Administrative Reports - 1882

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS HONGKONG 1882

Table of Contents

1 Minute on the Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure for the Year 1883

2 Stamp Revenue Returns

3 Bankruptcy, Probate and administration Returns

4 Gaol Returns

5 Police Returns

6 Educational Reports

7 Births and Deaths Returns

8 Harbour Master's Report

9 Returns of Cases in the Superior and Subordinate Courts

10 Botanical and afforestation Report

11 Revenue and Expenditure

12 Post office Report

13 Colonial Surgeon's Report

 




NOTE OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERN

MENT ON THE ESTIMATES OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

FOR THE YEAR 1883

I

In laying before the Council the Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure for the year 1883, I think will be interesting to Honourable Members, if I give at the same time some information about the financial position of the Colony.

2. The balance of Colonial Assets on 1st January last was $663,710.24, and that of the Special Fund Assets at the same period was $379,910 00, making a total of $1,043,620.24

3. The Secretary of State, in recently conveying his decision that the construction of the Tytam Water Works should be at once undertaken, has expressed the opinion that as these works will largely benefit the Chinese Community, the Special Fund, so far as it will go, might be very properly applied

T purpose. propose therefore, with His Lordship's sanction, to close the Special Fund Account at the end of the present year, and to transfer the balance to general account. The Tytam Water Works, as well as the expenditure for completion of the Breakwater at Causeway Bay will then be

to this

d against balances. It will be seen that in the present Estimates these Public Works are only red to in a note, and also that the contribution to Police Expenditure from interest produced by the Special Fund, as well as the provision for refund of loans from this Fund for the construction of +he Praya and Lighthouses have been omitted

4 In a despatch which was recently laid before this Council, the Secretary of State observed t premia from purchases of land, which are receipts for alienation of Colonial property, ought to be regarded in the light of Capital rather than of Annual Revenue. I have accordingly omitted this item from the Estimates of Revenue for 1883 As it may be interesting to know how much these premia have yielded, I have had a statement made up from which it appears that the total sum received since they were first levied in 1851 is $1,069,504.00. This sum is within $25,000 00 of the total balance of Assets to the Credit of the Colony at the commencement of the year. It may be considered, therefore, that the Receipts from the Establishment of the Colony, up to the present time, including both Imperial Grants and Special Fund, but excluding these premia, about balance the expenditure during the same period. During the early period after the occupation, the Expenditure was greatly in excess of Revenue, but in the course of the last ten years the excess of Revenue over Expenditure, excluding premia on land sales, has amounted to $432,386 00. In the two years 1874 and 1876, the Expenditure exceeded Revenue by $100,000 00; the $432,386.00 represents, therefore, the nett excess after deducting this sum The progress which the Colony has made as indicated by these # figures is most satisfactory

REVENUE

I have estimated the Revenue for 1883 at $1,115,665.00. In comparing this figure with the

, for 1881, which were $1,324,455.00, and with the Estimates for the present year, which are

,,860.00, it must be remembered that premia on land sales and the contribution from Special for Police have, as already explained, been omitted this year. The Grant-in-Aid of the Lock tal by the Admiralty has also been omitted, because a separate account is now kept of all other necerpts and Expenditure on account of Ordinance 10 of 1867.

T

وی

15

If these deductions be made the Receipts of 1881 will be reduced to $1,113,945 00, and t Estimates for the present year will not be more than $1,100,960 00

6. I think that in estimating the Revenue for 1883 at $1,115,665 00, I have not been too s guine. There is an increase of $5,000.00 under the head of Licences, which seems to be warr by the receipts of the last six months Interest has also been increased by $10,000 00, on acco the proposed transfer of balance of Special Fund to general account. This item will prot higher, but it will depend upon the progress that it will be possible to make with the different works in the course of next year There is also a considerable increase in "Miscellaneous Rec which is based on the collections from this source, especially for Storage of Gunpowder, durin first half of the year. Fines, Forfeitures, and Fees of Court show a small increase of $2,000.00, Fees of Office are augmented by $3,000 00, for although a reduction of $5,000.00 has been made account of the stoppage of the extensive Emigration to the United States, this is more than count balanced by the increase on Light Dues, Registration of Deeds, &c On the other hand, I have ma a reduction of $10,000.00 for Stamps, the collections on this account appearing to me to have be abnormally high for some time past, principally owing to transfers of land and litigation connect therewith. Reimbursements in aid of Expenditure are $8,000 00 less, the Estimate for conv labour having been reduced, and the two items Contribution by Admiralty, and from Special Fu having been omitted.

EXPENDITURE.

7 I have estimated the Expenditure of 1883 at $1,081,732, which may be classified as follov

Ordinary Expenditure,............

Public Works, Roads, &c

Military Expenditure,

.$ 810,915

161,750

109,067

$1,081,732

The Ordinary Expenditure in 1881 amounted to $762,660, and for this year it has been estimat at $792,816 The increase of over $19,000 shewn in next year's Estimates is thus explained.

8 There is a small increase of $444 in the Audit Department for a copying clerk who is mu required, and a coolie to be employed in stamping blank receipts with series of consecutive numbe a check on fraud that was recommended by a Committee appointed by the Secretary of State inquire into the Questions of Defalcations in the Colonies.

9. In the Registrar General's Department, the salary and allowance of a passed Cadet whc provisionally attached to this Department until an opportunity occurs for giving him a permane appointment causes an increase of $1,920.

10 The re-organization of the Establishment of the Supreme Court authorized by the Secret. of State, but hitherto only partially carried out, accounts for an increase of nearly $4,000.

11 In the Medical Establishment it has been found necessary to make larger provisi washing, medicines and provisions, &c, to the extent of $1,800. The upkeep of the Steam- of the Health Officer and Officer-rent for that Officer, already voted by the Council, cause an i of $1,000 On the other hand, this year's Estimates provided $4,000, for a Steam-Launch Health Officer which will, in all probability, be paid for this year. This item does not appear there. in next year's Estimates, which consequently exhibit on the whole a slight decrease under this head

12. Provision has been made for the salaries of eight additional European Constables who are expected from home These together with an increase in the good conduct allowances, and of the provision for oil, &c, augment the Estimates by $4,540, to which must be added certain allowances hitherto paid to Captain DEANE and Mr CREAGH from the Special Fund, which are really transfers and not increases. The total excess shewn by the Police Estimates of next year amounts to $6,220.

13 For the Gaol, the provisional appointment of four additional Turnkeys has already been

oned by the Finance Committee This causes an increase of about $1,400.

14. Under the Head Education, there is a reduction in the Normal School which the Secretary State directed to be made amounting to $1,408. On the other hand, the increase to Grants-in-Aid ❤is estimated at $2,461 The net increase is therefore only $1,365.

JL

15. The Pension of $7,000 granted to SIR JOHN SMALE has rendered it necessary to increase the amount estimated for Pensions

16. I have introduced a small increase of $1,000 for laying out the upper part of the Government Gardens immediately below the Robinson Road.

17. Under Light-houses the sum of $2,000 provided hitherto for re-imbursement of the loan from the Special Fund has in accordance with the arrangement which I have already referred to, been omitted from next year's estimates. Miscellaneous Services have been reduced by $2,000. Details of other smaller changes of not sufficient importance to be referred to here, will be seen in a statement that has been prepared by the Acting Colonial Secretary.

18. The contribution to Military Expenditure shews an increase of $2,300 which is owing to the rate of exchange being estimated at 3/9 instead of 3/10.

19 Under the head of Works and Buildings I have provided for the completion of the new Water Police Station, for a new Lunatic Asylum and for the conversion of the Lock into a Civil Hospital, ach last two items are revotes I have also inserted $25,000 on account of a new Central School. The other items do not require any remarks as they are nearly the same as appear in each year's Estimates for upkeep of different public buildings.

20. The Council is requested to vote separately the sums of $100,000 on account of the Tytam Water Works, and $10,000 for completion of the breakwater at Causeway Bay as these amounts are proposed to be taken from balances

21. The sum provided for Roads, Streets and Bridges will not I think be found too high. It is $5,700 in excess of the provision for this year, but it must be remembered that the Council has already had to vote a supplementary sum of $6,000 for Road and Street Contingencies The Acting Surveyor General states that $14,000 is the very lowest sum at which the Streets and Roads out of Victoria can be kept in proper repair.

22. The expenditure on account of Public Works including Roads, Streets and Bridges was, in 1881, $110,417. For this year it has been estimated at $152,050 and for next year I have provided $161,750.

23. The surplus of Revenue over Expenditure exhibited by these estimates is smaller than has been recently provided, but I have every confidence that it will prove sufficient. There is generally a sing under the head of Establishments, as no allowance can be made in preparing the estimates for contingencies of officers being absent on leave, when a portion of salary generally lapses to the

I

ry.

W H. MARSH, Administrator

11th August, 1882

}

5

1851, 1852,

1

Appendix.

Statement of Premia on Sales of Leased Lands from 1851 to 1881.

(The system of disposing leasehold by public auction for a premium began in 1851. Vide Secretary of State's Despatch No 222 of 2nd January, 1851)

...

1853,

1854,

1855,

1856,

...

...

1857,

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

1858,

1859,

...

-1860, ...

-1861, 1862,

1863, 1864, 1865,

1866,

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

PREMIA

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

$

211 00

926.00

1867,

...

795 00

1868,

...

5,661.00

1869,

...

75,460.00

1870,

5,477 00

1871,

70,770.00

1872,

...

9,095.00 7,170.00

1873,

...

1874,

..: 87,274.00

1875,

174,596.00

1876,

142,612.00

1877,

...

6,490.00

... 13,336.14

1878,

1879,

...

...

58,650 00 1,224.00

1880,

1881,

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Carried forward,... $659,747.14

AUDIT OFFICE, 10th July, 1882.

...

..:

...

...

PREMIA.

Brought forward,

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

***

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

$659,74

66,300.

14,700.0

......

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

400.C 400.C 967.0 1,140.0

5,350 C 14,000.7 ... 84,402.1 11,031.7 1,407.

...

5,998€ 203,659:

$1,069,502

FREDERICK STEWART,

S

Acting Auditor Genera

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 43.

STAMP OFFICE.

The following Letter from the Collector of Stamp Revenue, accompanying Returns for the years 1882 and 1881, is published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 3rd February, 1883.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

No 2

STAMP OFFICE, HONGKONG, 4th January, 1883

SIR,-I have the honour to enclose the usual Annual Returns of Stamp Revenue for 1882.

Although these Returns shew a decrease of nearly $13,000 as compared with those for 1881, they cannot but be regarded as of an encouraging nature The decrease in question is caused by a falling off of $18,534 on Conveyances, due no doubt to the collapse of the deplorable land mania, and another falling off of $5,276 on Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes. But not only are these two decreases, amounting as they do to nearly $24,000, redeemed to more than half their extent by a general increase spread pretty evenly (except $4,077 on Bank notes) over the entire Schedule, but also the Collection for 1882 exceeds by more than $30,000 that for 1880, and is, except the entirely exceptional Collection of 1881, the largest annual amount ever accounted for by this Office. The totals for the last five years are as follows.-

1878,..... 1879,....

1880.

.$128 519 .$116 043

$127 623average $136.457 $173 641 $160.769

1881,.. 1882,..

Some deductions should be made from the Total for 1882 on account of Court and Land fees, but I am unable to state their amount

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant.

The Honourable F STEWART,

+

Acting Colonial Secretary

A LISTER, Collector of Stamp Revenue

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT of the Revenue under the Stamp Amendment Ordinance, 1868, the Sheriff's Ordinance, 1873

the Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance, 1874, and for Telegraph Forms and Fees of the Supreme Court and Land Office, for the Years 1881 and 1882, respectively

Number

Revenue Revenue

of Article

in the

DESCRIPTION

in

in

Increase

Decrease

1881

1882

Schedule.

$$

t

$

C.

$

$

1

Agreements and Broker's Notes,

DOO

3,193 50

2,770 70

422 80

2

Bank Notes,

.....

23,480 69 | 27,558 14

4,077 45

Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes,

29,751 15

24,474 45

3

Bank Cheques,

1,006 80

994 26

..

5,276 70 12 54

4

Bills of Lading,

16,827 70

17,519 40

691 70

5

Bonds, Bottomy and Respondentia, and Average Statement,

109 00

59 50

49 50

6

Charter Party, &c,

3,940 00

4,002 50

62 50

17

Transfer of Shares in any Public Company,

11,595 50

11,409 40

186 10

8

Powers of Attorney,

495 00

618 00

123 00

··

9

Notes of Protest,

28.00

38 25

10 25

10

Any Notarial Act not otherwise charged,

166 00

312 00

146 00

11

Receipts for Money exceeding $10 (Impressed Stamps),

260 58

290 93

30 35

11A

Do

do

do do (Adhesive Stamps),

6,409 65

6,075 06

334 59

12

Probates and Letters of Administration,

1,952 75

2,116 50

163 75

13

Conveyances or Assignments,

30,983 75 |

12,449 25

18,534 50

13

Deed or other Instrument of Gift,

150 00

300 00

150 00

14

Mortgage,

3,950 50

3,088 25

862 25

14

15

Where in a Mortgage the Sum secured is unlimited, Reassignment of any Mortgaged Property,

164 75

166 50

175

16

Letter or other Instrument of Hypothecation,

580 50

502 00

17

Duplicate of any Deed chargeable with Duty,

285 50

312 25

26 75

2 2

84 50

18

Lease or Agreement for a Term of Years,

19

Lease or Agreement for a Lease without Fine or Premium,

771 50

663 00

108 50

20

Lease or Agreement for a Lease with Fine or Premium,

41 50

41 50

21

22

Instrument under Seal not otherwise specially charged, Policies of Marine Insurance,

706 00

870 00

164 00

4,323 10

4,404 00

80 90

1

23

Articles of Clerkship,

...

24

Warrant of Attorney,

1

25

Copartnership Deed,

26

Cognovit and Arbitration Award,

260 00 23 00

200 00

60.00

18 00

5.00

Sec 1

Adjudication Fee,

700

4 00

3.00

under Article 11a,

TELEGRAPH FORMS,

ADHESIVL STAMPS sold, exclusive of the 3 cent Stamps

.... ....

Duty received under The Sheriff's Ordinance, 1873, on-

Service of Summons, Subpoena, Citation, or Order,

Duty received under The Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance,

81 50

76 50

5.00

31,857 08

39,179 83

7,322 75

38 00

44 00

6 00

1874, on

Application for a Certificate,

Certificate granted,

Application for a Certificate, Schedule E II,

Certificate granted under

do,

118 00 119 00

111 00 100 00

700 19 00

TOTALS,....

$173,641 50 160,769 17 13,098 65 25,970 98

DEDUCT INCREASE,

TOTAL DECREASE FOR THE YEAR 1882,

Total Revenue for the Month,

Collected in 1881, up to December 31st,

....

Do 1882,

>>

27

31st,

Decrease,

Stamp Office, Hongkong, 4th January, 1883.

.... $13,098 65

....

$ 12,872 33

......

$7,693 08

$173,641 50 160,769 17

...$ 12,872 33

ALFRED LISTER, Collector of Stamp Revenue

1

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 48.

SUPREME COURT.

The following Returns are published for general information

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 10th February, 1883

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

1

}

On whose

Petition

26th May, 1865 6th Jan, 1866 1st Aug, 1866 4th Dec, 1866 28th June, 1867

Huffam, Official Assignee,

Do,

Do

Do

9

Do

Do,

Do.

Do,

do,

Blake-25th Sept, 1867

11th May, 1872 17th Feb, 1871 15th Dec 1871

24th Oct, 1867 28th May, 1872 6th Mai, 1871

Do

Do,

do,

Do

Alexander, Offi'l Assignee,

Do

Do,

do

"

}

5th Jan. 1872

Do

Do,

22nd April, 1872

18th May, 1872

Do

Do,

do,

154 Tam Chow, Lee Kuong, Kung Lok, 157 Tong Yut,

158 John Robinson White,

16th Mai, 1878

24th July, 1872 6th Aug, 1872 7th Mar, 1873 19th Mai 1873 14th Aug, 1873 | 26th Aug, 1873 11th May, 1874 1st Jan, 1874 7th Nov, 1874 | 18th Nov 1874 26th Jan 1877 9th Feb, 1877 öth Mai 1877 16th Mai 1877 5th Oct, 1877 29th Oct, 1877 26th June, 1878 8th Feb, 1878 26th Mar, 1878

Do

Do,

do,

>

Do

Do,

do,

,

Do

Do,

do

Do

Do,

}

Do

Do,

*

>

Do

Do

Do,

}

Do

Plunket, Official Assignee,

Do

Do,

do,

No on

former

Return

RETURN OF BANKRUPTCIES, MARKED AS OUTSTANDING IN THE LIST PUBLISHFD ON THE 7TH JANUARY, 1880, WHICH HAVE SINCE BEEN WOUND-UP

Name

William Robert Cunningham, Leonard Barnes,

Tong Ah Yute,

23

31

A P F Bielfeld,

17

40 W Henry Hohnholtz, A Emile Vaucher & Geo way, (Vaucher & Co ),

88 Alexander Gan,

91

J M Guedes,

97 HAR Hadjee Elias,

101 Lee A-fong,

104 Ho Yeok Chuen,

108 Henrique Rodrigues,

115 Hjahmar A Bjording,

119

Edouard Estalico,

123 John W Finch,

148 Einest Giclier,

149 Chu Poon alias Chu Chun Sang,

Date of

Adjudication.

>

8th May, 1865 6th Jan, 1866 10th July, 1866 15th Nov, 1866 12th June, 1867

Date of Fust

Meeting of Creditors

Bankrupt

Do

Official Assignee or Creditors' Assignee

do,

do,

do

do,

do,

do

do

"

Huffam, Official Assignee,

Debts

in

Schedule

1845

Date of Declaration of Dividend

24th June, 1882 231d June, 1882 22nd June, 1882 22nd June, 1882

31d June, 1882

Date of

Discharge

1865

13th Dec, 10th Feb, 1866) 21st Aug, 1866 30th Jan, 1867 9th Aug, 1867

1868

13th July, 1872 231d June, 1871 2nd Sept, 1872 10th July, 1872 20th Aug 1872 10th June, 1874

1874

3rd July, 18th Dec 1874

26th Mai

1877

Remarks

Unclaimed dividends paid into Treasury on 30th August, 1882

Assets

in

Schedule

Amount received by the

Official Assignees

Proof.

Dividend

$ 5,794 19

$ 8,617 00

$ 422 50 $ 4,156 00

5,768 29

2,623 50

268 50

1,147 97

100

4,156 00

3,753 61

602 61

2,126 55

9 18

18,378 08

959 13

327 93

4,626 25

7,348 35

213 73

148,791 45

146,583 86

4,759 22

83,654 14

3

48.9

100

5,379 83

3,000 00

419 53

5,119 69

5,586 10

494 52

29,809 52

137 00

7 55

20.00

4 365 89

13,821 75

28,823,17

36,176 28

242 92

550 03

55,164 60

31,677 64

754 31

43 678 45

30 70

802 00

2,159 15

101 00

32 50

8,207 56

1,142 24

276 08

447 50

4,470 00

Dec 1874 & Oct 1878

1,447 92

400 00

13 00

936 25

12.00

8.00

392 27

10,935 94

2,438 74

59 36

776 74

727 30

43 03

11 00

7,651 53

8,401 37

1,109 01

1,349 25

12%

Do

Do,

do,

2,731 32

10,045 57

1,033 03

2,050 81

42%

160

Yu Ching,

20th May, 1878

163

La Tsung alas Lee Tsung Foong,

13th July, 1878

7th June, 1878 Do 10th Aug, 1878 Creditors

Do,

do

4,262 15

5,930 27

827 16

3,100 70

1,610 25

11,163 44

Do,

do

164 Ho Tai Sang,

6th Sept, 1878

166

Cha Sz,

167 Chow Ting,

168 Foong Him Shan,

169 Hans Kiæ,

170 Wong Yau Ming & Tang Sik Lang, 174 Wm Carl Engelbiccht von Pustau, 177 Wong Tak,

178 Nursey Kessowjec & Co,

180

Ilo Kwong Ming,

181 Francis Hutchings,

}

5th May, 1879 | 19th May, 1879 231d May, 1879 | 11th Jan 1879

24th Sept, 1878 | Bankrupt 13th Sept, 1878 25th Sept, 1878 19th Sept, 1878 4th Oct, 1878 1st Oct, 1878 17th Oct, 1878 11th Nov, 1878 | 28th Nov, 1878 15th Oct, 1878 29th Oct, 1878 231d Dec 1878 14th Jan 1879 31st Dec 1878 20th Jan, 1879 2nd May, 1879

Do,

do,

42,105 50

10,782 37

88 21

14,498 09

Do

Creditors' Assignee,

136,389 82

153,533 49

1,584 24

130,156 36

14 85

Do

Do

do,

20,636 99

16,783 36

6,534 06

20,006 36

Do

Do

do,

169,647 03

177,177 78

101,056 20

Plunket, Official Assignee,

33,831 98

32,314 48

3,720 10

32,687 35

Do

Do,

do

19,652 17

13,247 96

507 68

11 674 95

Do

Do

do

1,099,807 23

1,007,898 25

23,802 33

Do

Do

do

2,413 80

2,493 69

285 31

2,097 31

588 01

7-80

100

6293

1000

100

25%

1 70

100

385 100

1st Div 1%

12 f

8th Nov, 1878 23rd July, 1880 ( 27th July, 1880 27th May, 1882 16th July, 1879 18th Apı, 1880

}

28th April, 1877 231d April, 1878 24th April, 1878 24th July, 1878

15th Sept, 1878

11th Nov 1878

22nd Dec 1879 20th May, 1880 27th July, 1880

31st July, 1880

15th Sept, 1879 27th Jan, 1879 28th July, 1880 11th Nov, 1880 25th Aug, 1882

8th June, 1882 | 31st Dec,

1879

Unclaimed dividends or indi- visible balance paid into Treasury 26th July, 1882

"

904 19

10,848 38

Creditois

Do

do

2

Bankrupt

Do

do

11,186 00

4,900 00

Do

Cicditois' Assignee,

1,661 76

194 60

3,923 56

82.09

9,677 53

546 27

35%

31st July,

1880

BANKRUPTCIES, OUTSTANDING AT DATE OF LAST RETURN BUT NOT SO MARKED, AND WHICH HAVE SINCE BEEN WOUND-UP

2 Luz Promoli,

19th Sept, 1865 | 13th Nov

J

Bankrupt Official,

7

Thomas William Smith,

15

Pang Wa Ting,

6th Feb, 1866 | 21st Feb 6th July, 1866

Do

Do

}

31d Aug,

1866

Do

Do

19

Reuben Solomon,

27th Sept, 1866

Do

Do

Do

42

Fiederick Major,

11th July, 1867

Do

Do

45

H Conan,

5th Sept, 1867 | 24th Oct,

1867

Do

$ 13,988 10

1,754 60

60,882 21

14 057 30

16,605 84

426 00

$ 2,721 51

386 00

28,824 06

25,505 90

6,970 71

$ 102 44 $ 8,270 33 169 00

8,570 99

100

2000 8th Jan 1869 27,557 35 17.59 & 1750 of 1 24th June, 1882 6,139 47 | 25,908 95 1st May, 1869

394 03

17 60

36 50

46

PP Reimann,

22nd Aug,

48 Malia Mould,

7

51

Sherff Culim,

9

1867 29th Oct. 1867 14th Nov, 1867 14th Feb 1868

Do

14,376 65

1,755 12

634 08

Do

814 18

670 00

330 93

755 85

13th Dec, 1865 9th Ap1, 1866 } 17th Aug, 1866 1st Nov 1866 21st Aug, 1867 4th Dec,

4th Dec, 24th April, 1869 | 18th Dec,

Unlumed dividend. 01 indi- visible balance paid into Treasury on 26th July, 1882 Do do, 30th Aug, 1882

Do do,

26th July, 1882

Do

do,

do

1867

Do

do,

do

1867

1867

Do do

}

30th Aug, 1882

Do

do,

do

52

JC But,

53

R S Sncil,

?

"

57 Loau Wah Thiau,

58 IIans Kiæ,

5th Mai, 1868 28th Feb 1868 16th Mar 1868 13th Mai 1868 27th Mai, 1868 5th Aug, 1868|19th Aug, 1868 231d Oct, 1868 | 16th Nov,

Do

9 662 31

17,533 49

468 11

Do

>

Do

Do

1,496 00

994 00

418 00

305 70

522 40

Annulled 15th May, 1866

Do do

do

Do do,

do

811 38

20 62

Do

Do,

13,668 63

25,885 58

1,085 00

1868

Do

Do

37,670 16

57,406 64

837 59

7 & 1 65

24th Jan 1882 19th Sept,1879 Į 30th June, 1880

"

15th May,

1st Dec,

27th Jan.,

5th Nov

1866

1869

Do do,

Do

do

do.

do

1879

Do do, 26th July, 1882

1868

Do

ão,

do

62

C Collins,

63

Guil de Silvena,

65

HA McClean,

67 Rustomjce Dadabhoy,

15th Jan, 1869 | 29th Jan, 1869 3rd Feb, 1869 | 17th Feb, 1869 1st June, 1869 | 17th June, 1869 18th June, 1869

Do

Do

2,578 85

9

Do

Do

4,602 22

124 50

1,872 12

Do

Do

Do,

Do,

860 00

62,285 34

61,936 65

782 00

4.00

69 16

455 57

1,017 21

12 50

428 63

68 Yee Hop,

18th June, 1869

5th July, 1869

Do

Do,

54,220 60

14,842 64

20-58 & 273 of 1

100 1000

231d June, 1882 1871 6th Sept, 24th June, 1882

27th Mar 1869 30th Mar, 1870 Annulled

Do

do,

do

Do do,

do

"

Do do 30th Aug, 1882

Do

do, 31st Oct, 1882

18 T T Smith,

17th July, 1866

9th Ang, 1866

Do

Do,

5,231 17

2,245 23

11,837 85

24th Aug, 1866

Do

do, 20th July, 1882

EDW

ACKROYD,-Registrar.

Registry, Supreme Court. Hongkong, 27th January, 1883

RETURN OF ALL BANKRUPTCIES PENDING at Date of last Return OR FILED IN THE SUPREME COURT OF HONGKONG, FROM 1st August, 1879, TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1882.

Name

Date of Adjudication

Whom

Petition

Official

or Creditor

Assignee

Debt

111

Assets.

Dividend

Schedule

Date of Declaration of Dividend

Date of

Discharge,

Amount Total Received by Amount of

the Official

Assignees

Debts

Proved

REMARKS

Ng A Kiu,

Hans Kiæ,

7th Mar, 1878

Do

Do.

9%, 12% & 12%

11th Nov,

1878

Do

Wong Tso Leong,

Yeong Yee Sze,

Su King,

Chan Tsun Hang,

Wilhelm von Pustau, Ji

14th Aug,

1879

Bankrupt

Do

Official

33,831 98

32,314 48

7} & 1% %

24th Nov 1879

Do

Do

}

21st Nov 1879

Do

Do

$ 3,994 44

45,082 67

350,967 37

$ 3,639 32

22,374 65

13,437 85

11100

11280

100

40 O

25th July, 1878 7th Nov, 1878 21st July, 1881 1879 19th Sept, 24th June, 1880 28th Oct 1880 7th Sept, 1882

18,900 09

43,795 14 | Bankiupt absconded *

27th Jan, 1879

5,031 50

45,679 06

$ 205 00

$ 1,617 51

1st April, 1880 29th Jan 1880

5,587 18

38,445 26

18th Nov, 1879

Creditors

Creditors

6%

15th Sept,

1881

231 50

8,596 67 None filed.

Not followed up

bankrupt

Au Yeung Luk,

12th Jan 1880

Do.

Creditors

8,004 07

}

Charles Louis Thevenin,

28th Jan 1880

Do

Official

8,313 72

6,207 54 | 40% & 7 33% 4,838 26

28th Oct 1880

}

9th Aug, 1881

26th Aug, 1880

4,329 69

8,721 81

• !

15

25th Aug, 1880

1st June, 1880

1,105 50

+

Secundino Antonio Noronha,

22nd Jan 1880

Do

Do

1,607 00

14

}

Leong A-Yon,

12th Feb 1880

Do

Do

35,952 67

9,983 52

12108

27th July, 1880 12th April, 1880 10th Nov, 1880 | 30th Dec

147 51

4,484 70

918 75

1880

331 50

918 49

>

John Inglis,

20th Feb 1880

Do

Do

99,842 42

95,607 89

84

Tang Fuk,

Jacob Fitz Shuster,

22nd April, 1880

Do

Do

11,213 17

9,316 82

14.75%

0\0\0

19th Aug 231d July, 1880

>

1880 20th May,

1880

7,113 61

15th July, 1880

1,310 95

9th April, 1880

Do

Do

4,901 95

1st June, 1880

0 44

565 58

Leung Iu & Leung Ching,

6th Aug,

1880 Creditors

Creditors

Dhiaimdass

Dayoomull,

4th Oct,

1880

Bankrupt

Official

6,860 36

Ip Long Chai,

4th Oct, 1880

Do

Do

409 06

Joseph Martin Hanlon,

9th Oct

1880

Do

2

Vugil Favie,.

14th Oct,

1880

Do

Do

Creditois

4,113 80

14,310 84

Tsang Ng,

28th Dec 1880

Do

Official

764 54

4,614 84

78 12

1,000 00

13 631 21

926 90

44

17th Dec, 1881

7th July, 1881

161 47

52,069 94

10,848 38

662 22

685 00

3,120 07 |

Unclaimed dividends on indivisible balance pud into Treasury on 26th July, 1882

Do

do

do

do

100

13-%%

26th July, 1881 | 18th Feb 1881 2nd Mai 1881

345 24

1,894 77

>

3

275 21

4 160 00

|

Jeremias Ritchie,

29th Jan 1881

Do

394 71

No Schedule filed one Creditor balance $35 10 paid into Treasury on 29th December, 1681

Unclaimed dividends or indivisible ba- lance paid into Teasury on 30th August, 1882

None yet declared, $125 available. Not proceeded with.

Bankrupt died

Proceedings abandoned

Lam Kam Che,

Chun Lai Woon,

Wong Lec Tsol,

15th Feb 1881 10th Mai 1881

>

2

Kwok Chik Nam,

Wan Pak Kwal,

Ramon Nicasio O1ozco,

24th Mai 1881 28th Mai 1881

}

Bankrupt Creditois

Bankrupt

Do

Official

6,997 30

5,815 38

16th June, 1881

Do.

Official

Do

13.8%

Sept, 1881

3,456 70

106,332 83

605 14

99,550 19

13th June, 1881

22-80%

28th Oct, 1881

767 17

176 05

5,032 16

3,427 14

No Schedule filed, Bankrupt did not Proceedings abandoned

[surrender

65 46

12,403 19

Bankrupt absconded

Petition dismissed

Yiu Yık Nga & 2 others,

Fok Hon Tung,

Cowasjee Rustomjer, Kwok Pak Shing,

La King Ip & 5 others,

Lindolo Rozal10,

Choy Sing Nam,

Wong Woh,

Ho Yık Chi,

Wu Yung Chan & mother,

Emil Vogel & others,

Ng Choy Sik,

Ferdinand Albert Cail Hahn,

15th Sept, 1881

Bankrupt

20th Oct, 1881

Do

Official

Do

3,809 47

6,509 63

17th Dec 1881

Do

Creditois

143,531 15

657 05

130,109 97

4th Jan 1882 231d Feb, 1882

,

Pending

"

17th Dec, 1881

Do

Do

12,934 21

9,837 99

Do

26th Jan,

1882

Do

Official

131,349 10

91,204 37

Pending

}

}

25th Feb 1882

13th Mai 1882

"

16th Feb 1882 18th Mai 1882 Creditors Do

Bankrupt

Bankrupt

Official

Creditors

4,173 52

1,387 83

Pending

Do

Pending

100 16

11 30

871 03

3,152 96

494 96

173 98

7,331.82

588 31

280 98

75,468 45

11,399 43

41,234 51

No proofs put in except privileged

Proceedings abandoned

Assets paid to privileged Creditors.

Creditors' Assignees are collecting assets Pending in hands of Creditors' Assignees Not followed ip

[claims

Proceedings abandoned.

4,151 00

2,419 06 | No Schedule filed

15,935 52

Do

Do

131,000 00

103,000 00

Do

53,157 45

Low Chun,

Lum Tsz Him,

6th Mar 1882

Do

Official

8,806 45

5,113 57

Do

814

5,719 62

+

11th April, 1882

Do

Do

9,363 14

2,374 83

Do.

Lew Kum Tong,

13th Ma 1882

Do

Do

15,791 87

14,249 00

Do

286,27

Assets consist of sums due by small debtors in Penang, California and other places

* Bankrupt has a life interest in some landed property, the 1ents are periodically divided among the Creditors

Name

Date of

Adjudication

Whom

Petition

Official

o1 Creditor

Assignet

Debt

in

Assets

Dividend

Schedule

RETURN OF ALL BANKRUPTCIES PENDING AT DATE OF LAST RETURN OR FILED IN THE SUPREME COURT OF HONGKONG,-—Continued

Total

Amount of

Debts

Proved

REMARKS

Date of Declaration of Dividend

Date of

Discharge

Amount

Received by the Official Assignees

Tsang Man Hing,

30th Mar 1882

Bankrupt

Official

$ 6,044 59

Cheong Yik Tsca Moo & mother,

Chow Sun Fung,

Creditors

Do

30th Mai 1882

Bankrupt

Do

42 060 58

Wong Sing Tak,

17th April, 1882

Do

Do

1,311 49

$ 2,502 30

* 12,677 45

221 02

Pending

$ 2 909 07

Not proceeded with

14%

19th July, 1882

4th Sept,

1882

207 02

1,311 43 Wound up

Lu Ho Mung, Meijah Buxoo, Fung Yau Po, Ng Ting Shun, Kwok Ying Shew,

Wo King,

Poon Woon,

Creditors

Do

2nd June, 1882

Creditois

Do

Bankrupt

Creditois

Official

231d June, 1882

Do

Do

12th June, 1882

Do

Do

Kw'n Man & another,

8th July 1882

Do

Choy Yik Shing & another,

Nooi mahomed Khamisa & anoi

Poon Mo1,

8th July, 1882

Do

Official

62 578 00

32,325 19

46,525 00

56,041 43

63 343 13

}

21st July, 1882

Do

Do

26 928 16

28th July, 1882

Do

74 679 37

Wong Tsuk Lam,

Tum Sher Kwing,

Tsui Lei Kum,

21st July, 1882

Do

16th Aug,

1882

Creditors

12,562 24

8 559 68

10 389 17

2150.00

74 446 01

4,809 25

13 811 27

9,804 92

138,353 85126,881 26

7 223 41

Pending

Poon Tat Pong,

17th Oct,

1882

Official

Do

4 713 88

1,925 26

77,173 89

44,914 83

Tam Chai,

3,912 41

1,035 50

15,110 92

119 92

9,084 80

238 20

286 78

13,259 93

2 770 00

18,369 55

56,383 15

Proceedings abandoned

Not proceeded with Proceedings abandoned

Not proceeded with

Trust Deed caecuted on behalf of Cre- ditors

Annulled

Deed of Sale before bankruptcy by Bankrupt of all his assets

Leung Lucn Po,

17th Oct,

1882

Official

80,715 03

Lum Shu Tak,

Do

63,250 00

3,095 00

Wong Ying Hin,

30th Nov, 1882

Do

Do

1,339 95

1,712 43

João Jose da Silva e Souza,

18th Dec, 1882

Do

Do

11,486 40

10,072 32

3,428 00

* Assets consist entirely of claims which have proved irrecoverable,

Registry, Supreme Court, 27th January, 1883,

*

>

† Assets consist almost entirely of inmoveable property in possession of the Mortgagees and of a few claims due by insolvent debtors

EDW J ACKROYD, Registrar

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS granted by the Supreme Court of Hongkong, during the Year 1882.

Date of

Name of Testator

or

Grant

Intestate

Place and Time

of Death

Probate, Administration with Will, annexed or, Administration

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator

Value of the

Effects as sworn to, or set forth in the Commis

sion of Ap

pi aisement

$

1882

Jan

Hermann Kaemena, .

"

5

Cheung A Ho,

Canton,

5

وو

Nicholas Harvey

H kong,

""

12

Chan Ham Yung alias Chinaman | At Sea

No 23

19th July 1879 8th Dec, 1881 13th Oct 1881,

Do,

Do,

Du

H'kong, 26th Oct, 1881, Administration, Otto Franz Mollendorff, Vice-Consul for

Germany, Official Administrator

Effects handed over to Chan Kam Yung,

the younger brother by order of the Acting Chief Justice,

500 00

2 000 00

300 00

Do,

Under

10 00

16 Carolina M F Garcia Plexs,

H'kong,

7th Nov, 1881,

Do

Candida Maria Coimbra the mother

1,200 00

"

and Johannes Alabor,

21

16

Ah Kee alias Foong Ah Kee,

At Sea,

>

16

Edwin Augustus Deacon,

Swatow,

14th Mar, 1881, 31st Oct, 1881

23

Wo Man alus Wong Mang,

At Sea,

30 Giacomo Bolmida,

Turin,

Feb

6 William Veal,

H'kong

9

Kwok Lee Kwong

H'kong,

>>

9

Sung A Shu,

H kong,

9

Lee Fut,

22

9

Ng Mun Sow

Swatow, Honam,

14th Mai 1881 15th Jan, 1880, 3rd Nov 1881

Do, Adm with Will

annexed 26th Dec, 1881, | Administration 20th May, 1881, Adm with Will

annexed,

Do, Probate, Administration, Adm with Will

Foo Shi, the widow,

200 00

Victor Hobart Deacon the brother, one

500 00

of the Executors,

Wong Ping the elder brother,

200 00

Thomas Jackson as Attorney for Cesare

20,000 00

6th Jan, 1882, | Administi ition 14th July 1870,

Varese, the Executor,

Kwok Chin Ip the eldest son,

Official Administrator,

200 00

1,000 00

Sung Long Too, the younger brother Lee Kwai Chow the elder brother, Ng Ho Shee, the widow,

400 00

800 00

3,000 00

13 Evaristo Francisco da Roza

"}

13 Camillo Lellis de Souza,

>"

""

16

Kong Achee,

Mar 3

Thomas Marr,

H kong,

"

6

Tung Chu alias Tong Yuk Chiu,

At Sea

Macio Macao H'kong,

26th Oct, 1881, 13th Jan, 1882, 8th Feb 1882, 6th Feb, 1882 17th Dec, 1881

annexed

Administration,

Do Probate Administration, Do,

Pompilio S da Roza the eldest brother Pompilio S da Roza, the great nephew, Kong Akwa the brother,

11,000 00

86,000 00

5,000 00

200 00

Isabella Mair, the widow,

Tang King Wa the father

100 00

100 00

6

Chuck Luck

At Sea,

31st Jan, 1882

Do,

Official Administrator

100 00

"

6

Chinaman No 20,

"

13

Patrick Rose Smith,

>>

13

Chue Pun alias Tsu A Pan

29

13

Low Sai Nam,

At Sea, Canton,

19

13 Elias David Sassoon,

At Sea 29th Jan, 1882, England, 27th Nov, 1881,

18th Dec, 1881, 13th Feb, 1882

Bombay, 22nd Mar, 1880,

Do. Probate,

Administration, Probate

Executors,

""

Adm with Will

annexed

28

Miguel de Souza

"} 28

>>

Oliver Calvert,

2nd Mar, 1882, 28th Feb, 1882,

28

Hienrick F C Dierks,

""

9th Mar. 1882, 7th Feb. 1882,

"J

17 Lun Tang Kiu,

22 William Hyde,

At Sea H'kong

2nd Feb, 1882, 1st April, 1882,

""

27 Pompilio Simeão da Roza

27 Evaristo Francisco da Roza

Macao, Macao,

3rd April, 1882 26th Oct,

1881

27 Lui Lin,

""

27 Chun Shun Kwong

27 Lam Ah I,

*

27 Ng Acheong,

May 2 Cheang Iu Ko,

17

2 Camillo Lellis de Souza

28 Maria Francisca Collaço

28 William Lapsely,

April 13 John Studd,

H'kong,

At Sea,

H'kong, H'kong,

H kong, 21st Feb, 1882 S'ampton, 7th Sept, 1881,

H'kong, 17th Jan, 1881,

H'kong, 1st April 1882 H'kong, 21st April, 1882, H'kong, 11th Feb, 1882, Kwanhau, 14th Oct, 1877, 13th April, 1882, 13th Jan 1882,

2 Tong Kee alias Leong Tso Kan, At Sea,

2 Fung Yow Chian alras Chung

Yam Tseung,

11

Kwok Kow Yow,

""

June 1 William Potter Livingstone

Macao,

Adm with Will

annexed,

Administration, Probate,

Administration, Letters of Adm de bonis non, Adm with Will annexed, Do, Administiation,

Do,

Do,

Do,

Letters of Adm de bonis non,

Official Administrator,

John Thurburn Attorney for Henry Jonathan Studd and Joseph Betts Horrell the Surviving Executors, Lam Tsit Fung, Wilhelm Reineis one of the Executors, Power-reseived to giant like probate to James Walter Hyde and Margaret Hyde,

Hermenegilda Libania da Roza the mother

do

Cheang Ng Shi, the widow

5 200 00 100 00

40.00

100 00

100 00

Hermenegilda Libania da Roza, the niece, 86,000 00

Kwok Kin, the elder brother, William Homfrey Fuller Darby Attorney) for Dorathy Ann Livingston Joseph Gibbons Livingston William Caton Thompson and William Potter, William Bolton Spiatt, the sole Survi

At Sea,

28th Mar, 1882 At Sea 22nd Mai 1882, Toiquav 10th Feb, 1882,

Administration, Do

Chung Wong Hing,

100 00

100 00

Adm with Will annexed,

17,000 00

New York, 25th April 1873

Probate,

15,000 00

ving Executor,

Lai Lai, the widow,

350 00

Administration,

Do,

Do,

Money and effects handed over to Chan Yuen, Hotel-keeper of No 4Queen s Street by order of the Chief Justice, 27th May, 1882,

Under

10 00

7,000 00

Mathew Taylor Falconer

60,000 00

100 00 1,000 00

15 Nelson Spratt,

15 | Chul Pat,

""

Hu Tak,

21 Chun Tai Yau,

21 Matthew Falconer,

27 Chan Cheong Hop

27 Edward Charles Chastel,

July 3 Chun Hee,

?

13 John Fitzpatrick,

26 Ko Moon Wo,

28 Lum Tong,

Aug 8 Henry Smith,

H'kong, 31st May, 1882, Administration At Sea, 16th May, 1882,

H'kong, 29th May, 1882 Chicago 15th Jan, 1882, At Sea, 10th June, 1882 H'kong, 13th Mai 1882, H'kong, 19th May, 1882, England 11th Nov, 1881,

Swatow, 27th Feb, 1882, H'kong, 25th Feb 1882,

H'kong, 25th June, 1882,

"

8 Alexander Rodger,

17 Chan Asken alas Chan A Ching,

18 Alberto Antonio Botelho,

Glasgow,

At Sea, Macao,

11

18 Lin Hee,

H'kong,

}

Probate,

Do,

Adm with Will

annexed, Probate Adm with Will annexed Probate,

1st Sept, 1876, Adm with Will

annexed, 4th July, 1882, | Administration, 19th July, 1882,

Do, 4th June, 1882, Probate,

Chun Kwai, the eldest brother of deceased

Official Administrator

John Joseph Francis Executor

Chun Yau, the brother and sole Executor, João Henrique dos Remedios, Attorney

for Annie Fitzpatrick,

Ko Kai Shun, the son Lum Chow, the eldest son

Thomas Jackson & George Edward Noble

Power rescrved to grant like probate to Eleanor Smith the widow Thomas Jackson as Attorney for A l' Carmichael one of the Executor Chan A Yeung, the brothe., Augusto Cesar Botelho, the son Fok Hoi I, sole executrix,

25,000 00

26 000 00

163,000 00 1,500 00

58 000 00

100 00

100 00 1,500 00

500 00

Administration,

Do, Do

Do

Alexander Findlay Smith, one of the

Executors,

Tsu A Luk, the younger brother, Low Sai Lok and Low Seong Kai, the

Meyer Elias Sassoon as Attorney for Jacob Elias Sassoon, Edward Elias Sassoon and Sassoon Jacob David Adelaide Romualda de Souza, the widow, Official Administrator,

4,000 00

100 00

4,000 00

100,000 00

170 00

4,000 00

200 00

Do

Do,

Jose da Silva Loureiro Consul General

for Portugal,

2 500 00

400 00

Do

31,000 00

100 00

50,000 00

11,000 00

Do

Lui Keng and Lui Shin

Ho Amui, the widow,

Cheong Ah Hoi, the son To King Yow the mother

Kwok Shap Luk, the widow

do,

11,000 00

5 000 00

1

Date of

Name of Testator of

Grant

Intestate

CALENDAR Of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,—Continued

Place and Time

of Death

Probate, Administration with Will annexed o1 Administration

Name and Description of the Executor o1 Administrator

Value of the Effects as sworn to, or set forth in the Commis-

sion of Ap- praisement

1882

Aug 22 Li Lui Shing,

**

24 Lim Tiang Swee

H kong. S'pole,

28th May, 1882, 22nd Jan, 1881,

Administration, Adm with Will annexed,

Fung Shi Yook, the widow,

6,000 00

Amo Seng Chew as Attorney for Yeap Kong Cheow and Seet Teang Lun,

6,000 00

Power reserved to Seet Lim Neo and Lun Tay Lin,

24 Ng Sik,

29 Lau Cheong,

Sept 4 Florinda Mercedes Carroll,

97

9

Leong Man Chun,

H kong, Масло,

Macao,

H kong,

15

Lau Fan,

Macro,

19

20

希尊

Chun Tai Kwong

H'kong,

22

João Luciano Britto,

H'kong,

25 Francisco Gonsalves Pereira,

Macao,

2

26

Jose Maria P da Cunha Teixeira,

H kong,

6th Jan, 1882, 20th Mar, 1882,

29th July 1882,

23rd Jan, 1856,

4th July, 1882

2nd Sept, 1882, 28th Aug, 1882, 16th June, 1882, 3rd Aug, 1882

Administration, Probate,

La A Chow the widow,

100 00

Lau Seung Kan and Lau Seung Yum, Į

the Executors,

60,000 00

Administration,

Vicenta Sibina Carneiro e Silva, the

11,000 00

eldest sister

Do,

Do,

49

Oct

3

Wan Cheung Chi,

9

Lai Un Chu

"

9

Lan Kwai Sin,

""

11

>>

Au Leung,

""

19 Leung Kwong Wa,

39

20 Alfied Springham,

24 O Tam Yew alias Ku Tam I,

""

24

Jesse Harrold,

At Sea, H'kong,

28th Sept, 1882,

""

25 John Noble

H kong,

8th Oct,

1882,

29

**

27 Chan A Ling,

At Sea,

11th Sept

1882

Do,

93

27 Lim Ngo,

At Sea,

4th Oct, 1882

Do

Nov 11 Kwok Koon Yau

H'kong,

28th Oct, 1882,

Probate,

""

59

Dec

15 Friedrich Wilhelm Hulse

16 Lam A Ching,

John Noble

Do,

Do,

At Sea 7th Sept, 1882 Shum Tak, 7th Aug 1881, H kong, 8th Aug, 1882, Au Chun, 31st May, 1882, Chau Chun, 5th Aug, 1882 H'kong, 28th Sept, 1882,

17th Mar, 1882

Adm de bonis non, Adm with Will

annexed Administration,

Do,

Administration, Do,

Do,

Do Probate, Do,

Administration Adm with Will

annexed, Administration,

George Orley, son in law of deceased Ritta Miranda Britto the widow, Official Administratur,

Mula d Assumpção Gomes Teixeira, the (

widow,

Wan Cheung Fan, the brother,

Lai Toi Chiu, the son,

Cheung A Pak, the widow,

Leung Cheung Kit, the eldest son, William Lysught and James Vanstove

the Executors,

Liu Ng Mun, the first and lawful wife, Frederick Joseph Harold, the brother,

Official Administrator

Im A Ho the first and lawful wife, Official Administrator,

Kwok Pak Shing the brother,

150 00 1,000 00

500 00 400 00

6,000 00

} 1,500 00

100 00 40,000 00

19th April, 1882, Administration, Lorenz Ponecker Attorney for Johann 11,000 00

Takao,

Germany, 4th July 1882, H'kong, 8th Oct, 1882,

Leong Yam Cheong, the son,

5,000 00

Lau Wong Shi, the widow,

15,000 00

3 000 00

3 000 00

3 000 00

400 00

Lin Yau, the son,

43 000 00

600 00

100 00

7,000 00

Jacob Hulse,

Leung A Fung, the mother

100 00

12

Norberto Ludovico de Souza,

12 Severino Paulo Pinheiro,

22

12

**

Lai A Lin,

*

19

Yeong Chan Ying,

Hhong, 10th Oct, 1882, H'kong, 1st Dec 1882, H'kong, 22nd Nov, 1882. Macao, 17th Oct, 1882,

Do, Probate,

Do,

John Samuel Cox as Attorney for Alexander Noble and William Lyon Noble, brothers of deceased, João Caetano da Cunha, Administrator, Andronico Francisco Alves sole Executor Kou Sun Choi sole Executrix

50,000 00

3,000 00

1,300 00

1,200 00

Do,

Tak Shing alias Yeong A Sam, and Tak

Wai alas Yeong A Yuen, the Exe- cutors,

71,000 00

30 Leung A Kew,

30 Lam A ln,

H'kong, 28th Dec, 1882, H'kong,

6ta Dec, 1882,

Administration, Do

Wong Chou, the lawful husband, Wong A Yau, the first and lawful wife

10,000 00

100 00

>>

EDW J. ACKROYD,

Registrar

Registry, Supreme Court, 18th January, 1883

$

*

3

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No 52

GAOL

The following Returns from the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol, for the year 1882, are published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 17th February, 1883

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary

RETURN shewing the NUMBER of PRISONERS IN VICTORIA GAOL on the last Day of each Week of the Year 1882

WEEKLY, 1882

EURO-

PEANS

CHINESE OR COLOURED

WEEKLY,

EURO-

PEANS

CHINESE OR COLOURED

TOTAL

TOTAL

1882

Males

Males Females

Males

Males Females

January 1

71

622

28

721

July

2

32

528

21

581

8

75

605

27

707

9

31

536

19

586

15

74

616

29

719

16

35

540

20

595

""

""

22

71

620

29

720

23

38

522

24

584

"

29

73

615

29

717

30

30

507

21

558

"

February 5

75

602

26

703

August 6

33

527

21

581

12

56

602

28

686

13

33

536

21

590

39

55

19

51

615

29

695

20

31

541

23

595

i

""

26

49

625

30

704

27

29

538

20

587

""

March

5

48

610

20

678

September 3

36

534

20

590

12

47

608

29

684

10

43

521

21

585

19

وو

19

55

585

29

669

17

37

579

20

636

"2

""

26

35

599

31

665

24

40

557

22

619

""

29

April

2

47

581

27

655

October

1

38

520

19

577

9

50

597

26

673

8

40

544

20

604

"

16

34

600

26

660

15

38

507

21

566

""

>>

23

30

581

25

636

22

41

490

20

551

*

30

30

554

24

608

29

39

494

24

557

*

May

7

32

565

25

622

November 5

36

495

19

550

14

33

566

27

626

12

36

495

20

551

>>

21

33

560

26

619

19

34

493

21

548

"

""

28

31

528

23

582

26

39

493

21

553

""

June

4

30

535

24

589

December 3

40

497

21

558

11

26

545

20

591

10

41

485

20

546

""

18

23

525

24

572

17

35

475

22

532

29

25

27

515

21

563

24

35

454

18

507

"

31

34

480

18

532

GEO HAYWARD,

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 1st February, 1883

Acting Superintendent

*

CLASS

OF

PRISONERS

RETURN shewing the CLASSIFICATION of OFFENCES, for which PRISONERS were committed to VICTORIA GAOL from the respective COURTS of the COLONY, during the Year 1882

Murder

Manslaughter

Cutting and wounding, or Assault occasioning grievous

bodily harm

Assault with intent to rob or Robbery with violence

Burglary, Attempted Burglary, Breaking, entering and stealing, and Having possession of housebreaking implements

Larceny, Larceny from a house, from Person, from Ships

or Boats in Harbour or on the High Seas

Obtaining goods or money by false pretences

Unlawful possession, and Receiving stolen goods or pro-

perty, and Unlawfully carrying deadly weapons

Child stealing Kidnapping, Abduction of females, For- cible detention and Buying or Selling human beings

Uttering counterfeit coin or notes

Perjury, Preferring a false charge and statement, and

Contempt of Court

Embezzlement

Piacy &c

Indecent Assault

Common Assault, Assault with wounding, Fighting, Dis- orderly conduct, Drunkenness, Refusing to pay chair hire Resisting Police, and Using abusive language

Misconduct as a Private or Public Servant,

Refusing

duty, Negligence, Desertion Absent without leave Remaining behind from ships, and Breach of Recogni-

zance

Breach of Military and Naval Discipline

Extortion and Attempting to Extort

Breach of Gambling Ordinance, Rogue and Vagabond, Suspicious and dangerous character, Obtaining passages surrepticiously on board ships, Aiding and Abetting in a Misdemeanour

Unlawful hawking or Selling goods without License, Uttering cries, Without Passes of Lights, Obstruction, Nuisance, Damaging property Firing crackers, Making bonfires, Defiling streams, Indecent exposure, Tres- passing, Breach of Ordinance for Harbour and Market Regulations, and Breach of Opium and Registration

Ordinances

Using Threats

Breach of Brothel Ordinance

Mendicancy

Illegal Pawning

Attempting to commit Arson

Libel

On Remand, for Trial, and pending orders &c

For Debt

Males,

EUROPEAN.

