls and bridles shall be looked into by the Ordnance Department.

His Excellency

I have, &c.,

R. G. BROADWOOD, Major General, Commanding the Troops, South China.

SIR FREDERICK D. LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.,

Governor and Commander-in-Chief.

5

Appendix P.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS.

EXPENDITURE.

1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings, were as follows:-

(i) Personal Emoluments and Other Charges, (ii) Annually Recurrent Works,.............

(iii) Extraordinary Works,

Total,....

AMOUNTS VOTED.

In Estimates.

Supplement- ary Votes.

Actual Expenditure.

Total.

C.

..

$ C.

268,126 437,500 $22,900

4,115.46

108,970.00

265,858.00

272,241.16 546,470.00 1,088,758.00 1,000,935,45

266,477.51

512,336.30

1,529,326 378,943.46 1,907,469.46 ,779,749.26

Detailed statements of items (ii) and (iii) are given in Appendices A and B. With regard to (i), the amount actually expen le is within 3 per cent. of the amount in the Estimates.

In the case of (ii), the following were the sub-heads under which the principal excesses occurred:

Maintenance of Buildings,

""

Lighthouses. Telegraphs...

Typhoon aud Rainstorm Damages,

Maintenance of Kowloon Water Works,..

$ (. 2.998.13

11,071.80

2,623.4

83,096.05

6,491.33

The excess on Maintenance of Buildings was due to the extensive repairs which had to be carried out at Queen's College; that on Lighthouses to the restoration of cable com- munication with Gap Rock, the adoption of exceptional measures for the protection of the cable and the provision of new glass for the lantern and Muntz metal shutters to the windows of the quarters there; that on Telegraphs to the provision of a new armoured end at Waglan for the cable communication with the lighthouse and an extensive alteration of the Government lines at the intersection of Pedder Street and Des Voeux Road; that on Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages to the typhoon of the 18th September, 1906, and to the rainstorm and typhoon of the 23rd and 27th July, 1905, respectively; and that on Mainten- ance of Water Works, Kowloon, to the laying of additional mains or substitution of larger mains for the distribution of an increased supply of water.

The only notable savings were under the following sub-heads :-

Dredging Foreshores,...

Maintenance of City and Hill District Water Works, ...

$ 3,899.16 19,231.5.

In the case of the first item, the saving was due to the dredger requiring no expensive renewals and in the case of the second item to very little pumping from Tytam Intermediate Reservoir being found necessary.

The large excess under (iii) was due to the purchase of the Dredger St. Enoch and and the starting of dredging operations for the construction of the Mongkoktsui Break water, which together accounted $183,693.32, any excesses under other sub-heads being more than counterbalanced by savifigs under others.

Besides the work or amounts expended appearing in Appendix B, the following sums were paid out of "Deposits not Available":

Paid by

$

C.

Extension of Medical Staff Quarters, Kowloon Cattle Depôt and Slaughter House, Boundary Stones in New Territories,.

7,911.19

Nursing Association.

619.06

619.06

Kowloon-Canton R'way.

75.90

Owners of Lots.

{

P 2

The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1908, as compared with that in the previous year—

1907.

1908.

Increase. Decrease.

*

$

Personal Emoluments and Other Charges,

219,547.62

266,477.51

46,929.89

Annually Recurrent Works,

520,659.65 512,336.30

8,323.35

Extraordinary Works,

Total,.......

784,320.30 1,000,935.45 216,615.15

1,524,527.57 | 1,779,749.26 263,545.04

8,323.35

The increase in the first item is principally due to the fall in exchange, the salaries of the senior officers having been paid at the average rate of 1s. 93d. per dollar as compared with a rate of 2s. Od. during the preceding year.

The decrease in the second item is principally due to reduced expenditure under the following votes :—

Maintenance of Ruildings

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,.............

....

Maintenance of City and Hill District Water Works,

$

C.

5,001.56

4,395.69

11,063.88

11,405.48

These reductions were however largely counterbalanced by the following increases under other votes, namely:-

Maintenance of Buildings in New Territories, Maintenance of Lighthouses,

Maintenance of Kowloon Water Works,.....

$

C.

3,092.39

9,007.37

8,251.73

The increase in the third item is principally due to the purchase of the dredger St. Enoch in connection with the construction of Mongkoktsui Breakwater and to the inclusion under the heading "Praya East Reclamation" of a sum of $57,315.39 which was merely transferred for Treasury purposes from Suspense Account, the expenditure having actually taken place in 1903-1905.

P 3

LAND SALES AND SURVEYS.

2. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, &c. The following tabulated statement gives particulars of these :-

NO. OFLOTS. AREA IN SQUARE FEET. ANNUAL RENT.

PREMIUM.

Total.

Total.

$

C.

$

Total.

C.

$

C.

Total.

C.

Sales by Auction.

Island of Hongkong,

6

Kowloon Peninsula,

1

1,334,320

nil.

798.00

nil.

12,914.00

100.00

N. T., Southern District,

46

2,437,270

137.16

1,917.78

Northern

185

201,873

242.02

2,013.80

""

238

3,973,463

1,177.18

16,945.58

Sales without Auction.

Island of Hongkong,

1

1,170

1.00

2,569.00

Kowloon Peninsula,.

N. T., Southern District,.

1

11,160

52.00

558.00

12,330

53.00

3,127.00

Extensions granted.

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula,

70

7

27,827

5

5,434

466.00 6,952.00

16,914.12 2,426.54

New Territories,....

12

33,261

7,418.00

19,340.66

Grants on Nominal Terms.

Island of Hongkong,

3

63,942

2.00

nil.

Kowloon Peninsula,

New Territories,.

3

63,942

2.00

uil.

Grants on Short Leases.

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula, New Territories,..

Permits to occupy Land

for short period, &c.

12

2

8,352 72,415

2,100.00 156.00

80,767

2,256.00

Island of Hongkong,

257

4,238.43

Kowloon Peninsula,.

105

6,370.90

New Territories,..

126

2,301.71

N. T. let by A.L.O. Southern

Not available.

District,

99

145.00

:

N.T.let by A.L.O. Northern

District,

207

536.75

791

13,592.00

Extensions of Short Period

Leases to 75 years.

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula,

New Territories,......

3

8,892

106.00

8,882

16,156.30

106.00

16,156.30

Quarry Leases.

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula, New Territories,.

Total,....

1,055

4,172,645

24,604.18

55,569.54

The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $70,420.27 or very much less than the Estimate,which amounted to $300,000.00. It included the following sums which do not appear in the above tabulated statement :-

...

Premia derived from sale of rights to erect piers, Fees for boundary stones to mark lots, Premium for permission to build upon portion of Kow- loon Marine Lot 11 (310 square feet), Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company's property,

...

$13,782.02 490.46

883.50

3. Sales by Auction.-There were no lots in the New Territories sold by the Public Works Department. The Assistant Land Officer at Tai Po sold 185 small lots which realized $2,013.80, and the Assistant Land Officer at Hongkong 46 small lots which realized $1,917.78. The large area gold in Hongkong was principally made up of a Farm

P 4

The

Lot in the Pokfulam District which comprised 28.68 acres or 1,249,300 square feet. large area sold in the Southern District of the New Territories consisted principally of 3 salt pans at Tai O totalling 41:44 acres and 1 at Lantao (D. D. 313) area 821 acres or 2,162,754 square feet in all.

None of the sales which took place were of sufficient importance to justify the insertion of details.

4. Sales without Auction. The only item under this heading in Hongkong was Inland Lot 1794 in Third Street, (area 1,170 square feet), which was granted to the District Watchmen's Committee. In the New Territories, New Kowloon Inland Lot 41 (area 11,160 square feet) was granted in exchange for Lots 821 and 824 in Survey District IV on payment of premium at the rate of 5 cents per square foot and increased Crown Rent for the new lot, which was of a less area than the old lots, on account of its greater value.

5. Extensions Granted.-The extensions granted in Hongkong comprised areas of 14,850 square feet adjoining Inland Lot 1300 near Shek Tong Tsui market; 800 square feet adjoining Inland Lot 1744 on Kennedy Road; 24 square feet adjoining Marine Lot 77 in Des Voeux Road West; 308 square feet adjoining Rural Building Lot 121 on Barker Road; 2,412 and 1,264 square feet adjoining Shaukiwan Inland Lots 403 and 414 respectively and 8,169 square feet adjoining Quarry Bay Inland Lot No. 5.

The ex- tensions in Kowloon comprised areas of 1,598 and 2,118 square feet which were added to Kowloon Inland Lots 1171 and 1172 respectively; 885 square feet added to Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1212 which was granted in exchange for Lot No. 5, Ma Tan Kok, required for the New Cattle Depôt, and areas of 633 and 200 square feet adjoining Kowloon Marine Lots 49 and 87 respectively.

6. Grants on Nominal Terms.-These consisted of an area of 6,109 square feet in Bridges Street granted to the Man Mo Temple Authorities, and areas of about 52,640 square feet at Kennedy Town and 5,193 square feet at Third Street both of which were granted to the Tung Wah Hospital Committee for Sinall-pox and Plague Hospitals res- pectively.

7. Grants on Short Leases.-The only item under this heading in Hongkong was Inland Lot 1774 (Old Harbour Office) the lease for which was renewed for one year. The grants in Kowloon comprised an area of 62,515 square feet (Kowloon Inland Lot 1159). let on a lease for 3 years from 30th September 1907 to the Kowloon Bowling Green Club and an area of 9,900 square feet (Kowloon Inland Lot 1144) hitherto held under a short lease, which was extended for another year.

The lease of One-Tree Island to Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co. for the storage of dynamite expired this year and was not renewed.

8. Permits to occupy land for short periods.-These were as usual of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of individual mention; most of them were for small areas to be held.quarterly.

9. Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75 years.-There were three of these cases, namely, Inland Lot 1280, (Dairy Farm Company's premises, Wyndham Street), extended from 20 to 75 years on payment of premium and increased Crown Rent; Tai Hang School Site, originally held by a committee of the Villagers on an annual lease, which has now been extended to 75 years on payment of premium and increased Crown Rent and Shaukiwan Lot 282, (now Shaukiwan Inland Lot 415) originally a squatter's holding, then granted a 21-years' lease by the Squatters' Board, and now extended to a 75-years' lease on payment of premium and increased Crown Rent.

10. Quarry Leases. |

11. Mining Leases.

There is nothing to record under either of these headings.

12. Resumptions.-The construction of the Slaughter fouse at Ma Tau Kok necessitat- ed the resumption of four houses at a cost of $500. An area of 2,613 square feet at Sham Shui Po (Lot 3212, S.D. IV) was resumed at a cost of $301.95 with a view to the future construction of a road.

Kowloon Inland Lot 210 and Kowloon Marine Lots 34 and 81 were resumed for railway purposes at a cost of $615,000. The combined area of the lots was 132,396 square feet and the resumption included some buildings and an iron pier for ocean-going steamers.

The following lots in Hongkong and Kowloon were resumed for non-payment of Crown- Rent viz.:- Inland Lot 161 and Kowloon Inland Lots 933, 943, 938 and 965.

}

*

- P 5

In the Southern District of the New Territories, 111 lots were resumed by the Assistant Land Officer: 88 for non-payment of Crown Rent and 23 for public purposes (con- struction of road to Shatin Gap, &c.). In addition to the foregoing, 40 lots were voluntarily surrendered and 1 lot (No. 390, Section A, S.D. IV) was exchanged for New Kowloon Inland Lot 37.

*

Particulars of the resumptions effected in the Northern District are contained in the Land Officer's report. They include the areas required for the construction of a road from Castle Peak Bay to Ping Shan.

13. Lease Plans.-Plans and Particulars (in duplicate) of 54 lots and 1 pier were forwarded to the Land Officer in connection with the issue of leases.

14. Boundary Stones.-Boundary stones were fixed for 7 lots in Hongkong, 3 in Kowloon and 2 in the New Territories.

15. Surveys. Many surveys of considerable extent were undertaken for the purpose of defining the boundaries of lots or preparing sale or lease plans. The most extensive works of this nature were the surveys of 36 Squatter Villages which took more than one surveyor's time for the whole year, the completion of the survey of Deep Bay, which occupiel a surveyor over three months, and a survey of the whole of Messrs. Butterfield and Swire's property at Quarry Bay which, taking the combined time of surveyors engaged, occupied over six months' time of one surveyor.

In addition to these, a certain amount of triangulation work to form the foundation of a trigonometrical survey of Hongkong and Kowloon was carried out, and extensive surveys were made of the South-Eastern portion of Kowloon Peninsula in con- nection with railway work and of several blocks of land held by the Military Authorities for the purpose of determining boundaries and areas. A survey was also prepared of the Naval Properties in the vicinity of Macdonnell Road, (re-named Canton Road), Kowloon, for the issue of leases.

Seeing that such extensive surveys have had to be undertaken, it was decided that in future uniform scales of 50 feet to an inch (6) and 200 feet to an inch (40) should be adopted for the maps of the whole Colony thus getting rid of difficulties hithert› experienced owing to the variety of scales in use. The whole of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula and New Kowloon has been divided into Ordnance Sheets and the survey of Kowloon is being pushed on with a view of replacing the existing map which is on the (2500) scale.

1

16. Sites for booths at the Racecourse.-A sum of $1,637.00 was realize by the letting of sites for the erection of booths and stan is at Happy Valley during the Race Meeting.

17. Squatters' Licences.-At the beginning of 1908 there were 232 Squatters on the roll, representing an annual rental of $393.58, and during the year 2 licences were written off leaving a total rental of $880.35 at the end of 1908.

18. Military Lands.-Through stress of other work slow progress was made with the surveys in connection with the exchanges of land under the Lewis Agreement. The War Department properties at Gun Club Hill and Central Block, Kowloon, were however demar- cated and agreement plans prepared. The number of outstanding surveys is 24.

The War Department agreed to pay $1.00 per annum for each of the following en- croachments:-

Magazine within the Reserve at Sywan.

Rifle Range

Covered Tank

Brick Building.

""

19

11

多多

>>

""

""

Two approach paths within the Reserve at Gun Club Hill.

An application was made by the Military Authorities for an are of land at Crown Point in the New Territories but the matter has not yet been settled.

19. Naval Lands.—Surveys were prepared of all the Naval properties in the vicinity of Canton Roa, Kowloon, for the purpose of issuing leases of the following lots, viz.: Kow- loon Marine Lots 35, 41 & 82. Certain arrangements between the Colonial Government and the Naval Authorities, whereby a strip of land between Kowloon Marine Lots 35 & 41 was surrendered to the latter in exchange for a strip to widen Jordan Road, were given

effect to.

20. Fiers.-Loneases of pier rights were granted in one case in Hongkong, one in Kowloon and one in the New Territories and extensions were granted for two piers in Kowloon. The premium derived amounted to $9,538.80 for permanent piers and $4,245.22

* Not printed.

P 6

for temporary piers. Licences for the following temporary piers for various periods were issued:-20 in Hongkong, 12 in Kowloon and 16 in the New Territories, the amount of fees payable for them being $7,189.41. Licences were also issued or renewed for 8 slip- ways in Hongkong and 6 in the New Territories, the fees for which amounted to $1,476.25.

PIERS, 1907.

Premium. $ 6,468.50 15,000.00

Temporary Piers, l'ermanent Piers,

PIERS, 1908.

Temporary l'iers,

Permanent Piers,...

Crown Rent, per annum.

$6,233.75.

1,320.00.

$9,538.80 4,243.22

$1,264.84. 790.83.

21. Cemeteries. It was decided by Government to open two new Cemeteries: one at Kowloon Tong to replace the old Sham Shui Po Cemetery which is on the line of some proposed main roads and one at Cheung Chau Island, New Territories.

WORK UNDER THE BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

22. Amending Ordinance.-After prolonged discussion with the leading architects and others, an amending ordinance, containing numerous important modifications of the provisions of "The Buildings Ordinance, 1903," was passed in July. One important alteration was the concentration under the Building Authority of practically all matters affecting the design and construction of buildings, such matters having hitherto been partly under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board, an arrangement which was fruitful in causing delays in the passing of plans. This and the transfer of most of the nuisance- notice work involved a considerable re-arrangement of the duties and staff of both depart- ments, the

the Building Authority's staff being strengthened by the addition of an Assistant Engineer, whilst the Drainage Surveyor, three subordinate officers and 2 coolies were transferred from the Sanitary Department. Two additional Overseers still remained to be appointed to cope with the extra work devolving upon the Building Authority under the amending ordinance.

The number of plans dealt with shows a decrease as compared with 1907, the greatest drop being in the number deposited for alterations and additions to existing buildings. This is doubtless due in great measure to the modified line of action adopted with regard to the enforcement of the provisions of the Ordinance affecting window area, cubicles and yard spaces in existing buildings, but the general falling off must be ascribed to the depressed state of trade throughout the Colony.

23. Plans.-Plans were deposited during the year for the following, the figures of 1907 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison

1907.

1908. Increase. Decrease.

European Houses,

18

18

Chinese Houses,

133

104

29

...

Buildings and Structures other than the above,..

155

88

Alterations and additions to existing Buildings,... 1,809

1,305

67 504

Verandahs,

20

59

39

...

Balconies,

63

30

...

Sunshades,

53

32

33 21

Areas,

2

I

...

Piers,

23

5

1 18

2,276

1,645

39

673

24. Certificates.-The following certificates for new buildings were issued :-

46 for 155 domestic buildings under Section 204 of Ordinance No. 1 of 1903. 31 for 52 non-domestic buildings or works.

P 7

These figures show an increase of 11 in the number of domestic buildings and a decrease of 19 in the number of non-domestic buildings certified as compared with 1907 or a net decrease of 8.

25. Notices and Permits.-Notices relating to structures in a dangerous condition were served in 143 cases whilst 742 permits, 208 notices of a miscellaneous nature and 742 notices dealing with nuisances reported by the officers of the Sanitary Department were issued. These figures show an increase of I in the dangerous structure notices and a decrease of 16 in those of a miscellaneous nature as compared with 1907. The nuisance- notice work having only been transferred to this Department during the latter part of the year, it is not possible to compare the figures with those of the previous year.

26. Resumptions for Scavenging Lanes, &c.—A statement of the work done will be found under the heading "Public Works Extraordinary ".

27. Private Streets.-Resurfacing and other repairs under the provisions of sections 186 and 187 of the Buildings Ordinance were carried out by this Department at the cost of the frontagers in the under-mentioned Streets :-

On Ning Lane.

Wa Hing Lane.

Sai Yuen Lane.

Algar Court. Li Sing Street.

28. Improvements, &c., of Public Streets. After some negotiation, an agreement was come to with the owners of Marine Lot 29 (now sub-divided into Marine Lots 295 and 296 and Inland Lots 1797-1800) whereby a public street, 30 feet in width, will be constructed from Queen's Road East to Praya East about midway between Arsenal and Ship Streets. The sum to be paid by Government for the land required for the road amounts to $15,812.

The scheme for raising the levels of certain areas in Kowloon has received careful attention, a number of houses in the Yaumati District having been rebuilt at a higher level, thus rendering it possible to raise a considerable length of Reclamation Street to the level decided upon.

29. Footways.--Attention has been paid to the footways under verandahs and balconies, numerous notices requiring the repair of such footways having been served and enforced. In most cases however the areas dealt with were small and no continuous length worthy of mention was done.

30. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage.-A large amount of damage to private property was attributable to both causes owing to the heavy rainstorms of the 18th-24th July, when 15.88 inches of rain fell, and the severe typhoon of the 27th-28th July. The following is a brief statement of the damage done :-

RAINSTORM DAMAGE.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

No. 26 Leighton Hill Road (verandah collapsed).

