Administrative Reports - 1879

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1879

Table of Contents

1 Police Annual Report and Returns

2 Gaol Annual Report and Returns

3 Annual Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts

4 Harbour Master's Annual Report

5 Report of Result of Examination on Grant-In-Aid Schools

6 Revenue and Expenditure, With Comparative Statement for 1878 & 1879

7 Post Office Annual Report

8 Annual Report on Government Education

9 Supplements to the Annual Report on Government Education in Hongkong

10 Annual Return of the Number of Cases Tried and Actions Commenced in the Supreme and Vice-Admiralty Courts

11 Report of Superintendent, Botanical Gardens and Plantations

12 Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure in 1879 & 1880

13 Reports of Colonial Surgeon and Other Sanitary Papers

 




De thus appears once only in the seven years as an addition to the Gaol, but forms an unit in every weekly average during that period. Whereas in former years when short sentences were the rule the same prisoner might appear five or six-different times in one year, and swell up the total of prisoners admitted during the year.

4. If the number of admissions to the Gaol be any criterion of the state of crime, the Colony is to he congratulated on the decrease of crime during the last two years which compare favourably with the previous sixteen years taking into consideration, the increase of population. The admissions during the last 18 years have been as follows :--

1862,..

1863,

1864,

...

1865,.....

1866,

1867,

1868,..

1869,

1870,.....

...admissions 3,088.

1871,

....

3,033.

1872,

17

3,957.

1873,

6,290.

""

1874,...

}}

6,688.

1875.

""

3,896.

1876,

4,546.

1877

""

4,347.

1878,..

4,122.

""

1879,...

..admissions 3,917.

})

6,268.

""

4,280.

""

3,281,

""

3,680.

4,065.

3,946.

}}

3,803.

""

3,669.

}

5. This speaks well for the deterrent effect of the discipline at present carried on in the Gaol. The success which has attended the adoption of the separate system is in my opinion complete, and I only regret that there seems no near prospect of its more extended application.

#

6. At the close of 1878 in accordance with a recommendation, made on my suggestion by the Gaol Commission, which sat under the Chairmanship of Mr. Justice SNOWDEN, an attempt was made to introduce the separate system on a small scale. Two large basement halls which had been used for other purposes were divided off into 46 cells. These were ready for occupation at the close of 1878. I commenced introducing into them old offenders who were constantly returning to Gaol. From the 1st December 1878 to the 30th November 1879, one hundred and three prisoners passed through these separate cells, remaining in them from fourteen days to six months according to their sentences. They were employed at oakum picking, string making, tailoring or any other employment for which they were adapted, and were allowed one hour's exercise in the yard every day.

From the very commencement, as I anticipated, the prisoners disliked the system and tried every means to escape it. In the first month there were several attempts at suicide, but I found they were all feigned and as the prisoners did not get released thereby, but were in addition subjected to rigorous search several times each day to prevent them from secreting articles which might facilitate attempts at suicide they found it wiser to accept the discipline. The separate cells so far from being injurious to the health of the prisoners have contributed the fewest inmates to the Hospital, only five having been admitted viz :-

No. 622 "Fever" remained in Hospital from 9th to 13th October.

No. 433 "Constipation" remained in Hospital from 16th to 20th September.

No. 174 " Observation" remained in Hospital from 12th to 16th May.

No. 580 "Tonsilitis" remained in Hospital from 30th July to 11th August. No. 116" Diarrhea" remained in Hospital from 13th to 20th June.

7. The daily hour's vigorous exercise in association has prevented any injurious effects which might arise from seclusion. Of the 103 prisoners who passed through the separate cells only three have returned to Gaol a second time. Under the new Dietary Scale these three men will get Reduced Penal Diet in addition to their separate confinement. One of these three men has since been released' and I see that he is making strenuous efforts to obtain his livelihood by other than dishonest means.

8. I have much satisfaction in stating that I have every confidence in the Officers who are now employed in the Gaol, and who from the Warden downwards do their best to preserve discipline. Cases of incbriety on the part of the Officers are almost unknown, and consequently there are few complaints of assaults by them on prisoners, and such an occurrence as an attack by a prisoner on an 'Officer which is the natural outcome of bad discipline, and ill usage has.not happened since I have been in charge of the Gaol.

"

9. There have been only twelve cases of Corporal punishment for Gaol Offences during the last year, and these all occurred before the 8th Angut last since which date there has been no flogging in this Gaol.

10. The transfer of the Gaol Guards from the Police to the entire control of the Superintendent of the Gaol has been a most beneficial step and the men are not only well satisfied, but seem more active in their duties.

ery the

ners

s to the

ring

11. I have made an attempt during the past year to increase profitable labour amongst the prisoners int although I have been most successful as far as I have been able to go, want of room curtails any further endeavours in this direction.

12. Out of the Officers' fine fund I purchased a number of amusing and instructive books and now there is formed the nucleus of a good Officers' library. The want of a reading room is very much felt, but at present there is no accommodation for, such a purposę.

The only

y

the

de to d for 1878. 1 the

these

They

they

every

were

orous

1

pts at us to

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&'c.,

&'c.

I have the honour, t

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

M. S. TONNOCHY, Superintendent.

RETURN showing the NUMBER of PRISONERS in VICTORIA GAOL on the last Day of each Week of the Year 1879.

; been

EURO-

WEEKLY. 1879.

PEANS.

CHINESE OR COLOURED.

TOTAL.

WEEKLY.

1879.

EURO-

PEANS.

CHINESE OR COLOURED.

TOTAL.

Males.

Males. Females.

Males.

Males.

Females.

January 5

31

554

12

.36

534

10

11

19

29

466

"

26

30

459

3

*

February

#

2

35

480

10

9

37

486

12

16

42

480

11

1

which r three educed ∙leased

וי

* 23

37

489

HOOTOR-O

596

July

6

39

514

17

570

580

13

38

528

15

581

""

9

504

20

45

530

13

588

""

7

496

27

39

494

15

548

19

525

August

3

38

491

14

543

535

10

58

499

17

574

11

533

17

46

498

17

561

9

535

24

60

514

16

590

"1

March

2

51

501

11

563

31

58

526

13

597

"2

9

50

515

13

578

September 7 47

538

14

599

16

35

526

15

576

14

53

564

15

632

""

11

23

34

572

13

619

""

30

34

561

15

610

"1

225

21

48

512

17

577

28

35

500

18

553

eans.

April

6

41.

566

13

620

October

5

34

536

15

585

13

40

574

16

630

12'

36

524

15

575

"1

20

'e now

27

May.

4

11

18

25

Jrne

8

15

29

• 31

20

Cases plaints which arge of

the last

ging in

ident of 2 active

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 8th March, 1880.

41

570

13

624

19

40

526

19

-585

49

564

14

627

26

34

524

17

575

43

• 587

J

13

643

November 2

33

508

20

561

41

£58

13

612

9

32

504

16

552

3

22

43

535

12

>

590

16

33

504

16

553

وو

46

527

11

584.

23

30

490

16

536

41

512

12

*55

30

33

485

12

530

"1

29

518

14

561

December 7

35

485

14

534

29

523

18

570

14

35

499

11

5-15

"}

539

17

587

21

40

495

12

547

35

516

16

507

28

38

500

17

555

""

M. S. TONNOCHY, Superintendent,

I

CLASS

OF

PRISONERS.

EUROPEAN.....

INDIAN

CHINESE

Females,... { Males, ............. Females,... Males, .........***

{Females,.......

{Males,

!

RETURN showing the CLASSIFICATION of OFFENCES, for which PRISONERS were committed to VICTORIA GAOL, from the respective COURTS of the COLONY, during the Year 1879.

1

14

...

3

1

:

:

:

-

13

879

14

309

2

1

2

16

4

...

...

་་་

111 5 1

2

;:

6

18

4

3

117

655

28

t

3

...

:

n

9

...

H

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

12

8

4

1

12

1

:

48

1

3348 11 3,125

431

133

143

...

86

68

S

Co

50

7

362

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Cutting and wounding, or Assault occasioning

grievous bodily harm.

Assault with intent, to rob, or Robbery with violence.

Burglary, Attempted Burglary, Breaking, entering and stealing, and having possession of house- breaking implements.

Larceny, Larceny from a house, from Person, from Ships or Boats in Harbour or on the High Seas.

Obtaining goods or money by false pretences.

Unlawful possession, and Receiving stolen goods.

Child stealing, Kidnapping, Abduction of females, Forcible detention, and Buying or Selling human beings.

Uttering counterfeit coin or notes.

Perjury, and Preferring a false charge.

Embezzlement.

Piracy with violence.

Conspiracy to defraud.

Escape.

Common Assault, Assault with wounding, Fighting, Disorderly conduct, Drunkenness, Refusing to pay chair hire, Resisting Police, and Using abusive language.

Misconduct as a Private or Public Servant, Refusing duty, Negligence, Desertion, Absent without leave, and Remaining behind from ships.

Breach of Military and Naval Discipline.

Breach of Conditional Pardon, and Returning from

Deportation.

Breach of Ordinance for Weights and Measuïcs.

Gambling, or Haunting Gambling-Houses, Rogue and Vagabond, Suspicious and dangerous characters. Vagrancy and Mendi- cancy, and Obtaining passages surreptitiously onboard ships.

Neglect to provide infant child with necessaries of life.

Unlawful hawking or Selling goods without Licence, Uttering cries, Without Passes or Lights, Obstruction, Nuisance, Damaging property, Firing crackers, Making bontire, Defiling stream, Indecent exposure, Trespassing, Breach of Ordinance for Harbour and Yurket Regulations.

Using Threats,

Breach of Brothel Ordinance.

Exposing Dead Bodies.

Attempting to commit Suicide.

On Remand, for Trial, and pending orders, &c.

For Debt.

TOTAL.

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 8th March, 1880.

TOTAL,

15.

5

5

13

893

16

313

31

1 16

5132

522

113

-

89

4

3

464

-

690

:

...

8

H

4 | 410| 22 |3,669

Superintendent.

M. S. TONNOCHY,

No. 65.

"

0

>

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following Returns connected with the business of the Superior and Subordinate Courts of the Colony, for the year 1879, are published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 10th March, 1880.

Ngmber of Cases.

Number of Persons.

4

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, during the Year 1879.

CRIMES.

422

8

Assault,

Assault cecasioning actual Bodily Harm, Assault with Intent to prevent Arrest,

Attempt to commit an Unnatural Offence,.

Being found at Night with House-breaking Implements, Breach of Conditional Pardon......

9 Breaking, entering and stealing in a Dwelling House,

Breaking out of a Dwelling flouse having been there with Intent to steal, Burglary,.

Conspiracy to defraud,

Counterfeiting Coin,

16

Child Stealing,

Entering a Dwelling at Night with Intent to commit a Felony therein, Embezzlement,

Escape,

Forcibly detaining a Woman with Intent to sell her,

6 Highway Robbery with Violence,..

2 Harbouring a Woman for the Purpose of Prostitution,

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Death recorded.

Penal Servitude.

Hard labour, over

Hard labour, 1 Year and under.! 1 Year.

SENTENCE.

Solitary Confinement, Number of Persons.

Number of Persons. Privately Flogged,

Number of Cases.

Number of Per-

sons.

Number of Cases.

Number of Ter-

sons.

ABANDONED.

POSTPONED.

CHARGES

CASES

- GD

11

4

+

1

5

2

:~ :71

2

1

5

2

16

16 Larceny,

12

ลง

Larceny by a Servant.

12

Larceny in a Dwelling House,

10

Larceny on board Ship in the Harbour,

5

Leading and taking away a Woman out of the Colony for the Purpose Į

1

-A

7 of Prostitution,......

1

1

Manslaughter,

...

1

1

Murder,

1 3 Murder on the High Seas,

3

3

- cr

1

3

1

3

Murder, the deceased having been within three months previously

2

~

employed on board a British ship as a Seaman,

Neglecting to provide Infant Child with Necessaries of Life,

Perjury,

Piracy,

3

1

Piracy with Violence,.....

Receiving Goods piratically stolen,

13 Receiving Stolen Goods.

2 Returning om Deportation,

Robbery, being armed,

23 Robbery from the Person,

Robbery from the Person with Violence,.

Robbery from the Person, being armed,

Selling a Woman for the Purpose of Prostitution,..

5 Unlawfully Wounding,

"

Wounding with Intent to do grievous Bodily Harm,

4 Unlawfully and by force bringing into this Clony a Child for the

Perpose of Selling her,

2 Unlawfully detaining a Woman for the Purpose of Emigration,.

148 202

Unlawfully giving False Statement to Registrar General,

+

2

10

20

1

mai mi wi i ∞⠀ -⠀ -⠀

1

...

1

3

2

4 2

4

11

3

1

2

Ca

133

51

11

:

6 78

36 17

<

• In this Case the Prisoner was sentenced to 9 days' Simple Imprisonment and to pay a Fine of Fifty Dollars.

:

11

13

C

...

***

:

:.

C. B. PLUNKET,

Registrar.

གརཱ; ''ཎཿ

i

Arrest.

HHH

Distress.

TOTAL

For .

entering | [Gambling]

Houses.

Magis- trates Onders.

Search.

ลง

2

259

21

179

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNIZANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT, DURING THE YEAR 1879. CASES HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.*

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MagistraATES, DURING THE YEAR 1879.

Warrants.

1

K.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

.145

13

18

47

12

179

17

4

3

18

3

34

8,103

602

1,088

151

:

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,.

.8,705

7,009

J. F. M. F.

189

36 1,000

8,705 | 5,758

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

TOTAL

OF

CASES.

TOTAL

NOMBER NUMBER OF

PRISO-

NERS.

P

"

C

}

f

C

CH

C

C

B

B

B

B

CH

B

R

B

B

B

B

D}}

TB

B

B

R

B

B

B.

}}

A

1,708

A

..... N

OFFENCE.

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:

No, OF CABES.

No. of PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCE.

24

30

Brought forward,

Conspiracy to defrand.....

Abduction and Sale of Women and Female Children, Absent from Ship without Leave, (see “ Senmien Abusive Language, (sez “ Breach of the Peace"). Accessory after the Fact to Felony, (see “ Felony

before

(

Accusing of Crime--Conspiracy for, (see Conspiracy”), Aiding and Abetting in Felony, (see “Felony"). Alms-Soliciting, (see “Mendicancy").

Animals--Cruelty to,...........

Arms Chinese not Holders of Night Passes found carrying, Army and Navy-Desertion from H.M.'s, (see “Desertion”), Arson,

Artificers and Artizans-Misconduct as, (see “Workmen”). Assault-At or in connection with riotous Assemblages,... —Accompanied with Damage to Property, -Common,

~

12

No. or

No. of

CASES.

PRI- SONERS.

1,060 |1,412

7

17

14

19

31

Constable of Police-Assault. &c., on, (see “Assaults”).

"}

*

-Assuming Name and Designation

of, (see “Police").,

-Attempt to bribe, (se “Bribery"). --Misconduct as, (ær “Police").

Consular l'orts-Deportation to this Colony from, (see

"Deportation,” &c.).

Contagious Diseases Ordinance--Breach of, Coolie Lodging. Houses-Unlicensed, (se“Unlicensed,”

&c.).

Coroner's Summonses to attend Inquests-Disobedience

of, by Juror, (see “Jurors").

Crackers-Making Bonfires or Firing, (see “Bonfires,"

&c.)

Crime-Conspiracy to accuse of, (see "Conspiracy"). Crimes and Offences committed in Chinese Territory,

(see "Chinese Territory").

Crown Land-Trespass on, (see "Trespass ").

Cruelty to Animals, (see “Animals ").

Cutting and Wounding with Intent to do grievous

bodily Harm,

Cutting and Wounding with Intent to murder,.. Damage to Property, (see “Malicious Injuries"). Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of.

Dangerous and offensive Trades-Carrying on,

**

""

Weapons-Found by Night

armed with, with Intent to break into a Dwelling House, (see "Night ").

Deaths and Births--Breach of Ordinance for, (see

"Births," &c.).

Decoying persons into or away from the Colony, ..... Deed-Inducing a person by Violence to execute a............ Deportation from Shanghai and other Consular Ports |

of China, under H.M's. Order in Council, 1865, Deportation from Consular Ports of Japan, under H.

M.'s Order in Council, 1865,

Deportation-Returning from, (see "Banishment" and

"Conditional Pardon ").

Deported Persons-Harbouring,

Desertion from Foreigu Ships,

546

754

-Indecent.

3:

11

-On Police in the Execution of their Duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

81

120

"

-With Intent to rob,

""

to commit an Unnatural Offence,

"}

**

"

2

1

6

8

17

-With wounding..

-On Females and Boys under 14 years of age, -On l'erson to prevent lawful Apprehension, Attempting to commit Felony. (see “Felony"),

"

"}

"

"

31

other Offences,

extort by Threats, Menaces, &c., (see

"Threat," &c.).

bribe Police Constables, (see "Bribery "). Auctioneer-Unlicensed, (see “Unlicensed ”). Banishment-Returning after, (see also "Conditional

Pardon"),.

Bankrupt-Fraud by,

Beasts or Birds-Larceny of, (see “Larceny "). Begging, (e "Mendicancy ").

Bestiality, (see Unuatural Offences").

Bills-Posting, (see "Posting Bills").

Birds--Brench of Ordinance for Preservation of.....

Births and Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of, Blasting Scones, (see “Nuisances ”).

Boarding Houses for Seamen-Unlicensed, (see “Unli-

censed).

Boats-Larceny in the Harbour on board (see “Larceny”).

-Exposing Night Soil along the Praya in open, (see

Nuisances *).

"

44

"

"

-Obstruction of Wharves by, (see “Obstruction,”). -Refusing to pay Hire of,.

-Unlicensed Plying of,

-Breach of Ordinance for Cargo, (see Cargo

Boats").

Bodily Injuries-Cutting and wounding and inflicting.

(see "Cutting," &c.).

Bonfires-Firing Crackers, or making..............

Breach of the Peace--Behaviour calculated to provoke a............ Bribery,

British Merchant Seamen-Refusal of Duty by, (see

"Seamen ").

Buggery, (see “Unnatural Offences ").

Buiblings-Breach of Ordinance for. Burglary,

Burial of Chinese Corpse elsewhere than in a Cemetery, Cargo Boats-Breach of Ordinance for,.

Cattle--Bringing into the Colony diseased, (see “Un-

wholesome Provisions").

6

6

12

60

:9

72

36

28

22

72

39

3

3

22:

2

20

30

-Turned loose on Public Ways, -Stealing,

struction").

Chairs and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for Street, Chair Coolies-Obstruction of Public Ways by, (see “ Ob-

L.

Chair Hire--Refusing to pay Vehicle or, (see “Chairs and

Vehicles").

4

1

2

C

2

G

39

39

19

19

20

20

1

1

7

7

720 1,216

>

3000

33

41

:

from H.M's. Army and Navy,

"

from British Merchant Ships,

Assisting in the-of Soldiers and Seamen..

gabonds," &c.).

Destitutes-(see "Vagrants," under "Rogues and Va-

Diseased Cattle--Bringing into the Colony, (see “Un-

wholesome Provisions ").

Disorderly Behaviour-Accompanied with Damage toĮ

Distilling--Micit,

Property,

-Drunkenness, Fighting, &c.,..

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c.,

Stealing.

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,

Dredging in the Harbour at Anchorage for Ships-of-

war, (see "Harbour").

Driving furiously--(see “Furious driving").

Drugs Administering.

Drunkenness (see “ Disorderly Behaviour").

Ducks-Selling in the Streets, (see "Breach of Markets

Ordinance").

Dust Bins-Negleting to clean out, (see “Nuisances").

-Raking. ( see "Nuisances").

Dwelling Houses-Found by Night with Dangerous and

"1

"

Offensive Weapons with Intent to break into, (see “ Night”).

-Found by Night in-with Intent to

commit Felony, (see “Night"). -Larceny in a. (see “Larceny ").

Earth-Cutting from prohibited Places, (see "Trespass

on Crown Land”).

Embezzlement,

Embracery,

Enclosed Places and Gardens-Larceny of Vegetables

and Fruits froni, (see “Larceny "),

66

Encroachment on Crown Land, (see Trespass on

Crown Land").

Escape of Prisoners from Gaol,.

"}

from Custody, ....?.

-Negligently allowing,

Evilence Giving wilful false, (see "False Charge," &c.).. Explosive Substances-Breach of Ordinance for Stor-

age of......

Extortion by Colour of Office,

9

9

102

127

Chai Mui-Night Noises by playing at the Game called,

(see “Night").

Child Stealing,

35

56

Child, not providing with sustenauce,

1

Chinese Corpsc-Burial of, elsewhere than in a Cemetery,

(see “Burial).

Arms, (see "Arms").

Chinese--not Holders of Night Passes found carrying

-Offenders found in the Colony after Banishment under Ordinance 9 of 1857 and in Breach of Conditional Pardon under Ordinance 1 of 1560, (see "Banishment” and “Conditional Pardon”).

Chinese Passengers' Act, 1855,–Preach of................ Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in,. Clothes Hanging to dry over Public Ways, wet, (see

"Nuisances).

4

17

10

ཋ:

:..

by Menaces,

17

-Purchasing or Receiving Regimental, (we “Mi-

""

by Threats, (see “ Threats ").

litary Law").

False Charge-Preferring-or giving wilful false Evi-Į

Coin-Offences relating to...

18

39

dence,

Common Assault, (see “ Assault").

**

Larceny, (see “Larceny ").

Conditional Pardon-Breach of,

3

3

Confederating with Pirates, (see “ Piracy ").

Conspiracy to accuse of Crime,

Conspiracy to commit Feiony,

Carried forward..........

1,060|1,412

False Imprisonment,

Prétences-Obtaining Goods and Money by.......... Statements-Seamen presenting false Characters and inaking, (weg " Seamen ").

False Trade Marks and Labels-Fraudulently using,

(see "Trade Marks ").

Carried forward.................

>

10

2:

3

3

མ:

22

235

22

23

26

2,012 | 2,898

• OFFENCE.

No, OF

CASES.

NO. OF

11-

SONERS.

OFFENCE.

No. OF

CARLY.

NG. F

PRI- SONERS.

Brought forward..

Felony-Accessory before the Fact to,

after

-Aiding and abetting in

-Attempting to commit,

-Conspiracy

>>

(see “Conspiracy ").

-Found by Night in Dyelling Houses with Intent

to comnit, (see “Night ").

-Inciting a person to commit,.

Fence, Live or Dead-Larceny of, (see “Larceny ").

Ferocious Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled, to be at large,

(see “ Dogs").

Fighting, (see "Disorder

Behaviour ").

Filth and Rubbish-Allowing Accumulation in House, or

immediate Vicinity thereof, (see “Nuisances ").

Fire Arms-Discharging,

Fire Brigade Ordinance-Breach of,

Fish-Selling in the Streets, (see “Breach of Markets

Ordinance").

Forcibly detaining or taking away adults with intent to】

obtain ransom,

Foreign Ships-Desertion from, (see " Desertion ").

Men-of-war, Stragglers from, (see "Desertion ").

Forgery,.

Fowls-Selling in the Streets, (see "Breach of Markets

Ordinance").

Fraud by Bankrupt, (see “Bankrupt ").

-Conspiracy to commit, (see “Conspiracy").

Fruits and Vegetables in Gardens and enclosed Places-

Larceny of, (see “Larceny ").

Fugitive Criminals-Apprehension and Detention of, Furious Driving,

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,.

་་

-in the Streets, treated as Obstruction ofį

Public Ways,

Registered Householder permitting, in a House, -in Public Ways, treated as Rogues and Vaga-Į

bonds,

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for,

Gaol-Escape of Prisoners from, (see "Escape").

Gardens and enclosed Places-Larceny of Vegetables and

Fruits from, (see “Larceny ").

Geese-Selling in the Streets, (se "Breach of Markets

Ordinance").

Girls---Abduction of, (see " Abduction ”).

Goods and Money-Obtaining by False Pretences, (sce

"False Pretences ").

Gunpowder-Breach of Ordinance for Storage of,.

**

-Depositing Feloniously,

Harbour and Coasts Ordinance-Breach of,

"

Dredging at Anchorage for Ships-of-War in the,. Larceny on board Boat or Ship in the, (sce

"Larceny "). Regulations-Breach of,

Throwing Rubbish on the Beach or into the, (sec

"Nuisances").

Hawkers--Calling out in the Sale of their Wares, (see

"Street Noises ").

-Obstruction of Public Ways by, (see “Obstruc-

tion ").

-Unlicensed, (see “Unlicensed ").

Highway Robbery with Arms or with Violence, (see

Robbery ").

House-Allowing Filth and Rubbish to accumulate in, or in immediate Vicinity of, (see "Nuisances "). Larceny in a, (see "Larceny ").

་་

Neglecting to paint Number on,.......

--Registered Householder permitting Gambling in

a, (see "Gambling ").

-Found by Night in a-with Intent to commit

Felony therein, (see "Night").

"}

-Found by Night with dangerous and offensive Weapons, with Intent to break into a Dwelling,

(see "Night").

2,012 2,898

:

Brought forward.....

Labels and Trade Marks--Fraudulently using false, (sce♦

Trade Marks," &c.).

Larceny-Cattle, (s♬: "Cattle Stealing ").

–-Children, (see “Child Stealing "9.

-Dogs, (see “Dog Stealing "). -Common.

2.413 13,781

Pi Pi

1

34

35

Pe

ད·

9071,015

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,

3

6

>>

the Person,.

146

160

19

99

Wreck,

""

-in a Dwelling House,

17

"

of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and{

enclosed Places,

10

12

Po

"

-of Beasts or Birds not the subject of Larceny

4

at common Law,

-of Live or Dead Fence,..

9

Po

3

3

Lewdness, (see "Indecent Exposure," &c.).

Po

Libel,

Lights-Chinese not carrying at Night,

RL

1

1

13

13

Lodging Houses-Unlicensed Coolie, (see“ Enlicensed ").

Pr

2

Mails-Detention of H. M.'s, (see “Post Office").

Malicious Injury to Property,

50

54

Manslaughter,

1

Marine Store Dealers--Breach of Ordinance for, Markets Ordinance--Breach of,

249

249

229 £ £ ££

Pc

Pr

I'r

Pr

Mendicancy,

142

142

Men-of-War Anchorage--Dredging at, (see " Harbour “). Merchant Scamen-Desertion of, (sce "Desertion ").

-Refusal of Duty by British, (see

"Seainen").

""

Military Law-Breach of,

Military Stores--Breach of Ordinance prohibiting ex-

portation of,

Misdemeanor--Attempting to commit,

1

4

76

550

140

140

4

4

109

109

10

10

"}

"

-Inciting a Person to commit a, -Aiding and Abetting in,.. Money Changer--Unlicensed, (see "Unlicensed "). Murder,

-Cutting and Wounding with Intent to com- mit, (see "Cutting and Wounding," &c.). -Piracy with, (see "Piracy").

Navy and Army-Desertion from H. M's., (see "De-

sertion").

Naval Stores--Breach of Ordinance for,

Navigation-Obstruction to,

Night-being out without Lights at, (see "Light").

-Found at, armed with dangerous and offensive Weapons, with Intent to break into Dwell- ing Houses,

-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent to

commit Felony therein,

--Noises, by playing at the Game called "Chai-

Mui,'

--Noises, by Watchmen, &c.,

Night Passes--being out without, (see “Passes ").

#

"

-Chinese carrying Arms, not being Hold-

ers of, (see "Arms ").

Night Soil-Exposing in the Streets in uncovered Buckets, and in open Boats along the Praya, (see “Nuisances ").

Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

2

Pr

1

Pa

2

3

9

Qu

Re

Re

1

Re

T

17

17

Re

Re

Re

Re

Re

82222 222 223 2

Ri

Ra

Re

9

11

N

13

Ri

Ro

Ro

་་

mises, or in immediate Vicinity thereof, -Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

170

170

4

Public Ways....................

---Keeping Pigs without a Licence,

25

25

Ro

-Throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets,. -Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets.........

116

116

9

"}

-Regulations--Brench of,

14

14

"

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour, or}

Ru

on the Beach,..............

. 34

34

22

-Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

and Property,

2

7

Obscene Pictures-Exposing for sale,

Obstruction of, or Resisting Police, (see "Police ").

of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers,

Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers,.......

""

of Who,ves by Boat People,....

of Ships entering Harbour, (sce" Navigation").

Offensive Trades-Carrying on Dangerous and, (see

"Dangerous").

Offensive Weapons-Found at Night with Dangerous

and-with Intent to break into a Dwelling House, (see "Night "). -Having Possession of, (see also

"Arms").

Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation and Sale |

eparati

9

10

of prepared,

1

Passengers' Act of 1855-Breach of Chinese, (see

<<

Chinese," &c.).

-Setting Fire to, (see "Arson ").

-Unlicensed Coolie Lodging, (see “Unlicensed ").

Seamen's Boarding, (see "Unlicense").

House Breaking,

Householder-Registered, permitting Gambling in a

House, (see "Gambling ").

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance for

Registration of,...............................

Inciting a Person to commit a Misdemeanor, (see “Misde-

meanor ").

Indecent Assaults, (see “Assault").

Indecent Exposure of Person by bathing or otherwise, Į

and Lewdness,

Injury to Property-Malicious, (see "Malicious Injury,'

&c.).

Inquests--Jurors disobeying Coroner's Summonses for Attendance at, (see “Jurors "). Japan--Deportation to this Colony from, (see “Deporta-

tion").

Jurors-Neglecting to answer Coroner's Summonses to)

attend Inquests,

Kidnapping, (see “ Child Stealing," "Abduction and Salé

of Women and Female Children, Forcibly detaining,

&c.").

Carrick forward,

2,413 3,781

Passes--Chinese carrying Arms, not being Holders of,

(see "Arms.").

"

-Chinese out at Night without,

--Uulawful possession of,,

Pawnbrokers--Breach of Ordinance for,

Pawning--Illegally..

Perjury, (see also "Preferring false Charge and giving

wilful false Testimony "),

Carried forward,

332

349

Sai

109

204

Sea

107

117.

743

3

B

5,762 7,312

Se

Se

2

F

.

f

OFFENCE.

Brought forward..

Pigs-Unlicensed Keeping of, (see “Nuisances," &c.),

Piracy,

-Confederating with Pirates,

"" --with Murder...........

Police-Assaulting, obstructing or resisting, (see “Assault”).|

-Assuming Name, Designation, &c., of Consta- į

ble of,

""

#!

29

""

-Escape of Prisoners from Custody of, (we

Escape," &c.).

-Kescuing Prisoners from Custody of,......

-Desertion from,

Police Constables-Bribing, or attempting to bribe, (see

""

· Bribery,” &c.).

-Misconduct as,

Posting Bills on Walls, &c.,

Post Office--Breach of Ordinance for, Poultry-Selling in the Streets, (see "Breach of Markets

Ordinance *).

Prepared Opium--Breach of Ordinance for Preparation

and Sale of, (see “Opium"). Preservation of Birds-Breach of Ordinance for, (see

"Birds," &c.).

Prison-Breach of Rules of, (see also "Gaols"). Prisoners-Escape from Custody of Police of, (see

"}

"

"

2

1

A

1

2

1-

K

Escape.").

Escape from Gaol of, (see " Escape ").

lowing

the Escape of, (see

-Rescuing from Custody of Police, (sce

"Police.").

Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bringing into the Colo- ny, unwholesome, (see “ Unwholesome Pro- visions," &c.).

Public Ways-Hanging, wet Clothes, &c. to dry over,

(see "Nuisances ").

"

--Obstruction of, (e "Obstruction ").

Quarantine Regulations-Breach of,..

Rape,

Receiving Stolen Goods,

Recognizances-Breach of.....

Regimental Clothes, &c.-Purchasing or receiving, (see

"Military Law”).

Registration of Births and Deaths-Breach of Ordinance

for, (see Births and Deaths").

Registration of Householders and Servants-Breach of

Ordinance for, (we “ House ").

Religious Ceremonies-Chinese carrying on without Au-

thority,

Rendition of Chinese, (see “Crimes,” xc.)

Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of Police, (see “ Police "). Resisting Police-Assaulting, obstructing, or, (see "Po-

lice ").