Females,

INDIAN

Males, Females Males,

1

CHINESE

{ Females,

TOTAL,

1

1

II

6

be

10

23

985

OT

T

18

N

119

8

p

2

10

23

1,009

17

122

17

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 1st February, 1883

6

9

6

104

16

15

18

11

I

6

226

10

3

3

1

44

16

co

999

7

6

14

3

348

45

44

3

685

526

4

1

18

2

225

4

16

507

4

31

3

1

19

4

2

46 452 31

3,124

I

103

N

36

1 520 34

3 498

GEO, HAYWARD,

Acting Superintendent

TOTAL

:

TABLE A.

RETURN of SERIOUS and MINOR OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1882, with the Results of such Reports.

Robberies

with Violence Burglaries.

from

the Person.

Larcenies in Dwelling

Houses

at Night.

Assaults

with Intent

Larcenies.

Felonies not already

Assaults and Disorderly

Gambling. Kidnapping.

Unlawful

Piracy.

Possession.

to rob.

given.

Conduct.

Miscellaneous Offences.

Euro- peans

Indians. and

Chinese.

Total.

Ameri-

cans.

1882.

January,

February,

March,

ԷԿ

2

-

حر

4

6

1

пр

4

:

:

MYN

:

216

22

1

..

:

47

68

12

25 26 2

H

23

April,

5

5

2

May,

2

H

..

June,

2

1

:

00

8

00

4

2

:

:

..

C

T

2

65

83 28

13 67

-

:

:

:

:

2

1

:

:

:

17

13

143

98

18

59

37

4

2

..

:

..

..

69 107 36

17 76

2

3

9

H

7

:

ི ཚེ

:

:

ON

2

:

:

..

..

189

103

32

3

:

57

88

22

15

21

ون

N

сл

2

..

412

1

..

:

447

106

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

No Pass or Light.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

TOTAL

OF

ALL

CASES.

3

6

2

11

51

52 10

1

..

..

39

11

47

122

131

54 20

111 502

12

7

1

49

43 11

1

..

:

36

17 49

114

98

21

41

67

19

455

455

69

T

<<<

H

..

29

31

5

:

..

:

:

24

31 19

128 130

26

50

7

4

2

440

83

494

92

2

3

:

..

3

23

16

8

..

..

**

17

31

47

183

196

29

31

4

2 4

568

96

601

N

73 108 37

20 54

4

4

2

6

11

9

2

3

6

31

25 59

277

221

214

32

28

2

7

1

123 532

567

ཌ ༣

596

197

108

26

.. ..

:

88 140 22

16 55

3

4

2

4

15

13

4

..

18

21

79

148

11

156

25

33

2

..

561

83

594

85

592

:

..

July,...

August,

September,..

October,

Qa

1

..

:

сл

3

..

เล

4

..

:

191

78

31

6

ទូ

12

76

97

43

21

52 16

1 3

4

17 8

12

..

:

:

:

:

9

7

3

:

:

:

:

182

91

33

5

1

5

50

58 22

31

75 31 10

2

8

19

13

00

&

:

:

6

7

5

4

:

..

:

••

:

133

133

74

26

1

1

..

66 109 20

29 101

10

5

ون

15

14

5

..

:

·

29

17

31

141

156

47

39

..

24 19

152

153

61

20

2

431

178

453

8

19

..

..

28 29

162

161

28

20

2

2

..

462

133

484

4

499

110

542

111

478

..

533

633

548

H

Go

2

ون

3

:

..

19

..

:

..

:

133

67

28

5

1

4

€2

87 39

14 34 14

4

1

00

8

Zovember,

December,........................

2

2

3

2

5

:

:

H

:

:

:

187

92

36

1

1

44

63 14

29 78 49

4

2

2

14 11

4

1

4

30

8

14

12

5

..

..

..

26

14 28

117

135

46

28

23

104

127

15

16

N

H

1

..

380

160

..

..

400

124

160

408

163

425

4160

416

125

431

T

:

:

3

..

3

..

..

..

:

131

75

2323

6

2

3

57

81 22

31 54 11 10

9

5

18

17

2

..

..

:

19 12 18

156

165

29

25

-

103 427

453

104

516

TOTAL,...... 30

21

6

59

37

26

32 12

-

Bad

..

Police Department, Hongkong, 31st January, 1883.

2

2104

1053

344

35 10

36 754 1089 317 261 693 117 55

29 59

275 239 76

5

10

3

11 276 263 424 1750

1820 382

385 32

25

25

9 5,559 1,366 5,969 1,407

6,324

7,376

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.—No. 83.

POLICE.

The following Returns from the Captain Superintendent of Police, for the year 1882, are published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 2nd March, 1883.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

.

1882.

1

1

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

Co

No. of Persons convicted.

10

13

4 2

1

ON

-

122

131

20

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

| No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

|

***

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Breach of Spirits

Ordinances. and Opium

TABLE B.

RETURN of MISCELLANEOUS OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1882, with the Results of such Reports.

Mendicants.

Unlicensed

Hawking.

Street Cries.

Desertion,

Refusal and Neglect of

Rogues, Vagabonds

and

Suspicious

Breach of

Public

Vehicles

Duty.

Characters.

Ordinance.

Breach of

Harbour and

Coasts

Ordinances.

Breach of

Police,

Gaol

and

Deportation

Ordinances.

Breach of Pawnbrokers,

Markets and

Weights and

Measures

Ordinances.

Cutting

Trees

Obtaining Goods and

Money

Trespass.

or

Intimidation, Exportation,

Bribery and

Conspiracy.

Earth.

by False

Pretences.

Breach of Registration Ordinance.

Spurious Coins.

Property.

Damage to

Attempt to commit

Suicide.

Animals. Cruelty to

Perjury, False Charge, and Contempt of Court.

Total.

15

14

January, ...

3

3 ..

15 13 3 31

3 ..

12 14

3

29 36 2

February,..

15

14

21 17

4

14 13 1

3

4..

[61

17

5

9

8 7

6

3 5 11 1

في

**

2

2

5

4

.

N

March,.....

11

9

3

13 13 ..

26 24

2

6

17

1

24 25 12

..

..

..

:

..

..

8

7

:

:

:

...

1

1

14

..

19 20 ..

12) 2

CO

3

2

16

15

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

April, ........

13 11

ลง

2

26 25 2

30 29 19

17

5

14 19 1 4

4

1 | 11

May,....... 27

221

5

30 28 2

55 58 ..

2

i

H

13

2

6

26..

10

}

8

4 17

27

6

:

**

..

41

39 2

Co

2

2

4

5

45

42

3

:

June, ......

July, ......

16

37

35 2

29 28 3

5

6

7 13..

E

3

CA

..

20

་་

6 4 2

1

:

I

20 21

N

11 10

2

35 32

30 29 1

6

6

1

19 21 13

ca

1

3

17 30

3

3. 2

..

..

18; 17

3

August,....

25 22

7

33 33

4

**

24 23 1

10

10

1

13 14 1

5

2

4

11..

**

3 4 2

2

1

1

22

22

1

:

September,. 19

15

19 20 2

13

13..

3

6

..

10

00

8

3

8 10

2 10

30 24

N

2

Է

2

43 42

4

H

October,....

16

8 6

16 16

1

4

4 ..

2 1

14 16

16 6

3

2 1

19 ნა 2

5

1

N

..

I

November, .

41

5 1

12 11 1

18

15 4

..

11] 10]

3

3

I

3

9 35

1

1 1

December,.. 19 11 81

10 15 ..

281

28 1

3 1

3 21

5

17 7

4

1 7

30

12

11

r

..

:

:

:

..

23

24

1

..

..

..

1

..

3

CO

33 38

201 19

N

3] 1; 2Į

3 3 2 1

3] 1 21

..

*

:

26

TOTAL,.. 172 139 43 265 258 22 274 267 14

64 84 32 196 202 58 58 51 21 97 272 64

Police Department, Hongkong, 31st January, 1883.

66

65

52 17 6 51 13 6

8

314 311 21 1812 10 4 2

15

12.

ها

13

דש

10

CUT

12

1

2

2

4

1

3

10 4

N

2

N

W

1

*

:

:

2

1

1

2

Q

~

N

:

N

:

1

3

3..

2

2

2

13 13

G

5

9

2

الله

Է՛

-

CO

-

-

N

N

H

N

2 109 107 23 38

17

10 | 20

15

18 15 8 812 5|

ลง

++

N

14

114

H

130

30

Co

98

21

128

183

196

995

25

26

29

221

214

82

148

156

25

10

152

153

19

64

162

161

28

141

1 56

47

117

135

46

104

15

156

29

|1,750 1,820 | 382

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

Murder,

DESCRIPTION.

Robbery with Violence from the Person, Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,.

Assault with intent to rob, ....

Kidnapping, ....................

Piracy,

Unlawful Possession..

Larcenies,

Felonies not already given,

TOTAL,......

TABLE C.

COMPARATIVE RETURN of OFFENCES coming under the notice of the Police, during the Years 1880, 1881, and 1882.

SERIOUS.

Number of Persons.

Number of Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

1880. 1881. 1882. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1880. 1881. 1882.

1

2

1

25

19

30

16

15

21

53

60

91

31

34

49

10

65

50

55

68

35

29

43

11

7

12

12

50

226 303 275

181

307 239

70

1,662 1,879 2,104

898

979 1,053

239

260

9

33

1

10

15

:** :*****

6

Assault, Gambling,

27

Miscellaneous,

2

Drunkenness,..

63

59

Nuisances,

11

No pass or light.

53

76

344

5

36

2,051 2,329 2,596 1,208 | 1,390|1,405

430

406

561

1882-Total Number of Cases, 6,324, being a Decrease of 372 Cases, or 5.55 per cent. under 1881. Increase of Serious Crimes, 267 Cases, or 11.46 per cent. Decrease of Minor Offences, 639 Cases, or 14.63 per cent.

Police Department, Hongkong, 31st January, 1883.

DESCRIPTION.

MINOR.

Number of Persons.

Number of Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

1880. 1881. 1882. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1880. 1881. 1882.

754 904 397 261

746

965 1,4301,089 693 358

814 1,046 1,8151,879 1,750 | 1,769 | 1,983 1,820

310

227 108 191 374 367

317 147 382

276

337

276

329

284

263

No Analysis of Convictions & Discharges.

840 566

424

TOTAL..

4,364 4,367 3,7283,548 4,459

3,602

875

702

846

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

1

Y

TABLE D.

1.—Return of SERIOUS OFFENCES reported to the Police, during the 10 Years ending 1882, showing the Number of Prisoners Arrested, Convicted, and Discharged.

MURDER.

ROBBERY WITH VIOLENCE

FROM

THE PERSON. DWELLING HOUSE.

BURGLARY

AND

LARCENY IN

ASSAULT WITH INTENT

KIDNAPPING.

TO ROB.

PIRACY.

FELONIES

UNLAWFUL POSSESSION.

LARCENY.

NOT ALREADY GIVEN.

YEAR,

1873,

1874,

1875,

co

3

+ 15 13

7 48 3 3

...

1876,

1 2 3 24 6

1877.

5 2 ... 2

21

17

2

4 10 90 23

19 79 12

7 30 1

1

1 55

31

:

12 1

...

2

2

73 35

36 71 9

9 4 13 107 41

UU

10

10

15 9

*T

3

14 12 10 22

92 19 3

5 14 69 34 14 48 ...

:

22232

I

-

09 03 20 1 8

1103 66

51 29

3333

3 63

36

44 110

17 46 7

10

71 5

35

32

63 5

9

.

**

-

22

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No, arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No, arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

232

227

75

302 846 609

191

800

22

10

7 17

9 18

203 194

137

331 802 495

171.

666

16

12

4

16

со

15 251 242

82

324 938 597

178

775 13

9

10

19

4

13 239 230

59

289 1,059 671

180

851 8

N

7

9

309 291

105

...

TOTAL,..

20 15 3 18

87 53 25 78437 129 31 160 6

Co

5

10

2 7 345 197 | 164 361| 27

1878,

7 4 1 5 35 12 2 14 131

49

5

LO

54

1879,

4

4 1 5 39 10 20 30 101

44

9 53 1

1880,

1

25 16

...

3 19 53 31

10 41 2

1

1881,

1882,

2

1

I 19

2

1

1 30 21

25

15

8 23 60 34 8 42

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

53 31 69 100

58

27

20

47 1,231 1,184

87

6

7 470 410

396 1,437 813

458 1,642 5,082 3,185

166 576

192

1,005 32

26

30

912 4,097 91

59

32

91

1,888 | 1,037

304

1,341

19

10

18

28

51

38 40 78 7 6

=

Co

N

333 302

105

407

1,850 972

302 1,274

11

10

7

12

...

50

6 27 91 49 27 76 1

:

2

2

9 8

65

68

43 111 11 12 50 62 226 181

70

251

1,662 898

239 1,137

6

11

15

16

35

63 98

7 12

55 29 59 88 5 3

9 21 303 307

11 14 275 239

53

360 1,879 979

260 1,239

9

7

5

12

76

315 2,104 1,053

344 1,397

33

10

36

46

TOTAL,..

16 10

148 71 39

2 12 148 74 39 113 || 436 207

113 39 113 436 207 59 266

4

1

2

3 274 201| 274 | 475 | 38 | 34

77

77111 1,607|1,439

470 1,909 | 9,383 | 4,939 |1,449 | 6,388 78

33333

81 114

Average of 1st Period,.

Do. of 2nd do.,

4.0 3.0 0.63.6 17.4 10.6 3.2 2.0 0.4 2.4 29.6 14.8

5.0 15.6 87.4 25.8 6.2 32.0 1.2 1.0 0.4

1.4 69.0 39.4 32.8 72.2 | 5.4

7.8 22.6 $7.241.4 11.8 53.2 0.8 0.2 0.4

0.654.8 40.254.8 95.0 7.6

5.4 4.0 9.4 246.8236.8 6.8 15.4 22.2 321.4 287.8

91.6 328.4 1,016.4 637.0|182.4 819.4 18.2

11.8 6.4

94.0 381.8 1,876.6 987.8 289.8 1,277.6 15.6

18.2

6.6 16.2 22.8

1873,

1874,

1875,

1876,

1877,

YEAR.

Cases

reported.

No. of persons

convicted.

No. of persons

discharged.

arrested.

Total No.

D.

2.—Return of Minor OFFENCES reported to the POLICE during the 10 years ending 1882, showing number of prisones arrested, convicted and discharged.

ASSAULT.

GAMBLING.

MISCELLANEous.

DRUNK-

ENNESS.

NO PASS OR

NUISANCES.

LIGHT.

reported.

Cases

No. of persons

convicted.

No. of persons

discharged.

Total No. arrested.

reported.

Cases

persons

convicted.

No. of

1,025

1,558

265

1,823

262

407

22

866 1,303

238

1,541

200

388

47

796

1,270

269

1,539

255

489

42

242

429

1,988

2,436

362

2,798

701

776

1,412

435

1,507

1,804

280

2,084

442

622

960

531

1,505

1,864

334

2,198

549

317

664

786 1,298

267

1,565

159

323

26

349

2,438 2,889

299

3,188

523

306

849

841

1,282

281

1,563

282

497

146

643

2,073

2,012

275

2,287

464

611

1,151

Total,..

4,314

6,711

1,320

8,031

1,158

2,104

283

2,387

9,511

11,005

1,550 12,555

2,679

2,632

5,036

144

1878,

875

1,289

318

1,607

353

585

125

710

1,794

1,965

332 2,297

512

355

335

1879,

838

1,134

376

1,510

157

499

185

684

1,442

1,717

337

2,054

301

232

762

1880,

746

965

310

1,275

358

814

191

1,005

1,815

1,769

374

2,143

276

329

840

1881,

904

1,430

227

1,657

397

1,046

108

1,154

1,879

1,983

367

2,350

337

284

566

1882,

754

1,089

317

1,406

261

693

147

840

1,750

1,820

382 2,202

276

263

424

.....

Total,.

4,117

5,907

1,548

7,455

1,526

3,637

756

4,393

8,680

9,254

1,792

11,046

1,702

1,463

2,927

Average of 1st period,

862.8

1,342.2

Average of 2nd period,

823.4 1,181.4

264.0 1,606.2

309.6 | 1,491.0

56.6

231.6 420.8

305.2 151.2

727.4

477.4 1,902.2 | 2,201.0 878.6 1,736.0 | 1,850.8

310.0 2,511.0

535.8

526.4

1,007.2

358.4 | 2,209.2

340.4

292.6

585.4

Cases

1

reported.

Altogether.

Excepting Nos. 13, 14, and 15.

In 1873,

.6,328 persons.

In 1878,

.6,739 persons

""

1874,.

5,204

1879,

.6,114

""

""

"}

,,

1875,.

.5,541

""

""

1880,

.6,061

""

""

>>

1876, 1877,

.6,371

>>

...6,030

""

1881, 1882,

.6,957

""

.6,414

""

""

29,474

32,285

"

"

6.-DETAILS OF NUMBER OF PRISONERS ARRESTED.

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

1873 to 1877.

1878 to 1882.

1. Murder,

2. Robbery with violence from the person,

3. Burglaries and Larcenies from dwellings,.

4. Assault with intent to rob,

5. Kidnapping,

6. Piracy,.....

7. Unlawful possession,........

8. Larcenies,

18

12

78

113

160

266

7

3

361

475

47

111

1,642

1,909

4,097

6,388

9. Felonies not already given,.

91

114

MINOR OFFENCES.

Yearly average.

10. Assaults,

11. Gambling,

.8,031

7,455

2,387

12,555

4,393 11,046

12. Miscellaneous,

13. Drunkenness,..

14. Nuisances,

15. No pass or light, .

No details of number of arrests.

7.-NUMBER OF PRISONERS CONVICTED AND DISCHARGED.

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Convicted.

Discharged.

In 1873,

948

330

In 1878,

1,554

571

1874,

787

357

1879,

1,381

485

>>

1875,

949

324

وو

وو

1880,

1,208

430

>>

>>

1876,.

974

295

1881,.

1,390

406

1877,

1,196

341

1882,

.1,405

561

"}

2.

4,854

1,647

6,938

2,453

FOR MINOR OFFENCES.

Except Nos. 13, 14, and 15, of which no details are given.

Convicted.

Discharged.

In 1873,.

..4,401

649

In 1878,.

1874,

3,495

565

"

""

1879,

1875,

""

.3,623

645

>>

1876,

4,510

592

1880, 1881,

1877,

.3,791

702

1882,

وو

19,820

3,153

Altogether.

Convicted.

In 1873,

.5,349

1874,

4,282

>>

1875,.

.4,572

">

1876,

5,484

Excepting Nos. 13, 14, and 15.

Discharged.

979 922

969 887

In 1878,.

1879,

""

""

1880,

>>

1877,

..4,987

1,043

>>

24,674

4,800

Convicted.

Discharged.

.3,839

775

.3,350

898

.3,548

875

.4,459

702

3,602

846

18,798

4,096

Convicted.

Discharged.

.5,393

1,346

.4,731

1,383

4,756

1,305

,, 1881,

.5,849

1,108

>>

1882,

.5,007

1,407

25,736

6,549

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

""

In 1873,

1874, 1875,

3.-CASES REPORTED TO POLICE.

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

1,316 cases. In 1878,

1,166

"

"}

1879,

1,396

"}

""

1880,.

">

1876,

.1,485

1881,

"}

1877,

.1,966

""

"

"> ""

""

1882,

7,329

""

MINOR OFFENCES.

"

In 1873, 1874,.

..6,164 cases. In 1878,

.4,597

""

1879,

""

1875,

.4,086

""

1880,

""

1876,

..5,061

""

1881,

""

1877,

.5,422

""

""

1882,

25,330

In 1873,

1874,

""

1875,

""

1876,

"}

1877,

او

Altogether.

"

7,480 cases. In 1878, 5,763

">

1879,

..5,482

""

1880,

"}

6,546

1881,

""

""

.7,388

1882,

""

32,659

""

,051

.2,611 cases.

2,397

"}

>>

2,329

""

.2,596

""

11,984

Increase of 63.51 per cent. in 2nd period.

.4,224 cases.

.3,732

وو

4,364

""

.4,367

">

.3,728

"7

20,415

>>

Decrease of 19.40 per cent. in 2nd period.

4.—DETAIL OF CASES REPORTED TO POLICE.

......6,835 cases.

.6,129

""

.6,415

""

.6,696

""

.6,324

""

32,399

33

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

1873 to 1877.

Yearly average.

1878 to 1882.

Yearly average.

5. Kidnapping,..

1. Murders,....

2. Robbery with violence from the person,

3. Burglaries and Larcenies in dwellings,.

4. Assault with intent to rob,

6. Piracy,

7. Unlawful possession,

8. Larcenies,

20

4.0

16

3.2

87

17.4

148

29.6

437

87.4

436

87.2

6

1.2

4

0.8

345

69.0

274

54.8

27

5.4

38

7.6

1,234

246.8

1,607

321.4

.5,082

1,016.4

9,383

9. Felonies not already given,

91

18.2

78

1,876.6 15.6

MINOR OFFences.

1873 to 1877.

Yearly average. 1878 to 1882.

Yearly average

10. Assault,

.4,314

862.8

4,117

823.4

14. Nuisances,

11. Gambling,

12. Miscellaneous,

13. Drunkenness,

15. No pass or light,..

.1,158

231.6

1,526

305.2

..9,511

1,902.2

8,680

1,736.0

2,679

535.8

1,702

340.4

.2,632 ..5,036

526.4

1,463

292.6

1,007.2

2,927

585.4

In 1873,

1874,

1875,

1876,

"

"

1877,

5.-NUMBER OF PRISONERS ARRESTED BY POLICE.

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

1,278 persons. | In 1878,.

""

""

""

""

1,144

1,273 1,269 .1,537

1879, 1880, 1881,

""

""

1882,

""

2,125 persons.

1,866

""

1,638

1,796

1,966

9,391

""

"

""

"}

A

In 1873,

», 1874,

"

1875,

1876,

""

"

1877,

6,501

">

FOR MINOR OFFENCES.

Excepting Nos. 13, 14, and 15, (see Table 2), of which no details are given.

.4,060

.5,050 persons. In 1878,.

1879,

""

.4,268

""

1880,

..5,102 .4,493

""

"

1881,

1882,

وو

22,973

"}

>>

4,614 persons.

4,248 .4,423

5,161

.4,448

""

"}

""

""

22,894 >

TABLE E.

RETURN shewing the ENLISTMENTS and CASUALTIES in the Police Force during 1882.

Enlistments.

Deaths.

Resignations through sickness.

Resignations through expiry of term of service

Dismissals or desertions.

Total number of casualties.

or otherwise.

Europeans,

26

1

1

9

Indians,

7

2

- T

Chinese,

59

CO

2

13

7

1

10

3

36

19

62

TOTAL,..

92

7

4

Police Office, Hongkong, 31st January, 1883.

ŕ

52

32

2222

85

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.—No. 84.

EDUCATION.

The following Annual Reports on Education in Hongkong, for the year 1882, are published for general information.

By Command,

FREDERICK STewart,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 3rd March, 1883.

No. 12.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL,

HONGKONG, 17th February, 1883.

SIR, -I have the honour to forward to you the Annual Report and Returns, connected with this School, for 1882.

In reviewing the events of the past year, the following facts deserve to be noted.

(1) With the approval of His Excellency, the Officer Administering the Government, Euclid and Algebra have been restored to the Time Table. As these subjects with Mensuration occupy half of the 6 hours given weekly to Arithmetic, no loss accrues thereby to the Study of English.

(2) Elementary Geography and Grammar are now taught in the lowest classes outside the Preparatory School, by which arrangement increased proficiency in English may reasonably be expected in the upper classes in two or three years' time.

(3) A half-yearly examination was held at the end of July, in the work of the past 5 months, with the satisfactory result in the English School of 80.75 per cent. passing, although no time was given for special preparation.

(4) By the return of Mr. MCKINNEY (4th Master) the School, for the first time, enjoyed for 4 months the benefit of the full complement of 6 European Masters; which rendered the discipline of the School highly efficient, and contributed to the satisfactory result at the Annual Examination.

(5) On the other hand, toward the close of the year, the staff suffered severely by the temporary removal of Mr. ARTHUR (5th Master) to the Magistracy, on the score of ill-health; and by the permanent loss of Messrs. CHAN-KAI-MING, TSANG-KIT-FAN, LAU-HO and A. RAMJAHN. The interests. of the School have, however, been secured by suitable appointments.

(6) The statistics call for no remark, as they have for some years attained a somewhat fixed average; no alteration for the better can be made in the Roll Returns in the present building.

(7) It is, however, satisfactory to observe that the Central School continues to meet a demand, having in the past year supplied 30 important vacant situations, in the Colonial Service, in the Chinese Imperial Customs and in leading legal and mercantile firms.

I have the honour to be,.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. II. BATESON WRIGHT,

Head Master.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

......

TABLE XIII.-RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS IN 1882.

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Exam-

ined.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Total Passed.

Number of Scholars who Passed.

No. of Scholars who Failed.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Standard I.

Standard II.

3.-

1.-Basel Mission, High Street (Boys),

+9

High Street (Girls),

21

21

2. Baxter Vernacular, D'Aguilar Street (Giris),.

15

15

31

31

4.-

5.-

Hollywood Road (Girls), Queen's Read M.

23

22

irls),

20

29

--C. M. S. East Street (Boys),...

I

26

26

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

78

72

8.+ཡ

"

(Girls),

31

9.-

""

Saiyingpan (Boys),..

48

2 2 2 2 5NPER

16

5

10

2

2

::

:

2

15

7

10

12

100 - 00

:

:::

21

15

18.48

30

1

40.21 10

22

25.34 35

27.70 80

Total Failed.

ance during School Year.

Average Daily Attend-

Standard I.

* 2 3 80 | Standard II.

Standard III.

Sums to which the School is entitled.

*

€Ð

$

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Good.

Very

Good.

Fair.

Needle Work.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant in 1882.

Amount of reduction.

Amount payable.

To Teacher.

To Manager.

$3

$

$

60

90

48

6

28

31.75 50

42

8

3

3

26

28.88 60

48

23

23

15

66

6

87.58 115

138

105

30

13

9

4

27

3

42.28 65

48

19

14

44

4

61.71

95

10.-

11.-

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

32

29

14

27

2

40.59 70

37

1. Division (Boys),

71

32

17

70

81.56 100 102 119

>>

12.-

II.

>>

(Boys),

18

18

8

7

15

3

31.02 40

༄ཚ་ྲཝ

51

84

60

42

13.-L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

71

71

17 24

14

10

5

70

1

85.94 $5 144

14.-

15.-

16.-

Staunton Street, I. Division (Girls),. II.

31

31

"

"

*

(Girls),.

28

27

"

17.-

18.-

73

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls), Wantsai Chapel (Boys),. (Girls),.

42

42

51

50

32

32

19.-

20.-

"1

Yaumati (Boys),

1

63

63

""

39

23.--

"}

21.-

25,-

26.-

31

""

""

27.-Mr. Ho's Aberdeen Street (Girls),

28.-

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

(Girls), 21.-Mr. Chan's Hollywood Road (Boys), 22.-Mr. Tong's Hollywood Road (Girls), Salyingp'un (Boys),..

Tang Lung Chau (Girls),. Wellington Street (Boys),.

20

20

21

21

25

21

66

2N992 3 2 2 2 3

13

9

5

2

2

31

31.68 65

54

12

5

2

15

15

2

2

4

2

11

21

9

2

10

22

13

10

:00 9 1

2

N:

: N

:

1

22

28.46 60

30

40

2

42.43 75

90

: ་མཝརཎྜམ་:: ོ= སྐ

14

16

49

40

21

24

a a a

24

3.00

58

3.00

36 4.50

1

:

42

16

9

20

40 7.50

1

21

24

27.70 130.821 18.74 112.08 18.18 144.48 20.70 123.78 30.94 92.84 40.21 299.21 42.87 256.34 64.08 192.26 25.34 203.84 29.21 171.63 43.65 130.08 34.75 262.25 37.58 224.67 56.16 168.51 28.88 181.88 26.06 155.82 38.95 116.87

28.02

81.06

24

18

87.68 487.58 69.87 417.71 104.42

313.29

28

8

52

7.50

56

24

24

58 1.50

24

10

:

98

80

35

16

:89

45

18

56

3.00

42.28 256.78 36.79 219.99 54.99 61.71 320.71 45.95 274.76 68.69 206.07 40.59 254.09 36.41 217.68 54.42 163.26 84.56 474.59§ 68.00 406.59 101.04 304.95 31.02 113.02 16.19 96.83 21.20 72.63 85.94 537.94- 77.08 345.65

31.68 278.68 39.93

165.00

460.86 115.21

238.75 59.68

179.07

14

27

56

1.50

14

16

18

40

74

3.00

2

46

4

64.17 55 126

63

40

8

3 3

16

16 36.43 10

60

28

62 3.00

2

2

5

44

10

4

:

14

4

15

2

21

4

13

4

21

65

21

20

19

1

63

(Girls),

18

18

8

1

18

32

31

5

15

5

2

4

27

90

88

16

51

13

2

85

30

30

G

20

30

I

27

26

7

16

25

29.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral (Boys),

30.—St. Paul's College Mission, D'Aguilar St. (Boys),

I

61

28

4

12

7

I

59

59

18

31.- Basel Mission (Girls),.

32-Berlin Mission (Girls),..

III 39

35

III 35

35

00 15 10

24

12

2 15

25

ཤ་བལྷ ཁ ིརཿ ལཏུ

19

76.47 110

78

6

18.42 50

21.19 20

90

28

14

37.55 20

78

28

2

70.39 105 120 133

16.90 40

48

31.66 25

90

35

3

102.60 80

321

91

29.84 30

120

28

1

26.80 35

96

3

39.15 20

72

49

* * * * * : * = **?

63

:

28

4.50

3

:

16

16.50

5

24

8

15.00

4

16

31 10.50

:

16

88 13.50

2

14

30 15.00

16

59

78.05 90 144

81 40

6

5

5

8

4

1

33

2

42.41 30

42

40

45

80

48

• Co

50 15.00

3

5

8

9

11

36.-

33.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys), 84.-Hongkong Public School (Boys),..

35.-R. C. Mission, Bridge's St. Poor School, (Mixed),

Italian Convent (Girls),

IV 20

19

1

5

IV 14

14

2

4

3

1 2 2

2

35

25.20 30 56

72

99

20

64 4.50

3

17

2 38.28

6

40

50 24

42

16

a:

(24

12

2

19.06 12

32

30

1*

IV 26

24

9

13

I

22

2

50.68 54 101

12 24.00

6

IV 38

37

8

6

5

9

4

2

32

5

69.12 48

48

50 108

56

28

31.50

1

37.-

38.-

55

St. Francis Chapel (Mixed),

IV 29

26

6

11

6

3

""

St. Joseph's College, Portuguese Division (Boys), .

IV

136 105

13

25

23

21

14

1

39.-

57

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

IV

55

41.-

40.-Victoria School (Boys),. School (Girls),

IV

15

IV

19

1813 →

53

34

4

2 3

15

3

6

2

1

1

:

:

23

3 45.08 36

88

60

6 10.50

4

1

100

5 191.06 78 200

230 252 196

64

28.46 216.96 31.09 185.87 46.46 42.43 372.43 53.36 319.07 79.76 239.31 64.17 348.17 49.89 298.28 74.57 223.71 36.43 199.43 28.57 170.86 42.71 128.15 76.47 327,47 46.92 280.55 70.13 210.42 18.42 131.92 18.90 113.02 28.25 84.77 21.19 145.19 20.80 124.39 31.09 93.30 37.55 201.05 28.81 172.24. 43.06 129.18 70.89 452.39 61.82 387.571 96.89 290.68 18.90 140.00 20.19 120.71 30.17 90.54 34.66 215.16 35.13 210.03 52.50 157.53 102.60 613.60 87.92 525.68 131.42 391.26 29.84 261.34 37.45 223.89 55.97 167.92 26.80 216.80 31.06 185.741 46.43 139.31 39.15 196.15 28 10 168.05 42.01 126.04

73.05 431.05 61.76 369.29 92.32 276,97 42.41 395.41 56.66 338.75 84.68 254.07 35.20 380,70 54.55 326.15 81.53 88.28 216.28 30.99 185.29 46.32 19.06 133.56 19.13 114.43 28.60 85.83 50.68 250.68 35.92 214.76 53.69 161.07 69.12 439.62 62.99 376,63 94.15 282.48 45.08 249.58 35.76 213.82 53.45 160.87 191.06 1214.06 173.97 1,040.09 260.02 780.07

139.41

244.62

138.97

45

00

8 62.72 204

32

1

13

2

30.35

ཨཱར

20

36

28

..

24 60

24

14

16

19

6

2

3

1

18

1

25.36

48

20

98

48

8

6.00

3

62.72 52.10 363.59 311.49 77.87 233.62 30.35 168.35 24.12 144.23 36.05 108,18 25.36 256.36 36.73 219.63 51.90 164.73

TOTAL,..

.$12,514.07 1,793.07 10,721.00 2,680.05 8,040.95

* 1 passed in Euclid Standard IV.

+ 1 passed in Euclid Standard V.

‡ Actual total $137.70, but 5 per cent. de-lucted under Rule 3.

§ Actual total $199.56, but 5 per cent. deducted under Rule 3.

! Actual total $382.72, but 5 per cent. deducted under Rule 3.

4. The proportion of boys to girls, enrolled in the Schools under Government supervision, deserves attention, the more so as there are but two or three Girls-schools in existence in this Colony apart from those under Government supervision. In the latter Schools we had in 1882 but 1241 girls, as compared with 3941 boys, whilst the Census of 1881 showed but a slight difference in respect of sex, for there were 10,629 Chinese boys and 9,940 Chinese girls returned as under sixteen years of age. Among the non-Chinese population the relative proportion of boys and girls is tolerably equal. It appears, therefore, that we may safely infer from the above given figures, that two thirds of the total number of girls in the Colony, who ought to be sent to school, receive no schooling at all and conse- quently, as a matter of fact, in most instances no education worth having.

5. Of the 80 Schools under Government supervision, there is but a small minority teaching English. The vast majority of the children in the Colony learn Chinese only. In 1882 there were 64 Schools in which a purely Chinese education is given, but in most of these Schools Christian teaching is superadded to the teaching of Confucianism under the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. Two (Missionary) Girls-Schools give a European education in the Chinese language, and 2 other (Missionary) Schools, of a mixed nature, give a European education in the Portuguese language. There were further 6 Schools giving a European education in the English language and 8 Schools which give an English education with Chinese in addition. English teaching is advancing in the Colony in quality rather than in extent, yet there is from year to year a steady, though slow, progress made in promoting a knowledge of the English language among the people residing in Hongkong.

6. As regards the range of subjects comprised by the education given in the various Schools under Government supervision, the Government Central School stands forth, facile princeps, among all the educational establishment of the Colony, owing to the unrivalled range of subjects it comprises. Whereas, for instance, the highest classes in such a well-organised School as St. Joseph's College, consisting of Portuguese and Chinese boys, are taught neither Portuguese nor Chinese, and could be examined merely in the following English subjects, reading, composition, arithmetic, grammar, geo- graphy and history, the corresponding classes in the Government Central School, consisting of boys of almost any nationality, were examined by me both in English and in Chinese, viz. in reading, map drawing, arithmetic, algebra, composition, dictation, Euclid, geography, grammar, history, mensuration, translation from Chinese into English, translation from English into Chinese, Chinese essay-writing, Chinese letter-writting and Chinese prosody. I only fear that multa are being preferred at the Central School to multum and that the load here laid on young shoulders, through the extraordinary difficulty of the written Chinese language, is too heavy to be compatible with the physical and mental health of weakly boys in a tropical climate. It is noticeable, on the other hand, that St. Joseph's College, the princidal school of the Portuguese community and filled with an overwhelming majority of boys who speak but Portuguese, does not teach (nor employ in teaching) the language of Camoes, nor does the Hongkong Public School, specially designed for European Protestant boys, teach anything but English. The Hongkong Public School, however, laudably added in 1882 to its subjects the teaching of Euclid, of physical geography and geology. It is desirable, in my opinion, that Schools like the Central School, St. Joseph's College and the Hongkong Public School, should-where it can be done with safety- superadd to their present scheme of class teaching also special higher classes (requiring boys to remain a year longer in school) for book-keeping, chemistry and physiology, and for Latin. There has been visible for years past a natural tendency to expand in that direction the range of subjects comprised by the teaching of the Schools at present existing in the Colony, but the demand for such teaching is still small and the natural tendency referred to is hampered by the extra-ordinary difficulties of the written Chinese language and by the multiplicity of different languages and dialects spoken in the Colony. The teaching given in the Schools under Government supervision represents at present three separate language viz. English, Portuguese, and Chinese, and Chinese teaching is moreover given in three different dialects, as some schools teach Punti, some Hakka and some Hoklo.

up

7. As regands the Government Central School, I have but little to add to the Report of the new Head-Master, Mr. WRIGHT, beyond detailing the results of the examination. This examination was this time conducted by me in a far more searching and comprehensive manner than before, as, by an understanding with the Head-Master, the examination was not arranged, as formerly, as a mere pass- examination, confined to the limited range of subjects required by the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, nor merely on the basis of the rule of 200 attendances. Every boy, present in school whilst the examina- tion lasted, was examined in every subject that had been taught in his respective class in the course of the year, whether he had been in school only a few days or throughout the whole year. I drew the examintion papers and framed the questions in each subject myself independently, on the basis of what had been taught in each class, and none of the Masters saw the papers before they were given out to the boys, except the Head-Master who confined himself to suggesting, in the case of two or three papers, that a few of the papers set by me be made more difficult for prize purposes. For this same reason, of combining with this examination the annual prize-examination, I had set more numerous questions in each subject than is customary at the pass examinations of the Grant-in-Aid Schools. The severity of the test applied lifts, therefore, the results of this examination beyond all comparison with the results of Grant-in-Aid School examinations, even considering that at the latter examinations two-thirds of the marks possible entitle to a pass, whilst at the Central School I passed at this examina- tion all who had made half marks. Under these circumstances it is highly creditable to the new Head-Master of the Central School and to his staff that, as the net result of such a searching

AVERAGE EXPENSES of each SCHOLAR at the CENTRAL SCHOOL during 1882. Expenditure, ..... Deduct School Fees,

.$15,079.35 4,084.00

.$10,995.35

Total Expense of the School,...

Average Expense of each Scholar calculated by the Total Enrolment,

"

""

"

Average Daily Attendance,....

$19.22 28.20

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, Head Master.

ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE,

1882.

CENTRAL SCHOOL.

NUMBER

NUMBER

NUMBER

MONTH.

OF

OF

OF

SCHOLARS.

ATTENDANCES.

SCHOOL DAY.

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE.

REMARKS.

Janury,

390

8,786

24

366.80

February,

372

2,916

8

364.50

March,

441

5,062

12

421.83

April,...

443

6,597

16

412.31

May,

440

10,123

25

404.92

June,

436

10,031

25

401.24

July,

432

10,485

26

403.27

August,

436

2,418

6

403.00

September,

422

10,128

26

389.54

October,...

414

9,906

26

381.00

November,

413

9,857

26

378.85

December,...

404

7,655

21

364,52

93,964

241

No. 23.

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1882, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1882, Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1882, Total Number of SCHOLARS at this during 1882,

93,964 241

.389,892

572

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, Head Master.

EDUCATION Department, HONGHONG, 20th February, 1883.

SIR,—I have the honour to forward herewith the Annual Report on Education and the Blue Book returns for 1882.

2. The total number of Schools subject to supervision by the Government amounted in the year 1882 to 80, as compared with 72 in 1881, 63 in 1880, 53 in 1879 and 47 in 1878. The total number of scholars enrolled during the year 1882 in Schools, subject to supervision and annual examination by the Government, amounted to 5182 as compared with 4372 enrolled in 1881, 3886 in 1880, 3460 in 1879, and 3152 in 1878. It is evident, therefore, that the number of Schools and the number of scholars, subject to Government supervision and examination, is steadily increasing from year to year. The annual increase of scholars in such Schools amounted in 1879 to 308 scholars, in 1880 to 426 scholars, in 1881 to 686 scholars and in 1882 to 810 scholars.

3. These Schools, subject to Government supervision and examination, may roughly be divided into two classes, viz. secular (Government) Schools and denominational (Missionary) Schools. The secular schools are under the entire control of the Government and supported, in one way or other, by fixed monthly payments, whilst the denominational (Missionary) Schools are under Government inspection throughout the year and annually subsidized by the Government on the basis of definite results, in fixed subjects, ascertained in each case through the annual examination of each individual scholar by the Inspector of Schools. Referring to the former of these two classes of Schools, I find that we had in 1882 in 39 Government Schools 2114 scholars, as compared with 1986 scholars in 1881, 2078 scholars in 1880, 2043 scholars in 1879 and 2101 scholars in 1878, which figures show a hardly appreciable increase of scholars. The explanation lies in this that in all these Government Schools all available space is crowded, and in the case of the Central School overcrowded, with scholars, the accommodation being entirely inadequate to meet the demand. As regards denominational (Missionary) Schools, we had in 1882 on the rolls of 41 Schools 3068 scholars, as compared with 2237 scholars in 1881, 1801 scholars in 1880, 1417 scholars in 1879, and 1051 scholars in 1878, which figures show, from year to year, a steady increase of scholars attending these denominational (Missionary) Schools.

Dictation,

Geography,

Grammar,

IL-CHINESE EXAMINATION.

1. CLASS I.

Reading,

Arithmetic,

8. CLASS VIII.

... failed.......

""

passed......33 boys.

12,

......21

Total number examined,.............

"

""

""

""

""

.16,

19

......33 ......17

Essay writing,

......failed......18, passed......28 boys.

Letter writing,

""

.14,

.19

Prosody (odes),

""

"

"

......19

""

""

"9

7.

.26

Essay writing,

22

""

Letter writing,

.46 hoys.

>>

""

......17, .26,

.29

وو

دو

""

.20

دو

2. CLASS II.

""

.failed......51, ..29,

...68 boys. passed......17 boys.

..39

""

19 ......28

"

.54 boys.

Translation.

Chinese into English,.. ......14,

English into Chinese,...,,

Total number examined,.....33 boys.

"1

passed,

.31

35

NOTE.-Neither Grammar nor Geography had been taught

in this Class in former years.

Reading,

Writing,

Arithmetic,

Dictation,

9. CLASS IX.

Total number examined,.

Prosody (couplets),......,, ......40,

3. CLASS III.

Total number examined,....................

Essay writing, ..... .failed......28, passed......26 boys. Letter writing,

.......16

""

""

22

......38,

>>

.failed......

passed...... .49 boys.

"

2,

"

......11,

""

......47 ......38

2.9

"9

""

1,

..48

25

وو

Prosody (couplets),......,, 34,

4. CLASS IV. Total number examined,........ Essay writing, .... .failed......15, Prosody (couplets),................

......20

59

...39 boys. passed......14 boys.

""

7,

.22

"

""

""

""

passed,

....30 ....39 .49 boys. .47

""

..24 boys.

......14,

......10

""

Translation.

Chinese into English,...,, ......19, English into Chinese,... ......10,

Total number examined,

وو

Reading,

Arithmetic,

Dictation,

Writing,

""

10. CLASS X. .failed...... 2,

passed......26 boys.

......

7,

"

"

""

2,

""

......21 .26

""

"J

1,

..27

29

""

9

Translation.

Chinese into English,...", ......19, English into Chinese,...

""

Total number examined,

و"

Reading,

Arithmetic,

Dictation,

Writing,

Translation.

و,

11. CLASS XI.

............. a.

......21

.28 boys. .26

passed.....36 boys.

5. CLASS V.

Total number examined,......

Essay writing,...failed......10, passed......14 boys. Prosody (couplets),......

6. CLASS VI. Total number examined,...................... Essay writing, failed......25, Prosody (couplets),...... ......18,

""

.....43 boys. passed......18 boys.

...25

7. ANGLO-CHINESE CLASS. DIVISION I.

Total number examined,..

.18 boys. failed......11, passed...... 7 boys.

""

......12, ......13,

"

""

99

......11, DIVISION. II.

Total number examined,.

.failed...... 7,

6 5

وو

""

7

+

.16 boys.

passed...... 9 boys.

Reading,

7,

25

Explaining,

وو

Writing,

Translation,.

passed,

..failed.......

Reading,

59

...15,

5,

......21 ......31

Writing,

""

Translation,.

دو

""

وو

3,

..33

22

55

""

8,

""

passed,

......28 ....36 boys.

..30

Reading,

""

English into Chinese,...

Total number examined,

"

...... 15,

""

""

..10,

1 6

""

"9

""

DIVISION III.

Total number examined,.................

23 boys.

.failed......23, passed.......

boys.

59

"

......18, ...... 21,

5

""

"

2

"

""

""

......21,

2

29

""

Repeating, Writing, Translation,...

9. As regards the Government Normal School, I append the Report of the Principal, Mr. MAY. The results of a searching examination of the Students which I conducted, by giving the Students papers to work out, by orally questioning them, and by making them teach classes under my eyes, are satisfactory and highly ereditable to Mr. MAY. Considering two thirds of the highest possible number of marks as entitling to a pass certificate, every one of the Students has satisfactorily passed his first year's examination. The students were under the observation of the Chinese Master both in and out of school hours, and their conduct has been exemplary. I also noticed throughout the year the strict discipline kept by the Principal in all branches of the Normal School. I subjoin a Table showing in detail the number of marks obtained by each Student in various subjects of the English examination of the Normal School:-

the

GOVERNMENT NORMAL SCHOOL-ENGLISH EXAMINATION.

1. Ho Ü Ming,

41

41

2. Mak Sun Kin,

42

39

3. Wong Sham,

35

45

4. Ng Yuk,

5. Yeung Hop Kat,

6. Wat Wing-tsʻau,

7. T'sü Kang Chiū,

40 38

36

37

28

38

39

33

∞ no ∞ = &

N N N N ☺ ☺ ☺

30

44

40

41

39

33

46

355

30

40

41

35

41 '

39

48

355

25

43

44

33

31

33

35

324

20

40

38

36

36

36

40

324 S

25

33

3.5

34

35

39

34.

308

25

30

33

32

36.

30

45

297

25

32

38

30

31

23

46

297

Names of Students.

Composition.

Full Marks, 50.

Geography. Full Marks, 50.

Arithmetic. Full Marks, 30.

Grammar. Full Marks, 50.

History. Full Marks, 50.

Teaching. Full Marks, 50.

Translation, English to Chinese

Prose.

Full Marks, 50.

Translation, Chinese to English. Full Marks, 50.

Translation, English to Chinese Verse.

Full Marks, 50.

Total of

Full Marks, 430.

examination, out of the 363 boys as many as 331 boys or 91.18 per cent. passed. As regards the Chinese teaching of the Central School, the result was on the whole satisfactory, considering the little time that can be spared for Chinese studies. It seems to me clear, that all the Central School can, without injury to its English teaching, successfully aim at in its Chinese department, is to maintain and revise the respective standard of Chinese knowledge which each individual Chinese boy brings with him to the Central School on beginning his English studies. So far the Chinese teaching of the Central School in 1882 has indeed been satisfactory. But as regards the Chinese teaching given in the Anglo-Chinese Class to boys whose mother tongue is other than Chinese, the result of the examination I held appears to me not only far below what might have been expected, considering the amount of time devoted to Chinese teaching in this Class, but there seems to have been in this branch of the Central School a general lack of energy. This was probably caused by the little amount of interest which non-Chinese boys take in Chinese studies, by the appalling nature of the difficulties of the written language of China, and by the concomitant discouragement felt by the teachers who see no hope of success except in the case of some few boys who happen to take, for a while, an excep- tional interest in Chinese studies. I think it might be well for the Head-Master to consider, whether it would not be better for the School and of more practical use for the boys of the Anglo-Chinese Class, to confine the teaching in this Class to the spoken vernacular, making attendance at such teaching obligatory, and to make the study of the written Chinese language optional to all non-Chinese boys who have obtained a certain proficiency in speaking Chinese.

8. The subjoined Tables exhibit in detail the results obtained by the examination of the several classes of the Central School both in English and Chinese subjects:-

I.-ENGLISH EXAMINATION.

Reading,

Mapdrawing,

Arithmetic,

Algebra,

Composition,

1. CLASS I.

..failed................ 2, passed..........32 boys.