Beaconsfield (retaining wall on east side collapsed endangering tower at north-east

angle of building).

Nos. 72 and 74 Bonhamn Strand West (kitchens collapsed).

No. 87 Stone Nullah Lane (portion of end wall and roof collapsed).

Abertholwyn, Peak Road (retaining walls in front and in rear gave way and

serious landslips occurred).

TYPHOON DAMAGE.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

Kingsclere (heavy chimney stack collapsed and carried away portion of roof). King's Buildings (chimney fell carrying with it a considerable portion of roof and

of all floors).

Nos. 15-17 Connaught Road Central (large pediment collapsed causing damage

to roof and walls).

No. 73 Queer's Road Central (verandah and roof collapsed).

No. 94 Des x Road Central (roof and floors of verandah collapsed).

No. 52 Conugut Road West (one bay of verandah collapsed on all floors).

Nos. 163 and 164 Connaught Road West (godowns), (partial collapse).

Nos. 23-25 Praya, Kennedy Town (godowns), (upper floor collapsed).

No. 136 Praya East (roof and portion of wall collapsed). No. 29 Morrison Hill Road (north wall partially collapsed).

P8 -

OTHER DISTRICTS OF HONGKONG.

Workshops, Quarry Bay Shipyard (several steel-framed structures in course of

erection entirely demolished).

Two houses on M. L. 10, Shaukiwan (portion of flank walls and roof collapsed). No. 17 Sai Wan Ho (total collapse).

No. 20 Shaukiwan West (front wall on 1st floor collapsed).

Nos. 21-29 (odd numbers). Shaukiwan West (major portion of rear walls collapsed

and fell on four old two-storied houses causing them to collapse).

No. 36 Shaukiwan West (front wall on 1st floor collapsed).

No. 84 Shaukiwan West (front and flank walls and roof collapse). House at Shaukiwan West (total collapse).

No. 28 Praya, Shaukiwan (roof collapsed). Factory on S. I. L. 22 (partial collapse). Soy Factory S. I. L. 104 (partial collapse).

Nos. 1 and 2 Mission Street, Shaukiwan (total collapse of one house; partial

collapse of other).

Smith's Villas, Magazine Gap (rendered dangerous). Brickworks, Aberdeen, Coolie Quarters (total collapse).

No. 55 Temple Street,

No. 117 do. No. 24 do. No. 62 do.

do.

KOWLOON.

Yaumati, (total collapse).

do.

do. North do.

do. do do.

No. 67 Kennedy Street, Yaumati

collapsed).

No. 1-8 Fook Shing Lane do.

(flank wall and roof collapsed). (rendere l dangerous).

(total collapse).

(flank walls, portions of other walls and roof

(practically total collapse of 8 houses).

Nos. 36-40 (even numbers) Portland Street, Mongkok (flank and party walls and

roofs collapsed).

Nos. 52-58 (even numbers) Station Street North, Yaumati (rear walls collapsed). No. 27 Ho Mun Tin, Dyeing Shed (total collapse).

Nos. 40 and 42 Market Street, Hung Hom (rear walls on 1st floor collapsed). Nos. 62-66 (even numbers), Kowloon City Road (flank and party walls and roofs

collapsed).

59 persons in all were killed by the collapses enumerated above. Many other buildings throughout the Colony were partially unroofed or otherwise injured by the storm which was of exceptional violence.

Enquiries into the collapses of Nos. 36-40 Portland Street and Nos. 21-29 Shaukiwan West were held by the Coroner, the buildings in both cases being of recent construction. In the case of the former, the jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against the architect but the Attorney General entered a nolle prosequi. In the case of the latter, the jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against the Contractor and, as the result of a trial before the Supreme Court, he was sentenced to one day's imprisonment, the Chief Justice express- ing the view that the supervision exercised by the Government had been inadequate.

31. Collapses.-No collapses occurred except those due to the rainstorms or typhoon. 32. Tests of Mortar.-Attention was continued to be given to the testing of mortar, 138 samples being taken from works in progress. Though still not up to the standard desirable, in no case was the quality found to be so inferior as to warrant a prosecution.

33. Prosecutions for Defective Building Work.--Two fines of $200 each and one of $500 were imposed in connection with defective bonding of walls, &c.

34. Cemeteries.-In conjunction with the drainage and other work transferred from the Sanitary Department, the laying out of the Chinese Cemeteries was also handed over to the Public Works Department. Surveys for the purpose of defining the various sections into which each cemetery has to be sub-divided were found to be necessary but, owing to vacancies. in the staff, it was not found possible to undertake them.

A new cemetery was partially laid out at Kowloon Tong, some new terraces were formed at Mount Caroline Cemetery and, in accordance with usual practice, exhumation was carried out over a considerable portion of the Chinese Cemetery at Aberdeen preparatory to utilizing the area again.

The Cemeteries given as authorized in the Schedule attached to Section 91 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance No. 1 of 1903 are as under :—

}

P 9

CHINESE.

1. The Mount Caroline Cemetery, I.L. 393.

2. The Mount Davis Cemetery (closed).

3. The Kai Lung Wan Cemetery, lying between Pokfulam Road and the sea,

(Extension gazetted in Government Notification No. 692 of 1906).

3a. Kai Lung Wan East Cemetery, I.L. 1766 (proclaimed Government Cemetery

for Chinese, Notification 752 of 1907, Gazette 15.11.07).

4. The Aberdeen Cemetery.

5. The Shek O Cemetery.

6. The Stanley Cemetery.

*6a. The Military Cemetery at Stanley (closed).

7. The Chai Wan Cemetery.

8. The Ma Tau Wai Cemetery.

8a. The Ma Tau Wai Cemetery (West) K.I.L. 1161.

9. The Sai Yu Shek Cemetery (Chinese).

10. The Sam Shui Po Cemetery.

11. The Chinese Christian Cemetery, Sai Yu Shek, N.K.I.L. 5.

GENERAL.

12. The Colonial Cemetery, (a portion of this has been set aside

for the burial of Japanese only),

13. The Roman Catholic Cemetery,

14. The Mahommedan Cemetery,

15. The Hindoo Cemetery, I.L. 1625, G.L. 27,.............

16. The Zoroastrian Cemetery, I.L. 364,

17. The Jewish Cemetery, I.L.'s 581 and 1717,

18. The Eurasian Cemetery, Mount Davis,

19. The Cemetery of the French Mission, Pok-fu-lam.

20. The Hindoo Cemetery, Kowloon.

21. The Infectious Diseases Cemetery, Kennedy Town.

22. The Infectious Diseases Cemetery, Cheung Sha Wan.

Happy Valley.

do.

do.

do.

do.

do.

.....I.L. 1415.

* These are not in list but have been entered here as they are in some respect extensions of the preceding numbers.

Of this list, Mount Davis has since been closed (Government Notification No. 691 of 1906) also Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Cemetery, and Cheung Sha Wan is closed as a Plague Cemetery from the beginning of the year 1909 by resolution of the Sanitary Board at a meeting held on September 15th, 1908. The Military Cemetery at Stanley is also closed.

The following Cemeteries are not included in this list :-

23. Cheung Loong Tin (proclaimed Government Cemetery for Chinese, Notification

3/1907 Gazette 4th January, 1907).

24. Chinese Christian Cemetery, Pokfulam I.L. 899.

25. Kau Lung Tong Cemetery (Government Cemetery for Chinese, known as

N.K.I.L. 38).

26. Christian Chinese Cemetery, Kau Lung Tong N.K.I.L. 16.

27. Po King Po Cemetery (clos d-Government Notification No. 338 of 1903). 28. Cheung Chau Cemetery (Government Notification No. 337 of 1908).

J

Νο

Both

35. Principal Works by Private Firms.-Messrs. Butterfield & Swire's new dock was used for the first time on the 1st October, when a vessel was admitted for repairs. vessel had been docked in the Admiralty Dock up to the close of the year. the Quarry Bay and Naval Yard Extension establishments were to a large extent in work- ing order.

The large blocks of godowns on K.M.L. 88 for the Ocean Steamship Co. and the piers in connection with same were ready for the cɔ:nmencement of business but no steamer had been berthed alongside up to the close of the year.

The Standard Oil Company's works at Lai Chi Kok (N.K.M.L. 2) were still incomplete though in such a state as to be available for use. Great delay in their comple- tion was caused by the slip of the sea-wall mentioned in the report for 1906.

The Brewery on N.K.M.L. 3, Lai Chi Kok, was completed. A Cigar Factory on K.I.L. 1203, Yaumati, was completed.

P 10

J

The excavation for the extension of the Dock Company's No. 1 Dock at Hunghom was in progress throughout the year as was also the construction of Messrs. Jardine, Matheson and Company's Office.

The reconstruction of the southern, or old, portion of the Hongkong Hotel was begun, the demolition of the old buildings being completed and foundations for the new building, which is to be of steel-frame construction, begun.

Among other works of less magnitude which have been commenced or completed during the year the following may be mentioned :—

Works commenced.-12 houses on M.L. 29, Queen's Road East.

5 European houses on Shaukiwan I.L. 409 in connection.

with Quarry Bay Shipyard.

6 houses on Shaukiwan I.L. 1780.

3

""

12

414.

Works completed.-Club House for the Royal Hongkong Yacht Club.

Victoria Recreation Club.

Godowns and tenement houses (16 houses) on P.R.M.L. 57. 10 houses on K.M.L. 29, Yaumati.

3

13

8

19

11

30

""

K.I.L. 1076, Mongkoktsui.

N.K.I.L. 21, Sham Shui Po.

Godown on Shaukiwan I L. 1580.

4 houses on M.L.s 78, 79, 80 and 206, Western District

of City.

36. Fires.-Four somewhat serious fires occurred in Victoria and one at Lai Chi Kok. 37. Reclamations.-The following is a statement of the private reclamation works in progress during the year :--

M.L. 293, Shaukiwan Road,..

K.M.L. 85, To Kwa Wan,

Completed.

K.M.L. 89 (extension of K.M.L. 49), Yaumati,

In

progress.

N.K.M.L. 2, Lai Chi Kok,.

Area. Sq. ft.

49,950

..140,000

.264,000*

Area. Sq. ft.

.345,928

...140.250

N.K.M.L. 3, Lai Chi Kok,

N.K.I.L. 26, Shamshuipo,

22,500

Very little reclamation work was done in the case of N.K.M.L. 3 as a considerable section of the lot was above high water mark and this area was utilized for the erection of the buildings.

The areas stated are those of the lots which in several cases extend for some distance further inland than old high water mark and, though largely so, are not therefore exclusively reclaimed from the sea. In some cases additional areas beyond those stated have to be

reclaimed for roads.

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

38. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings upon which any considerable sum was expended were the following:-

Queen's College--General repairs and painting throughout, also recon- structing verandah floors, renewing a considerable portion of the roof timbers and reconstructing ceilings to class rooms,

Government Civil Hospital:-

A Block-Limewashing, colourwashing and

cleaning down paintwork internally,

Superintendent's Quarters,

Staff Quarters,.....

Assistant Analyst's Quarters,.

Miscellaneous repairs,

* This area was wrongly stated as 165,000 sq. ft. in last year's report.

$11,769

$ 860

4,244

526

361

525

6,516

P 11-

Central Market-General repairs, &c., European Lunatic Asylum-General repairs and painting throughout,

also reconstructing verandah roofs,

Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town-General repairs, &c., Belilios Public School-General repairs, &c.,

....

$3,733

3,442

2,214

1,735

Government House, Custodian's Quarters-General repairs and painting

internally,

1,671

Central Police Station-General repairs,

1,515

Supreme Court-Colourwashing and cleaning down paintwork internally, Water Police Station,-General repairs and painting throughout,... Victoria Gaol-Supply of materials,.

1,055

907

896

Government Offices-Reconstructing a portion of the roof,. Sheep & Swine Depôt, Kennedy Town-General repairs, &c.,.

879

867

Chair Coolie Quarters and Shelter, Victoria Gap-General repairs and

painting throughout,

Magistracy-Reconstructing ceilings to Quarters,

Hung Hom Market-General repairs and painting throughout, No. 1 Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout, Chinese Lunatic Asylum-General repairs, colourwashing and painting

throughout,......

Saiyingpun Market-General repairs and painting throughout,.

778

775

757

750

749

730

Bay View Police Station-

Yaumati Market-

Do. Do.

Do.

640

Do.

572

Wing Fung Street Latrine-Reconstructing roof in reinforced concrete, Government Villas-General repairs and painting throughout,..

485

481

Government Pavilions-New floors and general repairs,

478

Victoria Hospital-Repairs, &c.,....

388

Mongkoktsui Market-General repairs and painting throughout,

366

Wanchai School-General repairs and painting throughout,

364

Kennedy Town Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout,

No. 5 Police Station-General repairs, &c.,....

357

350

Wanchai Store & Gas Works Store-(Repairs to matsheds), Mountain Lodge-Painting externally,

328

205

39. Maintenance of Buildings, New Territories.--In the case of the New Territories Buildings, the following are those which entailed considerable expenditure :-

Tai Po Police Station--General repairs and painting throughout,. Au Tau Police Station-General repairs,.....

$1,811

916

Sha Tau Kok Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout, Sai Kung Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout,.... Tai O Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout, Kowloon City Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout, San Tin Police Station-General repairs,.. District Officer's Quarters at Tai Po-General repairs,

842

743

712

449

446

320

303

Sha Tin Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout,

40. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-The following sums were expended upon the various lighthouses :-

Gap Rock,

Waglan,..

Green Island, Cape Collinson,

$12,654

1,302

1,227

212

A number of exceptional repairs were carried out at Gap Rock. The cable, which was severed during the typhoon of the 29th September, 1906, was repaired in the early part of the year by the insertion of a new shore end at Gap Rock, communication being restored on the 9th January. Special measures were adopted to prepare a bed for the cable and secure it in the best possible position so as to obviate as far as possible a repetition of the fracture. The iron shutters to the windows of the Lightkeepers' Quarters at Gap Rock having decayed, 9 pairs of these were replaced by new shutters made of Muntz metal. Finally, a number of new panels were inserted in the lantern, the old ones having been damaged by storms.

P 12

The expenditure on these special items was as follows:-

Providing, laying and securing new shore end to cable,...$ 6,220.60

New glass panels to lantern, Muntz metal shutters to quarters,

.....

Year.

Gap Rock Lighthouse.

2,814.86

1,647.00

$10,682.46

Expenditure on Lighthouses-1903 to 1907.

C.

*

Waglan Lighthouse.

Green Island Lighthouse.

Cape Collinson Lighthouse.

$ c.

C.

$

ŕ.

362.00

321.84

461.00

47.00

597.00

$

1903

1,844.00

1904

** 2,814.20

$$3

2,050.00 989.47

1905

† 7,689.38

1,348.00

1906

4,533.74

1,264.00

1907

4,180.00

305.00

243.35

283.00

37.00

1,782.00

** Including $173.34 for Repairs to Cables charged to "Maintenance of Telegraphs".

† $5,869.38 in 1905, on Supplementary Vote "Repairs to Gap Rock Cable ". $1,969.74 in 1906, on Supplementary Vote "Repairs to Gap Rock Cable ".

41. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City.-The road surfaces were maintained in a satisfactory.condition. The portion of Queen's Road Central opposite the City Hall was laid with tar macadam which has been found in England and elsewhere to afford a comparatively noiseless and dustless surfacing material. Though a portion of the work was executed under unfavourable weather conditions the surfacing has worn well so far. The footway on the South side of Queen's Road opposite Arsenal Street was lowered to correspond with the road surface, the lowering of which was carried out some 3 or 4 years earlier, and was also surfaced with cement concrete. The footpath on the North side of Queen's Road East between Garden Road and Arsenal Street was picked up and re- laid with cement concrete 4" thick; whilst those on the West and North sides of the Cricket ground and adjoining the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Gardens were surfaced with fine cement concrete 2" thick.

>

Improvements to the footways in First and Second Streets were carried out, the old surfaces being picked up, re-graded and laid with cement concrete.

Railings of a total length of 1,392 lineal feet were erected on Bowen and Kennedy Roads at places where some protection appeared advisable, the cost being $1,063.

42. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City.-The road surfaces generally were maintained in a satisfactory condition.

The footways around Tai Hang Village were re-graded and surfaced with lime and

cement concrete.

Improvements were also effected in the surface channels in the Village of Aplichau to enable the surface and sullage water to be carried directly into the sea.

43. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in Kowloon.-Owing to the progress of the railway works on the East side of the Peninsula and the raising of the roads in that district the ordinary work of maintenance was for a time suspended. Otherwise the roads were maintained in good condition.

The kerbing and channelling of the West side of Nathan Road (formerly called Robinson Road) was completed during the year and the macadamizing of a portion of the surface was extended to and carried along Austin Road, Austin Avenue and Kimberley Road.

The names of various roads and streets have been altered by the Governor-in-Council in order to avoid the confusion caused by having two roads in the Colony (one on the Island and one in Kowloon) with identical rames. For the most part names of Chinese towns have been chosen for the new names in order that they may readily lend themselves to transliteration into Chinese characters (a source of much difficulty with many of the existing names) and that persons who do not speak Chinese may have less difficulty in

* Charged under "Telegraphs ".

A

P 13

describing the road or street to which they may wish to be conveyed &c. The roads and streets thus altered are as follows:-

Old Names.

Chater Street........

Albany Street

East Street.

West Street

Chater Road

Des Voeux Road

Garden Road ....

Robinson Road

Macdonnell Road... Elgin Road...

East Road

HONGKONG.

KOWLOON.

New Names.

...Catchick Street.

Tai Yuan Street.

Tung Street. Sai Street.

.Peking Road. .Chatham Road. Hankow Road.

Nathan Road.

.Canton Road. .Haiphong Road.

Hanoi Road. ...Hart Avenue, ...Gordon Terrace.

..

East Avenue

East Terrace

YAUMATI.

First Street..

Third Street

.Kansu Street.

Second Street....

.Pakhoi Street.

...Saigon Street.

.Ningpo Street.

.Nanking Street.

Fourth Street.

Fifth Street Kennedy Street Seventh Lane.....

Fuk Shing Lane

Macdonnell Road

Station Street North ...

Station Street South

Sixth Street and Gascoigne Road South

Eighth Street....

Woosung Street.

Yunnan Lane.

.Suchow Lane.

..Canton Road,

..Shanghai Street.

...Shanghai Street. ...Jordan Road,

.Bowring Street.

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th Lanes............Notice Boards to be removed

with these numbers on them as the lanes are merely Scavening Lanes.

Temple Street is to be continued northwards to Man Ming Lane, Yaumati.

Portland Street is to be continued southwards to this same point.

Macdonnell Road

Hill Street

Nullah Street....

Station Street North

MONGKOKTSUI.

HUNGHOM.

...Canton Road. ....Changsha Street.

Shangtung Street. ..Shanghai Street.

Des Voeux Road Third Lane..... Hill Street .... Market Street.. Station Street...

High Street.... Praya Station Street

FUK TSUN HEUNG.

.Chatham Road. Nanning Lane. Tientsin Street. Wuhu Street. Taku Street.

Newchwang Street. .Chungking Street.

Foochow street.

P 14

44. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in New Territories.-A further length of the Taipo Road, between the 2 and 4th milestones and extending over a distance of 1 miles, was coated with macadam.

A further extension of the Kowloon City Road towards Customs Pass was added to the roads in this district.

45. Maintenance of Telegraphs.-The work of duplicating all the Government telephone lines so as to place them in Metallic Circuit was completed early in the year, the cost being defrayed out of Suspense Account.