Riotous Assemblages.

12

--Assault at, or in connection with,

(see Assaults").

River Steamers Ordinance-Breach of, Roads and Streets---Obstruction of, (see “Obstruction ").

"

"

-Injuring,

-Breach of Regulations as to,

Robbery-Assault with Intent to commit, (see “ Assault").

'0

""

+

19

-Fron the Person,

-From the Person with wounding,

-On the Highways with Arms or with Violence, Rogues and Vagabonds-As Street Gamblers, (sec "Gam-

9

19

14

"

11

"

bling").

-As Suspicious Characters,

-As Beggars,

Rubbish and Filth-Allowing Accumulation in House, or

"1

irmediate Vicinity thereof, (see "Nuisances").

-Throwing into the Streets, (see

"Nuisances").

-Throwing into the Harbour or on the

Beach, (see "Nuisances ").

Sailors-Assisting in the Desertion of, (see "Desertion "). Seamen-Iarbouring deserted,

19

14

"J

""

17

"

-Desertion of Merchant, (see “Desertion "). -Making false Statements as to Ships in which

they served, and presenting fale Characters, f ---Refusal of Duty by British Merchant,

Seamen's Boarding House, Unlicensed, (see “Unlicensed,"

"

&c.),

Effects-Detention of,

Servants-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of House-

holders and, (see “House”).

Servants-Misconduct as Domestic, (see "Domestic Ser-

vants").

Carried forward...........

No. or

NO. OF

PRI-

CASES.

1

SUNERS.

|5,762 :7,312

3

9

1

8

:

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,..

Shanghai-Deportation to this Colony from, (see “ De-

portation ").

Ship or Boat in the Harbour-Larceny on board, (see

**Larceny ").

Shopkeepers--Obstruction of Roads by, (see “Obstruc-

tion").

Shooting at with Intent to do grievous bodily Harm, Shrubs, Trees, &c.-Cutting and injuring, (see “Trees"). -Unlawful Possession of, (see “ Un-

lawful Possession").

11

11

2

2

35

48

Soldiers-Assisting in the Desertion of, (see “De-

ser ion").

-Disposing of Uniform, &c., (see “Military

Law").

Spirituous and fermented Liquors--Breach of Qrdi-{

nance for Retail of,

Stamp Ordinance--Breach of,

Stealing Cattle, (see "Cattle Stealing ").

"

Children, (see Child Stealing "). Dogs, (see “Dog Stealing ").

Steam-launch Ordinance--Breach of,

Stolen Goods--Receiving, (we "Receiving," &c.). Stones and other Missiles---Discharging, to Danger of Į

Persous and Property,

Stones--Blasting of, (see “Nuisances ").

Stores, Naval---Breach of Ordinance for, (see "Naval

Stores").

Stragglers from Foreign Ships, (see "Desertion "). Streams--Defiling,

Street Chairs and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for,

(see “Chairs and Vehicles").

Streets-Obstruction of Roads and, (see “ Obstruction ").

"

"J

11

-Gamblers, (see "Rogues and Vagabonds"). --Gambling, treated as Obstruction of Public

Ways, (see "Gambling "). --Noises by Hawkers, &c.,

Suspicious Characters, (see “Rogues and Vagabonds"). Threats-Attempting to extort by Menaces, and,

"

-Of Violence to the Person,

Trade Marks and Labels--Fraudulently using false, Trees, &c.---Cutting and destroying.................

""

-Unlawful Possession of Shrubs, (see “Un-

lawful Possession ").

No. CF

NO. OF

CASES.

PRI- SONERS.

|6,031 [7,644

1

1

5

3

3

4

14

15

54

54

::

15

26

27

Trespass on Crown Land,

68

68

Turf-Cutting from Crown Land without Permit, (see

"Trespass on Crown Land ").

&c., (see "Dogs ").

Unmuzzled Ferocious Dogs--Allowing to be at large,

Uniform, &c.--Soldiers disposing of, (see "Military

Law").

Unlawful Possession of Property,

"}

1

7

.00

Unlicensed-Auctioneer,..

339

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,

391 30

--Billiard Tables, keeping,.

1

"

-Coolie Lodging Houses,

3

22

-Hawker,

393

393

>>

-Money Changer,

...

27

27

21

-Plying of Boats for hire, (see "Boats").

5

5

-Seamen's Boarding Houses,

"

Unnatural Offence,

25

";

15

-Assault with Intent to commit an,

(see “Assaults").

19

18

♡ 67

28

10 Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring- Į

120

138

18

18

:

5

5

:

6.031 7,644

ing into the Colony,

Vehicles and Chairs-Breach of Ordinance for, (see

"Chairs," &c.).

Vessels---Breach of Ordinance for the Registration of........... Watchman-Misconduct as Private,..

"

-Night Noises by, (see "Night").

Weapons---Found by Night with dangerous and offen- sive, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses, (see "Night ").

"

--Having Possession of offensive,...

Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for,

Wharves-Obstruction by Boat People of, (see "Ob-

struction").

Will-Neglecting to produce to Official Administrator,., Witnesses -Intimidating, (see “Embracery ").

-Ordered to give Security for Appearance,.

Workmen-Intimidating,

--Misconduct as,..

Wounding--Assault with, (see "Assault ").

""

-Cutting and inflicting bodily Injuries, (see

"Cutting," &c.).

-Robbery from the Person with, (see "Rob-

bery").

Wreck-Larceny from, (see "Larceny ").

TOTAL,.

Co

8

15

1

8

co

3

3

12

12

:

:

4

1

7,009 8,705

3

12

Magistracy, Hongkong, 24th February, 1880.

C. B. PLUNKET, Police Magistrate.

ABSTRACT of Cases brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' Couur, during a period of Ten Years, from the 1st January, 1870, to 31st December, 1879, inclusive.

+

CASES HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER of Male and Female PrisonfKS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Years.

Total Number of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison

or detained pending Orders of His Excellency the Governor.

Ordered to find Security.

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beba, iour, and

Punished for Preferring False Charge

or giving Fale Testimony.

Total

'Undecided.

Number

of Defendants.

to answer

any Charge.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

* M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M

F.

1870,

5,936

5,702 609

2,065

261

127

12

336

1871,

6.400

6,143 673

2,400 311

148

28

414

1872,

9,950

11,185 999

2,426 291

137

23

44

271

1873,

9,137

8,810 | 1,352

1,798 266

67

10

15

171

1874,

8,079

6,636 | 1,135

1,651

269

101

31

175

1875, 8,055

6,749 $90

1,632

281

95

4

199

1876, 9,103

7,315 G83

1,744

300

118

11

6

174

1877, 9.283 7.336 1878, 9.100 7,166 628

572

1,966

364

209

15

16

192

2,126 251

200

18

11

98

1879, 7,009 5,758 361 1,900

189

145

13

18

290

REPARARENN

28

40

G

ΤΟ

16

40

7

19

23

29

37

10

21

50

29

23

7

23

25

17

14

22

10

3

32

18

RAAZRA

14

8,352

919

32

9,211 1,017

13

14,099 1,345

35

10,933 1,673

21

8,665

1,436

20

8.713 1,217

20

9,402 1,024

12

9,745

972

19

34

9,630 922 8,103

602

C. B. PLUNKET,

Police Magistrate.

Magistracy, Hongkong, 24th February, 1880.

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

TABLE A.-Return of all Coroner's Cases, 1879.

Nationality.

Inquest Held.

Buried without Inquest.

Very much decom-

Men. Women. | Boys.| Girls. | Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls. posed, sex not ascer- Total.

tainable.

Europeans and Americans,.

Chinese,

Portuguese,

Malays and Indians,

: တ

52

7

15

:: 525

1

11

1

12

86

33

1

T

:: co

3

37

1

103

Total,.

63

7

17

15

102

34

3

87

22

8

104

Total for 1878,

75

17

6

5 103

28

4

35

22

1

90

Verdicts.

Accidental Death,..

Died from Gun Shot wound,

Felo de Se,

Found Dead, (Canse of Death unknown),

Manslaughter,

Murder,

No Jurisdiction,' *

Natural Causes,

Do. in Gaol,

Overdose of Opium,

Suicide while Insane,

TOTAL,

TABLE B.--Return of Inquests, 1879.

Europeans

and Americans.

Chinese.

Portu- guese.

Indians and Malays.

Men. Girls. Boys. Men, Women. Boys. Girls. Girls. Men, Women. | Girls.

4

:

:~

2

21

10

6

1

1

6

7

1

3

1

1

00

8

1

2

1

...@

4.

:

Total.

49

7

13

6

52

52

7

15

12

1

3

1

102,

*Said to have died from the effects of a Shot fired from the Chinese Revenue Cruiser “ Peng-Chau-Ilai,”

TABLE C.--Return of Burials without Inquest, 1879.

Europeans

Reason why no Inquest was held.

Chinese.

and Americans.

Indians.

Men. Women.

Men, Women. Boys.| Girls.| Men.

Very much decompos- ed, sex not Total. ascertain- able.

Found on Shore, Found in Harbour.

Known.

Un- known.

Known.

Un- known.

No suspicious circumstances, No evidence and decomposed

1

28

26

13

1

ΟΙ

ཉ༔

$

283

70

20

33

14

32

1

23

State of Body,

Post Mortem satisfactory.

Total,.

1

333

1

$

37

22

2

1

::

:

8

104

22

57

22

Coroner's Office, Hongkong, 24th February, 1880.

C. V. CREAGH,

Coroner.

TONIO 0 521 - H22N

al.

8

2.

FLOGGINGS IN HONGKONG.

RETURN of Prisoners flogged from 1st January, 1875, to 31st December, 1879, and by whose authority.

Visiting Justices

Years.

1

Supreme Court.

>

Police Magistrate.

1875

1876

1877 1878

1879

HQONA

1

$2

53

41

20

5

our.

2-

2

NOTE.-No public floggings have been allowed in 1878 and 1879.

Victoria Gaol Office, 6th March, 1880.

Cn.

1

+

>

and

Gaol

>

Gaol Superintendent.

Superintendent.

128

18

TOTAL.

35

56

38947

119

113

53

49

18

M. S. TONNOCHY,

Superintendent.

+

No. 70.

"')

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

>

The following Annual Report from the Harbour Master, with the Returns accompanying it, is published for general information.

By Command,

W. H. MARSII,

Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 16th March, 1880.

[No. 49.]

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 26th February, 1880.

SIR,I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns of this Department for the year ending the 31st December, 1879.

"

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered.

IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port.

VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port.

VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks

entered at each Port.

cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered. XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Ordinance No. 10 of 1860, (Imperial Registry).

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of China. XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

SHIPPING.

2. Hongkong, like all other parts of the World, has suffered somewhat from the depression of trade and the present returns shew a reduction of 5.28 per cent on the arrivals published last year. Vessels under Continental flags have declined the most. There is also a decrease in the arrivals and departures of Chinese Junks,

3. The decrease of the Junk trade may be partially accounted for by the increase of 30,895 tons- in 1879 on 1878--carried in foreign built ships under the Chinese flag. These vessels have greater privileges than vessels under foreign flags, as the whole of the Ports of China are open to thein, and their movements must necessarily affect the Junk trade.

4. Of the whole inward trade of the Colony amounting to 4,122,668 tons, the Chinese, by Junks and in foreign bottoms, have the conveyance of 42.36 per cent of the tonnage.

5. The entire decrease in 1879 as compared with the previous year is 230,000 tons. Of this amount, trade in British bottoms shows a reduction of 1.46 per cent; Siamese 8.30 per cent; French 9.75 per cent; American 11.81 per cent; Danish 19.76 per cent; Spanish 19.86 per cent; German 35.36 per cent; and Dutch 73.13 per cent; while the trade in Austrian, Belgian, Italian, Portuguese and Swedish vessels, which has never been much, has also fallen off.

6. Of the Countries whence the tonnage is less in 1879 than arrived in 1878, the following is the proportion:-

From China and Formosa,.............

United States,.

India and Singapore, ... Cochin China,

Great Britain,

..

Japan,

Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin, Australia and New Zealand, Siam,...

4.47 per cent. 9.67

>>

.18.00

""

19.45

}}

...22.39

"}

.23.69

""

..27.97

.29.22 ..31.06

>>

"}

as against this decrease there has been an increase of 29.69 per cent on arrivals from Macao, and of 20.14 per cent on arrivals from the Philippine Islands.

7. Although Macao shews so favourable an increase, a large proportion of this tonnage arises from the changes made by the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steam-boat Company in the running arrange- ments of their vessels.

8. There is an increase in the tonnage of steamers arriving, the whole steam tonnage amounts to 2,204,901 tons or 3.18 per cent in excess of the tonnage entered in 1878. The trade in vessels propelled by sails, except Junks, is 265,744 tons or 41.50 per cent less than in 1878. Of the steam tonnage 82.06 per cent was under the British flag; 6.82 per cent under the French flag; 4.29 per cent under the Chinese flag; 3.39 per cent under the German flag; and 1.58 per cent under the United States' flag.

9. The China Merchants' Steam Navigation Company appear to be doing a large trade and for the first time the Chinese flag has made its appearance in foreign waters distantly situated from China. A vessel was despatched from Canton to the Sandwich Islands carrying Cargo and Natives to Hono- lulu. This is possibly but the precursor of a more extended direct trade between China and foreign Countries.

10. The Mitsu Bishi Company (Japanese) opened their line of Steam-ships from Yokohama and Kobe &c., to Hongkong in October 1879, and these vessels have run with great regularity. The ships have good speed, are well officered and manned and bid fair to be strong competitors for a more extended direct trade than the Japanese at present possess.

JUNK TRADE.

11. On the whole, there is a decrease of 109,473 tons under this heading, or 6.21 per cent on the arrivals in 1878; which bears a fair comparison with the decline of trade in foreign vessels. Junk owners cannot expect exemption from the fluctuations of trade, and now they have so formidable a body as the China Merchants' Steam Navigation Company to compete with the trade in native vessels will probably still further decline.

12. There has been an increase of 10,872 tons arriving from Macao; and a loss, of 120,345 tons in native vessels from the Coast of China and Formosa.

13. There has been increased activity between Victoria and the Outstations of the Island to the extent of 18,182 tons.

EMIGRATION.

14. The emigration of Chinese for the year under review shews a total of 33,529 souls as against 38,653 in 1878 or a falling off of 5,124 in number. Of this decline 1,581 fewer Chinese have gone to the Australian Colonies, and 4,209 fewer have left Hongkong for Manila. Emigration to Manila from Hongkong is however largely supplemented by vessels going direct from Amoy and Swatow to that Colony.

15. There is an increase of 915,Chinese emigrants to the United States of America.

16. Of Chinese returned to their Native land 2,660 more have arrived than in 1878, and these are nearly all from the Australian Colonies. The numbers returned from other Countries are about the

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same.

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REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

17. Of the five vessels registered here in 1879 is one, the Powan, the tonnage of which has been rectified; the vessel having formerly been registered as of 636.69 tons capacity while now, without any alterations, the vessel is 1,842.57 tons. Under the Merchant Shipping Ordinance of 1879-not yet confirmed-it is to be hoped that such miscalculations cannot again occur.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

13. The Offences have been few in number and of no serious nature. *

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS AND MATES,

UNDER ORDINANCE No. 17.OF 1860.

19. There were 48 Candidates for Certificates of Competency, of whom 43 obtained Certificates of Competency and 5 failed to satisfy the Examiners.

20. A great want felt here from there being no legal Board for the examination and granting of Certificates to Marine Engineers will be removed this year.

MARINE COURTS, UNDER ORDINANCE No. 11 OF 1860.

21. The following Courts have been held during the year :--

1. On the 11th February, 1879, inquiry as to the Misconduct of the Master (MOSES HENRY KERRUISH) of the British barque Black Watch, Official No. 45,073 of London. The Master's Certi- ficate of Competency was returned.

2. On the 25th March, 1879, inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Yesso, Official No. 48,343 of Hongkong, on the White Rocks. The Master's (SAMUEL ASIITON) Certificate of Competency was suspended for three months.

3. On the 1st May, 1879, inquiry as to the collision of the British Steam-ship Killarney, Official No. 65,876 of Dublin, with a Chinese Fishing Junk, about one and a half miles to the North West of Aichau Island, by which four lives were lost. The Master's (HENRY O'NEILL) Certificate of Compe- tency was returned.

4. On the 24th June, 1879, inquiry as to the Misconduct of the first Mate (CHARLES SAUTER) of the British ship G. C. Trufant, Official No. 70,696 of London. The first Mate was severely reprimanded and recommended that he be discharged from the ship.

5. On the 28th October, 1879, inquiry as to the collision of the British Steam-ship Amoy, Official No. 68,490 of London, with the Hongkong licensed Fishing Junk No. 1,545, about 20 miles W.S.W. of Chelang Point, causing the total loss of the Junk and also the death by drowning of six persons. The Second Mate's (JAMES JOHN SULLIVAN) Certificate of Competency was suspended for three months.

SEAMEN.

22. There is a sensible decrease in the number of Seamen shipped and discharged at this Port during the year, caused by Steam-ships superseding Sailing vessels. The number shipped is 6,438 or 18.42 per cent less than in 1878, and the number discharged is 6,925 or 14.99 per cent less than in

1878.

23. The Steam-ships as a rule bring their men from England and take them back again. Whereas under the sailing ship time, vessels arrived, discharged their crews and remained here until further employment was obtained when fresh crews were shipped.

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are

the

7

+

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

J

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&e.,

fc.

$

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, c.

:

I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country, in the Year 1879.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Toss. Crews. Vessels.

British North America,

Coast of China aud Formosa,

Cochin China..

Continent of Europe, ...................................................

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

Australia and New Zealand, .

942 1,042,789 42,07|| 110 97,348 3,406

G 4,062 891 101 140,783 3,887 85 112,993 6,639| 49,884 2,917

18

44

1

32,270 1,693|| 8781 161

19:

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

1,000 381 45

10,721 431 1,124 28

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

33,330 1,721 27 878 16

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST,

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

19,080 439 646 14

27

...

1

794 25

504 124

1,522

4,062 89 41 105) 141,287) 4,011] 21

75,014 3,535)

...

23,687 391

511

1,148 301

53

1 464

]

:

...

pelago,

Macao,

465 301,873 16,052)

861 12

86 114,515 6,672 10 51,032 2,947

404 13

466 301,959 16,064,

5,662 157

55

52,960 3,210

4,852

90.

59

5

2,033

651

5

992 149,788, 25,012

105

1

North Pacific,

...

Philippine Islands,

48

22,229 1,890

638

14

Ports in Hainau and the Gulph of Tong Kin...

38)

11,607 947

49 22,867 1,904 28 11,607

67

24,038 1,970

11

9611,033,510 42,502 15,962 1,295,221 207,5 7,766 435,157 87,299 23,728 1,730,378 294,829 16,904 2,332,010 249,607 7,785 112 98,467 3,434; 531 35,832 1,149

551 36,126 1,174, 4.1 75,014 3,539 21: 23,687 394] 10 5,662 157 57,812 3,330

2,033 G51

163 132,675 4,555] 501 79,076 3,628 122) 164,470) 4,281 95 118,655 6,796] 106 102,814 6,157 GI 2,497 78

8,858 1,174 1,097 158,646 27,080 1,457 451,061|41,964|| 74

1,730

1,000 28 445,878 87,721 24,680 2,783,558 337.001

1,918 53

167 184,593 4,008

Tons. Crews. Vessels,

439

19,080|

G46 14

Tons. Crews.essels.

71 51,350 2,132 2 1,524 30

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

72

52,410 2,170 2 1,5241 30

917!

42

22,502 ,222

2

Sandwich Islands,

1,840 32

Siam,....

521

35,839 1,566

52

35,839 1,506|

66

32,447 1,378

South Africa,.

2,686

43

2

2,686

481

South America,

1

405 18]

1

405

18

::

***

...

3

South Sea Islands,

549 301

...

United States of America,

12

22,113 1,058

12

...

22,113 1,058 13 53,295 1,225

TOTAL.........................

1,959 1,878,218 82,300|

31 16,803

549

55,408 2,283]

68,286| 2,941 2,686 48 405, 13

549

55,408 2,283

710 1,990 1,895,021| 83,010|17,363 1,774,184 248,302 7,854|| 453,463 88,754 25,247 2,227,647 537,056 19,3228,652,402|330,002|| 7,915|| 470,266, 89,464|27,237|4,122,CCS 420,066

50 79,076 3.628

504

124

120 164,974' 4,405

1,522

53

6,000

120

96 120,177 6,829 112 108,841 6,277

...

2,197 78

106)

1

101

74

25,768 2,071}

8,944 1,180 74

1,563; 400,005, 43,150

G

115

46,267 3,860

2,808

115

119

74

48,635 3,975

C

22,592|| 1,222|| 801

31,199 2,169

80

1,998 65

3,838 97

2

1,840 321

1,9981

65

34,199; 2,169 3,888. 97

66

32,447 1,378

118

68,286) 2,944|

2,686 48

405

18]

6491 30 18] 33,295 1,225.

30

30

20

*

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour, Master, fc.

***

H.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country, in the Year 1879.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN-BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

TONS. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Yessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons Cre

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

28 23,273 1,435

28 23,273 1,435

British North America,

---

2} 1,249; 28

...

2 1,249 28

28 23,273 1,435) 2 1,249 28

Coast of China and Formosa,,

Cochin China,

45

Continent of Europe,

61

9151,073,682 43,408 8! 82,964 1,540) 47 4,555 125

57,123 2,060 1,0261,180,805 45,468 16,4741,334,747 214,603 6,673 43,592 1,371) 92 76,556|| 2,711]

28 18,980 588

32

6

...

4,555 125

39 65,592 3,292)

39

364,782 69,110, 23,147|1,699,529 283,718 17,419 2,408,429 258,011 6,754 21,936 638 601 731

40,916| 1,226| 79

65,592| 3,292]

51,944 1,928

45

70,147 3,417.

...

Great Britain,

48 63,182 2,627

48

63,182| 2,627|

91

8,174 299

9 8,174 2991

571

71,856|| 2,926)

India and Singapore,

Japan,

511

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

21

pelago,

Macao,

80 111,320 5,391 55,835 3,081

891 38

470 304,028 16,189||

2,572

4,6811 138

822

84

113,892 5,178|

9,055 319

2,817

54

181

11,372 873)

94

120,375 5,710)

4.880 130

56

60,516 3,219]

44;

42,867 3,067

4,773

108

511

47,640 3,175

95

98,702 6,148

9,454

891

38

21

698 21

6201

24

4

1,318 48

1,589 62

620

246

24

23,273) 1,435 21 1,249 28 421,905 71,17024,173|2,830,334 29,181 65,528 2,00 152 117,472 8,937

45 70,147 8,417 57) 71,300 2,926 102 123,284 5,846 107 108,156 6,394

28

...

6 2,209 86

470

...

801,028 16,189|| 1,040]

152,775 26,284)

52

North Pacific,

41

་་་

2,940 78

4

2,9401 78

74

6

Philippine Islands,

52

Ports in Hainan and the Gulph of Tong Kin,

42

25,133 2,029| 11,420 1,003

20 12,195 3201

721

37,328 2,349

481

20,385 1,439]

42

11,420|| 1,003|

45

22,934 1,291

47

5,048 727 1,092 157,823 27,011 1,510 4,649 101 32 24,488 543 1,244 38

456,803 42,475

52

5,018

727 1,562

461,851 43,200

8

4,723 107

74

6

-7.589; 179

12

7,663 185

801

44,873 1,982 100

45,518 3,468

24,178 1,329|

87

Russia in Asia,

3

2,063

69

31

2,063) 69

34,354 2,294.

2,063

36,683 863! 152 1,244 38

82,201 4,8331

69

Sandwich Islands,...

3,016 71

3,016 71

3.016 71

35,598 2,332- 2,063; 69 3,016) 71

Siam,

36 25,108 1,090】

South Africa,

South America,..

199 8

1,695 47

6,149 2001

1,177 22

45

31,237 1,299

201

10,085) 3760

34

17,196 749

27,281 1,125

56!

35,193 1,466

199

2,872

684 22

6841

22

883

30

691

South Pacific.

1,916

157

11

...

...

1,916

41

3,611|

88

23,345

1,177 22

958

58,588 2,424

883

4,788

30

110

12

157

12

157

12

...

167) 12

South Sea Islands,

169

41

...

United States of America,

TOTAL,..

25

35,946 1,303

2,654

42

27

38,000 1,345||

الان

70,634 2,025

2,111

1,834|1,769,231| 79,114|

80 111,345 3,396

2,007 1,9 173 133,083 4,322 2,007 1,902,314 83,436 17,834 1,766,254 253,897 6,846 449,164 72,118 24,680 2,215,418 326,015 19,668 3,535,485 333,011 7,019 582,247 76,440 26,6874,117,732 409,451

169

41

169

41

169: 41

26 53

72,745 2,051

77 106,580 3,328

3

4,765

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, fc.,

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at the Port of Victoria, in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1879.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

'Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons: Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

C

American,

......

85-

90,264

2,394

15

11,346

243

100

101,610 2,637

British,

Chinese,..

1,959 116

1,878,218

82,300

31

16,803

710

1,990

94,007 5,258

630

48

1,895,021 83,010

118 94,637 5,306

Chinese Junks,

16,664

1,223,17222,765

7,844

428,852

88,033

|

24,508 1,652,023 310,798

Danish,

17

10,826

330

1,754

55

19

12,580

385

Dutch,

8

4,289

119

8

4,289

119

French,

107

160,079

9,029

107

160,079

9,029

German,

234

126,880

4,438

17

8,334

261

251

135,214

4,699

Italian,

3

2,400

45

Japanese,

6

6,574

465

::

3

2,400

45

6

0,574

465

Norwegian,

10

6,098

170

1

905

26

11

7,003

196

Portuguese,

1

632

19

...

1

632

· 19

Russian,

4

4,020

108

1

690

14

5

4,710

122

Siamese,...

41

20,934

1,065

41

20,934

1,065

Spanish,.

63

22,520

2,048

2

952

74

65

23,472

2,122

Swedish,

1,490

49

:

4

1,490

49

TOTAL...

19,322 3,652,402 330,602 7,915

470,266 89,464

27,237 4,122,668420,066

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1879.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

American,

76

84,207

2,433

34

Belgian,

1

...

20,706 2,297

507

110

110,913

2,940

61

1

2,297

61

British,

1,834 | 1,769,231

79,114

173

133,083

4,322

2,007

1,902,314 | 83,436

Chinese,..

113

Chinese Junks,.

17,269

92,544 1,287,612 | 230,672

5,163

3

6,644

944 336,426

87

116

93,488 5,250

68,694

23,913

1,624,038 299,366

Danish,....

9

5,373

172

5,661

154

17

11,034

326

Dutch,

5

2,780

78

3

1,507

47

8

4,287

125

French,...

96

156,022

8,777

18

6,609

210

114

162,631

8,987

German,

174

94,712

3,502

88

44,212

1,320

262

138,924

4,822

Italian,..

1

724

15

2,400

47

4

3,124

(2

Japanese,

6

6,574

472

6

6,574

172

Norwegian,

1

173

10

1

173

10

Nicaraguan,

3,826

103

~

3,594

103

12

C

< 7,420

206

Portuguese,

1,262

38

2

...

...

...

1,262

38

Russian,

3,278

197

1

576

14

5

3,854

211

Siamese,

12

5,506

283

28 15,047

709

40

20,553

992

Spanish,

59

20,873

1,957

2,440

143

65

23,313

2,100

+

Swedish,

788

25

745

22

1,533

47

TOTAL,........ 19,608 3,535,485 333,011. 7,019

582,247

76,440

26,687 4,117,732 409,451

:

II. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, ifc.

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པན

18 19 15

སྱཱ(5.རཿ

1

1

----

NAMES

OF PORTS.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOEB.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. - Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vis.

Aberdeen, Shu-ki Wáng

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yau-má Tí,.

...

...

...

Tons. Crews. Vis.

3801

452

140

1,950 1,878,218 82,300

31 16,803

...

...

Tons. Crews. I Vis.

21,456 3,689|| 7811 15,514 3,934| 7011 12,505 1,684| 92 710 1,990 1,895,021 83,010|15,805 1,658,171 228,319 4,175 66,448 10,676|| 2,185

ONNAGE V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1879.

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tous.

Crews.

IN BALLAST.

580

Total,..

1,959 1,878,218,82,300|

31 16,803

710||1,290 1,895,021 83,010|17,3693| 1,774,184248,302|| 7,884| 453,463 88,754|25,247| 2,227,647 337,056|19,322 3,652,402|530,602|| 7,915

Tons. Crews. Vls.

47,156 10,704 1,111 380 68,612 14,399 44,263 6,805 1,153 452 59,777 10,780

232

6,987 1,054 19,582 2,738 140 244,007 41,194 19,980 1,002,178 269,513 17,764 111,050 28,997 2,771 177,408 39,678 586

21,456| 3,689j 731 15,514 3,934 701 12,595 1,684 92 3,586,889310,619 4,206|| 66,448 10,676|| 2,185

47,156 10,704 1,111 68,612 14,303 44,263|| 6,805|| 1,153 - 59,777 10,730 6,987 1,054 232 19,582 2,738 260,810|41,904, 21,970; 3,797,190 352,523 111,05028,097 2,771 177,498 39,673 470,266 89,464 27,237|4,122,668|120,066

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

VI.—TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1879.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

- WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls.

Tous. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. VIs.

Tons, Crews.

VIS.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen, Shuu-ki Wán,

...

440

...

Stanley,.

Victoria,

1,834| 1,769,231| 70,114,

Yau-má Tí,......

...

Total,.

1,834 1,769,251 79,114||

15,389 2,316| 863 36,373 5,307 508

126 12,263 1,571| 106 173 133,083 4,322 2,007 1,002,314 83,436 15,934 1,638,224 234,251 3,680 926 64,005 10,452 1,689 173 133,083 4,322 2,007 1,902,314 83,436 17,834 1,766,254 253,897 6,846

226

622

...

Tons. Crews. Vls. 51,232 11,713 1,089 66,621|14,020 21,275| 5,223| 1,130| 57,648 10,530| 232

7,319 1,162 19,582 2,733| 256,853 31,675 19,614 1,895,077 265,920 17,768 3,407,455 313,365 3,853 112,48522,345| 2,615| 176,490|32,7!)7| 026 64,005 10,452 1,630

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

VIS.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews.

226

622

126

449,164 72,118 24,680 2,215,418 326,015 19,668 3,535,185|333,011|| 7,019

7,319 1,162 232 19,582 2,733 389,936 35,997 21,621 3,797,391|349,362 112,485 22,345 2,615 176,490 32,797

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, fc.

15,389 2,316 36,373 5,307 12,263 1,571

863

508

51,232 11,713 1,089 21,275|| 5,223) 1,130

66,621. 14,020

57,648 10,530

106

582,247 76,440 26,687 4,117,732, 409,451

གས་བམ་ནི་མ

!

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1879.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Victoria,

992

149,788

25,912 4,556

102

7,929 1,126

Passen- gérs.

28 1,094

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

157,717 27,038 4,584

*

#

Total,...

992

149,788 25,912 4,556

102

7,929 1,126

88

28

1,094

157,717 27,038 4,584

C

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

VIII.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1879.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TCTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Victoria,

1,039

Passen- gers.

152,519 26,273 5,043

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

50

4,381

673

97

1,089

Passen- gers.

156,900 26,946 5,140

Total,... 1,039 152,519 26,273 5,043

50

4,381

673

97

1,089

156,900 26,946 5,140

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1879.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen,

380

21,456 3,689

Passen- gers.