Reading,

Arithmetic,

""

""

......23, ...10,

Dictation,

27

......11

""

...24

Geography,

""

""

................14,

وو

""

3,

"

......20 ......31

Grammar,

""

Mapdrawing,

""

6,

.14,

.15,

"

..28

35

.20

""

95

19

25

27

..23

"

.25

""

""

"

21

23

-15

>>

Dictation,

Euclid,

Geography,

>>

,

.11,

Grammar,

29

ང དེན

History,

29

Mensuration,

......19,

J

Translation.

Chinese into English,... English into Chinese,...

JJ

"

6,

3

Total number examined,

J

235

passed,

29 ..28

,34 boys. .31

"

4. CLASS IV.

..failed.......

""

دو

.16, 1,

passed......42 boys.

دو

......26 ""

41

..32

.10,

5,

"

""

..32,

...37 .10

22

6,

""

"

7,

""

Translation,

Chinese into English,.......

English into Chinese,...,,

Total number examined,

passed,

5. CLASS V.

......36 ......35 42 boys. .39

>>

""

""

.........................failed............ 1, passed......24 boys.

2. CLASS II.

Reading,

failed......

passed.

Arithmetic,

4,

23 boys. .19

""

J

""

Composition,

1,

.22

25

>>

Dictation,

21

5,

...18

ور

Geography,

8,

.15

22

12

Grammar,

6,

..17

""

""

History,

......12,

..11

55

Mapdrawing,

"

...18,

5

21

Translation.

Chinese into English,.......

English into Chinese,...

3,

"

4,

"

Total number examined,

"

""

passed,

Reading,

Arithmetic,

Composition,

3. CLASS III.

..failed......

·

6, 8,

.20

21

..19

...23 boys.

***.20

Reading, Mapdrawing, Arithmetic, Dictation, Geography,

Grammar,

Translation.

Chinese into English,.......

English into Chinese,...

6,

"

......14, ......11,

11 "2

.14

"

.25

""

""

""

......18,

7

JJ

"J

.19

""

""

......25 ......25 .25 boys.

25

""

""

Total number examined,

Reading, Mapdrawing, Arithmetic,

Dictation, Geography, Grammar,

Translation.

passed,

6. CLASS VI.

Chinese into English,......... English into Chinese,...

.failed......

""

وو

"

"

passed......25 boys.

......14, .17,

11

JJ

""

8

""

""

......25

"

""

..22,

29

""

......19,

3 6.

27

"

59

6, 4,

19 ..21

""

"9

23

.25 boys. .21

Total number examined,

وو

passed,

7. CLASS VII.

...failed...... 1, passed......39 boys.

2,

.38

.22 20

""

passed......28 boys.

وو

Reading, Arithmetic, Dictation,

...... 28

"2

14

"J

"

Geography, Gramnaar,

19

"

5

"

29

Dictation,

Geography,

Grammar,

""

""

.14,

9,

""

Mapdrawing,

Translation.

Chinese into English,.......

English into Chinese,...

Total number examined,

23,

1.

.27

""

39

7,

..21

*

.28 boys.

passed, ....

.25

14

Translation.

25

21

22

1,

29

"

7,

""

5,

""

""

..39 ......33 ..35

,,

""

2,

55

""

1,

19

.38 ...39

22

passed,

.40 boys. .40 "

Chinese into English,..

English into Chinese....

Total number examined,

""

"2

NOTE. Neither Grammar nor Geography had been taught

in this Class in former years.

No.

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1882.

Name of School.

Basel Mission, High Street (Boys),.

""

1 Aberdeen,

2 Akungngam,

3 Aplichau,

4

5

6

77

وو

8

""

""

9

,,

10

11

Central School,

(Girls),.

Baxter Vernacular, D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

""

High Street, (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),... Queen's Road (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls),....

12 Chan's, Mr., Hollywood Road (Boys),

13 Church Missionary Society, East Street (Boys),

14

""

""

""

15

""

""

27

16

""

>>

""

17

""

>>

""

18

""

""

""

19

""

20

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

""

(Girls),

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),|

I Division (Boys),..

""

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

21 Fong's, Mr., Hollywood Road (Girls),

22

""

23

""

24

""

25

26

27

28

22

Háwán,

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

""

(Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls), Wellington Street (Boys),

Ho's, Mr., Aberdeen Street (Girls),

""

29

Hokts'ui,

30

Hokün,

Uihing Street (Girls),

31 Hongkong Public School (Boys),.

32 Little Hongkong,.

II

وو

(Boys),

London Missionary Society, Hollywood Road (Boys),.

AAAA

Staunton Street I Division (Girls),.

""

II

(Girls),.

...

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

33

34

""

"}

35

""

""

36

""

""

37

>>

""

Wantsai (Boys),

38

">

""

>>

""

(Girls),

39

""

""

""

Yaumati (Boys),

40

""

""

""

""

(Girls),

41

Mata'uch'ung,

42 Matáutsün,

43 Mongkok,...

Normal School,

Pokfulam,

R. C. M. Bridge's Street Poor School (Mixed),

Cathedral School (Boys),

Italian Convent (Girls),

44

45

46

47

""

48

""

49

"2

50

""

51

Chinese

"

""

>>

52 Saiyingp'un (English).

53

(Chinese),

St. Francis' Chapel (Mixed),

St. Joseph's College Portuguese Division (Boys),.

>>

(Boys),.

54 St. Paul's College Mission, D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Shaiwan,

Shamshuip'd,

55

56

57

Shaukiwan,

58

Shekò,

59

Shektongtsui,

61

""

(Girls),

60 Sheungwan (Boys),

62 Stanley,

63

Táikoktsui,

64 Táitamtuk,

65 Taiwan,

66 Táiwongkung,

67 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

68

69 T'okwawan (Hakka),

(Punti),

70

""

(Hoklo),

71

Tsattszmui,

72 Tunglowàn,

73 Victoria School (Boys),

74

75 Wantsai (English),

76

""

(Girls),

(Chinese),

77 Wongkoktsui,

78 Wongmakok,.

79

Wongnaich'ung,

80 Yaumati (English),

Central School.

Native Native Grant-in- Schools. Schools. Aid TOTAL.

(Government.) (Aided.) Schools.

...

27 25

27

25

43

...

43

42

42

55

55

45

45

67

67

44

44

56

56

36

36

572

572

25

25

...

52

52

123

123

76

76

97

97

70

70

139

139

60

60

59

59

65

65

118

118

25

25

45

45

168

168

56

56

40

40

...

35

35

13

13

23

23

...

28

...

28

27

...

27

145

145

51

51

48

48

!

76

76

115

115

62

62

152

152

27

27

28

28

N

44

44

21

10

12

...

69

61

77

56

...

256

256

86

...

92 73

...

43

26 23

...

73

..

117

117

26

43

...

20

20

55

55

66

66

110

110

48

48

11

11

9

9

...

12

12

55

55

81

...

81

36

36

35

...

35

46

46

16

16

25

25

61

61

39

39

116 119

116

...

119

25 11

25.

11

37 23

37

23

572

1,040

502

3,068

5,182

ZARSTNE888R=289838=

21

10

12

69

61

77

56

86

To the Chinese studies of the Normal School Students the same observations apply as those which I made above with reference to the Chinese Classes of the Central School. All that can be expected, in view of the limited time available for Chinese studies, is that the standard of Chinese attainments acquired by the Students before entering the Normal School be maintained and deepened. So far the result of the Chinese teaching of the Normal School has been highly satisfactory. I subjoin the details of the Chinese examination.

Essay writing, Letter

""

Prosody (odes),

Total number examined,

""

passed,

.....

.failed 1 passed 7 Students.

"" ...

4

""

8

4

29

.8

""

19

.........8

Apart from the above mentioned eight Students, secured by Bonds, two Probationers were received a few weeks before the close of the year, subject to three months' trial, but it is doubtful whether they can eventually be enrolled.

gone

10. The smaller Government Schools and the so called Aided Schools (in the villages) have their usual course in 1882 and do not call for special remarks. A growing demand for English teach- ing manifests itself now in the outskirts of the town and in the larger villages, and English teaching has shown satisfactory results in Saiyingp'ún, Wántsai, Wongnaich'ung, Stanley and Yaumati. In Stanley especially good progress has been made in 1882 as compared with the state of things there in the previous years. The Anglo-Chinese teacher at Shaukiwán had to be dismissed and purely Chinese teaching has been temporarily substituted there for Anglo-Chinese teaching, owing to the present impossibility of finding a trained or competent Master for such an out-station. In some few of the Aided Village-Schools, which give a purely Chinese education of a low class-Schools in which occasionally children do not learn writing because the parents are too poor to buy pen and ink-the results of the annual examination came near the average results of the corresponding class of Grant-in- Aid Schools. But in a vast majority of cases these Aided Government Schools in the villages are far below the lowest standard of education given in the Grant-in-Aid Schools. A comparison between those Aided Government Schools and the Denominational Grant-in-Aid Schools tends to impress upon the observer the desirability of encouraging the attempt which, I understand, is about to be made by some Grant-in-aid School Managers, to introduce in the villages also the Grant-in-Aid system which hitherto was confined to the city of Victoria and Yaumati. I can well remember the low stagnant condition in which the Denominational Schools of Hongkong were engulfed before the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, with its system of payment by results, was introduced and raised them gradually to the high educational standard they now occupy. I would fain see the same reforming influences brought to bear on the Government Aided Schools of Hongkong. Although the Grant-in-Aid Scheme affords material aid only to Schools which enjoy a large attendance and is therefore inappropriate to some of the smaller villages of Hongkong, which will ever require a continuation of the present system of Aided Schools with its fixed monthly payments, the Grant-in-Aid system might beneficially and suc- cessfully be introduced in a considerable number of the villages of Hongkong.

11. With reference to the Denominational Grant-in-Aid Schools, all the details, such as I have given above with reference to the Central School and the Normal School, will be found collected in the Tables accompanying this report, viz.: in Table XIII showing the number of scholars who passed and failed in each standard, as well as the amount of grant earned in each case, in Table XIV, which ex- hibits the percentage of scholars who passed in each School, and in Table XV, which shows the per- centage of passes obtained by each of those Schools in English reading, writing (or composition), arithmetic, grammar, geography, history, and in Chinese reading, repetition, writing, explanation, geography and composition. There are only a few of the English teaching Schools, which call for special remarks.

12. St. Joseph's College was moved during the year, first into temporary mat sheds and subse- quently into a splendid new building for which a Building Grant is now applied for. These changes in the locality of the School-rooms might have been expected to impair the efficiency of the teaching of the year, but the result of the examination has been highly creditable to the excellent organization and discipline maintained at this School by the Christian Brothers. The Chinese Division indeed has not been as successful as in former years, owing to the fact that the staff in this Division is inadequate now for the annually increasing number of classes into which the scholars in this Division have to be sub-divided. In former years, when there were only two or three classes in this Division, it was quite possible for the one Master to teach the whole Division single-handed, but to teach effectively 55 boys divided between 5 different standards, as was the case in 1882, was beyond the range of possibility for one Master, even assisted as he was by a Chinese pupil teacher. I mention this, in justice to the Master in question, in view of the fact that in this Division, out of 53 boys examined, 45 only passed, or 84.9 per cent., being a decrease of 13.12 per cent. as compared with the results of the previous year. The Portuguese Division of St. Joseph's College passed very well, as out of 105 boys examined in the various standards of the Code, as many as 100 boys or 95.24 per cent. passed, which is a result reflect- ing the highest credit on the Head-Master and staff of the College. It will also be noticed that the number of days, during which this School was taught in 1882, has been increased to 234 days, whereby a defect has been remedied to which I drew attention in my last Annual Report. Another defect of

i

.106,398

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT INSPECTION, IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

TABLE II.-PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1882.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA.

Population as per Census of 1881,..

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat population, as per Census of 1881,...45,595. CHILDREN IN SCHOOL UNDER GOVERNMENT INSPECTION,

IN VILLAGES,

No. of Scholars.

No. of Scholars.

1. Basel Mission, High Street (Boys),

2.

3. Baxter Vernacular, D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

4.

42

(Girls),

";

High Street (Girls),

2655

1. Aberdeen,

27

2. Akungngam,

25

45

67

3. Aplichau,

43

4. Hokts'ui,

13

5.

Hollywood Road (Girls),

44

5. Hokiin,

23

6.

19

Queen's Road (Girls).

56

6. Little Hongkong,

27

7. Berlin Mission (Girls),.

36

7. Mát auch'ung,

28

8. Central School,

.572

8. Mat'auts'ün,

44

11.

12.

13.

39

14.

..

15.

19

19.

""

20.

+1

21.

22.

9. Chan's, Mr., Hollywood Road (Boys),

10. C. M. S., East Street (Boys),

16.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),..

Saiyingpun (Boys).

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

I. Division (Boys),

17. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Roys), 18. Fong's, Mr., Hollywood Road (Girls),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),.

25

9. Mongkok,

21

52

10. Pokfulam,

12

123

11. Shaiwan,

26

"

(Girls).

76

12. Shamshuip'o,

23

97

13. Shaukiwàn,

43

70

14. Shekò,

20

139

15. Shekt ongtsui,

55

II.

"J.

(boys),

60

16. Stanley,

48

59

17. Táikoktsui,

11

65

18. Táitamtuk,

9

.118

19. Taiwan,

12

(Girls).

25

20. T'òkwawàn (Hakka),

35

Tanglungchau (Girls),

45

21.

19

(Hoklo),

46

"1

Wellington Street (Boys),

.168

22. Tsattzemúi,

16

23. Howán,

24. Ho's, Mr., Aberdeen Street (Girls),

56

23. Tunglowȧn,

25

40

24. Wongkoktsúi,.

25

25.

11

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

35

25. Wongmakok,

11

Yaumati (Boys),

37.

38.

39.

40.

"

41.

28.

11

29.

30.

"

31.

Wantsai Chaper (Boys),

32.

""

(Girls)

33.

34.

"

"

(Girls),

35. Normal School,

Cathedral School (Boys),

Italian Convent (Girls),

St. Francis' Chapel (Mixed),

26. Hongkong Public School (Boys), 27. L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

Staunton Street, I. Division (Girls),

II.

Taipingshan opel (Girls),

28

26. Wongnaich'ung,.

37

.145

27. Yaumati (English),

23

51

+

(Girls),

48

Total,......

.728

76

115

62

.152

27

10

36. R. C. Mission, Bridges Street. Poor School (Mixed)..

69

61

77

56

St. Joseph's Col., Portuguese Division (Boys), 256

Chinese Division (Boys),

42. Saiyingp'ún (English),

43.

(Chinese)..

44. St. Paul's College Mission, D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

45. Sheungwan (Boys),

46.

(Girls),

47. Táiwongkung,

48. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

49.

50. Victoria School (Boys),

51.

(Punti),

(Girls),

52. Wantsai (English), (Chinese),

53.

86

92

73

117

66

.110

55

81

36

61

39

.116

.119

Total.

.4,454

TABLE III.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the Government Schools during 1882, and Expense of each School.

No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total.

Expense. No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls.

Total.

Expense.

1

Aberdeen,

27

27

$ 60.00

Akungngám,

25

25

3

Aplichau,

43

43

Central School,..

572

572

45.00 21 120.00 22 10,995.35 23

";

Brought over,. Sheungwan (Boys),.

(Girls).

1,233

1,233

$16,619.63

66

66

306.00

110

110

636.24

Stanley,

48

48

339.37

Háwán,

56

56

348.00 24

Taikoktsui,

11

11

35.00

6

Hokts'ui,

13

13

55.00 25

Táitamtuk,

9

9

72.00

7

Hokiin,

23

23

60.00 26

Taiwan,

12

12

45.00

8

Little Hongkong,.

27

27

40.00 27

9

Mat'auch'ung,

28

Táiwongkung,

55.00 28 Tanglungchau (Hakka),.

55

55

306.35

81

81

120.00

10

Matáutsün,

44

44

11

Mongkok,

21

60.00

60.00 29 30

11

(Punti),. T'okwawan (Hakka),

36

36

121.00

35

35

55.00

12

Normal School,.

10

3,288.12 31

""

(Hoklo),

46

46

60.00

13

Pokfulam,

12

72.00 32

Tsattszmúi,

16

16

60.00

14

Saiyingp'ún (English),.

15

"

(Chinese),

16 Shaiwan,

17

Shamshuipfo,

18

Shaukiwàn,

19

Sheko,

CERASA

92

424.92 33

Tunglowàn,

25

25

60.00

73

120.00 34

Wantsai (English),

116

116

325,89

26

60.00 | 35

11

(Chinese),

119

119

245.75

23

60.00 36

Wongkoktsui,

25

...

25

66.00

43

252.24 37

Wongmakok,.

11

11

54.00

20

20

120.00 38

Wongnaichung,

37

37

260.99

20

Shektongtsúi,

55

55

324.00 39

Yaumati,

23

23

366.07

Carried over..

1,233

1,233

16,619.63

Total,..

2,004

110 2,114

20,154.29

this School remains, however, still to be remedied, viz., the irregularity of attendance on the part of the Portuguese scholars. Now, since the number of school days has been brought up to a satisfactory standard, the blame for failures in making up the 200 daily attendances required by the Code rests almost entirely with the parents of the children. The College itself suffers severely under this apathy of the parents, as out of 342 boys on the roll of St. Joseph's College in 1882, only 158 could be allowed to compete at the examination for the annual grant, which is paid by the Government on the basis of a minimum of 200 daily attendances during the year.

13. The Victoria Schools suffered, in the boys' division, a considerable decrease in the number of scholars attending this School, but the Tables appended to this Report will show that the efficiency of the teaching given in both divisions, that for girls and that for boys, has but slightly decreased as compared with the very high standard obtained in former years. As many as 94.74 per cent. of the scholars passed in 1882 in the girls' division and 86.66 per cent. in the boys' division.

14. The Italian Sisters are beginning to come to the front in their efforts for the improvement of the standard of education formerly available by the Portuguese community. In the Bridges Street Poor Schools as many as 91.66 per cent. of the children passed, being an increase of 52.77 per cent. over the result of the first year's examination. In the Italian Convent School, which has been examined for the first time and was accordingly under considerable disadvantages, as many as 86.48 per cent. of the children passed. The Portuguese division in St. Francis' School has also been highly successful, but the English division of the same School is too poorly attended to do credit to the excellency of the teaching of the Italian Sisters.

15. The Hongkong Public School has evidently been much improved by the present Master, as the general range of intelligence displayed by the boys, and the excellent method and discipline of this School amply testified. I have also above referred to the praiseworthy addition of extra subjects included in the programme of this School in 1882. But as the increase in the work of the School was not accompanied by a proportionate increase of time devoted to schooling, the result has been disappointing as far as a mere pass examination is concerned. Although, out of 4 boys, 3 boys passed in Euclid, 2 boys in geology and 2 in physical geography, yet only 2 passes could be counted for a grant in these extra-subjects, as there were failures in the ordinary subjects (arithmetic and geography). These details will explain the decrease of 7.15 per cent. in the passes obtained by the School, but I must further mention that, in my opinion, the boys did not do justice either to them- selves or to their Master because, having been separately examined by the Manager of the School for the purpose of the annual prize giving but a few days before the Government examination, the boys saw no immediate purpose served by a renewed examination and did not work, therefore with a will when examined once more. It is but due to the Master, of whose efficiency I have the highest opinion, that I should mention these facts.

16. The vernacular Grant-in-Aid Schools in Class I of the Code, which give a Chinese education, combined with Christian teaching, in the Chinese language, call for no individual remarks, as the results of the examinations are sufficiently illustrated by the details which will be found in the Tables appended to this Report. I may allude, however to some points of general interest.

17. When referring, in my last Annual Report, to certain evil tendencies arising from some of the provisions of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, I ought to have also pointed out, at the same time, that, whatever evil tendencies are called forth, for instance, by the high personal bonus paid to Masters of Schools in Class I, the good effect which these same provisions exercise may be eonsidered as more than counterbalancing the mercenary spirit and the subterfuges arising among Chinese Masters through the system of payment by results which forms the quintessence of the Code. Falsification of the daily attendance roll, which is one of the commonest subterfuges adopted by that mercenary spirit alive among the Chinese Masters, will be effectually checked to a great extent by enforcing the rule which for years past has been enforced in the Government Schools of the Colony, viz. that the daily attendance roll should be filled up punctually at 11 A.M. and that the slightest deviation from this regulation be treated as a serious breach of order and unsparingly visited with a fine. I found last

I found last year that some of the Chinese Masters in Grant-in-Aid Schools persisted in filling up the daily attendance roll during the recess for the noon-day meal, making it thereby impossible for me to detect one special form of falsification of the roll, whether I inspected a school in the forenoon or in the afternoon.

18. From premature applications made, at the close of the year 1882, by some Chinese Masters for new schools to be opened in 1883, I obtained renewed proof of the tendency existing among Chinese Masters to take advantage of the liberality of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme for the furtherance of private purposes. They sought to secure a promise on the part of the Government to receive, under the provisions of the Code, Schools which profess to be bona fide public Schools but which are in reality private Schools intended for private emolument.

19. As a curious illustration of the continued prevalence of kidnapping practices in Hongkong, I may mention that I noticed in 1882 several cases in which Chinese girls, living at a great distance from school and having to traverse on their way to and from school the most crowded portion of the town, were dressed like boys and attended, all through the year, Girls-schools in boys' dress.

20. I enclose the usual Tables, I to XVI, containing the Educational Statistics for the year 1882.

I have the honour to be

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.

Acting Colonial Secretary.

E. J. EITEL, PH. D.,

Inspector of Schools.

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1882.

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly

Enrolment.

Maximum Daily Attendance.

Minimum Daily Attendance.

(Monthly Average). (Monthly Average)

12304

Aberdeen,

25

17

23.40

15.00

Akungngám,

Aplichau,..

25

22

24.54

13.76

39

21

37.75

15.09

Central School,.

443

372

421.83

364.50

5

Háwán,

37

29

33.20

21.73

6

Hokts'ui,

13

12

12.87

11.25

7

Hokün,

21

8

17.82

6.56

8

Little Hongkong,

26

11

23.54

8.50

9

Mat'auch'ung,.

17

14

16.70

10.26

10

Matáutsün,

31

27

29.40

20.54

11

Mongkok,.

21

12

20.81

10.54

12

Normal School,..

10

7

8.76

5.65

13

Pokfulam,

11

9

9.50

8.19

14

Saiyingp'ún (English),

65

55

57.16

32.81

15

Saiyingp'ún (Hakka),

46

20

37.04

17.23

16

Shaiwan,

26

8

22.32

6.27

17

Shamshuip'o,.

16

13

13.79

10.35

18

Shaukiwàn,

28

17

25.22

13.12

19❘ Shekò,

19

15

17.20

13.70

20

Shektongtsui,

35

22

26.37

15.91

21 Sheungwan (Boys),

45

33

38.74

31.42

22

""

(Girls),

69

48

61.08

41.27

23

Stanley (Anglo Chinese),

38

15

35.16

12.23

24

Táikoktsui,

11

6

11.00

5.93

25

Táitamtuk,

9

8

8.00

4.75

26

Táiwàn,

12

8

11.59

3.73

27

Táiwongkung,

34

30

29.73

24.31

28

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

53

39

47.70

36.19

29

(Punti),

24

14

17.00

10.38

30

Tokwàwàn (Hakka),.

22

17

18.67

10.85

31

(Hoklo),.

37

22

29.40

,,

16.74

32

Tsattszmui,

22

14

17.33

9.62

33 Tunglowàn,

15

9

12.92

9.00

34 Wantsai (English),

88

62

80.37

58.16

35

وو

(Chinese),

90

64

72.62

40.82

36

Wongkoktsui,

18

15

17.31

11.16

37

Wongmakok,

10

9

9.29

7.88

38

Wongnaich'ung,

31

26

28.24

21.63

39

Yaumati,

21

12

19.23

11.00

1,603

1,062

1,444.60

988.03

TABLE VII.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the Government Schools were taught during 1882.

No.

Name of School.

School Days. No.

Name of School.

School Days.

1

Aberdeen,

253

21

Sheungwan (Boys),

254

2

Akungngám,

215

22

""

(Girls),

257

3

Aplichau,

258

23

Stanley,

243

4

Central School,

241

24

Táikoktsui,

150

5

Háwán,

254

25

Táitamtuk,

251

6

Hokts'ui,

256

26

Taiwan,

222

7

Hokün,.

257

27

Táiwongkung,

253

8

Little Hongkong,

221 28 Taglungchau (Hakka),

256

9

Mat'auch'ung,

254

29

""

(Punti),

254

10

Matáuts'ün,

254

30

T'òkwawan (Hakka),.

236

11

Mongkok,

261

31

""

(Hokld),

267

12

Normal School,

249

32

Tsattszmui,

260

13

Pokfulam,

257

33

Tunglowàn,

259

14

Saiyingp'ún (English),

250

34

Wantsai (English),..

249

15

وو

(Chinese),

250

35

""

(Chinese),.

250

16

Shaiwan,

260

36

Wongkoktsui,

256

17

Shamshuip'ò,

261

37

18

Shaukiwàn,

251

38

Wongmakok,

Wongnaich'ung,

224

252

19

Shekò,

247

39

Yaumati,

256

20

Shektongtsui,

255

TABLE IV.-AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR or STUDENT at the Government Schools during the Year 1882.

Expenditure,

Expenditure,

CENTRAL SCHOOL.

VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

.$10,995.35

.$ 5,870.82

""

Add Inspector's Salary,

Travelling Expenses,

$2,400 288

"

Chinese Teacher's Salary,

180

2,868.00

NORMAL SCHOOL.

Expenditure,

3,288.12

$23,022.29

Total Expenditure for the year :-

Central School,

Village Schools,

Normal School,..

.$10,995.35 8,738.82 3,288.12

A.

""

"

""

Average Expenses calculated by the Enrolment.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Schools,.

2.

I

3.

""

""

29

23

4.

at Government Central School,.... at Village Schools,. Student at Normal School,

""

>>

72

B.

$ 4.48 19.22

2.50 328.81

Average Expense calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Schools,

2.

3.

21

""

27

at Government Central School,

Student at Normal School,

$ 8.68 28.20

439.58

TABLE V.-AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government School for 1882.

Name of School.

Average Monthly Average Daily

Enrolment.

No.

1 Aberdeen,...

2 Akungngám,

3 Aplichau,

4

Central School,

5

Háwán,

6

Hokts'ui,

7

Hokün,

8

Little Hongkong,

9

Mat'auch'ung,

10 Matáutsün,

11

12

13

Mongkok,...

Normal School,

Pokfulam,...

14 Saiyingp'ún (English),

15

وو

16 Shaiwan,

17 Shamshuip'ò,

(Chinese),

Attendance.

23.17

19.93

20.25

19.37

32.00

28.07

420.25

389.89

33.75

29.07

12.92

12.27

11.33

9.26

23.00

18.87

16.17

14.62

30.16

25.42

16.58

14.76

8.42

7.48

9.17

8.46

54.83

50.74

35.41

29.19

18.92

11.45

14.25

12.41

23.50

19.79

17.17

15.68

29.00

21.67

39.00

35.21

59.08

51.05

29.92

28.21

9.57

9.53

8.16

6.31

10.70

7.33

32.17

28.83

47.25

42.93

20.33

14.26

17.00

14.89

31.00

25.31

16.67

13.84

11.50

10.56

71.60

63.24

74.58

61.40

16.92

13.96

9.20

8.49

27.16

24.87

18.08

16.24

1,400.14

1,234.86

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18

Shaukiwàn,

19

Shekò,

20

Shektongtsui,

22

"

(Girls),

21 Sheungwan (Boys),...

23 Stanley,

24

25

Táikoktsui,

Táitamtuk,

26 Taiwan,

27 Táiwongkung,

28 Tanglungchau (Hakka),..

""

30 T'okwawan (Hakka),

29

(Punti),

31

"

32

(Hokld),

Tsattszmui,

33 Tunglowàn,

34 Wantsai (English),

35

22

(Chinese),...

36 Wongkoktsui, ...

37 Wongmakok,

38 Wongnaich'ung,

39 Yaumati (English),......

TABLE XI.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending SCHOOLS receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions

of the Scheme of 1880), and Amount gained by each in 1882.

Class

Name of School.

of School.

I.

Basel Mission, High Street (Boys),

"1

19

High Street (Girls),

"1

11

Baxter Vernacular, D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

11

"

"

Hollywood Road (Girls), Queen's Road (Girls),

C. M. S. East Street (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

(Girls),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

I Division (Boys),

21

13

99

II

""

L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

11

(Boys),

"1

""

11

31

""

99

1)

Staunton Street, I Division (Girls),.

(Girls),

""

II

""

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

"1

Yaumati (Boys),

(Girls),

(Girls),

Mr. Chan's Hollywood Road (Boys),. Mr. Fong's Hollywood Road (Girls),..

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

(Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Wellington Street (Boys),

Mr. Ho's Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

"

21

R. C. Mission, Cathedral (Boys),

III.

N.

St. Paul's College Mission, D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Basel Mission (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

Hongkong Public School, (Boys),

R. C. Mission Bridges Street, Poor Schools (Mixed),. Italian Convent (Girls),

St. Francis' Chapel (Mixed),

"

91

1

"

""

"

"

19

""

"

*

Victoria School (Boys),.

"

"

19

(Girls),..

St. Josep's College, Portuguese Division (Boys),

Chinese

"

(Boys),

Boys.

Amount

Girls.

Total.

of Grant.

42

42

$130,82

45

45

144.48

67

67

299,21

44

44

203.84

56

56

262.25

::;:;:ཀྟྲི :ཀྰ

52

52

181.88

123

123

487.58

76

76

256.78

97

320.71

70

70

254.09

139

139

474.59

60

60

113.02

145

145

537.94

51

51

278.68

48

48

216.96

76

76

372.43

115

115

348.17

62

62

199.43

152

152

327.47

27

27

131.92

25

25

145.19

65

65

201.05

118

118

452.39

25

25

140.90

::༄::ཙཌ::7:ཧྨཙ

45

45

245.16

168

168

613.60

40

40

261.34

35

35

216.80

61

196.15

117

117

431.05

55

55

395.41

36

36

380.70

59

216.28

28

28

133.56

48

69

250.68

77

77

439.62

40

56

249.58

256

1,214.06

86

363.59

61

168.35

39

39

256.36

1,937

1,131

3,068

12,514.07

TABLE XII.-ENROLMENT, ATTENDACE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANTS-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1882.

Maxi-

mum

mum

No.

Name of School.

mum

mum

Mini- Average Average

Average Maxi- Mini- Average Daily Number Monthly Monthly

Monthly Attend- of Enrol- Enrol- Daily Daily Enrol-

ance

ment.

ment.

ance.

Attend- Attend-

ance.

ment.

for the

School Days.

Year.

1234 LO U

Basel Mission, High Street (Boys),

38

20

36,50 16.08

30.83

27.70

257

""

Baxter Vernacular, D'Aguilar Street (Girls),..

High Street (Girls),

29

15

26.08 14.17 20.63

18.48 266

60

34

53.39 31.75 45.18

40.21

266

"

""

Hollywood Road (Girls),..

30

23

5

"

Queen's Road (Girls),.

46

24

28.92 20.15 28.09 44.26 23.72 36.90

25.34 268

34.75

266

C. M. S. East Street (Boys),

35

30

32.50 27.50

17

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

104

63

102.75

19

(Girls),

61

32

32.00 60.40 90.27 59.52 29.24 44.81

28.88

268

87.58 259

42,28

264

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

84

40

80.81

35,50 67.54 61.71

259

10

"

11

"

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

I Division (Boys),

54

34

51.22

30.35 45.45 40.59

259

108

53

99.50

49.96 91.90 84.56

255

12

II

11

(Boys),

56

8

45.30

7.14

13

L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

117

61

105,16 52.87

39.63 92.36 85.94

31.02

255

261

14

""

Staunton Street, I Division (Girls),.

36

30

33.28 27.09 31.17 31.68

264

15

II

(Girls),.

37

23

16

"

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),.

55

43

45.92

34.16 20.27 31.63 28.46 261

32.30 47.81 42.43

273

17

""

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

73

54

70.42 49.65 68.27 64.17

279

18

""

19

>>

20

21

22

23

";

24

""

25

"

26

27

"

Yaumati (Boys),

22

Mr. Chan's Hollywood Road (Boys),

Mr. Fong's Hollywood Road (Girls),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

(Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Mr. Ho's Aberdeen Street (Girls),

(Girls),

45

36

40.79 28.59

94

62

89.63 55.55

(Girls),

23

B

22.50

38.18 36.43 82.58 8.72 20.50 18.42

275

76.47

279

293

25

18

57

26

24.11 14.56 22.80 21.19 50.29 24.45 43.27 37.55 279

252

102

42

86.11 30.45

81.54 70.39

268

20

14

19.11 10.58 18.18

16.90

271

41

29

37.88 24.81 38.18 34.66

255

Wellington Street (Boys),

130

59

121.80

57.40 110.27

102.60

278

35

34.07

9.00 30.54 29.84

264

28

""

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

31

25

29.28

29

R. C. Mission, Cathedral (Boys),

59

33

47.96

15.72 29.50 28.52

26.80

256

45.70 39.15

244

30

St. Paul's College Mission, D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

92

61

86.00 60.04 77.18 73.05

258

31

Basel Mission (Girls),

48

40

32

Berlin Mission (Girls),

36

35

46.76 29.68 45.75 42.41 36.00 33.87 35.75 35.20

255

33

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

46

37

42.60

34

Hongkong Public Schools (Boys),....................

22

19

20.22

265 36.00 41.75 38.28 249 17.08 20.54 19.06

244

35

36

»

R. C. Mission, Bridges Strect Poor Schools (Mixed),

Italian Convent (Girls),

59

45

55.13

82

66

37

""

38

11

St. Francis' Chapel (Mixed),

St. Joseph's College, Portuguese Division (Boys),

54

15

78.19 57.95 75.81 49.33

44.35 55.25 50.68 69.12

227

214

15.00 47.75 45.08

218

218

161

203.29

156.84

203.91 194.06

234

39

""

29

Chinese

""

(Boys);

69

30

69.00

29.70

62.00 62.72

231

40

Victoria School (Boys),

44

26

37.05

23.84

34.75 30.35

263

41

""

(Girls),

32

25

29.48

22.00

28.60 25.36

262

Total Enrolment for the Year.

TABLE VIII-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last twenty Years.

Minimum Daily Attendance.

(Monthly Average.)

Maximum Daily Attendance.

(Monthly Average.)

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

1863,

535

469

414

301

1864,

502

417

634

324

1865,

597

535

418

330

1866,

623

572

435

337

1867,

700

610

533

408

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

741

571

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,931

1,271

974

836

1875,

1.927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881, 1882,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

January, February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the Central School during 1882.

Mouth.

Number of Scholars.

Number of Attendance.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

390

8,786

24

366.08

372

2,916

8

364.05

441

5,062

12

421.83

443

6,597

16

412.31

440

10,123

25

404.92

436

10,031

25

401.24

432

10,485

26

403.27

436

2,418

6

403.00

422

10,128

26

389.54

414

9,906

26

381.00

413

9,857

26

378.85

404

7,655

21

364.52

October,

November,

December,.

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1882, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1882,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1882,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1882,

93.964

241

.389.892

572

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (the Normal SCHOOL and CENTRAL SCHOOL excepted)

Rank I.

Saiyingp'ún (English School). Wantsai (English School).

arranged in the order of their efficiency in 1881.

Wongnaich'ung (Anglo-Chinese School). Tanglungehau (Hákká, Chinese School). Sheungwan (Chinese School). Wantsai (Chinese School).

Rank II.

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese School). Sheungwan (Girls School). Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese School). Shekò (Chinese School).

Rank II,—Continued.

Iláwán (Chinese School).

Tokwawan (Hoklò, Chinese School).

Rank III.

Saiyingp'ún (Hákká, Chinese School). Shaukiwàn (Chinese School). Hokts'ui (Chinese School). Tsattszmni (Chinese School).

Shaiwan (Chinese School).

Táiwongkung (Chinese School). Mat'auch'ung (Chinese School). Tanglungchau (Punti, Chinese School). Pokfulam (Chinese School). T'unglowàn (Chinese School).

Rank III,-Continued.

Shamshuipfò (Chinese School). Mát'auwai (Chinese School). Mongkok (Chinese School).

Little Hongkong (Chinese School). Shektongtsui (Chinese School). Akungngám (Chinese School). Wongkoktsui (Chinese School). Wongmakok (Chinese School). Táitamtuk (Chinese School). Hokün (Chinese School). Aberdeen (Chinese School). Aplichau (Chinese School).

Taiwan (Chinese School).

T'okwàwàn (Hákká, Chinese School). Táikoktsui (Chinese School).

Class of

School.

No.

TABLE XIV. PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last Two Years.

Name of School.

1882.

1881.

Increase. Decrease.

Basel Mission, High Street (Boys),..

Baxter Vernacular, D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

99

多多

19

*

High Street (Girls), . Hollywood Road (Girls),. Queen's Road (Girls)...

C. M. S. East Street (Boys),

100.00

77.78

22.22

100.00

100.00

96.77

93.02

3.75

100.00

95.08

4.92

96.55

91.30

5.25

100.00

93.33

6.67

}

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),.

91.66

90.16

1.50

29

9

12

Saiyingpun (Boys)......

(Girls),

90.00

86.67

3.33

91.66

94.74

3.08

10

"

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),.

93.10

94.29

1.19

11

"

""

12

13

14

"1

15

16

"

L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

Staunton Street, I. Division (Girls),

II.

(Girls).

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

I. Division (Boys),. II.

98.60

(Boys),.

83.33 f

96.00

5.04

98.60

98.39

.21

100.00

92.59

7.41

81.48

61.90

19.58

95.24

88.23

7.01

17

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

92.00

18

"

(Girls),

50.00

69.69

19

11

20

(Girls),.......

21

22

23

24

25

""

26

27

28

20

30

31

Basel Mission (Girls), .

32

Berlin Mission (Girls),

33

34

35

36

22

Italian Convent (Girls),.

37

""

St. Francis' Chapel (Mixed),

38

39

Yaumati (Boys),..

Mr. Chan's Hollywood Road (Boys), Mr. Fong's Hollywood Road (Girls),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

(Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Wellington Street (Boys),

Mr. Ho's Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

R. C. Mission, Cathedral (Boys)...

St. Paul's College Mission, D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

Hongkong Public School (Boys),

R. C. Mission, Briges Street Poor Schools (Mixed),.

St. Joseph's College, Portuguese Division (Boys),

J 69.84

1 70.00

77.59

19.69

7.67

100.00

་ ་ ་

100.00

95.00

5.00

96.92

97.50

.58

100.00

100.00

:

87.09

76.88

10.21

96.60

100.00

3.40

100.00

96.15

89.28

100.00

10.72

100.00

98.39

1.61

94.28

95.35

1.07

100.00

97.03

2.97

...

89.47

90.32

.85

85.71

92.86

7.15

91.66

38.89

52.77

86.48

88.46

90.00

1.54

95.24

93.01

2.23

Chinese

""

ܕ,

(Boys),

84.90

98.02

13.12

40

Victoria School (Boys),,

86.66

100.00

13.34

41

"

(Girls),

94.74

100.00

5.26

TABLE XV.—PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

Name of School.

were examined in 1882.

Reading. Writing.

mar.

Arith- Gram- Geo- metic.

graphy.

History.

Repiti- Expla-

tion. nation. position.

Com-

I.

""

Basel Mission, High Street (Boys),.. Baxter Vernacular, D'Auilar Street (Girls),.

100.00 100.00

100.00

93.30

22

27

High Street (Girls)...

96.77

96.77

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

96.77 92.30

+1

19

,,

Hollywood Road (Girls), Queen's Road (Girls),.

95.40

95.40

100.00

93.10

80.00

100.00 100.00 95.71 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

""

C. M. S. East Street (Boys),

100.00 100.00

100.00

>>

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),.

90.28

93.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 84.21 100.00

>>

27

(Girls),

96.60 93.30

100.00

100.00 100.00

**

22

"

"

""

13

""

"

JJ

""

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

""

"3

(Girls),

""

"2

Yaumati (Boys),.

""

"

(Girls),

""

Mr. Chan's Hollywood Road (Boys),

29

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),.

I. Division (Boys), II.

L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),.

Staunton Street, I. Division (Girls),. II.

(Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

91.66

95.83

100.00

100.00 100.00

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls).

96.90

96.90

75.00

96.90 100.00

100.00

97.20

100.00

(Boys),.

77.70 94.

TA

100.00 100.00 60.00 100.00

97.20

93.80

100.00 100.00

100.00

96.80 96.2

75.00

100.00

100.00

88.88

92.60

"

42.85

92.60

100.00

97.62

95.24

100.00

100.00

100.00

90.00

100.00

85.71

100.00

87.50 42.85

€2.50

37.50

100.00

83.33

71.43

74.60

94.83 81.25

80.00

95.00 70.00

95.00

80.00

100.00 100.00

95.24

100.00

""

27

22

"

R. C. Mission, Cathedral (Boys),....

""

III.

Basel Mission (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls).

IV.

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

Mr. Fong's Hollywood Road (Chris),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

(Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Wellington Street (Boys),

Mr. Ho's Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

St. Paul's College Mission, D'Aguilar Strect (Boys), 100.00

90.48

95.24

100.00

100.00

100.00

96.82

96.82

95.80

75.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

93.55 87.09

100.00

100.00

100.00

90.90 97.72

100.00

100.00 100.00

50.00

96.66 100.00

100.00 100.00

96.20 100.00

100.00

100.00

92.86

85.71

100.00

70.00

96.61

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

77.14

88.57

100.00 100.00

"

Hongkong Public School (Boys),

R. C. Mission, Bridges Street Poor Schools (Mixed),

Italian Convent (Girls),

100.00 100.00 100.00 70.00 70.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 92.30 100.00 100.00

100.00

77.85 87.50 60.00

100.00 91.70

75.00

100,00

89.20

72.97

84.31 100.00

"}

""

St. Francis' Chapel (Mixed)..

100.00

95.45

60.00 100.00

"

"

St. Joseph's Col., Port. Division (Boys),

100.00

Chinese (Boys), 92.45

Victoria School (Boys),..

(Girls)...

100.00 86.66 100.00 89.47

100.00 94.74

90.47 90.05 100.00 95.45 80.00

92.45 92.45 100.00 100.00

100.00 80.00 100.00 100.00

92.30 100.00

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1882.

Number of Children in the Colony under 16 years of age, as per last Census (1881), Add Increment of Increase of Children under 16 years of age, say,

Deduct as being under 5

years of age, say,

Deduct as attending Schools of all denominations, say,

.....

Total Number of Uneducated Children, say,

APPENDIX.

21,869

1,859

23,728

7,326

6,800

14,126

9,602

E. J. EITEL,

Inspector of Schools,

GOVERNMENT NORMAL SCHOOL,

February, 17th 1883.

year

SIR, I have the honour to forward you the Report of the Government Normal School for the 1882. After the trial examination held by you in December 1881, ten Students (that number being the full complement for the first year) took up their residence on the premises in January following.

In March, one of the Students obtained permission from His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government to withdraw on condition of refunding the sums of money that he had actually received from Government. He is, however, now in Government employ.

In August, one of the Students obtained leave to go to his native Village, where he died, after a lingering illness.

In September, another of the Students asked permission to go to Canton to consult a native doctor, as he was also ill; but before he obtained permission he absented himself, and consequently his name was struck off the Roll. I have heard since, on reliable anthority, that he returned to the Colony, more ill, and died in October.

During October, one of the Students was sent to take temporary charge of the Shaukiwan School, on the dismissal of the master there. He had sole charge of that School for the whole of October, and one week in November, and judging from the results of this year's Examination, I venture to say that the experience did him good, as it imparted to him a spirit of self-confidence before a class, which is highly essential in a Teacher.

The remaining seven Students have already entered into a bond, required by the Government, to the effect that they are to remain in Training for three years and serve the Government as Teachers for five years after their training, if required so to do.

In December last, two more youths entered on three months trial, who, if approved of and accepted by Government, will bring the total number of Students for the coming year, up to nine. There is therefore still one Student more required to bring the number up to the intended complement of ten, and if a notification were inserted in the Gazette, before the end of the New Year's Holidays, inviting applicants, I am of opinion that there would be more applying for the vacancy, than was the case when a notice was inserted towards the end of the year, as Chinese do not care to make any changes at so late a period.

Considering that the object of the School is to train young men to act as Teachers in the Elementary Schools, it has been my chief aim to instruct them more especially in such subjects as are required for a Pass in any of the six Standards laid down in the examination Schedule (for Grant-in-Aid Schools) of June 1880, which in my opinion is the highest Standard that an Elementary school can be brought up to, allowing six years to complete the six Standards in.

In addition to these subjects English speaking and Translation have been specially taught, these being the substantial roots for the growth and expansion of teaching power of other subjects.

Besides the study of the ordinary subjects, each Student has had practical experience in teaching, by taking a class

purpose;

and once two hours daily in the Government Elementary School which is attached to the Normal School for this a week, a practical lesson on the art of teaching has been given by myself to the Students before a class of boys, which lesson was supplemented on each occasion by requiring a Student to give lessons to the same class under my personal supervision. The form attached shews the Attendances, &c. for the year. As the Students reside at the School none has been absent at any time except on leave obtained either on account of sickness or special circumstances.

I have the honour to be,

Dr. E. J. EITEL,

Inspector of Schools.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. J. MAY,

Principal.

1882.

NORMAL SCHOOL.

NUMBER

NUMBER

NUMBER

MONTH.

OF

OF

OF

SCHOLARS.

ATTENDANCES.

SCHOOL DAYS.

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE.

REMARKS.

January, February, March,

10

219

25

8.76

9

74

9

8.22

9

148

17

8.7

April,....

10

146

18

8.11

May,

9

201

25

8.04

June,

9

190

25

7.6

July,

8

204

26

7.84

August,.....

9

5

7.8

September,

169

25

6.76

October,....

77

147

26

5.65

November,

175

26

6.73

December,..

7

150

6.82

101

1,862

249

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1882,

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1882,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1882,

....1,862.

249.

7.48.

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1882, Monthly average,

10.

8.42.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 96

BIRTHS AND DEATHS.

The following Returns of the Registrar General are published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 10th March, 1883

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

RETURNS of BIRTHS and DEATHS for the Year 1882 ending 31st December.

CHINESE

DEATHS. BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY (including every Nationality, except Chinese)

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

British and other

Nationalities

Boys

Girls Males Females.

Females. Boys Girls

36

Males Females

other than those

specified,

Victoria,

75

80

113

40

680

516

1,686

1,765

Portuguese,

Kaulung,

29

19

134

94

Indians, &c.,

Shaukiwán,.

888

39

28

50

54

128

76

Non-Residents, ..`50

Aberdeen,

12

10

60

62

Stanley,.

11

9

21

10

153

TOTAL,..

75

80

113

40

782

608

2,029 2,007

GRAND TOTAL,

ANNUAL DEATH-RATE, PER 1,000

Whole Population,...

Births,..1,545 British & Foreign Community,

1878

1879

1880

1881.

1882

29 60

32 14

28 71

24 07

26 11

18 73

18 15

16 71

18 22

15 75

Deaths,..4,189

Do deducting non-Residents,

Chinese,

14 90

14 16

15 95

13 44

1247

30 35

33 11

29 54

24 45

26.78

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 5th March, 1883

DEATH-RATES IN DIFFERENT GROUPS OF AGES.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN, &C.

Under one year, One year to five,

AGES.

....

Total under five years,...

From 5 to 10

years,

10 20

""

""

""

བ ར ར བ ནྟནནྟནནྟན

20

25

""

""

""

25

35

....

"

""

35

45

""

>>

45

55

"

""

55

65

وو

65 75

""

75 85

""

85 95

""

""

"

95 and upwards,..

• ....

Total,...

J. RUSSELL, Registrar General

CHINESE.

Deaths

Per cent of whole.

Deaths.

Per cent of whole.

ساسی

17

11 1

1,479

36 6

13

85

580

144

30

19 6

2,059

51.0

1

07

108

2.7

7

4 5

128

3.2

16

10 5

166

4.1

35

22 9

430

10.7

37

24 2

408

10 1

17

11 1

279

69

7

45

228

56

2

13

- 151

38

••

07

62

1.5

15

0.4

2

153

100 0

4,036

100 0

1

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 122.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT.

The following Annual Report from the Harbour Master, with the Returns accompanying it, is published for general information.

1

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 31st March, 1883.

No 80

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 2nd March, 1883.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns of this Department for the year ending the 31st December, 1882.

I Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port

VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers.

XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII Amount of Fees received under Section III of Ordinance No. 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of China.

XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered

SHIPPING

1

2 The year 1882 under review shows a general increase in the trade of the Colony. The total of all arrivals is 28,668 vessels measuring 4,976,233 tons, the increase being 1,115 vessels measuring 442,929 tons

3. Of the arrivals, 59.16 per cent of the tonnage is in vessels propelled by steam, and 4 56 per cent in European Sailing vessels, the remaining 36 28 per cent being due to Junks.

4. The proportions of the whole tonnage under various Nationalities are as follows:

American, British,

.... .....

Chinese Steamers,

Junks,

180 per cent. ....47 52 244

.....36 28

""

>>

""

French,

German, Others,

""

'

... 3 49

>>

5 22

· •

3 25

""

5 The trade in 3,054 steam vessels, amounting to 2,943,867 tons, is divided in the following *proportion:

0 82 per cent

0 68

American, Austrian, British, Chinese,

....

Danish,

Dutch,.

French,

German,

Japanese,

Others,

""

.....78 62

"}

4 14

1 16

...

0 61

...

5 68

>>

5 93

""

1.10

,"

1.26

25

F

سیا

6. The tonnage in steam vessels has increased 13 25 per cent on last year's return, and the ton- nage of European sailing vessels has decreased 10 57 per cent

7 There is a slight decrease in the trade with the Australian Colonies, and Great Britain, but an increase as regards the Coast of China and Formosa, Cochin China, Continent of Europe, Japan, Java, Philippine Islands, Hainan, Gulf of Tonquin, and the United States of America British North Borneo is introduced in the columns of these returns for the first time, with an entry and clearance of 3 vessels and 1,065 tons The Island of Hainan and Ports in the Gulf of Tonquin have not been opened long, but there is a present trade between those Ports and Hongkong of 176 vessels and 73,708 tons.

JUNK TRADE.

8 I have again to report an increase under this heading. 892 vessels measuring 125,365 tons arrived from the Coast of China and Formosa in 1882 in excess of those entered in the previous year

9 The trade with Macao alone, in Junks, shows an increase of 1,401 tons.

10. 16 fewer Junk licences and 169 fewer Fishing licences were issued during the year, but there was an increase of 985 Anchorage passes.

{

EMIGRATION

11 8,239 more Emigrants left Hongkong in 1882 than in the previous year, an excess of 5,479 going to Portland, Oregon, and of 5,694 proceeding to California A rush was made for these two places in the first half of the year in consequence of the laws prohibiting the immigration of Chinese labourers into the United States coming into force on the 4th August 1882. The last ship left for San Francisco on the 4th July, carrying 1,182 passengers There is an increase of 5,956 Chinese to Victoria, Vancouver's Island 7,467 left for the latter Port for the purpose of constructing the pro- jected Railroad from New Westminster in British Columbia through the Dominion of Canada.