A telephone line was constructed between the extension of the Nurses' Quarters in the Medical Staff Quarters and the Government Civil Hospital; cables were substituted for the overhead wires in Pedder Street and the immediate neighbourhood so as to over- come the difficulty of providing posts in suitable positions for the overhead wires; a short length of cable was taken up near Pottinger Street; the Percival Street route practically reconstructed; the Caine Road route was much improved and the route at Causeway Bay altered to enable the Queen's Recreation Ground to be extended.

On account of repeated interruptions in the communication with Waglan Lighthouse, caused by the friction of the cable against the rocks, a new armoured end, 100 feet long, was laid.

All the instruments on Green Island were much damaged by lightning, necessitating special repairs.

46. Maintenance of Telegraphs in New Territories.-Two twenty-line switches were obtained from Messrs. Ericsson & Co. and were duly installed at Tai Po and Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station Exchanges.

47. Maintenance of Sewers. Nullahs, &c.—The sewers, storm-water drains, and trained nullahs, were cleansed and maintained in good condition, and the flushing tanks were systematically worked.

The details of the expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations

Repairs

Tools for cleansing operations

$13,683.70

4,365.50

1,174.88

$19,224.08

as against $22,447.36 in the previous year.

The decrease in expenditure, as compared with the previous year, is due to less being required in the way of cleansing operations.

48. Gas Lighting, City of Victoria and the Peak. The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City was 970, an increase of 3 over the previous year, and in the Hill District, 112, an increase of 1. The lighting of the Military Cantonments by 15 lamps remained on the same footing as formerly.

49. Electric Lighting, City-No alteration has been made in the number of lamps, which remains at 75.

50. Gas Lighting, Kowloon.—The total number of lamps at the end of the year, was 241, an increase of 4 over the previous year.

51. Electric Lighting, Kowloon.-No alteration has been made in the number of lamps which remains at 22.

52. Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers.-The following is a statement of the principal items of expenditure under the vote :-

Blake Pier...

Water Police Pier, Kowloon Point

Reinstating Sea Wall South of K.M.L. 58.

Arsenal Street Wharf......

Murray Pier

Kennedy Town Pier

Harbour Office Pier

Lai Chi Kok Pier.....

$1,356

688

658

421

388

343

324

242

Preparations were made for repainting Blake Pier, the necessary anti-corrosive paints being stocked at a cost of $1,015, which is included in the above sum.

A

{

P 15

53. Maintenance of Public Cemetery.-General_repairs were carried out to the surface channels and fountain. Toe walls were constructed at a cost of $1,050 to protect two of the newly formed terraces and two additional buttresses and an additional retaining wall were built on the northern boundary of the Cemetery at a cost of $1,096 to aid in prevent- ing landslips. Permits to the number of 74 were issued for the erection and repair of monuments and 40 tombstones were renovated at a cost of $350.

54. Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds.--Plots C to F of the Wongneichong Recreation Grouud were closed from May to October whilst improvements were being effected in the surface and subsoil drainage system of the valley. The Kowloon Cricket Club completed their pavilion in King's Park, Kowloon, and permission was granted on nominal terms to the Craigengower and Civil Service Cricket Clubs to crect premanent pavilions adjoining their allotments on the Wongneichong Recreation Ground.

The Polo Club's Riding School on the Queen's Recreation Ground was demolishel and reconstructed on a new site to admit of the extension of the area available for purposes of recreation. The expenditure incurred during the year in connection with the carrying out of this proposal amounted to $2,100.

55. Dredging Foreshores.-The quantity of material dredged during the year by the Priestman Grab Dredger was 33,836 c. yds., of which 8,990 c. yds. were dredged from the site of the Mongkoktsui Breakwater and 22,407 c. yds. from Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter.

56. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-A statement showing the extent of the damage done to Government Property by the typhoon of the 27th July was published in the Government Gazette dated September 25th, 1908.

Some of the repairs necessitated by the typhoon of the 18th September, 1906, were still in progress, notably the reinstatement of the pitching on the outer face of the Causeway Bay Breakwater. This work progressed slowly owing to the fact that most of it was tide- work and that very low tides were necessary before it could be begun. When it was nearing completion, further damage to a portion about 200 feet in length was done by the storms of the 27th July and subsequent dates.

The sea wall between Arsenal Street and East Point was thoroughly underpinned and repairs were found necessary to the section between Shek Tong Tsui and the Naval Yard. It was also found necessary to take down and entirely rebuild the North face of the West abutment of Bowrington Canal Bridge.

The Government cable under the Harbour from North Point to Hunghom was broken in two places by steamers dragging their anchors through the Cable Reserve, the north end being pulled out of the cable house. As a result of the serious damage done, it was found necessary to cut away 900 feet of the cable and to splice in a new piece 1,000 feet long.

The telephone service was very much damaged, nearly the whole of the New Ter- ritories lines being demolished. A further slip having occurred in the bank at "Braeside (I. L. 1523) a new retaining wall was built above the one previously constructed.

57. Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks.-The year opened with uni- versal constant supply in force and, with recourse to pumping for a period of 36 days during March and April from Tytam Intermediate Reservoir, it was possible to maintain constant supply throughout the entire year.

The quantity of water stored in the Impounding Reservoirs on the 1st of January amounted to 577,894,000 gallons and it reached a minimum on the 26th April when it .amounted to 218,182,000 gallons.

- P 16

The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow levels for the following periods

TOTAL CAPACITY.

Various periods, amounting to 44 days, between 24th July

and 22nd October.

Various periods, amounting to 181 days between 31st April'

and 31st December.

Tytam,

Tytam Bywash,.

384,800,000 gallons,

24th July to 1st November, (101) days.

22,366,000

""

Tytam Intermediate,.

195,914,000

Wongneichong,

30,337,000

""

Pokfulam

66,000,000

""

Grand Total,

699,417,000 gallons.

Various periods, amounting to 129 days, between 16th June.

and 1st November.

Various periods, amounting to 132 days, between 14th June.

and 7th November.

The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 549,968,000 gallons.

One of the new permanent pumping engines was utilized between the 23rd March and 28th April for raising water from the Tytam Intermediate Reservoir, the total quantity pumped amounting to 41,306,000 gallons.

A comparative statement of the total rainfall recorded at various points during the year is given in the following table, the figures for the Public Gardens being kindly sup- plied by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department :—

Month.

Kowloon Observa- tory.

Public Tytam Gardens.

Pokfulam Taipo Reservoir. TytamTuk. Reservoir. Quarters.

January, February,

Inches. 2.64

Inches.

Inches.

Inches.

Inches.

Inches.

2.83

3.15

3.05

2.27

3.78

2.83

2.70

2.46

2.44

ཟུར་

2.04

4.06

March,

.76

.98

.63

.87

.58

.61

April,

11.15

11.99

4.11

11.36

764

13.46

May,

1.32

1.60

1.35

1.56

1.29

2.35

June,

15.24

18.79

20.70

17.78

13.75

22.35

July,

22.26

28.34

24.88

23.53

28.10

33.59

August,

12.06

10.47

12.59

10.99

8.82

10.46

September,

13.72

9.88

12.84

11.31

9.97

17.14

October,

5.44

8.64

5.42

6.00

6.83

5.43

November,

December,

.14 4.28

.29

.25

.32

.43

.15

5.49

3.84

3.66

4.75

631

Total,..........

.... 1908. 91.84

102.00

92.22

92.87

86.46

119.69

1907. 93.51

111.69

96.51

Fixed 1-1-08

95.34

106.10

The total quantity of water supplied during the year was 1,665,643,000 gallons filtered and 17,752,000 gallons unfiltered, making a grand total of 1,683,395,000 gallons or 141,336,000 gallons more than in 1907.

The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes amount to 20 gallons, taking an estimated population of 206,760.

Full details of the consumption, contents of the reservoirs, &c., will be found in Appendices C and D.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst show the water to have been of ex- cellent quality throughout the year. Bacteriological examinations also gave very satis- factory results.

Difficulty was again experienced during the early part of the

part of the year in Western District of the City when the contents of Pokfulam Reservoir had

'ving the

nserved

P 17

for the supply of the High Level and Hill Districts. Proposals for overcoming this difficulty are under consideration.

The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District during the year amounted to 64,007,000 gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of 175,000 gallons whilst 27,633,000 gallons were pumped to the Hill District, giving an average daily consumption of 75,000 gallons. As compared with 1907 there was an increase of 9,093,000 gallons in the quantity pumped to the High Level District and an increase of 2,668,000 gallons in that pumped to the Hill District. The grand total pumped during the year amounted to 91,640,000 gallons as compared with 79,879,000 gallons in 1907. Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities puinped to the High Levels and the Hill District respectively will be found in Appendix E.

The new rising main (partly 5" and partly 6" diameter) which arrived from England at the end of 1907 was laid from Bonham Road Pumping Station to the service reservoir at Victoria Peak.

The 8-inch rising main was extended from the service reservoir (600 feet level) at West Point to the new service reservoir referred to in last year's report (750 feet level).

All motors, engines and station buildings were kept in a good state of repair during the year.

The number of meters in use at the end of the year was 1,070 in the City and 165 in the Hill District, or a total of 1,235 as compared with 1,005 and 164 in 1907, or a total of 1,169.

The quantity of water supplied by meter was as follows :—

Filtered-Trade

gallons. 172,787,000

Domestic (City) Domestic (Hill District)

102,556,000

27,633,000

Unfiltered,..

21,854,000

324,830,000

This shews an increase of 44,765,000 gallons in the quantity of water supplied by

meter over 1907.

New services were constructed or old ones repaired, altered, improved or connected to the mains to the number of 678, and 34 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The number of inspections of private services was 4,839; all defects were made good after the usual notices (1,137 in all) had been served.

58. Maintenance of Kowloon Waterworks.-The total quantity of water supplied amounted to 296,797,000 gallons, which gives a daily consumption of about 813,140 gallons or, taking an estimated population of 82,900, 9.7 gallons per head per day. These figures show an increase of 60,531,000 gallons over the quantity supplied during 1907.

Details are given in Appendices F and G.

The supply was constant throughout the year and the Government Analyst reported that the water was of excellent quality.

The various buildings were maintained in good repair.

A new distribution main, varying from 12" to 8" in diameter, was laid in order to give an increased supply to the Tsim Sha Tsui and Hung Hom Districts. Commencing at the intersection of Shanghai Street and Waterloo Road, it extends along the latter as far as Nathan Road which it follows until it joins the 7-inch main previously laid up to Kansu Street. From this point an 8-inch branch is connected to the 8-inch main in Gascoigne Road. The cost was defrayed out of the vote for maintenance.

There were 165 meters in use at the end of the year, an increase of 1 over 1907.

Private services were constructed, altered or repaired in 68 instances and 10 building supplies were laid on.

59. Maintenauce of Aberdeen and Shaukiwan Waterworks.--A satisfactory supply of water was maintained throughout the year at both these villages, the total consumption amounting to 4,580,000 and 22.077,000 gallons respectively, or about 13,000 and 60,000 gallons per day. Details are given in Appendices H and J.

The supply to Sai Wan Battery, which is included in the Shaukiwan returns, amounted to 1,699,000 gallons for the

year.

P 18

There were 6 meters in use at Aberdeen and 8 at Shaukiwan.

60. Maintenance of Laichikok Waterworks: Water Boat Supply.-The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 66,690,000 gallons, or about 180,000 gallons per day. Details are given in Appendix K.

There were 16 meters in use at the end of the year as compared with 11 in 1907.

61. Water Account.-The fixing of meters to properties not supplied by the rider mains continues and at the end of the year there were a large number of meters prepared for fixing early in 1909.

The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 716.

The following is a statement of the expenditure under the vote:-

Value of 197 new meters

..$11,417.46

Cost of fixing new meters

4,241.24

Repairs to meters...

4,303.79

Total,............ $19,962.49

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

62. Law Courts.-The whole of the main cornice was completed, and about 200 feet of the base to the balustrade was bedded. The carved figures in the pediment on the west front were completed and fixed and the statue of Justice was finished ready for hoisting into position. The granite facing of the walls of the second and third courts was completed; the east wall of the Library was built to a height of 15 feet above second floor level and the walls of the rooms on the second floor (east front) were built to a height of 3 feet above floor level and the window-sills were being fixed. The walls and piers of the upper part of the principal court were built to a height of 16' 6" above second floor level and the internal walls generally were within about 4′ 6′′ of the same height.

The massive teak brackets to support the overhang of the roof were fixed on the east and south sides of the third court. The concrete of the first floor colonnade was completed with the exception of four bays, and all the concrete floors (except that of the balcony over the colonnade) on the second floor were laid.

The dressed granite set in the work amounted to 26,863 c. ft. and about 1,500 c. ft. was dressed ready for setting. 105 granite balusters were prepared making a total of 455 ready for fixing. The average number of masons employed daily was 142.

A contract for the joinery and fittings required to complete the work was let to Mr. Chan A Tong on the 22nd February. A quantity of casements, etc., were made and the panelling of the courts was in course of preparation.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

......

.$100,000.00 | Total Estimates, ..... .$796,200.00 99,992.15 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 563,323.09

63. Post Office.-All the walls except those of the verandahs were built to the level of the third floor. In the case of the verandah walls, all the granite arches on the second floor were turned and about half the cornice at the level of the third floor was set. The joists for the third floor and most of the door and window frames above this level were fixed. The concrete floors at this level were also laid except those of the verandahs, main staircase landing and north-west lavatory.

The dressed granite set in the work amounted to 19,059 c. ft., in addition to which 5,894 c. f. of rough granite were set. 920 granolithic balusters were moulded bringing the number up to 2,720. The average number of masons employed daily was 92.

A large proportion of the

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

joiner work is ready for fixing.

$140,000.00 | Total Estimates,

136,577.93

$930,000.00

.$140,000.0 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 520,296.41

64. Public Latrines and Urinals.-Designs were prepared and contracts let for the following latrines :—

(i.) One, containing 24 seats, at Wongneichong Village.

(ii.)

16

""

in Chuk Hing Lane.

(iii.)

3

in Kennedy Road.

(iv.)

20

17

12

at Tai Kok Tsui Village.

>

-P 19

All the above were still in course of construction at the close of the year. necessitated a resumption of land which cost $4,500.

1908. Estimates, 1908. Expenditure,

$12,000.00 5,975.00

Item (ii)

65. Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill.-The machinery for dropping the time ball was all in working order early in the year, the ball being dropped on the 8th January. The total cost of the building, including transfer of machinery and repairing and fixing same was $6,543.28.

1908. Estimates,

.$1,245.00 Total Estimates,

$7,800.00

1908. Expenditure, ......................... 1,230.83 Expenditure to 31/12/08,... 6,543.28

66. Land Office at Tai Po.-This work was finally completed in August, continued bad weather and sickness among the workmen having impeded its progress. The building was however sufficiently advanced to admit of the two northern rooms being occupied by the Assistant Land Officer in the beginning of June, and the remaining two rooms by the end of June.

The building contains four rooms, the dimensions of which vary from 26' x 17' to 17' x 17' with verandahs on the east and west fronts 10' 0" and 8' 6" wide respectively and a corridor 8' 0" wide. The walls are of Canton red brick built in lime mortar, pointed externally and plastered internally. A granite string course with blocking course terminates the east verandah. The roofs of the verandahs are of cement concrete 6" thick supported on 3" x 3" steel angles and finished with granolithic 1" thick, and those of the rest of the building are of double pan and roll tiling supported on hardwood purlins and principals. The floors of the rooms are of hardwood, 14" thick, secured to hardwood fillets bedded in cement concrete 6" thick and those of the corridor and verandahs are of cement concrete 4" thick, the corridor being finished with 4" x 4" red tiles and the verandahs with granolithic 1" thick. A small brick latrine with double pan and roll tiled roof was erected near the Land Office.

The cost of the building including formation of site, paths, wall, etc., was $16,167.98 and furniture for the offices was supplied at a cost of $515.80-total $16,683.78.

1908. Estimates,.....

$15,000.00 | Total Estimates,.

$18,000.00

1908. Expenditure,......... 13,753.62 | Expenditure to 31/12/08, 16,687.94 As it was found necessary to utilize a pórtion of the building temporarily as quarters, a matshed was subsequently erected for coolies, also a kitchen and bath room, at a cost of $343.50.

67. Market near Quarry Bay.--This market, known as the Sai Wan Ho Market, was described in last year's report. It was completed in January at a total cost of $9,235.52.

1908. Estimates,

4,000.00 | Total Estimates, 1908. Expenditure,

$11,000.00 3,660.25 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 9,235.52

68. Slaughter House and Animal Depôts in Kowloon.-This work was finally com- pleted in November at a total cost of $66,889.91, towards which a sum of $18,000 was con- tributed from Railway Funds as mentioned in para. 93 of last year's report, where a general description of the work is given. In addition to the buildings there mentioned, an isolation. shed, 60' x 12', has been erected.

The buildings were occupied by the Sanitary Department in March, the delay in com- pletion being due to the difficulty of deciding upon a site for the isolation shed.

1908. Estimates,............. $52,000.00 Total Estimates,....... .....$70,000.00 1908. Expenditure,......... 48,889.91 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 48,889.91

|

69. Extension of old Stables to provide additional office accommodation required for Public Works Department.-The old stable building was extended and the walls were raised so as to provide a second storey throughout the full length of the building. The work was well advanced at the end of the year.

1908. Estimates,............ $10,000.00 | Total Estimates,.............. $12,000.00 1908. Expenditure,......... 6,851.77 | Expenditure to 31/12/08,... 6,851.77

70. Wanchai School Extension.-A contract was let in March and completed in August for extending this School so as to practically double its former accommodation, a portion of the new building being utilized for an assistant master's room and office. New and enlarged latrines and out-buildings were also constructed. The total cost of the work was $8,996.02.

1908. Estimates, 1908. Expenditure,

$9,000.00 | Total Estimates,.

8,996.02 | Expenditure to 31/12/08,

$9,000.00 8,996.02

P 20

71. Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School, Additional Storey.-This work was completed in October at a cost of $13,794.41.

The additional accommodation provided consists of :-

2 Class rooms

1 Class room

3 Class rooms (each)

Master's room

- 25' 9" x

- 25′ 9′′ ×

- 25′ 9′′ ×

21′ 1

11′′ 25′ 65

17' 29

-

12' 0" x

8' 0" 10′0′′

- 10' 0" x

Coolie's room

Coolie's kitchen -

- 10′ 0′′ ×

6' 0"

The verandahs were widened to 7' 6" and the three smaller class rooms are separated

Estimate $7,100 but a further expenditure of

from each other by removable partitions. $6,300 was authorized for the following

Screens,...

Extra Room,

Extras,

Temporary Latrines,

$ 700

5,000

500

100

$ 6,300

$

1908. Estimates,

$ 13,800.00 | Total Estimates,.

1908. Expenditure, 13,794.41 Expenditure to 31/12/08,

13,794.41

72. Victoria British School-Additional Storey to Quarters.-In consequence of com- plaints regarding the unhealthiness of the accommodation provided for the master of this school, an upper storey was added over the old quarters. This affords two rooms, a pantry and bathroom and there is also a verandah on the east side and a balcony on the west side. The rooms on the ground floor, formerly occupied by the master, were utilized as- class-rooms. The work was completed in July at a cost of $5,200.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$5,200.00 | Total Estimates,.

$

5,200.00 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 5,200.00

+

73. Market at Kowloon Point.-A contract for this work was signed by Mr. Hop Hing on the 21st September. On excavating trenches for the foundations it was found necessary to carry some portions of them to a greater depth than was anticipated on account of the softness of the ground. Excavation was still in progress at the close of the year. A quantity of building material was delivered on the site. The delay in getting out plans for this building was due to pressure of other work.