69

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

731

47,156 10,704

Shau-ki Wán,

452

Stauley,

140

Victoria,

14,114

15,514 3,934 163 12,595 1,684 957,370 176,870 | 114,271

701

44,263

6,805

99

92

6,987

1,054

4,033

211,467

39,347

Yau-má Tí,

586

66,448 10,676

49

2,185

111,050

28,997

86 1,111 384 1,153

11

232 25,215 18.147 43 2,771

68,612

14,393

155

59,777

10,739

547

19,582 2,738

110

Total,... 15,672 1,073,383 196,853 114,651

7,742 420,923

86,907 25,739

1,168,837 216,217 | 139,486

23,414 1,494,306 | 283,760 | 140,390

H. G. THOMSett, r.N., Harbour Master, &c.

177,498 39,673

92

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at vach Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1879.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

226

15,389

2,316

15

863

51.232 11,713

Sháu kí Ván,

622

36,373

5,307

119

508

21,275

5,223

91 342

Stanley,.

126

12,263

· 1,571

43

106

7,319

1,162

Victoria,

14,330

1,007,063 |184,753 | 123,947

5,428

139,734

Yau-mâ Tí,...

926

64,005

10,452

46

1,689

27,578 112,485 22,345

9 8,744 157

1,089 1,130 232

14,029 . 66,621

57,648 10,530

106

461

V

19,582

2,733

52

Total,... 16,230 | 1,135,093 | 204,399 | 124,170

6,594

332,045 68,021

9,343

17,758 2,615

22,824

1,146,797 212,331 | 132,691

176,490

32,797

203

1,467,138 | 272,420 | 133,513

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

XI.—Gross Total Number, Ponnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1879.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

*

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

380

***

21,456 3,689

69

731

47,156 10,704

86

1,111

68,612 14,393

155

Shau-ki Wán,

452

15,514 3,934

163

701

44,263

6,805

384

1,153

59,777 10,739

547

Stanley,......

140

12,595 1,684

99

92

6,987

1,054

11

Victoria,

15,106 | 1,107,158 |202,782 |118,827

4,135

219,396

10,473

25,243

Yau-má Tí,...

586

66,448 10,676

49

2,185

111,050

28,997

43

232 19,582 2,738 19,241 | 1,326,554 |243,255 2,771 177,498 39,673

110

144,070

92

Total,...

16,664 | 1,223,171 |222,765 |119,207

7,844 428,852 88,033 25,767

24,508 1,652,023 310,798 144,974

|

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

XII-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1879.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

226

15,389 2,316

15

863

51,232 11,713

Shau-ki Wản,

622

36,373

5.307

119

508

21,275

5,223

342

91 1,089 1,130

66,621 14,029

106

57,648

10,530

461

)

Stanley,

126

12,263 1,571

43

106

7,319

1,162

9

232

19,582

2,733

52

Victoria,

15,369 | 1,159,582 |211,026 | 128,990

3,478

144,115

28,251

8,841

i

Yau-má Tí,...

926 64,005

10,452

46

1,689

112,485

22,345

157

18,847 2,615

1,303,697 239,277

137,831

Total,...

17,268 | 1,287,612 230,672 | 129,213 6,644

336,426 68,694

9,440

176,490 32,797

23,913 | 1,624,038 | 299,366

203

138,653

>

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

XIII.—Return of Junks ( Local Trade ) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kowloon, during the Year ending 31st December, 1879.

12

00

lucosele !

17

:0

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,

3,767 124,361 41,487 6,538

1,707

35,850

11,753 10,721

5,474 160,211 53,240 17,259

Total,... 3,767 124,361

41,487 6,538 1,707

35,850

11,753 10,721

5,474

160,211 53,240 17,259

011-

S.

"

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, §c.

.}

XIV.-Return of Junks ( Local Trade ) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kowloon, during the Year ending 31st December, 1879.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons., Crews.

+

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passeu-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passon-

gers.

106

161

52

Victoria,

2,059

57,545 18,512 10,614 3,543 111,818 35,715 6,815

5,602

169,363 54,227 17,429

301

203

513

Total,... 2,059 57,545

18,512 10.614 3,543 111,818 35,715

6,815

5,602

169,363 54,227 17,429

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

XV.-SUMMARY.

ARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,

1,959

1,878,213

82,300

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

31

16,803

710

Total,.

1,990

1,895,021

83,010

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,...

1,834

1,769,231

79,114

Do.

do. in Ballust,

173

133,083

4,322

Total,..........

2,007

1,902,314

83,436

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,..

3,997

3,797,335

166,446

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

17,363

1,774,184

248,302

1

Do.

do. in Ballast,

7,884

453,463

88,754

Total,.....

25,247

2,227,647

337,056

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

17,834

1,766,254

253,897

Do.

do. in Ballast,

6,846

449,164

72,118

Total,..

24,680

2,215,418

326,015

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,

49,927

4,443,065

663,071

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,..

Do.

19,322

3,652,402

330,602

do.

in Ballast,

7,915

470,266

89,464

Total of all Vessels entered,..

27,237

4,122,668

420,006

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

19,668

3,535,485

333,011

Do.

do.

in Ballast,.

Total of all Vessels cleared,.............

7,019

582,247

76,440

26,687

4,117,732

409,451

Do.

do. in Ballast,.

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,.

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,...

38,990

7,187,887

663,613

14,934

1,052,513

165,904

53,924

8,240,400

829,517

LOCAL TRADE,

Total of Vessels entered,.

Do.

5,474

160,211

53,240

cleared,.

5,602

169,363

54,227

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,...

11,076

329,574

107,467

do.

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,........

Do.

in Local Trade only,

do.,

53.924

8,240,400

829,517

11,076

329,574

107,467

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,....

65,000

8,569,974

936,984

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan, .......

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,.

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

50,542

516,601

52,025 17,259

G

Total Arrivals,.

........

636,427

33,529

505,452

CPPCCFFCR

D

E

G

52,453

17,429

Total Departures....

608,863

Excess of Arrivals of Chinese over Departures,

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,

27,564

1,245,290

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

XVI.-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Honghong, during the Year 1879.

NAME OF VESSEL.

OFFICIAL │REGISTERED HORSE NUMBER. TONNAGE. POWER.

RrG.

BUILT

OF.

WHERE BUILT

AND WHEN.

#:

Leonore,

71,839

251.17

Brig

Wood

Emden, 1866,

Powan, str.,

68.387

1,842.57

120

None

Iron

Linthouse, Glasgow, 1873.

Diamante, str.,

77,448

514.13

129

Schooner Iron

Aberdeen, 1878.

Wing Hing, str.,

73.442

136.71

15

Bombay, str.,...........

30,710

740.22

180

Schooner Schooner Iron

Wood

Canton, 1877.

Glasgow, 1852.

1

1

REMARKS, &C.

>

Sold to Foreigner, 1879.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Registrar of Shipping, &c.

XVII. RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS CANCELLED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1879.

NAME

OF

VESSEL.

OFFI- CIAL No.

REGIS-

TERED TON-

NAGE.

DATE

OF REGISTRY.

HORSE POWER.

RIG.

BUILT

OF.

WHERE BUILT.

AND WHEN.

REASON

OF CANCELLATION.

Cæsar,

41.202 306.72

1861

Yesso, str..

48.343

559.87

1868

300

Powan, str.

68,387 636.69

1873

120

Alerta,

64,125 215.44

1875

Wood Barque Brigantine Wood None Iron Schooner Wood

Tuck Sing,

64,491

388.22

1875

Barque Wood

Taiwan, str.,

64,129

408.79

1876

80

Schooner Iron

Flora McDonald, str.,.

73,439

63.66

1878

25

Schooner Iron

Wing Hing, str.,

73,442

136.71

1879

15

Schooner Wood

Bremen.

Long Island, New York, 1864.] Linthouse, Glasgow, 1873. Apenrade, 1862.

St. John, N. B., 1870.

Aberdeen, 1874.

Hongkong, 1877. Canton, 1877.

Broken up, 1879, Wrecked, 1879.

Regd. anew at H'kong, 1879. Sold to Foreigner, 1879. Trans. to St. John, N.B., 1879. Lost on Bird Island, 1879. Sold to Foreigner, 1879. Sold to Foreigner, 1879.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Registrar of Shipping, &c.

XVIII.-.AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Ordinance No. 10 of 1860, in the

Harbour Department, during the Year 1879.

MATTER OR DUTY IN RESPECT OF WHICH

FEE TAKEN.

Certifying Desertions,.

NUMBER.

FEE.

AMOUNT.

REMARKS, &C.

94

$1.00

$94.00

6

1.00

6.00

25

1.00

25.00

5

10.00

50.00

1

5.00

5.00

4

5.00

20.00

3

5.00

15.00

2

5.00

10.00

5.00

20.00

Declaration of Ownership,...

Endorsement of Change of Master,

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry, Granting Copy from Register, Recording Mortgage of Ship, Recording Sale of Ship, • • Recording Transfer of Mortgage, Registering Certificate of Sale,

TOTAL,..........$

245.00

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Registrar of Shipping, &e.

XIX-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the year

ending the 31st day of December, 1879.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M. F. M.

F.

1 January 2| Gaelic, str.

1,712 British

W. H. Kidney

San Francisco

262

28

303

""

3 Dale, str.

645

>>

J. Thompson

"Bangkok

162

8

:

170

"

6 Achilles, str..

1,529

4

>>

9

Bowen, str.

844

C. Anderson

J. Miller

Straits Settlements

172

20

206

Port' Darwin

64

Cooktown

1

75

Sydney

10

·

10

11

12

56789EER

17

""

""

16 Rajanattianuhar, str.

18 Japan, str. ..............................................

933

""

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

96

City of Tokio, str. ...................

3,448 American

J. Maury

San Francisco

30

31

1,865 British

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

180

58

18

Venice, str. ......................................

1,271

P. L. Rhode

223

9

2642

98

78

248

1

235

*"

""

9 February 5

Hector, str.

1,590

E. Billinge

81

84

"

>>

6

"}

Oceanic, str..............................................

2,350

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

88

"

8

"J

Lorne, str.

1,035

W. McCulloch

Straits Settlements

83

>:

JJ

10

Dale, str.

645

"

J. Thompson

Bangkok

90

13

"

15

Diamante, str.

514

E. Thebaud

Manila

39

:.

::

90

92

90

...

...

39

""

14

95

15

Moray, str.

1,427

M. J. Butcher

Straits Settlements

160

"

15

""

15

Arratoon Apcar, str、

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

68

39

383

.7

5

...

172

107

"

16

11

17 Charlton, str.

780

J. Johnson

Port Darwin

508

10

...

518

"

17

A

20 Rajanattianuhar, str.

933

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

203

208

Straits Settlements

75

...

Port Darwin

316

...

Cooktown

...

18

22 Brisbane, str.

891

J. A. Reddell

475

""

Cleveland Bay

12

Sydney

52

Melbourne

19

*

19

20

9822

མ མཚོ སྶ

22 Esmeralda, str..

24 City of Peking, str.........

395 3,448 American

R. Cullen

Manila

27

27

22

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

556

12

576

23

21 March 4 Danube, str.....

22

""

7 Atholl, str.

& Ocean, str.

561 British

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

382

13

...

395

923

W. S. Thomson

Straits Settlements

323

55

14

10

402

"

Port Darwin

221

...

Cooktown

7

971

"

**RNA

24

دو

11 Dale, str.

645

"

25

14

"

Alden Besse,..

26

"

17

Belgic, str.

842 American 1,716 British

R. Edmondson

J. Thompson

499

Sydney

218

Melbourne

51

2

Bangkok

126

6

132

C. M. Noyes

Portland, Oregon

330

14

345

L. Meyer

Sau Francisco

589

27

18

""

Venice, str.

1,271

P. L. Rhode

Straits Settlements

437

41

285

28

18

Hindostan, str.........................

991

T. S. Gardner

56

23

126

506

502

370

""

Port Darwin

539

Cooktown

1

:

20

"

18 Menmuir, str.

1,247

J. W. B. Darke

Sydney

54

"

Melbourne

74

705

1

Dunedin, N.Z.

29

22 Herbert Black,

25 Coloma,..

25 Rajanattianular, str.

573 American 852 933 British 745 1,102 American 1,712 British

586 American

G. T. Hopkins J. W. Vandervord] W. S. Bartlett W. H. Kidley L. Taylor

San Francisco Portland, Oregon Port Darwin

F. W. Treat M. Hall

Portland, Oregon

229

236

333

337

""

Bangkok

377

10

...

387

Portland, Oregon

272

4

276

376;

382

""

586

3

596

281

281

30

83

30 31

""

32

""

33

""

26 Forward,

34

26

Stonewall Jackson,

35 April

1

Gaelic, str.

36

"2

1 Stillman B. Allen,

Cooktown

37

""

3 Bowen, str.

844 British

J. Miller

Sydney

Dunedin, N.Z. Melbourne

828

196

59

38

"

3 Radnorshire, str.

1,201

R. Thomson

Straits Settlements

640

40

13

7

700

39

""

4

Danube, str.....

561

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

94

94

40

"

7 Diomed, str.

1,241

M. H. F. Jackson | Straits Settlements

57

59

""

41

16

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

A. Milne

306

62

8

7

383

"

""

42

16 Moray, str.

1,427

M. J. Butcher

304

25

12

341

"1

"

43

"

19 Somerset, str.

654

""

W. H. Pockley

Cooktown Sydney

6

46

...

...

Dunedin, N.Z.

31

124

Melbourne

41

44

"

21 Penobscot,

45

""

21 Sarpedon, str.

1,133 American 1,592 British

46

"}

23 Thomas Fletcher,....

47

""

48

""

28 W. A. Holcomb,

49

37

30 Atholl, str.

923 British

25 Rajanattianuhar, str.

646 American 933 British

953 American

J. L. Chipman J. Rea

A. S. Pendleton G. T. Hopkins H. R. Dunton W. S. Thomson

Straits Settlements

San Francisco

378

18

396

Straits Settlements

309

309

Victoria, Van.'s Is.

275

3

1

282

Bangkok

246

:..

246

Portland, Oregou

342

1

7

351

321

26

9

358

50 May

3 Ajax, str.

51

"

6 Oceanic, str.

52

""

6 Danube, str.

1,525 2,350

561

A. Kidd

193

(26

220

""

""

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

820

5

21

837

17

A. Clauchy

Bangkok

127

:

127

J

53

"

6 Bellona, str.

789 German

F. Ahrens

Straits Settlements

83)

84

Cooktown

.9

54

"

15 Normanby, str,

Sydney

40

664) British

W. Ellis

118

Melbourne

44

Dunedin, N.Z.

25

288238%og&

55

17 Japan, str.

56

""

17 Venice, str.

1,865 1,271

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

257

160

7

428

""

P. L. Rhode

315

42

367

"

57

19 Dale, str.

045

""

58

""

20 City of Tokio, str.

3,448 American

59

26 Antenor, str...

1,645 British

GO

31 Belgic, str.

1,710

61

31 Rajanattianuhar, str.

62 June

3 Alaska, str.

63

""

6 Adria, str........

64

""

11 Danube, str............................

933 2,483 American 781 British 561

Carried forward................... 78,060

""

"

J. Thompson J. Maury II. Jones

1. Meyer

Bangkok

26

26

:

San Francisco

903

Straits Settlements

314

ོབ

7

16

3

1,019

50

4

7

375

San Francisco

477

C

488

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

167

170

:

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

47

51

E. Stewart

Straits Settlements

19

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

2301 58

239

58

Carried forward,.

17,521

843 316- 101 18,781

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Office, Hongkong,—(Continued.)

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP

MASTER'S NAME.

ADULTS. CHILDREN,

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL..

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward,.......

79,060

Brought forward, |17,521| Cooktown

843

316 101

18,781

Cleveland Bay

65 June

12 Bowen, str.

844 British

J. Miller

Sydney

66

158

Dunedin, N.Z.

6

:

}

Melbourne

68

1

8588RFR2*2

66

""

14 Agamemnon, str..

1,523

"

J. Wilding

Straits Settlements

127

130

67

""

14 | Arratoon Apear, str.

68

14 Moray, str.

1,392 1,427

""

A. B. Mactavish M. J. Butcher

144

84

7

241

}"

197

22

""

"

:

225

69

""

18 | City of Peking, str..

3,448 American

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

354

7

11

376

70

"

23 Achilles, str.....

1,529 British

C. Anderson

Straits Settlements

338

23

364

71

""

30 | St. Mark, str. ...

1,008

T. J. Johnson

123

12

141

>1

""

72 July

2 Rajanattianular, str.

933

"

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

314

:

314

73

"

3 Gaelic, str.

1,712

H. Davison

San Francisco

181

co

191

,,

74

5 Diamante, str.

514

E. Theband

Manila

16

16

"

75

"

5 Hindostan, str.

991

R. J. McConnell

Straits Settlements

200

24

227

">

Cooktown

3

***

Keppel Bay

6

76

"}

12 | Somerset, str.

654

S. G. Green

"1

Sydney

27

64

Dunedin, N.Z.

Melbourne

77

81

16

12

CBOGE

FR23388*885888.8***.68

"

78

79

80

14 Antenor, str.. 15 Danube, str.. 17 China, str........

17 Venice, str.

17 Japan, str.

1,645

H. Jones

Straits Settlements

261

28

3

296

561

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

97

:

2,323 American

J. M. Lachlan

San Francisco

60

>

1,271 British

P. L. Rhode

Straits Settlements

228

50

22

21 Auchises, str.

1,865 1,304

T. S. Garduer

141

101

29 30 39

:

::

97

65

4

285

13

257

""

""

C. Jackson

65

69

""

"J

21 Dale, str.

645

"

J. Thompson

Bangkok

33

33

84

28 | Teucer, str.

1,324

R. T. Power

Straits Settlements

337

15

354

85 August 1| Oceanic, str..

2,350

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

112

11

131

80

"

2 Rajanattianuhar, str.

933

J

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

141

141

87

""

6 Menelaus, str.

1,559

E. Billinge

Straits Settlements

42

27

""

7 Diamante, str.....

514

89

9

""

St. Mark, str. ................

1,098

E. Thebaud

T. J. Johnson

Manila

25

:

:

77

25

Straits Settlements

177

17

202

90

13

Moray, str.

1,427

M. J. Butcher

148

13

167

"

91

13

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,892

A. B. Mactavish

86

100

194

"J

92

16 Danube, str...............

561

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

120

120

93

""

16 | Hector, str.

1,590

C. Butler

Straits Settlements

34

16

50

"

94

"}

23 City of Tokio, str..

3,448 American

J. Maury

San Francisco

110

4

122

95

"

25 Glaucus, str.

1,648 British

T. S. Jackson

Straits Settlements

177

20

208

96

25 | Dale, str.

645

>>

J. Thompson

Bangkok

93

93

97

Sept.

3 Ulysses, str.

1,561

J. A. Guard

Straits Settlements

123

19

142

17

98

39

5 | Rajanattianuhar, str.

9331

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

142

146

Straits Settlements

19

Cooktown

1

76

32

81

27229-

99

6 Bowen, str.

844

J. Miller

Cleveland Bay

2

45

Sydney

13

Dunedin, N.Z.

9

Melbourne

1

100

"

11 | Belgic, str.

1,716

"

L. Meyer

San Francisco

140

G

152

101

"

11 Hindostan,

str.

901

R. J. McConnell

Straits Settlements

283

281

311

4:

27

102

""

17 Japan, str.

1,805

T. S. Gardner

132

85

12

235

""

"

103

17 Venice, str.

·

1,271

P. L. Rhode

204

24

234

"3

""

104

18

Danube, str...

561

"

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

176

176

""

96

105

>>

23 Sarpedou, str. ...

1,592

J. Rea

Straits Settlements

116

116

"

106

>>

26 | Dale, str.

645

""

J. Thompson

Bangkok

129

129

Cooktown

4

92337

00

107

30 Thales, str.

820

J. Peters

Port Darwin

13

79

Sydney

62

94

60

108

"

83

109

30 Nestor, str.

October 1 City of Peking, str.

110

""

4 Zamboanga, str.

1,414 3,448 American 651 Spanish

T. W. Freeman

Straits Settlements

122

122

"?

G. G. Berry V. Aranguren

San Francisco

178

186

Straits Settlements

314

37

353

Sydney

17

111

10 Menmuir, str.

1,247 British

J. W. B. Darke

Dunedin, N.Z.

7

38

:

""

24

Melbourne

12

112

14 Rajanattianuher, str.

933

"}

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

2921

300

196

113

16 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

246

129

10

393

""

"

103

114

""

16

Moray, str.

1,427

M. J. Butcher

365

398

182

115

22

Gaelic, str.

1,712

""

"

W. H. Kidley

San Francisco

135

141

446

116

22 Danube, str..

661

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

123

123

"}

""

151

117

""

22 Diamante, str.

514

E. Thebaud

Manila

41

42

""

359

118

23 Oceanic, str....

2,350

J. Metcalfe

Straits Settlements

63

12

-

79

""

""

220

119

""

24 Deucaliou, str.

1,639

R. S. Brown

170

170

"

Port Darwin

35

337

127

120

30 Ocean, str.

1,039

II. Webber

Cooktown

1

73

""

Sydney

37

84

121

"}

31 Orestes, str.

1,323

J. R. Webster

Straits Settlements

335

43

378

"

""

118

Keppel Bay

26

122

Nov.

3 Brisbane, str.

891

ارو

J. A. Reddell

Sydney

Melbourne

422

367

123

3 Dale, str.

615

"1

26

124

12

5 Olympia, str.

010

125

15

10 Agamemnon, str.

376

126

22

12 City of Tokio, str.

મહેમ

127

15 Suez, str...

1,390, British

783. German 1,523 British 3,448 Americau

J. Wilding

J. Maury

J. D. Eaton

J. Thompson F. Nagel

Bangkok

126

128

Straits Settlements

251

11

264

36

36

:

27

San Francisco

102

14

117

Straits Settlements

175

100

275

"

170

128

15 Venice, str.

1,271

P. L. Rhode

2871

30

317

19

""

2)

51

120

17 Rajanattianuhar, str.

933

"

G. T. Hopkius

239

130

17

Esmeralda, STP...................

395

R. Talbot

Bangkok Manila

127

127

41

41

59

58

131

21 | Stentor, str. .....................

1,304

"

132

22 Kashgar, str.

1,515

J. Kirkpatrick E. J. Baker

Straits Settlements

143

19

162

76

76

...

...

"

,781

Carried forward,.....

168,775

Carried forward,..

27,671 2,014

461

198 30,344

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, (Continued.)

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME,

Toxs.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

WHITHER Bound.

TOTAL.

M. F. M. F.

Brought forward,..

108,775

Brought forward,27,671 2,014 • 461

198 30,344

133

Nov.

26 | Danube, str.................

561 British

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

58:

1

59

Straits Settlements

22

Cooktown

1

134

""

A

29 Normanby, str.

664]

S. G. Green

Sydney

21

54

Melbourne

10

135

Dec.

3 Belgic, str.

1,716

136

3 | Achilles, str...

1,529

I. Meyer

C. Anderson

San Francisco

108

9

118

Straits Settlements

330

330

""

137

35

6 Teheran, str..

1,671

A. H. Johnsou

100

100

138

"

6

Diamante, str.

514

E. Thebaud

Manila

21

21

>>

Port Darwin

20

139

150

13 Bowen, str.

8441

J. Miller

Cooktown

3

40

""

Sydney

140

"

16 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,302

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

211

171

141

16 Moray, str.

1,427

M. J. Butcher

350

51

རྒྱས

398

409

""

>"

142

19 Patroclus, str.

1,650

M. R. White

434

36

470

"

""

143

22 Diamante, str.

514

E. Thebaud

Manila

24

24

31

19

144 145

33

24 | City of Peking, str.

13

24 | Antenor, str..

3,448 American 1,645 British

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

167

179

J. T. Bragg

Straits Setslements

112

112

24

Cooktown

146

27

147

"

148

31

Peshawur, str.......................

23

149

""

27 Somerset, str.

27 Rajanattianuhar, str.

31 Zamboanga, str.

654

J. W. B. Darke

59

1

Sydney

25

alelbourne

933 2,103

651 Spanish

G. T. Hopkins C. A. White V. Aranguren

Bangkok

186

187

Straits Settlements

167

168

448

:

457

""

Total Tons,..........

190,691

Total Passengers,..

30,546 2,284 489 210

33,529

SUMMARY.

To Bangkok,

""

Cleveland Bay,

"

Cooktown,

""

Dunedin, New Zealand,

,, Keppel Bay,

, Manila,

"J

Melbourne,

""

Port Darwin,

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

دو

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

"

Straits Settlements,

"

Sydney,

,,Victoria, Vancouver's Island, .

4,311

4,374

18

18

55

55

135

135

8

234

235

413

418

1,755

16!

1,771

2,163

41

2,208

6,479 123 160 43

6,811

|13,913|| 2,140|

204 164

16,421

787

793

275

282

Total Passengers,

30,546 2,284

489 210

33,529

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., . Emigration Officer, &c.

C

XX.-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire,

during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1879.

NATION-

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

ALITY OF SHIP.

1 January 2

Pekin, str.

2

3

4

3

**

Herbert Black,

4

"

Carisbrooke, str.

4

City of Tokio, str.

3,448 American

2,098 British

573 Americar› 960| British

Woolcott Treat Wharton Maury

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M.

F

M.

*

Straits Settlements

109

Portland, Oregon

121

Straits Settlements

98

* 2

San Francisco

70

109

124

100

711

Straits Settlements

68

M

Cooktown

116

1

Brisbane

20

5

4 Bowen, str.

844 British

Miller

326

Sydney

82

Dunedin, N.Z.

39

Melbourne

48

4 | Diamante, str.

514

Theband

Manila

180

7

J

6 | Emuy, str.

222 Spanish

Blanco

60

7 | Hector, str. .............

1,589 British

Billinge

Straits Settlements

215

8 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

255

10 | Rajanattiamuhar, str.

Hopkins

Bangkok

227

13 | Karo, str..

979

Collings

Straits Settlements

156

12

13

Lorne, str.

1,035

McCulloch

96

~

**

B

13 | Venice, str.

1.271

Rhode

99;

11

14

Hazelhurst,

878

Gondey

Portland, Oregon

120

15

17

Malwa, str.

1,776

16

17 Ocenic, str.

2,350

Tomlin Metcalfe

Straits Settlements

231

San Francisco

264

17

20 | Glenorchy, str.

1,775

Hoger

Straits Settlements

364

* 30

180

60

218

285

228

158

102

100

120

231

272

370

18

20

Danube, str.

561

19

23 | Teucer, str.

1.321

Clanchy Power

Bangkok

72

Straits Settlements

319

Thursday Island

66.

20

24 | Normanby, str.

664

Ellis

Keppel Bay

11

72

322

95

Sydney

Melbourne

21

18

28828 8 NARAHA

24 Hakon Adelsten, str.

905 Norwegian

Berg

Straits Settlements

86

.་

27 Namoa, str......

862 British

Westoby

66

23

"

24

29 Gordon Castle, str. 30 Nestor, str.

1,312|

Waring

42

1,414

Freeman

74

421

25 February 1] Charlton, str.

786

Johnson

Sydney

223

86

70

44

75 223

Cooktown

+

10

26

1 Briskanc, str.

896

Reddell

Sydney

61

Melbourne

12:

27

3 Ocean, str..

971

Edmondson

Sydney

90.

90

28

3

City of Peking, str.

3,448 American

Berry

San Francisco

199

199

29

5 Moray, str.

1,427 British

Butcher

Straits Settlements

147)

150

30

7 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Mactavish

130

134

་་

31

8 Glaucus, str.

1,648

Jackson

73

75

32

1

10 Diamante, str...

514

Thebaud

Manila

85

85

33

#1

12 Geelong, str.

1,139

Frazer

Straits Settlements

67

67

34

B

13 | Rajanattianuhar, str..

933

Hopkins

Bangkok

40

40

35

12

15 Hesperia, str.

1,136 German

Johannsen

Straits Settlements

106

2

112

36

15 Esmeralda, str.

395 British

Callen

Manila

54

54

37

!

22 Ulysses, str.

1,561

**

Thompson

Straits Settlements

430

430

38

24 Diamante, str.

514

Thebaud

Manila

75

75

1.

39

"

24 | Bokhara, str.

1,775

Orman

Straits Settlements

108

4

112

"

40

24 Jeddah, str....

993

Clark

200!

25

30

255

41

25 Danube, str.

561

Clanchy

Bangkok

42

46

42

26 Emuy, str...

222 Spanish

Blanco

Manila

72

72

43

26 Belgic, str. ....................

1,716 British

Mever

San Francisco

47

::

17

44

27 Teviot, str.

1,262

Nisbett

Straits Settlements

250

45

March

3 | Priam, str.

1,572

Butler

256

4 20

252

260

10.

#!

46

4

Dale, str.

645

Thompson

Bangkok

26

47

5 Esmeralda, str.

395

Cullen

Manila

70

::

26

***

ΤΟ

48

6

Adria, str.

781

Stewart

Straits Settlements

801

49

"

6 Diomed, str.

1,241

Jackson

145

285

148

2

83

150

31

50

6 Menmuir, str.

1,247

Darke

Cooktown

18

331

Melbourne

20

51

41

8 Venice, str.

1,271

Rhode

Straits Settlements

220

10

230

52

63

8283333333

11

Hindostan, str.

991

Gardner

213

213

་་

11

Thibet, str.

1,671

Torbock

59

59

...

:1

54

""

11 Diamante, str.

514

Thebaud

Manila

78

78

55

""

15 Gleniffer, str. .........

1,412

Graham

Straits Settlements

122

122

56

15 | Sarpedon, str................

1,592

Rea

350

20

400

"

57

་་

15 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

417

8

22

447

19

58

11

17 Rajanattianular, str.....

933

Hopkins

Bangkok

105

112

69

19

20 Gaelic, str. ....

1,713

Kidley

San Francisco

270

270

60

?!

20 Scotland, str.

1,190

Atkinson

Straits Settlements

29

30

61

19

24 Khiva, str.

1,506

Lee

57

57

"

62

"

25, Deucalion, str.

1,639

Brown

470

470

་་

147

6

Thursday Island

7

Cooktown

64

63

27 Bowen, str.

844

Millar

345

**

Rockhampton

21

Sydney

58

Melbourne

64

22222823832

28

Danube, str.

561

Clanchy

Bangkok

2 E

42

60

60

65

29 | Glenfalloch, str..

1,386

66

"

31 Glencoe, str,

1,901

Taylor

Gulland

Straits Settlements

242

250

169

169

67

April

2 Jeddah, str........

993

Clark

329

**

68

11

3 Dale, str.

645

69

""

4 Esmeralda, str.

395

70

"

5 Ajax, str..

1,550

Thompson

Cullen

Kidd

Bangkok

63

NN

331

65

Manila

150

150

>

Straits Settlements

273

12

2

289

71

7 | Moray, str.

1.427]

Butcher

210

20

230

•+

**

72

7

""

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1.392

Milne

231

30

261

•+

11

"

7 | Galley of Lorne, str.

1.390

Dryden

28

30

74

"

15 | Gleneagles, str.

1,838

McBain

308

2

310

31

Carried forward,...

89,032

Carried forwarð,

12.626

263

G4

4

12,957

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,--Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,........

75 April 15 | Lord of the Isles, str.

89,032

1,586 British

Beal

Brought forward,... 12,626|| 263 Straits Settlements

6.1

4 12,957

801 4

31

Cooktown

69

76

1+

15 Somerset, str.

654

95

Pockley

Sydney

291

::

98

77

>"

78

21

31

19 Rajanattianuhar, str.. Esmeralda, str...

933

Hopkins

Bangkok

138

4

142

395

Cullen

Manila

150

150

79

"

80

81

"

21

"

21 | Emuy, str.

Gwalior, str.

21 Oceanic, str.

222 Spanish 1,728 British

Blanco

91

་་

91

·

Babot

Straits Settlements

$7

87

82

"

23 | Antenor, str.

2,350 1,645

Metcalfe

San Francisco

191

"

191

Jones

Straits Settlements

710

30

740

83

28 | Glene.n. str.

1,810

Gasson

94

""

??

27

96

81

28 | Bellona, str.

789 German

Ahrens

Bangkok

401

40

$5

28

Danube, str.

561 British

Clanchy

52

2

J1

54

86

28

Orestes, str..

1,323

Webster

Straits Settlements

392

"1

392

102

00

Cooktown

13

87

"

29 Normanby, str.

664

Ellis

Sydney

41

216

Melbourne

44

88

89 May

27

29

Hankow, str.