12. There is a decrease of 6,301 Emigrants to Bangkok, and of 2,668 to the Australian Colonies. Emigration to the Straits Settlements is nearly the same, 36,490 left in 1882, and 36,545 in 1881.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING

13. Seven vessels were newly registered, and fourteen vessels were struck off the Register

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT

14 None of the 76 cases tried were of any importance

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS UNDER SECTION XV OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

*

ta

¿

15. The following list will show the number of Candidates who passed, and of those who failed in obtaining Certificates of Competency:

C

1

PASSED

FAILED

Masters, . First Mates,

Only Mates,

Second Mates,

RANK

First Class Engineers,

Second Class Engineers,

16

17

6734

4

2

1

3

40

10

23

20

23

2

43

2

MARINE COURTS, UNDER SECTION XIII OF ORDINANCE No. 8 of 1879

16 The following Courts have been held during the year:-

1 On the 12th September, 1882,-Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Hongkong, Official number 85,077 of London, on a rock lying in the fairway, a little North of a line drawn between Long-yıt and Double-yit at the Southern entrance of the Haitan Straits The Master's (JOHN BIDEN FRYER) Certificate of Competency was returned.

2. On the 14th November, 1882,-Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Paladin, Official number 68,001 of Glasgow, on the North Shoal, Paracels Group, China Sea The Master's (FRANCIS PHILIP AUBIN) Certificate of Competency was suspended for four months

&

SEAMEN.

17. 9,794 Seamen of all Nationalities were shipped, and 10,023 were discharged in the

year 1882. The excess of men discharged over men shipped is caused by some of the former being sent to England and Australia as distressed seamen, and others leaving the Colony without notifying their departure.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable F STEWART, LL.D.,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c,

&c,

&c

Harbour Master, &c

7

M

*

1

í

I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country, in the Year 1882

10TAL

BRITISH

FOREIGN

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

Vessels

Tons Crews Vessels Tons Ciews Vessels

Tons Crews Vessels Tons Chews Vessels Tons Ciews Vessels

TOTAL

Tons

WITH CARGors

Crews Vessels Tons Chews Vessels

IN BALLAST

Tons Ciews Vessels

TOTAL

Tons Crews

Australia and New Zealand,

431

British North America,

British North Borneo,

Coast of China and Formosa,

42,034 1,459 4,326 104 3 1,065 91 1,297 1,338,640 55,494

1

908

16 44| 42,942 1,475 23 16,236 342 4,326 104 1 1,073 17 3 1,065 91

3,450 55

26 19,686 397 66 I 1,073 17

29 24,211

Cochin China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

186 121,453 4,269| 29 53,530 3,525 135 191,189 5,402

1

136

29

2,558

40

53,530 8,525 72 111,608 5,944 137 193,747 5,442|| 381 45,838 829

1,821 105

73

38

India and Singapoie,

99] 115,267 5,627

4,296

99

102 119,563 5,726 261

18,714 565

26

Japan,

56

66,659 3,579

2,488

62

58

69,147 3,641|

67

70,612 4,620

7

9,317 149

74

Java and other Islands in the Indian Aichi-

1

638 15

739

24

1,377 39

19

13,270 917

2

1,109 26

21

911 1,326 1,362,871 56,405|| 15,905 1,426,411 209 367 8,625 538,080 98,450 24,530 1,964,491 307,817 17,202 2,765,051 264,861 8,654 136 121,453 4,269| 1061 81,478 2,583 19 107

562,291 99,361 25,856 3,327,342 364,222

19 243 203,067 6,871

102 166,959 9,574

175 239,585 6,271

99 128 138,277 6,291 211

132 149,076 8,410

1,848 50 24

58,270 1,801 4. 5,399 121 3 1,065| 91

4 4,358 71

70

62,628 1,872

4

5,399 121

3 1,065 91

81 614 2 602) 242 202,981 6,852

113,429 6,049

101 165,138 9,469

45,838 8291

173 237,027| 6,231]

18,714 565

pelago,

Macao,

377

213,515 13,739 |

86

12

378 213,601 13,751|

963

142,506 24,766]

122

10,703 1,439 1,085

North Pacific,

356 20

356 20

B

334

27

2

170 38

5

14,379 943

153,209 26,205

504

125 133,981 6,192 79,929 4,769] 123 137,271 8,199] 20

1,340

136

1,821 105

2,558 40

4,296

11,805

65

5

690

Philippine Islands,

50

24,270 1,946

1,710

92 52

25,980 2,038

43

13,964 1,449|

3,203

145

48

17,167 1,594

93

13,908 932

356,021 38,505

47

38,234 3,895

15,756 962

123

170

4,913

10,789 1,451 1,463 38

237 100

366,810 39,956

860

85

43,147 3,632

Poits in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,

94

37,206 2,639

94

37,206 2,639 82

36,502 2,040

82

36,502 2,040

176

73,708 4,679

176

73,708 4,679

Sandwich Islands,

1

1,083] 16

1

907 15

21

1,990 31

1

1,083 16

907

15:

21

1,990 31

Siam,

72

50,187 2,112

72

50,187 2,112 51

25,447 979

51

25,447

979)

123

75,634 3,091

123

South Africa,

165

9

1

165

9

165

75,634 3,091 165

9

United States of America,

37

66,107| 2,715

1,611

44

38

67,718 2,759

21

37,047 1,144

TOTAL,

2,434 2,326,442 102,736|

59 104,765 3,903

43 38,607 1,300 2,477 2,365,049 104,036 17,421 2,042,123 255,605 8,770 569,061 100,450 26,191 2,611,184 356,055, 19,855 4,368,565 358,341 8,813 607,668 101,750 28,668 4,976,233 460,091

21

37,047 1,144

58 103,154 3,859||

1

1,611

44

A

Y

H. G THOMSETT, RN, Harbour Master, &c

!

BRITISH

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES

II.—NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country, in the Year 1882

TOTAL

IN BALLAST

FOREIGN

IN BALLAST

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES

TOTAL

Vessels

Australia and New Zealand,

28

Butish North America,

Tons Ciews, Vessels Tons Crews Vessels 30,145 1,209 8,578 248

Tons Crews Vessels Tons Ciews Vessels Tons Ciews Vessels

Tons Ciews Vessels

Ions Crews Vessels Tons Crews Vessels

Tons

Ciews

28

30,145 1,209,

4321 17

7

Bitish North Borneo,

31 1,065 95

31

8 578 248

1,065]

14 16,531 297

21 4321 17 14 16,531 297

30

21

30,577 1,226

30

30,577 1,226

25,109] 540

211 25,109 545

95

3 1,0651 95

1,065 95

Coast of China and Formosa,

1,852 1,387,028 58,632

491

Cochin China,

48

34,971 1,348||

63

111

88,410 3,253 531 36,023 1,334|| 56

40,831 1,391 1,401 1,427,859 60,023 17,593 1,595,080 237,583 6,483|| 353,28865,037 24,076 1,948,368 302,620 18,945 2,982,108 296,215 6,532 53,439 1,905

43,455 1,360

109

79,478 2,694

101 70,994 2,682

119

394,119 66,428 25,477 3,376,227 362,643 96,894 3,265 220 167,888 5,947

Continent of Europe,

30

51,590 3,475

30

21,590 3,475 |

39

70,313 4,753

39

70,313) 4,753

69 121,903] 8,228|

Great Britain,

331

49,564 1,392

33

49,564 1,392]

5

4,417 131

4,417 131

38

India and Singapore,

139 176,480 7,278||

14

13,298 3261

153 189,778 7,604| 31

36,304 1,228

13

11,205 234

44

47,509 1,462]

170

Japan,

61

Java & other Islds in the Indian Archipelago,

1

Macao,

78,335 3,821 13] 510 19 377 214,073 18,739||

11,560 397

74

89,895 4,218

56!

59,024 4,206| 81

6,6321

206

64

55,656 4,412 117

53,981 1,523] 212,784 8,506| 27 137,359| 8,027| 21

3!

2,849

77

41

3,359 96

91

8,504 670

632

19

10

9,136[ 689

10

176

25

379

214,249 13,764

974

145,258 24,652||

611

7,049|

889 1,035

152,307 25,541

1,351

9,014 689 359,381 38,391|

63 7,225

24,503 560 18,192 603 3,481 96

914

Mauritius,

1,300 38

1

1,300 38

...

1,300) 38

69 121,903) 8,228 38 53,981) 1,523 197 237,287 9,066 138 155,551 8,630 14 12,495 785 1,414 366,556 39,305 1 1,300) 38

North Pacific,

8,490

280

8

8,490

280

Pellew Islands,

2901 11

290

11

Philippine Islands,

25

12,470

9001

161

11,388

269]

41

23,858 1,169

331

12,822 1,083

51

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,

91

34,097 2,566

51

3,6601 160]

961

87,757 2,726

77

32,975 1,987

2,484 109

46,837 891 3,560 145

7

2,484 109

15

10,974 389

15

10,974 389

1

290

11

1

290

11

841

59,659 1,974]

581

25,292 1,983]

67

84

36,535 2,132 168

67,072 4,553|

12

+2

58,225 1,160

125

83,517 3,143

7,2201 305

180

74,292 4,858

Russia in Asia,

7

4,762 173)

7

4,762 173

7

4,762 173

7

4,762 173

Sandwich Islands,

2

964

35]

21

964] 35

21

964] 35

2]

964 35

Siam,

51

35,082 1,548

5,924) 187 58

41,006 1,735

23

12,125|

509

16 6,357] 135

39

18,482] 644

74

47,207 2,057

23

12,281] 322

97

59,488 2,879

South Africa,

498

18

498

18

498

18

498

18

South America,

608

12

608

12

608

12

608

12

South Pacific,

1

52

9

52

9

52

9

52

9

United States of America,

56)

93,496 3,451

56

93,496 3,451

38)

58,242 1,614

1 1,438 21

TOTAL...

2,804|2,209,074 99,770||

39 59,675) 1,635

5,017 5,664|2,577,8 180 151,615 5,017|| 2,484 2,360,689 104,787 18,960 2,094,934 280,311 6,704 482,932 69,046 25,664 2,577,866 349,357 21,264 4,304,008 380,081 6,884 634,547 74,063 28,148 4,938,555 454,144

94 151,738 5,065|

1,433 21

95 153,171 5,086

H G. THOMSETT, R N., Harbour Master, &c

III-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1882

}

ENTERED

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

TOTAL

Vessels

Tons

Crews Vessels

Tons

Crews

Vessels

Tons

Crews

American, Annamese,

Austrian,

....

62

73,413

1,750

16

1

136

19

1

16,249 136

295

78

89,662

2,045

19

2

272

38

12

20,064

695

12

20,064

695

British,

...

2,434

Chinese,

Chinese Junks,

...

126

2,326,442 102,736

16,511 | 1,274,876219,275

43

38,607

1,300

2,477

2,365,049

104,036

121,480 5,960

1

392

25

127

121,872 5,985

8,720

530,514

99,277

25,231

1,805,390 318,552

|

Danish,

57

33,625 1,264

3

1,824

68

60

35,449 1,332

Dutch,

20

18,158

1,618

20

18,158

1,618

French,

127

...

173,692

11,998

127

173,692

11,998

German,

382

247,575

7,961

21

12,294

438

403

259,869

8,399

Italian,

1

435

12

1

435

12

Japanese,

32

32,630

2,371

32

32,630

2,371

Norwegian,

11

9,650

330

3

2,877

75

14

12,527

405

r

Portuguese,

1

632

18

1

632

18

[C

Russian,

....

17

13,432

448

2

2,499

132

19

15,931

580

Siamese,

24

11,204

545

24

11,204

545

Spanish,

33

9,791

1,299

3

2,276

121

36

12,067

1,420

Swedish,

...

1,330

42

4

1,330

42

TOTAL,.

19,855 4,368,565 | 358,341 8,813

607,668 101,750

28,668 4,976,233 460,091

|

H G THOMSEIT, BN,

Harbour Master, &c

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1882

CLEARED

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

TOTAL.

Vessels

Tons

Crews Vessels

Tons

Crews

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

Annamese,

Austrian, British,

56

76,057

1,971

1

136

13

28 1

...

22,415 136

458

84

98,472

2,429

13

2

11

18,548

620

11

272 18,548

26

620

2,304

2,209,074

99,770

180

Norwegian,

• ......... ... •

Chinese,

Chinese Junks,

Danish,.

Dutch,

French,

German,

Italian,!.

Japanese,

Portuguese,

Russian,

121 18,246

117,048

6,026

4

1,458,944 247,212

6,459

42

20,257

895

22

151,615 2,010 313,430 17,418

5,017 138 64,347

2,484 125

2,360,689 104,787

24,705

544

64

119,058 6,164

1,772,374 311,559

|

37,675 1,439

....

20

18,158

1,678

20

18,158

1,678

112

166,254

11,788

13

257

158,729

5,721

144

5,855 100,819

192

125

172,109 11,980

2,611

401

259,548

8,332

1

435

12

1

435

...

27

26,774

2,085

3

3,664

166

30

30,438

12 2,251

9

8,631

248

5

3,211

89

14

11,842

337

1

:

632

19

1

632

19

13

9,643

443

6

5,288

246

19

14,931

689

Siamese,

9

3.831

202

13

6,255

131

22

10,086

333

Spanish,

Swedish,

34

11,200

1,386

2

758

60

36

11,958

1,446

1

289

11

3

1,041

32

1,330

43

...

TOTAL,.

21,264 4,304,008 | 380,081 6,884

634,547

74,063

28,148 4,938,555 454,144

|

HG THOMSETT, RN,

Harbour Master, &c

$

J

(

V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1882

TOTAL

BRITISH

FOREIGN

NAMES

OF PORTS

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES

IN BAILAST

TOTAL

WITH CARGOLS

IN BALLAS I'

TOTAL

A

Vis

Tons Crews Vls Tons Crews Vls Tons Crews

Vls Tons Ciews Vls

Tons Crews Vls

342

Aberdeen,

16,707 2,917] 803

51,811 11,721| 1,145]

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,

Victoria,

2,434 2,326 442 102,736||

43

401 160 14,947 1,897| 113 38,607 1,800 2,477 2,365,049 104,036 16,107 1,924,741 240,497 4,213|

17,289 3,857| 665

41,858 6,359| 1,066|

Yaumáti,

Total,

2,434 2,326,442|102,736|

B

68,439 6,437 2,976 43 38,607 1,300 2,477 2,365,049 104,086 17,421 2,042,123 255,605 8,770

411

Tons Crews Vls

68,518 14,638 16,707 2,917

59,147 10,216 17 289 3,857

7,794 1,262 273 22,741 3,159| 14,947 1,897| 310,212 40,762 20,320 2,234,953|281,259|18,541 4,251,183 343,233 4,256 157,386 40,346 3,387 225,825 46,783|| 68,439 6,437 2,976 569,061 100,450 26,191 2,611,184 356,055 19,855 4,368,565 358,341 8,813

Tons Crews

Vls

Tons Crews Vls/

Tons

Crews

342

401

160

803

665

51,811| 11,721| 1,145 41,858 6,359 1,066|

113

411

68,518 14,638 59,147 10,216 7,794 1,262 273 22,741 3,159 348,819 42,062 22,797 4,600,002 385,295 157,386 40,346 3,387 225,82546,783 607,668 101,750 28,668 4,976,233 460,091

H G THOMSETT, RN, Harbour Master, §c

VI-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1882

BRITISH

FOREIGN

NAMES

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

OF PORTS

Vls Tons Crews

Vis

Tons Crews Vls Tons Crews

Vls Tons Crews Vis

Tons Crews Vls

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,..

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.....

Total,

2,304 2,209,074| 99,770|

2,304 2,209,074 99,770|

10,773 1,853| 945 618 38,571 5,213| 420 149 15,179 1,837 124 180 151,615 5,017 2,484 2,360,689 104,787 16,808 1,963,523 256,220 3,185 1,181 66,888 15,188 2,030 180 151,615 5,017| 2,484|2,360,689 104,787 18,960 2,094,984 280,311 6,704

204

58,052 14,073 1,149| 20,956 4,792 1,038|

TOTAL

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES

IN BALLAST

Tons Crews Vls Tons Ciews Vis 68,825 15 926|| 204 10,773 1,853| 945 58,627 10,005 618 38,571 5,213 420 22,741 3,159 149 15,179 1,837| 124 251,196 21,317 19,993 2,214,719 277,537 19,112 4,172,597 355,990 3,365 146,066 27,542 3,211 212,954 42,730 1,181| 66,888 15,188|| 2,030 482,932 69,046 25,664 2,577,866 349,357 21,264 4,304,008 380,081

7,562 1,322 273

6,884

TOTAL

Tons Crews Vis Tons. Crews

58,052 14,073 1,149| 68,825 15,926 20,056 4,792 1,038 58,627|10,005 7,562 1,822 273 22,741 3,159 402,811 26,334 22,477 4,575,408 882,324 146,066 27,542 3,211 212,954|42,730 634,547 74,063 28,148 4,938,555 454,144

H G THOMSETT, R N., Harbour Master, &c.

F

VII-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1882

CARGO

BALLAST

TOTAL

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen- gei s

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen- gers.

Vessels

Tons Crews

Victoria,

963

142,506 24,766

3,437

121

10,311 1,414

166 1,084

Passeu-

geis

152,817 26,180 3,603

Total,

963 142,506 24,766

3,437

121

10,311 1,414

166

1,084

152,817 26,180 3,603

H. G THOмSETT, RN, Harbour Master, &c

VIII-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1882.

CARGO

BALLAST

TOTAL

Vessels

Tons Crews.

Victoria,.

972

Passen- geis

143,692 24,558 3,935

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen- geis

Vessels

Tons Crews

Passen-

geis

60

6,657

863

166

1,032

150,349 25,421

4,101

Total,

972 143,692 24,558 3,935

60

6,657

863

166

1,032 150,349 25,421 4,101

HG THOMSETT R N

Harbour Master &c.

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1882.

CARGO.

BALLAST

TOTAL

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen-

gers

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen-

geis

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen-

gers

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,'

342

16,707

2,917

34

803

51,811 11,721

170

1,145

68,518 14,638

204

401

17,289

3,857

105

665

41,858

6,359

100

1,066

59,147 10,216

205

Stanley,

160 14,947

1,897

46

113

7,794

1,262

42

273

22,741 3,159

88

Victoria,

Yaumáti,

Total,

14,234 1,014,988 411 68,439

15,548 1,132,370 194,509 144,550

179,401 | 144,328

4,042

261,354

38,175

23,163

6,437

37

2 976

157,386

40,346

62

18,276 3,387

1,276,342 217,576 167,491

225,825 46,783

99

8,599

520,203 | 97,863

23,537

24,147 1,652,573 292,372 | 168,087

Y.

HG THOMSETT, R N

Harbour Master, &c

>

X-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1882.

Cargo

BALLAST

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons Ciews

Passen- gers

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen-

gers

Passen-

Vessels

Tons Crews

gers

Aberdeen,

204 10,773 1,853

40

945

58,052 14,073

158

Shaukiwán,

618 38,571 5,213

76

420

20,056 4,792

95

1,149 1,038

68,825 15,926

198

58,627

10,005

171

Stanley,

149

15,179 1,837

58

124

7,562 1,322

40

Victoria,

15,122 1,183,841 198,563 125,598

2,880

75,037 15,755

9,838

273 18,002

22,741 3,159

98

1,258,878 214,318 | 135,436

Yaumáti,

1,181

66,888 15,188

44

2,030

146,066

27,542

29

3,211

212,954 42,730

73

Total,

17,274 1,315,252 | 222,654 | 125,816

6,399

306,773

63,484❘ 10,160

10,160 23,673 1,622,025 286,138 135,976

HG THOMSETT, R N >

Harbour Master, fe

XI-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1882

CARGO

BALLAST

TOTAL

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen-

geis

Passen-

Passen-

Vessels

Tons Ciews

Vessels

Tons Crews

gels

gers

Aberdeen,

342

16,707

2,917

34

803

51,811 11,721

170

1,145

Shaukiwan,

401

17,289

3,857

105

665

41,858

6,359

100

1,066

Stanley,

160

14,947

1,897

46

113

7,794

1,262

42

273

68,518 14,638 59,147 10,216 22,741 3,159

204

205

88

Victoria,

15,197

1,157,494 204,167 | 147,765

4,163

271,665

39,589

23,329

19,360

1,429,159 243,756

171,094

Yaumáti,

411

68,439

6,437

37

2,976

157,386 40,346

62

3,387

225,825 46,783

99

Total,

16,511 | 1,274,876 219,275 147,987 8,720 530,514 99,277 23,703

25,231 1,805,390 318,552 171,690

| |

HG THOMSETT, RN, Harbour Master, &c

XII-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong (exclusue of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1882

CARGO

BALLAST

TOTAL

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen- geis

Vessels Tons Ciews

Passen-

geis

Passen-

Vessels Tons Crews

gers

Aberdeen,

204

Shaukiwán,

618

10,773 38,571 5,213

1,853

40

945

58,052 14,073

158

1,149

76

420

20,056 4,792

95

1,038

Stanley,

149

15,179 1,837

58

124

7,562 1,322

40

Victoria,..

16,094

1,327,533 223,121

129,533

2,940

81,694 16,618

Yaumáti,

1,181

66,888 15,188

44

2,030

146,066

27,542

10,004 29

68,825 15,926 58,627 10,005 273 22,741 3,159 19,034 | 1,409,227 | 239,739 3,211 212,954 42,730

198

171

98

139,537

73

Total, ..

18,246 1,458,944 247,212 | 129,751 6,459

313,430 64,347 10,326 24,705 1,772,374 311,559 140,077

|

HG THOMSETT, RN,

Harbour Master, fc

XIII-Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and

the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1882

CARGO

BALI AST

TOTAL

Vessels

Tons Crews

Passen- gers

Vessels

Tons

Crews

Passen- geis

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen-

geis

Victoria,

4,110 141,469 45,757 4,799 1,268

34,019 10,091

8,302 5,378

175,488 55,848 13,101

Total,

4,110 141,469 45,757 4,799

1,268

34,019 10,091

8,302

5,378

175,488 55,848

13,101

HG THOMSETT, RN, Harbour Master, &c

XIV — Return of Junks ( Local Trade ) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1882

CARGO

BALLAST

TOTAL

Vessels

Tons Crews

Passen-

gels

Vessels Tons Ciews

Passen-

gers

Vessels Tons Crews

Passen- gers

Victoria,

1,919

53,252 17,362 9,616 3,596 133,143 39,667

3,218 5,515

186,395 57,029 12,834

Total,

1,919

53,252 17,362 9,616 3,596 133,143 39,667

3,218

5,515

186,395 57,029 12,834

HG THOMSETT, RN,

Harbour Master, &c

XVI —RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1882

Name of Vessels

Official Number

Regis- tered Tonnage

Horse Power

Built

Rig

Where Built and When

Remarks, &c

of

Raven,

47,684

343 51

Barque

Wood

Hotspur,

49,764 522 62

Barque

Wood

Sual, str.,

64,100 261 87

Claro Babuyan,

44,497 357 97

Bengkalis, str,

73,449

90 42❘ 20

Yot Sai, str,

73,450

127 50

Honam, str,

73,451 1,377 92

500

8288

Fore & Aft

Iron

Sunderland, 1864

South Shields, Durham, 1865. Since lost at Manila in a

Hongkong, 1873

typhoon

Barque

Wood

Pallion, Durham, 1862

Schooner

Wood

Hongkong, 1882

80

None

Wood

Whampoa, 1874

Schooner Steel

Pointhouse, Lanark, 1882.

H G THOMSETT, RN,

Registrar of Shipping, &c

XVII —RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS CANCELLED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1882

Name of Vessels

Official

Number

Registered

Tonnage

Date of

Registry

Horse Power

Built

Rig of

Where Built and When

Reason of Cancellation

Queen of the Seas, 41,258 442 82

1867

USA, 1857

Norna, str,

Hilda,

31,152 606 56 64,090306 05

1871

230 Square For Iron

ward

1871

Barque Wood

Thales, str,

52,608 819 89

1871

200 Brig

Iron

Dumbarton, 1864.

Taku, str,

63,779 | 608 41

Appin, str, Pilot Fish, str, Europe, str, Oscar Vidal,

Sin Nanzing, str, Han Yang, str,

Kinshan, str,

Albay, str,

Hotspur,

60,991 | 394 36 64,113 36 73 68,037 528 10 64,117 299 94 64,127 714 96 64,115 404 46 50,652 1,381 26 63,841 366 00

49,764 522 62

1872 218 Schr 1873 90 Schr 1874 20 None Iron 1874120 | Schr Iron 1874

Iron

Dumbarton, 1870

Iron

Dumbarton, 1869

Hongkong, 1874

Barque Wood

1876 175 Schr 1877 70 Schr 1877 150 None 1877 90 Schr Iron 1882 Barque Wood

Iron

Glasgow, 1875

Iron

Shanghai, 1871

Wood

Barque Wood Wilmington, Delaware, I

Glasgow, 1853

Sweden, 1865

Glasgow, Renfrew, 1873 Reihersteig, 1862

Sold to Foreigner, 1882

Sold to be broken up, 1882 Transferred to Shanghai, 1882. Transferred to Aberdeen, 1882 Transferred to London, 1882 Transferred to London, 1882 Sold to Foreigner, 1882 Transferred to London, 1882 Sold to Foreigner, 1882 Transferred to London, 1882. Lost, 1882

New York, USA, 1863 Sold to be broken up, 1882

Glasgow, 1871

Transferred to Aberdeen, 1882

(South Shields, Durham,

1865

Lost during a typhoon, 1882

'H G THOMSETT, RN,

Registrar of Shipping &e

XVIII —AMOUNT of FLES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III of Ordinance No 8 of 1879, in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1882

MATTER OR DUTY IN RESPECT OF WHICH FEE TAKEN

Alteration in Agreement with Seamen,

Certifying Desertion,

Declaration of Ownership,

Endorsement of Change of Master,

Endorsement of Change of Ownership, .

Endorsement of Change in Tonnage,

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,

Inspection of Registry,

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

Recording Transfer of Mortgage,

Recording Discharge of Mortgage, Recording Sale of Ship, .

Registering Certificate of Sale,

....

NUMBFR

FEE

AMOUNT

REMARKS, &C

1

1

1

154

1

154

14

2

28

37

1

37

4

2

8

1

2

2

7

15

105

.....

7

1

7

7

5

35

1

5

4

20

11

5

55

3

TOTAL,....

.$

463

H G THOMSETT, RN,

Registrar of Shipping, &c

Į

+

XIX-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1882

CHILDREN

No

DATE CLEARED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP

MASTER'S

NAME

WHITHFR BOUND

TOTAL.

M

M

F

January 4 Zambesi, sti

1,540 British

7

""

Bothwell Castle, str

1,653

LH Moule W S Thomson

Straits Settlements San Francisco

411

23

437

966

63

1,029

25

9

Peshawur, sti

2,240

E J Baker

Straits Settlements

224

224

13

22

22

9

Achilles, str

9

Vladivostock str

1,529 | 678

C Anderson

214

214

""

Russian

PS Voronoff

"J

97

413

=

11

430

"

12

City of Rio de Janeiro, str

3,548 American

J M Cavarly

San Francisco

691

691

13

Gaelic, str

1,713 British

E O Hallett

890

890

""

22

14

Moray, str

1,427

W Tutron

Straits Settlements

505

9

14 Arratoon Apcar, str

1,392

A B Mactavish

530

88

33

90

""

รง

10

18

Suez, str

1,390

W M Dodd

San Francisco

773

***

3

564

14

638

777

>"

11

20

>>

Ulysses, str

1,061

A Thomson

Straits settlements

457

457

27

32

23

Venetia, sti

11

1,728

A B Daniell

170

172

>"

12

13

ގ

25

Volmer, sti

979

Danish

T Heintzelmann

405

49

10

14

27

Antenor, sti

1,645

British

JT Bragg

499

37

+ Q

470

542

15 February 4

Laertes, str

1,391

RF Scale

286

286

"}

90

10

Port Darwin

7

Cooktown

15

16

""

4 Catterthun, sti

1,406

J Miller

Townsville

4

152

Melbourne

17

2222222ARANARA***

"

6 Oceanic, str

2,440

J Metcalfe

27

18

6

Kaisai-1-Hind, str

2. 560

JC Babot

Brisbane Sydney

San FrancisCO

Straits Settlements

8

12

3

1,036

18

1,054

69

69

23

39

19

20

21

23

""

"3

""

6

Hungaria, str

11

Ajax, str

1,460 Austro-Hung G Sturlı

1,525 British

274

53

6

341

29

A Kidd

101

101

11

Aajer Head, str

1,300

A Roper

San Francisco

776

26

808

27

33

14

Japan, str

1 865

TS Gardner

Straits Settlements

62

69

22

22

14

Lennox, str

1,327

D Scott

50

67

""

""

24

15

Devonshule, str

1,513

A Purvis

San Francisco

846

848

22

25

28

Malacca, str

1,044

"J

H T Weighell

Straits Settlements

95

95

26 March

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

AA ARARA

وو

31

>>

A

1 City of Tokio, str

2 Bellerophon, str

2 W J Rotch,

7 Blue Jacket,

7 Cathay, str

8 Daphne, sti

11 Diomed, str

11 Belgic, sti

11 Menmuir, sti

3,448 American 1,397 British

1,884 British

1,396 Austro-Hung G Doncich

1,241 British

J Maury

San Francisco

1,070

1,075

T W Freeman

Struts Settlements

128

128

1,717

1,396

American

G L Bray

Victoria, VI

539

539

F F Percival

438

438

27

""

W M Robbie

Straits Settlements

73

74

412

19

442

22

M HF Jackson

286

286

""

1,716

""

H Davison

San Francisco

840

846

Port Darwin

39

Cooktown

31

1,247

W Ellis

"

Townsville

Brisbane

30

140

54

Sydney

Melbourne

5

35

13 Syren,

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

་་་་༴;ཅུ

14 Sumatra, str

875 1,406

American British

G W Brown

Victoria, V I

325

325

T Fairclough

Straits Settlements

642

52

3

701

15 | Ashington, str

809

E Allason

Bangkok

85

5

90

"}

18 Arratoon Apcar,

sti

1,392

A B Mactavish

Straits Settlements

519

44

7

377

""

18 Moray, str

21 Bangalore, str

1,447 1,310

W Tutton

""

610

19

13

645

>>

C Fraser

129

130

دو

21 Adam M Simpson,

22 Importer,

""

23 Meath, str

1,467 American 1,070 1,337 British

A Call, J1

Victoria, V I

517

517

27

44

23 | Agamemnon, str

1,523

CH Allyne J Johason J Wilding

Fortland, Oregon

395

395

841

17

858

ولا

Straits Settlements

214

214

Port Darwin

17.

1

Cooktown

Townsville

45

""

*

23 Tannadice, str

I 408

+

S G Green

Rockhampton

67

Brisbane

18

Sydney

13

Melbourne

GECOAAR

46

24 Metapedia, str

47

27 Mary Tatham, str

1,454 1,064

22

48

>>

28 Dale, str

645

49

""

28

Gleneagles str

50

""

29

Geelong, str

1,838 1,139

27

51

""

29

Glenelg, str

52

29

29

Gaelic, str

895 1713

29

53

""

30

Wm H Besse,

54

""

30 Ocean, str

1,039 British

57

988886881885

55 April

3 Alden Besse,

22

4 Edwin Reed,

""

4 Glamis Castle, str

""

"

60

""

27

62

دو

63

""

12 Coloma,

64

13 Arabic, str

Deccan, str

6 Vorwærts, str

Escambia, str Altonower, sti

11 Wakefield,

1,027 American

842 American 1,178 1,559 British 2,157

1,817 Austio Hung 1,401 British 1,611

887 American 853 2,788 British

S Fowler

J Gorley

PH Loff

K J Gasson WJ Webber S Nicholson E O Hallett BC Baker

RR Brown

A Noyes

J C Gilmore RJC Tod JB Chapman G Marussig

Pulvis

J Murray W S Crowell

C M Noyes W G Pearne

Victoria, V I Port Darwin Cooktown

Townsville

Brisbane Sydney

San Francisco

904

904

Portland, Oregon

644

644

Bangkok

104

95

Straits Settlements

523

523

739

32

7

779

Portland, Oregon

628

10

638

San Francisco

843

2

845

432

432

16

4

1 3

45

10

Melbourne

6

Portland, Oregon

336

336

390

8

398

""

San Francisco

939

10

949

Straits Settlements

214

1

215

دو

886

15

947

"

J

Victoria, V I

899

899

San Francisco

829

829

Portland, Oregon

298

298

344

وو

344

San Francisco

1,119

13 Ashington, str

66

17

15 Japan, str

809 1,865

E Allason

29

Bangkok

571

T S Gardner

Straits Settlements

805

25

27

67

""

15 Lennox, str

1,327

D Scott

17

""

788

31

ཚེ ཆེཌ།

30

1,149

57

30

864

835

Carried forward,

100,228

Carried forward,

31,915 602

342

87

32,946

I

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—( Continued).

No

DATE Cleared

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN

MASTER'S NAME

WHITHER BOUND

TOTAL

M

F M

F

Brought forward,

100,228

Brought forward, 31,915

602 342 87

32,946

68 April 17 | Strathauly, str

1,236 British

W B Fenwick

San Francisco

831

30

861

69

17 Fritz,

1,494 German

F Laukenan

Portland, Oregon

719

719

""

70

17 Sumatra,

1,073 American

C Rock

Victoria, V I

355

12

367

71

18 Khiva, str

1,419 British

G Scrivener

Straits Settlements

141

141

22

72

دو

19❘ Suez, str

1,390

W M Dodd

Victoria, V I

872

872

73

74

وو

20 Bothwell Castle, str

21 Hannah W Dudley,

1,653

W S Thomson

Portland, Oregon

1,032

20

1,052

23

75

21

25 | Dale, str

1,128 American

645 British

D W Dudley

368

4

372

PH Loff

Bangkok"

50

51

76

"

28 Cyclops, str

77

78

79

May

28 Kashgar, str

28 Charter Oak,

1,403 1,515

C Buttler

Straits Settlements

298

300

27

""

R G Murray

150

150

""

2 | Oceanic, str

964 American 2,440 British

L Gilkey

Victoria, V I

451

J Metcalfe

San Francisco

1,041

12

80

""

2 Killarney, str

1,060

H O'Neill

Straits Settlements

773

19

-22

7

458

1,053

795

"

369

14

Port Darwin

89

Cooktown

42

Townsville

26

81

""

2 Catterthun, str

1,406

J. Miller

""

Rockhampton

16

658

Brisbane

72

Sydney

13

1

Melbourne

14

Adelaide

1

91

97

***** * 8285881885

82

"2

3 Agate,

83

"

4 Avoca, str

626 American 905 British

C W Brown JP Hassall

Victoria, V I

271

10

Straits Settlements

429

84

"

6 Orion, str

85

""

8 Rajanattianuhar, str

1,814 Austro-Hung J Mahorcich

793 British

837

123

75

15

32

17

Q M

281 521

889

,,

W Y Hunter

Bangkok

32

32

86

""

9 Coptic, str

2,789

W H Kidley

San Francisco

979

987

"

87

サラ

""

11 Anerley,

11 Gwalior, str

str

1,256

""

F G Strachan

Portland, Oregon

611

12

San Francisco

724

101

1,629

"

89

12 Jonathan Bourne,

90

""

12 Martha,

29

13

Euphrates, str

1,300

1,473 American

853 British

M de Horne

A Doane

A McPherson

J Mitchell

Straits Settlements

161

162

Victoria, V I

639

12

651

346

12

358

""

597

597

"

92

13

Anjer Head, str

1,300

""

""

13 Vladivostock, sti

94

13

Teucer, str

"

678 Russian 1,824 British

A Roper PS Voronoff

San Francisco

770

7

26

Straits Settlements

413

20

SE

♡ co

806

437

RT Power

200

200

95

18

""

Arratoon Apcar,

str

1,392

A B Mactavish

383

54

13

459

96

18

Moray, str

""

1,427

W Tutton

453

12

12

478

""

18

Canopus, str

1,818

RH Joy

San Francisco

1,010

20

1,030

""

Port Darwin

40

3

Cooktown

11

Townsville

98

25

19 Vortigern, str

876

J Brown

78

""

A

Brisbane Sydney

8

Melbourne

10

99

19 Sumatra, str

100

""

20 Jason, str

1,406 1,412

T Fairthough

Straits Settlements

395

19

418

""

""

R J Brown

121

121

وو

Port Darwin

Cooktown

12

101

22 Crusader, str

647

T Rowin

"

Townsville

Brisbane

Sydney

3

89

41

5

Melbourne

6

102

""

25 City of Tokio, str.

103

"

26 Verona, str

104 June

2 Serapis, str

105

""

2 Belgic, str

106

39

5 | Helios, str

107

"

6 Kate Davenport,

108

""

109

9 Geelong, str

9 Cairnsmuir, str

3,448 American 1,985 British 1,271 1,716

""

""

1,516 Austro-Hung 1,249 | American 1,123 British 1,139

A Tercig

E B Mallett

GL Castle W J Webber

J Maury

San Francisco

1,068

H B Knocker

Straits Settlements

196

S F North

San Francisco

832

26

H Davison

594

35

Straits Settlements

3801 38

22047

1,071

198

858

598

430

Victoria, V I

195

195

San Francisco

712

716

Straits Settlements

G10

72

12

701

""

110

"

10 Bylgia

111

""

12 Devonshire, str

333 German 1,513 British

J A Andersen

Port Elizabeth Cape

152

152

A Pui vis

Portland, Oregon

846

846

112

12 Gaelic, str

27

1,713

E O Hallett

San Francisco

5871

18

605

""

113

13 C T Hook, str

902

W Jarvis

Straits Settlements

385

""

114

29

15 Triumph, str

1.797

W H Gauld

San Francisco

589

>>

115

"

17 Japan, str

1,865

T S Gardner

Straits Settlements

224

38

116

""

17 Lennox, str

1,327

D Scott

236

1585

389

12

606

7

274

254

""

""

117

""

19 Malabar, str

1,263

J Dixon

San Francisco

767

28

795

Straits Settlements

32

Cooktown

41

Townsville

118

"

22 Meath, str.

1,337

J Johnson

111

Brisbane

Sydney

13

Melbourne

14

Port Darwin

36

Cooktown

119

"J

23 Ealing, str

1,345

27.

T W Salmon

Townsville

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

331

101

12

14

120

121

""

122

124

125

7 Sarpedon, str

123 July

24 Bivouac, str

27 Zambesi, str

27 City of Peking, str

4 Arabic, str

5 Aglaja, str

3,448 American 2,788 British

1,374 Austro-Hung B Crillanovich

1,592 British

831

""

1,540

A J Campbell LH Moule G G Berry

Straits Settlements

28

San Francisco

W G Pearne

19

256| 25 1,052 1,182

∞ & &r

CO CO

33 288

1,070

1,182

Straits Settlements

357

37

12

126

11 Avoca, str

127

13 C T Hook, str

905 902

""

J Ward W A Wheler W Jarvis

呼多

389 20 212 243

19 17

2005

408

8

418

238

22

260

Carried forward,

184,994

Carrud forward,

60,849 1,158

765 138 62,910

}

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—( Continued)

පය

209

256

150

205

No

DATE CLEARED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN

MASTER'S

NAME

WHITHER BOUND

TOTAL

M

F M

F

Brought forward,

128 July

15 Moray, str

184,994

1,427 British

W Tutton

Brought forward, 60,849 1,158 765 138 Straits Settlements

178

19

8

62,910 204

48

Port Daiwin

Cooktown

129

""

17 Nelson, str

895

J Thom

Townsville Brisbane Sydney

87

8

Melbourne

10

130

22 Sumatra, str

1,406

T Fanclough

Straits Settlements

190

12

131

24 Picciola, str

874 German

T Nissen

213

34

132

22

26

Ajax, str

1 525 British

A Kidd

150

""

1

183 August 2

Stentor, str

1,304

>

J Kirkpatrick

173

28

""

134

""

2 Catterthun, str

1,406

F Binstead

Brisbane Sydney

12

16

""

Melbourne

13

Straits Settlements

159

34

Port Darwin

44

Cooktown

7

135

Menmuir,

str

1,247

W Ellis

Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

12

1

OD

41

290

Melbourne

136

"

4 Daphne, str

1,510 Austro-Hung G Doncich

Straits Settlements

2

67

187

"}

5 Canton, str

1,095 British

J C Jaques

39

12

""

138

""

14 Bellerophon, str

1,397

T W Freeman

137

""

139

""

14 Arratoon Apcar, str

1,392

A B Mactavish

145

41

"

""

140

""

19

Japan, str.

1,865

T S Gardner

157

47

""

141

19 Lennox, str

1,327

D Scott

119

29

"

""

142

29 Glenelg, str

143 Sept

2 Sunda, str

895 1,029

2

J Speechly

328 461

CO - CT DC41

11

22

S F Cole

102

324

59

140

199

215

161

382

102

12

Port Darwin

56

Thursday Island

1

Townsville

15

144

5 Tannadice, str

1,408

S G Green

Rockhampton

2

146

""

Cooktown

11

Brisbane Sydney

34

15

Melbourne

10

145

29

6 Vorwærts, str

1,817 Austro-Hung F Egger

Straits Settlements

281

74

908

146

""

9 Chi Yuen, str

1,193 Chinese

F Wallace

115

2

118

147

""

13 Devonshire, str

1,513 Butish

A Purvis

219

21

246

148

- *149

"3

150

""

16 Moray, str

16 Paxo, str

22 Canopus, str

1,427

W Tutton

253

27

23

"

1,265

R Clasper

198

43

22

1,818

""

R H Joy

383

431

66 10

1510

292

246

9

436

101

Port Darwin

44

Cooktown

151

15

26 Euxine, str

977

J B Peters

Townsville

159

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

3

9

10

152

"

28 Volmer, str

153 Oct 2 Geelong, str

979 Danish 1,139 British

154

""

3 Aujer Head, str.

1,300

""

T Heintzelmann W J Webber

A Roper

Victoria, V I

228

231

Straits Settlements

287

17

809

14

1 22

98

Mauritius

77

155

"

Killarney,

str

1,060

H O'Neill

Port Darwin Cooktown

Brisbane

11

23

58

22

Sydney

14

Melbourne

7

156

""

5 Madras, str

1,079

W H Bradley

Victoria, V I

138

16

157

""

5 Orion, str

1,814 Austro-Hung J Mahorcich

Straits Settlements

481

26

158

19

14 Lennox, str

1,327 British

159

>>

14 Japan, str

1,865

""

160

"

16 Teucer, str

1,324

D Scott TS Gardner RT Power

3181

27

"

250

72

""

0022

5969

132

11

39

Port Darwin

48

159 520

359

337

132

1

Cooktown

4

161

"

16 Menmuir, str

1,247

W Ellis

,,

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

3

90

11

14

Melbourne

10

162

163

164

165

My S

""

17

Bokhara, str

26

""

Jason, str

1,775 1,412

>>

"

27 Catharina II, str

31 Kashgar, str

810 Russian 1,515 British

H Weighell RJ Brown W Gollett R G Muray

Straits Settlements

177

177

223

223

467

11

485

29

151

151

99

119

5

Port Darwin

4

166

""

31 Meath, str

1,337

J Johnson

Brisbane

5

1

157

">

Sydney

13

Melbourne

8

167

Nov

1 Hector, str

168

""

3 Zambesi, str

1,590 1,540

E Billinge

Straits Settlements

403

L H Moule

192

63

>

"

169

""

6 Glencoe, str

1,901

170

"

7 Pandora, str

E F Park 2,143 Austro-Hung G Sturli

54

28

29

2

436

9

13

277

54

""

419

60

10

495

""

Port Darwin

85

Cooktown

4

Townsville

10

171

35

8 Catterthun, str

1,406 British

J Miller

Rockhampton

3

155

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

38

12

3

Carried forward, 245,569

Carried forward,

69,582 2,075

908

283 72,848

34

*

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-(Continued)

No

DATE CLEARED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN

MASTER'S

NAME

WHITHER BOUND

TOTAL

M F M

F

172 Nov 13

Brought forward, Himalaya, str

245,569

515 British

WR Beedle

Brought forward,

Straits Settlements

69,582 2,075 908 283

72 848

262

9

2

274

-

173

14 Gwalior, str

1,629

M de Horne

81

81

""

"

174

16 Arratoon Apcar, str

1,392

A B Mactavish

172

57

14

""

""

175

16 Moray, str

1,427

W Tutton

190

33

46

251

235

""

""

176

"

20 Patroclus, str

1,650

MR White

160

""

177

21❘ Khiva, str

1,419

P Hariis

137

21

J

""

""

278

15

∞ -

160 165

"1

Port Darwin

6

Cooktown

178

>>

24 Bowen, str

844

R Craig

Townsville

331

""

Brisbane Sydney

12

Melbourne

7

179 180

25 C T Hook, str

902

W Jarvis

22

Victoria, VI

146

1

148

22

""

28 Lombardy, str

1,570

W E Breeze

Straits Settlements

157

157

23

109

25

Port Darwin

20

Cooktown

181

28 | Hungarian, str

984

14

W McD Alison

Brisbane Sydney

169

Melbourne

182 Dec

4 Ferntower, str

700

"

J Kelley

Straits Settlements

301

13

320

183

184

185

Y

186

"

187

RRRRR

""

5 Antenor, str

1,645

J T Biagg

164

164

""

8 Berenice, str

2,001 Austro-Hung P Crillovich

536

82

13

639

""

""

12 Brindisi, str

2,143 British

R W B Haselwood

214

214

"}

14

Japan, str

1,865

FF Flack

292

59

""

"

14 Lennox, str

1,327

D Scott

309

6

78

12

370

321

23

""

Port Darwin

20

Cooktown

3

Townsville

188

15 Tannadice, str

""

1,408

34

S G Green

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

63

383383

13

16

Melbourne

7

189

**

20 Carlos, str

190

22

""

Ajax, str

763 German 1,525 British

P Horn

Straits Settlements

383

22

A

A Kidd

390

19

دو

191

192

""

193

22

194

30

""

26 Sutley, str

28

29 Geelong, str

Coniston, str

2,156

A H Johnson

215

19

""

Baumwall, str

1,261 German

JC Benohr

436

12

ލމ

1,139 British 1,491

W J Webber

114

67

29

TH Evans

227

24

LO

254

409

416

215

454

15

201

259

""

"}

Total Tons,

277,325

Total Passengers,

|75,000| 2,522|

987

355

78,864

To Adelaide, South Australia,

,, Bangkok,

Brisbane, Queensland,

,, Cooktown,

Do,

22

Mauritius,

دو

Melbourne,

99

Port Darwin, South Australia,

""

SUMMARY

Port Elizabeth, Algoa Bay, Cape Colony,

,, Portland, Oregon, USA,

27

">

Rockhampton, Queensland,

San Francisco, USA,

Straits Settlements,

,, Sydney,

,, Thursday Island, Queensland,

Townsville,

Do,

22

">

Victoria, Vancouver's Island,

Total Passengers,

1

319

392

182

77

6227

334

394

184

84

176

176

612

9

621

152

152

7,452

71

7,523

30

30

24,637

30

356

10

25,033

33,209 2,465

478 338

36,490

242

1

243

1

1

130

131

●雪

7,388 19

54

6

7,467

|75,000 2,522| 987

$55 78,864

H. G. THOMSETT, RN,

Emigration Officer, &o

#h

XX-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1882.

No

DATE ARRIVED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME

WHERE FROM

TOTAL.

M

F

M F

1 January 3

Danube, str

561 British

2

3

4.

6

"1

3

Cheang Hock Kian, str

755

Clanchy Webb

Bangkok

88

88

Straits Settlements

222

222

"

11

3

Arratoon Apcar, str

1,392

Mactavish

138

138

"

"2

4

Suez, str

1,390

Dodd

91

91

"}

""

4

Ajax, str

1,524

Kidd

223

"

223

4

Fyen, str

909 Danish

Groves

Bangkok

84

84

7

""

5 Gaelic, str

1,713 British

Hallett

San Francisco

600

600

8

7 Laertes, str

9

10

11

Kaiser-i-Hind, str

27

9 Dale, str

1,391 2,560 645

Scale

Straits Settlements

55

55

19

Babot

161

161

19

Loff

Bangkok

25

25

9

Alden Besse

22

12

"

10

13

14

Decima, str

11 Himalaya, str

16 Oxfordshire, str

842 American

1,151 German

Noyes

Portland, Oregon

335

335

Petersen

Straits Settlements

200

200

514 British

Beedle

89

89

**

998

Jones

97

97

27

""

15

20 Deucalion, str

1,639

"

Purdy

318

318

"

16

>>

21 Jeddah, str

993

""

Freebody

420

420

"

17

">

21 Glenroy, str

1,411

22

18

21 Oceanic, str

2,440

Wallace Metcalfe

85

85

"

San Francisco

617

617

ני

19

""

23 Thibet, str

1,671

""

20

23 Rajanattianuhar, str

793

"

21

24 Carisbrooke, str

960

Cole Hopkins Wharton

Straits Settlements

75

+75

Bangkok

154

154

Straits Settlements

267

270

??

Port Darwin

50

Cooktown

4

223

22

99

25 Hungarian, str

984

Alison

Townsville

14

149

27

Sydney

29

Melbourne

52

Port Darwin

15

Thursday Island

Cooktown

60

23

13

27 Catterthun, str

Townsville

1,406

Miller

216

Rockhampton

17

Brisbane

14

Sydney

88

Melbourne

11

35

36

***** 2 *******

24

27

27 Telemachus, str

1,421

Jones

Straits Settlements

90

90

"J

25

"2

27

Escambia, str

1,401

Purvis

250

250

""

97

26

""

28

Canton, str

1,095

"

Jaques

556

556

"}

27

39

30

Hungaria, str

1,460 Aust -Hung

Sturli

87

87

""

28

""

30

Catharina II., str

810 Russian

Gollert

162

162

17

29

33

30

Anjer Head, str

1,299 British

San Francisco

650

-

Roper

840

Honolulu

190

30

29

31

Danube, str

561

""

Clanchy

Bangkok

65

65

31❘ Feb

2 Sumatra, str

1,406

""

Fairtlough

Straits Settlements

108

108

32

"

2 Diomed, str

1,241

Jackson

331

331

""

33

"

3 Cathay, str

1,884

Robbe

88

88

""

""

34

"

6 Japan, str

1,865

Gardner

223

"

وو

6

1

230

"

6 Lennox, str

1,327

Scott

108

108

""

""

6 City of Tokio, str

3,448 American

Maury

San Francisco

246

246

Cooktown

8

Townsville

37

27

7 Bowen, str

844 British

Darke

Sydney

145

40

Melbourne

89

+38

39

40+

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

50

51

52

53

******#*95**85 * *

*

""

7 Devonshire, str

1,513

Purvis

San Francisco

366

366

""

"}

7 Bellerophon, str

1 396

Freeman

Straits Settlements

212

212

59

8 Fyen, str

""

13 Carnarvonshire, str

909 Danish 1,530 British

Groves

Bangkok

136

136

Patrick

Straits Settlements

150

150

91

16 Euphrates, str

1,299

Mitchell

210

""

""

وو

16 Dale, str

645

Loff

Bangkok

99

Il 00

218

100

""

>

17 Gleniffer, str

1,411

Norman

Straits Settlements

137

137

""

31

20 Geelong, str

1,139

"

""

20 Glenfruin, str

1,936

"

J

22 Stentor, str

29

48

49 March 3 Daphne, str

28 Belgic, str

1,304 1,716

37

Webber Hogg Kirkpatrick

68

68

70

70

264

Davison

San Francisco

196

1,396 Aust -Hung

Doncich

Straits Settlements

31

651

270

201

32

"

4 Moray, str

1,427 British

Tutton

49

49

""

??