1908. Estimates,.

$15,000.00 Total Estimates,

$66,000.00

1908. Expenditure, ......... 892.58 | Expenditure to 31/12/08, 892.58 74. Mount Gough Police Station Extension.-This work was completed in September at a cost $7,686.30.

The additional accommodation consists of 3 rooms, a bathroom, a storeroom, a kitchen, a servants' room and a latrine.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$9,500.00 | Total Estimates,

$9,500.00

7,686.30 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 7,686.30

75. Staff Quarters, Tai Po.-A contract for this work was signed by Mr. Luen On on the 22nd February. Considerable delay occurred in the execution of the work owing to sickness among the workmen and the lack of materials and men. At the close of the year,

the roof of the main building and the plastering had been completed, the floors had been laid, ceilings erected and most of the internal finishings had been fixed. The concrete floor of verandahs and the concrete surfacing under building were laid and the drains were in progress. The brickwork of the Servants' Quarters was completed and the roof timbers were fixed.

The walls of the Stable building were 3 feet above ground level.

It was decided to erect 4 small native houses for the Clerical Staff at Tai Po and to defray the cost out of the item "Staff Quarters, Tai Po ", a supplementary vote of $2,000 being taken in aid of the vote for this purpose. A contract for the work was let to Mr. Li Ping in July and the houses were completed before the end of the year.

Each house contains a living-room 19′ 0′′ × 10′ 3′′ (with cockloft 8′ 6′′ × 10′ 3′′), kitchen 10′ 3′′ × 10′ 3′′, a latrine and a small enclosed yard. The walls are of blue brick in lime mortar, plastered externally and limewashed internally. The floors consist of cement concrete, 4" thick, and the roofs are partly of double pan and roll tiling on China fir poles and partly of Canton tiles on hardwood boarding and China fir poles. The erection

P 21

of partitions in the living-rooms was subsequently ordered, but had not been completed at

the close of the year.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$12,000.00 | Total Estimates,

11,996.19 | Expenditure to 31/12/08,

$30,000.00 11,996.19

76. New Roads in Kowloon.-The following were the works executed under this vote

of $30.000:-

(i.) Extension of Robinson Road (re-named Nathan Road) from Market Street to Waterloo Road. This work was completed at a cost of $13,581.70, the expenditure during 1908 amounting to $4,351.94. (ii.) Continuation of same from Waterloo Road to K.F.L. No. 2. This work became necessary on account of the erection of the Cigar Factory on K.I.L. 1203. It was incomplete at the close of the year, the expenditure on it amounting to $8,514.36.

(iii.) Road from Ma Tau Kok to Tai Shek Ku (incomplete). The principal object of this road was to shorten the distance from the Slaughter Houses to Yaumati but it will be found very useful in other ways. The expendi ture amounted to $3,096.15.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

....

$30,000.00 15,962.45

. New Roads in New Territories.-The extension of the Kowloon City Road from its point of intersection with the Military roads to its point of bifurcation to Customs Pass and Chin Lan Chu Village was completed at a cost of $6,352.98, the Military Authorities contri- buting a sum of $3,176.58. There is nothing special to record about it. The gradient

varies from 1 in 14 to 1 in 8.

Contracts were let towards the close of the year for :-

(a.) A road, 6 feet in width, from Castle Peak Bay to Ping Shan Village. (b.) A road, 7 feet in width, from near Kowloon City to Shatin Pass.

The amount expended on item (a) was $2,500 for land resumptions and $1,250.97 for surveying, defining areas to be resumed, etc., or a total of $3,750.97.

In the case of item (b), the Military Authorities are to bear the principal part of the cost, the Government taking over and maintaining the road after its completion. The expenditure amounted to $1,594.68 for land resumption.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$15,000,00 8,524.23

78. Forming and Kerbing Streets.-The following is a statement of the works executed under this heading, except those of a trifling nature. The sum stated is in some cases only a part of the cost owing to the work extending into more than one year :—

HONGKONG.

(i.) Improving Shaukiwan Road from S.M.L. 1 to a point midway between S. L.s 395 and 397: Resumptions or com- pensation for removal of buildings to new sites,

Pulling down old buildings,

Diverting and kerbing and channelling road,

Reconstructing No. 8 Bridge and forming road to eastward

of same,

Diverting nullah adjoining S.I.L. 414,.

Diverting tramway,

Widening road opposite S.M.L. 1 to admit of diversion of

tramway,.....

$6,550

300

3,961

963

342

2,539

791

(ii) Improving Shaukiwan Road below Quarry Bay Dam No. 4,.$7,754 (iii) Improvement of Kennedy Road West of Public Laundries

and extension of Stone Nullah Lane to Kennedy Road, 3,282 (iv.) Excavating hill, removing slips and forming Forbes and

Cadogan Streets, Kennedy Town,...

3,000

(v) Forming and kerbing streets intersecting S.M.L.s 2-10,...... 2,373 (vi.) Forming and kerbing Praya West between Sand Street and

$15,446

Smithfield,

715

P 22

(vii.) Kerbing and channelling at houses on I.L. 1680, Causeway

Bay,.....

(viii.) Improving approach to the Jewish Cemetery, Happy Valley:

Compensation for land,

.$ 353

KOWLOON.

100

$17,577

(ix.) Forming, kerbing and channelling East Road,

(x.)

""

Hi Lung Lane,

(xi.) Reclaiming north ends of Reclmation Street and Macdonnell Road, adjoining K.I.L. 1077, and constructing side wall of nullab,

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$40,000.00 ....... 35,711.57

$ 970

500

500

$ 1,970

Item (i). This work forms part of an improvement scheme whereby Shaukiwan Road is being widened to 75 feet and otherwise improved. It was necessary to carry out the work at once as part of the lease conditions of Shaukiwan Marine Lots 2-10. The old road, which followed a very tortuous route, is now to a great extent included within the boundaries of these lots.

Item (ii). This also forms part of the same general scheme. It consists of a resumption of land from Quarry Bay Marine Lot 2, which was negotiated in connection with the sale of Shaukiwan Marine Lots 2-10 to Messrs. Butterfield and Swire, the construction of a retaining wall and the filling in of a considerable area in order to substitute a reasonable curve for the extremely sharp bend which occurred at this part of the road. The levels of the road have also been improved.

Item (iii). This consisted of the straightening of Kennedy Road immediately west of the Public Laundries and the elimination of several dangerous bends which formerly existed there. A concrete bridge has been substituted for the timber bridge which spanned the nullah and a flight of steps has been constructed from Stone Nullah Lane to Kennedy Road.

Item (iv). The hill which had to be cut away in order to form the roads mentioned proved to be of a very treacherous nature, several large landslips occurring during the course of the work.

A retaining wall has now been constructed which will, it is hoped, prevent further slips occurring.

Items (v)-(vii) call for no comment.

Item (viii). The amount stated was for the resumption of the land referred to in last year's report.

Items (ix)-(xi) call for no comment.

79. Raising level of Des Voeux Road, Kowloon, consequent on reclamation for Railway Terminus.-Much of the filling-in was completed, the material being obtained from the hill on the west side of the Kowloon Cricket Club's allotment in King's Park. transported by means of a temporary tramway laid down by the contractor.

1908. Estimates, .........$17.000.00 | Total Estimates,.. 1908. Expenditure,

.$20,000.00

6,500.00 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 6,500.00

It was

80. Gullies Reconstruction.-This work was continued, the area dealt with being the Kowloon Peninsula. During the year, 86 gullies, with single gratings, and 101, with double gratings, were constructed, or a total of 288 gratings, bringing the total number dealt with up to the close of the year to 676 gullies with single and 710 with double gratings.

1908. Estimates,...

.$10,000.00 | Total Estimates,

|

$98,000.00

1908. Expenditure,......... 9,997.89 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 91,683.38

>

T

P 23

81. Training Nullahs.-The following is a statement of the works carried out under this heading :-

Length Trained. Lineal Feet.

Expenditure.

529

$4,856.00

3,331

6,419.00

325

1,182.00

(i.) Extension of trained nullah in Stone Nullah Lane, Wanchai, to above Kennedy Road,

(ii.) Extension of Albany Nullah Branches to the east of the Peak Tramway between May Road and Barker Road,

(iii.) Branch Nullah at Tai Hang to relieve flooding

of old village,

(iv.) Happy Valley Drainage

This work consisted principally of open- ing up and clearing the subsoil drains in Happy Valley. It also comprised the reconstruction of such drains where necessary, providing inlets and outlets to same and the training of a portion of the nullalı 200 feet in length behind the Dharma Sala. The Jockey Club subscribed $1,500 towards the work which cost in all,

(v.) Nullah in valley to south-east of Kowloon

Disinfecting Station,

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

....

3,645.40

873

1,369.00

.$20,000.00 18,150.39

82. Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers and substitution of Iron for Earthenware Pipes. No new flushing tank was undertaken but iron pipes were substituted for earthenware pipes in the case of a portion of the Bonham Road sewer, west of Eastern Street.

The portion dealt with comprises 316 yards of 12" diameter pipe, and 144 yards of 9" diameter pipe, or a total of 460 yards.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$5,000.00 Total Estimates,..... .$

4,999.37 | Expenditure to 31/12/08, . 14,482.33

83. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.-Extensive works were carried out under this heading. The following is a statement of the principal items, the amounts stated representing in some cases only a portion of the cost, owing to the work extending into more than one year :--

HONGKONG.

(i.) Training nullah north of No. 8 Bridge, Shaukiwan

(ii.) Construction of stormwater culvert in Leighton Hill

Road, Completed

$ 2,228

1,471

(iii.) Extension of sewer from Peak Road to Inland Lot 1772,

May Road, Completed

1,307

164

(iv.) Extension of sewer in Shing Wong Street, Completed...

(v.) Construction of sewer in Cooper Street, Tai Hang

Village, Completed..........

(vi.) Drain Connections, Completed

150

1,188

$ 6,508

P 24

KOWLOON.

(vii.) Redrainage of portion of Yaumati in consequence of

Reclamation of Kowloon Marine Lot 89 (Extension of Kowloon Marine Lot 49), including $4,000 con- tribution received from Land Reclamation Co.,

$19,187, Completed.

(viii.) Redrainage of portion of Yaumati in consequence of Reclamation in front of Police Station, Practically Completed

$ 15,187

16,916

5,572

(ix.) Construction of sewers between Dundas Street and

Nelson Street, Mongkoktsui, Completed...

(x.) Extension of sewer from Fifth Street, Yaumati, to

Kowloon Inland Lot 1133, Completed..

2,260

(xi.) Extension of sewer in Dundas Street, Mong Kok,

Completed

(xii.) Extension of sewer in Mody Road, Tsim Sha Tsui,

293

Completed

(xiii.) Drain Connections, Completed

1908. Estimates,.

1908. Expenditure,....

.$45,000.00 44,999.85

258

1,125

A

$ 41,611

Item (i). With the reclamation of Shaukiwan Marine Lots 2-10 and an adjoining area for the Market, it become necessary to train a length of the stream which discharges at this point. The lessees of the lots mentioned constructed one side-wall of the nullah in carrying out their reclamation and the work now referred to consisted of the construction of the remaining side-wall past the Market and underneath the bridge.

Item (ii). This work was necessary on account of the old stormwater culvert not being deep enough to carry off the stormwater from the rear of Inland Lot 1596, and also not being large enough to carry off the stormwater from the locality it was required to serve.

It comprised the construction of an egg-shaped culvert, 2' x 3', the lower part, up to the springing line of the arch, being of cement concrete and the arch itself of brickwork.

Item (iii). This extension was required to provide for the drainage of houses on May Road and is so arranged as to take the sullage water from "Clovelly" (Inland Lot 1206) and from the buildings of the Ladies' Recreation Club, which has hitherto found its way into the nullahs.

It comprises the laying of a 6" pipe sewer through the Ladies' Recreation Club grounds and thence to May Road.

Items (iv), (v), (xi) and (xii). These items refer to small extensions or diversions of sewers, necessitated by erection of new buildings or by the existence of defects in the old sewers.

Items (vi) and (xiii). These items call for no comment.

Item (vii). This work was partly described in last year's report. It comprises, in addition to the work outlined therein, the raising of the invert of a portion of an existing stormwater culvert in Third Street; the construction of a stormwater culvert in Gascoigne Road South, partly egg-shaped, 3′ 0′′ × 4' 6", and partly circular, 2′ 6′′ in diameter, and the laying of pipe drains varying in diameter from 9" to 18" in the adjoining streets.

The egg-shaped culvert in Gascoigne Road South is constructed of cement concrete up to the springing line of the arch, the arch itself being of brickwork, and the circular culvert is composed entirely of cement concrete.

Item (viii). This work was rendered necessary by the reclamation in front of Yaumati Police Station as the outfalls of the stormwater drain and sewer discharged on the north side of Reclamation Street opposite Public Square Street and Market Street respectively. The sewer has now been diverted to an existing outfall opposite Hi Lung Lane, and the stormwater drain has been extended in an open nullah along Public Square Street to the new line of the sea-wall.

The work also included stormwater culverts in Reclamation and Public Square Streets, partly egg-shaped, 2′ 0′′ x 3' 0", and partly circular, 2' 0" in diameter, pipe drains varying in diameter from 12" to 25" in adjoining streets, and pipe sewers varying in diameter from 9" to 15" in Reclamation Street and streets adjoining.

P 25

The nullah is constructed of concrete (partly cement and partly lime), the side-walls being faced with rubble masonry; the egg-shaped and circular culverts are composed of cement concrete, the former being supported on piles.

Item (ix). This work was rendered necessary on account of the insanitary condition of the locality, caused by the discharge of foul water into the open nullahs in Soy and Nullala Streets.

It comprises the construction of a system of pipe sewers varying in diameter from 6" to 15", connected with an existing outfall at Dundas Street, and various connections from private properties and street gullies. The 15" pipe sewer in Macdonnell Road is supported on a concrete and piled-foundation.

Item (x). This extension was stipulated for in an agreement with the late lessee of Kowloon Inland Lot 1133, whereby a readjustment of the boundaries of his lots was made to admit of the construction of main throughfares.

It comprises the laying of a pipe sewer, 6" to 9" in diameter, extending from the junction of Fifth and Kennedy Streets to Kowloon Inland Lot 1133.

84. Extensions of Lighting.-The following lamps were erected or fitted with lanterns and burners:

Kennedy Road,

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT.

Kennedy Town Pier,

Government House (lantern, &c. only), Algar Court (paid for by owner),..

Lamont's Lane (

do.

Mount Kellett Road, The Peak,

)......

Hau Fung Lane (provided by owner),...

Deduct lamps removed from Blake Pier,

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

8

4

4

As regards the lamp in Hau Fung Lane, the lighting was taken over by Government in consequence of the surrender by the owner of Inland Lots Nos. 260 and 1731 of the scavenging lane and right-of-way pertaining to these lots.

KOWLOON.

Nullah Street, Mongkoktsui......

Macdonnell Road (re-named Canton Road), Yaumati, Reclamation Street, Yaumati,

1908. Estimates,..

1908. Expenditure,

.$2,500.00 527.50

12

1

2

1

4

85. Permanent Marks for Traverse Survey Points in New Territories.-Owing to insufficiency of staff in the first instance and pressure of important work subsequently, it was not found possible to proceed with this work.

1908. Estimates,.. 1908. Expenditure,

.$3,000.00 Total Estimates,

$11,000.00

Expenditure to 31/12/08, 314.65

86. Reinforced Concrete Piers.—A wrought iron shed with matting roof was erected. in the yard at Wanchai referred to in last year's report and the yard itself was surfaced with lime and cement concrete. The necessary moulds were then prepared and 27 rein- forced concrete piles were made for the Kowloon City Pier which was to be put in hand in priority to the Green Island and Harbour Office Piers, but it was not possible to do any work on these last named up to the end of the year owing to the want of a Crane Barge.

1908. Estimates,. 1908. Expenditure,

.$19,000.00 4,230.53

Expenditure to 31/12/08, 11,574.60

87. Blake Pier Shelter.A contract was let to Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. in March for the manufacture of the granolithic slabs and rolls, with which it was decided to cover the roof, and the whole of these were completed in August. The columns, steel trusses, etc.,

P 26

having arrived from England in July, a further contract was entered into with Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. for their erection and by the close of the year the work was completed with the exception of the painting and the fixing of the new lamps. The painting was delayed by unsuitable weather.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,.....

$25,000.00 | Total Estimates,.

$28,100.00

24,990.90 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 24,990.90

88. Miscellaneous Works.-The following are the principal items of expenditure under this heading, representing in some cases only a part of the cost of the works in consequence of their execution extending over more than one year :---

Government Offices-Extension of Correspondence and Accounts

Offices, Public Works Department,

.$3,568

Government Offices-Reconstructing roof gutters and verandah

floors, Completed,

3,085

Green Island Gunpowder Depôt-Store for detonators, Completed Government House-Miscellaneous small works Completed,. Kowloon-Canton Railway-Taking borings in connection with

report on bridges (to be debited to the Railway),

2,719

2,493

1,823

1,538

1,463

1,328

1,053

* Douglas Rock-Beacon to mark position, Completed,..

Cheung Chau Pier, Completed...... Vegetable Market, Yaumiati, Completed,

Battery Path-Railing enclosing bank on north side, Completed Yaumati Police Station-Railings and sunshade, Completed, $527

""

--Additional cells,

do.

Railway Rest House at Tai Po-Contribution on account of pro-

vision of a room for the Local Auditor, Completed, Central Market-Constructing kitchen & scalding room, Completed Victoria British School-Filling in and fencing area for play-

ground, Completed,

Western (Temporary) Market-Repairs,

462

989

895

849

756

700

City Disinfecting Station-Repairs to compound, etc., Completed, Praya Reclamation Office-Alterations, Completed, Lighthouse Pier, Green Island-Extension,

673

662

662

European Lunatic Asylum-Converting latrine into bathroom,

Completed,

586

Filling in Swampy Land to S.W. of Disinfecting Station, Kowloon,

Completed,

504

Street Watering Fountains in various parts of City, Supreme Court-Renewing concrete surfacing of compound, &c.,

Completed,

488

454

Land Office-Constructing strong room, Completed, GovernmentCivil Hospital-Miscellaneous small works, Completed, Queen's College-Office for evening classes, &c., Completed,. Victoria Hospital-Plastering wards, &c., Completed, Reconstructing Refuse Enclosures, City of Victoria, Completed,... Coolie Quarters, &c., for Assistant Land Officer, Tai Po, do.

441

434

299

385

369

343

1908. Estimates, 1908. Expenditure,

$35,000.00 34,896.11

The beacon, which was of cement concrete, was entirely destroyed soon after its completion.

89. Queen's Statue Pier

Instructions were received from Government that

these works were not to be proceeded with.

90. Paving Cattle Depôt Compound 91. Mongkoktsui Breakwater-Typhoon Refuge for Small Craft.-On-the 7th March, a despatch was forwarded by His Excellency the Governor to the Secretary of State for the Colonies, submitting the scheme which had been prepared for the construction of a break- water off Mongkoktsui, the estimated cost of the works involved being $1,540,000 and the area of sheltered water afforded 166 acres. The scheme was referred by the Secretary of State to the Consulting Engineers (Messrs. Coode, Son and Matthews).