2,332

19

Symington

Straits Settlements

117

123

1

Thales, str.

820

Lamont

Bangkok

51

51

90

""

3 Agamemnon, str.

1,522

Wilding

Straits Settlements

346

10

356

91

92

93

19

5 Lombardy, str.

1,726

Hall

45

"!

45

1)

5

City of Tokio, str.

3,448 American

Maury

San Francisco

169

169

"

6

Esmeralda, str.

395 British

Cullen

Manila

180

180

94

"}

7 Venice, str.

1,271

Rhode

Straits Settlements

315

25

340

"

95

7

Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

260

60

"

11

320

96

10 Alaska, str.

2,483 American

Seaburry

San Francisco

143

97

14 Patroclus, str..

1,650 British

White

Straits Settlements

470

98

17 Zambesi, str.

1,540

Symons

126

""

99

"

17 | Belgic, str.

1,716

100

"

19 Rajanattianuhar, str..

933

101

20

!!

Jeddah, str....

993

102

20

Glenfinlas, str.

1,366

Meyer Hopkins Clark Wilcox

San Francisco

102

: :;

143

40

510

126

102

Bangkok

188

Straits Settlements

5001

28

12

200

50

550

83

3

"

""

86

114

Cooktown

411

103

"

20 Brisbane, str.

891

Reddell

**

Keppel Bay

63

316

Sydney

90

104

"1

21

Esmeralda, str.

105

21

Emuy, str.

100

26 Achilles, str.

107

30

City of Peking, str.

395

222 Spanish 1,529 British

3,448 American

"1

Cullen Blanco

Manila

1001

100

150

150

Anderson

Straits Settlements

450

450

Berry

San Francisco

73

73

108

109

30 Danube, str.

31 Teheran, str.

564 British

Clanchy

Bangkok

89

93

1,671

Johnson

Straits Settlements

157

4

3

167

"?

110

>

31

Electra, str..

1,161| German

Boehme

158

162

111 June 3

Chinkiang, str.

799 British

Orr

Bangkok

126

128

112

""

3

Atholl, str.

923

Thomson

102

105

113

11

3

Moray, str.

1,427

Butcher

Straits Settlements

192

198

114

"1

3

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

Mactavish

310

01

330

>>

"J

115

5

Hindostan, str.

991

"

116

??

5 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

994

McConnell Webb

57

"

390

25

59

6

396

117

7 | Stentor, str..........

1,304

7

"

118

"

7 Emuy, str.

2221 Spanish

Kirkpatrick Blauco

3901

29

390

Manila

164

164

Port Darwin

76

119

9 Bowen, str.

844 British

Miller

Sydney

221

Dunedin, N.Z.

177

25

Melbourne

51

120

"

11

Glenroy, str.

121

12

"

Dale, str.

122

14

Khedive, str.

1,370 645 2,228

Donaldson

Thompson

Straits Settlements Bangkok

217

10

6

247

62

62

!!

Steward

Straits Settlements

222

"

123

14

Thales, str.

820

Lamont

158

32

225

3

163

27

19

124

16 Diamante, str.

514

Theband

1:

125

17| Gaelic, str.

1,712

Davison

Manila San Francisco

220

220

168

168

126

17 Carisbrooke, str.

960

Wharton

Straits Settlements

154

170

127

19 Antenor, str.

1,644

Jones

367

19

386

"

94

"

Cooktown

63

128

20 Menmuir, str.

1,150

Darke

"

Rockhampton

178

Townsville

Brisbane

31

129

23 Anchises, str.

1,30

"

"

130

23

Esmeralda, str.

395

"7

""

131

23 Emuy, str.

132

99

24 Rajanattianular, str.

222 Spanish 933 British

Jackson Cullen Blanco

Straits Settlements

262

11

273

Manila

801

80

200

200

"

133

28 Malwa, str.

1,776|

""

134

30 Teucer, str.

1.324

Hopkins Tomlin Power

Bangkok

199

200

Straits Settlements

120

120

443

451

"?

"

135

17

30 | Diamante, str..

514

Thebaud

Manila

117

117

136

July

2 Glengyle, str.

1,263

137

5 Venice, str.

1,271

Quartly Rhode

Straits Settlements

178

2

180

230

20

250

>>

11

138

Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

257

...

257

139

7 Danube, strø.

561

""

140

7 Esmeralda, str.

3951

"J

141

J1

7 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

954

Clanchy Callen Webb

Bangkok

100

102

Manila

60

GO

Straits Settlements

380

387

11

Port Darwin

143

142

7 Ocean, str.

971

Webber

";

Sydney

87

::

230

143

9 China, str.

2,323 American

Lachlan

San Francisco

110

110

144

10 Kaisar-1-lind, str.

2.559 British

Mathven

Straits Settlements.

99

102

145

10 Menelaus, str.

1,559

Billinge

995

295

"

29

"

Cooktown

31

146

12 Somerset, str.

654

Green

138

19

Sydney

30

Melbourne

47

147

""

14 Dale, str.

645

Thompson

Bangkok

67

67

Carried forward.................

178,660

Carried forward,.

26,699

101 670

15

27,483

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,--Continued.

No.

DATE ÁRRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

CHILDREN.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward,.

178,660

Brought forward,... 26,693|

670 101

15

148 July 149

15 Diamante, str.....

514 British

17 | Oceanic, str.

2,850

Thebaud Metcalfe

Manila

130)

27,485 130

San Francisco

275

275

}

150

11

17 Hector, str.

1,589

151

11

152

21

18

153

14

154

""

23

155

21

150

19

157 158 159

11

་་

17 Benledi, str.

Glenlyon, str.

21 Esmeralda, str.

Lydia, str...

26 Bokhara, str......

26 Rajanattianuhar, str.. 28 | Carisbrooke, str.....

30 | City of Tokio, str.

31 Glaucus, str.

160 August 1 Moray, str.

1,169 German

1,775 British

1,000

1,373

395

Butler Ross Wallace Cullen

Straits Settlements

325 20

345

74

15

82

130

134

21

Manila

70

"}

70

Paulsen

}

Straits Settlements

801

10

90

Anderson

GO

64

??

933 9601

??

Ilopkins

Bangkok

991

103

Wharton

Straits Settlements

88

ல்

10

:1

100

3,448 American

Maury

San Francisco

129

129

1,647 British

Jackson

Straits Settlements

411 26

8

2

450

1,428

Butcher

100 17

117

13

161

17

1

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

Mactavish

180

180

11

162

11

2 Diamante, str.

514

Thebaud

Manila

110

J1

110

6

163

"1

5

Emuy, str.

222 Spanish

Blanco

287

287

""

164

""

6

Ulysses, str................

1,561 British

Guard

Straits Settlements

271

12

283

165

3

19

8 Viceroy, str.

2,460

17

166

8

i1

19

Esmeralda, str.....

395

19

167

16

""

9

Danube, str.

561

Comyn Talbot Clanchy

144 3

"

147

Manila

87

...

87

Bangkok

70

168

15

99

9

Cathay, str.

1,884

Dundas

Straits Settlements

105

19

169

39

""

9

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

444

238

72

108

"

11

...

450

170

30

""

14

Belgic, str.

1,716

171

"

14

Adria, str.

781

Meyer Seaton

San Francisco

183

183

Straits Settlements

179

.6

6

185

172

20

"

15

Dale, str.

645

>>

Thompson

Bangkok

35

3

38

173

18

Diamante, str.

514

Thebaud

Manila

210

...

210

174

10

19 Priam, str...

1,572

Butler

Straits Settlements

382

70

452

"

175

26

19 Patterdale, str.

8851

"

19

Bentley

28

30

Cooktown

391

02

176

""

19 Brisbane, str.

891

Reddell

""

00

Sydney

80

41

177

50

178

86

179

180

16

181

"

182

******

21 Yang Tsze, str.

23 Emuy, str.

782

Schultze

11

Bangkok

62

2

61

222 Spanish

Blanco

Manila

170

*..

170

23 Guy Mannering, str.

2,115 British

Mann

Straits Settlements

110

15

...

125

23 Sarpedon, str.

1,592

Rea

320

10

19

330

25 Indus. str.

2,234

11

26 Esmeralda, str.

395

Shallard Talbot

123

4

127

11

Manila

101

104

183

00

19

29 Rajanattianubar, str..

933

91

Hopkins

Bangkok

GO

60

50

184 Sept.

2 Diamante, str...

514

Thebaud

Manila

100

100

185

50

2 Oxfordshire, str...

998

Jones

Straits Settlements

30

30

73

186

"

3 | City of Peking, str.

3,448 American

Berry

San Francisco

202

202

93

Straits Settlements

87

7

.67

Cooktown

16

.62

187

3 Bowen, str.

884 British

Miller

Keppel Bay

3

128

Brisbane

6

142

108

Sydney

6

198

Melbourne

17

330

188

19

4 Carisbrooke, str.

960

Wharton

Straits Settlements

196

4

189

59

4 Glencoe, str.

1,901

Gulland

85

190

396

"7

5 Venice, str.

1,271

Rhode

212

23

10

10

5

14

191

390

5 Japan, str.

1,865

192

164

6 Nestor, str.

1.435

Gardner Freeman

2201

47

17

195

5

193

6 Khiva, str.

1,506

""

194

8 Danube, str.

561

"

177

195

"

8: Emuy, str.

196

9 Esmeralda, str.

222 Spanish

395 British

Lee

42

11

Clanchy Blanco

Bangkok Manila

42

60

Talbot

65

"

""

247

197

11 Atholl, str.

923

Thomson

喃喃

Port Darwin

47

62

198

11 Diomed, str.

1,241

Jackson

Straits Settlements

224

带带

227

199

27

16

Ajax, str.

1,525

Scale

197

"

163

200

19

16

Glenartney, str.

1,370

Auld

60

220

201

16

11

Loudoun Castle, str.

1,615

Marshall

70

168

202

17 Diamante, str.

514

Thebaud

Manila

110

11

170

203

"

17 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

959

Webb

Straits Settlements

224

6021

356

204

18 Dale, str.

645

"

Thompson

Bangkok

32

205

1:

22 | Gwalior, str.

1,726)

Babot

Straits Settlements

61

206

24 Gaelic, str.

1,713

Kidley

San Francisco

405

178

207

25 Sunda, str.

1,030

Reeves

Straits Settlements

62

~

208

39

26 Zamboanga, str.

651 Spanish

Aranguren

Bangkok

40

209

27 Emuy, str.

222

Blanco

Manila

185

200

87 250

267

200

43

42

60

65

47

230

207

62

71

110

230

32

61

405

64

40

185

.,

273

Port Darwin

30

Cooktown

40

200

210

27 Menmuir, str.

1,247 British

Darke

Sydney

78

201

Melbourne

9

120

Dunedin, N.Z.

20

451

211

29 | Glenearni, str.

1,410

Gasson

Straits Settlements

270

278

"

117

212

99

180

213

250

257

29 Esmeralda, str.

30 | Deucalion, str.

214 October 3 Moray, str.

215

395

Talbot

Manila

55

56

"

1,639

Brown

Straits Settlements

53

15

68

1,427

Butcher

247

248

11

3 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,302

Mactavish

321

37

19

322

102

216

4 Ancona, str......

1,965

Stend

69 J

69

#1

??

11

217

4 Rajanattianular, str..........

933

>>

387

218

6 Ocean, str.

971

Hopkins Webber

Bangkok

100

106

Port Darwin

40

40

219

230

220

8

7 Lord of the Isles, str.

Orestes, str..

1,586

1,323.

110

221

13 | Radnorshire, str.

1,201

Felgate Webster

Davies

Straits Settlements

39

40

296

302

"

27

***

31

11

3012

222

13 Braemer Castle, str.

1,425

Thomson

154

154

""

295

223

13 Danube, str

561

Clauchy

Bangkok

59

60

224

13 Charlton, str.

786

Johnson

32

32

225

138

""

13

Emuy, str.

226

13

Diamante, str..

"

222 Spanish 514 British

Blanco

Manila

67

67

Thebaud

120

120

227

"

15 Oceanic, str.

2,350

19

67

17,485

228

"

15 Agamemnon, str.

1,522

11

Metcalfe Wilding

San Francisco

464

6

470

Straits Settlements

333 29

10

4

376

Carried forward,.

275,326

Carried forward,..

38,542 1,098

139

26

39,805

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,--Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F

M.

F

Brought forward,.

275,326

229 October 18 | Gleneagles, str.

1,837 British

230 231

""

18 Carisbrooke, str..

9601

+

"

20 Kashgar, str..

1,515

McBain Wharton Baker

Brought forward,..... 38,542] 1,098 Straits Settlements

139

26

39.805

2221

4

4

230

138

A

140

""

61

61

>>

232

""

22 Dale, str.

645

Thompson

Bangkok

28

3

31

233

"}

27 | Esmeralda, str.

395

Talbot

Manila

501

50

234

19

28 Stentor, str........

1,304

Kirkpatrick

Straits Settlements

412

12

430

235

19

29

Brisbane, str.

891

Reddell

Sydney

57

""

Melbourne

34

91

...

236

"

29

Ben Gloe, str...

1,198

Buchanan

Straits Settlements

70

70

"

237

Nov.

1 Diamante, str.

514

Thebaud

Manila

100

2

...

102

238

"

1 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956)

Webb

Straits Settlements

400

7

8

4

419

239

3

Teheran, str.

1,671

Johnson

82

...

82

"1

240

""

3 Venice, str.

1,271

Rhode

170

10

6

Co

190

>>

"1

241

""

8

Suez, str.

1,390

Eaton

270 49

...

319

242

3

City of Tokio, str.

3,448 American

Maury

San Francisco

633

...

...

...

633

243

5 Fleurs Castle, str.

1,622 British

Kidder

Straits Settlements

29

***

30

""

244

11

11 | Rajanattianuhar, str.....

933

""

Hopkins

Bangkok

101

...

106

245

11 | Achilles, str.

1,525

Anderson

Straits Settlements

260

263

"

246

11 Glenfalloch, str.

1,418

}}

"

Taylor

129

130

39

127

""

247

19

11 Normanby, str.

664

Green

11

Keppel Bay

154

Sydney

23

248

"

12 Esmeralda, str.

395

249

"}

12 Iphigenia,

464 German

Talbot Green

Manila

46

46

Honolulu

42

1

1

45

250

14

Olaf, str.

976 Danish

Andresen

Cooktown

39

39

251

17

Thibet, str.

1,671 British

Torbock

Straits Settlements

104

8

112

"

252

17

Diamante, str.

>

253

18

Danube, str.

514 561

Thebaud

Manila

100

100

11

Clanchy

Bangkok

30

2

32

254

"

19

Feronia, str.

1,115 German

Schultz

Straits Settlements

125

125

255

21

"

Electra, str......................

1,161

Bochme

Honolulu

58

""

256

21

Patroclus, str.....

1,649 British

White

Straits Settlements

497

20

200

23

62

8

A

527

257

93

24

Belgic, str.

1,716

21

Meyer

San Francisco

628

258

26

Carisbrooke, str..

960

Wharton

Straits Settlements

198

"

11

259

27

71

Dale, str.

645

Thompson

Bangkok

31

:

:

628

200

...

31

260 Dec.

2

Diamante, str.

514

261

"3

3 Antenor, str.

1,644

"

Thebaud

Bragg

Manila

160

За

163

Straits Settlements

244

250

262

21

3 Glenorchy, str.

1,755

;"

Hogg

297

300

263

"

4 Peshawur, str...

2,300

White

48

3

51

29

36!

264

4 Bowen, str.

844

Miller

"

91

Melbourne

69

::

...

105

265

5 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

Mactavish

Straits Settlements

406

34

444

"1

266

6 Moray, str.

1,429

Butcher

319

15

""

19

...

334

267

6 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

959

Webb

253

3

256

་་

268

11

13

Somerset, str.

651

Darke

64

64

11

269

13

Gordon Castle, str..

1,312

"1

19

270

13

Anchises, str.

1,304

Waring Jackson

143

7

150

181

3

"

"

271

11

15 Kaisar-I-Hind, str..

2,559

Methven

114 12

10

NO

186

140

11

272

"

15 Esmeralda, str.

395

Talbot

Manila

841

84

11

273

16

"

Diamante, str....

514

Thebaud

95

"

14

...

95

274

"

16

City of Peking, str.

3,448 American

Berry

San Francisco

920

920

275

17

Alden Besse,

19

276

"

20 Teucer, str.

842 1,324 British

Noyes

Portland, Oregon

338

3

342

Power

Straits Settlements

387

19

406

277

19

20 | Rajanattianuhar, str.....

933

་་

Hopkins

Bangkok

176

7

183

278

27 Danube, str.

561

""

17

Clanchy

50

2

52

Port Darwin

90

279

27 Thales, str.

820

Peters

103

99

""

Cooktown

13

280

27 Garibaldi,

670 American

Forbes

Portland, Oregon

272

272

281

29 Esmeralda, str.

395 British

Talbot

Manila

30

30

"

282

"1

29 Gleniffer, str. ......................

1,111

Graham

Straits Settlements

238

3

4

245

283

30 Bokhara, str.

1,775

Anderson

84

84

...

11

TOTAL TONS,..

341,061

TOTAL PASSENGERS,....

48,950 1,356

192

44

50,542

ADULTS,

CHILDREN.

VALUE OF

TOTAL.

TREASURE

SUMMARY.

M.

F.

M.

F.

BROUGHT.

From Bangkok,

2,896 81

Melbourne,

Sydney,

"

Brisbane,

})

Cooktown,

19

Dunedin, N.Z.,

**

19

Keppel Bay, .....

19.

Manila,

>>

12

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A......................

$7

Port Darwin,

11

San Francisco,

Straits Settlements,

"

Thursday Island,

Townsville,

29

2,977 29

580

580

$666,058

84

84

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

100

3

3

107

80

80

4,931

6

4,937

405

405

351

6

858

401

...

401

$ 12,469

Rockhampton, ..........................................

27

27

6,286

14

'6,300

$8,229,873

31,298 1,246

189

42

32,775

903

903

...

73

73

6

...

6

TOTAL PASSENGERS,..

48.950 1,356

192

44

50,542

$8,308,400

·

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Emigration, Officer, &c.

*35*** * 88888688582 2 88-258*

112

100

125

62

527

628

200

31

163

250

300

51

105

444

334

256

64

150

186

140

84

95

920

342

406

183

52

103

272

30

245

84

),512

OF

JRE

HT.

,058

,469

,873

1,400

XXI-RETURN of Marine Cases tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE's Count, during the Year 1879.

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF.

NATURE OF Charge.

NO. OF CASES.

No. of DE-

FEND-

Impri- Impri-

ANTS. with

Hard Labour. of Fine.

soned soned

in default

Fined.

Forfei- ture

Repri- inanded.

of l'ay.

Duty.

Sent back to charged

from Ship.

To be dis-

Dis- missed.

AMOUNT OF

FINES.

Absent from Ship without Leave,........

10

29

16

13

Arrival without Report, (Junk),

Assault,

20

30

5

13

Contagious Diseases Ord., 1867, Sec. 64, Breach of, Desertion,

1

13

...

10

~

Disorderly Conduct,

22

14

Drunkenness,

JO

25

N

False particulars, Giving, (Junk),.

Found stowed away,

Harbour and Coasts Ord., 1866, Breach of,

Harbour Regulations, Breach of,

Insubordination,

Leaving without Clearance, (Junk),

Merchant Shipping Act, 1854,

Obstructions of Fairways,

Refusal of Duty,

Throwing Ballast, &c., into Harbour, Wilfully remaining behind,

7

13

1

5

3

4

10

3

1

2

...

14

3

22

31

85

68

Co

5

15

12

:

:

TOTAL,.

144

299

139

2

65

25

17

$11.00

10

106.27

1

15.00

21.00

4.00

24.00

11.00

5.00

12.00

1

41.00

3

1

10.19

13.00

ลง

40 $273.46

}

?

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Marine Magistrate, §c.

TONS.

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3.900,000

3.800,000

3.700,000

3,600.000

3.300.000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

1867.

DIAGRAM Of Tonnage entered at. Hongkong, from 1567 to 1879 inclusive,

BLUE LINE represents Junk. Tonnage only.

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire trade in Foreign Ships and Funks.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1877.

1878.

1879.

Toxs.

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3.800,000

3,700,000

3,600,0

3.500,000

3.400,000

1.100,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2.900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

7,600,000

2,500,000

1,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

$1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

2,900,000

2,800.000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2.100,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

Harbour Department. Hang?

Trowsert, K.N..

No Man de

DROIT

No. 75.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following letter with enclosure from the

Inspector of Schools, reporting the result of

the examination of the Grant-in-Aid Schools, is

published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office,

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

Hongkong, 24th March, 1880.

號五十七第報憲

輔政使司馬

離去年獎賞一册錄呈 監督學院歐 爲申陳事竊做監院現將連年考取獎賞各輔翼義學情節

致規

督憲諭將監督學院

三月 二十四日示

册杪印俾衆週知 一千八百八十年

輔翼義學獎賞單一

公文并内附考取各

十規年

照 定輔翼義學規條第三款每百員減少五員更有義學一去年三月朔始 更嚴卽前准限錯二字者去年只准限錯一字等更有一館去年所領獎賞 名戊寅年被取者九十五名丁丑年被取者八十六名如是去年被取較 前年稍遜惟厥故非因去年教法不及前年實因甄別之法去年較前年 班次創蒙考取致該規條所列各班照每百名學童計去年被取者八十六 四百五十九名惟去年所甄別中有一義學照規條第二十二款所定額外 各館應考學童去年有七百五十五名戊寅年有五百五十七名丁丑年有 條去年甄別一十九館查戊寅年甄別一十七舘丁丑年甄別一十四館致 案除國家義學及國家輔翼義學共二十九館外做監院遵定輔翼義學規

[No.21.]

INSPECTORATE OF SCHOOLS,

HONGKONG, 25th February, 1880.

SIR,I have the honour to forward under this enclosure the annual table showing the results of the examinations I conducted under the Grant-

in-aid system.

Apart from the Government Schools and Gov-

ernment Aided Schools, 29 in number, the total number of Schools examined by me under the provisions of the Grant-in-aid Schedule last

year amounted to 19 as against 17 in 1878 and 14 in 1877. The total number of children presented

for examination amounted to 755 as against 557 in 1878 and 459 in 1877. In one School some boys were, for the first time, examined in the subjects of a higher class of education as provided for by Rule No. 22 of the Schedule. The passes

in the whole of the subjects included in the Schedule amounted to 86 per cent. as against 95 per cent. in 1.878 and 86 per cent.in 1877.

The

reason of this decrease in the percentage of passes,

as compared with the previous year, does not lie any decrease in the effectiveness of the teach-

in

ing given in 1879, but is to be found in the fact

that at the last examination I increased the strict-

hess of the test applied in Schools under Class I, allowing only one mistake where two mistakes

were allowed formerly. In the case of one School a cumulative reduction of five per cent. on the whole earnings had to be made under Rule No. 3 of the Grant-in-aid Schedule. In the case of

t

another School, opened on 1st March, 1879; pay- ment has been calculated pro rata, this being the condition under which the School was accepted by the Government. As regards St. JOSEPH's College, I have to state that the figures in the enclosed table refer only to the results of the examination of those boys who, from 1st January, 1879, up to the day of examination, 29th January, 1880, had completed the 200 attendances required by the Schedule, but that I have kept a Memo- randum regarding the results of the examination of those boys whose attendance was insufficient, which Memorandum can hereafter be referred to, if required.

The sum total earned by the Grant-in-aid Schools amounts for last year to $6,124.54 as against $4,811.53 in 1878 and $3,752.90 in 1877. Out of this sum the grant earned by the Victoria School, amounting to $370.74 has al- ready been paid under an advance warrant, leav- ing a balance still due of $5,753.80.

The actual amount payable under the revised Schedule for passes in extra subjects under Rule No. 22 of the Schedule is at present under con- sideration, but I have meanwhile calculated the amount at the rate of $2 for an extra pass in each extra subject of Standard VI of Schools in Class IV as fixed by the Schedule in Rule No. 22.

The amount total provided for Grants-in-aid in the Estimates for 1880 is $6,000. Of this sum we have already spent $230 in gratuities for those Masters of Government Schools whose schools were classed respectively as "very good" and as “good.” There will therefore be an ex- cess of $354.54 over the sum estimated, in ex- planation of which I have but to refer to the fact that several schools were accepted under the Grant-in-aid Scheme after the Estimates for 1880 had been prepared.

I did not employ an Assistant Examiner, but as regards the classification of the merits of the needlework in Girls' Schools, the following Ladies kindly undertook to act as Judges, viz., Mrs. BURDON, Lady SMALE, Mrs. CHALMERS, Miss. S. J. ANDERSON, M.D., Mrs. VIRGINIA A. R. DO ROZARIO, Miss SCHROEDER and Miss JOHNSTONE.

As there has been considerable delay in the preparation of this complicated account, in con- sequence of circumstances over which I had no control, I beg to recommend that an advance warrant for the sum of $5,753.80 be issued at once so that the Managers may without delay receive the sums which their schools have earned in the past year.

I reserve all comments regarding the educa- tional results of the year 1879, as disclosed by these examinations, for my general report.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL,

Inspector of Schools.

+

"

+

輔右為五司厥 此十

千使申

八馬陳

院 新 可

局大

銀現

但做

奶家義

項目

乃 掌

即姑

派娘甄

送及

及别

各贊

總娘

年學

厥故則可云度支局預備

核甄

學獎賞銀乃六千大員但爲甄別

教所有上取次取經支 玉若何現在向須酌傘做監院察核該數乃規條第二十二款所指第四等書館第六班學童每藝被取者准獎銀弌大 照度支局預備本 應領之獎賞銀三百七十員界七四仙經預給領故現向應給領者五千七百五十三員八毫 照新議輔翼義學規條第二十二款所定 寅年應領四千八百一十一員五毫三仙丁丑年應領三千七百五十二員九毫去年則應領六千一百二十四員五毫四仙但内有威克多理阿 遵照輔龔義學規條所定學滿二百日者另有學童學習未滿該期者做監院亦嘗另存試册嗣後欲察若何隨時皆可 核各輔與義學獎賞銀兩戊 啟館者則照國家所准該館之規條及該館教讀之日程而獎賞致論約瑟書院須知後附取錄名數只是由去年正月朔至甄別之日卽現年正月杪止

·蒙甄別者數館 敝監院亦未嘗邀請別位同考惟各女義學針黹工夫精麤不一

·大員故現應支溢於支局預備者三百五十四員五

五十三員八毫犁做監院可將去年獎賞之項立卽派送各義學總理 所有去年甄別該輔翼義學教習事欸若何容俟中陳各義

理獎

別錄

輔附位

翼詳同現每毫

義册考應藝

學停惟

習多

事時

欵質

預弍

銀義員

量做四

專獲輪員

欵撥院五

時銀實亳本

再五蒙四年

阿當正

仙輔格書銀月

若翼外館兩秒

問義學所戊止

那千

包夫人

RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS IN 1979

NAME OF SCHOOL.

2

:

...

11

2

16.66

es is

5

36

14

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS IN 1879.

No, of Scholars who Passed.

No. of Scholars who Failed.

Sums to which the School is entitled.

Needle Work.

Total Passed.

ance during School

Average Daily Attend-

Year.

Total Failed.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

: * | Standard IV.

18

$

$

000000

69

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

Very Good.

Good.

Fair.

Average Daily At-

tendance.

Assistant Examiner's Fee.

1. Baxter Girls' School, D'Aguilar Street,.

13.

1 6 2

2

2. Baxter Girls' Schools, Hollywood Road,. Baxter Girls' School, Sai-ying-phún, «

I

17

9

1

I

30

8

00

8

7

:

Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, D'Aguilar Street,

I

41 15 9 11

4

5. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, St. Stephen's,...

I

35

6 11

5

1

-f

6. C. M. S. Boys' School, Queen's Road,.

I

16

6

Co

***

...

:

...

7. C. M. S. Boys' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,

I

39 14

8

8

3

...

8. C. M. S. Boys' School, St. Stephen's Church,.......

I

68; 16

27

16

2

...

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

.:.

:

3

1

1

...

6 3

p

2

:

:

:

:

TA.

:

:.

*

***

...

9. L. M. S. Boys' School, Tank Lane,....

I

49

CT

15

10

74 2

10. L. M. S. Boys' School, Wán-tsai,..

46 13

13 7

11. L. M. S. Boys' School, Yan-má-ti,

I

23 2

11 1

:

2. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, Staunton Street, I

55 11

12 10

11

N

:

:

:

4

3

2

2

1

2

1

...

:

:

3

1

5

...

...

3

1

2

...

7

1

1

1

13. L. M. S. Girls' School, Tai-p‘ing-shán,

I

31 10

5

10

8

co

2 2

4. L. M. S. Girls' School, Wán-tsai,..

I 23 7

5. Basel Mission Boys' School,..

III

15

****

G

5

3

5

2

16. Basel Mission Girls' School,

III 51 9 11 973 4

17. Diocesan Home & Orphanage, (Boys & Girls), IV

18. St. Joseph's College, (Boys),

19. Victoria School, (Boys & Girls),

25

R

3 3

4

2

1

IV 148 10

55

36 17 3 6

co

2

...

:

...

3

1

2

:

4

4

6

1

IV

30

2

7 7 4

4

4

...

...

:

1

1

ار

1

...

...

Inspectorate of Schools, Hongkong, 25th February, 1880.

17

20.36 45

42

135

7

t-

...

..

...

2

1

1 1

:

: :

:

27

3

34.67 40

48

39

2

47.141 75

54

==

49

32

77 32

:

...

:

21 11

43.03❘ 30

66 35

Co

8

...

10

14

2

23.67❘ 25

40

...

...

...

...

:

...

...

:

33

6

51.92 70

...

62

6 111,75 80

3 +

162 | 112

...

:

43

G

58.39 | 25

90

37

9

:

49.73 65

78

:

:

17

30.10 10

84

1

461

64.47 55

72

27

31.82 50

30

T:

:

:

:

...

20

3 29.15 35

36 35

10

5

10

31.29 18

35

...

...

1

1

...

...

...

:

2

1 3 2

2

:

1 4

43

00

8

50.53

54 77

:

..

:

18

7

30.82 30

24 30

12713 171.89|60|440 | 360 204 42 || 96 | 16

28

2

38.74 12

56

2 9 3 2 2 3 8 2

2 3 2 3

899

70

49

48 56

24

16

***

...

10

56 36 20

32-

...

...

28

J

...

70

SS 18

...

16 18

8

9

16

...

...

72

63 30 48

24 56 16

70

48 56

64

Grant-in-Aià.

To Teacher.

To Manager.

Total

Grant.

REMARKS.

$

$

$

$

$

...

:

...

28

30

527.50

16.66

29.41 88.25

117.66

CD

3

:

:

20.36

36.84 110.52

147.86

31.67

65.79 197.38

263.17

:

...

17.14

71.28 218.86

285.14

...

16 28.50

9

43.03

G1.38 184.1

245.63

(Cumulative reduction of

...

5 per cent.

19.67

21.17 63,50

81.67

Payiuent

***

...

...

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

Pro reta.

54.92

63.23 159.69

252.92

111.75

116,79 350,37

467.16

58.39!

...

88.85 (266.51

355.39

...

...

49.73

30.10

...

:

68,43 205.30

273.73

:

32.77 | 98.33

131.10

71 24

00

64.47

118.37 355.10

473.47

:

46 12 1

31.82

65,20:195.62

260.82

...

40

៣រ

3

1

29.15

49.03 147.12

196.15

31.29

25.07 75.22

100.29

...

...

:

61 24

3

50.53

121.38 364.15

485.53

8

3

2 30.82

55.95 167.87 223.82

171.89

...