4 Arratoon Apcar,

1,392

Mactavish

71

71

Thursday Island

19

4 Menmuir, str

1,247

Ellis

Rockhampton

40

Sydney

38

6 Consolation, str

764

Young

Bangkok

27

27

Port Darwin

38

Cooktown

7

Townsville

54

"

7 Meath, str

1,337

Johnson

96

Brisbane

25

Sydney

Melbourne

13

*** * * * 8285

55

8 Gleneagles,

1,838

Gasson

Straits Settlements

26

56

10 Jeddah, str

993

Dinsdale

442

57

11 Priam,

1,402

11

""

13 Zambesi, str

1,540

Butler Moule

230

""

:

33

27

444

230

33

Cooktown

59

""

13 Tannadice, str

1,408

Green

Townsville

គឆ្កួត ន

"

Sydney

60

"

14 Plainmeller, str

1,196

McKenzie

Straits Settlements

238

1

241

""

San Francisco

61

$

16 Mary Tatham, str

1,064

Gorley

100

Honolulu

149

49

62

""

18

Khiva, str

1 419

Scrivener

Straits Settlements

125

125

63

"1

20

Canton, str

1,095

64

92

21 Patroclus, str

1,650

* * *

Jaques

660

"

660

White

Carried forward

84,670

Carried forward

333 12

12,481 47

345

3

12,531

...

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued)

No

DATE ARRIVED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN

MASTER'S NAME

WHERE FROM

TOTAL

M

F

M

F

Brought forwaı d

84,670

Brought forward

12,481 47

3

12 531

22222282.*

65 March 21 | Arabic, str

66

"

22 Fleurs Castle, str

2 787 British 1,624

Pearne

Straits Settlements

64

64

Thomson

299

9

1

300

67

68

69

22 Meifo str

2

1,338 Chinese

Petersen

229

229

"

22 Gaelic, str

1,712 British

Hallett

San Francisco

59

59

25 Danube, str

561

Jordan

>

Bangkok

31

31

70

>>

27 Glenorchy, str

71

*

76

77

ور

72

73

74

75 April

1 Kashgar, str

1 Massalia, str 3 Lennox, str

29❘ Suez, str

30 Rajanattianuhar, str

1,775 1,390

>>

Quartly

Straits Settlements

102

Dodd

San Francisco

106

793

Hunter

Bangkok

68

122

103

108

70

30 Vorwærts str

1,817 Aust -Hung

Marussig

Straits Settlements

300

300

31 Orestes, str

1,323 British

Webster

247

3

250*-

1 515

Murray

139

139

""

1,262 German

Schultz

109

3

112

"2

1,327 British

Scott

200

200

22

78

3 Japan, str

1,865

Gardner

170 40

79

3 Antonio, str

1,214

Seabourne

141

80

"

3 Cyclops, str

1,403

Butler

299

Hnö

5

2

217

2

143

1

300

2

??

81

4 Consolation, str

764

Young

Bangkok

76

76

82

5 Cheang Hock Kian str

955

Webb

Straits Settlements

350

8

8

366

83

8 Bothwell Castle, str

1,653

Thomson

San Francisco

124

6

130

+

84

8 Ashington, str

809

Allason

Bangkok

96

4

100

85

11 Anchises, str

1,304

Jackson

Straits Settlements

349

29

1

379

>

86

9

13 Carisbrooke, str

87

88

14 Gwalior, str

14 Glenavon str

960 1720

Wharton

68

68

2

De Horne

111

111

1 935

Donaldson

135

39

"

89

17 Lorne str

1035

McKechnie

104

9

90

17 Catharina II,

str

91

17 Teucer, str

92

19 Oceanic str

2 440

810 Russian 1,324 British

Power

Metcalfe

Gollert

185

104

15

GO LO SO LO

8

3

146

5

109

188

San Francisco

180

11

S

93

J

20 Jeddah, str

94

2

20

Galley of Lorne, str

95

21

Dale, str

96

97

11

22

Coptic, str

993 1,380

645

2,789

Dinsdale

Straits Settlements

400!

29

Branthwaite

165

"2

22*

20

20

2

20

121

180

20

20

460

175

Loff

""

Bangkok

51

51

Kidley

Straits settlements

288

288

29

24

Jason, str

98

""

24 Danube, str

1,412 561

Brown

234

240

Jordan

Bangkok

48

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

39

99

24 Catterthun, str

1,406

Miller

Rockhampton

136

Sydney

65

Melbourne

57

Dunedin, N Z

2

100

27 Glencoe, str

101

28 Verona str

2

1,901 1,984

Park

19

Straits Settlements

77

Ashdown

90

"?

19

102

28 Orion, str

1,814 Aust -Hung

Maholcich

215

32

Y

122

103

28

104

May

105

""

106

}

Stirling Castle, str

1 Anjer Head str

1 Rajanattianuhar, str

5 Douglas, str

2,004 British

Marshall

60

1,299

29

Roper

793

Hunter

""

San Francisco Bangkok

87

96

4

$

982

Ashton

Straits Settlements

283

22

107

6 Plainmeller str

1,196

McKenzie

230 10

"

"

108

27

6 Arratoon Apcar, str

1 392

Mactavish

393

70

2

""

109

"

8 Moray, str

1 427

Tutton

210

ado

16

6

2

110

""

8

City of Tokio, sti

3,448 American

Maury

San Francisco

257

111

8 Consolation, str

764 British

""

Young

Bangkok

157

,

112

19

9 Strathleven, str

1 588

Pearson

2

Straits Settlements

501

113

""

10 Hector, str

1 589

"3

Bellinge

297

>

114

""

10 | Ashington, str

115

""

11 Ancona, str

809 1,874

Allason

Bangkok

123

Bwaw

10

3

12

13

~

O

N

Stead

""

Straits Settlements

142

116

?

13 Glenfinlas, str

1 409

Jacobs

47

3

"

117

118

22

15 Feronia, str

15 Cheang Hock Kian, str

1,115 German

956 British

Nagel Webb

30

2

"}

580

11

""

119

"

17 Killarney, str

1,060

O'Neill

328

11

""

120

18 | Lido, str

620

Lewis

وو

Bangkok

52

121

"

19 Lorne, str

1,034

McKechnie

Straits Settlements

108

122

+9

19 Nestor, str

1 458

""

123

22

Dale, str

124

""

25 Belgic str

645 1,717

Nish Loff Davison

170

""

Bangkok

104

1124

**

San Francisco

81

80

90

247

60

87

110

283

265

463

246

257

166

60

300

150

142

50

32

598

328

53

10

119

182

108

81

1

Port Darwin

30

Cooktown

21

125

25 Menmuir, str

1,247

Ellis

Townsville

16

160

"2

Sydney

82

Melbourne

11

126

25 Carisbrooke str

960

"

>>

127

""

25 Brindisi, str

2,142

Wharton Lee

Straits Settlements

176

4

6

186

108

108

>

128

25 Kenmure Castle, str

"

1,236

Barrett

294

6

300

?

""

129

26 Minard Castle, str

1,596

Skinner

47

47

23

*

130

27 Menelaus str

1,519

"

Lapage

138

Q

140

131

30 Helios, str

""

1,516 Aust -Hung

Tercig

156

156

132 June

1 Glenartney, sti

1 399 British

Wallace

70

2

72

133

>>

1 Gaelic, str

1,712

Hallett

San Francisco

90

90

134

"

1 Sury Wongse, str

135

""

2 Jeddah, str

136

"3

3 Ganges, str

1 495

?

513 German

993 British

Rademaker

Dinsdale

Blaik

Bangkok

25

1

26

Straits Settlements

440 11

19

7

477

120

120

137

3 Lennox, str

1 327

Scott

27

138

13

3 Sarpedon, str

1,591

Ward

22

""

200 122

3

15

LO

5

223

122

139

7

3 Achilles, str

1,528

Anderson

57

ลง

59

140

2

5❘ Japan, str

1 865

Gardner

2551

255

""

141

J42

143

Cari ed for nard

8 Vladivostock, str

9 Kaiser-1-Hind, sti

10 Consolation sti

764

194 630

678 Russian

Voronoff

156

160

29

2,400 British

Babot

142

142

"

Young

Bangkok

290

296

Carrud for nard

25,591

438

140

49 26,218

.......

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued).

No

DATE ARRIVED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN

MASTER S NAME

WHERE FROM

TOTAL

M

F M F

Brought forward

194,630

Brought forward 25,591 438 140

49 26,218

144 June

12 Ashington, str

809 British

McDonald

Bangkok

148

150

145

12

Meath, str

1 337

Johnson

San Francisco

192

200

多梦

""

146

12

Antenor, str

1,644

""

>

Bragg

Straits Settlements

244

250

147

13

Cheang Hock Kian, str

956

Webb

366

7

373

17

148

35

14

City of Peking, str

3,448 American

Berry

San Francisco

171

171

Port Darwan

19

149

""

15 Nelson, str

895 British

Thom

Cooktown

Townsville

14

3

83

Brisbane

11

Melbourne

36

150

15 Glenfalloch str

1,418

Burch

Straits Settlements

2201

220

*3

151

20 | Atholl, str

923

Duncan

335

5

348

>>

وو

152

>>

22 Khedive, str

2,123

Tomlin

121

121

21

153

22 Strathmore, sti

1,383

Rowell

280

280

39

"

154

"

22 Laertes, str

1,691

Scale

246

246

1

155

23 Fernwood, str

1,202

Golder

171

171

>>

156

23| Arabic, str

2,788

Peaine

San Francisco

112

10

122

157

23 Lido str

620

Lewis

Bangkok

73

73

3"

158

27 Aglaja, str

1,374 Aust -Hung

Crillanovich

Straits Settlements

125

131

159

28 Posang, str

983 British

Howden

72

3

75

"

160

28 Radnorshire, str

1,201

161

29 Danube, str

561

“រ

162 July

1

Ajax, str

1,524

Davies Jordan Kidd

52

52

""

Bangkok

50

4

54

Straits Settlements

185

185

>>

163

"

5

Oceanic, str

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

141

141

"

164

99

6 Rosetta, str

2,136

Barlow

Straits Settlements

57

57

Y

"

165

21

6 Arratoon Apcar, str

1.392

Mactavish

200

23

,

166

29

7 Moray, str

1 427

Tutton

286

>>

""

167

""

7 Rajanattianuhar, str

793

Hunter

>>

Bangkok

320

168

10 C T Hook, str

902

Jarvis

Straits Settlements

481

""

169

""

11 Glenroy, str

1,411

Geake

85

""

170

11 Stentor, str

1,304

>>

Kirkpatrick

144

"

171

11

13 Yorkshire, str

1,025

"

Lyon

75

>>

172

11

14 Bellerophon, str

1,397

Freeman

152

bow NENO co

3

Q

20

205 306

10

330

50

85

146

83

10

162

>

"

173

15 Coptic, str

2.958

35

Kidley

San Francisco

211

211

174

17 Ashington, str

809

McDonald

>

Bangkok

30

30

175

17 Consolation str

764

J

19

Young

302

176

17 Cheang Hock Kian, str

956

Webb

Straits Settlements

525

209

5

307

10

15

550

""

177

57

21 Norden, str

778 Danish

Rosmussen

86

86

19

178

21 Thibet, str

1,671 British

Thompson

89

89

事事

179

22 Benledi, str

180

>>

24 Glaucus, str

999 1,647

""

""

Ross Jackson

242

co

250

"

145

145

"

181

""

25 Atholl, str

923

Duncan

126

1

00

130

"

Port Darwin

39

Cooktown

63

Townsville

182

وو

25 Catterthun, str

1,406

Binstead

24

Sydney

62

239

Melbourne

59

Dunedin, N Z

11

Adelaide

3

183

39

27 Anerley, str

184

28 Menmuir, str

19

1,256 1,247

""

185

>>

28 Daphne, str

186

31 Telemachus, str

39

1,396 Aust-Hung

1,421 British

Strachan

Ellis

Doncich Jones

San Francisco

337

13

350

Cooktown

14

27

Sydney

13

Straits Settlements

160

160

144

19

187

31

Lord of the Isles, str

}}

1,586

19

Felgate

113

>>

188

31

Danube, str

561

Jordan

Bangkok

146

"

189 August 1 City of Tokio, str

3,448 American

Maury

San Francisco

229

CO

45

150

113

150

234

190

#

1 Agamemnon, str

1,522 British

Wilding

Straits Settlements

40

40

191

"}

1 Merionethshire, str

1 245

Read

39

2

41

19

192

"

2 Shannon, str

2,162

193

"

194

"

4 Japan, str

4 Lennox, str

D

1,358 1,865

Murray Scott

57

57

""

258

12

270

""

39

195

+

5 Glenelg, str

895

Gardner Nicholson

109 11

5

125

""

Portland, Oregon

30

30

"

Port Darwin

28

196

8 Bowen, str

844

""

Craig

Sydney

35

90

Melbourne

27

197

8 Fernwood, str

1,202

Golder

Straits Settlements

248

250

>

198

""

9 Hesperia, str

1,136 German

Petersen

30

30

??

199

$1

9 Altonower, str

1,611 British

Murray

San Francisco

93

93

200

""

11 Geelong, str

1,139

Webber

Straits Settlements

60

60

9

201

""

14 Deucalion, str

1,629

"

Purdy

390

10

202

15 Carisbrooke, str

960

Wharton

557

""

""

203

"1

15 Orestes, str

1,323

Webster

107

""

204

"7

16 Gaelic, str

1,713

Hallett

""

205

""

16 Ashington, str

809

McDonald

San Francisco Bangkok

53

80

99

206

17 Lado, str

620

Lewis

90

">

19

207

39

18 Marlborough str

1,175

}

208

18 Ulysses, str

1,561

14

209

""

19 Cheang Hock Kian, str

956

Kunath Thompson Webb

Straits Settlements

174

191

>

270

OUR LOG

400

5

567

3

110

54

80

1

91

6

10

ลง

2

192

3

200

10

6

4

290

"

Port Darwin

19

Thursday Island

1

Cooktown

2

210

"

19 Vortigern, str

876

Brown

Townsville

13

90

"

Brisbane

26

Sydney Melbourne

23

211

212

213

***

22 Belgic, str

22 Serapis str

22 Stirling Castle, str

Carried forward

1,716

1,271

2,004

291 165

༦ ཝཱ་

>>

Davison North

San Francisco

65

458

12

470

""

Marshall

Straits Settlements

81

9

87955

65

90

27

Carried forward

37,156 683

200

55

38,094

Y

$

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued)

No

DATE ARRIVED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN

MASTER S ΝΑΜΕ

WHERE FROM

TOTAL

M F

M F

Brought for war d

291 165

Brought forward |37,156 683

200

55

38,094

214 August 23 Picciola, str

874 German

Thisen

Straits Settlements

199

3

202

Port Darwin

1

Cooktown

21

215

""

24 Tannadice, str

1,108 British

Green

Townsville

Sydney

86

31

Melbourne

22

Adelaide

216

25 Priam str

1,402

Butler

Straits Settlements

198

99

"2

217

""

25 Kwong Sang, str

989

Norman

51

19

>

218

""

26 Consolation, str

761

"

Young

Bangkok

54

San Francisco

319

219

""

28 Cairnsmuir str

1,123

Castle

?

Honolulu

81

220

28 Glenfruin, str

1,936

27

Hogg

Straits Settlements

63

221

وو

28 Vorwærts, str

1816 Aust -Hung

Agger

185

10

222

J

29 Harter, str

1 196 British

Grandin

66

88888888

22221LOL

200

53

56

403

195

មាន

64

67

"

223

29

City of Peking, str

3 148 American

Berry

San Francisco

218

218

224

31

Danube, str

561 British

Jordan

Bangkok

100

3

109

225 Sept

1

Ganges, str

2,162

Andrews

Straits Settlements

80

80

>

226

1 Canton, str

1,095

Jaques

345

3

348

"

227

2

Moray, str

1,427

Tutton

100

10

110

"

228

4 Loudoun Castle, str

1,616

Kidder

92

92

""

229

6

Paxo, str

>

1,264

12

Clasper

90

90

230

Y

?

8

Diomed, str

1 736

Jackson

128

19

231

""

11

Fei Lung, str

752

Allison

Bangkok

26

San Francisco

390

232

233

07

11

Anjer Head, str

1,299

Roper

Honolulu

44

2 M

2106

132

.30

450

""

12

Arabic, str

2788

Pearne

San Francisco

275

275

>

234

14

Anchises, str

19

1,304

Jackson

Straits Settlements

185

15

200

235

73

15

Gleneagles, str

1,838

236

49

15

Bokhara, str

1775

""

237

">

15 Ashington, str

809

Gasson

Weighell

McDonald

201 12

213

153

153

**

19

Bangkok

50

50

Sydney

15

238

""

16 Crusader, str

647

Rowen

25

Melbourne

10

239

""

18 Malabar, str

1,263

Dixon

San Francisco

516 12

7

2

537

240

""

18 Rajanattianuhar, str

793

Hunter

"

Bangkok

120

7

127

241

18 Camelot, str

1,049

Boor

Straits Settlements

96

100

"

242

"3

18 Cheang Hock Kian, str

956

Webb

480

14

10

2

506

243

"

18 Fernwood, str

1,203

Golder

166

4

170

244

19 Carlos, str

763 German

Harsloop

Bangkok

35

1

37

245

""

246

25

21 Bellona, str

Teucer, str

+

789

Schafer

Straits Settlements

70 11

17

10

108

"7

1,324 British

Power

240

1

246

39

247

25 Sumatra, str.

1,406

Fairtlough

38

2

42

""

Port Darwin

26

Thursday Island

2

Cooktown

16

218

27 Meath, str

1,337

Johnson

Townsville

4

88

""

Brisbane

21

Sydney

6

Melbourne

13

249

19

28

Orion, str

250

""

251

19

252

""

30 Japan, str

253

""

255

256

"" 拳

257

"7

258

""

5 Fidra, str

259

""

6 Jason, str

260

99

6 Chi Yuen, str

261

7 Coptic, str

29 Oceanic, str

30 Consolation, str

30 Oxfordshire str

254 October 2 Kashgar, str

2 Lennox str

2 Carisbrooke, str

3 Carnarvonshire, str

1,814 Aust -Hung 2,440 British

Mahorcich

Straits Settlements

300

20

20

10

350

764 1,865

2

Metcalfe Young

San Francisco

330

330

Bangkok

98

"

998

Gardner Jones

Straits Settlements

105

7∞

7

105

8

10

5

118

150

150

""

1,550

"

Murray

65

65

"

1 364

9

960

1,530

Scott Wharton

Patrick

296

20

316

"

230

2

236

??

29

1

30

2

730

1,411

Cave Brown

169

7

184

7

119

1

120

"

1,193 Chinese 2,789 British

Wallace

484

484

""

Kidley

San Francisoo

113

2

115

Port Darwin

16

Cooktown

31

Townsville

11

262

7 Menmuir, str

1 247

Ellis

Rockhampton

Brisbane

10

14

195

Sydney

65

Dunedin, N Z

16

Melbourne

31

Adelaide

1

263

"

10 Hoihow, str

896

Shaw

Straits Settlemeuts

198

200

""

264

34

12 Glencoe, str

1,901

Park

98

98

""

265

""

13 Hector, str

1,589

""

Billinge

120

120

266

"

14 Lorne, str

1,035

Hunter

209

4

213

>

>>

267

""

16 Gwalior, str

1 628

De Horne

131

131

>>

268

""

16 Menelaus, str

269

>>

16 Fei Lung, str

270

"

19 Ashington, str

271

""

272

""

19 Camelot, str

273

"

19 Massalia, str

274

"

20 | Zambesi, str

19 City of Tokio, str

752 809 3,129 American

1,049 British

1,263 German 1,540 British

Lapage Allison

McDonald

Maury

Boor

Schultz

Moule

1,519

2201

30

250

"

Bangkok

45

45

60

60

San Francisco

252

255

Straits Settlements

66

ลง

2

70

108

111

>>

105

15

120

275

""

20 Rajanattianuhar, str

793

Hunter

Bangkok

69

70

"

276

23 Canton, str

1,095

"}

Jaques

Straits Settlements

435

444

277

25 Antonio, str

1,214

Seabourne

126

2

132

""

77

278

25 Marlborough, str

1,175

279

27 | Gaelic, str

1,712

Kunath Hallett

335

339

""

San Francisco

110

3

113

Carried forward

381,821

Carried for nard.

48,179 977

287

82

49,525

*

1

{

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued)

No

DATE ARRIVED

SHIP'S NAME

TONS

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP

ADULTS

CHILDREN

MASTER S

NAME

WHERE FROM

TOTAL.

M

1

F M

F

Brought forward

381,821

Brought for nard

48 179

977 287 82

49,525

Port Daiwin

10

280 Oct

27 Catterthun, str

1,406 British

Cooktown

25

Miller

78

Townsville

9

Sydney

34

281

""

30 Lombardy, str

282

30 Patroclus, str

1,571 1,650

Bieeze

Straits Settlements

79

79

""

White

332

19

""

283

""

30 Glenfinlas, str

1 409

Jacobs

101

17

284

""

30

Pandora, str

2,143 Anst -Hung

Sturli

200 12

84+2

340

105

212

""

285

31

Consolation, str

764 British

"}

Lindsay

Bangkok

82

84

286

22

31

Danube, str

561

Jordan

45

46

2

287 Nov

1

Atholl, str

923

Duncan

Straits Settlements

231

4

10

240

وو

288

4

Arratoon Apcar, str

1 392

Mactavish

166

20

186

>>

289

4 Moray, str

1,427

Tutton

380

380

290

6 Cheang Hock Kian, str

955

291

7❘ Nestor, str

1,159

Webb Nish

251

4

10

כי

268

120

120

19

292

8 Breconshire, str

1,241

Williams

53

53

Port Darwin

36

293

9 Bowen, str

844

19

Craig

Cooktown

28

114

Sydney

501

294

10 Belgic, str

1,716

Davison

San Francisco

260

260

19

295

11 Gordon Castle, str

1,320

Waring

Straits Settlements

100

100

296

יי

11

Chi Yuen, str

1,193 Chinese

Wallace

548

550

297

13 Brindisi, str

2,143 British

Hazelwood

931

93

>>

298

17 Antenor, str

1,644

""

Bragg

248

299

""

18 Glenavon, str

1,936

Donaldson

215

22

22

250

6

6

249

""

Port Darwin

1

Cooktown

22

Townsville

300

18 Hungarian str

984

Alison

60

ky

Brisbane

Sydney Melbourne

201

301

18

Martha Davis

"

872 American

Benson

Honolulu

139

G

2

రా

302

"}

20

City of Peking, str

3,448

Berry

San Francisco

496

303

و,

304

"22

305

"

306

20

Feronia sti

20 Rajanattianuhai, str

20 Ashington, str

20 Laertes, str

1.391

1,115 German

793 British

Hunter

Bangkok

106

809

McDonald

68

?

"

Scale

Straits Settlements

114

10

""

Nagel

26

""

307

27

22

Lorne, str

1 035 British

Hunter

173

""

308

>>

23

Fei Lung, str

752

Allison

Bangkok

41

309

"

24

Ajax, str

1 524

Kidd

Straits Settlements

127

310

*

24

Canton, str

1,095

311

24

Poo Chi, str

544

Jaques Dunn

428

NON7

27

73

10

59

149

J

312

25

Sutlej, str

2,156

Johnson

117

313

31

28 Galley of Lorne, str

1,380

Pomroy

156

5

19

314

"}

28

Arabic, str

2,788

Pearne

San Francisco

380

147

4.96

106

70

124

28

7

187

3

17

129

440

149

117

161

380

"

Port Darwin

16

Cooktown

27

315

29 Tannadice, str

1,408

Green

Townsville

100

19

Sydney

26

Melbourne

22

316

21

30 Glenlyon, str

1,375

Gedve

Straits Settlements

167

167

317 Dec

2 Berenice, str

2,001 Aust-Hung Chellovich

242

245

>

318

"

4 Lennox, str

1,327 British

319

""

6 Horseguards, str

320

19

7 Japan, str

896 1,865

""

Scott Thompson Flack

220

5

225

309

316

1

77

216 21

241

""

""

321

7 Danube str

561

Newton

""

""

Bangkok

100

103

322

22

9 Minard Castle, str

1,596

Skinner

Straits Settlements

131

136

""

323

""

9 Cheang Hock Kian, str

956

Webb

384

19

2

409

""

1

324

""

9 Mirzapore, sti

2,164

Perrin

122

122

37

325

""

11 Oceanic, str

2,448

Metcalfe

San Francisco

393

393

9

326

"

12 Himalaya, str

514

Beedle

Straits Settlements

35

38

2

327

""

15 Sarpedon, str

328

**

15 Achilles, str

1,592 1,528

Ward

164

168

27

$

Anderson

116

117

19

329

""

18 Coniston, str

1,491

22

330

20 Bellerophon, str

1,397

Evans Freeman

172

175

"

97

97

""

331

*

20 Geelong str

1,139

Webber

81

84

332

99

22 Coptic, str

2,789

Kidley

San Francisco

442

442

333

22 Alden Besse

??

334

22

23 Rajanattianuhar, str

335

"

23 Chi Yuen, str

842 American 793 British 1,198 Chinese

Noyes

Portland, Oregon

222

222

Hunter

Bangkok

192

196

Wallace

Straits Settlements

600

7

613

336

24

Rome str

337

""

26 Ashington, str

2,558 British

809

Cates

245

245

McDonald

Bangkok

109

1

110

Port Darwin

15

Cooktown

29

338

26 Euxine, str

978

Peters

17

Townsville Rockhampton

Brisbane

12

16

155

27

Sydney

5

1

Melbourne

51

339

"

29 Canton, str

1 095

Jaques

Straits Settlements

246

246

340

30 Strathleven, str

1,588

Pearson

192

195

}

341

""

30 Helios, str

1,516 Aust -Hung

Tercig

113

14

127

342

29

31 Stentor, str

1,304 British

Kirkpatrick

66

1

67

2

343

19

31 Glenorchy, str

1,775

"

Quartly

28

30

"

344

29

31 Fei Lung, str

752

Allison

}

Bangkok

145 3

148

TOTAL TONS,

472,459

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

60,262 1,205

341

97

61,905

$

}

t

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victorių, Hongkong,—( Continued).

SUMMARY.

From Adelaide, South Australia,

Bangkok,

"

Brisbane, Queensland,

39

Dunedin, New Zealand,

"

39

Cooktown, Queensland,

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Melbourne,

Port Darwin, South Australia,

Portland, Oregon, USA, Rockhampton, Queensland,

Straits Settlements,

""

""

San Francisco, USA,

Sydney,

""

Townsville, Queensland,

Thursday Island, Queensland,

ADULTS

CHILDREN

VALUE

OF

TOTAL TREASURE

M F M F

BROUGHT

8 4,682

102 34

4,822

147

147

26,722

407

407

260,868

29

29

503

518

534

534

360

360

122,627

587

587

46

46

10,315

41,788

721

ཚ་

94 999 294

7

91

NH

2

10,418

3,726,876

43,172

722

639,771

7

7

128

128

4,254

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

60,262 1,205 341

97

61,905 | $4,781,118 ·

H G. THомSETT, R.N., Emigration Officer, &c.

XXI RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE Magistrate's COURT, during the Year 1882

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF

No OF

NATURE OF Charge

No of CASES

DE- Impri- Impri-

soned FEND-

with ANTS

Hard

Labour of Fine

soned

Forfel-

in

Fined

ture

default

of Pay manded

Sent Repri- back to

Duty

To be dis- charged from

Com-

Dis-

missed

mitted for

Ship

Trial.

11

AMOUNT OF

FINES.

/

Absent from Ship without Leave,

Assault,

13

15 16

Broaching Cargo, &c,

9

do

14

Certificate of discharge Detaining,

Desertion,

Disorderly Conduct,

Drunkenness,

12

22

150 H

4

1

4

ܗ܂

∞112 1N

False particulars Giving (Junk),

Found stowed away,

10

6

2

Harbour Regulations, Breach of,

2

Insubordination,

2

Neglect of Duty,

Refusal of Duty,

Leaving without Clearance (Junk),

Rogue and Vagabond,

Steam Launch, Breach of condition of licence,

Wilfully remaining behind,

2

212

1

82

30

10

1

211

27

18

$28 25

5 00

500

2

15.00

50 00

2

10 00

I

5 00

10

00

6 00

50 00›

500

2

TOTAL,

76

189

52

28

7

39

1

47

2

$189 25

H. G THOMSETT, RN,

Marine Magistrate, &c

t

"

TONS

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

1867

1868

{

XXII-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongl.

BLUE LINE represents Junk Tonnage only.

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Ton.

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire trad

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874

1875

1874.

ntered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1882 inclusive.

ink Tonnage only.

eign Shipping Tonnage only.

presents entire trade in Foreign Ships and Junks.

1875

1876.

3

遭到

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880

1881.

1882.

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600 000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

TONS.

+

{

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 131.

COURT RETURNS

The following Returns connected with the business of the Superior and Subordinate Courts of the Colony, for the year 1882, are published for general information

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 7th April, 1883

Number of Cases

Number of Persons

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, during the Year 1882

CRIMES

Convicted

Acquitted

Death

Death Recorded

Penal Servitude

Hard Labour over one Year Haid Labour one

Year & under

SENTENCE

Solitary Confinement, Number of Persons

Number of Persons Pivately Flogged,

Number of Cases

Number of Pel-

sons

Number of Cases

Number of Per-

DONED

PONED

CHARGES CASES

ABAN

POST-

1

2 Assault and Wounding,

2

1

1

Attempting to Steal,

1

1

1

Attempt at Burglary,

1

Attempting to Bribe a member of the Police Force,

Attempt at Arson,

2

3

Assault being armed with Intent to Steal,

Assault and Ravishing,

3 9

Burglary,

1

1

Being in possession of certain Articles with Intent to Set Fire,

1

2

Felony therein,

1

1

Extortion by a Constable,

1

1

Entering a Dwelling House at Night with Intent to commit a

Embezzlement by a Servant,

Forcibly detaining a Child with intent to deprive parent of its

possession,

3

5

Highway Robbery with Violence,

38

43

Larceny and Previous Convictions,

11

Larceny in a Boat in the Harbour,

5 7

Larceny in a Dwelling House,

3

3

Larceny by a Servant,

10

10

Larceny from the Person,

4 Larceny on the High Seas,

1

1 Larceny of a Letter,

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

8

1

I

2

1

40

1321

24

10 - 40 10 103

1

-

2

1

3

4

2

3

1

Suos

1 Libel,

4 Manslaughter,

2 Murder,

3 Obtaining Goods by False Pretences,

5 Obtaining Goods on a Forged Document,

1

Perjury,

2 Purchasing a Woman for the Purpose of Prostitution,

10 Piracy,

1 Pretending to exercise Enchantment and Sorcery

1 1

H

2

3

2 3

2

3 Receiving Stolen Goods,

3

7 Robbery with Violence,

1

6 Robbery from the Person with Violence,

13 6

19124

1

3

GN

Rape

1 1

2331

2

3 Shooting with Intent to Murder,

3

4 Unlawfully Wounding

43

3

NN

deprive parent of its possession,

1

2 Unlawfully and by fraud taking away a Child with Intent to

1 Unlawfully detaining a Woman in a House against her will,

1

1

1

1

2

1

Unlawfully and by force detaining a Gul for the Purpose of

Prostitution,

1 2

1

Unlawfully Wounding to prevent Arrest,

1

1

1 Uttering Counterfeit Coin

1 Wounding with Intent to do grevious Bodily Haim,

1

1

108 163

124

38 1

49

37 36

9 2

15 21

1

3

Number Tried,

Convicted,

Acquitted,

Recognizance Estreated,

Charges Abandoned, Cases Postponed,

Hongkong, 20th March, 1883

Total

163 Persons

124 38

163

21

3

187

EDW J ACKROYD,

Registrar

REMARKS

t

F

་,

TOTAL

TOTAL NUMBER

NUMBER

OF

CASES

OF

PRISON-

ERS

Convicted

and

Punished

Discharged

Committed

for Trial at

the Supreme

Court

Committed

to Prison, or

pending

Detained Orders

of H E the

Governor

To keep

the

Peace

Ordered to find Security

*

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNIZANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT DURING THE YEAR 1882 CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1882

Testimony

7,567

9,402 | 6,049

M F M

394 1,922

F

M

F M F M F

M

F

M

F

M F. M

F

M F M

255 259 17

36

GQ

28

12 198 87

19

18 1 13

4

80

7

F

8,622 780

1,604

170

102

182

1

41

134

2,234

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

9,402

Y

Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment

1

Distress

Wariants

TOTAL

OFFENCE

THE CASES CONSISTED OF

NO OF

CASES

No OF PRI-

SONERS

OFFENCE

NO OF

No OF

CASES

PRI- SONERS

336

60

Abduction and sale of Women and female Children, Absent from Ship without Leave (see “Seamen") Abusive Language (see “Breach of the Peace") Accessory after the Fact to Felony, (see “Felony ")

before

22

11

33

Accusing of Crime-Conspiracy for, (see "Conspiracy") Aiding and Abetting in Felony, (see "Felony ") Alms-Soliciting (see "Mendicancy ") Animals-Cruelty to,

Army and Navy-Desertion from H M 's, (see “Desertion") Arson,

Artificers and Artizans--Misconduct as, (see “Workmen")

- Assault—At or in connection with riotous Assemblages,

-Accompanied with Damage to Property, -Common,

-Indecent,

52

>

509

747

$

7

7

>>

-On females and boys under 14 years of age,

1

>

2

3

84

97

9

27

""

21

19

-On persons to prevent lawful apprehension, -On Police in the Execution of their Duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

-With intent to rob,

"

to commit an unnatural Offence,

-With wounding,

Attempting to commit Felony, (see “Felony ")

other Offences,

extort by Threats, Menaces, &c, (see

"Threats," &c)

bribe Police Constables (see "Bribery ")

Auctioneer-Unlicensed, (see "Unlicensed ")

Banishment Returning after, (see also

Bankrupt Fraud by,

Begging, (see "Mendicancy ")

Pardon,")

..

Conditional

1

10

Brought forward,

Contagious Diseases' Ordinance-Offences against, Conspiracy to accuse of Crime,

""

to commit Felony,

to defraud,

Constables of Police-Assault, &c, on, (see ‘Assaults")

-Assuming name and designation of,

>

"

37

(see "Police ")

-Attempt to bibe, (see "Bribery") -Misconduct as, (see "Police")

C

1 Contempt of Court,

Coolie Lodging Houses-Unlicensed, (see · Unlicensed,”

&c)

Coroner's Summonses to attend Inquests-Disobedience

of, by Juror, (see "Jurors")

Crackers-Making Bonfires or Firing, (see "Bonfires,"

&c)

Crime-Conspiracy to accuse of, (see "Conspiracy ") Crimes and Offences committed in Chinese Teriitory, (see

"Chinese")

Crown Land-Trespass on, (see "Trespass")

Cruelty to Animals, (see Animals")

3 Cutting and Wounding with intent, &c,

1

1

18

20

Damage to Property, (see "Malicious Injuries") Dangerous and Offensive Trades-Carrying on,

37

Weapons-Found by Night with,

with intent to break into a Dwelling House, (see "Night")

Dangerous and Offensive Weapons-Found by Night)

with, without being the lawfully holder of a Night pass,

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of,

ight}

Deaths and Births-Breach of Ordinance foi, (see

"Births," &c)

Deportation from Canton to the Colony under H M's) Order in Council, 1865, f

Returning from

27

"}

19

Decoying persons into or away from the Colony, Deported Persons-Harbouring,

Desertion from Foreign Ships,

H M's Army and Navy,

Breach of the Peace,

Bestiality, (see "Unnatural Offences")

Bills-Posting, (see "Posting Bills")

Birds-Breach of Ordinance for Preservation of

>>

>>

Japan

Buths and Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of, Boats-Larceny in the Harbour on board (see "Larceny")

1

1

""

""

Shanghai

2

>>

-Exposing Night Soil along the Praya in open, (see

"Nuisances")

""

""

-Obstruction of Wharves by, (see "Obstruction") -Refusing to pay Hire of,

1

2

""

-Unlicensed Plying of, (see “Unlicensed ")

-Breach of Ordinance for Cargo, (see" Cargo Boats")

censed ")

Bodily Injuries-Cutting and wounding and inflicting,

Bonfiles-Firing Crackers or making,

234

Bribery or attempting to bribe Police Constables,

5

British Merchant Seamen-Refusal of Duty by, (see

"Seamen ")

Boarding Houses for Seamen-Unlicensed, (see "Unli-

(see "Cutting," &c)

Buggery, (see "Unnatural Offences")

Buildings Breach of Ordinance for,

Burglary,

Burial of Chinese Corpse elsewhere than in a Cemetery,

Canton--Deportation to this Colony from, (see "Deporta-

tion," &c)

Cargo Boats-Breach of Ordinance for,

Cattle-Bringing into the Colony diseased, (see “Unwhole-

some Provisions")

"2

"

-Turned loose on Public Ways, ---Stealing,

Chans and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for Street,

Chair Coolies-Obstruction of Public Ways by, (see ‘Ob-

struction")

Chair Hire-Refusing to pay Vehicle or, (see “Chairs and

Vehicles")

Chai Mui-Night Noises by playing at the Game called,

(see "Night")

Child Stealing and Unlawful detention of children uuder (

14 years of age,

162

"

British Merchant Ships,

1,241 1,582

39

52

11

11

8

8

""

29

""

""

"

5

6

29

2∞∞

282

29

8

Assisting in the-of Soldiers and Seamen,

Destitutes (see "Vagrants," under "Rogues and Vaga-

bonds," &c)

Diseased Cattle-Bringing into the Colony, (see “Un-

wholesome Provisions")

234 Disorderly Behaviour-Accompanied with Damage to

1

Property,

-Drunkenness, Fighting, &c,

-Wasting Water at Public Hydrants

Disorderly House-Keeping a,

Distilling-Illicit,

13 Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c

298 330

"

--Stealing,

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,

Dredging in the Harbour at Anchorage for Ships of War,

(see "Harbour ")

Driving furiously-(see "Furious driving ")

Drugs-Administering,

744 1,325

1

1

23+

3

44

44

8

11

Breach of Markets

Drunkenness (see 'Disorderly Behaviour") Ducks-Selling in the Streets, (see

Ordinance")

Dust Bins-Neglecting to clean out, (see "Nuisances ")

39

-Raking, (see "Nuisances ")

Dwelling Houses-Found by Night with Dangerous and

"

}

10

18

Chinese Corpse-Burial of, elsewhere than in a Cemetery,

"

(see "Burial")

-not Holders of Night Passes found carrying Dangerous Weapons, (see "Dangerous Weapons") -Offenders found in the Colony after Banish-

"2 ment under Ordinance 9 of 1857 and in Breach of Conditional Pardon under Ordinance, of 1860, (see "Banishment and Conditional Pardon ")

-Passengers' Act 1855, Breach of,

$1

--Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in, Clothes-Hanging to dry over Public Ways, wet, (see

27

'Nuisances")

-Purchasing or Receiving Regimental, (see “Mi-

Coin-Offences relating to,

1

litary Law")

Common Assault, (see "Assault")

Conditional Pardon-Breach of,

Larceny, (see "Larceny ")

Confederating with Pirates, (see "Piracy")

Carved forward,

Offensive Weapons with Intent to break into, (see "Night")

-Found by Night in-with Intent to commit Felony, (see "Night") -Larceny in a, (see “Larceny ")

tr

Earth-Cutting from prohibited Places, (see Trespass

on Crown Land "),

Embezzlement,

Embracely,

Enclosed Places and Gardens-Larceny of Vegetables and

Fruits fiom, (see "Larceny ")

Enchroachment on Crown Land, (see "Trespass ")

Escape of Prisoners from Gaol,

""

""

from Custody of Police,

-Negligently allowing,

Evidence-Giving wilful false, (see "False Charge," &c ) Explosive Substances Breach of Ordinance for Storage of, Extortion, by Colour of Office,

""

by Menaces,

17

22

""

by Threats, (see "Threats")

"

Attempt to extort,

1

1

""

Imprisonment,

""

1,2411,582

False Charge-Pieferring-or giving wilful false evidence,

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by,

Carried forward,

3

3

ON

6

2

62

1

1

1

1

17

17

33

33

2,220 3,159

t

4

OFFENCE

Brought forward,

False Statements-Seamen presenting false Characters and

99

making, (see "Seamen ")

Trade Maiks and Lables-Fraudulently using, (see

"Trade Marks")

Felony-Accessory before the Fact to,

""

NO OF

CASES

NO OF PRI SONERS

2,220 3,159

Q

3

J

1

3 69

8

543

110

110

2

w

3

27

28

Registration of,

after

J

""

-Aiding and Abetting in,

-Conspiracy

6

(see Conspiracy")

رو

-Attempting to commit,

-Found by Night in Dwelling Houses with Intent

to commit, (see Night," &c)

Ferocious Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled, to be at large, (see

"Dogs")

Fighting, (see Disorderly Behaviour ")

Filth and Rubbish-Allowing Accumulation in House, or immediate Vicinity thereof, of, (see 'Nuisances")

Fire Arms-Discharging,

Fish-Selling in the Streets, (see Markets Ordinance,"

Breach of)

Forgery,

Forcible Entry,

Foreign Ships-Desertion from, (see "Desertion")

**

Man-of-War Stragglers from, (see Dasertion") Fowls-Selling in the Street, (see "Markets Ordinance,"

Breach of)

Fraud,

""

-Conspiracy to commit, (see 'Conspiracy")

Fruit and Vegetables in Gardens and enclosed Places—

Larceny of, (see "Larceny ")

Furious Driving,

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,

""

19

- the Streets treated as Obstruction of}

Public Ways,

-Registered Householder permitting, in a House, (see "Householder," &c )

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for,

Gaol-Escape of Prisoners from, (see "Escape")

Gardens and enclosed Places-Laiceny of Vegetables and

Fruits from, (see "Laiceny ").

Geese-Selling in the Streets, (see "Markets Ordinance,"

Breach of)

GnIs-Abduction of, (see “Abduction")

Goods and Money-Obtaining by false Pietences, (see

⚫ False Pretence")

Gunpowder-Breach of Ordinance for Storage of, Harbour and Coast Ordinance-Breach of,

"3

>>

وو

Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of Wai in the, Larceny on board Boat or Ship in the, (see Lar-

ceny ")

Regulations-Breach of,

Thiowing Rubbish on the Beach o into the

(see "Nuisances ")

Hawkers-Calling out in the Sale of their Wares (see

وو

وو

"Street Noises")

-Obstruction of Public Ways by, (see “Obstruc-

tion")

-Unlicensed, (see “Unlicensed ")

Highway Robbery with Arms or with Violence, (see “Rob-

bery")

House-Allowing Filth and Rubbish to accumulate in, or in immediate Vicinity of, (see “Nuisances”)

House Breaking,

Householder, Registered, permitting Gambling in a House,

(see Gambling ")

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance, for

House-Larceny in a, (see 'Laiceny ")

40

40

"

"

-Hanging wet Clothes, &c, to dry over

Public Ways,

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof, -Exposing Night Soil in the Streets in un- covered Buckets and in open Boats along the Praya,

3

2

2

""

-Keeping Pigs without a Licence,

12

"

--Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, andĮ

79

throwing Rubbish, &c, into the Streets,

"3

-Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets,

222

12

79

29

29

LO

5

5

10

2

-Raking Dust Bins,

-

-Thiowing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

the Beach,

61

61

12

12

"

-Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons)

and Property,

2

2

-Ringing Door Bells,

1

-Found by Night in a-with Intent to commit Fe-

lony therein, (see "Night")

"

-Regulations-Breach of,

29

29

Obscene Pictures-Exposing in Public Street,

3

>

-Found by Night with Dangerous and Offensive Weapons with Intent to break into a Dwelling, (see "Night," &c)

Obstruction of Resisting Police, (see "Police ")

11

of Roads and Streets, &c, by Hawkers, 554

Chan Coolies and Shopkeepers,

554

-Unlicensed Coolie Lodging, (see "Unlicensed ")

Seamen's Boarding, (see Unlicensed ') Hydrant-Wasting Water at a public, (see "Disorderly

95

Conduct")

Inciting a Person to commit a Misdemeanor (see' Misde-

Exposure of Person by Bathing" or otherwise,

and Lewdness,

of Wharves by Boat People

211

211

99

of Navigation, .

21

21

Offensive Trades-Carrying on Dangerous and, (see

"Dangerous")

"2

19

>>

3

77

"

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,

the Person,

Wreck,

51

19

-in a Dwelling House,

}

OFFENCE

Brought for nard,

Larceny-Cattle (see "Cattle Stealing ")

-Children, (see "Child Stealing ") -Dogs, (see “Dog Stealing ")

-Common,

No OF CASES

NO OF

PRI-

SONERS

2,539 3,961

8201,015

-of Vetetables and Fruits from Gardens andĮ

enclosed places,

of Beasts of Birds, not the subject of Larceny at Common Law,

Lewdness, (see "Indecent Exposure," &c)

Label,

Lights-Chinese not carrying at night,

Lodging Houses-Unlicensed Coolie, (sce “ Unlicensed ") Mails-Detention of H M's, (see ' Post Office")

Malicious Injury to Property,

Manslaughter,

4 Marine Store Dealers-Breach of Ordinance for,

Markets Ordinance-Breach of,

828 ***

22

43

189 207

43

58

13

15

15

15

CO LO

3

* 10

29

29

7

18

383

383

Mendicancy,

187

187

"1

Men-of-War Anchorage--Dredging at, (see "Harbour") Merchant Seamen-Desertion of, (see Desertion")

-Refusal of Duty by British, (see “Seamen ") Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance-Miscel-

laneous Offences against,

<

11

11

Military Law-Breach of,

15

-Inciting a Person to commit a, Money Changer-Unlicensed, (see "Unlicensed ") Murder,

-Noises, by playing at the Game called "Chai-Mu,"

by Watchmen,

""

Night Passes-being out without, (see "Passes ")

??

-Chinese calving deadly dangerous Wea- pons, not being Holders of, (see “Danger- ous and offensive Weapons")

Night Soil-Exposing in the Streets in

uncovered

Buckets, and in open Boats along the Praya, (see 'Nuisances ")

Nuisances-Allowing Duit and Filth to remain on Pre-

Misdemeanor-Attempting to commit,

""

Piracy with, (see "Piracy ") Navy and Army-Desertion from H M's, (see

sertion")

12

2 Night-being out without Lights at (see "Light")

-Found at, aimed with dangerous and offensive) Weapons, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses,

4

19

-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent to

commit Felony therein,

17

18

2

2

1

91

이성

10

10

5

5

ลง

~

· De-

meanor ")

Indecent Assaults (see Assault")

,,

19

19

Offensive Weapons--Found at Night with Dangerous and -with Intent to break into a Dwel- ling House (see "Night") -Having Possession of,

6

Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation and Sale

61

கக

66

Information-Laying a false,

1

1

ot prepared,

Injury to Property-Malicious, (sce "Malicious Injury,”

Passengers Act of 1855-Breach of Chinese, (see “Chi-

&c)

nese," &c)

Inquests-Jurois disobeying Coroner's Summonses for

Attendance at, (see “Juiors")

Night, (sce "Night")

Insanity,

1

1

22

-Chinese out at Night without,

Japan-Deportation to this Colony from, (see "Deporta-

tion")

Pawning-Illegally,

Jurors-Neglecting to answer Coroner's Summonses toĮ

attend Inquests,

1

1

Kidnapping, (see "Child Stealing," "Abduction and Sale

of Women and Female Children")

Passes-Chinese carrying Arms, not being Holders of

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for,.

Perjury (see also "Preferring false Charge and giving!

wilful false Testimony,")

Pigs-Unlicensed Keeping of, (see "Nuisances," &c) Piracy,

386

386

སྒྱུ ས ༥༠

2

6

Co

Labels and Trade Marks-Fiaudulently using false, (see

"Trade Marks," &c )

دو

وو

Carried forward,

2,539 | 3,961

-Confederating with Pirates,

—with muides,

Carried forward,

5,8217,541

34

}

1

OFFENCE

Brought forward,

Police-Assaulting, obstructing or resisting,

22

""

55

-Assuming Name, Designation, &c, of Constable of, -Escape of Prisoners from Custody of, (see

"Escape," &c)

-Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of,

Police Constables-Bribery, or attempting to bribe, (see

92

"

"Bribery," &c)

-Misconduct as,

Posting Bills on Walls, &c,

Post Office-Breach of Ordinance for,

Poultry-Selling in the Streets, (see "Markets Ordinance

Breach of ")

Praya-Exposing Night Soil in open Boats along the,

(see "Nuisances," &c )

Prepared Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation

and Sale of, (see "Opium ") Preservation of Buds-Breach of Ordinance for, (see

"Birds," &c)

Prisoners-Escape from Custody of Police of, (see “Es-

cape")

>>

"

"

-Escape from Gaol of, (see “Escape")

-Negligently allowing the Escape of, (see "Es-

cape")

-Rescuing from Custody of Police, (see “Police”) Provisions Exposing for Sale, or bringing into the Colo- ny, unwholesome, (see "Unwholesome Pro- visions," &c)

Public Ways-Hanging wet Clothes, &c to dry over, (see

46

'Nuisances," &c)

-Obstruction of, (see "Obstruction")

Quarantine Regulation-Breach of,

Rape,

Receiving Stolen Goods,

Recognizances--Breach of,

Regimental Clothes, &c, purchasing or receiving (see

'Military Law")

Registration of Births and Deaths-Breach of Ordinance

19

for, (see "Births and Deaths")

of Householders and Servants-Breach of

Ordinance for, (see "House")

Religious Celemonies-Chinese carrying on without Au-

thority,

Rendition of Chinese, (see "Chinese")

Au-

Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of Police (see "Police") Resisting Police-Assaulting obstructing, or, (see "Police"

&c)

Riotous Assemblages,

>>

No OF

CASES

No GF

PRI SONERS

5,821 7,541

1

33 2

OFFENCE

Brought forward,

ship or Boat in the Harbour-Larceny on board (see

"Larceny ")

Shooting with intent to do grievous bodily harm,

to murder,

1 Shopkeepers-Obstruction of Roads by, (see “Obstruc-

tion")

"Un-

Shrubs, Trees, &c-Cutting and injuring, (see "Trees")

-Unlawful Possession of, (see

lawful Possession")

3

""

34

mm O

Soldiers-Assisting in the Desertion of, (see "Desertion") -Disposing of Uniform, &c_(see Military Law") Spirituous and fermented Liquors-Breach of Ordinance

for Retail of

Stamp Ordinance-Breach of,

1

Stealing Cattle, (see “Cattle Stealing ")

"

Children, (see "Child Stealing")

Dogs, (see "Dog Stealing")

Stolen Goods-Receiving, (see "Receiving," &c ) Stones and other Missiles-Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property,

Stragglers from Foreign Ships, (see "Desertion ") Streams-Defiling, .