A reply to the despatch having been asked for by cable, a telegrain, dated 15th July, was received from the Secretary of State stating that the Consulting Engineers, whilst approving generally of the proposals, considered some modifications in the design necessary and thought them of sufficient importance to justify a consultation with Mr. Boulton, the

L

P 27

Executive Engineer who had prepared the scheme. Some further telegraphic correspondence took place and, as the result, Mr. Boulton left for London on the 15th August.

Meanwhile, the hopper dredger St. Enoch (capacity, 650 tons), which had been employed on the Naval Yard Extension Works, was purchased from Messrs. Punchard, Lowther & Co. in July for the sum of £15,000 ($167,441.85) and dredging for the founda- tion trench of the breakwater was commenced on the 2nd September and continued throughout the remainder of the year, 82,600 cubic yards of material being dredged and deposited in Gindrinkers Bay. The dredger was laid up for 9 days for repairs.

Mr. Boulton returned to the Colony on the 9th November.

An account of the consultations between him and the Consulting Engineers and the results arrived at is contained in Sessional Paper No. 1/1909, which was laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th February, 1909. The scheme was modified somewhat, the area of sheltered water becoming 140 acres so as not to exceed the estimated cost.

The Secretary of State considered it advisable to refer certain matters in connection with the scheme to the Admiralty and, in a despatch dated the 29th January, 1909, it was intimated that the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty assented to the modified scheme proposed by the Consulting Engineers.

1908. Estimates,. .$211,500.00 | Total Estimates,

$

1908. Expenditure, 208,693.32 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 208,693.32

....

|

92. Compensation under the Buildings Ordinance of 1903.-This vote provides for the resumption of areas to form Scavenging Lanes and for the payment of compensation in connection with the removal of houses over the ends of Private Lanes or Streets. In some cases, instead of the area devoted to Scavenging Lanes being resumed, an agreement has been entered into with the owner to the effect that the lane will be preserved so long as the buildings abutting on it exist and in a few cases the owners have surrendered the areas required, in whole or in part, in consideration of being permitted to count them as part of their open space.

1908. Estimates,

$35,000.00

1908. Expenditure,.........

......... 18,203.16

The following is a statement of the resumptions effected during the year-

Scavenging Lanes resumed on payment of compensation

A

Area in Compensation Sq. Ft.

paid.

In rear of 4 houses on M. L. 178, Queen's Rd. W. (part)

306

$2,448.00

9

:7

">

4 houses on M. L. 177, Queen's Rd. W. (part) No. 28 New Market Street,

573

3,871.13

88

1,584.00

No. 13 Li Sing Street,

45/1/20

376.00

""

""

No. 272 Des Voeux Rd. and No. 64 Wing Lok St. 6 houses on Kowloon Marine Lot 51, Macdonnell

Road, Yaumati,

84

2,100.00

600

840.00

""

Nos. 276 and 278 Des Voeux Road and Nos. 68

and 70 Wing Lok Street,

172

4,300.00

""

No. 274 Des Voeux Road Central and No. 66

Wing Lok Street,

88

2,222.00

Scurenging Lanes surrendered to Government without payment of compensation

Area in Sq. Ft.

In rear of 4 houses on M. L. 178, Queen's Rd. West (part)

306

"}

""

4 houses on M. L. 177, Queen's Rd. West (part)

280

3 houses in Hau Fung Lane,

417

""

No. 303 Queen's Road Central,

54

"" No. 29 West Street,

423

..

>>

No. 136 Des Voeux Road West,

101

">

""

**

No. 76 Bonham Strand,...

202

1

P 28

Scavenging Lanes provided by owners but not surrendered to the Government :—

Area in Sq. Ft.

....

In rear of houses on Marine Lots 188 and 189, Queen's Road

West, Des Voeux Road West and Hill Road,....... ..1,629 7 houses on P.R.M.L. 57, Connaught Road Central and Des Voeux Road Central,..

>>

17

""

7061

Nos. 70, 72 and 74 Queen's Road Central,

396

>>

"1

4 houses on I.L. 834, Queen's Road West,

.1,104

""

32 houses on M.L. 115, I.L.'s 412 & 413, Praya East, 2,236

>>

4 houses I.L.'s 423 and 523, Caine Road,

270

""

13 houses on K.I.L. 1076, Macdonnell Road, Reclama-

ation Street and Argyle Street,..

942

Nos. 458-464 Queen's Road West,

444

">

"

10 houses in Des Voeux Road Central, Connaught Road Central and Wing Wo Street,.

991

In order to provide additional open space in the case of a number of very deep houses which were about to be erected on the Praya Reclamation between Des Voeux Road and Ko Shing Street, the Government agreed to resume a strip of land 8 feet wide from the area appertaining to Marine Lot 57, paying compensation at the rate of $8 per square foot. The compensation will amount to about $8,424 and, as the owner of the property was required. to provide a lane 14 feet in width, the arrangement will result in the preservation of a lane or street 22 feet in width.

93. Albany Filter Beds, Reconstruction and Extension.-The new beds, known as Nos. 6, 7 and 8, were completed and brought into use before the close of the year and No. 5 Bed was well advanced. The excavation for the remianing beds (Nos. 2, 3 and 4) was begun.

1908. Estimates, .$35,000.00 | Total Estimates,..... $ 150,000.00 1908. Expenditure,...... 34,979.41 | Expenditure to 31/12/08, 121,016.66 94. Kowloon Waterworks, Gravitation Scheme.-The whole of these works were completed with the exception of the Storage Reservoir and a few trifling items connected with the various meters and meter-houses. Very little progress was made with the dams for the storage reservoir but, as the works had reached such a stage as to afford an ample- supply of water to the inhabitants of the Kowloon Peninsula, it was not considered necessary to take the work out of the Contractor's hands.

1908. Estimates, ......... .$44,000,00 Total Estimates,.........$1,194,600.00 1908. Expenditure,...... 35,330.99 | Expenditure to31/12/08, 1,113,080.86 99 | Expenditure to31/12/08, 1,113,080.86

95. Tytam Tuk Scheme, First Section. These works, which have now been fully com- pleted, form part of the scheme for the full development of the Tytam Valley Supply.. They comprise the following:-

(i.) A Storage Reservoir in the lower portion of the Tytam Valley, the per-

manent overflow level being 200 feet above Ordnance Datum.

(ii.) A pumping station on the west shore of Tytam Bay.

(iii.) A road from the Shaukiwan-Stanley Road to near the Tytam Byewash

Dam,

(iv.) Access roads to the Pumping Station and to the gauge basin at the inlet to

the Tytam tunnel and a path from the old Stanley Road round the shore of Tytam Bay to the pumping station.

(v.) A rising main from the pumping station to the inlet to the Tytam tunnel. (vi.) A suction main from the storage reservoir to the pumping station.

The following is a description of the works :-

(i). Storage Reservoir, designated Tytam Intermediate Reservoir. This reservoir has a capacity of 196 million gallons at permanent overflow level, which is 200 feet above Ord- nance Datum, and, by inserting boards 2' 6" high in the overflow, its capacity can be increased to 213 million gallons. Its catchment area is 470 acres but the water from a portion of it, 210 acres in extent, is intercepted by the Tytam West Catchwater. As the catchwater is inadequate however to convey all the water flowing from this area during heavy rainstorms, the reservoir derives some benefit from it, besides intercepting the subsoil water. The dam is constructed of cement concrete faced with rock-faced granite

*These lanes were provided prior to 1905 but, as the formal agreements were not completed, they have been omitted from

previous reports.

P 29

ashlar on the upstream face and partly with rubble and partly with dressed ashlar on the downstream face and is provided with an overflow 100 feet long about the centre of its length. The cement concrete, with the exception of the backing of the upstream ashlar face, tapering from 10 feet thick at the base of the dam to 5 feet thick at the crest, which is in the proportion of 4 to 1, is mixed in the proportion of 6 to 1 and contains displacers. The height of the dam above the original stream bed is 90 feet and, from the lowest foundation level to the crest, 110 feet. A valve-well, containing four 10-inch draw-offs, connected with a 12-inch stand-pipe, which is in direct communication with the 18-inch suction main to the pumping station, is constructed in the dam and is surmounted with a valve-house. A Venturi meter (with recorder in the valve-house) registers the amount of water passed down to the pumps. The contents of the dain are:-

Cement Concrete, Ashlar Masonry,

Rubble Masonry,

24,520 Cubic Yards. 47,755 451

Feet.

""

Yards.

(ii). Pumping Station.-The pumping station has been erected on a site well below the proposed low level reservior and excavated out of the hillside, the material so obtaine l being utilized to form a reclamation where junks can come alongside and discharge coal. The buildings are substantial structures and comprise a commodious engine house, boiler house, workshop and store. Quarters for a European overseer have been constructed on a site 100 feet above the station overlooking Tytam Bay, whilst those for the Chinese staff of engine drivers and stokers are situated close to the station. The main flue from the boiler house is carried up the hillside and terminates in a short shaft 61 feet in height, the total vertical height from the fire-grate to the top of the shaft being 135 feet.

Two sets of pumping engines and two boilers, supplied by Messrs. Tangye, Birmingham, have been installed. Each set is capable of raising 14 million gallons a day to the gauge basin at the inlet to the Tytam tunnel, 400 feet above Ordnance Datum; the engines have been so designed as to work alternatively from the proposed low-level reservoir or with a negative suction lift of from 100 to 200 feet when pumping water from the intermediate reservoir. The engines are triple-expansion, condensing, and run at 24 revolutions per minute with a steam pressure of 135 lb. per square inch. The pumps, three in number, have 12-inch diameter rams and 30-inch stroke and are placed immediately under each cylinder, being driven direct from the piston rod cross-head by side rods straddling the crank shaft. The boilers, two in number, are of the Lancashire type and are fitted with super-heaters in the smoke chamber. An engine, supplied with steam from the main boilers, and a direct-driven dynamo of ample capacity have been installed for lighting the station. An overhead 5-ton travelling crane, capable of lifting any portion of the engines, spans the engine room.

(iii). Road.-The road, whilst taking the rising main alrealy laid and containing provision for a duplicate main to be laid later, also supersedes the old road which will be submerged when the low-level reservoir is constructed. It is 14 miles in length and has a width of 20 feet for 14 miles, where the main is laid under it, and of 12 feet where it has only to accommodate the traffic. The road has a continuous rising gradient, varying from 1 in 240 to 1 in 8, and is free from sharp bends so as to avoid excessive friction in the main when pumping is in progress. There are four large bridges, (one with 3 spans of 50 feet, one with 3 spans of 20 and one of 30 feet, one with 6 spins of 20 feet and one with 2 spans of 20 and one of 30 feet), three cuttings over 60 feet deep and numerous massive retaining walls.

The bridges have a clear width of 13 feet between parapet walls. The piers, abutments and arches are constructed of cement concrete, face throughout with granite. The spandrels and haunches are filled in with lime concrete.

Wherever the road is on embank nent, masonry piers have been carried up from the solid ground to support the mains.

(iv). Access Rouds.-These bave been constructed to take the rising and suction mains. They are of an aggregate length of 1·33 miles and have widths of 6 and 12 feet.

(v). Rising Main.--The rising main is 3,406 yards in length and consists of cast iron pipes 18 inches in diameter, 7 inch thick and 12 feet in length. The weight of each pipe is 19 cwts., the pipes being of uniform section throughout the whole length of the main so that no confusion should arise in laying them. Three sets of reflux, sluice, air and by-pass valves and five washouts have been fixed at intervals in the rising main.

The rising main is laid in a trench 3 feet 6 inches deep, the joints being run with leal, 24 inches deep, after the insertion of a strand of yarn.

P 30

(vi). Suction Main.-The suction main is 2,416 yards in length, the pipes being the same as those used for the rising main. Two sets of sluice and air valves and two washouts have been provided on the suction main. The suction main is laid in a trench 2 feet 3 inches deep, the joints being run with lead, 14" deep, after the insertion of a strand of yarn.

The cost of the works was as follows:-

(i.) Storage Reservoir,

(ii.) Pumping Station :—

Preparation of site and erection of

Buildings,

Pumping engines and boilers (2 sets) 111,820.66

(iii) Road,

(iv.) Access Roads,

(v.) Rising Main,

(vi) Suction Main, j

Miscellaneous Charges,

$383,435.14

.$ 86,465.55

198,286.21

...154,507.57

.135,094.97

24,815.75

$896,139.64

The foregoing is exclusive of a sum of $142,025.44 spent on the temporary pumping plant, which was brought into operation on the 1st November, 1903, and disinantled in May, 1907, and on preliminary works, surveys, borings, well-sinking, &c., principally at the site of the proposed low-level dam.

1908. Estimates,

$15,000.00 Total Estimates, .........$ 862,000.00

|

1908. Expenditure,. ...... 13,692.81 | Expenditure to 31/12/08, 1,038,165.08

96. Miscellaneous Waterworks.-The following are the principal items of expenditure under this heading, representing in some cases only a part of the cost of the works in con- sequence of their execution exten ling over more than one year :

(i.) New Service Reservoir at 750′ level, West Point, Construc-

tion of reservoir (capacity 448,000 gallons), completed, $11,544 Extending 8" rising main to

completed,

do.

(ii.) New 8" rising main to 600' service reservoir, West Point,

Completed,

(iii.) Conduit Road Extension-6" main from 750′ service reservoir along Hatton and Conduit Roads, Queen's Gardens and May Road as far as Inland Lot 1772 (except the portion in front of Queen's Gardens houses which was laid in 1907), completed,...

401

$11,945

322

13,705

(iv.) Substituting 5′′ rising main in Peak Road for old 3′′ & 4′′,

completed,

3,307

(v.) Laying 4" main in diverted portion of Shaukiwan Road

past Shaukiwan Marine Lots 2-10, &c., completed,

1,130

$30,409

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,......

...

.$33,500.00 30,852.31

Item (i). This new reservoir, the reason for which was explained in last year's report, was completed and brought into use in August, but there was still a balance outstanding at the close of the year. Great improvement has been effected in the supply to the houses above Conduit Road and, in the event of fire occurring in this neighbourhood, an efficient supply of water should now be found available.

The reservoir is constructed principally of cement concrete, the walls being faced with brick in cement and the covering consisting of brick arches supported on brick pillars. Its capacity is about 418,000 gallons.

The district supplied from it comprises the whole of Conduit Road, Queen's Gardens, May Road and the group of houses on Peak Road above Queen's Gardens. The latter were formerly dependent upon a small tank of some 12,000 gallons capacity, which would have been found quite inadequate in the event of an outbreak of fire or of any serious breakdown in the pumping plant. On completion of the new reservoir, it became possible to dispense

f

P 31

with the one behind Inland Lot 1568 and the area on which the latter is situated was sold to the owner of the lot mentioned.

Item (ii). The object of this work was explained in last year's report.

Item (iii). The 3" main originally laid in Conduit Road has been superseded by one of 6" diameter which was connected to the new 750′ service reservoir and extended to Inland Lot 1772 on May Road. The length in front of Queen's Gardens houses was how- ever laid in 1907. There will be a credit later on account of the return into store of the pipes forming the old main.

Item (iv). Owing to the small diameter of the old rising main, it was not possible to use some of the motors to raise water to the tank which it supplied and accordingly a larger

main has been substituted for it.

Item (v). This work was rendered necessary by the diversion and improvement of the section of road referred to.

97. Flot Water Apparatus, &c., Government House.-The amount appearing opposite this heading was merely the balance due on the work which was completed in 1907.

1908. Estimates, 1908. Expenditure, 98. Queen's College: Latrines and Urinals.-The amounts appearing opposite this heading was merely the balance due on the work which was completed in 1907.

$406.00 | Total Estimates,

$3,000.00 405.53 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 2,998.98

1908. Estimates, 1908: Expenditure,

$966.00 Total Estimates,

461.22 Expenditure to 31/12/08,

.$2,550.00 2,200.71

99. Resuming and Filling in Fish Pond at Tai Po.-This work, which was begun towards the end of 1907, was continued, about 44,000 cubic yards of material being deposited to fill in the fish pond and to raise the area between the Village of Tai Wo Shi and the sea embankment to the level of the Tai Po Road. The work was nearly completed by the end of the year.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$5,900.00 | Total Estimates,

5,900.00 Expenditure to 31/12/08,

$10,473.20

9,000.00

100. Compensation to certain squatters whose removal was necessitated by the sale of Kowloon Inland Lot 1203.-The expenditure shown in Appendix B was paid as compensa- tion to some of the squatters removed from Kowloon Inland Lot 1203 who did not desire to accept land in exchange for their former holdings.

1908. Estimates,

$1,303.00 Total Estimates,

|

...$

1908. Expenditure, ......... 1,303.00 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 1,303.00

101. Refund of part of premium for Pier opposite Marine Lot 198.-Owing to the total destruction of the pier in question, which had just about reached completion, and the decision of the owners (Messrs. Butterfield & Swire) not to re-erect it, the Government agreed to refund two-thirds of the sum ($14,000) which had been paid by them as premium for the right to increase the size of it from 250' x 20' to 350' × 50'. The pier (250′ × 20′) was one of those for which a right of re-erection existed under "The Praya Wharves and Piers Ordinance, 1893", and, as a lease for it had been issued, it was decided that the terms of such lease must be adhered to. No lease had however been executed for the extended

pier.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

.$9,334.00

Total Estimates,

9.333.33 Expenditure to 31/12/08,

to

$

9,333.33

102. No. 5 Police Station, Alterations to Quarters.-Considerable alterations were carried out to improve the accommodation for the firemen occupying this station. They were completed before the end of the year.

1908. Estimates,

...

$1,300.00 | Total Estimates,

1,261.61 Expenditure to 31/12/08,

$1,300.00 1,261.61

1908. Expenditure,. 103. Installation of Electric Fans at Government House.-It was decided to instal electric fans throughout Government House and a contract for the work was entered into with the Hongkong Electric Company. The installation included 21 overhead fans and 21 desk fans, (2 of the latter being 16" and the remainder 12"), besides the necessary wiring, wall-plugs, &c. In connection with the installation, the 3 glass chandeliers in the Drawing Room were removed and 3 3-light pendants and 24 single-light wall brackets were sub- stituted for them. The whole of the work was satisfactorily completed before the end of the year.

1908. Estimates, 1908. Expenditure,

.$4,400.00 | Total Estimates,.

4,208.55 Expenditure to 31/12/08,

$4,400.00

4,208.55

&

P 32

104. Quarantine Station.-The lessees of the Trausvaal Emigration Depôt at Lai Chi Kok having signified their intention to terminate their lease and remove their buildings, the Government arranged to purchase the whole of the buildings from them for a sum of $3,000 with a view to utilizing them for a quarantine station. The amount stated ($3,000) was paid out of the Vote "Miscellaneous Services" appearing under "General Administra- tion" in the Estimates.

The buildings, which are of a somewhat temporary description, required a considerable amount of repair and it was also decided to erect a masonry boundary wall to enclose them and to repair the old Customs Station for use as a guard house. The expenditure appear- ing in Appendix B was on account of these works.

1908. Estimates,

1908. Expenditure,

$8,500.00 | Total Estimates,

.$12,567.00

2,006.00 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 2,006.00

105. Compensation for the Resumption of Lots 212 and 711, Demarcation District 6, Tai Po-Portions of the lots in question were required for railway purposes and, as it appeared probable that the remainder would be required in connection with the development of Tai Po, it was decided to resume the whole of them. They were situated immediately to the westward of Tai Wo Shi Village, the entire area being 8·50 acres, of which the Railway occupied and paid for 2.54 acres.