***

847.47 1,042.42 | 1,389.89 |

22

3

1

38.74

92.68

278.06

370.74 January.

Pald in

TOTAL GRANT,

Less paid in January,

..$6,124.54

370.74

$5,753.80

E. J. EITEL, Inspector of Schoole:

1,

員三毫 該掌教值獎銀六十八四三先

倫敦傳教會油蔴地男館 應考學童計三名 第一班取二名賞銀十員 第二班取十四名獎銀八十四員 第三班取一名獎銀七員 按名數計獎

銀三十貞一毫 以上合共獎銀一百卅一員一毫 在內攤派書館艄獎銀九十八員三三先 該掌教值銀三十二員七七先 倫敦傳教士丹頓街女館 應考女童五十五名 第一班取十一名賞銀五十五元 第二班取十二名賞銀七十二元 第三班取十名賞銀七十元 第四班取十一名賞銀八十八元 第五班取二名賞銀十八元甄別針黹 上班賞銀七十四元 中班賞銀十四元下班賞銀八元 按名數計 賞銀六十四元四臺七 以上合共賞銀四百七十三元四毫七 在内攤派書館值賞銀三百五十五員一毫 該掌教值賞銀一百十八元三七 倫敦傳教會太平山女館 應考女童三十一名 第一班取十名賞銀五十元 第二班取五名賞銀三十元 第三班取八名賞銀五十六元 第四班 取二名賞銀十六元 第五班取二名賞銀十八元 甄別針黹 上班賞銀四十六元 中班賞銀十二元 下班賞銀一元 按名計賞銀三十 一元八二先 以上合共賞銀二百六十元零八毫二先 在內攤派書館値賞銀一百九十五元六毫二先 該掌教 【銀六十五囡

傳教會灣仔女館 應考女童二十三名 第一班取七名賞銀三十五 第二班取六名賞銀三十六圓 第三班取五名賞銀三十五元 第四 班取一名賞銀八元 第五班取一名賞銀九元 甄別針黹 上班賞銀四十元 中班賞銀三元下班賞銀一元 按名數計賞銀二十九元一 亳五先、以上合共賞銀一百九十六元一毫五先 在內攤派書館値賞銀一百四十七元一毫二先 該掌教値賞銀四十九元券三先

巴色傳教會男館 應考學童十五名 第一班取三名賞銀十八圓 第二班取五名賞銀三十五圓 第三班取二名賞銀十六園 按名敬計賞銀三 十一圓二九先 以上合共賞銀一百圓零二毫九先 在内攤派書館値賞銀七十五圓二毫二先 該掌教值獎銀二十五圓界七先 巴色傳教會女館 應考女童五十一名 第一班取九名獎銀五十四圓 第二班取十一名獎銀七十七圓 第三班取九名獎銀七十三圆 第五班 取七名獎銀六十三圓 第五班取三名獎銀三十圓 第六班取四名獎銀四十八員 甄別針黹 上班獎銀六十四員 中班獎銀二十四員 下班獎銀三真 按名數計獎銀四十員零五毫三先 以上合共獎銀四百八十五貫三毫三先 在內攤派書館値獎銀三百六十四員-毫五先 該掌教獎銀一百二十一員三毫八先

日字樓孤子院 應考男女童廿五名 第一班取五名獎銀世員 第二班取三名獎銀十四員 第三班取三名獎銀三十員 第四班取二名獎銀

四貞 第五班取四名獎銀五十六員 第六班取一名獎銀十六員 甄別針黹上班獎銀八員 中班獎銀三員 下班獎銀二員按名數計獎 世員客八毫二先 以上合共獎銀二百十三員八毫二先 在內攤派書館的賞一百六十七員八毫七先 該掌教值獎銀五十五員九毫五先 聖約瑟書院 應考學童一百四十八名 第一班取十名獎銀六十員 第二班取五十五名獎銀四百四十員 第三班取三十六名獎銀三百六十員 第四班取十七名獎銀二百零四員 第五班取三名獎銀四十二員 第六班取六名賞銀九十六員額外考取四名獎銀十六員 按名數計獎 銀一百七十一員八九先 以上合共獎銀一千三百八十九員八九先 在內攤派書館値獎銀一千零四十二員西二先 該掌教 三百四十七員四毫七先

威克多理阿書館 應考男女童三十名 第一班取二名獎銀十二員 第二班取七名獎銀五十六員 第三班取七名獎銀七十員 第四班取四名 獎銀四十八員 第五班取四名獎銀五十六員 第六班取四名獎銀六十四員 甄別針黹 上班獎銀二十二員 中班獎銀三員 獎銀 一員 按名數計獎銀三十八員七毫叫先 以上合共獎銀三百七十員零五毫四先 在內攤派書館值獎二百七十八員零六先 獎銀 十二員八六先

一千八百七十九年考取各輔翼義孝獎賞册

德記拉街白思他女館 應考女童十三名 第一班取一名賞銀五圓 第二班取六名賞銀三十六圓 第三班取二名賞銀十四圓 第五班取二名 賞銀十八圓 甄別針黹 上班賞銀二十八圓 按名數計賞銀十六圓六毫六先 以上合共賞銀一百一十七圓六亳六先 在內攤派書館值 賞銀八十八圓二五仙該掌教值賞銀二十九圓四一先

荷李活道白思他女館 應考女童十七名 第一班取九名賞銀四十五元 第二班取七名賞銀四十二元 第三班取一名賞銀七元 甄別針黹 上班賞銀三十元 中班賞銀三元 桉名數計賞銀二十元零三亳六仙 以上合共賞銀一百四十七元三毫六先 在內攤派書館值賞銀一百 一十元零五二先 該掌教値賞銀三十六圓八毫四先

西營盤白思他女館 應考女童三十名 第一班取八名賞銀四十元 第二班取八名賞銀四十八元 第三班取七名賞銀四十九元 第四班取四 名賞銀三十二元 甄別針黹 上班賞銀五十二元 中班賞銀七元五毫 按名數計賞銀三十四元六毫七先 以上合共賞銀二百六十三元 一毫七先 在內攤派書館值銀一百九十七元三毫八先 該掌教值銀六十五圓七毫九先

聖士提反白思他女館 應考女童三十五名 第一班取六名賞銀三十元 第二班取十一名賞銀六十六元 第三班取五名賞銀三十五元 第四 班取一名賞銀八員 第六班取一名賞銀十員 甄別針黹 上班賞銀十六員 中班賞銀二十八員五毫 下班賞銀九員 按名數訐賞銀四 十三元券三先 以上合共賞銀二百四十五元五毫三先 在內攤派書館值賞銀一百八十四元一毫五先 該掌教値賞銀六十一元三毫八先 德記拉街包監督男館 應考學童四十一名 第一班取十五名賞銀七十五元 第二班取九名賞銀五十四元 第三班取十一名賞銀七十七員 第四班取四名獎銀三十二員 按名數計獎銀四十七員一亳四先 以上合共獎銀二百八十五元一毫四先 在內攤派書館估賞銀二百一十 三元八毫六先該掌教値賞銀七十一元二八先

國家聖會聖士反男館 應考學童六十八名 第一班取十六名賞銀八十員 第二班取二十七名賞銀一百六十二員 第三班取十六名賞銀一百 一十二員 第四班取二名賞銀十六員 第六班取一名賞銀十貝 按名數計賞銀一百一十一員七毫五先 以上合共賞銀四百六十七員一 毫六先 在內攤派書館値賞銀三百五十員零三七先 該掌教值賞銀一百一十六員七九先

國家聖會西營盤男館 應考學童卅九名 第一班取十四名賞銀七十元 第二班取八名賞銀四十八元 第三班取八名賞銀五十六元 第四班 取三名賞銀十四元 按名數計賞銀五十四元九毫二先 以上合共賞銀二百五十二元九毫二仙 在內攤派書館値賞銀一百八十九元六亳 九仙該掌教値賞銀六十三元二毫三先

國家聖會皇后大道男館 應考學童十六名 第一班取六名賞銀二十五元 第二班取八名賞銀四十元 按名數計賞銀十九元六七先 以上 合共賞銀八十四元六七先 在內攤派書館值賞銀六十三元五毫 該掌教値賞銀計一元一毫七先

教會水池街男館 應考學童四十九名 第一班取五名賞銀十五元 第二班取十五名賞銀九十元 第三班取十名賞銀七十元 第四班 取七名賞銀五十六員 第五班取四名賞銀卅六員 第六班取二名賞銀二十大員 按名數計賞銀五十八員三毫九先 以上合共賞銀三百 五十五員三九先 在內派書館值賞銀二百六十六元五毫四先 該掌教値賞銀八十八元八毫五先

倫敦傳教會灣仔男館 應考學童四十六名 第一班取十三名賞銀六十五元 第二班取十三名賞銀七十八元 第三班取七名賞銀四十九員 第四班取四名賞銀三十二員 按名數計賞銀四十九員七毫三先 以上合共賞銀二百七十三員七三先 在內攤派書館値獎銀二百零五

LI

No. 89.

}

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following Return of the Revenue and Expenditure of the Colony for 1879 is published for general information, with the Comparative Statement for the years 1878 and 1879.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 7th April, 1880.

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

No. 95.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

!

The following Annual Report from the Postmaster General, is published for general information.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 21st April, 1880.

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, March 15th, 1880.

SIR,-I have the honour to report on the British Postal Service in Hongkong, China, and Japan during the year 1879.

2. It has been a year of very severe and incessant work in this Department, which, from sickness and other causes, has also been somewhat short-handed. The pressure experienced arose, however, not so much from the amount of work, as from its uneven distribution. All through the year the French and English mails arrived within a day or two of each other. The French packet would come in first, then, perhaps even before her mails for the North were disposed of, it would be necessary to despatch the mail for Europe. Hardly was that done ere the peak gun would announce the English mail. A day is recollected, only one out of several, on which nearly every officer of the Department was hard at work for thirteen continuous hours, from six in the morning till seven at night, with barely time to snatch a hurried mouthful of food. Nearly the entire work of a fortnight would be crowded into about three or four days. The fact that there was little but routine to occupy the rest of the time scarcely made up for these seasons of severe pressure, the effect of which on the health of some members of the staff has been only too obvious. The mails are now, however, beginning to arrive at weekly or nearly weekly intervals, and it is hoped in future to have the work of the Depart- ment less crowded together.

3. The incessant changes to which Postal business has been subject during the last three years have naturally entailed a great amount of labour and correspondence upon this Office. Three times at least every detail of the service has had to be rearranged. There is no comparison between a period of such continual change and the tranquil years of the past, when perhaps there was nothing to be recorded in the Annual Report more important than that postage to some German Principality or Italian Duchy had been doubled, or that various South American republics had declined to admit patterns. The present transition state of the service will probably continue (it is to be hoped it will) until the Postal Union is universal in reality as well as in name, and until the goal of all hitherto is reached, viz., when all countries contribute to a central fund for the reimbursement of those progress which provide transit, and all accounts of the actual weights of mails transmitted are swept away.

1

4. A still further reduction of International postage was effected during the year, and certain other changes, the outcome of the Convention of Paris in 1878, were introduced. Some of these have not become very popular. Post Cards for instance, which it is now obligatory for every Union coun- try to issue, will probably never be much used in the East. Return Receipts for Registered letters are also seldom demanded, as the public seem rightly to consider the Registration system completely safe without them. A most perplexing distinction between Printed and Commercial Papers has been established, which probably no amount of explanation will make generally understood. People are apt to ask somewhat impatiently why such arrangements are made. But the present system, under which the same Postal Rules are applied over nearly the entire civilised world, naturally requires some deference to the views of other countries. It is no longer merely a question of what suits Hongkong or what suits England, but of what suits every country, and against such little inconveniences as the limitation of patterns to eight ounces in weight may be set the fact that a man who knows Post Office practice in one Country of the Union knows it in all. The traveller has no longer to consult a fresh code of rules in every town he enters, the facilities he finds in Canada he will equally find at St. Petersburgh, or in Japan.

5. The most recent changes in the service have enabled this Department to accomplish what has been its aim for years, viz., the establishment of an absolutely uniform Postal Tariff, free (except in the solitary instance of the Australasian Colonics) from all differences of charge on account of route, and with all its rates (except as above) decimal in amount. It will now, it is hoped, be possible gradually to reduce our overgrown category of Stamps, and replace them by about half a dozen values, all decimal.

6. The Registration fee has not been lowered to anything like the small amounts adopted by some countries, as it is found that such low fees throw an immense amount of responsible work on every Post Office concerned, to which the sums paid seem disproportionate. A Registered letter can now be sent for considerably less than an ordinary letter cost three years ago, and it may perhaps therefore be said that reasonable cheapness has been attained.

1. Since the above was written a steady demand for the 1-cent cards recently issued has set in.

んだ

7. A money Order system with most of the Australasian Colonies has been established, and there is reason to believe it will be of use to the Chinese who have cmnigrated there and who are constantly sending money to their friends, hitherto by enclosing sovereigns in Registered letters, a practice which sometimes leads to unpleasant questions, as the contents of the letters do not always correspond with the amounts written outside. In one instance the envelope purported to contain three sovereigns, but what it did contain was a piece of tea lead, of the exact weight required, neatly folded up. It is રી matter of regret that Victoria has held aloof from this Money Order Convention.

8. The close of the year was marked by the withdrawal of British Post Offices from Japan, a measure which this Department never deprecated before its completion, nor has regretted since. Had the Japanese continued as indifferent to Postal matters as Chinese are still, it would have been desira- ble to maintain foreign Post Offices in Japan, but it is certainly the more healthy and natural state of affairs for the Post Office of any country to belong to that country. With the awakening interest and progress of the Japanese in Postal matters complications of all kinds began to be created, and it was a relief to every one concerned when such perplexing questions ceased to exist. Far from being below the average standard of efficiency, it would be difficult to name any Offices where the work is better done than at those of Japan with which this Department has the pleasure of exchanging mails, for it is a pleasure to cooperate with an Administration at once courteous, intelligent, and exact. Mr. MACHADO, our late Postmaster at Yokohama, who has just become a naturalised British subject, has been transferred to Shanghai, where no doubt his services will be as acceptable to the community as they were to that at his former post. It would have been very desirable for the Assistant Postmaster General or myself to spend two or three weeks at Shanghai in general inspection and supervision of the office there on the induction of Mr. MACHADO, but the partial employment of Mr. BARFF in the Supreme Court has rendered it impossible for either of us to leave the Colony.

9. This community has not enjoyed its usual good fortune in the matter of mail hours during the year. The English and French mails are now closed at entirely different times, in spite of every effort for uniformity, and the hour of departure of the English mail is in every way undesirable. We have had to realise that there are other places besides Hongkong. To take one only, it is very difficult to suggest any arrangement which shall avoid Sunday work here without necessitating Sunday work in Shanghai, especially when monsoon changes are taken into account the whole year through. It is to be hoped, however, that in the course of a little time, it may be possible to modify the new Time Tables so as to regain our former regularity without unduly inconveniencing other Ports.

In

10. The subject of Revenue during the year under review would be rather a gloomy one, but for the consideration that the small balance left to the Colony is the result of paying off arrears due for 1877 and 1878, and that the revised rates of Postage which have just come into force will do some- thing towards checking the steady decline of Postal receipts which has been going on since 1872. round figures it may be said that this Department collected $102,000 during 1879; of which $40,000 was paid to England and other countries (including arrears); $20,000 was devoted to the conveyance of mails, including a special contribution towards lessening the Imperial loss under this head; $37,000 represents other working expenses; and the Colony has but $5,000 left, the smallest balance on record. It would be pleasant to add that all arrears have been paid off, but such is not the case, though they have been lessened. Considerable sums are still due to London, but as much as possible in the absence of exact information has been remitted on account. Detailed figures as to the year's revenue will be found in the appendix.

11. The only way to form any just idea of the financial position of this Department is to take the years 1877, 1878 and 1879 together. If this is done it will be found that, during these three years the Gross Annual Revenue of the Post Office has averaged $118,000, of which the average Imperial and Foreign share was $45,000; the cost of conveyance of mails $17,000; and the local expenditure $35,000; leaving an average annual balance to the Colony of $21,000, or say $63,000 for the three years. Our debts are now fairly paid up to date except perhaps about $8,000 due to London, and a contribution of about $16,000 will be due in April next, revenue coming in however meanwhile to meet it. Taking the prospect of increased revenue this year into consideration, our financial position may be regarded as satisfactory. The heavy expenditure in Marine Sorting noticed in the last Annual Report still continues, nor does there appear to be any means of lessening it.

12. The Government of this Colony having abolished the restrictions which were placed on the issue of subsidiary silver coin (only obtainable formerly at a premium or as a matter of great favour) it has been possible to keep the Post Offices of Hongkong and Shanghai always sufficiently supplied with change, a little matter perhaps, but one that has remedied a most inconvenient and not altogether creditable state of things.

13. Through the kindness of the London Post Office a lithographed portrait of the late Sir Row- LAND HILL has been placed in the main sorting room here as a memorial of that distinguished bene- factor to humanity.

14. It would be pleasant to bring the record of any year to a close without having to mention some disastrous day, but that good fortune has not yet occurred to the Hongkong Post Office. Ou December 29th (so nearly was the year well finished) a bag containing more than 300 letters for Foo- chow, the entire French and English mails in fact, was left behind in consequence of one of those com- binations of circunstances against which neither vigilance nor organisation at times avail anything,

8

12

16

18

24

28

30

18

96

3

10

3

5

nor could all this important correspondence be sent on for nearly a week. It may be allowable to cite, as an instance of good nature not to be surpassed anywhere, that though almost every resident at Foochow must have been more or less disappointed, not one syllable of complaint reached this Office. The Foochow community may rest assured however that the case could not have received more atten- tion than it did, nor a repetition of such an occurrence have been inore carefully guarded against, had every newspaper in China been crowded with indignant letters. At the same time, it is always well to call attention to such matters, as they are often not within the knowledge of the head of the depart- ment. Perhaps it may be permissible here to point out to a few residents at Northern ports served through Shanghai, that they would do better to forward to this Office the covers as to which they sometimes complain, than to write sarcastic letters to the papers. Such vague complaints afford no ground for investigation, and whenever a tangible case has been put forward, the alleged delay has al- ways been satisfactorily explained.

15. As the International Bureau of the Postal Union attaches importance to the compilation of certain statistical returns, an account was kept during 28 days in November of the amount of corres- pondence of all kinds passing through this Office. The totals of this account, multiplied by 13, form the basis of the Statistical Table now submitted amongst other returns.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

&c.,

Sc., &'c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

ALFRED LISTER,

Postmaster General,

1879.

Imperial and Foreign Share,..

$40,293.96

APPENDIX.

(4.)—COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE, 1879 & 1878.

........$ 8,270.08

1878.

$32,023.88

Increase,

Conveyance of Mails and contribu-

tion towards P. & O. Subsidy,... f

20,235.13

25,274.42

Decrease,..

5,039.29

Expenditure,

36,663.78

34,347.30

Balance,.....

4,594.16

29,799.98

Increase, Decrease,..

.....

2,316.48

25,206.82

Gross Revenue,.....

..$101,787.03

$121,445.58

Decrease,

$19,659.55

(B.)-SALE OF POSTAGE STAMPS.

1879.

DENOMINA-

1878.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

TIONS.

دم

Number.

Amount.

Number.

Amount. Number.

Amount.

Number.

Amount.

$ c.

$ C.

$

C.

$

C

2 Cents.

278,908

5,578.16

323,191

6,463.82

c

44,283

885.66

""

213,883

8,555.32

218,030

8,721.20

d

4,147

165.88

""

17,338

1,040.28

24,579

1,474.74

7,241

434.46

:0

O Q = C ==

""

219,796

17,583.68

86,478

6,918.24 133,318 10,665.44

12

123,613

14,833.56

""

219,177

26,301.24

95,564

11,467.68

16

37,728

""

6,036.48

87,171

13,947.36

a

0

49,443

18

7,910.88

""

4,717

849.06

7,896

1,421.28

3,179

24

572.22

""

35,413

8,499.12

47,539

11,409.36

12,126

28

2,910.24

98

27.44

""

30

3,751

21

1,125.30

13 7,406

3.64 2,221.80

85

23.80

3,655

48

1,096.50

""

12,313

5,910.24

17,271

8,290.08

.96

4,958

""

6,358

2,379.84

6,103.68

9,332

8,958.72

2,974

9208

2 Dollars.

2,855.04

1,037

2,074.00

1,373

2,746.00

336

672.00

r)

3

406

""

1,218.00

569

1,707.00

...

163

489.00

10

26

260.00

d

""

114

1,140.00

88

880.00

3 Cts. Post Cards.

3,584

107.52

er

5

12

1,721

80.05

3,584 1,721

107.52 86.05

Total,......

$79,887.89

$101,724.48

$10,882.81

$32,719.40

le-

1879.

Total Sale, Hongkong,

.$50,107.23.

1878. $ 61,282.84

Decrease.

$11,175.61

On

Shanghai,.

22,204.89

Yokohama,

00-

Other Ports of China and Japan,

4,831.76 2,744.01

26,280.62 6,365.22 7,795.80

4,075.73

1,533.46

m-

5,051.79

12.

Total,..

.$79,887.89

$101,724.48

$21,836.59

அங்கம்..

DESCRIPTION

OF

CORRESPONDENCE.

(C.)—APPROXIMATE STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1879. Supplied to the International Bureau of the Postal Union, Berne.

INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONdence.

LOCAL CORRESPONDEnce.

TOTAL.

Despatched. Received.

Despatched. Received.

Ordinary paid Letters,..

Unpaid and short paid Letters, Letters on Post Office business,

Post Cards,

Newspapers and Periodicals,

252,000

255,000

65,000

70,000

642,000

3,340

4,030

1,378

5,629

14,377

572

468

1,287

819

3,146

2,970

2,980

100

60

6,110

Do. with prepaid reply,.

88,000

100,000

30,000

9,000

227,000

Books, Circulars, Prices Current, &c.,

107,000

209,000

33,000

21,000

370,000

Patterns,

3,000

2,600

.300

250

6,450

Commercial Papers,.

200

370

570

Do.,

Registered Letters,

Letters with value declared,.

Registered Letters with Return Receipt,

Parcels,.

Do. with value declared,

Number of Money Orders,

Amount of

7,514

8,450

1,677

1,378

19,019

...

364

650

60

65

1,139

120

90

210

2,962

223

257

307

3,749

Fr. 331,000

Fr. 22,461

Fr. 14,082

Fr. 31,352 Fr. 398,895

(D.)—MONEY ORDER BUSINESS.

у

No. of Orders.

Amount.

Colonial Com- mission.

Total Com- mission.

£

s. d.

$

C.

$ c.

Drawn by Hongkong on London,

1,507

6,725. 8.4

236.88

[

""

by Shanghai

1,101

>>

5,785.18.8

173.06

""

by Yokohama

354

1,398. 8.2

60.74

"

TOTAL, China and Japan on London,...

2,962

13,909.15.2

470.68

470.68

B

£

8. d.

$ c.

tl

Drawn by London on Hongkong,

131

638.18.6

34.26

""

by

""

on Shanghai,.

- 52

178. 3.9

10.17

""

by

""

on Yokohama,

40

165.14.5

7.91

n

TOTAL, London on China and Japan,.

223

982.16.8

52.37

52.37

$ c.

C.

Drawn by Hongkong on Shanghai,

64

992.08

9.45

2 2 3 3 3

re

of

be

be

by

""

>>

on Yokohama,.

45

956.66

7.65

by

""

""

on Singapore,

39

666.90

6.60

by Shanghai on

9

109.82

1.50

""

""

29

by Yokohama on

6

84.01

1.05

"

TOTAL, Local Orders Outwards,

163

2,800.47

26.25

26.25

C.

$ c.

T

Drawn by Shanghai on Hongkong,

132

2,761.13

25.50

""

by Yokohama on

""

">

by Singapore on

19

by

"

on Shanghai,

......

">

by

"

on Yokohama,

TOTAL, Local Orders Inwards,

TOTAL COMMISSION,.............

93

2,205.25

17.15

71

956.11.

6

52.10

16.00

305

5,990.59

42.65

42.05

591.95

No. 108.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following Annual Reports on the state of the Government Schools in Hongkong, for the

year 1879, are published for general information, By Command,

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office,

Hongkong, 4th May, 1880.

國家書院掌院

憲 嘵事照得

署輔政使司史

第報憲

百 俾衆週知

書館之年報抄印

八百七十九年各

督憲札諗將一千

號八零百

俾書

一千八百八十年

五月初四日示

各千

1

進然後再行酌奪爲此須至申陳者 化之法現在無庸增益待所酌議新建之書院竣工遷 將各件另行詳申似非緊要至於修改本書院管理教 屬國家版藉學童數目等圖附送桉除該圖所載外現 中陳事茲將一千八百七十九年本書院年報及凡

千 政

使司

為增

奪庸

八 馬陳此益非

+

十 年 二 月初五日

現凡為

(Copy.)

[No. 14.]

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL,

HONGKONG, 5th February, 1880.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Blue 八 使申

Book and other Annual Returns connected with

this School for 1879.

Beyond the information there tabulated it is

not necessary, at present, to make any detailed

report. Nothing more can be done in the way

of improved organization and instruction than is.

being done, until the proposed new School has been built and occupied.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

FREDERICK STEWART, Head Master.

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&e.

}

- 1 - 1

1. January,

2. February,.

3. March,

4. April,

5. May,....

6. June,

7. July,

8. August,

9. September,

10. October,

ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the CENTRAL SCHOOL during 1879.

MONTH.

11. November,

12. December,.

Total Number of Scholars present during the year,

Average Monthly Enrolment,

Average Daily Attendance for the year,..

:

Number of School Days,.

:

L

NUMBER ENROLLED.

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE.

404

390.25

444

431.6

440

408.34

454

417.71

446

419.07

445

420.78

446

419.57

430

419.4

451

425.96

446

422.96

439

415.76

428

403.86

..590.

.439.42

.416.11

.249.

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the CENTRAL SCHOOL during 1879.

Expenditure,...

Deduct School Fees,...

.$16,764.35

t

2,636.00

f

Total Expense of the School,....

$14,128.35

f

A. Average Expense of each Scholar calculated by the Total Enrolment,

$23.95

B.

21

"}

"}

"

>>

Average Daily Attendance,

33.95

[No. 28.]

INSPECTORATE OF SCHOOLS, 28th April, 1880.

SIR, I have the honour to forward to you my contribution towards the Annual Report on Education and the Blue Book Returns for 1879.

2. Since the separation of offices of Head- master of Government Central School and Inspector of Schools has been approved of, in February 1879, by Her Majesty's Principal

:

n

с

in

6

le

A SE 3.EO 2 3 7 8 Þ.GE - L

of

es

W

in

IV

do

I

th

10

監督學院

一千八

申歐

謹將一千

申陳事兹

月遵奉

九年二

百七十

八百七十

藩政

附數版凡

等學國報

凡屬國家

年報及

九年各書

將大 院掌院

大臣准

JUL

分而爲

院之職

監督學

如常同列附入各 院將大書院之數目卽照掌院允願者 開列各數等圖應以畫一爲貴故敝監 理輔翼之各義學耳但學政衙門遞年 大書院外所有以監督學院而設立管 統轄者故儼監院自下只陳明國家於 院以爲暫將大書院分理非監督學院 一百五十三頁所因格外原由按監 二前一千八百七十九年香港轅報第

則按

較所

有國

奇土

-僅得四名有奇耳按敝監院約計本港孩童自六歲至十五歲未入書塾就學者或有一萬四千之多

按大書院外所有義學國家所管理者查該學童之數於一千八百七十八年有二千五百四十四名間去 四名故於英國土民伸計前年時每百人中得初學學童九名有奇惟在香港各色居民兼計大小學童每百人 奇查英國土民前年得二十八兆四十四萬八千三百二十六人中有初學學童二百七十八萬二千四百五十 塾學童其數難言在六千以外卽照本港現在儲色居民有壹拾四萬五千之多伸計每百人中得學童四名有 去歲稍爲增益按敝監院所見所聞本港華民儒教署未入國家管轄者數亦頗多但統計香港一區諧般書 館其中一爲聖約瑟書院有學童二百五十五名乃初服國家管轄者故國家管轄之書館學童之數較前年 較諸前年計每百名增至九名有奇惟國家管轄之書館苴數亦增校前歲有四十七間去歲有五十間新增三 所有國家管轄之書館合而言之則見前年有學童三千一百五十二名去年有學童三千四百六十名以去 國家義學學童向來遞年減少惟學會義學學童三年間遞年增益如是以此所增足補彼所減者但統計全港 各聖會義學而歸國家察理者前年有一千零二十一名去歲則有一千四百一十七名按去歲實如前二年時 則有二千八百七十名其中在國家義學肄業者前年有一千四百九十三名去歲則有一千四百五十三名但

本百

管者

書在

Secretary of State for the Colonies, and since, by Notification in Government Gazette (1879, p. 153), the Government Central School has been, for special and, I presume, temporary reasons, constituted an independent branch of the Edu- cation Department, not subject to the control of the Inspector of Schools, I naturally confine myself in this Report principally to the affairs of those schools outside the Government Central School which are either conducted or subsidized by the Government through the Inspector of Schools. Nevertheless, in order to preserve uni- formity in the annual statistical records of the Education Department as a whole, I have included the statistics of the Central School, with the permission of the Headmaster, in the usual tables which will be found appended to this Report.

3. The total number of scholars subject to the supervision of the Government, outside the Cen- tral School, amounted to 2,870 in 1879, as con- pared with 2,544 in 1878. Of that number of 2,870 scholars, there were in 1879 attending Government Schools (outside Central School) 1,453 scholars as against 1,493 in 1878, and in the Grant-in-aid Schools there were, under Gov- ernment inspection, 1,417 scholars in 1879 as compared with 1,021 in 1878. There has been, in fact, during the last three years a continuous slight decrease in the enrolment of scholars in the Government Schools, compensated by a continuous steady increase during the same three years in the enrolment of scholars in the Grant-in-aid Schools. Taking, however, all the schools subject to Government control or in- spection in this Colony together, there was in 1879 an increase in the total number of scholars (3,460 in 1879 as compared with 3,152 in 1878) amounting to 9.77 per cent., as compared with the preceding year. The number of schools un- der Government supervision advanced in 1879 from 47 to 50, one of the three new schools (St. Joseph's College) bringing as many as 255 boys under Government inspection. There has, there- fore, been a slight advance made in 1879 as re- gards the number of schools and scholars brought under Government supervision, and from what I have observed and learned as regards the Chinese portions of the town, I believe the number of purely native Confucian Schools, inde- pendent of Government, have also been slightly increased. Nevertheless I do not think that we can safely estimate the whole number of children in schools of all descriptions in the Colony at over 6,000, which with our present population of at least 145,000 inhabitants amounts to 4.13 per cent. In 1878 there were in the Prinary Schools of Great Britain 2,782,454 children out of an estimated population of 28,448,326 people. Thus we have 9.74 per cent. of the whole population in Great Britain under primary instruction, whilst we have in Hongkong about 4.13 per cent. un- der instruction whether primary or otherwise. I calculate the number of uneducated children in the Colony, from 6 to 15 years of age, to amount to about 14,000.

一千八

於男

++

於理或有未當

男得四之三女得四之一似此

塾男女童比較其數亦如疇昔 年去歲實是十增其一但將各 家管郸各塾女童之數較諸前 增至四百三十一名故畧計國 得女童三百四十三名去年則 七十九名又查聖會義學前年

三十五名去年頓減僅得一 查國家義學前年得女童二百 論及女學較諸兒童似更虧欠

百以

天人是 文

所立不教門者或各聖會所傳楊天主耶穌二教者無非教人以克已愛人正心修身之道故各塾所關爲國爲民同 各修其身而後乃可但做監院深信上文所陳各塾果增此與國與民蓋各書塾無論華人所設遵奉儒教者或國家 三百名其間有或書或夜學習英文者約三百名但惜其教英文之法猶有未盡善者天主教書塾未入國家察理者學 恥以爲香港華人趨下流於不英不華複雜之民而使政刑各署有不繁擾之事上文所言華人儒教書塾學童一千

八百四十名又有華人儒教書塾或有學童一千三百名而國家察理者共計學童約有三千四百六十名竊思徒教 天文地理格物致知之道與夫外邦風俗當代規模齊驅幷教如斯固可使在濬產育訛英語之民且不慮有如今H所

本港各塾教條若何實爲最要按本港除各育嬰堂所有書塾内之小子外有未入國家察理之天主教書塾約有學童 人語言者未嘗二什得一故與其教習華文究不如使多人解言英語在港教習英文之爲愈且也若教英文便可用 是一般珍貴但念使闔港興盛助國家治理如此藩地者則說華人語言者十居九五百歐洲人與各署官憲求其解華 小子讀書摹字殊非成全教化之意以此教法不足使人爲長民倘欲使國與民並受其益必須使肄業諸童各正其心

千所

4. As regards the education of the girls which

is even more neglected in Hongkong than the education of boys the number of girls in Govern- anent Schools feil from 235 in 1878 to 179 in 1879, but as the number of girls in Grant-in-aid Schools increased at the same time from 343 in 1878 to 431 in 1879, there has really been an advance made in 1879 amounting to 10 per cent.

over the total number of girls in schools under Government supervision in the previous year. The proportion of girls to boys in those schools collectively is still about 1 to 4, which is a very unsatisfactory state of things.