NO OF

CASES

No OF

PRI

SONERS

6,376 8,156

1

1

14

7

1

of }

co

00

26

26

Street Chairs and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for,

(see "Chairs and Vehicles”)

Streets-Obstruction of Roads and, (see "Obstruction") -Gamblers and Watchmen to Gamblers, (see

'Rogues and Vagabonds")

25

-Gambling, treated as Obstruction of Public Ways,

""

(see "Gambling ")

-Noises by Hawkers,

"

Suspicious Characters, (see 'Rogues and Vagabonds")

Threats-Attempting to extort by,

6

6

33

69

"

14

14

2.

1

-Of Violence to the Person,

-With Intent to extort Money,

Trade Marks and Labels-Fraudulently using false, Trees &c-Cutting and destroying,

"

9 Unlicensed-Anctioneer,

146

146

1

1

45

45

-Unlawful Possession of Shrubs, &c, (see Unlawful Possession")

Turf-Cutting from Crown Land without Permit, (sec

'Trespass on Crown Land")

Trespass on Crown Land

200

200

Unmuzzled Ferocious Dogs-Allowing to be at large &c,

(see "Dogs")

Uniform, &c-Solers ansing of, (see "Military Law") Unlawful Possession of Property.

283

324

""

of Trees, Shrubs, &c,

48

49

"

-Coolie Lodging Houses,

**

-Fishing Boats,

2

2

""

-Hawking,

367

367

"

-Money Changer,

1

1

""

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

39

40

5

"

-Seamen's Boarding Houses,

16

Unnatural Offence,

1

1

10

-Assault with Intent to commit an,

247

(see "Assaults")

men to

""

وو

-As Suspicious Characters, -As Vagrants (European and In-Į

dians),

174

174

ing into the Colony,

Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bling-}

7

Vehicles and Chairs-Breach of Ordinance foi, (see

39

39

"Chairs," &c )

Assault at, or in connection with,

(see Assaults," &c)

Roads and Street-Obstinction of, (see " Obstruction," &c)

وو

-Injury to,

Robbery-Assault with intent to commit,(see "Assault,"&c )

"}

""

>

-From the Person,

-From the Person with wounding,

-On the Highways with Arms or with Violence,

+

Rogues and Vagabonds—As Street Gambles and Watch-247

Rubbish and Filth-Allowing Accumulation in House, or

immediate Vicinity thereof, of, (see "Nuisance")

"

---Throwing into the Streets, (see "Nui-

sances")

""

1

-Throwing into the Harbour or on the

Beach, (see "Nuisances")

Sailors-Assisting in the Desertion of, (see Desertion")

Seamen-Harbouring deserted,

"

"

"

-Desertion of Merchant, (see "Desertion") -Making false Statement as to Ships in which they served and presenting false Characters, -Refusal of Duty by British Merchant,

Seamen's Boarding House, Unlicensed, (see "Unlicensed,

&c)

Seamen's Effects Detention of,

Servants-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of House-

holders and, (see "House")

-Misconduct as Domestic, (see Domestic Ser-

vants")

Shanghai-Deportation to this Colony from, (see “De-

13

Watchmen to Gamblers, (see "Rogues and Vagabonds")

"

+9

-Misconduct as Private,

-Night Noises by, (see "Night")

Weapons-Fouud by Night with dangerous and offensive, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses, (see "Night")

Having Possession of offensive,

Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for, Witnesses-Intimidating, (see "Embracery ")

-Ordered to give Security for Appearance,

Wharves-Obstruction by Boat People of, (see “Ob-

struction")

13 Workmen-Intimidating,

"

Wounding-Assault with, (see "Assault”)

3

3

11

-Misconduct as,

£

-Cutting and and inflicting bodily injuries,

(see "Cutting," &c)

-Robbery from the Person with, (see "Rob-

bery")

Wreck-Larceny from, (see Larceny ")

portation," &c)

Carried forward,

6,3768 156

Magistracy, Hongkong, 17th February, 1883

TOTAL,

7,567 | 9,402

HE WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate

4

1

T

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January 1873, to 31st December, 1882, inclusive

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD

Committed to Prison

Ordered to find Security

Years

Total Number of Cases

Convicted and Punished

Committed for Trial at

Discharged

Supreme

or detuned |pending Oiders of

Punished for Prefering

Total

To keep the Peace,

False Charge Undecided

Number

to be of Good

Court

His Excellency

Behaviour, and

or giving

the Governor

to answer any

Charge

False Testimony

of Defendants

1

2

+

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F M F

M

F

1873,

9,137

8,810 1,352

1,798

266

67

10

15

171

1874,

8,079

6,636 1,135

1,651

269

101

2

31

175

1875,

8,055

6,749

890

1,632 281

95

4

190

1876,

9,103

7,315 683

1,744 300

118

11

6

174

1877,

9,283 7,336

572

1,966 864

209

1.5

16

1

192

1878,

9,100 7,166

628

2,126 251

200

18

11

98

1879,

1880,

1881,

1882,

7,009 5,758 361 7,098

5,892 252 8,203 7,049 333 1,678 173 7,567 6,049 394 1,922 255

1,900 189

145

13

18

230

1,775 187

170

27

15

204

192 48

4

369

259

17

36

3

263

100

222272282

377 10 35

50

23

25

14

10

32 18

48 37

15

34

13

ONEBO CH

2

21

7

3

3

322220*888

6

12

19

53

COCO 1

• 4257

10,933 1,673 8,665 1,436 8,718 | 1,217 9,402 | 1,024 972 9,745 9,630 922 8,103 602 8,126 531 9,379 630 8,622 *780

Grand Totals)

for the 10 Years,

Average per

Year,

82,634 68,760 6,600 18 192 2,535

1,556

170

156

10

5

2,066

386

261

60

10

327

31

91,318 9,787

8,263 46,876 06600 1,819 2253 5

155 6

170

15 6

05

206 6

38 6

26 1

60

32 7

31

9,181 8 978 7

Magistracy, Hongkong, 17th February, 1883

J

24 →

CORONER'S INQUESTS, &c

*

TABLE A-Return of all Coroner's Cases, 1882

HE WODEHOUSE,

Folice Magistrate,

Inquest Held

Buried without Inquest

Nationality

Men. Women Boys Girls Total Men. Women Boys Girls.

Very much decom- posed. sex not

Total,

ascertainable

Europeans and Americans,.

my

77

1

Portuguese,

****

.....

1

Chinese,

77

14

7

17

105

51

40 38

:.888

co::

1

1

3

139

Indians and Malays,

1

1

:

Total,

84

14

7

8 113

53

77

40 38

Co

3

141

Total for 1881,......

70

19

10

12

111

37

27

24

2

97

K

VERDICTS,

TABLE B-Return of Inquests, 1882

Europeans and

Chinese

Indian and Malays.

Americans

Total.

Men. Women Men Women Boys | Girls.

Men

Women Boys Girls.

1'

35

4

2

2

44

Accidental Death,

.... ...

Death occurred to the child who was in a sickly state of health and un- likely to live, after a fall occasioned by a push given to the mother of the child, but whether such death was accelerated by the fall or not there is no sufficient evidence to show, Death came to the deceased through

the falling of the floor of house No 150, Queen's Road West, upon him while on the ground floor engaged in extinguishing a fire which was raging in that house, Death from Strangulation, Died from a Gun Shot Wound,

Died from Injuries received during a fight, Died from Injuries received from a fall, Died from Fever brought up by excess-

ive exposure,

Felo de Se, .

Found Dead (cause of death unknown),

Found Drowned,

Manslaughter,

Murder,

Natural Causes,.

....

...

·

Natural Causes in Gaol,

Overdose of Opium, Suicide while Insane,

...

• •

Total,..

1

2

Q1

1

1

1

1

2

Q you Q

1

1

2

1

6

14

:

6

3

CV

1X

1

2

9

12

3

HOLIQ

1

1

2

2

1

10

5

1

7

1

2

2

7

77

14

77

7

1

113

TABLE C-Return of Burials without Inquest, 1882

Euro- Portu-

Chinese

Reason why no Inquest

was held

peans guese

Men Men Men Women Boys | Girls

Very much lecomposed, sex not ascertain- able

Found on Shore Found in Harbour.

Total

Known

Un- known

Known

Un- known

No suspicious circumstances,

and

No evidence or decomposed, State of Į

Body,

Post Mortem satisfactory,

37

28 21

90

21

54

3

12

CO

~

11

14

3

36

1

27

1

7

1

1

8

1

1

3

15

7

4

1

3

Total,

1

1

51

7

40

38

3

141

29

85

5

22

Coroner's Office, Hongkong, 20th February, 1883.

HE WODEHOUSE,

Coroner

/

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.--No. 137.

GARDENS.

The following Report from the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department is published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 14th April, 1883

W. H MARSH,

Colonial Secretary

BOTANIC GARDEN,

i

Y

HONGKONG, April 4th, 1883.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on the work of this department for the year 1882

2. In connection with the usual routine work I may mention that the Garden Staff has made unusual progress in general efficiency The general organisation is rapidly improving and the results of the efforts of the staff have been much more satisfactory than those of former years. This result is in a great measure attributable to the more suitable office accommodation, the clerical assistance, and the improved means of interpretation to the native staff, all of which had been so greatly needed, and which have now enabled the working of the whole establishment to be put on a more methodical footing.

3 A portion of the soil in all the flower beds has been removed and replaced with new soil. This was done in consequence of the plants showing signs of an exhausted food supply, no change or addition of soil having been made for many years. The flower beds, as usual, have been planted twice, and in some instances three times, during the year The plants used during the dry season-October to March, inclusive-are chiefly annuals There is but little difficulty in obtaining plants in sufficient variety for the purpose; but during the other six months, i. e, the hot and wet season, there is some difficulty in keeping the beds attractive in consequence of the rampant growth of the plants and the small selection of those suitable for the climate This is a subject of perplexity in other places besides this, where the climate is similar to ours, but there is hope that the realisation of an efficient summer display of flowering and foliage bedding plants is not far distant, as during the last few years there has been a considerable acceleration of plants adapted to this kind of decorative work.

4 Owing to the exceptionally dry termination of the wet season, and the subsequent dry months, many trees and shrubs ceased flowering much sooner than customary, thus causing a great scarcity of flowers, but we shall probably reap an advantage from this in a greater profusion of blossom by and by in consequence of the better rest which the plants have obtained

5 In accordance with custom, plants in pots and cut flowers have been lent freely for public decorative purposes, the recipients paying the cost of conveyance of the plants from and their return to the Gardens. The supply of cut flowers for sale by the native market gardeners has greatly increased during the last few years, therefore when there is a sufficiency available from those people it would, I think, be reasonable to expect that we should not be asked to furnish cut flowers for private purposes, as has sometimes been done, but that the flowers should remain on the plants in the Gardens to be there enjoyed by visitors.

6. During the six dry months the chief occupation of the staff is in watering, work, which, this season, has been more than usually heavy, and which has prevented some improvements being effected in the Gardens. It is to be hoped that when the Tytam Water Works are complete the demands of the Garden for a liberal supply of water will be taken into favourable consideration.

7. A great saving in the time of the workmen has been effected by the introduction of mowing machines, besides the great improvement achieved in the condition of the lawns Those having tennis and other lawns would find it much more satisfactory to obtain small machines with which their gardeners could keep the grass in order, than to submit to the present method of cutting the grass with scythes, or, in a great many instances, with shears in cases where the gardeners cannot be induced to learn to use a scythe. A little supervision in the management of the machines would keep them in order and they would last many years.

8 Another year has fortunately passed without the visitation of a typhoon, and no other serious misfortune to plant-life, or the order of the Gardens, has occurred to injure them or mar their beauty. There is, however, one serious defect, which I had the honour to allude to in my last Report, that still remains as it was, viz, the Land-slip in the Glenealy Ravine It is to be hoped that steps may be initiated soon to wipe out this sad disfigurement and to again afford the Public the means of access to the New Garden from Robinson Road

1

my

9 It is satisfactory to be able to note that the piece of waste ground alluded to in paragraph 6 of last Report has finally been set apart for garden purposes, and that a small vote was granted last year to commence the laying of it out. The work was begun last December, and will, I hope, be completed during the next dry season, i.e., after the balance of what is required to finish the work shall have been granted during the current year.

10. When we shall have got the New Garden extension grounds sufficiently advanced to remove thither the less interesting portion of nursery stock, I hope that with the present nursery ground we shall be able to make suitable arrangements for the improved cultivation of specimen plants in pots, of decorative, botanical, and economical interest, and that for this end we shall be able to put up the requisite structures, some of a light and inexpensive nature; and, if possible, some of glass to protect tender plants from cold and drying winds. If we could be provided with the means for this, an additional source of utility, pleasure, and interest could be secured.

11. Some special attention has been bestowed on getting together a good collection of the different varieties of Bamboo of China and Japan. I was enabled to add several useful varieties from the West River during my expedition to the Cassia lignea districts. The collection in the Garden now represents twenty-five varieties.

12. The botanical origin of the Star Anise of commerce not having yet been verified beyond the fact that it is a species of Illicium, probably near to the Japanese I. anisatum, a good deal of interest has been excited in the subject, and H. KOPSCH, Esq., Commissioner of Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs at Pakhoi, being situated at the part at which large quantities of Star Anise are received from the interior for export, has taken great interest in the subject, and he has made repeated exertions to procure seeds or plants of the tree. Mr. KOPSCH very kindly sent me seeds on two or three occasions, but they did not germinate. However, Mr. KoPSCH eventually succeeded in obtaining a few very small seedlings which he forwarded to me; they have had the greatest care bestowed on them, and I am glad to say that six are now thriving perfectly, and I hope that ultimately we shall succeed in getting them to flower, and that then the plant can be examined and the species satisfactorily ascertained, if before then we do not succeed in procuring good dried botanical specimens of the plant from the districts where it grows. I hope that I may have the opportunity of visiting the districts to the North-west of Pakhoi, where it grows. The districts could only be reached by a considerable amount of troublesome overland travelling, but I think the journey is practicable. If this journey could sometime be made, the whole question of the botanical origin and cultivation of the Star Anise could probably be settled, as was done with the Cassia lignea by my expedition to the West River last year.

13. The usual Annual Flower Show was held by the Exhibition Society in the Gardens in February. These shows have been held uninterruptedly for ten years, and they have fulfilled the chief purpose for which they were organised, viz., to improve the cultivation and supply for market purposes of the kinds of vegetables usually grown in Europe, as well as Chinese kinds. The cultivation of pot plants in general, except by a few energetic exhibitors, has not made the advance which was anticipated. Several years ago I drew attention to the possibility of much success in fern cultivation which might be achieved by any one desirous of taking it up. The really fine specimens of ferns exhibited at the recent (1883) Show were a fulfillment of what I predicted might be done.

14. I have the great gratification of being able to record a new and important departure in the work of this department, which, now that the Secretary of State has been good enough to sanction the appointment of an Assistant from England, I trust we shall be able to continue with energy. In the month of May last, with the consent of this Government, and with the approval of Lord KIMBERLEY, at the instance of Sir JOSEPH HOOKER, I was permitted to make the first of what is intended to be a series of expeditions in the Chinese Empire, for the purpose of obtaining more knowledge of its little known vegetable productions. I proceeded to the Cassia lignea districts on the West River, for the purpose of clearing up the uncertainty respecting the botanical origin of Cassia Bark, and for the acquirement of information on the collection of the Bark and cultivation of the plant, so that the information which had been so long wanted might be made available for scientific and economic purposes. The full Report on the result of the expedition was published in the Government Gazette on the 26th August, 1882. Dried specimens of the plant were brought back and forwarded to Sir JOSEPH D. HOOKER, at Kew, where they were identified without doubt as Cinnamomum Cassia, Bl. Subsequently, living plants, which I had also brought back with me, were distributed from this Garden to the Botanic Gardens of Kew, Singapore, Calcutta, Ceylon, Mauritius, and Brisbane, and to the Fiji Government. From the Royal Gardens, Kew, the plants will be forwarded to the West Indian Colonial Gardens; and from Mauritius a number were to go forward to Zanzibar. Acknowledgements of the receipt of the plants at most of the above named places have been received, and the reports state that they arrived in good condition, in some instances not a plant having died in transit. The total number of plants distributed was 641. Besides the plants sent away a number have been kept to stock a small experi- mental plantation in this Colony.

Mr. W. T. THISELTON DYER, C.M.G., F.R S., &c., Assistant Director of Kew Gardens, read, in November 16th 1882, at the Meeting of the Linnean Society of London, a Note on the Origin of Cassia ligne in the course of the paper Mr. DYER remarked in reference to my Report:-This

X

>>

"Report has been printed as a Government Notification (No. 339); but as in that form its circulation "will necessarily be very limited, I think the facts deserve the wider circulation which will be afforded "by the Society's Journal In addition to abstracts of the more interesting portions of the Report Mr. DYER added some notes of interesting botanical and historical particulars in reference to Cassia lignea. In the discussion which followed the reading of Mr. DYER'S paper mention was made of two other kinds of Cassia lignea from China, which have appeared in the London market, and on which information is still required. It will be my endeavour to try to procure the desired information. Inquiries have been made on this subject, but they have, however, not yet elicited any more knowledge on the question.

15. There is still some doubt as to where Cinnamomum Cassia exists in a wild state. It may be of some interest to state that in recently looking over the travels of Marco Polo I noticed that he says in reference to the province of Thibet:-" cinnamon and coral occur" (p 137); and again :-"It 'yields ginger, cinnamon, and other spices." Alluding to a river which he calls Brius he says "on "its banks is found abundance of cinnamon” (p. 140). It may be that these districts in Thibet are the home of the cassia in a wild state.

66

16. As much time as could possibly be spared has been bestowed on the herbarium. The re-arrangement of the plants according to the Genera Plantarum has been begun. The West River Expedition was the means of considerably enriching the collection of dried Chinese plants, as every possible opportunity was made use of to procure specimens of what we did not possess My best thanks are due to Dr H. F HANCE F.L.S., for his kind assistance, and the use which he was good enough to allow me to make of his valuable library and herbarium at Whampoa in determining the plants collected on the West River, and also for valuable help in other ways. We are also much indebted to Kew for help in the identification of dried plants. We have still an immense work to do before we possess in the herbarium even the already known plants of China, but as the opportunities and facilities for travelling in the Empire become greater we shall be able to gradually lessen this work, which it is most important should be thoroughly taken in hand by this establishment, as if we wait for specimens to be sent to us by amateur collectors the time when a tolerably complete herbarium might be expected would be far distant. Except what we have, there is no public herbarium in China; therefore as the work of providing one would seem to belong peculiarly to Hongkong, it is most earnestly to be hoped that the work towards its accomplishment may be pushed on with vigour.

17. The exchanges of plants and seeds &c., has been continued. The receipts were 495 plants, 500 packets and bags of seeds, 23 animals, and 7 Wardian cases, in which some of the plants were contained, from 46 contributors.

18. The plants sent out were 2,617, and of seeds 354 boxes, bags, and packets, and 10 Wardian cases, in 99 consignments to 44 recipients.

/19. The following is the list of principal contributors to the Gardens :- Alabaster, H., Bangkok; numerous orchids and

other plants.

Bailey, J., Ningpo; Paicha wood specimens for

museum.

Bailey, Major, Forest School, Dehra Dun.; forest

tree seeds.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide, Dr. Schomburgh, Director; Australian seeds. Jamaica, D. Morris, M. A.,

Director; seeds.

""

""

وو

"

Natal, J. M. Wood, Superin-

tendent; seeds. Singapore, N. Cantley, Super- intendent; 2 Wardian cases plants, &c

Tergeste, Dr. Raimondi To-

minz, Director; seeds. Townsville, W. Anderson,

Superintendent; seeds. Trinidad, H. Prestoe, Super-

intendent; seeds

Royal Botanic Gardens, Ceylon, Dr. H. Trimen,

""

Director; Wardian case plants, seeds, &c. Calcutta, Dr. G. King, Superintendent, valu- able plants.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Sir Joseph D

Hooker, K.C.S.I., C.B., &c., Director; seeds & bulbs.

Bruce, R.E., Kiung-chow; 1 bear. Bruce, R. H., Amoy; 1 cassowary. Brown, H. S., Manila; valuable orchids. Cordes, G. A., R. C. Feih; Formosa plants. Gardner, Captain, S S. Japan; Indian birds. Henry, Rev. B.C., Canton; plants and seeds. Horticultural Gardens, Lucknow H. Ridley,

Superintendent; seeds.

Kopsch, H., Pakhoi; valuable plants and seeds

of Illicium.

Mo Sih Chui, Canton; seeds in quantity of Aleu-

ritis vernicia.

Museum of Natural History, Trieste, Dr. Mar-

chesette, Director; seeds.

Pasedag, C., Amoy; plants and seeds.

Perry, W. Wykeham, R.N.; specimens of North

Chinese plants.

Roberts, J. F., Melbourne; seeds of Australian

trees and shrubs.

Romano, A. G.; seeds.

Sampson, Theo., Canton; plants.

Veitch J. & Sons, London; seeds.

Watters, T, Tamsui; herbarium specimens.

AFFORESTATION

20 The operations of the year were of much greater extent than those of any previous year. The total number of trees planted, that is, including the number of patches of seeds sown in situ-was one million, ninety-six thousand two hundred and thirty Cf this number 266,440 were planted, the remainder-829,790 patches, were of sowings in situ. The total of this year's work is thus 318,316 more than the total of last year's work On account of the great want of rain in the first four months planting was rendered extremely difficult, as, although artificial watering might be resorted to in dry weather to give the trees a start, water on the hills generally is not obtainable at that season. Trees planted in the first two or three months of the year make much better growth for some years than those planted when the season is well advanced, therefore every effort is made to put out as many trees as possible at the very commencement of the year, advantage being taken of the few scattered localities where a drop of water is obtainable for artificial watering It is also advisable for the sake of distributing the work so as to relieve a little the great pressure on the staff, which comes with the rains, of planting so very large a number of trees, to commence early, although the necessary watering is an expensive item in the general costs.

21. As I mentioned in the Report for 1880, par. 20, an attempt was then made to form plantations by sowing the seeds in situ, instead of having the trees reared in nurseries and then transplanted to the hills. Most of the ground selected for this method of afforestation was exceptionally favourable. in quality and aspect, and the result generally was very satisfactory Consequently, the following year I was induced to repeat the experiment on a very much larger scale. By taking in hand so great an area it was impossible, for want of some subordinates on the staff with more education or intelligence than those we now have, to select and plot out patches of land which were the best adapted to sowings in situ, therefore the lands included soils of various qualities, and slopes of many different aspects, although as much care was exercised as possible in general instructions to avoid those places which were plainly unsuited to the work.

22. The extent of in situ sowing last year was a little greater than that of the previous year The sowing commences about the beginning of February and is finished about the end of March or middle of April. The early months of last year which were so unfavourable for planting were equally so for the seeds which were sown As showing the difference in this respect between the season of 1881 and that of 1882 I may state that in the three months of February, March and April-which are those during which seeds are sown-in 1881 rain fell on 30 days, the total being 16 49 inches, while in the corresponding months in 1882 there were only 24 days on which rain fell, and the amount of rain was only 5 23 inches In consequence of this extreme drought during three months while the seeds were in the ground the earth became so hot and dry that a very large proportion of the seeds were scorched and dried up; the earliest sown germinated well after a little rain had moistened the soil, but during the subsequent dry weather a large proportion succumbed for lack of moisture before the heavy rains of May began I have noticed that on aspects sloping to the south seeds in situ generally have but little chance of success, owing to the drying influence of the sun, which has there so much more power than on slopes with other aspects On all steep places the heavy rush of water from the rains carries away the loose soil and the seeds from many patches which are situated where the water collects in little channels.

23 It will thus be seen that seeds and tender seedlings have much more to contend with on the hills, where, after once put out, they are to a great extent out of the reach of further protection, than in nurseries, where, for a year, they can have their requirements attended to and receive protection from the various and manifold influences which threaten their existence The cost of sowing in situ is only about one fifth of that of using nursery trees, and as the losses sustained from the various causes attendant on the system are not more than one third of the whole number, there is reason for pursuing that plan in places which are suitable for its successful accomplishment But the two million patches which have been devoted to in situ sowings having taken up nearly all the suitable land on the northern side of the Island along the whole range from East to West, and much being left for tree planting proper, we should now again limit the in situ work, and increase the nursery tree growing until the lands within moderately easy access from head-quarters are planted.

24. The increasing demands for intelligent supervision and direction of afforestation works being greater than could be supplied by the staff, as it is at present composed, I was driven to seek some way of relief from the pressure, and accordingly arranged the chief part of the nursery work to be carried out by contract, the contractors taking all responsibility, and agreeing to supply for this year's planting 300,000 trees at a fixed rate per thousand The experiment was very successful, and it has been repeated this year for next year's supply. As the consent of the Government to resume land held by squatters on yearly licences, but liable to be resumed at a month's notice if the land should be required for public purposes, could not be obtained, the contractors had to make their own private arrangements with the squatters, a business which occupied a great deal of our time, and which gave an immense lot of trouble both to myself and the contractors I cannot but think that it would be much better for the Government to temporarily resume such lands as may be required each year for nursery purposes as the scenes of operations move on, of course giving due compensation, which would

Y

not amount to very much, to the squatters for the use of land which had been brought into an improved condition There is no ground available for new nurseries but that which is in the possession

of squatters.

25. Through the kind assistance of my friends the Rev. B C HENRY and Mr MOн SIH CHUI of Canton, in procuring seeds from localities on the North and West Rivers, I was enabled to introduce the Chinese Varnish-tree-Aleurites vernicia—and we now have three plantations of this, containing 26,000 healthy seedlings about a foot high Judging of what I saw of this tree, and the situations in which it flourished, when I was up the West River, there seems great promise of its succeeding in Hongkong, and being, when old enough, of considerable economic importance.

26. Of the Mahogany-tree, Swietenia Mahoganı, 322 were planted, and they have made very good progress; a well sheltered ravine, with fairly good soil, having been selected for them. From Reports of the Indian Forest Department I notice that the mahogany trees in India are much subject to the attacks of boring insects, which destroy the ends of the young branches The same thing has occurred here with our older trees, but those planted last year have not shown any signs of attack For the seeds from which these trees were obtained we were indebted to Mr H PRESTOE, the Super- intendent of the Trinidad Botanic Gardens

27 Eucalyptus citriodora, the lemon-scented Gum-tree, planted in 1880, is succeeding fairly well where it was planted amongst pine trees which had attained sufficient height to protect the young gum-trees Of five trees measured the mean height was 18 feet, and the mean circumference at one foot from the ground was 10 inches Of this and other kinds of gum-trees planted experimentally on hills where there were no other trees to nurse them, the trees have failed From this we may learn

that, with the pine as a nurse trce, other exotic trees of certain kinds can be successfully reared

28 From the one small tree of Persea nanmuh, the celebrated Chinese Coffin-wood-tree, which was introduced from Yun-nan, with the kind assistance of Mr WATTERS, in 1880, we propagated 64 by layering; eleven of these were planted out in permanent positions

29. Seeds of the Toon-tree,-Cedrela Toona-were received from the Indian Forest Department, but I regret to say we could not get any of them to germinate. In a Report just to hand from Mr. HORNE, Director of Forests in Mauritius, I see that he likewise could not get any seeds of this tree received from India to grow, and that consequently he has procured seedlings in Ward's cases from India As this is a valuable and quick growing tree I shall try to get a quantity of seedlings introduced.

30. The first revenue derived from tree planting was obtained from thinnings of one of the plantations made in 1875. The plantations having arrived at that condition when thinnings are required, there will be a portion coming in with each succeeding year that should be attended to, and as the plantings were gradually increased in area with each year the number of trees to be felled will also be larger each succeeding year The number of trees felled this year was 1,460, for which we obtained $48, or about 3 cents for each tree The whole cost of planting the trees was three cents each. Those which we felled being the weakly ones, and those which are left being at least half as big again as those taken out, we may calculate the value of the standing trees at about five cents each, which is an increase in value in eight years of about 66 per cent, which, from a financial point of view might be looked upon as a satisfactory investment of Government money, in addition to the advantages of tree planting, which cannot be represented in figures The trees here alluded to are growing on one of the most favourable positions, therefore taking an average of the whole results of tree planting on bad soils and otherwise unfavourable places as well as on those situations where trees grow rapidly, the financial result would probably be brought down to par for the first eight years; however, after that the trees which would be left standing would increase more rapidly in value, and if cut down and sold would render a profitable return for the outlay. Although in Hongkong the money value of tree planting is not the object in view, yet if it can be shown that there is a prospect of a return of the sums laid out in addition to the accomplishment of well wooded hills, the result is all the more satisfactory

The forest guards The

31. The protective work of afforestation has been energetically attended to generally have done what they could to stop tree cutting and grass cutting on prohibited lands measures adopted to confine the grazing of goats to certain localities which have been reserved for that purpose have worked very well on the whole, and considering the number of goats in the colony there has been very little trouble with them The people at Little Hongkong have again been very troublesome in cutting down and damaging trees near the village. These people have always stated that the work was done by boat people arriving in and making raids from Deep Water Bay Recently I noticed in the woods a quantity of fine trees cut half through, and some cut quite down The forest guards were set to watch the place constantly, and eventually a party was seen to come to work with saws and axes When pursued, the people fled to the village, but the guards succeeded in capturing one of the party who was convicted and fined, since then no more tree cutting seems to have been done. Altogether since the appointment of the forest guards tree cutting at Little Hongkong has very greatly decreased Grass-fires during the dry season were unusually numerous, and in several cases they destroyed a large number of young planted trees When the trees have reached the age of four or five years they are beyond the power of grass-fires to destroy them The origin of the fires seems to have

{

been from fire used by worshippers at the cemeteries and at isolated graves, from pedestrians passing along roads and throwing down lighted matches, and from goat-herds. It has been impossible to fix the offence of starting fires on any one. On the approach of the next dry season we should, as a preventitive step, make fire-tracts round the cemeteries and along road sides which are near to plantations, so as to isolate trees from the danger of fires reaching them from the carelessness of passers by &c

These fire-tracts would be made by burning, under careful supervision and control, a track of the dry grass so as to cut off the communication for fire which the grass affords.

32. In 1880 certain lands were prohibited for grass cutting and goat grazing, from which prohibition a great deal of good resulted, but the success has not been perfect, as the grass-cutters, whenever they think they can do it without detection, continue to procure grass from those lands. At the same time these people frequently cut down trees and bushes and leave them to dry, when, if they can get an opportunity, they carry off the dry branches in their bundles of grass.

Without a great, increase in the staff of forest guards it is impossible to entirely stop these offences Besides the opportunities which grass-cutters generally have of cutting trees, they deprive the soil of the grass which should be allowed to decay and accumulate for its enrichment for the nourishment of trees, and also they cut from around the young trees the grass which should be left to give them shelter from winds which are so prevalent and injurious. The conclusion which I have arrived at is that grass cutting should be entirely prohibited on the Island, or that it should be permitted only by licences, to be obtained and periodically renewed on payment of a small fee, from this Department, so that the grass-cutters might be controlled in their work, and be brought in as helps rather than impediments to tree conservancy. As the present Ordinances seem to be inadequate to prevent grass cutting, it might be advisable to frame one which would give the power necessary to bring the people under control

33 Dr. BRANDIS, Inspector General of Forests of India, in response to an application which I made to him, very kindly consented to supply us with copies of the Reports of the Indian Forest Department, and now we regularly receive the various Reports as they are published from time to time. I need hardly say that these Reports are of much interest and use in shewing the various works carried out in forestry in India and British Burma, information which is frequently applicable to c work.

34. The planting operations of the year are shown in the following table :—-

Pinus sinensis,.

202,495

sown in situ (patches),

Curcas jatropha,

790,050

32,397

Aleurites vernicia,.

Quercus bambusaefolia, in situ (patches),.

Rhus succedanea,

Stillingia sebifera,

26,374

.....

17,440

9,000

4,950

Melia Azederach,.

4,350

Casuarina equisitifolia,

3,000

Bischoffia javanica,

1,770

Melia Azederach,.

1,000

Aleurites triloba, in situ (patches),

1,000

Persea sp,

857

Y

Livistonia sinensis,

435

Swietenia Mahogani,.

322

Grevillea robusta,

316

Camellia hongkongensis,

125

Ficus retusa,

63

Cunninghamia sinensis,. Miscellaneous,

40

246

1,096,230

Total,..

I have the honour to be,

Sır,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanic and Afforestation Department.

The Honourable W. H MARSH, C.M G,

Colonial Secretary,

&c,

&c,

&c

Y

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.—No. 153

The following Statement, showing the total Receipts and Payments for 1882, including the Accounts received and paid by the Crown Agents in England, is published for general information, together with a Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for the Years 1881 and 1882

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 28th April, 1883

W H MARSH,

Colonial Secretary

COLONY OF HONGKONG

STATEMENT SHOWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS IN THE YEAR 1882

RECEIPTS

Amount

Estimated

Amount

received in the Colony

Amount received by the Crown

Agents in

England

Total

Receipts

More than I ess than Estimated Estimated

PAYMENTS

Amount

Estimated

Amount paid in the

Colony

Amount

paid by the Crown

Agents in

England

Total

Payments

More than Less than Estimated Estimated

$

0

$

Land Revenue,

148,300

158,416 75

158,416 75 10,116 75

CIVIL DEPARTMENIS

Governor,

$

C

$

'

33,032

24,150 01

9,695 23

33,845 24

813 24

Colonial Secretary,

20,828

21,345 01

2,804 93

24,149 94

3,321 94

Rents, exclusive of Lands,

59,100

64,338 85

64,338 85

5,238 85

Auditor,

21,649

20,625 09

4,400 46

25,025 55

3,376 55

Treasurer,

9,970

9,960 80

9,960 80

9 20

Licences,

250,342

258,521 71

258,521 71

8,179 71

Clerk of Councils,

1,060

1,054 30

1 66

1,055 96

4 04

Surveyor General,

41,332

35,202 41

4,388 49

39,590 90

1,741 10

Taxes,

379,600

399,918 30

399,918 30 20,318 30

Government Gaidens & Plantations, |

6,066

6,032 62

6,032 62

33 38

Postmaster General,

92,632

60,904 25

2,469 56

63,373 81

29,258 19

Postage,

100,000

100,793 94

Fines, Forfeitures and Fees of Court,

10,000

18,194 46

100,793 94

18,194 46

793 94

8,194 46

Registrar General,

21,023

20,439 37

765 63

21,205 00

182 00

Harbour Master,

37,120

35,870 26

848 20

36,718 46

Lighthouses,

7,508

4 504 88

617 44

5,122 32

Government Marine Surveyor,

8,746

8,700 77

8,700 77

401 54

2,385 68

45 23

Fees of Office,

91,480

119,450 77

166 30

119,617 07 28,137 07

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

4,642

4,022 69

671 61

4,697 30

55 30

Judicial Departments,

54,468

50,444 74

3,273 48

53,718 22

749 78

Sale of Government Property,

1,500

228 20

Reimbursements,

28,038

29,514 06

Interest,

20,500

22,039 69

4,024 42

8,742 78

Miscellaneous Receipts,

18,000

24,666 85

228 20

33,538 48 5,500 48

31,282 47 | 10,782 47

24,666 85

1,271 80 Ecclesiastical Department,

5,498

5,500 00

5,500 00

200

Educational

do

1

39,843

38,251 40

827 00

39,078 40

764 60

Medical

do

32,316

34,138 57

3,305 64

37,444 21

5,128 21

Police Magistrates' do

19,693

19,343 51

21 01

19,364 58

328 42

Police,

184,258

160,732 07

25,138 94

185,871 01

1,613 01

Gaol,

47,480

47,562 20

1,502 76

49,061 96

1,584 96

6 666 85

File Brigade,

do,

14,602

13,483 84

3,726 56

17,210 40

2,608 40

Pensions, &c,

25,000

13,580 18

25,182 15

38,762 93

13,762 93

Chantable Allowances,

4,000

2,839 08

44 29

2,532 37

1,117 63

Transport,

4,500

862 94

3,391 94

4,254 88

245 12

Works and Buildings,

104,750

98 969 57

25,055 00

124,024 57

19,274 57

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

47,300

46,771 87

46,774 87

525 13

Lighthouses, (Maintenance),

3,000

2,193 06

2,193 06

806 94

Government Gardens and Plantations,

(Tree Planting, &c ),

14,750

14,031 82

315 85

14,347 67

402 33

Miscellaneous Services,

37,800

56,015 28

6,846 32

62,861 60

25,061 60

Land and Houses Purchased,

2,600 00

2,600 00

2,600 00

Military Expenditure,

106,748

109,372 52

109,372 52

2,621 52

TOTAL Colonial Revenue,

Deposits Available,

Deposits not Available,

Advance Account,

Family Remitt inces,

1,106,860 | 1,196,583 58 189,139 77

14,318 45

7,087 43

23,921 78

12,933 50 1,209,517 08 | 103,928 88 189,139 77

1,271 80

TOTAL Colonial Expenditure, $ 1,051,614

969,507 44 125,297 48 | 1,094,804 92 82,009 23 38,818 31

Deposits Available,

505,259 24

505,259 24

14,318 45

Deposits not Avulable,

16,278 35

16,278 35

432 14

7,519 57

Advance Account,

4,639 98

5 030 59

9,670 57

23,921 78

Family Remittances,

24,234 16

24 234 16

Subsidiary Coins,

Crown Agents,

100,000 00

100,000 00

Subsidiary Coins,

251,705 96

251,705 96

Crown Agents,

4,241 92

153,192 13

95,738 08

100,000 00

14,751 29

167,943 42

Praya Wall a' d Piers,

169 32

169 32

Praya Wall and Piers,

5 512 39

5,512 39

Kowloon Se Will,

50,000 00

Special Fund Account,

165,855 94

50,000 00

165,855 94

Kowloon Sea Wall,

49,340 13

49,340 13

Exchange Account,

2,177 42

2,177 42

Balance, 1st January, 1882,

101,721 17

101,721 17

TOTAL,

1,850,974 86 265,071 60 | 2,116,046 46

TOTAL,

Investment by Crown Agents,

Balance on hand, 31st December, 1882,

1,850,974 86 265,071 60 2,116,046 46

49,607 07

49,607 07

93,396 21

93,396 21

A F. ALVES,

Accountant

Colonial Treasury, Victoria, Hongkong, 21st April, 1883

Y

Examined,

W. H MARSH,

Auditor General

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Treasurer

T

REVENUE.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1881 AND 1882

1881

1882

INCREASE

DECREASE

EXPENDITURE

C

$

C

$

C

1881

$

1882

INCREASE

DECREASE

с

C

LAND REVENUE

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS

Leased Lands,

123,115 59

Lands occupied by Chinese Villagers, Squatters, &c,

2,745 44

not leased,

140,467 25

2,166 50

17,351 66

578 94

Auditor,

Stone Quairies,

13,200 00

15,249 00

Fees on Grant of Leases,

310 00

534 00

2,049 00

224 00

The Governor,

Colonial Secretary,

Treasurer,

33,072 78

22 411 77

33,845 24

772 46

24,149 94

1,738 17

23,626 13

25,025 55

1,399 42

10,017 84

9,960 80

Clerk of Councils,

1,058 78

1,055 96

57 04

2.82

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS,

59,115 17

64,338 85

5,223 68

Surveyor General,

37 499 09

39,590 90

2,091 81

LICENCES

Government Gardens and Plantations,

5,166 06

6,032 62

866 56

Spirit Retailers,

26,538 94

28,270 00

1,731 06

Postmaster General,

75,947 51

63,373 81

12,573 70

Pawnbrokers,

13,650 00

11,550 00

2,100 00

Registrar General,

18,357 16

21,205 00

2,847 84

Auctioneers,

3,000 00

3,300 00

300 00

Haibour Master,

40,513 69

36,718 46

3,795 23

Tenements for Emigrants, .

128 75

125 00

3 75

Lighthouses,

4,831 87

5,122 32

290 45

Emigration Brokers,

2,400 00

2,600 00

200 00

Government Marine Surveyor,

8,700 77

8,700 77

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys,

775 00

700 00

75.00

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

4,539 22

4,697 30

158 08

Opium Monopoly,

187,916 67

209,005 71

21,089 04

Judicial

Departments,

47,958 20

53,718,22

5,760 02

Boarding Houses,

****

192 00

175 00

17.00

Ecclesiastical

do,

5,498 00

5,500 00

2.00

Mariage,

233 00

331 00

98.00

Educational

do,

33,265 18

39,078 40

5,813 22

Chinese Undertakers,

90.00

90 00

Medical

do

34,405 54

37,444 21

3,038 67

Money Changeis,

780 00

895.00

115 00

Police Magistrates' do

19,258 26

19,364 58

106 32

Marine Store Dealers,

1 140 00

1,065 00

75.00

Police

do

183,332 33

183,871 01

2,538 68

>

Spirit Distillers,

310 00

415 00

105 00

Gaol

do

47,298 92

49,064 96

1,766 04

TAXES

Fire Brigade

do,

14,032 98

17,210 40

3,177 42

Stamps,

165 340 91

116,990 59

18 360 32

Pensions, Retired Allowances and Giatuities,

29,260 90

38,762 93

9,502 03

Police, Lighting, Water and Fire Brigade Rates,

221,796 23

252,937 71

31,141 48

Charitable Allowances,

3,970 00

2,882 37

1,087 63

Postage,

98,822 56

100,793 94

Fines of Courts,

10,648 03

7,140 38

Forfeitures of Courts,

710 20

1,309 25

Fees of Courts,

5,539 34

9,744 83

1,971 38

599 05

4,205 49

Transport,

3,407 45

4,254 88

847 43

3,507 65

Works and Buildings,

60,281 00

124,024 57

63,743 57

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

..

40,136 07

46,774 87

6,638 80

Lighthouses, (Maintenance),

2,634 03

2,193 06

440 97

FEES OF OFFICE

Govt Gardens and Plantations, (Tree planting, &c ),

13,959 81

14,347 67

387 86

On Cemetery Burials,

968 25

575 50

302 75

Miscellaneous Services,

57,236,36

62,861 60

5,625 24

Licences for Junks, &c

19,839 50

9

19,966 50

127 00

Land and Houses Purchased,

2,600 00

2,600 00

Registry of Boats,

3,053,68

2,961 17

92 51 Military Expenditure,

108,605 17

109,372 52

767 35

Do

Do

of Cugo Boats and Crew,. of Hawkers,

2,843 53

3,297 16

453 63

3,696 25

3,755 50

59 25

Official Signatures,

Cargo Boat Certificates,

Registration of Householders,

Do

of Servants, &c

Registration of Deeds,

487 00

601 00

114 00

1,813 00

2,203 50

390 50

91.00

"

86 25

475

88.00

372 50

284 50

9,369 62

8 050 06

1,319 56

Shipping Scamen,

6,910 00

9,794 00

2,854 00

Examination of Masters, &c,

2,090 00

1,370 00

720 00

Survey of Steam-ships, &c.

}

7,231 17

9,222 50

1,991 33

Colonial Registers,

45.00

6.00

39 00

Registry Fees, &c, (Merchant Shipping Act),

317 00

463 00

146 00

Registry of Cannages, Chairs, &c,

2,891 90

4,005 60

1,113 70

Registration of Companies,

819 50

627 50

222 00

Medical Fees on Examination of Emigrants,

Registration of Births, &c,

Light Ducs,

}

Licences, &c, for Steam Launches,

18,919 25

35 10

20,755 14

382 50

21,013 25

2,091 00

57 38

22 28

23,371 33

597 50

2,616 19

215 00

Official Administrator and Assignee,

550 93

6,503 07

5,952 14

Registration of Trade Maiks,

141 20

66 80

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

520 00

650 00

130 00

Sale of Government Property,

1,891 17

228 20

74 40

1,662 97

Reimbursements,

29,269 10

33,538 48

4,269 08

Interest,

22,316 22

31,282 47

8,966 25

Miscellaneous Receipts,

24,903 63

21,666 85

236 78

1,120,796 77 | 1,209,517 08

118,202 69

29,482 38

981,582 10|1,094,804 92

131,180 21

17,957 39

Deduct Decrease,.

29,482 38

Nett Increase,

88,720 31

Deduct Decrease,

Nett Increase,

Colonial Treasury, Victoria Hongkong, 21st April, 1883

NOTE -$203,659 20 "Premia on Land Sales," received in 1881, transferred to "Deposits Available Account"

A F. ALVES,

Accountant

Examined

WH MARSH,

Auditor General,

17,957 39

113,222 82

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Treasurer

1

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.--No 154

The following Annual Report from the Postmaster General is published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 28th April, 1883.

No 40

W. H MARSH,

Colonial Secretary

GENERAL POST OFFICE

HONGKONG, April 18th, 1883

I

1882

SIR,-I have the honour to report on the British Postal Service in Hongkong and China during

2 There is not much to record in the way of changes, extensions, or improvements of the larger kind Costa Rica has entered the Postal Union, and the establishment of a British Colony in North Borneo has added one more to the list of places which more or less depend upon Hongkong for the transmission of their correspondence

3 It must not be supposed however that the immense impetus given to Postal reform by the institution of the Union is wholly expended. Improvements, not of course on the striking scale of those effected at first, are still being consolidated and developed. A Postal Congress will probably be held at Lisbon this year, to review the experience of the service since 1878, and to recast the regulations by which all Union offices are now bound. That such a Congress will consider current Postal questions in a wide and liberal spirit is certain. It may be hoped however, on behalf of small administrations like that of Hongkong, that the desire for absolute uniformity which is nearly sure to find place in an assembly of specialists, will not be allowed to add to the somewhat formidable list of burdens, financial and other, already laid upon small offices A multitude of ingenious devices which may be appreciated in Europe, Return Receipts, Post Cards with prepaid reply, &c, &c, fall absolutely dead upon a Colony like this, and their compulsory adoption simply increases working expenses without any commensurate result The same remarks apply to a few rather microscopic regulations as to the compulsory exchange of collections of stamps, the vexatious minimum charge at present fixed for packets of commercial papers, &c Now that Postal work is becoming organised on the same lines all over the world, what is most to be avoided, it seems to the writer, is a spirit of pedantry, the sort of idea apt to get hold of the expert in every profession, that the procedure is everything, the result comparatively nothing.

year

4 The striking extension of the Money Order relations of Hongkong may be pointed out as one consequence of the fresh departure effected in Postal matters A few years ago this Colony exchanged Money-Orders with one country only, exchanges are now carried on with eleven During the under review Money-Order conventions have been concluded with Victoria and Ceylon, and thus, besides the United Kingdom, remittances of small sums can be exchanged with India, Ceylon, all Australia, Tasmania, the Straits Settlements, China, and Japan

5. The Indian Money Order system, which had been just commenced when the last Annual Report of this Department was submitted, has been a great success It is steadily used by Sikh Police, Gun Lascars, Gaol guards, and other Indians for remitting money, sometimes in considerable sums, to their native places The fact that these men are now constantly at the Post Office where unfortunately nobody was able to communicate with them in their own language, has led to the employment of an Indian clerk, not only to act as Interpreter, but also to deal with letters which arrive here addressed in Indian characters only

for

6 The establishment of a Savings Bank, not only for these frugal and thrifty Indians, but also any others of the community who might be disposed to avail themselves of it, is a subject which has been again and again considered in this Department There has always been one obstacle or another in the way It is believed now, however, that the only insuperable difficulties have been overcome, and there is room for hope that before another Annual Report is presented the Bank may have been established.

7. A distributing Agency of this Office has been established at Tientsin, thus effecting an extension of the service long and much needed So long as the British Post Office remains the only really organised Postal administration in China, it is certainly not creditable that the Ministers at the capital should have no Postal facilities nearer than 700 miles An application has been made to the London Office to allow £100 a year for the establishment of a completely equipped Post Office at Tientsin, and £50 a year for an assistant at Amoy, the want of such assistance being at present severely felt It is hoped also that ere long something may be done to organise regular Postal communication with Bangkok Siam at present is a break in the chain of Postal establishments which otherwise would extend round Asią from Aden to Japan

4

8 In stating that the British Post Office is the only really organised Postal administration in China there is no intention to convey any idea that this Office at all claims or even desires a monopoly of Postal work in that country Few things would be regarded by the Hongkong Post Office with more satisfaction than the establishment of a really efficient Chinese Post Office at every port on the Coast Such an office could at present be worked only by the foreign Customs, and the pleasure of co-operating with it, instead of directing our own few and under-manned Agencies, is a thing to look forward to (like the entry of Australia and the Cape into the Postal Union) as extremely desirable rather than at all probable An Official Post Office has been established by the Chinese Government at Canton under the title of Man-pò Kuk It is intended to facilitate the exchanging of correspondence with Chinese Ambassadors, Ministers, Consuls, and other officials stationed abroad It is understood that such correspondence will be transmitted through this Office

9 There is at length every prospect of the appointment of an Assistant to this Office who will be able to give his whole time to it More than four years have now elapsed since the gentleman whose place he will take was temporarily lent to the Supreme Court, and during the whole of that time this Department has been either partly or more generally wholly without Assistant An idea no doubt prevails that, however much strength may be abstracted from the working staff of an Office, it will still continue to drift along somehow, and the application of this theory reached its climax when during the unavoidable absence of the writer, the then Assistant Postmaster General was expected efficiently to manage the Post Office (in itself too much for any one man) and also to keep the accounts of the Supreme Court The natural result has of course been a breakdown It must be recorded with pleasure that the routine of the Office has been kept together, so far as it has been kept together, during the four years alluded to, almost entirely by Mr J G DA ROCHA, Accountant and subsequently Acting Assistant who has done good service under very unfavourable conditions

10 Towards the close of the year it became apparent that there was something radically wrong in the Department somewhere Letters alleged to have contained money were missing, even a Registered Letter had disappeared in a very unaccountable manner Suspicion at first fell on the Chinese staff, but when more Registered Letters disappeared it was evident that a clerk was the thief, and the measures taken resulted in the arrest and conviction of a lad who had been employed, in very misplaced charity, since March last as junior sorter, and who had plundered the Registered Letter case in a wholesale way which any more intelligent person would have known could not but ensure speedy detection It is satisfactory to be able to add that, with the exception of money, of which he got a good deal out of unregistered letters, most of the stolen property has been restored to its owners But even when this offender was disposed of robberies of ordinary letters still went on The want of sufficient superintendence had, in a few months, leavened the whole Office with dishonesty Severe measures have been taken, and will continue to be taken should such evils continue

But an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and is also very much easier Facilis descensus

Such

11 These painful incidents have revealed the fact that very much larger sums in bank notes are sent through the Post in unregistered letters than the Department had suspected It was hoped that reiterated warnings and appeals had induced some measure of consideration and caution as to this matter It appears not to be so, however, and the facts being as they are, the immunity of this office in past years from serious cases of letter-stealing becomes only the more remarkable offences have hitherto been confined to petty thefts by Chinese for the sake of clean stamps when they could get hold of them, and though perhaps such annoying robberies have always gone on a little they have seldom led to complaints. It must be said of the clerks of this office that such a thing as dishonesty amongst them has hitherto been unknown nor could it be believed, till the proof become indisputable, that a clerk was the offender in the late unhappy case

12 It will be said that the Post Office has been for years past advocating the Registry of letters as rendering them perfectly safe, and here is a case in which more than a few of such letters have been stolen Is not this a proof that the public is right in its idea that Registration is merely a pedantic crotchet of Postal Officials, and that an ordinary letter has as a good a chance of reaching its destination as a Registered letter, if not a better?