1908. Estimates, .......... .$1,368.00 | Total Estimates,........ .....$ 1908. Expenditure, ......... 1,367.30 | Expenditure to 31/12/08, 1,367.30

to

106. Compensation for the Resumption of certain lots in Demarcation District 183 (Tin Liu, Shatin Valley).-Portions of these lots hal been resumed in connection with the Railway and, as the bank enclosing them suffered during the typhoons, the lessee request- ed the Government to resume the remainder because the portions left in his possession would not justify his incurring the expense of the necessary repairs. His request was re- cognized as a reasonable one and the remaining portions were accordingly resumed.

1908. Estimates,. 1908. Expenditure,

.$ 634.00 Total Estimates,

633.74 Expenditure to 31/12/08, 633.74

107. Compensation for Resumption of Lot No. 3212, Survey District IV.-It was considered desirable to resume this lot with a view to providing for the construction of future roads projected in the neighbourhood of Sham Shui Po and the lot was resumed accordingly. Nothing was actually paid during the year.

108. Praya East Reclamation.-The expenditure appearing in Appendix B was merely a transfer for Treasury purposes of a sum expended in 1903-1905 from Suspense Account to Public Works Extraordinary.

T

WORKS NOT APPEARING IN APPENDIX B.

109. Civil Hospital, Staff Quarters.-The reason for the extension of this building was explained in last year's report. The additional accommodation consisted of two rooms, 26' x 20', two rooms 13' x 8', two bathrooms and a latrine in the yard. The total cost of the work, which was defrayed from the Nursing Institute Fund, was $10,071.46, the expenditure in 1908 amounting to $7,911.19.

110. Obelisk, Kowloon.--This monument was formally unveiled on the 14th May by Madamoiselle Morel, daughter of the Governor of Tonkin. The cost of it, which amounted to $2,533.73, was defrayed by private subscription.

111. Volunteer Head Quarters-Kitchen.-A Kitchen, 12′ 0′′ × 6′ 9′′, was added to the outbuilding adjoining the Volunteer Head Quarters. The cost, amounting to $450, Was defrayed from funds in the possession of the Corps.

112. Fire Alarms.-Twelve new fire alarms (Saunders and Brown's) were erected in various parts of the City and connected by wire with the Central Fire Station (Police Station No. 5) direct. The alarins admit of the use of a pocket telephone instrument, with which some of the Police are provided, access to the apparatus being obtained by means of a key. The alarms can be used by the public by the usual method of breaking the glass cover and ringing a bell. The cost of the installation ($2,488.62) was defrayed from a Police Vote.

+

+

P 33

113. Causeway Bay Typhoon Refuge-Deepening shallow area to one foot below Ord- nance Datum.-A contract for this work was let to Mr. Li Ping in October and operations. were commenced on the 24th November; shallow-draft junks, fitted with iron-shod bamboo basket scoops, being employed for the purpose of excavating the material. The quantity removed up to the end of the year amounted to 10,000 cub. yds, but, as no payment had been made to the Contractor, the item does not appear in Appendix B.

ADVANCE ACCOUNT.

114. Metallic Circuiting.-This work was completed early in the during 1908 amounting to $151.23.

The total cost of the work has been as follows :-

Materials and labour,..

Add 15% for Supervision,

year,

the expenditure

$34,198.52 5,129.78

,

Total,....

$39,328.30

A claim for this amount has been forwarded to the Electric Traction Co. but no settle- ment has yet been arrived at.

STAFF, &c.

The following Officers left the Service of the Department :-

Mr. A. S. Mulholland, Overseer.

Mr. Arthur Crane, Overseer.

Mr. A. V. Parker, Overseer, and several other Subordinate Officers.

The following appointments were made :-

Mr. F. Sutton, Assistant Land Surveyor.

Mr. J. Grant,

Do.

Mr. J. J. Bryan, Drainage Surveyor (transferred from Sanitary Department)..

Mr. J. Edwards, Overseer.

Mr. J. H. Kynoch, do.

Mr. P. Keyser,

do.

Mr. J. Dickson, Jr., do.

Mr. R. J. Wilkinson, Custodian Recreation Ground.

Mr. Fong Yau Leung, Tracer.

Mr. Wong Sun Kuen,

Mr. Wong Wing Iu,

Mr. Chan Siu Tong, Clerk.

do.

do.

Mr. Ip Pun, Clerk (transferred from Police Department).

.Mr. Ko Siu Fan, Clerk.

Mr. Lo Kau Kwai, Clerk (transferred from Sanitary Department).

Mr. Ma Fung Shu, Clerk and Draughtsman,

do.

do.

Mr. A. Small, Foreman,

Mr. Alvaro Malachias Souza, Foreman,

do.

do.

Mr. Lau Pui, Foreman,

do.

Mr. Mak Lo, Foreman,

Mr. Tam Yam, Foreman.

Mr. Cheong Hing, Foreman.

and 40 watchmen, survey coolies, &c., &c.

P 34

The Captain, Chief Engineer and crew (21 members) of the Dredger St. Enoch were taken over with the vessel. The Chief Engineer died towards the close of the year and the vacancy caused by his death was at once filled.

The following Officers returned from leave and resumed duty on the dates mentioned :-

Mr. H. P. Tooker, Executive Engineer,

C. H. Gale,

H. G. C. Fisher,

D. Jaffé,

4th December. 26th March.

1st October.

27th March.

"?

A. J. Darby, Land Surveyor,

20th September.

>>

C. N. Solomon, Foreman of Works, Hill District,...... 18th August.

Beyond the transfer of a number of Officers from the Sanitary Department, conse- quent upon the passing of the amending Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, no change of any moment occurred in the Staff during the year.

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE,

Hongkong, 19th May, 1909.

W. CHATHAM, C.M.G., M.I.C.E.,

Director of Public Works.

{

P 35

Appendix A.

ANNUALLY RECURRENT EXPENDITURE, 1908.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED, ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

PROVISION-

ALLY

VOTED.

ESTABLISHMENT.

€9

$

$

C.

*

C.

C.

*

CA

('.

Personal Emoluments including Exchange

Compensation,.....................

248,130

Other Charges,

19,996

248,794.43 17,683.08

664.43

4,115.46

2,312.92

$268,126

266,477.51

664.43

2,312.92 4,115.46

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

Buildings.

55,000

57,998.13

2,998.13

3,000.00

in New

9,000

7,296.62

1,703.38

4,500

15,571.80

11,071.80

11,170.00

1. Maintenance of Buildings,.

2.

""

Territories,

""

3. Maintenance of Lighthouses,

Communications.

4. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

City,

55,000

54,998.60

1.40

5. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

outside City,

25,000

24,986.41

13.59

6. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

Kowloon,.................

22,000

21,994.70

5.30

7. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

New Territories,...

10,000

9,988.96

11.04

8. Maintenance of Telegraphs,

8,000

10,623.48

2,623.48

3,000.00

9.

in

"2

""

New Territories,

4,000

4,787,30

787.30

800.00

Drainage.

10. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

20,000

19,224.08

775.92

Lighting.

11. Gas Lighting, City of Victoria and

the Peak,

{

45,000

43,935.20

1,064.80

12. Electric Lighting, City of Victoria, 13. Gas Lighting, Kowloon,..

23,000

22,347.48

652.52

10,000

9,264.18

735.82

14. Electric

"

1,000

883.20

116.80

Miscellaneous.

15. Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers, .

7,000

5,163.72

16.

,,

Public Cemetery, ....

4,000

2,768.35

1,836.28 1,231.65

17:

Public Recreation

??

Grounds,

3,500

2,896.54

18. Dredging Foreshores,

12,000

8,100.84

603.46 3,899.16

19. Miscellaneous Services,

10,000

11,324.78

1,324.78

20. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,....

12,500

95,596.05 83,096.05

1,400.00 83,100.00

Waterworks.

21. Maintenance of City and Hill District,.

65,000

45,768.20

19,231.80

22.

Kowloon,

8,000

14,191.33

6,491.33

6,500.00

23.

Shau-ki-wan,

1,000

834.38

165.62

24.

""

Aberdeen,

1,000

211.51

788.49

25.

15

Lai Chi Kok,.

2,000

1,317.97

682.03

26. Water Account (meters, &c.),

20,000

19,962.49

37.51

Total,.....

437,500

512,336.30 108,392.87

33,556.57 108.970.00

1

P 36

Appendix B.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE, 1908.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

Buildings.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

INCREASE. DECREASE.

$

('.

$

C.

*A

C.

PROVISION-

ALLY

VOTED.

1. Law Court,

100,000

99,992,15

7.85

2. Post Office,

140,000

136,577.93

3. Public Latrines and Urinals,

12,000

5,975,00

3,422.07 6,025.00

4. Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill,

Kowloon,.....

1,200

1,230.83

5. Land Office at Tai Po,

9,000

13,753.62

30.83 4,753.62

45

6,000

6. Market near Quarry Bay,

4,000

3,660.25

339,75

7. Slaughter House and Animal Depôts

in Kowloon,

52,000

48,889.91

...

3,110.09

8. Extension of Old Stables to provide Additional Office Accomodation required for Public Works Dept.,

10,000

6,851.77

9. Wantsai School Extension,

9,000

8,996.02

3,148.23 3.98

10. Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School,

Additional Storey,

7,100

13,794.41

6,694.41

6,700

11. Victoria British School, Additional

Storey to Quarters,

3,500

5.200.00

1,700.0)

1,700

12. Market at Kowloon Point,

15,000

892.58

14,107.42

13. Mount Gough Police Station Extension, 14. Staff Quarters, Tai Po,

9,500

7.686.30

1,813.70

10,000

11,996.19

1,996.19

2,000-

Communications.

15. New Roads in Kowloon,

16. New Roads in New Territories,

30,000

15,962.45

15,000

8.524.23

17. Forming and Kerbing Streets,

40,000

35,711.57

14,037.55

6,475.77

4,288.43

18. Raising level of Des Voeux Road, Kowloon, consequent on reclam- ation of Railway Terminus, ......

17,000

6,500.00

10,500.00

:

Drainage.

19. Gullies Reconstruction,

10,000

20. Training Nullahs,

20,000

9,997.89 18,150.39

2.11

...

1,849.61

21. Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers and substitution of Iron

for Earthenware Pipes,

5,000

22. Miscellaneous Drainage Works,

45,000

4,999.37 44,999.85

.63 .15

Lighting.

23. Extensions of Lighting,

2,500

527.50

1,972.50

Miscellaneous.

24. Permanent Marks for Traverse Survey

Points in N. T.,

3,000

3,000.00

:

25. Reinforced Concrete Piers at Green

Island Gunpowder Depôt, New Harbour Office & Kowloon City,

19,000

26. Blake Pier Shelter,

20,000

4,230.53 24,990.90

14,769.47

4,990.90

.....

5,000

27. Miscellaneous Works,

35,000

34,896.11

28. Queen's Statue Pier,

10,000

103.89 10,000.00

29. Paving Cattle Depôt Compound, 30. Mongkoktsui Breakwater, Typhoon

Refuge for Small Craft,....

5,000

5,000.00

25,000

208,693.32 183,693.32

186,500

31. Store Account,......................

100

Carried forward,...$ 683,900 783,681.07 203,859.27 103,978.20 207,945

>

- P 37-

APPENDIX B,—Continued.

PROVISION-

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

ALLY

VOTED.

Brought forward,........

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance,

1903.

$

$

C.

683,900

783,681.07

!

$

c.

203,859.27

$

C.

$

103,978.20 207,945

32. Compensation,

20,000

18,203.16

1,796.84 15,000

Waterworks.

33. Albany Filter Beds, Reconstruction

and Extension,

35,000

34,979.41

20.59

:

34. Kowloon Waterworks, Gravitation

Scheme,

44,000

35,330.99

8,669.01

35. Tytam Tuk Scheme, First Section,

15,000

13,692.81

1,307.19

36. Miscellaneous Waterworks,

25,000

30,852.34

5,852.34

8,500

37. Hot Water Apparatus and Baths.

Government House,

405.53

405.53

406

38. Queen's College, Latrines and Urinals, 39. Resuming and Filling in Fish Pond,

Tai Po,

461.22 |

461.22

966

5,900.00

5,900.00

5,900

40. Compensation to Certain Squatters whose removal was necessitated by the Sale of K. I. L. 1203,

1,303.00

1,303.00

1,303

41. Refund of Part of Premium for the Pier opposite M. Lot 198,...................... 42. No. 5 Station, Alteration to Quarters, 43. Installation of Electric Fans at Govern-

ment House,

44. Quarantine Station,

45. Compensation for the Resumption of Lots No. 212 and 711 situated

in Demarcation District No. 6,... 46. Compensation for Resumption of Cer- tain Lots in Demarcation District No. 183,

47. Compensation for Resumption of Lot No. 3212 in Survey District IV, New Territories,

43. Praya East Reclamation,

9,333.33

9,333.33

9,334

1,261.61

1,261.61

1,300

4,208.55

4,208.55

4,400

2,006.00

2,006.00

9,500

:

1,367.30

1,367.30

1,368

633.74

633.74

634

302

......

57,315.39 57,315.39

Total,

822,900 * 1,000,935.45 293,907.28 115,771.83

265,858

* Less Store Account Credit, ... $11,849.26

Refund by Railway,

1,882.50

13,731.76

$987,203,69

MONTH.

POKFULAM.

In Reser- voir 1st of over month. gauge.

Delivered

MAIN.

Appendix C.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORKS, 1908. Monthly Consumption and Contents of Reservoirs (gallons).

TAITAM.

WONG-NEI-CHONG,

TOTAL CON-

MINT DAM, BLUE POOL

RAIN-

COLLECTED TOTAL CON-

FALL

TENTS OF

AND

SUPPLIES

GRAND

AT

FROM

SUMPTION

REMARKS.

INTERMEDIATE.

Delivered

over

In Reservoir 1st of mouth.

gange.

In Reser-

voir 1st of

month.

Delivered

FROM

OBSER-

over

IMPOUNDING

RESERVOIRS

STREAMS. (Filtered).

POKFULAM TOTAL,

VATORY

gauge.

CONDUIT (Unfiltered).

(Inches).

195,212,000|105,963,000 | 1,122,000

nil.

Constant supply

2.64

during

year.

whole

BY-WASHI.

In Reservoir In Reservoir 1st of month. 1st of month

P 38

Jan.,

48,410,000 20,606,000 333,150,000

nil.

Feb.,.36,640,000 17,233,000 251,060,000 497,000 197,103,000 93,115,000 2,654,000

">

.76

1.32

577,894,000 10,636,000 137,211,000 2,357,000 139,568,000 487,954,000 11,822,000 122,190,000 2,944,000 125,134,000 | 2.83 March, 28,200,000 | 21,327,000 174,800,000] 1,235.000 194,276,000 | 105,410,000| 4,568,000| 3,487,000|403,079,000|| 4,559,000 | 134,783,000 1,695,000 | 136,478,000 April, 11,740,000 10,146,000 97,600,000 571,000 183,642,000 101,956,000 403,000 802,000 293,956,000 17,100,000 130,004,000 1,693,000131,6 7,000 11.15 May,. 48,410,000 29,053,000 [129,510,000 898,000 198,292,000 96,559,000 | 15,320,000 8,464,000 392,430,000 9,504,000 143,580,000 111,000 143,691,000- June,22,200,000 25,807,000| 75,200,000 696,000 181,379,000 75,292,000 8,091,000 4,774,000 287,566,000 39,206,000 145,079,000 1,096,000 146,175,000 15.24 July, 66,000,000 22,002,000 246,375,000 295,000 142,165,000 | 90,563,000|30,337,000 3,806,000 485,162,000 32,206,000 148,577,000 1,298,000 | 149,875,000 22.26 Aug., 66,180,000 25,390,000 385,520,000 22,497,000 | 196,389,000 103,877,000 30,398,000 nil. 700,984,000 21,179,000 150,446,000 1,295,000 151,741,000 12.06 699,417,000 13,764,000 | 144,106,000 1,289,000 145,395,000 13.72 747,340,000 26,565,000 | 139,908,000 1,284,000 141,192,000 5.44

Sept., 66,000,000 29,328,000 384,800,000 22,366,000 | 195,914,000 101,014,000 30,237,000

""

""

.14

Oct.,... 70,409,000 | 25,455,000 407,000,000 26,301,000 210,307,000| 87,888,000 | 33,260,000 | 400,8 Nov., 67,890,000 25,935,000 400,800,000 13,939,000 210,370,000 99,454,000 30,337,000 4,472,000 723,336,000 4,358,000 134,219,000 1,324,000 135,543,000 Dec.,.54,380,000 19,714,000 345,280,000 nil. 208,651,000 85,203,000 20,669,000 | 23,457,000 628,980,000 7,166,000 135,540,000 1,366,000 136,906,000| 4.28

Total,.

1908.

Total,

...

272,016,000

291,235,000

1,116,300,000

49,262,000

198,065,000 1,665,643,000 | 17,752,000 1,683,395,000 91.84

918,170,000

...

92,433,000

215,253,000 1,517,091,000 |24,968,000 1,542,059 000

Tytam Tuk Pumping En- gines running from 23rd March to 28th April, but stopped for four days on account of re- pairs. Number of days running =32.

1907.

:

Excess

in

...

:

1908.

:

:

:...

:

:

:

:

...

Estimated average population for whole year, 206,760. Consumption of filtered water per head per day, 20 gallons.

...

148,552,000

141,336,000

...

7

1

+

Appendix D.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORKS, 1908. Particulars of Metered and Unmetered Supplies (gallons).

FILTERED SUPPLY.

P 39

UNMETERED.

UNFILTERED

METERED.

GRAND

MONTH.

CITY.

TOTAL.

SUPPLY

(Metered).

TOTAL.

CITY.

HILL DISTRICT.

Trade.

Domestic.

January,

111,710,000

16,314,000

7,249,000

1,988,000

137,211,000

2,667,000

139,878,000

February,

101,455,000

12,227,000

6,626,000

1,882,000

122,190,000

3,308,000

125,498,000

March,......

112,124,000

13,225,000

7,223,000

2,211,000

134,783,000

1,839,020

136,622,000

April,

106,447,000

14,352,000

7,242.000

1,963,000

130,004,000

1,953,000

131,957,000

May,

116,408,000

15,881,000

9,108,000

2,183,000

143,580,000

416,000

143,996,000

June,

115,661,000

16,889,000

10,082,000

2,447,000

145,079,000

1,498,000

146,577,000

July,

119,648,000

15,550,000

10,917,000

2,462,000

148,577,000

1,666,000

150,243,000

August,.

122,189,000

15,467,000

10,374,000

2,416,000

150,446,C00

1,706,000

152,152,000

September,

120,053,000

12,673,000

8,796,000

2,584,000

144,106,000

1,628,000

145,734,000

October,

116,857,000

11,597,000

8,845,000

2,609,000

139,908,000

1,740,000

141,648,000

November,

109,113,000

13,612,000

8,963,000

2,501,000

134,219,000

1,594,000

135,813,000

December,

111,002,000

14,970,000

7,131,000

2,437,000

135,540,000

1,839,000

137,379,000

Total, 1908,

1,362,667,000

172,787,000

102,556,000

27,633,000

1,665,643,000

21,854,000

1,687,497,000

Total, 1907,

1,261,994,000

122,647,000

107,485,000

24,965,000

1,517,091,000

24,968,000

1,542,059,000

Increase,

100,673,000

50,140,000

2,668,000

148,552,000

145,438,000

Appendix E.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORKS, 1908.

Water Pumped to Hill District and High Levels of the City (gallons).

(Theoretical Displacement of Pumps.)

F

HIGH LEVELS OF CITY.

HILL DISTRICT.

MONTH.

MOTORS.

ENGINE.

TOTAL.

Motors.

700′ and 750′ TANKS

(Conduit and Peak Roads District.)