5. The nature of the instruction afforded in the schools of the Colony is a matter of the ut-

most importance. Not counting the infants in the schools of the Foundling Houses of the Co- lony, there were about 840_children in Roman

Catholic Schools not subject to Government

supervision, there were further about 1,300 chil- dren in independent native Confucian Schools, and 3,460 were in schools under Government super- vision. Now whilst considering that mere teach- ing of reading and writing and so forth is not education, and does not in itself tend to produce better citizens, but that the kind of instruction

which would benefit the State and Public Society must have a tendency to form a high moral cha- racter in the scholars, I still believe that every one of those schools above mentioned contributes

to a certain degree such real benefit to Public Society and to the State. For in all those schools,

whether they be purely native and therefore Confucian, or purely Government Schools and therefore secular, or Grant-in-aid Schools and as such Christian Schools, all the children in these schools are being imbued with the principles of love and self-sacrifice, with the spirit of a pure

and elevating system of morality. So far all those schools are on the whole of equal value to the Government and to the community. But what

is of specially great importance to the prosperity of the Colony and to the administration of the Government in a Colony like this, where over 95 per cent. of the population speak Chinese only and scarcely 5 per cent. of the European residents and officials speak or understand anything of Chinese, is an extensive promotion of a know- ledge of English. The principal advantage of English teaching in this Colony, compared with Chinese, is this that the teaching is then com- bined with the enhanced educational influences of natural science and modern civilisation, and that it furnishes the means of creating here an Anglo-Chinese community in place of that hybrid form of social life, with pidgin English speech, towards which the Chinese community in Hongkong must otherwise continue to drift to the great embarrassment of the Executive and Judicial departments of the Government. Out of those 1,300 scholars in independent native schools

(including night schools) about 300 are taught English in a very imperfect tashion. Of the $40 scholars in Roman Catholic Schools, not under Government supervision. I assume 400 to receive

文同

十名皆循法竭力兼教英 英文者或兼教英文華文者去歲學童共二百二十二名又有天主教耶穌教各聖會之輔

童八百四十名其間學英文者計有四白之多惜其教法仍有未備者更有國家大書院兼訓英文華

監院以爲照你去歲之數而言溯日十年來均計每

漢文粗淺英語遺忘矣惟聖 文一節所有虧欠顯然易見矣推原其故監院以爲實因國家書館一向分時兼教英文華文 同類者爲陪審之員按此數輩以華人而得備陪審人員之列或在港另有善說英語之華 肄業五六年間均計每日學習英文一時三刻或僅二時兼之大書院在該時期兼教方學代數化學等無怪乎遞年出院之童莫能說英語矣無怪夫 拜服

竟不能羨六人之數因照澇例即一千八百六十四年第十一條則例第四歎凡不闇英語者不得借陪審人員之列致健華人有因罪被鞫而不藝與其 即本港能說英語之少年與十年來之教誨一較歴時如此之久效如此之少誠不敷也現在香港居民華人不下十三萬五千欲從中選舉陪審人員 書塾肄業五年要之如此教法倘果有益則少年子弟善說英語者今不乏人矣但自問絕不偏私實在可云現能說英語者寥寥無幾又除英人子女外 英文漫分時候是以獲益良多彼童歸家雖耳所聞者多是西洋中華言語迨出塾時說英語繕英文兩者俱佳 文字義學之頗難學童家耳絕不開英語况在塾 惰其肄業之區則自香港而外者由此觀之香港教習英

專學英文或兼學英文華文之童九百名又彼等各在 英文者三百六十名合共學童約一千八百八 去歲學童五百九十名又有國家各義學或專

惟國家書塾則更欲爲所不能爲兼以忍耐堅守成法實足驚

殊益

港不

俱怪

佳夫

more or less English teaching also tainted with imperfection. Adding to this number 590 boys

who were taught both English and Chinese in the Central School last year and 222 boys taught

English or English and Chinese conjointly in outside Government Schools, also 368 children

who received exclusively English teaching in Grant-in-aid Schools, both Catholic and Protes-

tant, we have a total of 1,880 children under some sort of methodic and on the whole good

English or Anglo-Chinese tuition. I feel sure I

am not far wrong if I add, on the basis of the

statistics of last year, that for the last twenty

years an annual average of 900 children has been

under English or Anglo-Chinese instruction, and

that each child attended such teaching on an

average for 5 years. Yet, considering what a

number of English speaking young people there

ought to be in the Colony if this teaching was at

all effective, the fact strikes every impartial ob-

server that the number of English speaking in-

habitants is very small in the Colony and that,

apart from the children of English parents, the

number of English speaking young men and wo-

men in the Colony is out of all proportion with

the amount of English teaching given during the last twenty years. Out of a population of at

least 135,000 Chinese resident in this Colony, we cannot muster even half a dozen Chinese on the Jury list, as under Ordinance No. 11 of 1864, Section IV, no person ignorant of the English language can serve as a Juror, the effect of which is that Chinese offenders are generally tried by Jurors who are not their peers. Most of those Chinese who are Jurors or who do speak English fluently are found, on inquiry, to have been educated outside of this Colony. The prin- cipal cause of this manifest educational failure, as far as English speaking is concerned, I see in the attempt which the Government Schools of this Colony have all along made of dividing their limited time between English and Chinese teach-

ing. As the Chinese written language is extra- ordinarily difficult, as almost all the children in Government Schools never hear English spoken in home, and are on an average only 5 or 6 years at school and scarcely more than 3 hours per diem at English studies into which-in the case of the Central School-even Geometry, Algebra and Chemistry are crammed, it is not to be wondered at that an overwhelming majority of scholars leave our Government Schools year after year unable to speak English and with but a smatter- ing of the written Chinese language, whilst sure to forget soon again most of the English know- ledge acquired in school. Those Grant-in-aid Schools which teach English at all give their whole undivided time to it and the result is of course satisfactory; though most of those children hear but Portuguese or Chinese spoken in their homes, they leave school able to speak English and able to write it to a certain extent with faci- lity. It is only in the Government Schools that

the Danaide labour of trying to do the impossible

is still continued with a perseverance worthy of all admiration.

知顛末做監院亦

彼 地

亦回

藉陳善

等明於稀 情教彼

彼學

設規

理立條 條書

由此觀之則國家教法必須易轍較爲顯然 今本港仍未設有書院以育成本土人欲肩英文教師之任者故欲得確善誘人之教師則不得已動用多費請自英國來 條本意學成某歎之課卽領某 能爲愈於國家者爭衡則數年前早已不勝本土人能教英文且善於教及樂於教而所用修俸亦不若是之奢也爭奈选 牧師於心無所嫌疑且亦無傷規 立一院以育成本土人欲英文教師之任者且多設初學英文書塾又不設此只教華文之義學以與本土人所樂爲所 內開各欸一句如此改易创聖會 輔異義學因彼地瘠人稀無力所致也至在五環專教華文之國家義學按監院意見非徒無益而又害之蓋華人自理 及去歲所改輔翼 諸多煩瑣耳且恐國家涉其教法蓋意謂彼知教華文之法愈於國家所可知者惟在村鄉籬落之人極樂國家在彼設立 一千八百七十九年時 此外又有要者卽教學所需經費如或專教華文所費甚騅故土人儒教之散館學館義學港内在在均有且掌理如此書 若欲詳知去歲義學若何可觀後 習英文費用極奢之故實因英人教師請自英國來盤川不少另其修俸周歲不下三百磅數 者是廢除規條內所有世俗及初 需求國家輔助卽諭知准領國家獎賞之項彼亦未協於心非謂不樂受國恩所不樂者乃國家賞給義學規條 附一片在該片可見國家義學於 論及國家各義學所有費用若干與及獎賞各聖會義學之項若干請看下附數目等圖便 現奉 藩政大臣准各款最要 文並不兼教華文叉 學二語卽將世俗二字删除添入

規條若何

習者

英 文

載後或因病請假回藉等恼所有盤川亦由國家支給故也倘國家在本港創教英文時只

教書

欵 條牧

歎之賞如此則各望會牧師於選

THE B

學觀

於後

某規會入初

初要

何何

6. Another question of great importance is the cost of education. Purely native teaching is ex- tremely cheap. The consequence is that purely native Confucian Schools, public and private,

abound all over the Colony. Their managers ask for no grant from Government and even decline

to apply for it when invited. They would not hesitate to take the money of the Government, but they object to the trammels of the Grant-in- aid Schedule and fear interference with the method of teaching, believing, as they do, that they know better how to teach Chinese than a foreign Gov- ernment can possibly know. In the smaller

villages and hamlets of the Colony alone the people are glad to have the advantages of the

Grant-in-aid Scheme because their poverty does

not allow them, with their small number of families, to establish schools of their own as they would otherwise prefer to do. But in the town all purely Chinese schools kept by the Govern- ment are, in

my opinion, not only uncalled for

but compete injuriously with native self-help in Confucianist education without giving really a better education. For details as to the cost of the Government Schools and the amount of aid

given to Grant-in-aid Schools I refer to the tables appended to this Report. But I wish to point out

that the costly nature of English teaching princi-

pally consists of the salaries of English Masters. who have to be imported from England, who require free

passage out, a salary of at least £300, and after some years a passage back to England on furlough or sick certificate. Had the Govern- ment, when first beginning to teach English in this Colony, confined itself to English teaching, instead of combining it with Chinese, and esta- blished a training school for native teachers of English, creating at the same time a demand for

such teachers by opening Elementary English schools instead of purely Chinese schools all over the Colony and thereby needlessly competing

with the natives in what they were willing enough to do themselves and what after all they do better than the Government can do, there would long ago have been furnished a supply of natives able to teach English effectively and willing to teach

it at very moderate salaries. Even now

no

training school exists in the Colony and conse- quently almost all English teaching in the Colony that is really effective has to be provided for by procuring the teaching power at great cost from England. A revision of the whole Educational Policy of the Government is clearly needed.

7. Detailed information as to the changes which have taken place last year in the constitution of the Education Department will be found in the Supplements * aunexed to this Report. To the same Supplements I also refer for detailed in- formation as to the progress made by the outside Government Schools in the course of the

year 1879. and as regards the revision of the Grant- in-aid Schedule. This revision, as far as approved at present by the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, consisted principally in the expurgation from the Schedule of the words secular and “ elementary." For the words

* These Supplements, being reprints from the tiovernment Gazette, are not re-published here but will be niserted in Blue Book,

f

t

}

C

C

tl

te

th

off

m

此助删

學之列時所助者只教華文之義學茲則推廣規條不但中館卽大館書院均可准 有初學-語删除尤爲切要因自立輔翼義学規條直至聖保羅書院初入輔翼義 法之一如英國無異論及英國教法情事可云用物者未足品評是物之 教徒一事較爲方便且與國家不涉聖會事宜之定法亦無滯礙致將規條内 最後更欲陳明一事倘思若何修改香港教法一端所最要者勿.香港教 官教英文者則無不合故教英. 精微要之此語爲英官在極多華民之藩地欲教華文者似爲台而英 国家在本港所可備與居民者此固宜

宜英 之教

家義學之法使 領獎賞且如此推廣規條之意自應增益各欸獎賞之貲此亦理所當然者按監 然但以英官而教華文或兼教 院意見如此删改輔與義學之規條實爲大路進步之階所云大路者卽改香港國 值無多而教師修金貴故彼工人所入難供子弟就學

故兼

*按在英國偷工人殺獲

學以使貧家

法以獎賞港ž館大館所有各書塾 妙莫如效埃蘭國於一千八百七十八年 右 有進初學之機更當大度畧裁規條而用學某欸課領某欸賞之 有公平之基卽使凡有國家義學成如現在國家察理之各義

庸流修

中陳者

環之間傭工者流變値似亦不賤况華文書塾修金 事國家似亦無庸關涉蓋華人自是以華人之道理教法爲百者

理金

此須至

於教習華文一 【惟在香港五

"secular instruction" there has been substituted

the phrase "instruction in the subjects of the standards." which alteration, whilst removing conscientious scruples of denominational Educa- tionists, did not affect the vital principle of the Grant-in-aid System, viz.. payment for results in specified subjects. It gives, moreover, greater freedom to the Managers in the selection of books without compromising the attitude of the Covern- ment as regards the principle of non-interference

in religious matters. The elimination from the Schedule of the word "elementary" is a matter of the highest importance. The Grant-in-aid Scheme, hitherto or rather until the time when St. Paul's College first came under the Grant-in-

aid System, was confined to aid native elementary

education. Now, however, it is open to further

development in the direction of admitting not only intermediate but high class educational in- stitutions to the benefits of the Grant-in-aid

system and by making this alteration in the scope of the scheme the necessity of enlarging the value

of the passes is involved as a natural consequence.

I see in this alteration of the Grant-in-aid Scheme a step in the right direction towards placing the Educational Policy of the Colonial Government

on a thoroughly sound and equitable basis, viz., the aim to confine all direct teaching, such as is now given in schools kept at the entire expense and under the exclusive control of the Govern- ment, to the Elementary English education of the poor classes, but to give increased aid with fewer

restrictions on the principle of payment by results in specified subjects to the middle schools and high class schools of the Colony, more or less in the manner indicated by the Intermediate Edu- cation Act (Ireland) of 1878.

8. In conclusion I beg to point out that in considering the Educational Problem of this Co- lony, it is all important to refrain from assuming an identity of the radical features of the problem as it presents itself here and in England. In England it may be said regarding matters of education that the consumer is not a competent judge of the commodity." but this principle does not apply to the purely Chinese education at- tempted by an English Government of a Colony the overwhelming majority of which is made up by Chinese; though this principle does indeed apply to the teaching of English, and hence it follows that English education is one of those things in Hongkong which it is admissible in principle that a Government should provide for the people. As regards purely Chinese teaching or Chinese teaching combined with English the case is entirely different. Whilst in England the common wages of unskilled labour are too low and the cost of teaching too high to enable an ordinary unskilled labourer to pay the whole cost of elementary instruction for his children, the wages of unskilled labour are comparatively so high here in town and the cost of Chinese teaching so low, that Government interference in the matter of Chinese teaching is entirely call- ed for, especially as the Chinese place an extre- mely high esteem on their own system and method of education.--I have the honour to be, Sir, your

inost obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL,

Inspector of Schools.

輔翼中館之法

輔右中

使申

馬陳

TABLE 1--NUMBER SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1879.

1. Aberdeen,

2. Ap-li-chau

3. Basel Mission Boys' School,

4. Basel Mission Girls' School,

5. Baxter School, (D'Aguilar Street),

6. Baxter School, (Hollywood Road),

7. Baxter School, (Sai-ying-pún),

8. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, (D'Aguilar Street),

9. Central School,

10. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, (St. Stephen's),

11. C. M. S. Boys' School, (Queen's Road),

12. C. M. S. Boys' School, (Sai-ying-p'ún),

13. C. M. S. Boys' School, (St. Stephen's),'.

14. Diocesan Home and Orphanage,.

15. Girls' School,

1. Há-wán, ...

17. Hok-ün,

18. Hung-hòm,

19. Little Hongkong,

20. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, (Staunton Street),

21. L. M. S. Boys' School, (Tank Lane),..

22. L. M. S. Boys' School, (Wán-tsai),

23. L. M. S. Boys' School, (Yau-má-tí),

24. L. M. S. Girls' School, (T'ai-p'ing-shán),

25. L. M. S. Girls' School, (Wán-tsai),

26. Ma-tau-chung,

27. Ma-tau-ts'ün,.

28. Mong-kok,

29. Pok-fú-lam,..

30. Sai-ying-p'ún, (Hakká),

31. Sai-ying-pun, (Puntí),.

32. Shái wán,

33. Shau-ki-wán,

34. Shek-d,....

35. Shek-t'ong-tsúi,

34. Sheung-wán,

137. Stanley,.

38. St. Joseph's College,

39. Tải-kok-tsui,

40. Tai-t'ám-tuk,

41. Tai-wong-kung,

42. Tang-lung-chau, (Hakka),

43. Tang-lung-chau, (Puntí),. 44. T'o-kwa-wán, (Hákká),

45. Tò-kwá-wán, (Hokló),.

46. Ts'at-tsz-múi,

47. Victoria School,

4. Win-isai...

49. Wong-nai-chống,

50. Yau-má-tí,

Central School.

Native Schools Native Schools Grant-in-Aid (Government). (Aided).

Schools.

Total.

14

44

58

58

68

68

69

59

25

25

34

34

47

47

590

g: ;

73

73

590

53

63

38

38

73

73

170

170

67

57

137 69

137

...

69

15

15

33

33

...

17

17

87

+

87

101

...

101

...

...

90

90

100

47

47

39

39

45

45

23

23

...

222: ¦ ¦ ¦ S88: : : 222ng: Ex⠀⠀⠀⠀

20

20

18

18

9

98

110

22

110

22

80

23

64

78

78

60

60

255

255

36

36

12

12

62

65

50

50

34

34

24

24

29

29

56

50

78

34

51

590

1,103

350

1,417

3,460

TABLE II.-PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY OF VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1879.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA.

VILLAGES.

Population as per Census of 1876,

Schools in the City of Victoria.

.113,573.

No. of Scholars.

Population, including Boat Population,

..25,571

Schools in the Villages.

No. of Scholars.

1. Basel Mission Boys' School,...................

2. Basel Mission Girls' School,.

68

1. Aberdeen,

44

59

2. Ap-lí-chau,

58

3. Baxter Girls' School, (D'Aguilar Street),

25

3. Hok-ün,

15

4. Baxter Girls' School, (Hollywood Road),

34

4. Hung-hòm

33

5. Baxter Girls' School, (Sai-ying-p'ún),

47

5. Little Hongkong,

17

6. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, (D'Aguilar Street),. 7. Central School,

73

6. L. M. S. School, (Yau-má-tí),

47

.590

7. Má-tan-chung,

23

8. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, (St. Stephen's),. 9. C. M. S. Boys' School, (Queen's Road),............... 10. C. M. S. Boys' School, (Sai-ying-p'ún),...

53

8. Ma-tau-tsin,

20

38

9. Mong-kok,

18

73

10. Pok-fú-lam,

9

11. C. M. S. Boys' School, (St. Stephen's Church),

.170

11. Shái wán,..

22

12. Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys & Girls), 13. Girls' School,

57

12. Shau-kí-wán,

80

.137

13. Shick-ò,

23

14. Há-wán,

69

4. Stanley,

60

15. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, (Staunton Street),

87

15. Tái-hoh-tsui,

36

16. L. M. S. Boys' School, (Tank Lanc),

.101

16. Ti-tam-tuk,

12

17. L. M. S. Boys' School, (Wán-tsai),

90

17. Tó-kwá-wán, (Hákká),

34

18. L. M. S. Girls' School, (Tai-p'ing-shán),

39

18, Tù-kwa-wán, (Hoklò),

24

19. L. M. S. Girls' School, (Wán-tsai),..

20. Sai-ying-píún, (Hákká),

21. Sai-ying-p'ún, (Puutí),.

22. Shek-t'ong-tsúi,

45

19. Ts'at-tsz-múi,

29

98

20. Yau-má-ti,

51

.110

64

Total,....

2B, Shung-win,

24. St. Joseph's College,

2. Tái-wong hung,

26. Tang-lung-chan, (Hákká),

27. Tang-lung-chau, (Puntí),

28. Victoria School, (Boys & Girls),

20. Wán-thi...

20. Wong-ai-chung,

78

.655=2.56

Pcent.

.255

62

05

50

49

78

34

Total.........

2.798=2.16

† cent,

1

TABLE III.-NUMBER OF SCHOLARS at the Government Schools, during 1879, and Expense of each School,

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Expense.

1. Aberdeen,

2. Ap-li-chau,..

3. Central School,

4. Girls' School,.

44

44

55

تت

3

58

$

6.

265.00

122.50

590

590

14,028.35

137

137

691.00

ễ. Há-wán,...

6. Hok-ün, 7. Hung-hòm,

8. Little Hongkong, 9. Má-tau-chung,

59

10

69

368.00

15

15

62.00

33

33

60.00

17

17

61.00

23

23

·62.00

10. Má-tau-ts in,

20

20

61.50

11. Mong-kok,

· 18

18

61.50

12.

Pok-fú-lam,

9

'9

74.00

13.

Sai-ying-pún, (Hákká),

98

98

258.00

14.

Sai-ying-pún, (Puntí),

110

110

283.75

15.

Shái-wán,

22

22

62.00

10. Sháu-kí-wáng

70

10

80

171.00

17. Shek-ò,

18. Shek-t'ong-tsúi,

10. Shéung-wan,

20. Stanley,

23

23

124.00

61

Co

3

64

326.50

78

78

338.50

58

G2

60

282.00

21. Tai-hoh-tsui,

36

36

63.50

5. Tai-tâm-tuk,

12

12

60.00

23. Tai-wong-kung,

59

3

62

301.50

24.

Tang-lung-chau, (Hákhí),

63

25.

Tang-lung-chau, (Puntí),..

46

પેન

2

65

138.00

50

258.00

26.

Tò-kwa-wán, (Hákká),

34

34

62.00

27. Tò-kwá-wán, (Hoklò),.

24

24

55.00

28. Tsfat-tsz-múi,.

29

29

74.00

20. Win-tsai,

78

78

268.50

30. Wong-nai-chung,

31

34

279.00

31. Yau-má-tí,

46

10

5

51

181.00

1,864

179

2,043

$19,609.10

TABLE IV.-AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the Government Schools during 1879.

CENTRAL SCHOOL..

Expenditure,

Deduct School Fees,...

Total Expense of Central School,..

VILLAGE SCHOOLS.

Expenditure,

Add Inspector's Salary,

*

Inspector's Rent,.

Travelling Expenses, .. Chinese Writer's Salary,..

$16,764.35

2,636.00

$14,128.35

.$5,480.75

..$2,400

180

144

180

2,904.00

Total Expenditure for the Year,......

..$8,384.75

A.

Average Expense calculated by the Enrolment.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Schools,

2.

""

""

22

at Government Central School,

;

3.

it.

"}

""

17

>>

at Native Schools,

B.

Average Expense calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Schools,

"}

19

8.

་་

21

at Government Central School,

at Native Schools,

$11.01

23.95

8.77

..$19.35

33.95

7.38

TABLE V.—AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1879.

Average Eurolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

1. Aberdeen,

2. Ap-li-chau,

3. Central School,

4. Girls' School,

5. Há-wán,

6. Hok-ün,

7. Hung-hòm,

8. Little Hongkong,

0. Má-tau-chung,

32.20

25.79

39.00

25.71

489.42

416.11

79.66

63.46

82.66

28.22

10.58

9.44

12.08

10.22

13.00

12.42

14.08

11.11

10. Má-t'an-ts'ün,

11.41

9.13

11. Mong-kok,

12.50

10.59

12. Pok-fú-lam,

7.41

6.75

13. Sai-ying-p'ún, (Hákká),

57.83

50.55

14. Sai-ying-pún, (Puntí),

52.83

45.64

15.

Shái-wán,

18.58

14.00

16. Sháu-kì-wán,

17. Shek-ò,.

18. Shek-t'ong-tsúi,

19. Shéing-wán,

20. Stanley,

21. Tái-kok-tsúi,

22. Tai-t'ám-tuk,

23. Tai-wong-kun,..

24. Tang-lung-chau, (Hákká),.

50.66

36.74

15.83

11.19

36.75

31.09

47.16

40.98

43.58

39.44

32.91

20.26

9.36

7.86

37.58

33.46

43.16

37.06

28. Ts'at-tsz-múi,

29. Wán-tsai,

25.

Tang-lung-chau, (Puntí),

26.

Tò-kwá-wán, (Hákká),

27. Tò-kwá-wán, (Puntí),

30. Wong-nai-chung,

31. Yau-má-tí,

21.33

14.42

24.75

20.92

18.72

17.04

23.00

19.84

42.66

38.54

29.41

28.02

30.25

27.05

1,323.87

1,103.95

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1879.

Maximum

Minimum

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

Daily Attendance.

Daily Attendance.

(Monthly Average.) (Monthly Average.)

1. Aberdeen,

35

18

31.56

14.64

2. Ap-li-chau,

53

26

42.00

13.52

3. Central School,

454

404

431.60

390.25

4. Girls' School,........

85

59

74.08

50.88

5. Há-wán,

36

19

31.67

17.70

6. Hok-ün,

7. Hung-hòm,

8. Little Hongkong,

9. Má-tau-chung,

11

10

10.00

8.19

30

1

25.33

3.36

14

8

14.00

8.00

16

11

13.75

9.18

10. Má-tan-ts in,

14

11

12.44

6.70

11. Mong-kok,

13

10

11.72

8.92

12. Pok-fú-lam,

8

6

8.00

5.84

13. Sai-ying-p'ún, (Hákká),

76

38

66.41

34.50

14. Sai-ying-p'ún, (Punti),..

68

22

55.26

19.47

lũ. Shái wáng.

20

16

16.73

12.17

10. Sháu-ki-wáng.

67

29

56,52

20.50

17. Shek-ò,...

17

14

13.59

6.30

18. Shek-t'ong-tsúi,

40

30

34.33

25.74

19. Shéung-wán,

53

43

49.12

34.82

20. Stanley,

47

30

42.87

23.90

21. Ti-kok-túi,

27

20

26.30

15.06

22. Tái-tín-tuk,

10

9

9.38

5.00

23. Tái-wong-hung,

43

30

41.50

26.31

24. Tang-lung-chau, (Hákká),.

46

33

42.37

30.20

25. Tang-lum-chau, (Punti),

27

12

17.83

6.86

26. To-kwa-wán, (Hákká),

26

21

22.85

16.89

27. Tò-kwá-wán, (Hok-lò),

23

10

20.96

9.44

28. Ts'at-tsz-múi,..

20. Wán-tsai, 30. Wong-nai-chung,

31. Yau-má-tí,.

25

16

23.15

14.31

26

48.88

25.16

26

20.96

25.40

38

16

33.26

15.43

1,516

1,027

1,856.92

904.66

?

TABLE VII.--Number of Days on which the Government Schools were taught during 1879.

School Days.

School Days.

1. Aberdeen,

198

17. Shek-ò,

260

2. Ap-li-chau,

261

18. Shek-t'ong-tsui,

259

3. Central School,

..249

19, Shéung-wán,

259

4. Girls' School,

256

20. Stanley,

257

. Há-wán,

258

21. Tái-kol-tsui,

260

6. Hok-ün,.

7. Hung-hòm,

8. Little Hongkong,.

9. Má-tau-chung,

253

5. Tái-tâm-tuky.

252

253

23. Tái-wong-kung,

258

261

24. Tang-lung-chau (Hákká),

256

258

10. Má-tau-ts in,

262

25. Tang-lung-chan (Punti), 26. Tò-kwá-wán (Hákká),

261

261

11. Mong-kok,

259

27. Tò-kwá-wán (Hoklo),

255

12. Pok-fi-lam,.

259

28. Ts'at-tsz-múi,

258

13.

Sai-ying-p'ún (Hákká),.

257

20. Wán-tsai,

257

14.

Sai-ying-p'ún (Puntí),

255

30. Wong-nai-chung,

253

15. Shái-wán,

249

31. Yau-má-tí,....

261

10. Shau-ki-win,

260

TABLE VIII.-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last Eighteen Years.

1862. 1863. 1864. 1865. | 1866. | 1867. 1868. | 1869. | 1870. 1871. | 1872. | 1873. | 1874. | 1875. | 1876. | 1877. 1878. 1879.

Central

School excepted.

Total Enrolment for the Year, Maximum Daily Attendance,

(Monthly Average),...........................

Minimum Monthly Enrolment, 505 414 Minimum Daily Attendance,

733 535 502

622 469 417

634

(Monthly Average),.........] 299 301

324

597 623 700

535 572 610

418 435 533

380 337 408

916 942 1,302 1,292 1,480| 1,838 1,931| 1,927| 2,171| 2,148| 2,101| 2,043

664 748 950

572 627 683

460 504 556

937 1,157 1,326| 1,271| 1,312| 1,333|1,446|1,326 1,366

741 837 852 974 988 1,057 1,212 1,100 1,027

571 665 760 836 863 925 1,035 936 904

1. January,.

2. February,

3. March,

4. April,

5. May, 6. June, 7. July, 8. August, 9. September, 10. October,

11. November,

12. December,

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the Central School during 1879.

Month.

Number Enrolled.

Average Daily Attendance.

404

390.25

444

431.06

440

408.34

454

417.71

446

419.07

445

420.78

446

419.57

430

419.04

451

425.96

446

422.96

439

415.76

428

403.86

Total Number of SCHOLARS present during the year,...

Average Monthly Enrolment,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE for the year,.......

Number of SchooL DAYS, ......

...590

439.42

.410.11

249

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (the CENTRAL SCHOOL ercepted) arranged in the order of their efficiency in 1879,

Rank I.

Rauk 11,-Continued.

5. Shán-kí-wán.

1. Sai-ying-pin, (English School).

2. Wong-nai-ch'ung, (Anglo-Chinese). 6. Yan-má-tí.

4. Stanley.

5. Girls' School.

. Theung-wán.

Rank II.

1. Wán-trai, (Anglo-Chinese).

2. I-wán.

3. Tang-lung-chau, (Iákkí).

4. Tang-lung-chau, (Puntí).

7. Sai-ying-p'ún, (Hákká).

Rank III.

1. Aberdeen, (Anglo-Chinese). 2. Shek-ò.

3. Ti-koh-tsui.

4. Tai-wong-kung.

5. Ap-li-cháu.

6. Slick-t'ong-tsúi.

Rank III,--Continued.

7. Hok-ün.

S. T-kwa-wán, (Hákká).

9. T-kwa-wán, (Hok-1). 10. Pok-fú-lam. 11. Shai-win. 12. Mong-kok.

13. Má-tan-ts'ün. 14. Má-tru-chung. 15. Hung-hdm. 16. Little Hongkong. 17. Ts'at-tsz-múi.

18. Tái tám tuk.

TABLE XI.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending SCHOOLS receiving GRANTS-IN-AID, (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1873), and Amount gained by each, in 1879.

Class of School.

Name of School.

Boys.

Girls,

Total.

Amount of Grant.

$

C.

I.

>>

*7

1. Baxter Girls' School, D'Aguilar Street, 2. Baxter Girls' School, Hollywood Road, 3. Baxter Girls' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,

25

25

117.66

34

34

147.86

47

47

263.17

7

">

4. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, D'Aguilar Street, 5. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, St. Stephen's,..

73

73

285.14

53

53

245.53

>>

6. C. M. S. Boys' School, Queen's Road,.

38

38

84.87

""

7. C. M. S. Boys' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,....

73

73

252.92

""

8. C. M. S. Boys' School, St. Stephen's Church,

170

170

467.16

9. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, Staunton Street,.

87

87

478.47

10. L. M. S. Boys' School, Tank Lane,

101

101

355.39

11. L. M. S. Boys' School, Wán-tsai,..

90

90

273.73

""

12. L. M. S. Boys' School, Yau-má-tí,

47

47

131.10

27

"}

13. L. M. S. Girls' School, Tái-ping-slán,

39

39

260.82

14. L. M. S. Girls' School, Wán-tsai,.

45

45

196.15

III.