13 To begin with, the late robberies were quickly detected because the letters stolen were Registered, and not only so, but also the Registration system enabled the Department to forward much of the stolen property to its owners But also there are some evils for which no remedy exists except the selection of proper persons to fill places of trust The clerk now in prison was one of those whose duty it is to watch over Registered Letters, to apply the various checks necessary to ensure their safe transit, and to prevent their being stolen When the policeman himself turns thief owners of property are apt to suffer for a while, and there is no remedy but to get a better policeman

14 With regard to the transmission of Bank Notes, &c, in unregistered letters this Department has adopted a line to which it is intended to adhere, namely, to make no enquiries whatever about the alleged losses of such letters. Such enquiries are, in any case, a farce, the enaction of which simply encourages the sending of this most objectionable kind of correspondence When once a system of

robbery fairly gets established in a Post Office it is almost impossible to stop it, except by checking the transmission of the articles stolen All other means of inducing the public not to send money in unregistered covers having failed, it may possibly be found that to turn a resolutely deaf ear to complaints of its loss will have the desired effect

I

2

15 In order to bring Registration as near as possible to residents at the Coast Ports, where the Postal facilities, though the best this office can give, are not quite all that could be desired, a system has been devised which perhaps this mention may bring into more extended notice. Many firms on the Coast and elsewhere are in the habit of sending parcels of correspondence direct to this Office Sometimes they enclose letters marked To be Registered, but it is found that this direction generally escapes observation

It has therefore been arranged that such letters may be enclosed in a red cover,

directed as follows:-

LETTER FOR REGISTRATION IN HONGKONG

Please return the receipt to-

As there is no address on the red cover it cannot possibly be sent on beyond Hongkong, and its conspicuous colour calls attention to it the moment it is turned out of the parcel, ensuring its being at once put aside for attention. The contents, however, are not regarded as Registered till a receipt is actually issued.

16 Some letters would be more safely transmitted if the senders could be got to bear in mind that whoever presents a letter for Registration must ask for a receipt It is of no use to write this or that on the letter itself, on a separate piece of paper, or in a Chit-book, there is no security that the officer who takes in the letter will have tune to read anything of the sort. What frequently happens is this. An ignorant coolie is sent with the correspondence, and he gives it up without a remark of any kind

About an hour afterwards he reappears and asks for a receipt As he has not the slightest idea of the address, and as there probably would not be time to find the letter if he had the general result is that it does not get registered at all

17 A great deal of extra and needless trouble would be saved to this Office if non-mercantile residents here would only keep stamps at home as they would elsewhere Why it should be the fashion in Hongkong to buy stamps one at a time, and that invariably just when the mail is going, it is difficult to say And the persons who do this seem to think that the Post Office is responsible for seeing that their servants put on the correct postage, post the letter, and bring back correct change' This opportunity may be taken of explaining that the Post Office has nothing to do, and will have nothing to do with affixing stamps to letters That is the sender's duty, and there are boxes into which he can drop the letters when he has stamped them properly If he chooses to delegate this to an ignorant servant, who perhaps never even saw a postage stamp before, that is his own affair

18. The length of time required for sorting the inward French Mail still continues to occupy attention. Everything that possibly can be done to shorten the process is done but in spite of this, the time taken in sorting has again crept up to two hours, if not a little more The reason is not only that the bulk of the mail has been steadily increasing for some years,* but also, and perhaps more especially, that it becomes more and more difficult to get any time for sorting free from departures of steamers for other places

It

19 When the French Mail arrives on a fairly clear day, and the staff of this office have two hours before them during which no steamer is leaving for any other port, it is possible to confine attention to the Hongkong correspondence only, and then the mail might easily be sorted in an hour and a half † But if only one steamer is leaving, say for Swatow, the whole correspondence for all China and Japan has to be gone over to pick out the mail for that port, officers have to be detached to make up that mail, and it not unfrequently happens that scarcely anyone is left to push on the Hongkong work There is now a steamer for Canton every evening, Sundays included, and that alone often necessitates the sorting of the whole mail for China before the correspondence for Hongkong can be delivered. is unfortunate also that the French Mail generally arrives within twenty-four hours of the departure of the return packet for Europe, so that all the time sorting is going on a constant stream of applicants for Money Orders, Stamps, Registry, information, &c, has to be dealt with It would be difficult to exaggerate the bewildering pressure under which work is done on such occasions.

It would be very desirable if persons who have any little favour to ask of the Post Office, in the way of interception of letters, &c, would bear in mind that they might just as well ask it some days beforehand as leave it to the last moment Unfortunately that seems seldom to occur to anybody, and the mail gun is the signal for a flood of notes and verbal requests to be let loose on this Office just when there is least time to pay attention to anything

20 Another impediment is the masses of Prices Current, Trade Circulars, &c, sent out here by firms which advertise largely, such circulars being evidently got up from very old Directories, as most of the persons addressed are either absent or dead. There is very little pleasure in dealing with this class of correspondence, as it may reasonably be doubted whether addressees who do receive the papers in question ever look at them. It is intended in future to let these articles stand over until there is time to distribute them

21 What has been done during the year to expedite the delivery of the mail is this Arrangements have been made, thanks to the courtesy of the Messageries Maritimes Company, for the mail to be disembarked off Green Island, instead of at the steamer's buoy, thereby saving nearly an hour. This however is practicable only in fine weather. The improved system of sorting mentioned in the last

* The outward French mail used to consist of 15 or 16 bags, it now consists of 80

† On Sunday evening April 8th, 1883, the French and Australian Mail and a mail from Manila were sorted in an hour and twenty minutes

For this improvement the community is indebted to Mr BAREF late Assistant Postmaster General

Report has been and is being developed, but it requires, to be fully carried out, a comparatively inexpensive enlargement of the office, for which, as the Public Works Department is somewhat heavily taxed at present, it has not been thought advisable to press A third measure has been the leaving over of all insufficiently paid correspondence to be dealt with after the general delivery of the mail, instead of preparing it to go out with that delivery. This may sometimes cause an unpaid letter to be forwarded to the Coast by a later steamer than that which carries the paid mail-an extra penalty on non-prepayment One basketful of unpaid letters takes just as long to deal with as do the eighty odd sacks of which the mail is composed. If persons will not prepay their letters, they are not entitled to any sympathy when delay ensues in consequence

22 The local delivery of the Hongkong Office is not, and never has been one of its strong points. Without a largely increased staff it never can be, and for such an augmented staff there is not sufficient local work to pay

The work of the Office has to be arranged entirely according to the arrivals of steamers, it is therefore impossible to imitate the town deliveries of inland cities, where the postmen proceed to their various districts three, four, or even ten times a day with unbroken regularity. Measures however have been taken to improve our local delivery as much as possible, and it is now more used for the distribution of invitations, notices, and similar documents than it has ever been before

23 Complaints are not infrequently received that correspondence for private houses is delivered at places of business This does not arise, as is often assumed, from the idleness of the postmen, but is the invariable rule of the Office, and is also the rule which on the whole is most convenient to all persons concerned

Considering how widely scattered private residences are, some at Kowloon, some at the Peak, &c, it is difficult to see how, with our present staff, business letters would ever get delivered at all were the postmen continually taken off their work to carry single letters these long distances. The rule adopted therefore is delivery at the nearest place of business The only exception is in the case of large numbers of invitations, &c, when a special request is made for delivery at private houses, and even then such a request can only be carried out in subordination to the mail work which is the essential duty of the Office. Of course all this is written in the Postal Guide, but the difficulty with Postal Guides, or indeed with Postal Notices of any kind, is to get people to read them

24 After being unsettled for some time, the departures and arrivals of the Contract Mails for and from Europe have been arranged for days and hours which, taking the year all round, are perhaps as convenient as it is practicable to make them. The mails three times reached London and once reached Hongkong in 32 days, in each instance by French packet. The quickest British packet passage has been 33 days, twice, outward. Taking the whole year, however, and the passages in both directions, the British Packets show an average of 364 days against 36, the average French mail

The following are the averages for the year,

passage

British Packets, Outward, French Packets, Homeward, French Packets, Outward, British Packets, Homeward,

35 days. 36

37 #7 371

19

I have the honour to be,

Sır,

Your most obedient Servant

The Honourable W H MARSH, C M G

1

&r,

Colonial Secretary

&c,

&c

APPENDIX.

r

A LISTER, Postmaster Generat

(A)-COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE 1881 & 1882

1882

1881.

Imperial Share,

$19,894 49

$31,344 88

Decrease,

$11,450 39f

Conveyance of Mails and contribu-

tion towards P & O Subsidy,

$10,031 05

$11,588 78

Decrease,

$ 1,557 73

Expenditure,*

$31,317 85

$31,901 92

Decrease,

Balance,

$43,438 55†

$27,874 98

Increase,

$

584 07 $15,563.57†

Gross Revenue,

* Crown Agents' account not included

....$104,681 94

$102,710 56

Increase,

·

$ 1,971 38

† Thcsc large differences are caused by an outstanding debt of about $13,000 to the London Office

&

(B)-MONEY ORDER BUSINESS

No of Orders

Colonial Total

In Sterling

Hongkong on London,

Shanghai

Hongkong or Shanghai on Queensland,

""

"2

>>

on New South Wales, on South Australia, on Western Australia,

...

• ...

Total Outward Orders in Sterling,

London on Hongkong,

""

on Shanghai,

Queensland on Hongkong or Shanghai,

New South Wales on

22

Amount

Com-

Com-

mission

mission

£ s d

$

1,618

6,813 6 7

322 88

968

3,526 010

180 81

....

8

20 6 6

1 60

26

168 11 8

14 20

6

37 15 0

340

2,626

10,566 0 7

522 89

522 89

111

288 2 8

15 44

47

162 14 1

.....

171

1,102 4 0

8 13 59.00

385

2 595 16 6

126 93

South Australia on

42

350 2 6

16 52

Western Australia on

دو

وو

1

6 7 0

0 34

Total Inward Orders in Sterling,

757

4,505 6 9

226 36

226 36

In Dollars

$

Hongkong on Shanghai,

on Japan,

""

or Shanghai on Straits Settlements,

R22

73

1,271 98

25 60

71

1,335 15

20 20

75

1,735 12

13 80

Total Outward Orders in Dollars, .

219

4,342 25

59 60

59 60

Shanghai on Hongkong,

99

1,895 59

39 60

Japan on

51

575 23

""

Straits Settlements on Hongkong,

100

1,638 86

Total Inward Orders in Dollars,

250

4,109 68

3o 60

39 60

In Rupees

Rs

a

Hongkong or Shanghai on India,

153

12,329 3

74 61

7461

India on Hongkong or Shanghai, .

25

1,182 2

247

247

TOTAL COMMISSION,

$

925 53

(C)—APPROXIMATE STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1882

Supplied to the International Bureau of the Postal Union, Berne

INTERNATIONAL

LOCAL

COMPARISON WITH 1881

DESCRIPTIO OF CORRESPONDENCE

TOTAL

De- spatched

Received

De- spatched

Received

Total in 1881

Increase

Decrease

Te

Ordine

} 25

Lines Pustu Busines

Post C 102

W

na 11 ette.s,

n paid Acles

436,750

10,000

1,200 8,020

466 000 13,000 800 1 700

62 600 2,200

1,200

1,000

61,200 1,029 550 16,400 1,400 1,700

41,600

4,600

12,420

859 300 34,500 4,330 11 600

170 250

7 100

270

820

Nesp216 v

158 000

Books Cicla's, Ines Canent, &c,

124,000

200 362 000 125,000

49,300 16 800

Patterns

5,200

12,000

520

19 100 12,300 100

588,700

278,100

508 400 243 100

80 300

35 000

17,820

7 400

Comm rcial Papers,

600

130

730

Registered Articles,

14,500

16 000

2,400

1,330

34 230

290 32 800

10,420 440

1 430

Letters with value declared

Registered Articles with Return Receipt,

130

650

650

130

1 560

780

780

Parcels,

300

100

400

300

100

Do Number of Money Orders, Amount of

with value declared,

2,626

757

372

275

4 030

3483

547

Do,

fi 264,150 fi 112,625 fi 52,535 fr 23 505 | fr 452,815 fi 395 613 fi 57,202

(D)-SALE OF POSTAGE STAMPS

1882

1881

DENOMINA-

INCREASE

DECREASE

TION

Number

Amount

Number

Amount

Number

Amount

Number

Amount

CA

$ c

с

1 Cent (Cards).

6,039

60 39

6,876

68 76

837

8,37

2 Cents

407,475

8,149 50

404,566

8,091 32

2,909

58 18

3

(Cards)

2,245

67 35

2,585

77 55

340

10 20

4

39,954

1,598 16

33,760

1,350 40

6,194

247 76

5

221,592

11,079 60

212,706

10,635 30

8,886

444 30

10

456,647

45,664 70

445,347

44,534 70

11,300

1,130 00

30

34,598

10,379 40

32,452

9,735 60

2,146

643 80

48

وو

6,790

3,259 20

7,034

3,376 32

244

117 12

96

4,342

4,168 32

5,004

4,803 84

662

635 52

2 Dollars

1,321

2,642 00

1,182

2,364 00

139

278 00

3

693

2,079 00

634

1,902 00

59

177 00

Other values

876

876

Total,.

89,147 62

86 948 55

2,979 04

779 97

Deduct Decrease,

779 97

Total Increase,.....

$2,199 07

1

!

*

}

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.—No. 255.

The following Annual Report of the Colonial Surgeon, with Returns annexed, for the Year 1882, is published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 21st July, 1883.

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 21st May, 1883.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for 1882, together with the Tables shewing the work done in the different Establishments under my supervision and charge; also reports from the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital and the Government Analyst of the work done by them.

POLICE.

2ere has been a considerable increase in the number of admissions to Hospital from the Force this yet as compared with last, the number being 549 as compared with 498 in 1881

3. The last five years compare unfavourably with the previous four years, all of them being much in excess, though the numerical strength of the Force appears to have decreased to a considerable extent. In 1874 the average strength of the Force was 648, and the admissions to Hospital 346; this year the average strength is 588, and the admissions to Hospital 549.

4. There were eight deaths in the Force this year, three only of these occurred in Hospital, two Indians and one Chinaman. Police Constable ANDERSON was killed while on duty at a fire Four Lokangs died while absent from duty or on leave.

5. Table I shews the number of admissions from the Police to the Hospital for each month of the year. Table II shews the average strength of the Force, and the percentage of sickness and deaths in it.

6 These tables show only the number of sick admitted to Hospital. Inspectors, married men, and those living out of Barracks are in many cases attended by myself in their quarters, and if necessary remain off duty under medical certificate, so that the real amount of sickness amongst the Police is somewhat more than is shown by these tables, and is difficult to estimate.

7. Admission to Hospital does not imply serious sickness, as many cases are only detained a day or two, and would not be so detained but that it is inconvenient for men messing in Barracks to obtain other dietary than that supplied by the mess, nor could they be depended upon to obey the directions given them in this respect. Therefore it is better for them and for the service that they should remain in Hospital for a few days than that they should run the risk of turning a trifling complaint into a severe I am often obliged to send married men in for these reasons, oftener because their quarters are in such an unwholesome atmosphere as to render their chances of a speedy recovery very small.

one.

8. Table III shews the Police admissions to Hospital from the different Districts and Stations. Some of the Police Stations are of the worst possible description as regards construction and location, notably Nos. 3, 4, 7, 8 Nos 3 and 7 have no excuse, as they have plenty of ground and are in good positions, but Nos 4 and 8 are as badly constructed as they well can be, and their situation, hemmed in as they are, precludes any chance of making them any better. None of the Stations within the city of Victoria, from the Central Station downwards, can be commended in a sanitary point of view either in construction or convenience, and they are nearly all overcrowded

9. The Police Hulk has long been condemned as worthless on sanitary grounds, besides being rotten and unsafe.

3

YR

7

10. Whitfield Station, which is one of the best constructed Stations and well situated, has up to the last two years been one of the healthiest in the Colony, but in those two years it has furnished the worst type of fever cases we have had in Hospital, owing to the new Harbour of Refuge lately constructed having been permitted to become a permanent camping ground for junks, and a filthy lot of mat huts and piggeries having been constructed in its vicinity. From these junks and huts so much offal, &c, is thrown into the Refuge Harbour that the tide is unable to wash it away, and the Harbour has become permanently foul, the stench arising from it being at times insufferable.

11. Aberdeen, which used to be the most unhealthy of all the Stations, has much improved of late years Though there has been little sickness comparatively, the situation of the Lokangs' quarters is anything but prepossessing

12. In addition to the ordinary demand for the accommodation of the Police, there has been a great increase of married members in the Force. It used to be the exception for married men to be sent out from home, in the last batches a considerable portion of the men were married and brought their wives with them

13 But neither to the construction of the Stations, their situation, or overcrowding can the increase in the amount of sickness in the Force be entirely attributed, as the Stations are the same as they were in 1874, and the number of men to be accommodated less, though some of the Stations have been rendered unhealthy by causes which have arisen since the before-mentioned year, still others have been much improved I think therefore it may be inferred that the increased hours of duty have something considerable to answer for, more especially as the increased ill health is pretty equally distributed in the different portions of the Force as regards their strength

Admissions to Hospital, 1881,

1882,

22

Europeans

.88

.92

Indians

212

230

Chinese

198

227

14. The admissions to Hospital and deaths in the Police Force for the past nine years are shewn in the following figures:-

1874, 1875,

1876,

1877,

1878,

1879,

1880,

1881, 1882,

Admissions to Hospital.

...346

436

..410

..418

..566

566

...588

..498

..549

Deaths

14

7

6

6

8

13

10

8

15. As increased sickness means a considerable loss of time and money to Government, it becomes a question if this loss is balanced by the Force doing extra work with less men, only looking at the matter in a monetary point of view

TROOPS

16 There is a decrease in the number of admissions of the Military to Hospital of nearly a hundred as compared with 1881, but an increase of five in the number of deaths.

17 Table IV gives the average strength of the Force, the sickness and deaths, with their percentage to strength for 1882.

18. The number of admissions to Hospital and of deaths among the Troops for the past nine years are given below

1874, 1875,

1876, 1877,

1878,

1879, 1880,

1881, 1882,

....

• ...

·

...

Admissions to Hospital.

Deaths.

.1,067

10

716

9

563

2

973

9

944

10

8

13

4

9

.1,035 ....1,075

....

.1,116

.....1,019

F

J

4-

To

19. In 1874 the Colonel of Engineers informed me that, having quoted my reports on the sanitation of the Colony, a grant had been made by the War Office of a large sum to improve the drainage and sanitation of the Barracks, and to what was then done he afterwards attributed the improved health of the Troops in the two following years Since 1876 the health of the Troops has apparently been going from bad to worse, until it reached the highest number of admissions to Hospital in the past nine years in 1881

20 It would be interesting to know to what cause this is in Mr CHADWICK's report of the sanitary arrangements in the for the sick list being nearly doubled between 1876 and 1881 to inefficient working of the Contagious Diseases Ordinance

attributed, for the information furnished Barracks does not sufficiently account Nor can it I presume be all laid down

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPII AL

21 In my last Annual Report I referred to the condition of the buildings at present occupied by this particular Establishment. As I described them then so they remain at present, but we have now brighter hopes of a speedy improvement in the state of things that has been so long grumbled at The Superintendent in his report refers to his Annual Report for 1878 on the same subject

I wrote a special report on these buildings dated April 10th, 1879, also a special report on the proposed plans for the new Hospitals dated September 20th, 1880, which will be found attached to C ́SO 2352 of that year, when the whole subject was discussed

22 There is nothing new to be stated about the buildings at present in use as a Hospital, we can only wait and hope the promised improvements will not be long delayed The subject of a Govern ment Civil Hospital has been under discussion for ifteen years, the Colony never having as yet possessed a Hospital, but only makeshifts pending this discussion The first building occupied as a Hospital was a most inefficient old Mission House which was blown down in the Typhoon of September 1874, the next building used for the purpose, (an unoccupied Hotel) was a decided improvement, but that was burnt down in the great fire, December, 1878

23 The admissions during the past year have been more numerous than ever before table will shew the number and position of the patients admitted during the past two years

Police,

Board of Trade,

Private paying Patients,

Government Servants,

Police Cases,

Destitutes,.....................

The following

1881

1882

498

......

549

117

116

193

268

67

88

139

207

222

230

1,236

1,458

24. The admissions from the Police shew an increase of 51 compared with 1881 Government Servants an increase of 21. This represents a considerable loss in money and services to the Colony. Police Cases and Destitutes have more than doubled their numbers since 1880, when their numbers were 101 and 107 respectively, these also represent incumbrances and loss to the Colony. Against these may be placed the Board of Trade and private paying Patients who a little more than pay their expenses.

25. In 1881 the influx of European loafers and Chinese beggars reached its present height. The European loafer is a terrible nuisance Left on the beach without money or clothes, he wanders about the streets and sleeps on the hill sides, plenty of good natured people give him drink, but he gets very little food, a short time of this lands him either in the Hospital as a destitute or a Police Case, or in the Gaol as a vagabond. Dismissed from either, he has only the streets to go to, and soon turns up in one or other establishments again, the Hospital for choice. He cannot get work (though he does not exert himself much in trying) because he soon becomes well known in the Colony There is great difficulty for him in getting away from the place, for there are always plenty of applicants of better character for berths on board ship, and if he knows nothing of sea-going work his chance of getting away at all is very poor, and depends entirely on the efforts of the charitable of the Community So there are a number now in the Colony who have for years been taking alternate spells in the streets, Hospital, and Gaol, and it is perfectly astonishing how well they wear under the circumstances With the Chinese beggars the life is similar, with the difference that they go to the Tung Wa Hospital instead of to the Government Civil Hospital

} :

26 Table V shews the character of the diseases in patients admitted to Hospital during the past year, as usual-Fevers, Bowel, and Chest complaints have their usual prominence in the list. But an unusual increase is shown in the large number of contusions, wounds, and fractures in this year.

27. Table VI shews the rate of mortality in the Hospital for the past ten years, which rate is very small for a General Hospital.

28. Table VII shews the admissions and deaths in each month of the year, the Summer months May, June, July and August bringing the greatest number.

29. Table VIII shews the number of dead bodies brought to Hospital for examination, which is much in excess of the numbers in former years, which up to 1881 were seldom much over the hundred, and are now 198, of which seventy-eight were bodies of infants, and this is another result of the influx of beggars from Canton, some of whom are dreadful spectacles in the way of disease.

30. Of the six classes of patients admitted to the Government Civil Hospital the increasing numbers of two classes only are at all satisfactory, those sent in by the Board of Trade, and the paying patients. The increase in admission of Police and Government Servants is the most unsatisfactory of all while the slightest suspicion remains that unwholesome overcrowded quarters and residences have anything to say in the matter. That any man earning from forty to sixty dollars a month or even less should be hard put to it to find himself a decent habitation in a Colony like this is nothing short of a scandal, and here hundreds of Europeans are compelled to live in the most unwholesomely constructed houses, that no one can keep clean with the best intentions, and that no fresh air ever enters The Police Cases and Destitutes in increasing numbers are no credit to the Colony either.

31. The numbers of admissions and deaths in the Hospital for the past nine years are shewn below.

A

1874,

Admissions

829

Deaths

1874,

.95

1875,

1,010

1875,

....59

1876,

.1,000

1876,

.36

1877,

950

1877,

..49

1878,

....1,289

1878.

50

1879,

.1,071

1879,

55

1880,

1,055

1880,

..44

1881,

1,236

1881,

1882,

1,458

1882,

...49 .68

....

SMALL POX HOSPITAL.

32. There were no admissions this year The following numbers shew the admissions for the past

nine years

Year

1874,

....

1875,

1876, 1877, 1878, 1879,

1880,

1881,

1882,

VICTORIA GAOL

Admissions

6

5

.18

25

7

.13

.29

7

0

33. There is a considerable diminution in the number of prisoners admitted to the Gaol this year, being 652 less than m 1881, but the daily average number in Gaol is still very high, being higher than any previous year except 1881, as the following figures shew.

Total No of Prisoners admitted into Gaol

Darly Average No of Prisoners.

1874, 1875,

.3,645

.4,023

1876,

4,062

350.04 374 06 432.60

1877,

.3,964

395 22

1878,

.3,803

519.22

1879,

.3,665

576.13

1880

.3,530

575 25

1881,

...

4,150

666

1882,

...3,498

622

*

34. There is however a considerable increase in the number of sick admitted to the Gaol Hospital, being 356 as compared with 297 in 1881. In 1874 there were only 148 admitted, and I reported in that year the very limited accommodation there was in the Gaol Hospital for the sick As it has never been increased it now causes very serious difficulty at times. The great increase in the amount of sickness is easily accounted for in the very different type of prisoners received of late years, formerly the majority of them were sturdy rogues, now the great majority are miserable weakly wretches of the beggar class referred to as increasing the numbers of Destitutes and Police Cases in the Civil Hospital, of whom such numbers have of late years made their appearance in the Colony. Amongst the European prisoners there were few except prisoners sent in by the Army and Navy Court Martials, now there is à regular gang of loafers who are continually appearing again and again for vagabondage, drunkenness and similar small offences

35 Table IX shews the causes of admission to the Gaol Hospital. Table X, cases treated in the Cells. Beside these, endless petty complaints not recorded, together with malingerers, are brought up every morning for examination, or to be passed for punishment, averaging about fifty daily

36 There were seven deaths in the Gaol this year, exclusive of one European suicide and one Indian executed Four of these were taken into the Hospital immediately on admission to the Gaol, two of them died within twenty-four hours, all the seven deaths were among the Chinese prisoners

37. Table XI B shews the number and nature of the cases sent at once to the Gaol Hospital when brought in from the Courts

38. Table XI C gives a list of the opium smokers received into the Gaol and reporting themselves as consumers of one mace and upwards of opium daily. It gives their age, number of years they have contracted the babit, their consumption of opium per diem, weight on admission, and for the four following weeks, if detained so long None of them were ever permitted to have opium in any form, those who were sick were treated on the merits of their cases, and some were in a terrible condition of disease There have been no deaths among them, and I have not found any cases of disease among them that could be attributed to their indulgence in the habit of opium smoking

39 As near as I can make out 110 lbs is about the average weight among ordinary Chinese prisoners of all classes received into Gaol, if any thing I think this average is rather above than below the mark Taking picked men of the largest size and well developed as regards muscle, it is rare to see the scales turned above 130 lbs. The opium smoker is of all classes, the greatest smokers are men who can afford the expense, and are generally more fat than muscular, but I cannot find that opium smoking causes emaciation in any way. In judging from the reduction in weight in this table, the change of diet on entering Gaol must be taken into consideration, and none of these men were excused from the regular dietary scale without good and sufficient reason other than that of opium smoking, as a matter of fact very few were excused at all, or had their labour reduced Nearly all of them had to undergo penal diet, that is to say, in the month their weights were taken they did two spells of five days each on rice and water only, as every prisoner has to do every month under six months' imprisonment Under these conditions it would have been thought that all would have lost flesh, but curiously enough that is not so, even in the cases of those who it might be supposed from their weight were accustomed to better food outside, so that loss of weight cannot be put down to deprivation of opium

40. The heaviest smoker was the fourth on the list, his daily consumption being 15 mace or 150 grains, he.had been an opium smoker for 30 years, he comes into Gaol weighing 107 lbs., does not loøse weight at all, but in three weeks rises to 110 lbs, at the end of the fourth week weighing the same

41 It appears to me that the opium smoker suffers much less from the enforced deprivation of the accustomed luxury at once than the tobacco smoker. Many of them make no complaint at all, there is no particular symptom caused by the deprivation, which is common to all There is certainly no loss of sleep to any extent, for I have had many of them specially watched Yet according to state- ments made by the Anti-opium League, they ought to have suffered tortures, but then it is the custom of the Anti-opium League to repeat and believe all the yarns they hear, and not take very much trouble about verifying them. Physicians of Hospitals at home are easily misled by patients, where the watching is at any rate much better than in any Hospital in China, and yet to read the accounts by the Physicians themselves of how they have been imposed upon for a considerable tune by patients is quite sufficient to shew how easily an old opium smoker could bamboozle a Physician in a China Hospital. In the Gaol it can also be done, but it is not so easy where they are watched day and night by European Warders And this is the only Gaol in China that affords such facilities for watching

such a number of opium smokers

42 I am still of opinion that there are few subjects concerning which so much nonsense has been talked, or so many false impressions been disseminated as about opium smoking, which from all I can gather seems in itself a most harmless practice I am not talking about the money squandered or families impoverished by the luxury indulged in by the bread winner The same may be said of the gin drinker, but no one can say that the gin has no evil effect as a poison itself on the gin drinker. I contend that opium smoking has no effect whatever on the opium smoker Here we have given four

""

Now

different preparations of opium to old opium smokers First, opium as prepared by the opium farmer, which contains 7 per cent of morphia; secondly, the opium farmer's prepared opium with 10 per cent. of morphia added; thirdly, similar prepared opium with 20 per cent of morphia added, fourthly, the opium farmer's prepared opium deprived of its morphia Now the opium smoker states that the first and third are "good," that with the morphia extracted "fairly good but not so good as the first and third." Number two with the 10 per cent. of morphia added is said to be "not very good the opium smoker cannot detect any difference between the farmer's prepared opium containing 7 per cent of morphia, and the same wrth 20 per cent. of morphia added, nor does he detect much difference between those two and opium with all the morphia extracted. That is to say he hardly recognises any difference between 25 per cent of morphia in the drug and none at all, and does not recognise difference at all between 7 per cent of morphia and 25 per cent, which he certainly would do if In fact the great principle of the opium, morphia, in smoking seems to vanish, certainly it in no way affects the smokers

any he ate it

43 Now, I have had opium eaters under my care in Gaols in India and Assam, and among Khalassic crews on board ship, and if they had been deprived of their opium as the opium smokers have been the consequences would have been serious

44 I can also speak from personal experience. I have eaten opium till I could consume half an ounce daily, and I can understand the fascination of that habit, and fully appreciate the difficulty of leaving it off. I have myself smoked three mace of the opium farmer's prepared opium within an hour without the slightest effect. I have watched other Europeans do the same, as they admitted to their astonishment, with no effect either. I counted their pulses and took their temperature, neither of which were altered by smoking in the slightest degree.

45. Three mace is equivalent to twelve pipes, and a pipe every five minutes is certainly more than a smoker would get through had he to load for himself. The actual smoking is but three long inhalations to each pipe, but the loading takes time. An old opium smoker always prepared our pipes for us, and watched that they were fairly and properly smoked

46. No opium smoker among the Chinese smokes with the idea of procuring sleep, being naturally tired he may take a pipe or two before going to sleep, but with no intention of helping him to sleep

47. An opium smoker visits a friend who offers him a pipe, and they lie smoking and chatting between the pipes for hours, just as a European offers wine to a friend. The Chinaman does not expect his visitor to go off to sleep and snore like a hog, any more than the European expects his friend to get drunk and make a beast of himself.

48. That it is costly and expensive as a habit there is no denial, and in order to procure this luxury unless a well to do man, the Chinaman must deprive himself and his family of many comforts and necessaries. A consumption of 15 mace a day means an expenditure of $1.20 daily, or $438 00 a year, say £80. One mace or eight cents worth of opium daily is equal (allowing 30 days to the month) to $3.40, a pretty hole in the income of a man who earns say six dollars a month, and many smoke that amount who earn a good deal less than six dollars a month

49. So far, what I have said concerning opium smoking in my reports has dealt with facts and figures known to myself to be correct, I have given nothing on hearsay A man of the western races who would take to such a habit as opium smoking must be a miserable object, a habit that requires you to muddle away more than an hour loading a pipe in order to get five minutes' smoke, for each pipe, takes about five minutes to load, and less than thirty seconds to smoke. One can understand a tobacco pipe that will last half an hour, take only a few seconds to load, and will allow you to read, write and do a hundred other things at the same time; at least I can, being a smoker myself, but the opium smoker is a complete puzzle to me to find out what pleasure he derives from the habit, all I can see in it is a waste of time and money

TEMPORARY LUNATIC ASYLUM.

50. This is still in the wretched buildings before described in my previous Annual Reports, which in the event of any atmospheric disturbance not amounting to a Typhoon requires the removal of the patients for their safety to the Police Cells.

51. The number admitted last year was eight, seven were discharged, some relieved, some sent to their native places. One woman remains There were no deaths.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

52. The total number of patients admitted to the Chinese Hospital during the year was 1,434, as compared with 1,292 in 1881; among these 628 died as compared with 569 in 1881. The number of out patients treated was 67,158 as compared with 79,845 in 1881.

53. Chinese rarely enter a Hospital unless they are so ill as to be unable to work to support them- selves, or are in the last extremity of disease, having a great dislike to any restraint upon their freedom of action; it is this that accounts for the large percentage of deaths in this institution.

Y

1

54 As I have mentioned before in previous reports, this Hospital has taken the place of a number of Dying Houses as they were called, which in former times existed in different parts of the Town. To these houses it was the custom to carry all persons in a moribund condition, or when death was speedily-expected The keeper of these houses supplied all cases that were brought with water to quench their thirst, but relieved their necessities in no other way, if the friends brought no food or gave them no attention they got nothing more till they died

55. The reason for the existence of these houses was the dislike of the Chinese to have a death

occurring in their dwelling houses I have been called in to see a Chinese merchant who was estimated as being worth from 150,000 to 200,000 dollars, who was in a moribund condition, lying on a cane lounge chair in the back yard of his house, his friends keeping carefully away. His case was hopeless, and he died shortly after my visit Here was a man of wealth turned out into his own back yard to die in order that he might not contaminate his own house

56. This objection to a death in the house being so strong even in the wealthy, it is not to be wondered at that among the poorer class, who live many families in one room, and who are comparative strangers to one another, the objection to a dead body on the premises should be even stronger.

57. There is for a long time among the Chinese prisoners in Victoria Gaol a great horror of being confined in a cell in which another prisoner has died.

58. The number of out patients that attend the Tung-Wa Hospital during the year is sufficient evidence of its popularity among the Chinese.

59. The number of cases of Small Pox admitted during the year to this Hospital was 10, of these 3 died, 6 were discharged, and one remained in Hospital.

60. The number of vaccinations performed by the Native Doctors in the City of Victoria and the villages of Hongkong was 1,763. These vaccinations are efficiently and carefully performed on European principles, and tubes of lymph are taken from well selected healthy children. This is one of the greatest benefits this Hospital confers upon the community of Hongkong.

TEMPORARY LOCK HOSPITAL.

61. The building occupied by this Establishment is still the ruinous old school-house mentioned in my Annual Report for 1880, which is fast becoming unequal to the accommodation required, owing to the strictness with which the Contagious Diseases Ordinance is now being enforced, and the numerous arrests of sly brothels that have lately taken place, a very large proportion of the women in these places on examination being found diseased

62. The number of admissions to this Hospital this year was 99 as compared with 44 in 1881, the majority of the admissions were in the latter part of the year, the prosecutions of the sly brothels not having begun till late in the year The average number of days detention of any single case in Hospital was 102 days.

63. Table XV A shews the number of admissions to Hospital, number of diets issued, and average number of days' detention for the past twenty-one years. The daily average number of women in Hospital this year was 5.

64. Table B gives the return of the number of women brought under the provisions of the Ordi- nance. The total number of examinations made was 10,343, the total number of women brought under the provisions of the Ordinance was 230. The number proceeded against 25.

65 Since the begining of the Commission on the Contagious Diseases Ordinance in 1878 there have been no prosecutions of sly brothels until this year. The state of things resulting from this want of action on the part of the Government I animadverted on in my Annual Report for 1881, and the Chinese themselves petitioned Government last year against a continuance of this inaction.

66. Table E is the return of the admissions into the Military, Naval, Police and Civil Hospitals of patients suffering from venereal diseases. The number of admissions to the Military Hospital was 138. Of this number one case was not contracted in Hongkong. The admissions are nearly the same as in 1881, when the number was 136.

67. The number of admissions to the Naval Hospital was 168, of these 58 cases were not contracted in Hongkong. In 1881 there were admitted 245, of which 115 cases were not contracted in Hongkong. 68. The number of Police cases admitted to Hospital were 40 as compared with 37 in 1881.

69. The number of cases admitted to the Civil Hospital was 124, of which 58 cases were not contracted in Hongkong. The number of cases admitted in 1881 was 96, of these 50 were not contracted in Hongkong.

70. There were only two cases of Secondary Syphilis among the 99 women admitted to the Lock Hospital this year; this shews that the type of venereal disease among them was very mild.

71. The number of admissions to the Naval Hospital of patients suffering from Secondary Syphilis was 25, of these, 5 cases were contracted in Hongkong. Thus of the 110 cases of venereal disease contracted in Hongkong only 5 shew symptoms of constitutional disease, so that for the most part the form of disease contracted by the seamen in this port was of the mildest type.

72 The number of admissions to the Military Hospital of patients suffering from Secondary Syphilis was 16, compared with 21 in 1881. Here 16 contracted constitutional disease, a very unsatisfactory number as considering the percentage to the number admitted

73 Among the Police 12 contracted Secondary Syphilis out of the 40 cases admitted to Hospital. The percentage here is still worse than among the Military, but many admitted they contracted the disease from unlicensed prostitutes

74. Among the cases admitted to the Civil Hospital there were 45 suffering from Secondary Syphilis out of 124 Here also the percentage is very unsatisfactory, but it is not known to me how many of these cases were contracted in Hongkong.

75 In the Military, Naval, Folice and Civil Hospitals it is customary to make inquiries as to where and when the disease was contracted, and if possible, when the disease has been contracted in Hongkong, to get the men to point out the house where, and the woman from whom it was contracted Many registered women have been thus pointed out, but it is very rare to find one of the accused suffering from disease As a matter of fact the men are rarely intimately acquainted with the town, are more than half seas over when on leave, and do not know where or with whom they have been In most cases it is more than probable they have been picked up by women on the street, hill side, or on boats, who are unregistered The examination the registered women undergo is most thorough, and it is impossible they should escape if diseased Many of the Army and Naval Medical Officers have attended the inspections and satisfied themselves on this point, some of them have examined women pointed out by the men under their charge as having diseased them, and have satisfied them- selves that the woman has been free from disease With the rapid reduction in the sly brothels it is to be hoped that the future will bring cleaner bills of health, but it will take a considerable time and a great deal of trouble to sweep away the unlicensed houses that have arisen during the late period of inaction. Of 41 women summoned last year only 25 were convicted, the utmost care and circumspec- tion has to be used in conducting these cases The commission did great good in exposing the abuses that had arisen in regard to prosecutions under the Contagious Diseases Ordinances

HEALTH OF THE COLONY AND SANITATION

The percentage

76 The number of deaths among Europeans was 55 as compared with 64 in 1881 to the number of residents was 1 80, the lowest percentage of deaths in the last ten years

77 The rainfall last year was 73 13 inches, the total number of days on which it rained 121. May, June, July, and August were the months in which most rain fell, 60. inches out of the 73 falling in those months. This is the smallest rainfall in any one year since 1874.

78. This year the Report of Mr CHADWICK, the Sanitary Commissioner sent out from England to report on the sanitary condition of Hongkong, has been received in the form of a Blue Book, and fully confirms all I have said in my reports from 1874 till now, and proves that if I have appeared to act the part of an alarmist it has not been without good and sufficient grounds It can only be with regret that any Colonist can look back on the past nine years that have been wasted, and the many great and valuable opportunities afforded for improved sanitation that in the last five years have not only been thrown away, but absolutely availed of to increase the number and size of the unwholesome dwellings so graphically described in Mr. CHADWICK's report

>>

79. In the report he begins by a general description of Hongkong, in which he states that, "like "the Europeans, few of the Chinese are permanent settlers, but only residents coming to Hongkong to "avail themselves of the facilities offered by British rule for earning money with which they propose "to return to their own country to end their days amongst their own people Seeing the benefit that it is acknowledged they receive from British rule, is it too much to expect that they should be required to conform to British laws, instead of the British laws, against the interest of the British people, being made to conform to Chinese ideas? They do not come here with philanthropic ideas of benefitting the Colony any more than the Europeans, but with the same desire of realising a competence and clearing out as soon as possible. One would think, to hear the sympathy that has been wasted on the native population, that we had come here as conquerors of a populous place, instead of having converted a barren island into a prosperous Colony, in which every resident of every nationality is more or less a bird of passage, from the wealthiest merchant whether European or Chinese to the poorest coolie. It ought not therefore to be permissible for one section or the other of the community to convert the Colony into a pest-house for the purpose of realising possession of the Almighty Dollar more speedily than legitimately

CC

6

80 Mr CHADWICK, after describing the ordinary Chinese houses of Hongkong writes, "A moment's "consideration of the samples of the Chinese Dwellings which I have given examples not "selected for badness, but fairly representative--will show that overcrowding exists to a very serious extent, both as to the number of inhabitants within a given cubic space, and as to the provision of proper proportion of open space for light and ventilation, and for giving free access to "the building. Other sanitary defects are equally apparent. The type of house in Hongkong is (ઃ quite different to that in use on the neighbouring mainland, and I am certain that the lower class population is more densely packed together in Hongkong, and worse provided with appliances for "cleanliness than they are in Canton

(C

44

Q

81. Now what has been argued of late years is that the unwholesome style of building in Hongkong is peculiar to the Chinese, and therefore, though bad enough as one storied buildings, they have been permitted to make them three and four storied, and even then to subdivide each storey by cock lofts For whose sake? Not for the sakes of the Chinese population, but for the sake of a set of gamblers in House property. The overcrowding has been represented as showing the prosperity of the Colony, when it is a well known fact that crowds were procured by the speculators to fill these houses free of rent, in order that they might represent them to purchasers as being tenanted, and to this as much as anything we owe such an increase of the population living from hand to mouth as has appeared in the last few years, and the consequent overcrowding. In 1874, the houses that were more than two stories high could be easily counted Now it would be much easier to reckon up those that are not more than two stories high.

"With all this overcrowding, and consequent dirt and discomfort, it is strange to find that, on the east of the town particularly, there are several large lots unbuilt on, and it is surprising to learn that time has elapsed during which the lessees were bound to build on them according to their leases," "and yet the penalty of forfeiture provided by law has not been enforced " Thus writes Mr CHADWICK, but then the Chinese do not care for the east part of the town, and small European houses are not such profitable properties as the unwholesome buildings in which Chinese are compelled to live, and now hundreds of Europeans also. These, once run up as described by Mr. CHADWICK, never get any repairs worth mentioning, however much they may be required. For a description of their drainage and general sanitation the following, copied from the above mentioned report, is sufficiently graphic. "Of late years the Government have made the connection to the main sewer and constructed the house drain up to the front wall of the house The remainder of the drain has been left to the uncontrolled "intelligence of the Chinese builders. No care whatsoever is taken as to line, gradient, or work-

manship."

"In February last (1882) a new drain was being constructed in the following manner The "sides were of brick on edge, and did not rest on the tile which formed the sole. See Fig. 39, Sheet "IX. Under these circumstances it need hardly be said that a great. proportion of house drains are "but elongated cesspools, the greater part of their fluid contents filtering into the subsoil

In one "case a drain was found having no bottom but the natural soil."

66

"Instances are to be found where the outer wall of one property is built so close to that of the adjacent house as to leave an inaccessible space between them which serves as an open drain. In one case the space between two houses was but 8 inches wide, and it received the filth from windows "of cook houses looking into it (Cleverly Street)

66

""

"Something similar was found in José Lane, opening from Ladder Street. As the arrangement "of the houses is characteristic, it is shown in Fig. 44, Sheet X. Here a drain certainly went down into "the gully, but what became of it afterwards could not be discovered."

"The slops from the upper cook houses are conducted down by a pipe of rough earthenware coated "with plaster Frequently this is inside the house, in which case it delivers its flow into the floor of "the cook house below, as in the case of the house shown in Figs 1, 3, Sheet I"

(C

"At other times it is put outside the house. As the upstairs lodgers have no convenience for getting rid of rubbish, much is stuffed into the down pipe, choking it, causing it to leak and saturate "the walls with filthy fluid, oozing from its imperfect joints. For the same reason the house drain "also is frequently obstructed."

82 These, among the numerous other defects in these buildings are what for years the Surveyor General and myself have been protesting against, and which in defiance of our protests Chinese petitioners have received sanction from Government to perpetuate

83 Mr. CHADWICK further says, regarding the health of the Chinese, "Many experienced medical "men who have practised in China have recorded the opinion that typhoid fever is almost unknown "there

It would appear that some have concluded from this that the filth and stinks with which the "Chinese surround themselves are not only harmless, but even beneficial, that they have discovered "the true art of living, and that they should be allowed to do in Hongkong as they do in the City of "Kowloon and elsewhere in their own country."

(6

"It will therefore be well to examine the evidence on which these conclusions are based, and to see whether, according to the scanty statistics available, the Chinese are so healthy a race that it "would be presumptuous for westerns to interfere with their time-honoured stinks.”

"With regard to the absence of certain diseases, with due deference to the experienced men who attest this fact, it must be observed that their evidence is not quite complete On the mainland no "vital statistics are kept, and by far the greater majority die without consulting an European Physician "Even in Hongkong the greater number of deaths are registered by Chinese Doctors, who with very "few exceptions (those trained in England) do not distinguish these diseases from others similar in "their general characteristics. Other medical men, while admitting the rarity of true typhoid fever, assert that malignant fevers, apparently filth fevers, are but too common (Dr. DUDGEON of Pekin, in his

paper on the habits of Chinese in China, between 1880 and 1883) so this form of filth disease "is not unknown."

(6

(6

Fevers

Fevers

Q

"Even assuming the absence of certain forms of disease, and a comparative immunity from "epidemics, there is no ground for the assertion that the violation of the laws of health is not punished, "in China as elsewhere, with a general lowering of vital condition, and not only by intermittent

scourges of epidemic disease

CC

"It is stated that hitherto Hongkong has escaped the epidemies which have affected other places "in the neighbourhood. The settlement is but 40 years old, and the subsoil beneath the city may not yet be sufficiently saturated with filth to make it a hot bed for disease and a breeding ground of filth poison. It is somewhat premature to assume that this happy immunity will always continue, for "the process of saturation is slowly but surely going on, and if unchecked cannot fail to bring forth "abundant fiuit in the form of misery and disease"

(

84. Concerning the amount of Typhoid or Enteric Fever that occurs among the Chinese in China I know little That it is well known and recognised by medical men in some of the European settlements is proved by their reports. That it is well known here is also proved by the deaths registered among Europeans That it is to be easily acquired I have proved in my own person, as, after my inspections of the Chinese quarters of Victoria in 1875, I was seized with a very severe attack of this disease and was delirious for eighteen days. In my report for 1881, I gave a table of the death rates among Europeans and Chinese, as registered here, from causes which may arise from filth poison, pointing out that in these diseases there are many characteristics which may cause Chinese native doctors to confuse one with another I now give the table of the death rate from these diseases as registered for the past ten years, from which it will be seen that in the last six years there has been a considerable increase in deaths from these causes

Deaths among Chinese

1873

1874

1875

1876

1877

1878

1879

1880

1881

1882

Enteric

12

125

31

94

145

89

116

309

438

679

Simple continued

96

46

291

243

370

481

733

373

168

71

Typhus

16

N

8

33

21

38

Diarrhoea

195

231

288

259

311

701

608

348

435

465

Enteric

Simple continued

Typhus

Diarrhoea

Deaths among Europeans

1873

1874

1875

1876

1877 1878

1879

1880

1881

1882

1

1

1

Οι

5

3

3

1

2

10

6

5

9

8

15

21

12

17

13

2

4

4

2

1

1

....

17

17

18

14

10

9

14

10

10

13

85 That this class of cases should be steadily increasing year after year is proof enough that there is something radically wrong somewhere, and Mr CHADWICK'S and my own reports of the state of the Chinese houses in this city give sufficient evidence that there is every reason to believe much of it is caused by the foul and unwholesome state of these dwellings.

86 This year we have had cholera epidemics carrying off thousands in Japan and Manila, which are both within a week's journey of us That we have escaped, considering the amount of traffic passing from these countries through this port, is something for the Colonists to be thankful for, but not to crow about, for we have done nothing to deserve such fortune.

87. Table XVI shews the rate of mortality among the Foreign residents in Hongkong. The percentage to the population is less than any previous year in the preceeding time.

88 Table XVII shews the work done by the Inspectors of Nuisances Now that a cleanliness amendment Ordinance has been passed, and a board appointed with a fair staff of officers to look after the sanitation of the Colony, it is to be hoped that in future years we may have to record an improved state of things It has been a hard fight for the Surveyor General and myself for many years to prove that the state of things so well described in Mr. CHADWICK's report existed at all except in our imaginations, and it was not until he was sent out as Sanitary Commissioner and sent in his report

that we were thought anything but alarmists, exaggerating greatly what we have described to exist in the way of overcrowding, filth, and general uncleanliness in quarters of the town seldom visited by Europeans I have made these long extracts from Mr CHADWICK's report because his opinions are not generally known, few people having sufficient interest to read, even if they had the chance, this voluminous Blue Book That the Chinese are as anxious as any one for decency, cleanliness, and order is sufficiently well proved by the articles that have appeared in the native papers

The courtesy and good will with which we were received when visiting houses in the poorest quarters of the city, when I accompanied Mr. CHADWICK in his inspections, surprised him greatly, while making enquiries of the residents we were invariably offered seats, and frequently tea Such enquiries as we made would have received but scant courtesy among the poorer class of Europeans at home, even if we got off without insult and injury.

It is

I

89. Mr MCCALLUM furnishes a very interesting report of the analyses made this year something to know that the water supply from Pokfulum is good, but it needs to be well filtered think it is much improved by being well boiled before filtering The milk analysis is not satisfactory. Not only is it largely diluted with water, but it is very doubtful where the water is obtained, and the knowledge that numerous wells exist in the Colony, more or less polluted, and easy of access, does not allow the comfort of thinking that this mode of cheating is less injurious to our systems than our pockets.

90. Among the poison analyses the cases of drugging by Datura have cropped up very largely of late One man was brought into the Gaol suffering from the effects of this drug The prisoners in one case, after sentence, said that the Datura was the drug used, which grows freely in Hongkong, but they got the plant from the native herbalists, that they used Jasmine in the decoction they made, which moderated the symptoms of Datura poisoning and rendered the patient less noisy, though it increased the danger to life and must be used very sparingly and with care They also stated that a decoction of liquorice root well sweetened with coarse brown Chinese sugar was an antidote, and that if this was mixed with the decoction of Datura it destroyed its efficacy This no doubt is only a popular delusion. The effects of Datura are well known all over the East It is very commonly used in India for drugging in the same way as here, it produces an appearance of intoxication, and this effect is produced very rapidly and takes a long time to wear off, generally at least twenty-four hours

In the first stage the patient is talkative and merry, performing all sorts of odd antics, as the effects progress it causes profound sleep, and if used in a poisonous dose, coma and death. As the sleepiness passes off the delirium and antics occur again. The pupil of the eye is always largely dilated, and this symptom remains long after all others have disappeared In India it is also used to produce an appearance of insanity, the patient being kept under the influence of the drug for weeks and months

I have the honour to be,

Sır,

Your most obedient Servant,

PH В C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon

The Honourable W H MARSH, C M G

2

Colonial Secretary

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 24th March, 1883.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Hospital Statistics for the year 1882, with some remarks upon them

2. I was absent on leave for the first nine months, and I am therefore not in a position to make a complete report of the working of the Hospital for the year.