600′ and 650′ TANKS. (Robinson Road District.)

GRAND

TOTAL

COMBINED

PUMPED.

TOTALS.

Engine.

Total.

Motors.

Eugine.

'Total.

January,

1,938,000

1,938,000

937,000

937,000

1,720,000 1,947,000 3,667,000

4,604,000

6,542,000

February,

1,882,000

1,882,000

868,000

868,000

1,518,000 1,670,000 3,188,000

4,056,000

5,938,000

March,...

2,211,000 2,211,000

927,000

927,000

April,.

1,963,000 1,963,000

875,000

875,000

1,545,000 2,006,000 3,551,000 4,478,000 1,573,000 2,024,000 3,597,000 4,472,000 6,435,000

6,689,000

¡

P 40

May,

2,183,000 2,183,000

825,000

June,.

2,447,000 2,447,000

860,000

July,

2,462,000 2,462,000 1,018,090

August,

2,416,000 2,416,000

392,000 1,269,000

September,

2,584,000 2,584,000

397,000

990,000

October,

66,000

2,543,000 2,609,000

342,000

November,

December,

Total, 1908.

75,000

Total, 1907.

9,000 2,492,000 2,501,000 2,437,000 2,437,000 131,000 27,558,000 27,633,000 7,872,000 24,965,000 24,965,000 11,566,000

300,000

1,261,000

1,880,000

1,078,000

5,928,000

Increase,

75,000

2,593,000 2,668,000

5,928,000

825,000 2,515,000 2,154,000 4,669,000 860,000 3,308,000 634,000 3,992,000 1,018,000 3,560,000 1,012,000 4,572,000 5,590,000 8,052,000 1,661,000 3,249,000 1,430,000 4,679,000 6,340,000 8,756,000. 1,387,000 4,032,000 458,000 4,490,000 5,877,000 8,461,000 1,603,000 3,802,000 471,000 4,273,000 5,876,000 8,485,000 1,630,900 4,261,000 458,000 4,719,000 6,349,000 8,850,000 1,209,000 4,339,000 471,000 4,810,000 6,019,000 8,456,000 13,800,000 35,422,000 14,785,000 50,207,000 64,007,000 91,640,000 11,566,000 21,463,000 21,885,000 43,318,000 54,914,000 79,879,000 2,231,000 13,959,000

5,494,000

7,677,000

4,852,000 7,299,000

6,859,000 9,093,000 11,761,000

-7

Y

Appendices F & G.

+

KOWLOON WATERWORKS.

Contents of Reservoir and Details of Monthly Consumption (gallons), 1908.

$

METERED SUPPLY.

IN RESERVOIR

MONTII.

Unmetered SUPPLY.

GRAND TOTAL.

REMARKS.

1ST OF MONTH.

Trade.

Domestic.

Total.

P 41

January,

February,

March,.......

April,

132,500,000

4,181,000

1,899,000

6,030,000

15,579,000

21,609,000

130,400,000

3,387,000

1,728,000

5,115,000

15,710,000

20,825,000

135,650,000

3,670,000

1,700,000

5,370,000

16,891,000

22,261,000

122,133,000

4,922,000

1,855,000

6,777,000

14,232,000

21,009,000

May,

116,000,000

4,880,000

2,246,000

7,126,000

15,135,000

22,261,000

June,

116,500,000

5,022,000

2,308,000

7,330,000

17,129,000

24,459,000

Constant Supply during whole

July,

135,125,000

5,417,000

2,926,000

8,343,000

13,177,000

21,520,000

year.

August,

156,200,000

7,451,000

2,487,000

9,938,000

16,994,000

26,932,000

September,

77,100,000

5,986,000

2,245,000

8,231,000

20,460,000

28,691,000

October,

176,700,000

4,807,000

2,127,000

6,934,000

22,524,000

29,458,000

November,

176,700,000

5,454,000

1,947,000

7,401,000

21,448,000

28,849,000

December,

160,109,000

3,735,000

1,560,000

5,295,000

28,628,000

28,923,000

Total, 1908.

58,862,000

25,028,000

83,890,000

212,907,000

296,797,000

Total, 1907.

23,027,000

25,054,000

48,081,000

188,185,000

236,266,000

Increase,

35,835,000

35,809,000

24,722,000

60,531,000

Appendices H, J, & K.

VILLAGE AND WATER BOAT SUPPLIES.

Details of Consumption (gallons), 1908.

P 42

H.

J.

ABERDEEN WATERWORKS.

SHAUKIWAN

WATERWORKS.

MONTH.

Unmetered

Metered Supply.

Supply.

Total.

Metered Supply.

Unmetered

Supply.

Total.

Sai-wan Supply. Grand Total.

K.

LAI-CHI-KOK

WATER BOAT

SUPPLY.

METERED.

January,

59,000

346,000

405,000

88,000

2,853,000

2,941,000

71,000

3,012,000

8,517,000

February,

49,000

272,000

321,000

105,000

2,683,000

2,788,000

64,000

2,852,000

7,196,000

March,.

$8,000

320,000

358,000

84,000

1,467,000

1,551,000

71,000

1,622,000

9,500,000

April,

62,000

295,000

357,000

82,000

1,770,000

1,852,000

58,000

1,910,000

8,688,000

May,

45,000

363,000

408,000

109,000

1,981,000

2,090,000

79,000

2,169,000

5,530,000

June,

41,000

406,000

447,000

95,000

1,270,000

1,365,000

88,000

1,453,000

4,465,000

July,

55,000

380,000

435,000

68,000

1,412,000

1,480,000

162,000

1,642,000

3,966,000

August,..

78,090

285,000

363,000

52,000

1,450,000

1,502,000

446,000

1,948,000

3,199,000

September,

68,000

429,000

497,000

85,000

1,335,000

1,420,000

384,000

1,804,000

3,232,000

October,

56,000

249,000

305,000

95,000

1,280,000

1,375,000

100,000

1,475,000

2,944,000

November,

34,000

277,000

311,000

87,000

948,000

1,035,000

92,000

1,127,000

3,903,000

December,

45,000

328,000

373,000

129,000

850,000

979,000

84,000

1,063,000

5,550,000

Total, 1908,

630,000

3,950,000

4,580,000

1,079,000

19,299,000

20,378,000

1,699,000

22,077,000

66,690,000

Total, 1907,

546,000

5,504,000

6,030,000

1,093,000

12,190,000

13,283,000

4,965,000

18,248,000

97,363,000

Increase,

84,000

7,109,000

7,095,000

3,829,000

...

T

7

}

+v

1

Appendix Q.

REPORT ON THE KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY (BRITISH SECTION).

In presenting this report for the work done during 1908 which includes an Estimate for the completion, I would first make a few general remarks with regard to the progress and cost of the work going more into detail under each main head of the Estimate afterwards.

Good progress has been made every where with the exception of the Reclamation of a site for Kowloon Station Yard but arrangements are being made whereby it is hoped that the delay in the completion of this work will not interfere with the opening of the line for public traffic. Elsewhere especially in Beacon Hill Tunnel the work has been carried out at a very satisfactory pace. The heading driving in the big tunnel will be finished fully six months ahead of the time specified in my last Annual Report but I do not think it likely that the date specified in that report for the opening for public traffic (May 1910) can be altered.

In the New Territories the appointment of two native Assistant Doctors, one at Shatin and the other at Taipo as well as the better medical and sanitary arrangements made during the year greatly facilitated the good progress made. The Railway Medical Officer's report shows very plainly how much benefit has been reaped by these arrangements which though in some cases rather costly have in every case I consider fully warranted the expense incurred.

At Taipo the staff suffered rather severely during the last six months of the year. Hardly a week went by without one or two of the European foremen being down with fever for two or three days at a time. Notwithstanding this however the progress there has been very good both in Tunnelwork and Bridgework.

Turning now to the cost of the Railway which is given in a summary at the end of this report, Column C gives the figures of Mr. BRUCE'S and the Honourable Director of Public Works' Estimate. Column D gives the Estimated cost of works as per last year's report. It is impossible to arrange that the first Estimate should contain everything required for the Railway without unduly delaying the publishing of that Estimate.

The total actual expenditure to date is given in Columns I and J and the total estimated to complete in Columns K and L and the sum of these represents the total cost of the Railway given in Column M.

Land.

The figures for land remain as in last year's Annual Report, and cannot be regarded as an exact estimate, since certain matters in regard to resumption, ani the proportion of cost to be borne by the Railway are not finally decided. The amount paid during the year was mainly for purchase of land at the South East corner of Kowloon Peninsula commonly called Blackhead's Point.

Earthwork.

Under this heading the progress was good with the exception of the Reclamation in Kowloon Station Yard which is in the hands of European Contractors. Up to the end of December 1908 when 60 per cent. of the contract time had lapsed 2,265 feet out of a total of 4,300 feet of sea wall had been completed to full section and only about 40 per cent. of the quantity of earth in reclamation had been filled in. However these percentages do not give a fair basis to calculate the time of completion as the progress now is better than during the first six months.

The high embankments between Hung Hom and the South Face of the Tunnel are giving trouble as the ground cannot bear the weight. In several places where the hard ground is very far below the surface, embankments are sinking in fast causing the ground to spue up all round. The movement of the ground is affecting some of the bridges which have cracked in consequence. However there is a surplus of excavated material from the cuttings to make up the subsidence and I expect that by the time the line is ready for public traffic, equilibrium will have been established and the subsidence reducel to a very small

amount.

North of the range of the hills the earthwork has progressed in a satisfactory way. The rock has exceeded the estimate in both quantity and hardness. The interior of so ne of the big cuttings near Lok Loha turned out to be much harder than was expected. The composition of the rock is quite different from the granite usually met with in Hongkong,

Q 2

the majority of it is more like a greenstone or whinstone, very hard and brittle and difficult to drill through. In order to make the requisite progress the rates had to be raised for some of the cuttings. The large cutting North of Taipo will probably be the last on the line to be finished. This cutting is carried through an enclosed valley at 17 feet lower than the surface of the valley. A very large amount of sub-soil water will have to be dealt with which will require rather larger drains than usual.

Nearly all the slopes exposed to the action of the sea have been protected by stone pitching and above this turfing has been done to protect them from the wash of heavy rain.

The cost of sea wall between Granville Road Storm Water Outfall and Blackhead's Point and also the cost of certain works required for the safeguarding of the Railway in the big cutting near Hung Hom are now included in this sub-head (Earthwork) and covered by savings on the general work. The Consulting Engineers have continually expressed an opinion that such a deep cutting as that at Hung Hom is not safe in soft material and now that the interior of the hill has been exposed and found to be of a soft friable nature certain works have to be carried out so as to avoid slips during heavy rain which might endanger the traffic.

Tunnels.

The first tunnel near Yaumati was driven and fully lined during the year and only the masonry faces remain to be put on.

Beacon Hill Tunnel which is the largest work on the line made very good progress during 1908. Up to the end of 1907 the headings from both sides had been driven a total of 2,100 feet from the permanent faces. This represent d practically one year's work. During 1908 another 3,544 feet was driven making a total of 5,641 feet altogether, of which 2,528 was driven from the South and 3,116 from the North Side. The difference in distance driven was due to a large extent to the length of 500 feet driven both ways from the shaft at the North Side. In other respects the progress was fairly even on both sides of the hill. The material through which the heading was driven at the South Side however was much more variable, in some places wet running sand being met with which added greatly to the expense and caused considerable delay.

The soft rock extended much further into the hill on the South Side than on the North which will necessitate the heavy section of lining being carried much further than was estimated for.

Work was carried on night and day continuously all through the year with the ex- ception of a stoppage of about ten days early in April at the North Side to fix the cage in the shaft and in the end of July and the beginning of August the typhoon damaged the coolie sheds so much that the coolies all ran away and in consequence the work stopped for nearly a week. Not counting these stoppages but taking into account that work was car- ried on at four faces (two extra from Shaft at North Side) during thirty-five days, the average daily progress per face was 4:47 feet as against 1.97 per day per face for 1907.

During 1907 a total length of 465 lineal feet of heading was widened out to full section of tunnel and lined and during 1908 a length of 2,940 feet making a total of 3,405 feet. Of this total a length of 2,730 was lined to the full heavy section of Brickwork.

The balance of 675 feet was left unlined to see if it would be safe to leave it without support. It was decided however in view of the constant change in the nature of the rock that this would be rather dangerous so a thin skin will have to be put in to prevent small pieces of rock breaking loose with the vibration of the trains and falling on to the line.

During the rains it was found difficult to keep sufficient men on the work to make the widening out keep pace with the heading. It is hoped that when the headings meet there will remain not more than 2,500 feet of widening to do which should take about six months.

The cost of the tunnel-driving was very much reduced during 1908 due to better organization made possible by coolies getting more trained to the work. The estimate however will be very largely exceeded in this tunnel. The average costs per lineal foot of heading, enlarging and bricking in during the year were $7.49, $140.86 and $113.54 respectively. Up to December 1907 the figures were approximately $184.00, $275.00 and $221.00 respectively per lineal foot.

It is a very difficult thing to give a price for completion of this tunnel. With the constant variation of the rock and liability to sudden in-rushes of water the cost may vary as much as 50 per cent. per lineal foot between various months.

28

In the Estimate for the completion I have allowed rates less than the average for the whole of last year as the costs during the year showed a fairly steady decrease.

The central part of the tunnel though it cannot be left altogether unlined can have the thickness of the lining very much reduced and a saving made in brickwork quantities com- pared with the outside lengths.

A rough estimate for the completion is :-

Lining Shaft at North Side,

Heading driving,

Widening out,

Lining,

Depreciation of plant,

S

6,000

105,000

500,000

410,000

100,000

$1,121,000

This brings the total cost of the tunnel to $3,000,000 or $1,300,000 more than my Estimate of 1907.

This great increase above the Estimate is principally due to the unusual hardness of the rock met with.

The unusual hardness of the rock came as a great surprise. The interior of the hill consists of quite a different class of rock from that usually met with in the Colony. It is not the same kind of granite at all. In places it combines great hardness with the addition of numerous faults and backs which causes the drills to jamb. The quantity of explosives used is very great compared with other tunnels and this above all other causes, made the greatest difference between the estimated and actual cost.

In September 1908 the South Face heading reached such hard rock that the comsump- tion of dynamite reached thirty pounds per foot run which was about three times what was estimated. This increase applies both to the heading and the widening and shows how misleading comparisons with tunnels in other parts of the world were. This hard rock has continued almost continuously at the South Face but not quite so badly at the North Face.

The great hardness of the rock necessitated very large gangs of blacksmiths to keep the drills sharp and also caused much greater wear and tear on the rock drills than was estimated for.

When writing my last yearly report I also had hopes that it would not be necessary to line the central portion of the tunnel except with a light flying arch and probably not even that. However owing to the hard and massive nature of the rock it is necessary to build side walls from which to spring the arch for the roof as a good bench cannot be dressed in the rock. The rock though very hard is full of faults and backs which render it liable to shake loose and come down with the vibration of the passing trains. Any such accident would be very serious and the risk is not worth the saving obtained by leaving the tunnel without lining.

Damages done by Typhoons were originally charged to a separate unestimated sub-head but afterwards this damage was charged against the works concerned which was chiefly Beacon Hill Tunnel.

In Tunnel No. 3 the headings were completed and all fully widened out and lined ex- cept a length of forty-five feet in the centre. The two portals were nearly completed. The length of this tunnel is 329 feet.

One fifteen feet length of lining and one face remained to be completed of Tunnel No. 4 on 31st December, 1908. This tunnel is 170 feet long.

Taipo Tunnel (No. 5) gave a great deal of trouble at the South Face. This side of the hill consists of yellow clay full of water which kept slipping into the cutting approaching the Face of the Tunnel. Great difficulty was experienced in making a start at heading driving as time after time the hillside slipped and blocked the entrance.

It was not until a length had been completely lined outside the slips that a safe entrance could be effected. However all danger is now over. During the year a length of 573 feet of heading was driven out of a total of 924 feet and 158 feet 6 inches lined of which 90 feet is of flying arch type as the rock is very hard.

Tunnels 3 and 4 should be completed for the estimated amount but Tunnel No. 5 may exceed by a little owing to the great expense incurred at the South Face.

-Q4

Bridges.

In building a Railway especially in a mountainous country the expenditure under this heading is almost invariably under-estimated. It is impossible even on a year's survey to decide what bridges are necessary to carry the water off and it therefore happens that many minor bridges are converted into major bridges and in places new minor bridges added. It very seldom happens that a bridge can be cut out altogether.

In the present case it will be noticed that there will be a large increase under the sub- head of major bridges. This is due to the fact that the number of major bridges has been increased and excess so caused will not be covered by the saving on those originally estimated for.

Under the heading major bridges, only two remain to be started, namely, Gascoigne Road Bridge in Kowloon Station Yard and a large River Bridge near Taipo. The first of these has been very much increased in size above that estimated for and the excess expendi- ture amounts to $40,000 on this bridge alone. This bridge carries Des Voeux and Gascoigne Roads over the Railway and will be put in hand soon. The increase in size referred to is necessitated by the fact that to avoid a right angle bend these roads must form junction on the bridge. The River Bridge at Taipo will also be started in the near future. It has been decided to put this bridge in the bed of the present river instead of diverting the river through a new channel. This will add considerably to the cost as the foundations will have to be on wells sunk about 25 feet into the bed of the river.

The cracks in the bridges near Kowloon caused by the under-ground movements started when the heavy banks approached some of the bridges may cause a slight excess in the money required under this sub-head. I do not anticipate any serious expenditure from this cause except in the case of Bridge No. 8, a four span arch bridge on a high bank in the Kowloon Tsai Valley. This bridge was standing practically complete for nearly six months before the bank approached. The matter is now in the hands of the Consulting Engineers but as the movement of the banks on either side is still considerable it may be necessary to dismantle the bridge and carry the foundations down on wells to the rock which is between thirty and forty feet below ground.

The bridge across Sam Chun River has been altered from that originally estimated for. The ironwork is now being made for double line girders in order to carry a double line at the junction between the two sections.

The saving under minor bridges will I hope be about $66,000. The saving is due to a certain extent to the fact that bridges have been altered from minor to major owing to the spans being increased. Against this must be put the fact that several bridges have been added for future road extensions near Taipo as well as for waterways. There still remains to be started a bridge to carry a new road over cutting No. 1 running between Hung Hom and the Steam Laundry. This cannot be begun until the work on the cutting is further advanced. Very little now remains to be done on other minor bridges.

In almost every case the foundations of both major and minor bridges proved more- difficult than usual. The labour was very bad especially the kind of labour required to put the timber in the excavation. A large amount of piling had to be done as well as pumping which was very costly, as owing to the bad climate it was extremely difficult to keep good fitters and such skilled labour on the work.

The bridges on the Fan Ling Sub-division which however were chiefly minor, cost more than I originally estimated owing to want of facilities for transport and the fact that the local labour proved itself entirely unable to do the work. Coolies had to be imported and matsheds built for them. It was also decided to burn bricks locally with coal as the ordinary Canton brick was not good enough for the purpose and stone was not available. Very good bricks were burnt but the cost was great, but not so great as imported stone. Indians had to be brought from India to load and fire the kilns as the Chinese did not know how.

There is a slight excess shown in culverts but again it is impossible to judge the future expenditure. The villager who owns land near the line of Railway has a habit of saying nothing if the Railway bank cuts off the irrigation water from his land. In one or two cases he has waited for two years and then asked that all his lan should be bought. The methods of irrigation are very complicated and it is sometimes difficult to determine whether or no the Railway bank really cuts off the water.

Telegraph.