15. Basel Mission Boys' School,

68

68

100.29

16. Basel Mission Girls' School,

59

59

485.53

>"

17. Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys and Girls),

39

18

57

223.82

IV.

18. St. Joseph's College, (Boys),

255

255

1,389.89

22

19. Victoria School, (Boys and Girls),

32

24

56

870.74

986

431

1,417

$6,124.54

TABLE XII-ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1879.

Average Number Maximum Minimum | Maximum Minimum Average Daily

Monthly Mouthly Daily Daily Monthly Attendance Enrolment. Enrolment. Attendance. Attendance.] Enrolment.] for the

of School Days.

year.

1. Baxter Girls' School, D'Aguilar Street,

21

15

19.27

13.77

18.72

16.66

259

2. Baxter Girls' School, Hollywood Road,

27

21

25.33

14.00

28.91

20.36

272

3. Baxter Girls' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,..

41

25

37.11

20.23

36.68

34.67

268

4. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, D'Aguilar Street,

71

12

61.65

11.70

49.83

47.14

272

5. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, St. Stephen's,

53

37

5156

36.11

41.91

43.03

253

6. C. M. S. Boys' School, Queen's Road,

38

10

30.22

7.00

29.18

23.67

254

7. C. M. S. Boys' School, Sai-ying-pún,

73

42

67.38

40.96

59.63

54.92

250

8. C. M. S. Boys' School, St. Stephen's Church,..

170

92

150.23

78.95

133.83

111.75

254

9. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, Staunton Street,

81

62

73.28

52.65

72.09

04.47

266

10. J. M. S. Boys' School, Tank Lane,

70

44

65.63

42.92

61.83

58.39

261

11. L. M. S. Boys' School, Wán-tsai,

70

31

66.70

23.25

63.66

49.73

275

12. L. M. S. Boys' School, Yan-má-ti,

39

17

10.20

16.61

38.75

30.10

285

13. 1.. M. S, Girls' School. Tái-ping-shán,

29

36.15

25.42

36.00

31.82

281.

14. L. M. S. Girls' School, Wán-tsai,

25

34.46

19.38

#3.36

29.15

279

15. Basel Mission Boys' School,

19

13

3842

10.40

37.81

31.29

253

16. Basel Mission Girls' School,

نات

17

58.87

45.33

53.63

50.53

260

17. Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys and Girls ),

45

27

40.32

24.33

$4.38

30.82

258

18. St. Joseph's College, (Boys),

223

169

198.64

147.12

207.27

171.89

216

19. Victoria School, ( Boys and Girls ),

49

37

44.88

31.75

42.50

38.74

255

Cr

).

| + |

I LO w S

16. Basel Mission Girls' School,

III 51 911

97

3 4

17. Diocesan Home & Orphanage, (Boys & Girls), IV 25 5 33 2

18. St. Joseph's College, (Boys),

IV 148 10

13

36

-

e

19. Victoria School, (Boys & Girls),.

IV 30

2

7

t-

4

4

:

6

6 1

4

:

2

:

Q

1

4

1

2

3

Q

:

1. Baxter Girls' School, D'Aguilar Street,.

2. Baxter Girls' School, Hollywood Road,

17 97

3. Baxter Girls' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,.

I

30

4. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, D'Aguilar Street, I 5. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, St. Stephen's,.

41 15

35

11

:

6. C. M. S. Boys' School, Queen's Road,..

16

:

7. C. M. S. Boys' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,

I

39 14

00

8 8

**

8. C. M. S. Boys' School, St. Stephen's Church,..

I

68 16

27 16

9. L. M. S. Boys' School, Tank Lane,.

15

10

~

10. L. M. S. Boys' School, Wán-tsai,.

46 13 13

*

11. L. M. S. Boys' School, Yau-má-ti,

I

12. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, Staunton Street, I 13. L. M. S. Girls' School, Tái-p′ing-shán,

23 2 11

55 11

1

12 10 11

I

31

10 58 2

N

N

14. L. M. S. Girls' School, Wán-tsai,,

23

65 11

15. Basel Mission Boys' School,..

III 15 3 5 2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

co

~

1

1

1

1

:

3

Q

:

*

:

N

I

1

N

-

*

N

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1 1

:

:

:

...

1

L

:

:

:

:

Q

...

13

ลง

*

11.

17

$

2 16.66) 5

:

:

:

:

:

20.36] 45

42

121

34.67 40

48

49 32

N

47.14] 75

54

3

32

:

24

11 43.03 30

66

35

Co

10

14

2

23.67 25

40

83

6

54.92] 70

48 56 24

62

6 111.75 80

33

162 112 16

10

111.75

:

:.

1116.79 350.87

467.16

43

6

58.39 25

90 70 56 36

20

58.39

88.85 266,54

355.39

37

9

49.73 65

78 49 32

...

49.73

68.43 205.30.

273.73

17

30.10 10

84 7

÷

:

30.10

32.77 98.33

131.10

46

9

64.47 55

72

12

70

88

88 18

74

24

8

64.17

118.37 355.10)

473.47

27

1

31.82 | 50

30 50

16 18

46

122

12

1

31.82

63.20 195.62 260.82

20

3

29.15 35

36 35

Co

..

40

3

1 29.15

49.03 147.12

196.15

10

10

31.29] 18

35

16

...

...

:

31.29

25.07 75,22

...

43 8 50.53 54 77

72

223

18 7 30.82 30 24 30

24 56 16

127 13 171.89 60 440 360 204 42 96 16

8 2

63 30

48

...

64

25

24 3 50.53

8

CY

5:

3 2 30.82

171.89

:

28

2

38.74] 12 56

70

20

48 56 64

22 3 1 38.74

92.68 $278.00

100.29

121.38 364.15 485.53 55.95 167.87 223.82

847.47 1,042.42 | 1,389.89

370.74

Paid in

January.

*

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

14

: 00

دن:

اته :

16.66

*^

:

29.41) 88.25

117.66

30

20.36

36.84 110.52

147.36

52 7.50

34.67

65.79 197.38

263.17

47.14

71.23 213.86

285.14

1628.50

43.03

61.38 84.15

Cumulative 245.53 22 reduction of

45 per cent.

:

19.07

21.17| 63,50

81.67 {Payment

...

{ pro rata,

51.92

63.23 189.69 252.92

:

$

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

TABLE XIII-RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS IN 1879.

No. of Scholars who l'assed.

No. of Scholars who Failed.

Sums to which the School is entitled.

Needle Work.

Extra Subjects.

Total Passed.

Total Failed.

Average Daily Attend-

ance during School Year.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

Good.

Very

Good.

Fair.

Average Daily At-

tendance.

Assistant Examiner's Fee.¡

To Teacher.

To Manager.

Total

Grant.

REMARKS.

Grant-in-Aid.

Inspectorate of Schools, Hongkong, 25th February, 1880.

TOTAL GRANT,

Less paid in January,

6,124.54

870.74

$5,763.90

E. J. EITEL, Inspector of Schools.

TABLE XIV.-Percentage of Senolaus who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS, during the last Two Years.

1879.

1878.

Increase.

Decrease.

1. Baxter Girls' School, D'Aguilar Street,

84.61

100.00

15.30

2. Baxter Girls' School, Hollywood Road,.

100.00

3. Baxter Girls' School, Sai-ying-pún,

90.00

100.00

10.00

4. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, D'Aguilar Street,

95.12

5. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, St. Stephen's,

68.87

96.78

28:21

6. C. M. S. Boys' School, Queen's Road,

87.50

7. C. M. S. Boys' School, Sai-ving-prim.

84.61

97.86

12.75

8. C. M. S. Boys' School, St. Stephen's Church,.

91.17

98.96

5.79

9. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, Staunton Street,

83.64

87.50

3.86

10. L. M. S. Boys' School, Tank Lane,.

87.75

96.07

8.32

11. L. M. S. Boys' School, Wán-tsai,.

80.43

92.50

12.07

12. L. M. S. Boys' School, Yan-má-tí,

73.91

100.00

26.09

13. L. I. S. Girls' School, T'ai-ping-shún,

87.10

100.00

12.90

14. L. M. S. Girls' School, Wán-tsai,

86.96

100.00

13.04

15. Basel Mission Boys' School,

66.67

93.54

26.87

16. Basel Mission Girls' School,

84.31

100.00

15.09

17. Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys and Girls),

72.00

95.00

23.00

18. St. Joseph's College, (Boys).

90.71

19. Victoria School, (Boys and Girls),

93.33

90.00

2.67

TABLE XV.-PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1879.

Class of School.

Name of School.

Reading. Writing.

Arith- Gram- Geogra- metic. nar. phy.

tion. History.

I.

1. Baxter Girls' School, D'Aguilar Street,

21

2. D. xter Girls' School, Hollywood Road,

84.61 92.30 94.12 94.12

100.00

Repeti- Expla- Compo-

nation.sition.

(Chinese) (Chinese) (Chinese)

100.00 75.00

100,00 100.00

3. Baxter Girls' School, Sai-ying-p*ún,

93.33

96.66

66.66

100.00

61.64

>>

4. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School, D'Aguilar Street, 95.12 5. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School. St. Stephen's,

100.00

60.00

100.00 93.75 60.00

77.14

82.86

75.00

100.00 77.77

6. C. M. S. Boys' School, Queen's Road,

$7.50 93.75

100,00

>"

7. C. M. S. Boys' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,

89.74 94.87

75.00

100,00

53.84 100.00

**

8. C. M. S. Boys' School. St. Stephen's Church,

94.12

92.64

66.66

91.12 50.00 100.00

9. L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School. Staunton Street,

85.45

87.27

85.71

98.18

91.66

*

,.

10. L. M. S. Boys' School, Tank Lane,

100.00

93.88

76.47

96.87

86.20 82.35

4

11. L. M. S. Boys' School, Wán-tsai,

93.48 *86.96

90.00

160.00

76.47 50.00

"

12. L. M. S. Boys' School, Yau-má-ti,..

60.87 91.30

95.65

33.33

13. L. M. S. Girls' School, Tai-ping-shán,

90.32

*87.09

100.00

100.00

83.33

14. L. M. S. Girls' School, Wán-tsai,

95.65

91.30

50.00

100.00

62.50

II.

15. Basel Mssion Boys' School,

100.00 93.33 46.66

16. Basel Mission Girls' School,

Iv

17. Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys & Girls),!

96.00

18. St. Joseph's College, (Boys),....................

97.97

19

19. Victoria School. ( Boys and Girls),

100.00

92.16 78.43 90.20

84.00 76.00 69.23 93.24 90.54 97.22 96.15 92.31 83.33 100.00

91.74 100.00

100.00 100.00 94.74 100.00

TABLE XVI.--NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1879.

Number of Children in the Colony under Sixteen Years of age as per last Census (of 1876), ......26,247 Add increment of increase of Children under Sixteen Years of age, say,

Deduct, as being under Five Years of age, say,

Deduct, as attending Schools of all denominations, say,

Total Number of Uneducated Children, say,

2,577

28,824

8,698

6,000

14,698

.14,126

E. J. EITEL.

Inspector of Schools.

SUPPLEMENTS TO THE ANNUAL REPORT ON GOVERNMENT EDUCATION

IN HONGKONG.

I. CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING REVISION OF GRANTS-IN-AID SCHEDULE AND SEPARATION OF THE OFFICES OF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS AND HEAD MASTER OF CENTRAL SCHOOL.

1. THE HONOURABLE THE COLONIAL SECRETARY TO THE INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.

[C.S.O. No. 329.]

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 27th March, 1879..

SIR,

of

I am directed by His Excellency the Governor to forward to you, for your information, a copy an extract from a despatch which has been received from Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies detailing the decision at which he has arrived as to the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. I am to add that His Excellency will be glad if you would prepare a draft of the new Grant-in-Aid Rule in accord- ance with the Secretary of State's instructions."

I have the honour to be,

Dr. E. J. EITEL,

Inspector of Schools.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

(6

2. EXTRACT FROM DESPATCH No. 15 OF 6TH FEBRUARY, 1879, FROM THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, BART., M.P., TO HIS EXCELLENCY GOVERNOR POPE HENNESSY, C.M.G.

"I shall be willing to do my utmost to facilitate the acceptance by the Roman Catholics of the ad- vantages of the grants-in-aid by consenting to modify the language of the rules, as Bishop RAIMONDI desires, in the first seven points* which he has specified in his letter to Dr. EITEL of 10th July, 1878,

*

Extract from letter of Bishop Raimondi to Dr. Eitel, dated 10th July, 1878.

Let me suggest the following alterations in the Grant-in-Aid Scheme published as a second appendix to Mr. STEWART's last report.

1.-In the first line omit the word "Elementary," Schools that come under the higher standards are not elementary

in any sense of the word, and the use of the word might lead to complications hereafter. 2.-In Section 1 § a strike out “Elementary."

3.-In § Section 4 strike out the word “secular” and let the clause read: "The time devoted to instruction in the

subjects of the standards is not less than four hours daily."

4.-In Section 2 § strike out the words "provided they are either before or after the four hours of secular instruction required by this Code." If we improperly mix religious instruction with instruction in the subjects of the standards the examinations will show it, and we will suffer in pocket and in reputation. 5.-Ind strike out the word "secular." The concluding words of the sentence sufficiently specify the kind of book

The Superior

required. If the books are not what they ought to be, again the examination will show it.

6. In Section 4 § the insertion of the word "paid " before teacher would obviate certain difficulties.

of the Christian Brothers is at the same time Manager and Teacher. What you really want is to get hold of the responsible person, the master and not the paid servant, where there are paid teachers. In our schools, managed by priests and religious, there are no paid teachers. In Section 8 the same word or the word "salaried ́ ought to be introduced before the words "teacher" and "master" wherever they occur.

A personal pay- ment to one of the Christian Brothers of a fourth of the grant is simply a payment to the Superior. The object of the clause is perfectly clear and perfectly reasonable, but is inapplicable to the teaching members of a religious congregation who have no divided interest.

7.-In Section 10 strike out the words "secular instruction" and let the Section read: "Grant will be made for definite

results in the subjects mentioned in the standards hereinafter referred to, and no other."

8.-In Section 14 substitute "the basis of education will be that the school is kept open for not less than 200 days in

each year, and for not less than four hours per day of instruction in the subjects of the several standards.” 9.-In Section 15 strike out the words "and they may not be withheld without reasonable excuse." If we withhold children from examination for any reason, we get a diminished grant and a bad report. Why interfere further with our discretion or with the wishes of parents? Why make the Inspector an Inquisitor?

10. In Section 25 the amount of the capitation grant needs reconsideration as previously suggested. 11.-We call the attention to these two facts: 1st that at home the ground for schools or something equivalent is given by the Government and a certain amount is fixed for building which should be determined also here; 2nd, in Singapore the standards are easier and the grant larger.

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"as giving offence upon religious grounds. You will, however, observe that the omission of the "word "Elementary" from I (a) of the Rules, necessitates a further alteration in the definition (a) of “Public Elementary School in the Schedule; where in place of the words, a Public Elementary "School shall mean a school where clementary education is the principal part of the education given,' the following words should be substituted, 'a Public School shall mean a school where education is given in the subjects of the Standards.'”

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"It seems to me necessary to insist upon certain other points objected to by Bishop RAIMONDI, (8) "and 9 in his letter to Dr. EITEL). The requirement of 200 attendances under Rule 14 should be preserved, as I regard it as a safeguard for the thoroughness of the education; and, in order to secure "the general efficiency of the schools, the children must not be withheld from examination without "reasonable excuse. I also consider that, for the present, at any rate, the capitation fees should remain as they are. Bishop RAIMONDI appears to me to do only justice to the Government when he describes "the Grant-in-Aid Scheme as a fair and liberal one. It will be time enough to consider the propriety "of augmenting these fees after the Roman Catholics have come into the scheme, if, upon a fair trial, they are able to show that the amounts granted are unreasonably low, or are so arranged as to operate "unfairly to their schools."

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"As to the question of building grants, which have hitherto been dealt with separately upon the "merits of each case as it arose, it is, of course, impossible for the Colony to make to the Managers "grants equivalent, or indeed approaching, to the sums which it spends upon the Government Schools, but I am quite willing to approve, as part of the Code, a general regulation on this subject applicable "to schools receiving grants-in-aid and framed so as fairly to meet all cases. And I have to request you to transmit for my approval before it is brought into operation the drafts of such a regulation. "which, if approved, will eventually become part of the Grant-in-Aid System."

3. THE INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS TO THE HONOURABLE THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

[No. 36.]

SIR,

INSPECTORATE of Schools,

HONGKONG, 25th April, 1879.

In accordance with the instructions contained in your letter No. 329 of 27th ultimo, I have the honour to forward, under this enclosure, a draft of the new Grant-in-Aid Scheme, revised by myself on the basis of the Despatch No. 15, of 6th February, 1879, from the Right Honourable Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, Bt., M.P., to Governor PorE HENNESSY, C.M.G.

2. As regards "Building Grants "I have drafted, in accordance with the Secretary of State's instruction, a general regulation, which is simply an abridgment of the regulations introduced in England under the "Code (1871) of Minutes of the Education Department."

3. I take this opportunity to direct the attention of the Government to another alteration in the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, which I beg to suggest, and which is of no vital importance to the Scheme, but of practical utility in Hongkong. I propose to abolish rule le, on page 1, "the average attendance is not under twenty.'

This rule is borrowed from the English Code, but is quite unsuited to the peculiar character of Chinese schools, in which class teaching finds but limited application, so that a teacher can scarcely teach more than twenty boys effectively. More than one half of the Government schools of the Colony have actually all along had an average daily attendance of less than twenty. To prove this I enclose a table showing the number of those Government schools, out of a total of thirty, in which, during the last five years, the average daily attendance was under twenty. This table is com- piled from the Annual Reports of the Education Departinent as published in the Government Gazette. 4. I should also like to direct the attention of the Government to the fact that the Hongkong Scheme, as it now stands, makes no provision for night-schools nor for industrial schools, which are admitted in England under the New Code of 1871.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, Inspector of Schonis.

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

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4. Enclosure in Inspector of Schools' Letter of 25th April, 1879.

GRANTS-IN-AID.

For the better promotion of Education in the Colony, the Government of Hongkong is prepared to assist schools on the system of grants-in-aid, subject to the following conditions:--

1. Before any grant can be made to a school, the Government must be satisfied that--

(a.) The school is conducted as a public school.

(b.) The school is not carried on with a view to private emolument.

(c.) The school premises are healthy, well lighted, drained and ventilated, properly furnish-

ed, and contain sufficient internal space for the average attendance.

(d.) The master is competent.

(e.) The time devoted to instruction in the subjects of the Standards is not less than four

hours daily.

(f.) The school roll is carefully kept, and proper discipline maintained.

(g.) The organization is good, and the work conducted in accordance with a proper time

table.

2. The Government will not interfere in any way with--

(a.) The religious instruction of a school.

(b.) The hours for such instruction.

(c.) The appointment of a teacher, provided he is competent.

(d.) The school books, provided they are sufficient, as regards the instruction which they

contain, for the purposes of the Standards hereafter to be referred to.

(e.) The style of handwriting, but a bold round hand is recommended for European writing. (f.) The stipulations of this code, without six months' previous notice in the Gazette.

3. Grants will be subject to a cumulative reduction of five per cent. on the whole sum gained by a school, in each case where the Inspector reports defects in-

(a.) The teaching.

(b.) The accommodation.

(c.) The keeping of the school roll.

(d.) The organization.

(e.) The discipline.

(f) The books and apparatus.

Due regard in all these cases will be had to circumstances.

4. A school receiving a grant must be---

(a.) Open at all times to Government inspection.

(b.) Represented by a Manager, distinct from the paid teacher, who will conduct all corres- pondence with the Government, sign the receipt for the grant, and furnish all Returns which the Government may require.

5. In the case of Chinese schools not under European supervision, the Inspector will be Manager when necessary.

6. The Government will not bind itself to give grants to all schools claiming them under the foregoing conditions, but will be guided by the circumstances of each case, and by the amount of money at its disposal for educational purposes. In all cases where a grant is refused, the reasons for the refusal will be given.

7. The Government will reserve to itself the power to withdraw or reduce grants. In all cases, the reasons for the withdrawal or reduction will be given. No grant will be withdrawn, or materially reduced, until a second examination has been held by the examiner assisted by two assessors, the one chosen by the Government and the other by the Manager.

8. One-fourth of the total grant made to a school will be handed to the paid teacher as a personal payment. In the event of a change of paid masters, each will receive his proportion of this sum, according to the period of his service. If a paid master is dismissed, his share of the grant will the school.

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9. A detailed account, with proper vouchers, of the total income and expenditure of each school must be furnished by the Manager annually, in the form provided for that purpose.

10. Grants will be made for definite results in the subjects mentioned in the Standards hereinafter referred to and no others.

11. These results will be ascertained at the annual examination of the school by the Inspector, or by such examiners as the Government may appoint.

12. Examiners who are not in the service of the Government will be paid for their assistance.

13. Schools eligible for grants-in-aid will be-

Class I.-Schools in which a Chinese education is given.

Class II-Schools in which a Chinese education is given, with English in addition. Class III.--Schools in which a European education is given in the Chinese language. Class IV.-Schools in which a European education,is given in any European language. Class V.--Schools in which a European education is given in any European language, with

Chinese in addition,

14. The basis of examination will be two hundred daily attendances of not less than four hours each, at instruction, in the course of the year.

15. Children who have satisfied that condition will be examined in accordance with the following Standards, and they may not be withheld from examination without a reasonable excuse.

of the examination of each scholar will be communicated to the Managers.

16. For Schools in Class I. (Schools in which a Chinese education is given.)

STANDARD I.

1. Reading. Two pages of the First Book used in the school.

2. Writing. From dictation, five common characters in the same book.

3. Repetition. Two pages of the same book.

Value of a pass in this Standard, five dollars.

STANDARD II.

The results

1. Reading.-A passage not exceeding fifty characters in the Second Book used in the school. 2. Writing. From dictation, ten consecutive characters in the same book.

3. Repetition. A short paragraph of the same book.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the scholar

has not passed in two of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, six dollars.

STANDARD III.

1. Reading.-A passage not exceeding sixty characters in the Third Book used in the school.

2. Writing. From dictation, twenty consecutive characters in the same book.

3. Repetition.--A short paragraph of the same book.

4. Explanation. The characters in the passage read.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the scholar

has not passed in three of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, seven dollars.

STANDARD IV.

1. Reading.-A passage not exceeding seventy characters in the Fourth Book used in the school. 2. Writing.-From memory, a passage not exceeding thirty characters in the same book.

3. Explanation.-Simple phrases in the passage read.

4. Composition.---An antithetical sentence () of not more than three characters.

5. Geography-General outlines of China Proper.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the scholar

has not passed in four of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, eight dollars.

STANDARD V.

1. Reading.-A passage not exceeding eighty characters in the Fifth Book used in the school. 2. Writing. From memory, a passage not exceeding forty characters in the same book. 3. Explanation.-A passage not exceeding twenty characters in the same book. Orally or

in writing at the option of the examiner,

4. Composition. A very short theme.

5. Geography.--The Canton Province, in addition to the Geography of the previous Standard.

Copy writing will not be taken in this Standard.

Value of a pass in this Standard, nine dollars.

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STANDARD VI.

1. Reading--A passage not exceeding one hundred characters in the Sixth Book used in

the school.

2. Writing. From memory, a passage not exceeding fifty characters in the same book. 3. Explanation.-A passage not exceeding thirty characters in the same book. Orally or

in writing at the option of the examiner.

4. Composition.---A short theme.

5. Geography.The Chinese Empire.

Copy writing will not be taken in this Standard.

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Value of a pass in this Standard, ten dollars.

Note.--In Girls' schools, Repetition may be substituted for Composition in Standards

IV, V and VI.

17. For Schools in Class II., (Schools in which a Chinese education is given, with English in addition.)

STANDARD I.

The same as Standard I for schools in Class I.

Value of a pass in this Standard, five dollars.

STANDARD II.

In addition to Standard 11 for schools in Class I,

4. English Reading.--A short sentence from the First Book used in the school, with ex-

planation of single words in Chinese.

5. English Writing.-From dictation, a short sentence in the same book.

English copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in four of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, six dollars and a half.

STANDARD III.

In addition to Standard III for schools in Class I,

5. English Reading.-A short passage in the Second Book used in the school, with expla-

nation in Chinese.

6. English Writing.--From dictation, an ordinary sentence in the same book.

English copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in five of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, seven dollars and a half.

STANDARD IV.

In addition to Standard IV for schools in Class I,

6. English Reading.—A short passage in the Third Book used in the school, with explana-

tion in Chinese.

7. English Writing. From dictation, a short passage in the same book.

8. English Grammar.-Ability to distinguish the parts of speech in a short sentence in the

same book.

English copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in seven of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, eight dollars and a half.

STANDARD V.

In addition to Standard V for schools in Class I,

6. English Reading.-A short passage in the Fourth Book used in the school, with explana-

tion in Chinese.

7. English Writing.--From dictation, a short passage in the same book.

8. English Grammar.--Parsing a simple sentence in the same book.

9. Geography. Outlines of Asia and Africa.

English copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in eight of the other subjects.

Value of à pass in this Standard, nine dollars and a half.

STANDARD VI.

In addition to Standard VI for schools in Class I,

6. English Reading.-An ordinary prose passage chosen by the examiner, with explanation

in Chinese.

7. English Writing.-A short theme or letter.

8. English Grammar.-Analysis and parsing of a short ordinary sentence chosen by the

examiner.

9. Geography.-Outlines of Europe and America, in addition to the Geography of the previous

Standard.

English copy writing will not be taken in this Standard.

Value of a pass in this Standard. ten dollars and a half.

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18. For Schools in Class III. (Schools in which a European education is given in the Chinese language.)

STANDARD I.

1. Reading.-Two pages of the First Book used in the school.

2. Writing.-Five common characters from dictation.

3. Arithmetic.---Notation.

Value of a pass in this Standard, six dollars. STANDARD II.

1. Reading.-A passage not exceeding fifty characters in the Second Book used in the school. 2. Writing. From dictation, ten consecutive characters in the same book.

3. Arithmetic.-Simple Addition and Subtraction, in addition to the Arithmetic of the previous

Standard.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the scholar

has not passed in two of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, seven dollars.

STANDARD III.

1. Reading. A passage not exceeding sixty characters in the Third Book used in the school,

with explanation in colloquial Chinese.

2. Writing. From dictation, twenty consecutive characters in the same book.

3. Arithmetic.-Simple Multiplication, in addition to the Arithmetic of the previous Standards. Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in two of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, eight dollars.

STANDARD IV.

1. Reading.-A passage not exceeding seventy characters in the Fourth Book used in the

school, with explanation in colloquial Chinese.

2. Writing. From dictation, thirty consecutive characters in the same book.

3. Arithmetic.-The Simple Rules.

4. Geography.-General outlines of China Proper.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the scholar

has not passed in three of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, nine dollars.

STANDARD V.

1. Reading.-A passage not exceeding eighty characters in the Fifth Book used in the

school, with explanation in colloquial Chinese.

2. Writing. From memory, a passage not exceeding forty characters in the same book.

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3. Arithmetic.-Reduction (Chinese Tables) and Simple Proportion, in addition to the

Arithmetic of the previous Standards.

4. Geography. The Canton Province, in addition to the Geography of the previous Standard. 5. History. The first half of the History used in the school.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in four of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, ten dollars.

STANDARD VI.

1. Reading. A passage not exceeding one hundred characters in any book used in the

school, with explanation in colloquial Chinese.

2. Writing. From memory, the substance of a short story read out twice by the examiner. 3. Arithmetic.-Vulgar and Decimal Fractions, in addition to the Arithmetic of the previous

Standards.

4. Geography.-The Chinese Empire.

5. History.-The History used in the School.

Copy writing will not be taken in this Standard.

Value of a pass in this Standard, twelve dollars.

Note.-The school books may be wholly or partially in the Romanized Character, at the option of the Manager. When the Romanized Character is used, the passages selected for examination will be of the same length as those for schools in Class ÏV.

19. For Schools in Class IV. (Schools in which a European education is given in any European language.)

STANDARD I.

1. Reading.-Accurate pronunciation of each word in a passage not exceeding five lines in

the First Book used in the school.

2. Writing. Copy on a slate or black board a line of print in the same book, and write from

dictation a few common words.

3. Arithmetic.--Notation, Simple Addition, and Subtraction.

Value of a pass in this Standard, six dollars.

STANDARD II.

1. Reading.-Slow and distinct reading of a passage not exceeding ten lines in the Second

Book used in the school.

2. Writing.--A sentence from the same Book slowly read once, and then dictated in

single words.

3. Arithmetic.-Multiplication Table, Simple Multiplication and Division, in addition to the

Arithmetic of the previous Standard.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in two of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, eight dollars.

STANDARD III.

1. Reading.-Clear and intelligible reading of a passage not exceeding ten lines in the Third

Book used in the school.

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2. Writing.-A sentence from the same book slowly dictated once by a few words at a time. 3. Arithmetic.-Compound Rules and Reduction, in addition to the Arithmetic of the pre-

vious Standards.

4. Grammar.-Ability to distinguish the parts of speech in a short sentence in the Reading

Book.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the scholar

has not passed in three of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, ten dollars.

STANDARD IV.

1. Reading. Intelligent reading of a prose passage not exceeding fifteen lines in the Fourth

Book used in the school.

2. Writing.-A sentence from the same book slowly dictated once by a few words at a time. 3. Arithmetic.-Simple and Compound Proportion, Simple Interest, and Practice, in addition

to the Arithmetic of the previous Standards.

4. Grammar.-Parsing, orally or in writing at the option of the examiner, a simple sentence

from the Reading Book.

5. Geography.--Map of the World (general outlines) and Europe.

Copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the scholar

has not passed in four of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, twelve dollars.

STANDARD V.

1. Reading.-Fluent and intelligent reading of a short ordinary paragraph chosen by the

examiner from some common book or newspaper.

2. Writing. From memory, the substance of a short story read out twice by the examiner.

Writing, spelling and grammar will be taken into account.

3. Arithmetic.-Vulgar and Decimal Fractions, in addition to the Arithmetic of the previous

Standards.

4. Grammar.-Analysis and parsing, orally or in writing, of a complex sentence chosen by

the examiner from an ordinary book or newspaper.

5. Geography--Asia, Africa and America, in addition to the Geography of the previous

Standard.

Copy writing will not be taken in this Standard.

Value of a pass in this Standard, fourteen dollars,

STANDARD VI.

1. Reading.To read with fluency and expression any ordinary piece of prose or poetry

chosen by the examiner.

2. Writing. A short theme, or letter, or easy paraphrase. Writing, spelling and grammar

will be taken into account.

3. Arithmetic.-Compound Interest, Square and Cube Root, Profit and Loss, and Progression,

in addition to the Arithmetic of the previous Standards.

4. Grammar.--Analysis and parsing, orally or in writing, of an ordinary stanza of poetry

chosen by the examiner.

5. Geography.-Ability to draw from memory a map of any of the Continents, the map to

include the principal rivers, mountains and cities in the Continent prescribed.

6., History. The first hundred pages of the History used in the school.

Copy writing will not be taken in this Standard.

Value of a pass in this Standard, sixteen dollars.

Note.-In Girls' schools, Arithmetic in Standard V will not extend beyond Vulgar Fractions, and in

Standard VI not beyond Decimal Fractions.

20. For Schools in Class V. (Schools in which a European education is given in any European language, with Chinese in addition.)

STANDARD I.

The same as Standard I for schools in Class IV.

Value of a pass in this Standard, six dollars. STANDARD II.

In addition to Standard II for schools in Class IV,

4. Chinese Reading.--A page of the First Book used in the school, with explanation of single

words in the principal language taught in the school.

5. Chinese Writing. From dictation, ten common characters.

Chinese copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in four of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, eight dollars and a half.

STANDARD III.

In addition to Standard III for schools in Class IV,

5. Chinese Reading.-Two pages of the Second Book used in the school, with explanation. 6. Chinese Writing. From dictation, twenty characters in the same book.

7. Chinese Speaking. Turning very short sentences into colloquial Chinese.

Chinese copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in six of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, ten dollars and a half.