3 The work was carried on in the makeshift establishment occupying the buildings at West Point known as the old Lock Hospital and the new Lock Hospital, neither of them deserving the name of Hospital at all.

4 In my annual report for the year 1878 I enumerated the defects of the first mentioned building, and in 1880 I drew attention to the defects of the latter, then just erected. I need not therefore now dwell upon the structural shortcomings of the establishment, but it is only right to mention them in passing, as they add materially to the difficulty of carrying on the Hospital work.

5. The number of cases on the Hospital Register for 1882 is 1,543, 85 of which were treated in the surgery and dismissed

These 85 comprised superficial wounds and contusions, with 5 cases of

dog bite, 2 of gunshot wounds, &c

6 There were thus 1,458 patients treated in Hospital during the year, including 44 who remained in Hospital on the 1st January, 1882 Of this number 549 were Police, and the remaining 909 were made up

of seamen, private residents, destitutes, prisoners, members of the Chinese Revenue and Customs Services, and officers and men from foreign ships of war

7 The number of admissions from the Police Force was large, and might be reduced if more attention were paid to Sanitary requirements in the housing of the men. The Police Hulk is especially unwholesome, and productive of one of the worst forms of fever among the Chinese Constables. In the latter part of the year Whitfield Station became remarkable for the number and severity of the cases of remittent fever sent to Hospital. This is probably to be attributed, at least in part, to the construction of the new breakwater in the neighbourhood, with the accumulation of filth from

the boats behind it.

8. No. 3 Station, old and badly built, contributes occasional cases of diphtheritic sore throat. 9. I may here call attention to the objectionable practice in the Hongkong Police Stations of providing continuous benches for the sleeping accommodation of the Chinese Constables It affords facilities for overcrowding, and on that and other grounds is objectionable.

10 The sickness among the Police was chiefly diarrhoea, febrile attacks, bronchial catarrh, and surgical injuries. One Indian Constable was admitted to Hospital suffering from corns and abrasions of one foot He had been accustomed to go barefoot at home, and was quite disabled by the thick hard leather boots served out to him when he joined the Police in Hongkong. It might be as well to allow these men to wear canvas shoes, either black or white.

11. The total number of days spent in Hospital in 1882 by members of the Force was 5,607, in 1881 it was 6,134.

12 The admissions from foreign ships of war were 12 in number: one officer and two seamen from the French vessels, one officer and six seamen from the Russian fleet, and two seamen of the American Navy

13. Table V shows the varieties of disease among the patients generally, with the mortality from each.

14 A comparison of the relative frequency of the different diseases in this list with that of 1881 would be of little value, as so much depends upon the amount of time and attention given to the diagnosis in each case, and with several changes in the Acting Superintendents, there is no common ground of comparison.

15 There were more venereal cases in 1882 than in the preceding year, as many as 25 being in Hospital at once, but some of them were brought into the Colony Nagasaki seems to be especially dangerous in this respect.

16. In a number of cases the disease was said to have been contracted from Hongkong boat-women. 17. The law regarding detention in Hospital of seamen affected with venereal disease is somewhat anomalous. It compels infected seamen who have taken up their residence in a licensed boarding house to come to Hospital, and to stay there until cured, whereas if they are destitute and thrown on the streets they may scatter disease broadcast without let or hindrance.

18. Some of these cases apply and are received into Hospital as destitutes, but they are often turbulent and troublesome, and insist on leaving before they are cured.

19 There were 68 deaths during the year, which is not a large number, but some of the severest cases of injury and disease among the Chinese are usually removed by their friends to die at home.

20 The number of dead bodies sent to the Hospital, there being no public mortuary, was 198; of which 7 were European adults, 113 Chinese adults, and 78 Chinese children.

21 I believe a public mortuary will be built one of these days, and it will probably have connected with it a post-mortem room, as well as a Coroner's Court, waiting rooms for witnesses, &c.

22. When this comes to pass, the Hospital will be freed from the offensive exhalations from bodies in all stages of decomposition, as well as from the noise and bustle of the Coroner's Court, and the melancholy sight and sounds of continually passing funerals.

23 In Table V six cases of parturition are recorded, in two of which the mother died. The fate of the off-spring is not recorded, but most of them, if not all, were born dead. I have in previous reports alluded to the fact that, in cases of difficult labour among the Chinese, the lives of both mother and child are invariably sacrificed unless European aid is called in. The Chinese so-called doctors know nothing of anatomy, and they admit their utter ignorance of the mechanism of child-birth, and their consequent powerlessness to render aid to parturient women

24 This is a matter which deserves more attention than it has received, for with the increase of the Chinese population the deaths in child-bed are likely to be more numerous year by year.

25 Last November it was suggested to the Government that a small lying-in Hospital should be provided, and it was stated that the Directors of the Tung Wa Hospital were prepared to remunerate à Medical Officer for attendance on these cases. This proposition fell to the ground, and nothing came of it beyond an undertaking by the Surveyor General to provide a lying-in ward in the new Civil Hospital when built The new Civil Hospital, however, is to be built according to the plans approved by the Secretary of State in 1879, and as these plans only provide about of the accommodation required for the present establishment, it is difficult to understand where the lying-in ward will be. Perhaps a more feasible scheme would be for the Directors of the Tung Wa Hospital to provide a lying-in ward for poor Chinese, and to call in European assistance when necessary.

}

*

ť

26 In 1872, when I was appointed to the Civil Hospital, the admissions were 938 (518 Police and 420 paying patients and others) and the receipts $3,867 04 in 1882 the admissions were 1,458 (549.Police and 909 paying patients and others) and the receipts $9,822 14. Thus during ten years that I have been in charge of the Hospital the paying patients and others have more than doubled, and the receipts nearly trebled

*27 Hence it is apparent that the demands upon the Hospital Establishment are considerably larger now than formerly, a natural consequence of the growth of the population and the increased traffic through the port, as made evident by the Census returns and the statistics of the Harbour Office I am informed by the Harbour Master that the European tonnage which entered the port in 1873 was 1,635,352, and in 1882 it was 3,170,843

28. In 1877 plans were drawn up by the Colonial Surgeon and the Surveyor General for the adaptation of the old Lock Hospital to the Civil Hospital Establishment

29. Since 1877 the number of patients and the staff have both increased, and when directed to report on these plans in 1880, I found they did not provide sufficient accommodation In 1882 the number of patients was still larger, and a fortiori the plans drawn up in 1877 and approved by Sir M H. BEACH in 1879 are now still less adequate to the requirements of the growing Colony.

30 The nursing staff is defective, and should be supplemented by the addition of an European Ward-master Considerable difficulty has been experienced in past years in finding a suitable man for the post, but sufficient inducement was never offered by the Government, and the patients suffer accordingly. 31. It may be interesting to give an example of one day's work performed by the two Medical Officers in charge of the Civil Hospital, viz:

a Attendance on Subpoena at the Magistracy to give evidence.

b Post-mortem Examination of woman, suspected opium poisoning

c Attendance at Inquest to give evidence

d Case of child-birth: Primpara, woman three days in labour, delivered with forceps

e Sixty-five patients in Hospital to be seen, comprising two cases of punctured wounds of

the lung, two of locomotor ataxia, and cases of cerebritis, abscess of liver, fistula in ano, dysentery, chronic diarrhoea, remittent fever, caries of spine, acute bronchitis, acute and chronic phthisis, chyluria, morbus cordis, rectal abscess, severe laceration of leg, incised wound of cornea, fractured thigh, irido-choroiditis, &c This, with the ordinary administration of the establishment, may be considered a good day's work for two surgeons, and it is fortunate if such days do not come very frequently The largest number of patients at one time in Hospital was 87

32 The Medico-legal work of the Colony, almost the whole of which is performed by the two Medical Officers of the Hospital, often takes up much time and attention, to the detriment of the patients in Hospital

33 Only the other day the Superintendent was in attendance at the Supreme Court for 5 hours, while the Assistant Superintendent was at the Magistrate's Court for an hour and a half

34 During a recent inquest, which was protracted over several weeks, the Medical Officers were both summoned and subjected to Examination at great length at different periods of the enquiry. This necessarily involved careful preparation, and made a serious addition to the Hospital labours of the two surgeons

35. I refer to this matter here because, in considering the amount of work performed at the Civil Hospital, the Medico-legal work has on several occasions been left altogether out of the count, or else casually alluded to as a mere trifle

36 The harassing nature of these duties, their importance to the community, and the responsı- bility which falls on those called upon to undertake them, make them a very serious part of the week's work at the Hospital

37 The want of a laundry is much felt at the Hospital The soiled bedding and clothing is at present sent to the Gaol to be washed, and the result is not satisfactory Bedding and clothing used by the sick should, after each washing, be exposed for as long a time as possible to the air and sunlight. 38. This cannot be done in the Gaol, and would not be done by private washermen, and a laundry is one of the many wants of the Hospital.

39. The Hospital vote for the year's washing is $700

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

C J. WHARRY, M D., Superintendent

A

Dr PH B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon

POLICE

I.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1882

EUROPEANS

INDIANS

CHINESE

MONTHS

TOTAL Admissions

TOTAL

Deaths

Admissions

Deaths Admissions Deaths Admissions. Deaths

Remaining on the 1st Jan,

1882

January,

March,

April,

>

February,

May, June, July,

August,

11

September,

October, .

November,

December,

180703OZIN∞∞∞

4

4

9

12

20

40

6

13

10

29

15

4

26

6

13

16

35

23

29

55

6

27

27

60

32

14

11

25

64

1

16

1

41

2

22

13

42

24

19

51

15

24

52

9

16

20

45

Total,

92

230

c

2

227

1

549

3

CJ WHARRY, MD,

Superintendent

II.—TABLE shening the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICF FORCE during the Year 1882

AVERAGE STRENGTH

TOTAL SICK

TOTAL DEATHS

RATE OF SICKNESS

RATE OF MORTALITY.

$

European Indian

Chinese

Total European Indian

Chinese European Indian

Chinese

European

Indian.

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

103 171

314 588

92 230 227 1

2

5

89 32

134 50 72 29

0 97

1 16

1 59

per cent

per cent

per cent

per cent.

per cent.

per cent.

European

Indian

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

III.—POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1882

CENTRAL

No 5

No 2

8

22

3

No 1 AND STONE CUTTERS'

"

9

"

ISLAND

No 6

No 7

WATER POLICE

HULK, TSIMSHATSUI

WHITFIELD

SHAUKIWAN

POKFULAM ABERDEEN

STANLEY

European

Indian

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

Remaining on the

1st Jan, 1882, January,

February,

1 5

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

4 17

October,

November,

December,

5

4

10

4 12

3 10

15

3

15

MAONO555OZORGO

2

2

1

1

11

4 25 10

11B422

7 10

5 20

8 13

8

4

1

1322

R14

IIIQ♡ —∞ ∞ I NEE

11

1

1

4

1

1

1

1

1

3

1

2

2

1

1

3

1

1

1

1

15

A

Total,

53 167 67 2 12 20

1

1 4 25 17❘ 25

91 2 3

4

3

4

12

5 16 6

European

Indian

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

European

C. J WHARRY, MD Superintendent

IV.—TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1882

AVERAGE STRENGTH

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL

DEATHS

RATE OF SICKNESS

RATE OF MORTALITY TO STRENGTH

White Black Total White- Black Total

White

Black

Total

White

Black

White

Black

845

166

1011

794

225

1019

5

4

9

Average No constantly sick

Average No constantly sick

0 59

177

41 10

9 24

per cent per

cent

W A THOMSON, MB,

Deputy Surgeon General Principal Médical Officer

>

Indian

YAUMATI,

HUNG HOM

Chinese

European

Indian

Chinese

**

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

V.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1882

ADMISSIONS

DEATHS

ADMISSIONS

DEATHS

DISEASES

317 189 201 707 | 18 12 9 39

1

14

1

4

AAEAGOO Europeans

3

2 11

1224

16

22

10 18 7 35 30 11 19

60

1 6

10

1

1 Diarrhoea,

Do, Chronic, Colic,

Constipation, Lumbrici,

Rupture of Bowels Heinia Inguinal,

Condylomata of Anus, Hæmorrhoids,

Fistula in Ano,

33 45 100

8

2

Brought fornard,

Indians

Chinese

Total

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

DISEASES

Typhoid Fever, Febricula,

Intermittent Fever,

Remittent Fever,

Erysipelas,

Rheumatism, Acute,

Do,

Do, Do,

Diabetes,

Subacute,

Muscular,

Chronic,

Sciatica,

Lumbago,

Lupus,

Syphilis, Primary,-

Hard Chancre

10

Soft Chancre,

22

ON

2

10

or co

Phagedonic Sore,

2

22

15

Secondary,-

Roseola,

2

Local Affections,—

Iritis,

2

Laryngitis,

~

Rupia,

Psoriasis,

Eczema,

Ecthyma,

Perioslitis,

4

Ulcers of Tongue,

14

1 1

16

Do Pharynx,

Do

Septum of Nose,

1

Do Skin,

A

3

Tubercles of Scrotum,

Hemiplegia,

Anæmia,

10

16

Anasarca,

26 37 13

13

3

42

26

1223

3181

112

76

17

~~

со

1 1

Q

18

2

2 4

17

1

1

43

Pennoal Abscess,

Congestion of the Liver,

10

Hepatitis,

10

32

Abscess of Liver,

2

Curhosis of the Liver,

Jaundice,

2

Hypertrophy of Spleen,

2

Cataııh of Bladder,

50

13

3

3

1

14

co

2

143

Rupture of Spleen

Bright's Disease,

Chyluria,

Retention of Urine,

Urethritis

Spermatoirhoea,

Gonorrhoea,

Gonorrhoeal Rheumatism and

Conjunctivitis

Gleet,

Stricture of Urethra,

Excoriation of Penis,

Do

Anus,

Fungoid Cancer of Penis,

Enlarged Inguinal Glands, Orchitis,

Scrofulous Disease of Testis,

4 Laceiated Scrotum,'

Rupture of Vagina,

Leucorrhoea,

Subacute Metritis,

Periostitis,

Disease of Hip Joint,

Necrosis of Tibia,

Arthritis (Wrist)

Do, (Knee)

Do,

(Ankle),

Chronic Arthritis,

Contracted Knee Joint

Phlegmon of Thigh,

Abscess,

Abscess, Lumbar

Multiple Abscesses after Fever, Carbuncle

Rhagades

40

-

1871

11

122

Meningitis, Subacute,

Softening of the Brain,

Apoplexy,

General Paralysis,

Hemiplegia,

Locomotor Ataxy, Epilepsy,

Epileptiform Fits,

Cholea,

Hysteria, Neuralgia,

Hemici ania, Cephalalgia,

Delirium Tremens,

Alcoholism, Mania,

Hordeolum .

Conjunctivitis,

Congestion of Retina,

Intis,

Incised wound of cornea, with }

prolapse of iris,

Ulcers of Gornea,

Otitis,

Morbus Cordis,

Do Mitral Regurgitation,

Do Aortic

Do,

Fatty Degeneration of Heart,

Dilatation of Heart,

Aneurism,

Pharyngitis,

Bronchial Catarrh,

Bronchitis, Acute,

Do Chronic, Asthma,

Pneumonia, Acute,

Do,

Chronic,

Pleuro-pneumonia, Homoptysis,

Phthisis,

Pleurisy,

Parotitis,

Cancrum Oris,

O CO

162

14

211

12

17

3

}

A

Onychia,

Sycosis,

Herpes Circinatus,

Do Preputialis,

1

Eczema,

1

Ecthyma,

Erythema

1 Acne,

Scabies, Ulcer, Bubo,

1

1

P221I2642

12172-2 LO

11

201

4 M N ✪ 10 00

52

Boils,

19

2

1

3

10

Burns and Scalds, Frost Bite,

Debility,

KO

Poisoning, Opium,

1

10

5

Do,

12

Do,

Do,

Narcotic,

Do, Mercurial, Alcoholic,

1

Suspected,

ONA

312212

OD 10

1721

2

~

2113

41

13

1

Immersion in Water,

Privation,

1 Inebrietas

Moribund (Small Pox), Observation,

Bite, Snake,

Do, Dog,

1

Do, Man,

21

12

::

-

126221-2211

=

27

1

1

Gastric Catarrh,

Dyspepsia,

Hæmatemesis, Dysentery, Acute,

Do, Chronic,

Enteritis,

14

42

N

Peritonitis,

1

20

5

622

1

322

Do, Centipe le,

Contusion,

Sprain of Ankle,

Do

of Hand, Wounds, Contused,

10

0

Do,

Do,

Incised, Lacerated

92

22 26

2 11 16

Carried forward,

|317 |189 |201 707

18

12

39

Carmed forward,

587 355 457 1399 24

16

20

60

Alveolar Abscess,

Toothache,

Necrosis of Jaw,

Tonsillitis,

Gastritis,

DISEASES

TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY, &e,-( Continued)

ADMISSIONS

DEATHS

ADMISSIONS

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

DISEASES

DEATHS

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

596 361 475 1432 24 17 21 62

Brought formaıd,

587 355 457 1399 24

10

16

20 60

Brought for ward,

Wounds, Gunshot of Forehead,

1

1

Fracture Simple of Os Calcis,

1

Do

do of Spine,

1

Do

do of Hand,

1

Do

do

of Base of Skull,

Do,

do

over Scapula,

Do

Compound of Skull,

Do,

Punctured of Face,

Do,

do, of Brain,

1

1

1

Do

do

of Radius,

Do

do

of Humerus,

Do,

do

of Eyeball,

1

Do

do

of Fingers

1

Do,

do

of Chest,

3

Do

do

of Tibia,

Do,

do

of Abdomen,

Do

do

of Tibia

Do.

do

of Thigh

CO

طري

and Fibula,

1 1 Fracture Compound of Femur,

Do

do commi-

nuted of Tibia & Femur

Rupture of Tendo Achillis,

Tumour of Face,

Fibroma of Neck,

Burn of Eye with Caustic Soda,

Parturition,

Concussion of Brain,

Do of Spine,

Fracture Simple of Clavicle,

Do

do of Radius,

Do

do of Radius and

Ulna comminuted,

Fracture Simple of Ulna,

1

1

1

Do

do

of Humerus,

2

Do

do

of Acromion,

Do

do

of Femur,

1

Do

do

of Tibia com-

1

minuted,

Carried forward,

596 361 475 1432 24 17 21

}

62

62

1221 »

Co

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

Q

N

TOTAL

602 362 494 1458 25 17

26

68

CJ WHARRY MD,

Superintendent

*

f

VI-TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admissions

Admitted.

Persons Admitted

Admitted

1873,

1874,

Per cent

6 33 9 12

Per cent

Per cent

Per cent

1873,

3 33 1873,

7 93

1873,

7 14

1874,

9 06

1874,

6 22

1874,

12 50

1875,

4 55

1875,

4 35

1875,

4 08

1875,

576

1876,..

2 49

1876,

281

1876,

253

1876,

176

1877,

5 15

1877,

4 16

1877,

3 25

1877,

8 12

1878,.

3.88

1878,

3 46

1878,

3 08

1878,

576

1879,

5 13

1879,

3 12

1879,

8.39

1879,

4 72

1880,

417

1880,

373

1880,

2 66

1880,

580

1881,..

396

1881,

387

1881.

3 09

1881,

4.80

1882,.

4 66

1882,

4 35

1882,

4 38

1882,

5 24

CJ WHARRY, M D Superintendent

>

શ્રી ગ

*

t

VII.-TABLE sheming the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1882

EUROPEANS

COLOURED

MONTHS

Admissions

Deaths Admissions Deaths Admissions

CHINESE

TOTAL Admissions

TOTAL Deaths

Deaths

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1882,

23

1

9

12

44

January,

50

2

30

4

33

February,

44

1

24

27

ام اسم

1

113

1

95

March,

44

5

23

April,

34

1

19

May,

56

1

34

June,.

45

4

42

July,

53

1

38

August,

50

3

33

September,

46

32

QHQT

13

80

30

83

50

1

140

2

57

1

144

52

7

143

3

40

123

1

42

120

October,

43

36

55

November,

54

19

1

45

134

118

...

December,

55

2

26

1

40

121

HNQNDONO OLD H CO 10

1

7

2

7

3

3

77

9

9

4

6

5

Total,....

597

26

365

16

496

26

1,458

889

68

+

ļ

January,

February,

March,

April,

CJ WHARRY, MD,

Superintendent

VIII -LIST of DEAD BODIES brought to the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL for Examination

during each Month of the Year 1882

EUROPEANS

COLOURED

CHINESE

MONTHS

TOTAL

Adults

Children Adults

Children Adults

Children.

>

May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December,

Total,

...

3

1

1

N

:

6

8

13

12

16

10

17

8

ÒO CO 00 LO CO CO 1O 1 00 CO NGO

6449

14

13

12

14

12

14

5

18

20

8

25

6

16

7

25

6

15

113

78

198

CJ WHARRY, M D

Superintendent

IX-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY, during the Year 1882

ADMISSIONS

DEATHS

DISEASES

Euro-

peans

Coloured Persons

Chinese Total

Euro- Coloured peans

Persons

Chinese

Total

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1882,

4

13

17

...

:

Febricula,

3

1

31

35

Intermittent Fever,

7

7

1

1

Remittent Fever,

1

1

1

1

Bubo,

4

4

*

Cephalalgia,

Chancres,

Chancres and Bubo,

4

6

20

22

21

2

Epilepsy,

Initis, .

Lunacy,

Ophthalmia,

Gonorrhoeal,

Paralysis,

1

1

2

10

NO

2

2

...

12

1

1

2

2

Sciatica,

Rheumatism,

Scrofulous Sores,

Syphilitic Warts,

Anasal ca,

Cardialgia,

Compression of Brain,

1

13

14

1

1

1

1

1

1

··

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Dyspuca,

Morbus Cordis,

1

1

:

4

4

Aphthæ,

Palpitation,

Vertigo,

Chronic Bronchitis,

Hæmorrhage from Lungs,

Hæmoptysis,

Cynanche,

Congestion of Liver,

Constipation,

Colic, and Collapse 1,

Dyspepsia,

2

3

1

1

3

29

32

1

1

1

1

1

1

4

3

1

1

1

1

1

**

4

220

8

12

23 3

2

1

1

Diarrhoea,

Dysentery,

Gastralgia,

Hernia,

Hæmorrhoids,

Jaundice,

Tonsillitis,

15

20

35

4

4

1

1

...

3

3

1

4

2

2

1

1

Balanitis,

Chylous Urine,

Cystitis,

Gonorrhoea,

Hæmaturia,

Paraphymosis,

Stricture,

Spei matorrhoea,

Abscess,

Boils,

*

1

I

*****

+1

2

2

1

19

19

* ...

• •

3

3

1

I

·

1

1

2

2

1

5

3

3

1

...

1

C

4

1

1

29

31

1

1

1

...

....

6

6

....

....

1

1

.. •

3

218

2

1

21

Carbuncle,

Cystic Tumou of Ear,.

Sinuses,

Ulcer,

Ulcerated Gums,

Ulcer on Scrotum,

Alcoholia,

Debility,

Child Birth,

Contusions,

Contused Wound,

Gun-shot Wound,

Sprained Ankle,

Wound,

Observation,

**

53

2

301

356

7

17

TOTAL,.

Other Deaths,-1 European, Suicide, I Indian, Executed

نکلے

Total number of Prisoners

admitted to Gaol.

F

X.-TABLE shewing the CASES, not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1882

DISEASES

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1882,

+

....

Febricula,.

Cephalalgia,.

Morbus Cordis,

Chronic Bronchitis,

Aphthæ,

Diarrhoea,

Dyspepsia,..

Gum Boil,

Hæmorrhoids,..

Sore Gums,

Tonsillitis,

Ulcerated Gums,

Abscess,

Debility,

Alcoholia, Contusions,

Observation,

-

.

.....

TOTAL,

.....

...

13

Europeans

Coloured Persons

Chinese

Total

1

1

2

6112-242-

6

1

1

2

}

7

2

1

1

2

2

3

3

2

2

32

34

1

1

10

5

6

11

2

61

74

-

XI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1882

Total No of

Daily

Prisoners

Average

Total Sick

Total

admitted to Gaol

No of Prisoners

in

Hospital

Sick, Total Trifling Deaths

Cases

Serious Sickness to Total

Rate of Sickness

Rate of Mortality

To Total

To Average

To Total

To Average

3,498

622

356

74

7

10 177 12 321

3 490

0 200

1125

XI, A —TABLE shewing the NUMBER of PRISONERS ADMITTED into Victoria GAOL HOSPITAL, from the COURTS,

by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1882

Europeans

Indians

Sick in Hospital

from the Courts

Admitted to Hospital

Total Hospital

Hospital Courts cases.

cases from Courts

Europeans

Chinese

Chinese

Total

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

Total

To total Gaol admissions

To total Hospital admissions

To total European Hospital

cases

3,498

53

2

301 356

9

35

44 1,257

12,359 16,981

11,627

To total Chinese Hospital

cases.

TABLE, XI, B--CASES ADMITTED to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL at the First Medical Examination by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1882

SENTENCE

Number

DISEASES

DATE OF ADMISSION

DATE OF DISCHARGE

REMARKS

Years Mos

Days

123456700

252

Piles

15 March

3 April

Debility,

2*

31 March

....

"

1

Tonsillitis

5 April

21 April

1

Stricture

24 June

13 July

14

Alcoholia

9 Sept

25 Sept

do

7 Oct

13 Oct

3

do

24

31

8

Diarrhoea

25 Nov

23 Dec

On Remand

9

:

by

Alcoholia

5 Dec

11

10

42

Debility

30 Jany

8 March

11

12

13

.66

7

Paraphymosis

2 March

8

Ulcers and Sinuses

7

""

25 May

Debility

15

11 April

No 2 No 2

14

42

Sprained Ankle

1 April

12 May

15

42

Observation

10

31

11 April

16

14

Debility

18 May

17

Observation

26

18

Cole and Collapse

1 June

19

14

Debility

20

"2

20

N

Morbus Cordis

23

""

21

Diarrhoea

10 July

22

Intermittent Fever

10

35

23

2

Comp of Brain

14

"

24

14

Debility

28

""

25

1

Observation

23 Aug

>

26

Chancres

1 Sept

37

30 May 27

15 Aug 15 July

5 Aug 24

6 Sept

On remand

Died 2nd June, 1882

Died 2nd July, 1882

Died 18th July, 1882 Died 14th July, 1882

27

14

Debility

5

18

دو

28

21

Diarrhoea

6

2

29

4

Debility

30

42

do

14

31

14

do

20

32

42

Gun-Shot Wound

13 Oct

23 Nov

33

14

Balanitis

20

26 Oct

34

Debility

25

وو

35

36

Co

Gonorrhoea

27

13 Nov

13

命吵

14

37

38

39

40

41

2

42

43

44

42

+2

Spei matorrhoea

28

8

>

Diarrhoea

30

8

وو

وو

6106 ED ED ED

Chancres

31

18 Dec

Syphilitic Warts

10 Nov

11

وو

Observation

11

13 Nov

59

Chancres

13

"

Debility Contusions

Chronic Bronchitis

13

2 Dec

23

>>

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec, 1882 No 2

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec, 1882

28

do

do

>>

""

4

*

&

A

XI, C-TABLE shewing the WLIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS) for the First Four Weeks Confinement in Victoria GAOL, during the Year 1882

Number

Number of Consumption Age Years Opium

Smoker

per diem

Weight when Admitted

Weight First Four Weeks

REMARKS

1

36

15 Years

2

47

5

"

36

6

* 1 ∞

3 Mace

96 lbs

95 96 99 100

1

99

104

107

109 112

""

""

2

104

108

109

111

110

4

45

30

* A

دو

دو

15

107

107

108

110

110

"

25

27

10

5

89

83

87 92

90

"

""

6

'28

2

2

118

119

1224 126

126

"

39

36

14

3

111

114

1191 116

118

>>

""

8

40

30

3

112

120 126 124

124

19

دو

9

28

10

"

11/

102

"

1061 105 108

110

10

26

12

4

95

100

105 102

103

>>

""

11

32

6

89

98

961

97

98

""

""

12

27

13

28

14

42

17

15

36

10

16

44

17

25

18

47

16

HACOBB LO

4

102

112

""

""

29

113호

114호

114호

4

83

89

90

91

93

>"

وو

""

93

93

98

55

""

1001 101

1

91

90

89

87

91

22

دو

""

5

2

117

118

120

"

""

""

122층

123

5

94

90

91

92

91

""

""

""

101

105

103

""

وو

19

44

20

99

95

97

96

""

""

""

20

45

16

21

29

22

30

13

643

109

"

103

104

106

108

889

99

""

119

119

119 119

"

""

""

6

111

109

109!

وو

""

""

23

43

10

114

112

1134 112

112

32

""

وو

24

40

15

122

124

120 120 122

""

""

25

36

15

26

28

67

125

>>

>"

124층

1243

4

114

107

110

""

"

"

27

24

4

4

116

"

""

""

1153 1173 1175 1175

28

36

10

29

32

10

30

32

31

30

32

31

33

36

34

47

99753 ∞ ∞

2

97

""

104 101 101 101

""

A

"

128

a

121 120

120

120

2

دو

2

2

93

9

8

1

"

"

""

35

34

17

5

""

36

30

37

35

12

38

28

10

720

>"

13/

2

"

3

"

39

28

8

1

"

40

44

20

2

""

41

45

30

3

"

42

26

7

2

""

43

30

13

21

""

44

32

2

2

"

45

25

5

"

46

34

12

""

47

29

6

2

32

48

40

10

دو

49

46

10

2

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

113

106 106

106

105

""

101

21

1021/

103

103

104

115

118

117

118

118

وو

106

110

109

109

1091

111

105

110

""

136

132

133

132

130

124

125

123

23

120

121 120

118

116

101

1001 105

104 105

85

87 90

88

88

109

وو

1021/2

109

110

109

117

115

113 114

1131

122

وو

121 118

119

120

109

105

108 108

1071

104 94

109

107 106

108

96

98

98

98

122

121

120

122

""

103

102

106

110 106

122

115

116

1201

""

107

""

106 107

108 107

50

58

20

3

108

107

107

109

108

"

""

51

28

18

3

107

101

13

"

A

102호

103호

104호

52

37

20

2

121

112

105

110

113-

>>

53

52

30

1

104

""

"

دو

وو

104

107

107호

54

36

20

88

89

""

"

891 87 91

108 107

55

41

20

116

115

"2

115 117 117

56

38

10

2

110

111

23

"

113 116 115

57

38

15

3

122

122

122 121 125

A

"

58

32

8

2

105

105

106 108

1101

""

""

"

59

36

20

2

94

59

""

60

46

20

1

101

"

61

33

11

92

>>

62

23

4

136

133

""

""

""

63

30

14

116

"

64

29

10

108

""

>

A

65

33

13

118

>>

""

""

66

53

30

100

""

67

29

10

104

""

""

""

68

34

5

100

382F

23

"2

""

69

31

15

""

70

36

15

"

71

19

OD GO -

3

3

103 116 99

وو

وو

""

"

911 89 89

101 100 1021 101

901 90 91

93

132 132 129

116 1143 115 112

104 106 105 115 117 114

103 104

97

101층

116

110 108 113 102 109 109

99 99 99 103 105 107

119 118

1011 1011 101 100

90/1/

118

XI, D-TABLE shewing the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of PATIENTS treated in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUM

during the Year 1882

No

Native of

Age

Disease

Date of Admission

Date of Discharge

No of Days in Asylum

Description of Patients

1234 10 5 - ∞

Chinese,

48

West Indian, English,

Anglo-Chinese,

Chinese,

6

American,

7

English,

8

Indian,

**5*888

Suicidal Melancholia,

4th May

18th May

14

PC 367

24

Epileptic Mania,

26th May

2nd Sept

97

37

Suicidal Melancholia,

22nd June

1st July

9

34

Dementia,

12th July

Still in Asylum

Board of Trade

Private paying

Police Case

38

Mania,

24th July

25th July

1

"

27

Mania,

22nd Aug

30th Aug

8

Private paying

39

Melancholia.

29th Aug

26th Oct

36 Dementia

4th Nov

29th Dec

எக

58

55

Police Case

Remaining in Hospital on the 1st

January, 1882

Admitted duling the year 1882

Total Cases Treated

in the Hospital

Discharged Died

XII. TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1882

Death Rate per cent,

including Incurables and Monbund Cases

Death Rate in the Total of the 68,592 Treated at and in the Hospital

Number of Out-Patients Treated at the Hospital

}

Remaining in Hospital

on 1st Jan,

#

1883

Male

Fe- male

Male

Fe- male

Male

Fe- male

Male

Fe- male

Male

Fe- male

Male

Fe- male

Total Male

Fe- male

Total

Pei cent

Male

Fe- mile

Total

72

14

236 1,181 1,112

250 618 84 478

150 53,943 13,215 67,158 | 40 37

60

43 79

0 912

88 16 104

XIII.-VACCINATIONS performed during the Year 1882, by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA

IN VILLAGES AND RURAL DISTRICTS TOTAL NUMBER OF VACCINATIONS.

1,611

Aberdeen, Shau-ki-wan, Yau-ma-ti,

15

53 152 84)

1,763

XIV.-CASES of SMALL POX treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1882

REMAINING IN

HOSPITAL

ADMITTED DURING

THE YEAR 1882

DISCHARGED

DILD

REMAINING IN HOSPITAL

Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

6

4

10

4

2

6

1

2

3

1

XV -LOCK HOSPITAL

TABLE A

→→SHEWING the ADMISSION into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 25 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIFTS issued

and the AVERAGE LENGTH of TREATMENT

1

ADMISSIONS

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED

124

1858,

1808,

4,797

1858,

43 8

162

1859,

1859,

5 389

1809

30 8

361

1860,

9,107

1860,

23 7

1860,

442

1861,

1861,

10,778

1861,

23 4

1862,

485

1862,

12,193

1862,

22 0

420

1863,

1863,

11,707

1863,

237

442

1861,

1864,

11,940

1864,

270

1865,

390

1865,

11,303

1860,

28 0

1866,

406

1866

13,060

1866

28 6

1867,

434

1867,

13,120

1567,

25 5

1868,

579

1868,

16,462

1868,

23 6

546

1869,

1869,

16,799

1869,

248

722

1870,

1870,

18 382

1870,

23 1

1871,

593 1871,

12,308

1871,

18 5

1872,

656 1872,

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500 1873,

11,219

1873,

195

1874,

345

1874,

6814

1874,

186

1875,

134 1875,

2916

1875,

187

168

1876,

2,730

1876,

143

1876,

177

1877,

1877,

3,069

1877,

166

105

1878,

1878,

2,242

1878,

190

129

1879,

1879,

2,199

1879,

136

57

1880,

1880,

1,300 1880,

44

1881,

1881,

1,330 1881,

147 21 7

1882,

99

1882,

1,831

1882,

* 15 5

* Daily average detention 5 days Longest detention 102 days

في

Number of Beds in Lock Hospital

18

TABLE B

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No 10 during the Year 1882

Number admitted

into Hospital

on Certificates of Visiting Surgeon

Number who submitted voluntarily

99

205

Number against whom it was necessary to proceed by Information before the Registrar General

25

Total Number brought under

the Provisions of the Ordinance

230

Total Number of Examinations made during the Year

10,441

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found

10,342

Total Number Discharged

from Hospital.

97

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No of Females admitted

anto Lock Military Naval Police Civil

ospital Hospital Hospital Hospital Hospital

ADMITTED INTO

Total No of Men Diseased

TABLE C

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1882

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per Month)

Average No of

Soldiers Seamen Police

Mer- chant Seamen

Men in Garnison and Port (per month)

99

138*

168+

40

1241

569

999

761 | 690

12,461 14,911

0 318

TABLE D

Average Percentage

of Men Diseased (per month)

REMARKS

* One case of primary syphilis, and one case of secondary syphilis were admitted to Mili- tary Hospital among the Troops from the Straits Settlements and are not included in this return among the admissions One case of Gonorrhoea was not contracted in H'kong † 58 of the admissions into the Naval Hospital

were not contracted in Hongkong 53 of the admissions into the Civil Hospital

were not contracted in Hongkong

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1882

EXAMINATION

HOSPITAL

DISCHARGED

Average No of

days per month

on which Examı- nations were held

Total Number of

Examinations made during the

year

Number admitted

into

Hospital

Total Number of Examinations made when no Dis-] ease was found

13

10,441

99

10,342

DISEASES

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do,

Do, and Primary Syphilis combined, Secondary Syphilis,

TOTAL,

TABLE D 2

No remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1881

Admitted

Total Treated

Cured

36

37

36

40

40

38

21

21

20

2

3

3

2

99

101

97

No remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1882

Shewing the Number of UNLICENSED PROSTITUTES apprehended under Ordinance No 10 of 1867, during the Year 1882

NO OF WOMEN

In Houses,

41

DISEASES

CONVICTED

DISCHARGED

25

16

TABLE E

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1882

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

Do,

and Primary Syphilis, combined,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Gonorrhoea and

Secondary Syphilis,

Gleet,

Bubo,

do,

Do and Excoriation of Ficenum,

Do

and Gonorrhoea,

Do

and Primary Syphilis,

do,

Gonorrhoeal Rheumatism and Conjunctivitis,

FOUND DISEASED

9

Military

Hospital

Naval Hospital

Police Hospital

Civil Hospital

44

44

*77

97

1

3

13

13

#5437

8

13

10

37

1

5

4

17

1

27

14

2

7

2

1

TOTAL,

1882,

138

168

40

124

TOTAL,

1881,

136

245

37

96

:

121

1

TABLE E 2

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT

TABLE shewing the Number of NAVAL MEN admitted into NAVAL HOSPITAL during the Year 1882.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS

January, February, March, April,.....

May, June, July, August, September,

October,..... November,

December,.....

Months

·

....

..

....

Contracted at Hongkong

Contracted Elsewhere

1

Total

***

219

2

Total Number,

3

1

9

2

OF S

3171

1

1

4

4

I

1

23

TABLE E 3

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT

TABLE shewing the Number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL during the Year 1882

SECONDARY SYPHILIS

January, February, March,

·

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Months

Contracted at Hongkong

Contracted Elsewhere

1

....

Juod ¿O O7 CO A

4

3

2

1

Total Number,

Total

3

2

1

1

16

XVI —TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY among the Foreign ResidenTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years

Years

Number of European and

American Residents

Deaths

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents

1873,

2,520

49

1874,

2,520

72

194 2 85

1875.

2,520

59

234

1876,

2,520

74

2 93

1877,

2,767

84

3 03

1878,

2,767

67

2 42

1879,

2,767

55

198

1880,

2,767

69

2 49

1881,

3,040

64

- 1882,

3,040

55

210 1 80

Average of 10 Years, .

2,722 8

648

238

XVII.—TABLE shewing the Work performed by the INSPECTORS of NUISANCES during the Year 1882

No of Summonses No of Persons

Issued

Arrested

No of Persons Discharged

No of Persons Fined

No of Notices Issued

Total Amount of Fines in Dollars

119

43

20

142

3,900

$501 40

1

XVIII.—TABLE shewing the ANNUAL MEAN STATE of the ATMOSPHERE, during the Year 1882, as recorded at the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPItal, 86 feet above mean low level of Spring Tide

FAHRENHEIT THERMOMETERS

HYGROMETERS

WINDS.

1882

BAROMETER

Self Registering in Shade

In Shade

Mean

Max Max Sun Sun Min Bulb Bulb on

Dry Bulb

Wet Bulb

Min

in soil

Quarter

(prevailing )

in

ex- Glass Inches

In Shade

In Shade

Max

Min

Vacuo posed

deep

MONTHS

9 AM

3 PM

Max Min

9 AM Noon3 PM

9 AM

3 PM 9 AM

3 PM

9 AM

3 PM

RAIN IN INCHES

During the MONTH

Νο

STATE OF WEATHER

OF

DAYS

HAV-

ING

RAIN

Average during the Month

9 AM

3 PM

Januuy,

30 13

30 07

740

43 0

699

521

620

65 6

65 4

107

80

54 2

512

612

65 o

56 0

585

N & E

N & E

0 45

4 Fine, 17 days Oveicast, 14 days | Fine, 25 days Overcast, 6 days

February,

30 09

30 04

710

43 0

63 6

49 9

55 6

62 2

61 7

103

76

517

49 3

58 6

615

537

56 2

NE & E

NE & E

V 76

9

March,

30 09

30 04

80 û

450

68 2

54 7

63 6

66 8

66 4

107

80

56 7

54 0

63 0

66 2

57 6

60 8

NE & E

NE & E

071

12

April,

29 96

29.91

880

54 0

77 3

63 1

726

762

76 4

117

90

65 0

62 3

72 2

763

67 6

708

E & W

F & W

3 76

13

"

May,

29 84

29 79

910

610

83 6

69 7

791

82 2

81 7

121

91

710

67 7

787

814

743

765

E & W

E & W

15 46

19

12

June,

29 77

29 74

94 0

70 0

882

740

83 7

867

86 1

128

95

754

72 5

836

86 1

784

806

F & W

E & W

10 01

19

16

July,

29 71

29 68

95 0

710

90 2

74 5

849

88 5

87 2

129

96

724

730

81 5

87 2

792

81 3

E & W

E & W

17 06

18

17

723267

19

15

13

"}

"}

""

}}

"

}}

19

12

19

"}

"}

وو

>>

*1

"}

"}

17

20

10

"

}}

"}

"}

15

19

10

21

>>

""

14

20

10

""

"}

">

}}

"

14

19

12

>>

""

}"

"}

77

""

>>

August,

29 69

29 66

920

700

87 3

72 5

826

857

85 3

118

93

742

711

823

85 2

77 3

79 1

F & W

E & W

18 04

15

15

15

17

14

""

>>

>>

September,

29 83

29 80

930

700

89 4

73 5

83 4

87 5

83 1 131

94

750

725

828

86 5

770

798

E & W

E & W

5 03

17

21

9

26

4

"}

>>

}}

"}

October,

29 93

29.89

93 0

66 0

86 8

702

802

85 2

84 3 131 94

723

69 6

79 8

84 3

719

757

E & W

E & W

1 03

29

2

""

33

"?

November,

30 01

29.96

86 0

48 0

76 1

61 2

70 9

74 8

74 1

107

81

63 0

61 7

70 3

741

627

66 7

NL & E

NE & E

0 42

12

18

59

>>

11

December,

30 04

30 00

80 0

38 0

69 8

543

63 1

68 4

67 0

106

76

558

58 0

624

66 9

55 0

588

Nk & E

NE & E

22

9

"}

"}

""

: ཧྨ ;

17

130

33

"}

"

25

6

>>

"

"}

Annual Mean,

29 92

29 88

86 4

56 6

79 8

64 1

73 5

77 5

76 5

117

87

65 5

63 6

730

768

67 5

73 3

73 13

121

Total Total

THERMOMETER, FAHRENHEIT

RAINFALL IN INCHES

during during |

the

the

year

yeal

1874

1875

1876

1877

1878

1879

1880

1881

1882

1874

1875

1876

1877 1878 1879 1880

1881

1882

Maximum,

90 0

910

90 0

95 0

95 0

94 0

95 C

96 0

95 0

Minimum,

47 0

410

37 0

41 0

38 0

45 0

39 0

40 0

38 0

48 98

83 43

103 55

76 72 84 40 90 70 111 57 | 98 21 73 13

Range,

43 0

50.0

53 0

540

57 0

49 0

56 0

56 0

57 0

**

LABORATORY,

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 15th February, 1883.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the following report of the work done in the Laboratory during 1882

2 Seventy-one Analyses were made Of these, four were researches for poison in cases of suspected poisoning, two were researches for poison in-cases of suspected drugging, and one was a research for poison in a case of malicious poisoning of fish The remainder were quantitative and qualitative analyses of water, milk, bread, wine, porter, lime-juice, milk, sugar and opium.

3 Water received most attention. A number of well-waters in the city were examined at the nstance of Mr CHADWICK, and a report on the same furnished to him Well-waters from Stanley, Aberdeen and Kau-lung have also been examined and reported upon The accompanying table gives the result of the monthly analyses of the Pok-fu-lum water. The samples were drawn from a tap in direct connection with a main in which the supply of water is continuous. In the same way as last year the organic impurity increases in the hot rainy season and decreases again in the cold and dry season The increase of organic impurity is contemporaneous with an increase of turbidity, and is mainly if not altogether due to matter in suspension. This is in a great measure proved by comparing the June analysis with an analysis made, in the same month, on a highly filtered sample, the result of which is given at the bottom of the table These two analyses clearly demonstrate how much the water would be improved by an efficient filtration, and the necessity for constructing filter-beds for effecting that purpose Another noticeable feature in the table is the faint odour recorded in February, March, April, May and December The cause of this may be due to the turbid state in which the water enters the pipes, the deposition of some of the suspended matters therein, and the subsequent decay of the organic portions thereof, or it may be that the intermittent system of supply has some- thing to do with it In any case it is a thing deserving attention, and the cause should be removed. The increase in the amount of Chlorine recorded after the typhoon in October 1881 continued until the

rainy season, when a decided decrease occurred

4. Taking the samples of milk submitted for analysis as representing the average condition in which this valuable food is sold, adulteration with water still largely prevails

5. In the three samples of bread examined, no foreign substances were detected contained a slight excess of moisture, and two of them had a faint musty taste.

All the samples

So far as

6 The two cases of drugging which came under notice are of considerable importance is known, they are the first instances in which it has been clearly shown that of the frequent cases of alleged drugging which come before the Police Court, some have a solid foundation

The first case happened in Aberdeen. Some men from another village visited an acquaintance there, and he invited them to join him in his evening meal They consented, and themselves procured some samshu All apparently drank from the same brew, but the host was the only one affected. The remains of the rice of which he partook, and a small pot containing some Chinese wine which was found in the room were brought for analysis The pot of wine was not that from which all appeared to have drunk and did not belong to the occupant of the room Nothing foreign was found in the rice

In the wine an Alkaloidal substance, producing physiological effects peculiar to those caused by certain plants belonging to the solanaceous order, was detected The second case occurred in the city A few persons after eating congee became more or less stupefied. The remains of the congee were brought for analysis In this an Alkaloidal substance, producing the same physiological effects as the substance detected in the wine in the first case, was found Unfortunately it was impossible to prove what particular plant was used in either of these cases, but no doubt it was a Datura, and most probably the variety known as Datura Alba The Chemical tests for the mydriatic alkaloids, derived from plants belonging to the solanaceous order, are not so distinctive as is desirable The Physiological tests are extremely delicate and certain, but they do not afford any means of distinguishing from which plant the alkaloid has been derived. Whether in these cases the wine and rice were drugged to facilitate the commission of other crimes, or whether the cases were merely trumped up for revenge, the fact remains that the lower classes of Chinese are cognisant of and use for producing stupefaction one or more of the poisonous solanaceous plants.

7 The case of malicious poisoning of fish which occurred in the Central market is worthy of some attention It was a cunningly devised plan for attaining the object in view, with a minimum amount of risk to the operator The substance used kills fish with certainty, although it takes some little time to act In this case it was so prepared that on being dropped into water it readily sank to the bottom, and took some time to diffuse through it. At least half an hour would elapse from the time it was added before the fish would show manifest signs of poisoning. Even then, to those unacquainted with it, the water would have no marked indications of its presence. Fortunately in this case a lump of the material was found and forwarded for analysis. A research for mineral poison and for alkaloids resulted in failure The substance appeared to be some vegetable

F

er, mixed with sand and moistened with petroleum. A partial proximate analysis showed the esence of petroleum, fixed oil, a resinous substance, vegetable matter insoluble in 84 per cent alcohol, and and

Experiments on fish showed the resinous substance to be the principal toxic agent Further examination of this resinous matter proved it to be closely allied to, if not identical with the

Lucosule called saponin.

This knowledge of the substance could not be considered satisfactory, and inquiries were instituted for the purpose of ascertaining what vegetable substances were generally used by the Chinese for poisoning fish. Mr. ORLEY, Inspector of Markets, succeeded in procuring two substances called by the Chinese Cha-tsai Fan () and Cha-tsai Peng (1) stating he had been informed they were used conjointly when mixed with oil as a fish poison

The ordinary purpose

for which the former is used is to remove greasy stains, and for washing things generally, the latter as a hair wash On examination both appeared to be the same thing in different forms, and cor- responded with the substance previously examined, which had been used as a fish poison Further enquiries indicated that they were derived from the fruit of the Camellia Oleifera, a tree which closely resembles the tea tree, and is sometimes confounded with it Mr FORD very kindly procured and gave- me some of the fruit of this tree. The seeds yielded a large percentage of a fixed oil, and also contained a substance giving most of the reactions of saponin, but differing from it in some points. These differences may be due to slight impurity, or the substance may be distinct from saponin, although very similar to it

8. It would thus seem to be satisfactorily proved that Cha-tsai Fan was the material used in the case of the malicious poisoning of fish, that the active principal- thereof is either saponin or a very closely allied substance, that it is derived from the seeds of the Camellia Oleifera, and that the method of production is first to remove the oil from the seeds by pressure, and then to reduce the cake sex *** obtained to a fine powder Saponin or closely related substances have been found in many rants of different orders, but this appears to be the first time it has been recorded as occurring in the Camelliaceæ

I have the honour to be,

Sır.

Your most obedient Servant

Dr PH B C AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon

HUGH MCCALLUM. Analyst

MONTHLY ANALYSES OF POKFULAM WATER FOR 1882

PARTS PER MILLION

GRAINS PER GALLON

MONTH

Smell when Phosphoric

heated to Acid in 100° Fahr Phosphates

Chlorine

Free Abuminoid Ammonia. Ammonia

in

Chlorides

Oxygen absorbed in four hours at 80° Fahr.

Degree of Hardness

Total

solid matter Wanklyn's

dried at 212° Fahr.

Scale

January, February,

March,

None Faint

None

0 00

0 064

09

0 0270

3 1

14

0 00

0 050

09

0 0280

35

16

"

Very faint

0 01

0 064

09

0 0315

3 3

14

دو

0 008

0 072

09

0 0350

33

14

>>

"

0 006

0 104

07

0 0770

47

1 2

"

None

0 008

0 088

06

0 0700

41

12

"

0 008

0 092

06

0 0910

37

12

....

"

J

0 006

0 076

06

0 0665

34

14

""

0 006

0 060

06

0 0700

32

1 2

""

0 00

0 062

07

0 0315

32

1.2

"

""

Slight trace

0 00

0 046

07

0 0315

3 1

14

Faint

None

0 00

0 048

07

0 0245

31

12

April, May, June,.. July, August, September,

October,

......

·

·

November,

December,

Collected in June 1882,

None

and well filtered,..

Laboratory, 15th February, 1883

Government Civil Hospital.

0 006

0 020

06

0 0175

39

26

}

1

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Analyst