Under the main head of Telegraphs some work was done during the year. were put in place for about five miles at the Northern end of the line.

The posts-

*

Q 5

Ballast.

In my estimate I placed the rates for ballast very high compared with Railways in other Eastern countries in anticipation of excessive prices due to combination. My estimate for the top ballast is $6.00 per hundred cubic feet. I hope to get it broken for less than this amount. Small quantities have been broken at $3.50 per hundred cubic feet but no large contract can be let at this rate as whenever a large quantity is mentioned the con- tractors raise the rates.

At the commencement of the work I went into the question of the advisability of using mechanical stone crushers. There were several in use in the Colony at that time in the Naval Yard Extension Works and at Quarry Bay. The conclusion arrived at from information given me was that stone crushers only pay when time is an object, and that they are no cheaper if the collection of large quantities of ballast can be spread over a long period of time.

A contract was let for sleepers (Australian) which was cheaper than the Estimate though the present low Exchange will not make the saving as much as it might have been. About 25 cents per sleeper will be saved making a total of $15,000. A contract has also been let for the rails but in the absence of any details it is impossible to say if there will be any saving under this heading.

Stations and Buildings.

Very little has been done during the year under this heading.

The expenditure shown was incurred on Taipo Jetty. A sum of $15,000 for a length of 330 feet was allowed in the Estimate for this, but this sum will be exceeded by about $7,000 as it has been decided to run the jetty out into much deeper water than was at first thought necessary, being an extension of 290 feet. There will now be ten feet of water at Low Water Spring Tide. The passenger traffic to Sha U Chung is expected to be good and this jetty will accommodate large launches.

It has been decided to make two flag stations which are not allowed for in the original Estimate. One of these is close to Taipo New Market and should prove to be very much frequented. The other is to be at Lofu on the British side of the frontier river.

It is proposed to treat these flag stations as experiments and to put up only a cheap temporary building. If the receipts warrant it, a more permanent building can easily be built afterwards with sidings, etc., for passing trains.

For reasons of economy it has been decided to have only very low platforms at Shatin, Taipo and Fan Ling Stations. High platforms necessitating expensive foundations are costly and as a rule represent the heaviest item in a station estimate. The carriage stock is being designed so as to be easily entered from both the high terminal and the low wayside station platform. The saving thus made will I hope balance the extra cost of the Taipo Jetty and the two new flag stations.

Under the sub-head "Workshops" no expenditure has been incurred up to date. It has however been practically decided to erect a small workshop in Kowloon to keep the Rolling Stock of the British Section in repair. The total cost of this shop with its tools and plant, etc., will be about $120,000.

Plant.

There was some expenditure under the sub-head Construction" during the year, a good deal of two foot gauge trainway and trucks was purchased as well as metre gauge stock for construction of the tunnel.

An indent has gone home for some of the permanent Rolling Stock for the line. One locomotive has been ordered and one more will be ordered shortly but it is not expected that payment will be made for these before 1910.

The underframes for eight carriages are on order. It has been decided to build the wooden superstructure locally and take advantage of the cheap labour and timber.

Eighteen waggons have also been ordered, twelve of which are of the long bogie type and six short ones. It is proposed shortly to order thirty more short trucks and a couple of goods brake vans.

General Charges.

The Expenditure under General Charges was in excess of that estimated for at the beginning of the year. The excess is under salaries only, there being a decrease under other minor heads. It was not found possible to reduce the Engineering Staff as soon as it

6

was expected. The fall in exchange also made a great difference. The expenses of salaries of Engineering Staff, Store, Accounts and Indoor Offices, Medical and Consulting Engineers' fees however are only 41 per cent, of the total works expenditure for the year and 5'1 of the expenditure to date. This percentage compares very favourably with similar expendi- ture on other Railways. The total cost of superior supervision to date including quarters and office expenses is only 68 per cent. of the total expenditure.

Arrangements were made early in December and one sub-divisional office was closed on the 1st January, 1909, the services of one assistant engineer having been dispensed with.

It may be possible to make further reductions on the staff charged to this Main Head of the Estimate later on in the year. The amount of reduction will depend greatly on the health of the staff as during the rainy season malarial fever places many of the staff on the sick list for several days at a time which throws extra work on those who are well. It would therefore be highly imprudent to reduce the staff prematurely and run the risk of bad work being done especially as any reduction would represent such a very small percentage of the total expenditure.

The cost of general management and supervision is given below in percentages of the total expenditure for the year:—

Salaries of all Engineers (C.R.E., D.E. & A.E.s)

and Chief Storekeeper with their indcor staff

of clerks, cashiers, etc.,

Salary of Railway Medical Officer,

Consulting Engineers' salary and Home Office expenses, Accounts and Audit Office,

3.15 per cent.

•14 "" *50 59 *35

4.14 per cent.

In addition to the above there is the out-door staff of Inspectors of Works, Overseers, Timekeepers, etc., whose pay is charged direct to the works on which they are employed. The salaries of these men amounted to 5:21 per cent. of the expenditure during the year. Considering the difficult nature of the work and scarcity of labour and contractors with any knowledge of Railways, I consider the above percentages extremely good, as they compare well with other Railway construction, even in easier country.

It was found difficult to obtain good foremen: those sent out from Home though they knew their work well were often troublesome to deal with. The cost of getting them out from Home made it possible for them to behave very badly before they could be dismissed and they in many cases took full advantage of this. One assistant engineer can be got for the same cost as two foremen and I certainly think in China that it pays to have more assistant engineers with shorter sections and fewer European foremen.

There are very few departmentally paid coolies on the work now. These are mostly at Beacon Hill Tunnel and consist of the skilled labour driving engines, keeping the plant in order and sharpening tools, etc. All the rest of the work is on petty contract or piece work

rates.

The cost of labour varies very much with the place. The highest wages have to be paid at Taipo. Ordinary blacksmiths and fitters are paid eighty cents per day at the South Face of Beacon Hill Tunnel, ninety cents at the North Face and a few get one dollar per day at Taipo. Carpenters get from seventy to eighty cents per day and blacksmiths hammer- men forty to fifty.

It is very difficult to say what the ordinary coolie earns. In the tunnel nearly all are on piece work. The highest wages are paid to the coolies who work the drilis at the heading faces and these earn over one dollar per day. The rates are gradually reduced till those working outside get about forty cents per day.

The average number of coolies employed per day on the Beacon Hill Tunnel through- out the year was 1,533 and about 1,711 on the rest of the line North of the Kowloon Hills.

9th March, 1909.

GRAVES W. EVES, Chief Resident Engineer.

year.

Q7

REPORT OF THE RAILWAY MEDICAL OFFICER.

Mr. Naidu has been stationed at North Face Camp (No. 2 Tunnel) throughout the

Mr. Chan Tsan Kun was apppointed as an extra Assistant Medical Officer on August 13th and has been stationed at Taipo Kau.

Mr. Kelly, Sanitary Inspector, has been stationed at North Face Camp (No. 2 Tunnel) and has ably carried out the sanitary work at various camps.

The general health of the Railway Staff shows a distinct improvement during the year, more especially in the camps at Beacon Hill Tunnel where there has been a reduction of approximately 50 per cent. of cases of Malarial fever.

A similar reduction has taken place in entries for Dysentery and Beri-beri.

The Railway work has proceeded without hindrance on account of sickness throughout the year.

The camps at No. 5 Tunnel, Taipo Kau, have been very unhealthy since work began there, but are now showing great improvement.

The Europeans especially suffered badly from Malarial Fever in the summer in spite of the administration of prophylactic doses of quinine.

The ground is very wet and soft and with repeated land slides which occurred on opening-up the South end of the tunnel, pool-formation could not be prevented.

The workmen moreover, in consequence of the extremely wet nature of the ground, have had to work under most trying conditions, almost always being knee-deep in water or soft mud and this no doubt has been a responsible factor in the incidence of sickness.

Now that the work is well in hand drainage and scavenging are being carried out as thoroughly as possible, coolie houses are frequently cleansed with disinfecting fluids, and the result has been a remarkable improvement.

Oil is used freely all over the line as a means of destroying mosquito larvæ in pools impossible to drain.

Case books have been kept at the two main camps at Beacon Hill Tunnel and since the appointment of a resident Assistant Medical Officer at Taipo Kau, at that place also.

It is impossible to record every case of sickness occurring amongst the coolies living in outlying matsheds but speaking generally, there has been a great decrease in all cases occurring in places not attached to main camps as well as in the main camps themselves.

Quinine has been dealt out freely, though perhaps not so freely as formerly as I found that a considerable amount was wasted by being thrown away into the nullahs or bartered at the small stores for food, etc., the natives, especially when new to the territory not taking kindly to the drug, and it has often to be given under compulsion. As soon as the practice was discovered steps were taken to stop it.

Serious accidents have, fortunately, been rare during the year.

One of the most troublesome ailments at present is the effect of the dynamite fumes in the big tunnel.

The heading is about 3,000 feet from the entrance at each face. Ventilation will however be much improved when the headings meet in the course of a few months allowing a free current of air through the whole length of the tunnel.

Most of the workers, especially at South Face, suffer constantly from severe irritation of throat and lungs as a result of breathing the air heavily charged with dynamite fumes.

Occasionally coolies have to be carried out from the workings being overcome by the futnes after blasting operations. A few minutes in the fresh air however, always revives

them and there have been no serious results.

The total number of cases treated at North and South Face Camps, No. 2 Tunnel, during the year is:-

1907

of these the following are the principal diseases :----

Malaria Dysentery Beri-beri Injuries

...

.2,064

3,667

1908.

1907.

556

1,168

53

124

58

81

354

371

8

The following table shows the monthly Malaria returns at the two camps and the omparative percentages for 1907 and 1908 :--

Mar. Apr

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec.

Number of cases of Malaria, Percentages to total number of

1907 60

1908 56

59 48 59

25 32 16 37 89

166 185 203 117 85 62 65 59

51 33

65 42 55 55

1907 1.9 3.7 1.7 2.03 7.4 8.5

11 6.8 3.4 2.3 2.4 2.6

coolies on the line,

1908 2.3 1-21-04 6 1.2 2.8

1

1.1 1.5 1.3 .9

The total number of patients seen at the No. 5 Tunnel Camps from August (when a Resident Assistant Medical Officer was appointed and records could be kept) to December 31st was 403.

Of these the following were the principal diseases :--

Malaria, Ulcers, etc.,

Skin Diseases,

Dysentery & Diarrhoea,

Beri-beri,

Injuries,

147

75

42

22

4

19

Sept.

Oct. Nov. Dec.

Cases of Malaria....... 48

41

32

18

Percentage.

2.2 2.2

1.4

1

The following table shows the cases sent to Hospital during the year:

Malaria,

Dysentery,

Beri-beri,

Injuries,

Cellulitis, Ulcers, etc.,....

Debility,

Chest Diseases,

Eye Diseases,

37

11

16

21

7

3

4

Venereal,

Alcoholism,

Hepatitis,..

Snake bite,

2

Quinsy,

Leprosy,

1

1

1

1

Plague,

1

Ademitis,

Lumbago,

1

1

Pleurisy,

1

Rheumatism,

1

Total,..

113

7

Q 9

During the year 44 deaths occurred on or near the Railway works.

Railway works. The following were the causes :-

Malaria, Beri-beri,

Injuries,

Dysentery,

Heart failure,

Small-pox,

14

13

7 (One murder).

3

1

1

1

Plague,

Pneumonia, Phthisis,

1

3

A great many of these cases are unknown wanderers (not Railway employees) who attach themselves to a camp when sick in the hope of finding shelter.

Unfortunately the number of sick loafers is on the increase.

Five Europeans have been invalided to Englan 1 for the following diseases :

Abscess of Liver, Malaria,

Paralytic Stroke,

Malaria, peripheral neuritis,

1

1

1

Chronic Bronchitis, peripheral neuritis,

Perineal abscesses, boils, etc.,

1 .1

The preventive measures adopted against disease, viz., scavenging, frequent cleansing of coolie lines, drainage and the free use of quinine have obviously resulted in diminishing considerably the incidence of the three most prominent and dangerous diseases, viz., Malaria, Dysentery and Beri-beri, as well as others of a less serious nature, and the results of these measures have I think quite justified their adoption and consequent expense. population is however a floating one and fresh cases are constantly being introduced from without, a serious factor to contend with in the attempt to eradicate disease.

The

A noticeable feature of the dispensaries is the frequency with which the neighbouring villagers bring their sick children, for medical advice and Western treatment.

J. W. HARTLEY, M.E.,

Railway Medica! Officer.

L

P

Q 10

A

B

Main Head.

Sub-head.

C

Total of Mr. Bruce's & Mr. Chatham's

Estimate.

D

C. R. E. Re- vised & Sup-

plementary Estimates as

E

Items not

F

included and Total Revised Supplementary Estimates.

Estimates.

per last Report.

I-Survey,

II-Land,

$37,642.00 $ 42,267.65 $

10.00 $ 42,277.65

10.500.00 1,196,538.02

658.82 1,195,879.20

III-Formation,

(a) Earthwork,

(b) Tunnels,

1,530,997.00 2,260,000.00

1,924,860.00 2,503,415.00

8,176.05 2,268,176.05

996,409.69

3,499,824.69

(c) Road,

IV-Bridges,

(a) Major,

82,500.00

563,858.47

2,479.84

84,979.84

113,907.89 677,766.36

(b) Minor,

412,650.00

406,251.06

66,646.78 339,604.28

(c) Culverts,

63,468.14

1,775.72

65,243.86

V-Fencing,

(a) Boundaries,

31,813.00

8,186.45

39,999.45

(b) Signs,

396.00

4.00

400.00

VI-Telegraphs,

26,864.00

107.42

26,971.42

VII-Track,

(a) Ballast,.

167,923.94

35,857.40

132,066.54

(b) Permanent Way,....

716,625.00

748,032.00

15,839.29

732,192.71

VIII-Stations and

Buildings,...

(a) Building,

450,000.00

1.53

449,998.47

(b) Station Machinery,...

315,000.00

35,970.00

4,030.00

40,000.00

3

(c) Furniture,

3,410.00

1,590.00

5,000.00

(d) Workshops,

60,000.00

60,000.00

IX-Plant,

(a) Construction,

234,000.00

.10

234,000.10

(b) Loco., Tools and Plant, .

50,000.00

50,000.00

(e) C. & W. Plant,

10,000.00

10,000.00

(d) Engineering,

(e) Loco. Rolling Stock,..

140,000.00

52,000.00 $8,000.00

(ƒ) C. & W. Rolling Stock,.

340,000.00

30,460.00 309,540.00

X-General

Changes, (a.)} (i) Salaries,..

309,724.84

89,995.59 399,720.43

(ii) Quarters and Offices,

72,545.34

4,050.21

68,495.13

(iii) Furniture,

10,164.14

1,475.47

11,639.61

(iv) Office Expenses,......

34,974.16

2,263.23

32,710.93

105,000.00

(v) Medical,

22,825.90

506.44

22,319.46

(ci) Home Charges,

70,099.80

4,378.49

74,478.29

(vii) Typhoon Damages, . }

43,242.37

43,242.37

(b.)

Accounts,

42,843.53

42,843.53

Total,$ 5,053,274.00 9,860,283.83

1,143,844.17 11,004,128.00

N.B.--The Item under Typhoon Damages has been written off to Works.

The figures in italics mean a minus quantity.

!

Explanation given in Report.

>>

""

-Q11

*

REMARKS.

Extra cost of road approaches to Bridge No. 2 (Gascoigne Road Bridge).

Excess due to conversion of Minor into Major Bridges.

Saving

""

*

Total saving anticipated in Report of 1908 not probable.

Extra boundary fencing required in Kowloon.

Explanation given in Report.

For explanation see Report.

Furniture, &c., for Kowloon Station.

Not previously estimated for.

""

""

-Amount of rolling stock over-estimated. Less required and prices in general at home have been greatly reduced.

For explanation see Report. Salaries have been increased by an allowance for an expert to come at end of 1909 to advise on a joint working agreement. Salaries of construction staff only allowed for during the first six months of 1910, after which date they will be chargeable against revenue when line opens for traffic.

Written off to Works.

Accounting staff not originally estimated for, it being anticipated that the accounting would be done in one of the Colonial Departments. Portion of expenses of expert referred to under Salaries is included under this sub-head.

12

G

Main Head.

Sub-head.

H

I

Expenditure up to 31st -December,

J

K

Estimated Expenditure.

L

M

Expenditure

1908.

Grand Total.

1907, as per last Report.

1909.

As perColonial To complete.

Estimates.

I-Survey,

...

$42,267.65 $ 10.00 $

$

$ 42,277.65

II-Land,......

146,538.02 615,341.18

350,000.00

84,000.00

1,195,879.20

III-Formation, (a) Earthwork,

532,452.15 655,723.90

700,000.00

380.000.00 2,268,176.05

(b) Tunnels,.

900,756.09 1,271,068.60

500,000.00

828,000.00 3,499,824.69

*

(c) Roads,

679.84

30,000.00

54,300.00

84,979.84

IV-Bridges,│(a) Major,

243,858.47 223,907.89

100,000.00

110,000,00

677,766.36

(b) Minor,

106,251.06

(c) Culverts,

33,468.14

25,775.72

V-Fencing, (a) Boundaries,

346.45

173,353,22 50,000.00

2,000.00

25,000.00 14,653.00

10,000.00

339,604.28

4,000.00

65,243.86

39,999.45

(b) Signs,

VI-Telegraphs,

3,565.74

VII-Track,

(a) Ballast,

17,923.94

(b) Permanent Way,... 107,192.71

VIII-Stations &)

Buildings, (a) Buildings,

11,698.47

400.00

11,405.68 7,000.00 5,000.00

1,142.60 10,000.00 103,000.00 132,066.54

640,000.00 15,000.00 732,192.71

200,000.00 238,300.00 449,998.47

400.00

26,971.42

(b) Station Machinery,

(c) Furniture,

(d) Workshops,.

IX-Plant,...... (a) Construction,

15,000.00

3,400.00

25,000.00

40,000.00

1,600.00

5,000.00

60,000.00

60,000.00

376,264.79

156,152.31

298,417.00

234000.10

(b) Loco.,Tools&Plant,

50,000.00

50,000.00

10,000.00

10,000.00

(c) C. & W. Plant,......

(d) Engineering,

(e) Loco. RollingStock,

140,000.00

52,000.00

88,000.00

(f)C.&W.RollingStock,

......

340,000.00 30,460.00 309,540.00

X-General

Charges,

(i)Salaries,

129,724.84

(a.)

(ii) Quarters & Offices,

62,545.34

111.995.59

4,949.79

122,863.00

35,137.00

399,720.43

1,000.00

68,495.13

(iii) Furniture,

10,164.14

775.47

1,000.00

300.00

11,639.61

(iv) Office Expenses,... 16,974.16

6,736.77

8,000.00

1,000.00

32,710.93

(v) Medical,

10,825.90

4,793.56

6,000,00

700.00

22,319.46

(vi) Home Charges,

30,099.80

21,378.49

9,000.00 14,000.00

74,478.29

(vii)Typhoon Damages,

43,242.37

43,242.37

(b.) Accounts,

12,843.53 20,000.00 10,000.00

42,843.53

Stores, China,

100,000.00 70,687.25

170,687.25

Total,..... .$ 2,914,461.76 3,337,177.49 3,280,663.00 1,471,825.7511,004,128.00

N.B.—Items under Typhoon Damages and Stores China have been written off to Works.

The figures in italics mean a minus quantity.

The item $298,417 under Plant, Construction, represents the estimated amount by Sale of Plant.