STANDARD IV.

In addition to Standard IV for schools in Class IV,

6. Chinese Reading.-A short passage in the Third Book used in the school, with explanation.

7. Chinese Writing. From dictation, forty characters in the same book.

8. Chinese Speaking.Turning short sentences into colloquial Chinese.

Chinese copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in seven of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, twelve dollars and a half.

STANDARD V.

In addition to Standard V for schools in Class IV,

6. Chinese Reading.--A short passage in the Fourth Book used in the school, with explanation. 7. Chinese Writing.-From memory, a short passage in the same book.

8. Chinese Speaking.---Turning a short passage in the same book into colloquial Chinese.

Chinese copy writing will be taken in this Standard, but it will not be counted if the

scholar has not passed in seven of the other subjects.

Value of a pass in this Standard, fourteen dollars and a

half.

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STANDARD VI.

In addition to Standard V1 for schools in Class IV,

7. Chinese Reading.-An ordinary passage from a Chinese newspaper, with explanation. 8. Chinese Writing.-A short letter.

9. Chinese Speaking.-Fluent and correct colloquial Chinese.

Chinese copy writing will not be taken in this Standard.

Value of a pass in this Standard, sixteen dollars and a half.

21. In all cases where copy writing is taken, not less than one month's work must be shown to the examiner.

22. Scholars who are presented under Standards IV, V and VI for schools in Classes III, IV and V, may also be examined in one or more of the following subjects, namely:--Algebra, Geometry, Physical Geography, and the Natural Sciences, provided they have previously passed in all the sub- jects contained in the Standards under which they are presented, and provided the subjects are taught in such a way as to graduate the instruction to the different Standards. For example:

EUCLID.

Standard IV. Book I. Propositions 1 to 20 inclusive.

Standard V. Book I.

Standard VI.

Books I and II.

Value of a pass, in each of such cases, in Standard IV, one dollar, in addition to the proper value of the Standard; in Standard V, one dollar and a half, in addition to

the proper value of the Standard; and in Standard VI, two dollars, in addition to the proper value of the Standard.

23. Managers of schools wishing to have scholars examined in one or more of these special sub- jects will, for the present, receive a graduated scheme for the subjects of their choice, on application to the Inspector.

24. No grant will be made for any subject not specified in this code.

25. A capitation grant of one dollar will be given for each scholar in average attendance.

26. No scholar will be examined in a lower Standard than that under which he has been previously presented, nor in the same Standard unless he has failed to pass in two or more subjects.

27. Scholars learning a language which is not their mother tongue, will have their intelligence tested by requiring them to explain in their own language the meaning of the passages read.

28. In Girls' Schools, one of the four hours for instruction may be assigned to plain needlework, which will have the following values:--

Fair, one dollar. Good, one dollar and a half. Very good, two dollars.

29. The following Regulations for Building Grants, are to be submitted for the approval of the Secretary of State before coming into effect.

1. Aid is not granted to build new public schools unless the Government is satisfied-

(a.) That there is a sufficient population requiring a school in the vicinity.

(b.) That the school is likely to be maintained in efficiency.

2. The grants made by the Government for building, enlarging, improving, or fitting up

public schools, are not to exceed one half of the actual cost.

3. The site, plans, estimates, specifications, title, and trust deed, must be previously approved

by His Excellency the Governor.

4. The extension of the area of existing school-rooms to receive more scholars, and the addition of teachers' dwellings to existing school-rooms, are treated pro tanto as new case under Article 2.

5. The trust deed must declare the premises to be granted in trust for educational purposes and for no other purpose whatever. It must provide for the legal ownership of the premises, and for the inspection and management of the school in accordance with the principles of the Grant-in-aid Scheme.

6. The grant is paid on presentation of a certificate (with balance sheet annexed), by the Building and Managing Committees of the school, setting forth that the building and conveyance are completed, and that the money in hand, will, when added to the grant, meet all claims and finally close the account.

Number.

30. All correspondence with the Government on subjects connected with this code must be sent through the Inspector of Schools for the time being.

Hongkong, 25th April, 1879.

E. J. EITEL, PH. D.. Inspector of Schools.

Application Schedule.

(To be filled up when application is made for a Grant-in-aid.)

1. What is the name of the School?...

2. Is it a Public School? (a.).....

3. Is it a Boys', or a Girls', or a Mixed School?

4. Where is it situated?

5. What are its Dimensions? (b.)

6. What is the Average Attendance? (c.)

7. Is the school-work conducted by a Time Table? (d.)

8. Is there a regularly kept School Roll? (e.)

9. What Books are to be used under the several Standards? (f.)

10. What are the School-hours?

11. What 'four hours' are to be assigned to instruction in the subjects of}

the Standards?...

12. What Holidays are given, and when?

13. What is the Manager's name, and what is his profession or occupation

14. What is the paid Master's name?.....

15. How many years' experience as a teacher has he had?

16. What Assistants bas he, and what are their names?

17. What is the Salary of the paid Master, and that of each of his

Assistants?

18. What annual sum is derived from School-fees?

19. What annual sum is derived from Donations and Subscriptions?.. 20. Has the School any other, and what, means of support?

21. What are the various headings and amounts of Expenditure? 22. Is there any, and what, Debt connected with the School?...

Signature of Applicant...

Date of Application

(a.) A Public School shall mean a school where education is given in the subjects of the Standards, and where no child is refused admittance

on other than reasonable grounds.

(b.) Give the length, breadth and height of the room or rooms, with the extent of wall-space available for maps.

(c.) The Average Attendance is the total number of attendances marked in the roll within a certain period, divided by the number of days the

school has been taught during the same period.

(d.) Enclose a copy.

(e.) Enclose a specimen page.

(f.) Forward a copy of each.

Examination Schedule.

(To be filled up and forwarded to the Inspector seven clear days before the day fixed for the examination.)

Age

Date of Admission

Name of Scholar. (on last to this School.

Birth- day).

Year. Month.

Number of Attendances of four hours each at Instruction in the Year.

In what class

in School. (The First Class means the highest. Commence with the lowest Class.)

Under what Standard Last examined.

Under what Standard Now

Remarks.

to be examined.

Signature of Manager..

Date

!

No.

5. Enclosure 2 in Inspector of Schools' Letter No. 36 dated 25th April, 1879.

TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS, WHOSE AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE WAS UNDER 20, FOR THE LAST FIVE YEARS.

>

Average Daily Attendance.

1

Aberdeen,

...

2

Hok-ün,...

3 | Hung-hòm,

4

5

Little Hongkong,

Má-tau-chung,

6 | Má-tau-ts in, 7 Mong-kok,.

8 Pok-fú-lam,

9 | Shái-wán,

10

Shek-d,

+

11 Tang-lung-chau, (Hákká),

12 Tang-lung-chau, (Puntí),.

13 Tò-kwá-wán, (Hoklò),

·

14

Ts'at-tsz-múi,

15 | Wong-nai-chung,

16

Yau-má-tí,

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

11.05

9.01 17.45

13.37

12.50

10.95 16.00 12.55

10.45

15.20

14.37 17.46 13.65

13.03

14.47

11.96

18.29 12.08

11.68

19.58

· 16.54

14.21

10.37

12.96

12.23

13.55

13.88

8.62

14.76

14.76 12.84

11.56

8.15

11.32

9.18 12.02

9.73

7.34

13.56

9.93 17.78

13.15

15.24

16.51

16.29 16.32

13.67

13.45

15.59

8.34

18.57

17.34

16.82 18.85

16.31

12.30

9.67

15.99

17.20

16.22

11.35

14.71 11.76

19.57

16.05

6. HIS EXCELLENCY GOVERNOR POPE HENNESSY, C.M.G., TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, BART., M.P.

[No. 33.]

GOVERNMENT House, HONGKONG, 29th March, 1879.

SIR,-I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 15 of the 6th of February transmitting copies of two reports of Mr. STEWART on Education in Hongkong, and conveying to me your instructions with respect to the points raised in those reports and in some despatches I had written on the subject.

2. I believe the decision you have arrived at on the various questions which from time to time I felt it my duty to submit for your consideration, will give very general satisfaction to the parents whose children are to be educated in Hongkong, and will undoubtedly place the public instruction of the Colony on a thoroughly satisfactory basis.

3. As to the Central School, I enclose for your information a copy of a minute in which I indicated my wish to have the revision of the School fees and the other points in the management of that im- portant establishment, determined as far as possible in accordance with Mr. STEWART's views.

that

4. In creating the separate office of Inspector of Schools, with a salary of $2,400 a year, you say you should have instructed me to offer the appointment to Dr. ErTEL, but that I desired to employ his services in another capacity. The question of an Interpretation Department being, however, still unsettled, and as there is no other gentleman in the Colony whom I could recommend for the post, I have complied with the spirit of your instructions and provisionally appointed Dr. EITEL Inspector of Schools. I have informed him that, in continuing the work on which he has been so usefully employed for the last twelve months, he is, in future, to have nothing whatever to say to the Central School, which will be under the sole control of Mr. STEWART. I enclose an Extract from the Estimates for 1879, showing that due provision has been made for the separate office of Inspector, whilst retain- ing to Mr. STEWART his full salary as Head Master.

5. Though in all that I have written or spoken on the subject of Education, the only suggestion of mine as to the separation of the Head Mastership of the Central School and the Inspectorship of Schools is contained in my observations early last year at the Central School, (Despatch No. 12 of 27th January, 1878), in which I expressed a preference for giving the Inspectorship to Mr. STEWART, yet I must admit that further experience has entirely convinced me that the deliberate decision now given by Her Majesty's Government is undoubtedly the best.

6. There is no one in Hongkong who possesses in so eminent a degree the qualifications essential for the responsible office of Head Master of the Central School; and by now devoting his whole time. to the School, Mr. STEWART will, I have not the slightest doubt, render it a most valuable institution.

}

}

7. With reference to the objections, recently transmitted, of the Reverend Mr. KIDD, the Colonial Chaplain, and of Pastor KLITZKE, of the Berlin Mission, to the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, I believe they will be effectually removed by the modifications you instruct me to make in the Scheme; and that those School Managers and the other Educationists in Hongkong, who, on conscientious grounds, were unable to accept the Grants-in-Aid, will in future cordially cooperate with the Government in promoting public instruction in the Colony.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

J. POPE HENNESSY.

The Right Honourable Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, Bart., M.P.,

Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies,

&c.,

&c.,

Sc.

FL

SIR.

7. THE COLONIAL CHAPLAIN TO THE HONOURABLE THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

THE CHAPLAINCY, HONGKONG, 4th March, 1879.

I have the honour to request that you will inform His Excellency the Governor that I have opened a School for English boys.

This step was made almost necessary on my part, because, at the end of last year, the School hitherto carried on at S. Paul's College, the only School for Protestant boys in the Colony, was closed by the Bishop of Victoria.

For the sake of English boys, whose parents are, for the most part, members of my congregation, I felt bound to provide some means whereby they might receive an education based on Church of England principles.

In taking this step I have received the cordial support of those for whom I made the provision. The number of English boys in the Colony is only limited, but I have now the names of 25 boys on the School list, and 19 are in attendance this morning. To show that the parents desire the kind of teaching for their children which I intend to give here, I may say that I was yesterday informed by the Acting Inspector of Schools that every English boy had left the Central School (where secular instruction only is given) to join my classes. From an experience of the Colony, dating from 1871, I am convinced that English parents here desire the establishment of a School, (1) where religion has its place, and (2) where their boys can receive instruction apart from the Chinese.

I am sorry to say that I am unable to put my school under Government Inspection, and thus claim the pecuniary support (under the Grants-in-Aid Scheme) which I really very much need. I cannot conscientiously give secular instruction only for the required number of hours per day, nor can I omit the Bible and the Prayer Book from my Time Table.

I have determined to charge each boy a fee of $2, but, of course, the sum total arising from such a charge will be quite inadequate to defray the expenses of the School. The School fees will probably amount to about $45 per mensem, but even under the present favourable circumstances, when I am giving my personal superintendence to the School, and helping considerably in the class work, I have been obliged to involve myself in a charge for masters of $88 per mensem. I calculate that the School will cost quite £300 per annum. I ought to say that the outlay, in commencing this School, for books, desks, forms, &c., has been great, falling but little short of $250. Of course, this account would be considerably increased but for the fact that I give three roons in my house-which is the Chaplaincy only in the sense that I live here, and not because it is a residence provided for the Chap- lain, wholly or in part, by either the Government or the Community--for the purposes of the School. Under these circumstances I need hardly say that I should have been glad if I could have received some substantial aid from the Government.

We are prepared to teach in the School the higher subjects of Greek and Latin, as well as advanced mathematics. Attendance at the School for Chinese is optional. Instruction is given in that language from 2 to 4 P.M. daily (except Saturdays). I have engaged for my Chinese master a teacher recommended by the Acting Inspector of Schools.

I annex the School Time Table, as well as the School prospectus.

Of course the Establishment of this School, which I propose to call the Chaplaincy School, has added considerably to my already sufficiently arduous duties. Responsible for the Cathedral Services, and Chaplain to the Gaol, Hospital, and Cemetery, it is only a strong sense of duty which has caused me to take a step which involves so much labour, as well as moral and pecuniary responsibility.

I have only to add that on my arrival in the Colony in 1871, I set on foot a Sunday School in connection with St. John's Cathedral, which has proved very successful. The two Schools combined will, as I hope, be of lasting benefit to the English boys whose lot is cast in this Colony.

In the hope that the establishment of the Chaplainey School will receive the hearty approval, as I' feel sure it will, of His Excellency the Governor,

I have the honour to be.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

R. HAYWARd Kidd, Colonial Chaplain.

The Honourable W. H. MARSI.

Colonial Secretary.

8. MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE Governor.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 28th March, 1879.

Having placed in Mr. STEWART's hands the despatch of Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, No. 15 of the 6th of February, 1879, he has read the decision of the Secretary of State on the various points respect- ing education in Hongkong raised in my despatches and Mr. STEWART's reports upon them.

2. Having thus before him the views of the Secretary of State on the resolutions of the Education Conference, and on the question of raising the fees at the Central School, he will be able to let the Surveyor General know the probable number of pupils the new School should be built to accommodate, and, thereupon, Mr. PRICE can, at once, prepare the final plans and estimates for approval.

3. As to the future fees payable at the Central School, the Secretary of State thinks it might be sufficient to commence by raising the fifty cents fee to a dollar; but if Mr. STEWART should be of opinion that this increase is too much to begin with, I shall sanction (subject to the Secretary of State's approval) any other arrangement Mr. STEWART might prefer, so as not to materially diminish the number of his pupils.

4. Any other modification in the future arrangements of the School that Mr. STEWART might desire, shall also receive my most favourable consideration, as I believe the success of the School will mainly depend on leaving so able and experienced a Head Master as unfettered as possible in the arrangements and management of the institution.

J. POPE HENNESSY.

2

II.—ADDRESS OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOr at the CentrAL SCHOOL, 30TH JANUARY, 1880.

The annual public examination of the scholars attending the Central School was to have been held yesterday morning, but none of the public attended to question the boys. At noon His Excellency Governor HENNESSY, C.M.G., arrived, attended by Major PALMER, R.E., A.D.C., and proceeded to distribute the prizes; having done so, His Excellency said-

Ladies and gentlemen, it is the usual custom on these occasions for the Governor of the Colony to briefly review any changes that may have occurred respecting the public instruction of the Colony during the previous year. When I distributed the prizes in the Central School in January, 1879, Dr. STEWART was absent in Great Britain, and on his return important changes were made. During his absence in his own country, the head master of this school obtained from the University where as a youth he had studied a high recognition of his ability, character and learning, for he then received from the ancient University of Aberdeen the ad eundem degree of Doctor of Laws. It is fitting cu this occasion, when he has returned to the Colony and is presiding over this flourishing institution, that you and I should congratulate him on the honour he thus received. Dr. STEWART received, I think I may call it, another honour, though it was in the practical way of official business, in the Colony itself, soon after his return. He has been for many years one of the most eminent officials in the Government of Hongkong. But, last summer, for the first time in his career, he was placed upon the Executive Council of the Colony, and for three months filled the responsible post of Acting Colonial Secretary,

You, who are aware how able is the staff of officials that I have the advantage to be assisted by, can appreciate what I will call the substantial honour that was conferred upon Dr. STEWART by placing him upon the Council and putting him, even for the short space of three months, at the head of the permanent Civil Service of the Colony. I will only say this much, that, though he did his work during my absence, yet, in the ordinary routine of official business, not a week has elapsed since then but papers have come before me which enable me to judge how far the acting appointment I had made was a proper one, and I am bound to say that Dr. STEWART performed the high functions of Colonial Secretary to my entire satisfaction, and to the credit of the Colony.

The year 1879 is in other respects also an epoch in the history of public instruction in Ilongkong. Dr. STEWART, during his absence in England, was requested by the Secretary of State to express frankly and fully to Her Majesty's Government his opinion upon one or two subjects of paramount importance. It is known to all of you that the Government scheme of education, as far as the grants- in-aid were concerned, was a scheme which did not commend itself to the universal approval of those interested in education in Hongkong. The part of the scheme that was particularly objected to was a clause to this effect--that no school could get a Government grant in which there had not been four hours every day of purely secular instruction. From papers laid before the Legislative Council, it is now a matter of notoriety that various religious bodies in the Colony took objection to that clause in our grant-in-aid scheme. It was objected to by Bishop RAIMONDI; it was objected to by our late Colonial Chaplain, the Rev. Mr. KIDD; it was objected to by Pastor KLITZKE, of the Berlin Mission and in each case the objection took this form: they said, "We object to the word 'secular' being in the grant-in-aid scheme. We object especially to the word 'secular' being in that part of the scheme "which relates to the books we are to employ. We have no objection to have, as in other parts of the "empire, a system of examination in secular subjects by independent Government Examiners testing the "results of education, but we do desire to have the Bible, or to have religious teaching, made a part "of our daily school life; and, that being so, we cannot accept the Government restrictions." Now, this is a point of such importance that I think it was most fortunate that my friend Dr. STEWART had an opportunity of stating at length his own views on the subject, and of representing also the views of an intelligent portion of this community. I will read to you a sentence in which Dr. STEWART dealt with the subject in his report to the Secretary of State, and I think you will at once admit that, in treating this question as a high question of policy, to be decided by the Secretary of State and on the responsibility of Her Majesty's Government-he took a wise and proper course. I find that, in a letter

of Dr. STEWART, written in November, 1878, to the Under Secretary of State for the Colonies, he said :---

"The next objection is to the word 'secular' wherever it occurs, and to the provision that religious "instruction 'must be either before or after the four hours of secular instruction required by the code.' I have already explained in what sense the word 'secular' is used in the scheme. To remove it and to "allow religious instruction to be given during the time required for the subjects of the standards would "involve a sacrifice of the principle on which Government grants for education are now allowed. If, as "the Bishop claims, distinctive Catholic teaching must pervade the whole work and time of his schools, "the Government by allowing this would be departing from the position of religious neutrality which it "has hitherto thought it advisable to maintain. All the protestant denominations that have accepted the scheme comply ungrudgingly with the regulation, which would therefore appear to be a fair and a reasonable one. It seems to me that this point is one peculiary calling for the decision of the Secretary "of State as a question of policy."

tr

Now, before I received the decision of Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH Upon this report of Dr. STEWART, there came to me a representation from the Rev. Mr. KIDD, our late Colonial Chaplain, in which he stated in one sentence his objection to the grant-in-aid scheme.

He said :-

"I am sorry to say that I am unable to put my school under Government inspection, and thus claim "the pecuniary support (under the grant-in-aid scheme) which I really very much need. I cannot "conscientiously give secular instruction only for the required number of hours per day, nor can I omit "the Bible and the Prayer Book from my time-table."

The question that Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH had to decide was one of importance. Dr. STEWART had properly described it. It was a question of policy, and it has been finally set at rest, the decision being that the word "secular," wherever it appeared, was to be struck out of our grant-in-aid scheme. In reply to the letter of the Colonial Chaplain I received a despatch dated April, 1879, from Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, telling me that the modifications he had instructed me to inake in the grant-in-aid scheme would remove the objections taken to it by the late Colonial Chaplain; and no doubt that is the case. The grant-in-aid scheme is now published for the information of the whole community. The word "secular" no longer appears in it. Every friend of education in the Colony can now come under that scheme and get the benefit of it. The schools must be open to Government inspection. Govern- ment Examiners must examine the children, and report upon the results of education in the specified subjects of the standards; and upon those reports the Government will give its aid. So far for that important question. The decision, I am aware, has given general satisfaction throughout the whole community.

There was another subject, and one also of public interest, which at that time was under the consideration of Her Majesty's Government, who were assisted in coming to a decision by the

זי

presence of Dr. STEWART in London; and that is, the question of English teaching in the Government Schools of Hongkong. You are all aware that, on the first occasion of my coming here, and I think I may say on every other occasion when I have had to address the managers, or the pupils' parents, or promoters of schools in this Colony, I have invariably dwelt on the importance of teaching English to the Chinese. I have noticed to-day with satisfaction that, among the prizes which have been provided for the pupils here by Mr. STEWART, all those books that you saw on my right hand, and which I have just been giving away, are books that will be useful in teaching English to the Chinese boys who got them. Dr. STEWART selected these books himself. They are copies of an English and Chinese dictionary, a practical and valuable prize. But this is not the only indication that Dr. STEWART has given of his intention to have more English taught in the Colony. The question was put to him in Eugland, at the instance of the Secretary of State, as to how far he could manage to have the teaching of Chinese made optional in this school. It was represented to the Government that some of the Chinese boys coming here wished to devote themselves to learning English, and that, having already, in their opinion, or the opinion of their parents, a sufficient knowledge of Chinese, they might be allowed to study English throughout the whole of the school hours. Dr. STEWART's remark upon that is to this effect, in a letter dated London, 17th January, 1879, addressed to the Under Secretary at the Colonial Office :- "In answer to your question whether the duties could not be so arranged as to leave it optional for a boy to learn English during all the hours allotted to work, or English for part of the time, and Chinese "for the rest, I reply that it could not be done with the existing building, and with the present limited "staff of masters, but if it is considered desirable by the Secretary of State that the option should be 'given, I will waive my own opinion and give effect to the regulation as soon as the new arrangements "will permit of its being done.'

"

Now, gentlemen, this brings me to the statement that the provision of a suitable building for the Central School is still under the consideration of the Government. In the early part of last year. I gave instructions that the plans and specifications should be prepared for the new Central School, that Dr. STEWART was to be consulted as to the precise requirements he thought necessary, and that his wishes were to be acted on as to the nature and dimensions of the building. The department to which that work is entrusted has been occupied with a very urgent work. the most important, perhaps, we have had in this Colony, the rebuilding of the Praya wall, and no one, I think, can find fault with the Surveyor General that, during my absence in Japan, he should have had to apply to the Administrator for permission to postpone dealing with the school until the Praya works were finished. That permission was given, and very properly so, I have no doubt, under the circumstances. The result is that Dr. STEWART has not the capacious building he ought to have in conducting this important institution. I may mention, in connection with the subject of teaching English to the Chinese, that I asked the Secretary of State to allow me to build five new schools in this Colony for the Chinese, where they would be taught English, saying that in the meantime efforts would be made to introduce it in all the village schools. Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH has authorised me to build those schools, and to expend $10,000 on the work, and that also will be the duty of the Surveyor General when the task he has now in hand is finished; he will then undertake the preparation of plans for these five additional schools. In a word, you will see that Her Majesty's Government and the local Government are alive to the importance of teaching English to the Chinese youth of this Colony. and that practical steps are being taken to secure that result.

Now, when first I spoke from this desk, I adverted to the fact that Dr. STEWART, filling the two offices of Head Master and Inspector, was over-worked, and I indicated my wish that he might be constituted Inspector of Schools in the Colony, and relieved from the task of Head Master. Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, in the decision at which he arrived on the public instruction of Hongkong, directed me to inform Dr. STEWART that he thought the work of the Central School was enough for any man's time, and that therefore he was to be retained as the head master of the Central School, and that the office of inspector was to be conferred on some other gentleman. Arrangements in accordance with the wish of the Government have been made, but I have no hesitation in saying that I regard them as provisional and temporary. I was most fortunate in obtaining for the Inspectorate of the other schools in the Colony the services of Dr. EITEL, a friend of education and an accomplished scholar, and he now fills the appointment of Inspector of Schools. But I have recommended Dr. EITEL. to the Government for another appointment, namely, that of being the head of a staff of interpreters, and also Chinese Secretary, a post which formerly existed and was found a very useful one; and, if the Government think fit to approve of my suggestion, the consequence will be that the appointment of Inspector of Schools will then be vacant. Everyone knows that, on its falling vacant. I should best perform my duty to the public Instruction of Hongkong, if I were then to ask Her Majesty's Govern- ment to give to Dr. STEWART the Inspectorate not only of the schools with which Dr. EITEL now deals, but of those schools together with the Central School, so that he will then be the head of the Educa- tion Department of the Colony in all its branches. That, I trust, we may yet accomplish; at all events, I shall strongly recommend it; and when it is done, but not till then, shall I be satisfied that Dr. STEWART is in the position he is entitled to hold.

During last year, not only were the changes to which I have adverted made by Her Majesty's Government, but a very eminent gentleman who had called to see me--Mr. ROBERT HART. the head of the Imperial Customs Service of China, a trusted and able officer of the Emperor of China, and,

indeed, one of the most distinguished men in the East-expressed his gratitude for what had been done for the Foochow Arsenal and for certain works at Tientsin by the Government scheme of education in this Colony; for he told me that every year young Chinese, well trained in their own language, were sent from this school to the Foochow Arsenal, and to other places in China where the Imperial Chinese Government have works; and that the young men who had been trained here were found most useful to the Chinese Government in the sphere in which they were then placed. Well, I told Mr. HART that it was always agreeable for the Governor of the Colony to receive the thanks of any man for what the Government had been doing; but I did not conceal from him my conviction that the young men who were sent to the Foochow Arsenal, or who might be sent to the Chinese Government establishments in Tientsin, ought to be educated, not at the expense of the ratepayers of Hongkong, but at the ex- pense of the Government of China; and that, whilst it might be a very laudable undertaking to do something for the four hundred millions of Chinese in this vast empire near us, and that, whilst it might be a friendly act to assist the Chinese Government as far as the training of its Chinese officials goes, that, nevertheless, it did occur to me that Her Majesty's Government and the 140,000 inhabitants of Hongkong had something to say to the question; and that, if a Chinese youth is to spend five or six years in this school, being highly trained under a distinguished head master and able staff of teachers, after all it might be better for the Colony if that young man remained in Hongkong and did not proceed to the Foochow Arsenal. And then the question arises, how does it come to pass that these young men do not remain in the Colony, but that we send so many of them to be employed by the Chinese Government? This is certainly an interesting question to answer, for there is no doubt that in Hongkong, as some friends who are sitting here on my right know, there is a great demand for Chinese youths who really understand English, have a knowledge of book-keeping, and can assist in keeping accounts; and that the European merchants would be glad to have an ample supply of clerks of that stamp; but that, nevertheless, the number of Chinese boys educated here who have a good knowledge of English-both speaking and writing it-is very limited indeed. Many of my friends among the European merchants feel the inconvenience of this state of things. The records and accounts of the Foochow Arsenal are kept in Chinese, and if we set before us the task of training young natives for that institution, we must of course look to teaching them Chinese rather than English. But, I must say, I should prefer do what we can to assist in giving the students educated here and in our other schools the kind of education suited for the mercantile life of Hongkong-this great depôt of British shipping and commerce-In that way we shall be doing our duty to Her Majesty's Government and to the local taxpayers. It is my wish-it has been the ambition of nearly every man who preceded me in the Government of this Colony, and it has been the policy of all Secretaries of State who have written to my predecessors and myself-that Hongkong should be made an Anglo-Chinese Colony, where Her Majesty should have thousands upon thousands of Chinese subjects, with a thorough knowledge of the English language--amenable to English law and appreciating the British constitution, loyal to their QUEEN, and a strength to this distant part of Her Majesty's Empire. Our education scheme will accomplish a practical result if it assists in achieving that. An Anglo-Chinese Colony, such as I have over and over again expressed my wish to see here, must spring from the children in the Colony. Last year there came to me a deputation of Chinese merchants and shopkeepers. Some of them said, “We have children and grand-children, born in this Colony, and we ourselves desire to become naturalised. We desire to see the property we hold transmitted to our children as from British subjects to British subjects;" and they asked for my assistance to this end. They also told me they desired to keep their children here, with all their future interests wrapped up in Hongkong as their permanent home, their real country and last resting place. I believe that the carrying out of that policy will not only advance the interests of the natives, but also facilitate the operations of the European merchants, who feel the want of English speaking Chinese employés; and, above all, it will assist in carrying out the policy Her Majesty's Ministers have in view, that of securing here a peaceful, intelligent, reliable Anglo-Chinese community.

one.

I

Now, ladies and gentlemen, I have thus referred briefly to the changes that have been made in 1879, and to the policy I believe our education system should be identified with. I will only add that during the absence of the head master he had no fault to find with the way in which this school was conducted; on the contrary, he tells me it was managed during his absence to his satisfaction, and he has assured me to-day that the staff of teachers present he regards as a most able, efficient, and loyal We have present at this moment 399 pupils. That is a respectable number to have at these exa- minations. The result, as far as the papers show, is also, Dr. STEWART tells me, most satisfactory. And I believe it is satisfactory, for this reason, that, in dealing with this school, knowing the character, ability, and attainments of its head master, I have agreed to every proposal he has made to me. will let you into one little secret of official work. There comes to me every day a despatch-box from the Colonial Secretary's Office, filled with what we call the Colonial Secretary's Office papers, that is, various applications made by heads of departments and others on public business. That comes to me every morning, and I endeavour as early in the day as I can to deal with it. So far as education goes, I am in this position, that, when I see a C.S.O. paper with the handwriting of Dr. STEWART upon it, and the précis of its contents outside, I don't take the trouble of opening it. I read the little précis he has made, and I write under it "approved," sign my name, and send it back to the Colonial Secre- tary's Office. I am bound to say that I do the same with the papers that come to me from Dr. ErTEL. the Inspector of Schools; and, therefore, I must frankly admit, that so far as the administrative conduct

of the education department is concerned, my duties are extremely limited. Accordingly, ladies and gentlemen, I must on this occasion express to all the officers connected with this department my best thanks. They have done their duty to my entire satisfaction, and in a way that gives me, as head of the Government, no trouble whatever. And having now thanked them, I must also express to you, ladies and gentlemen, on behalf of the head master and myself, our thanks for your attendance here to-day, and I have the pleasure of announcing to the boys that they will receive from this date the customary holidays.

The following is the list of the prizes referred to in the last Government Gazette as having been distributed by His Excellency the Governor on the 30th of January, 1880:-

NAME.

PRIZE.

DONOR.

NAME.

SPECIAL PRIZES.

PRIZE. PHILOSOPHY CLASS.

DONOR.

Best Scholar.

1st Division.

Lau Ho

...Morrison Scholarship Morrison Trustees.

Yam Sik Lam....Watch

Translation.

Ho Tsik Shin..... Watch

..Mr. Jackson.

Composition.

W. Wilson.......Watch

....Hon. J. Russell.

Chemistry.

J. Tanabe .........Gold Pencil Case ...Head Master.

Sin Hon

ORDINARY PRIZES.

1st Class.

Watch

......Mr. Kwok Acheong. Ho Tuk........ ..Silver Pencil Case .Mr. Arthur. B. Yasuheiro......Silver Pencil Case

Wat Pat Tai......Watch

Chan Shan

M. Alarakia..

Wan Kit Sz

2nd Class.

.......Silver Pencil Case

...Dictionary

Watch

3rd Class.

Chan U Kwan ...Silver Pencil Case .

F. X. Jesus ...... Dictionary

Chan Un Fan ...Watch

4th Class.

Pang ShanChun...Silver Pencil Case... Lau Kwai ......... Dictionary

Li Ip.....

Lo Tso Yan ......Silver Pencil Case

So Wai

Leung Man Kwong... Dictionary

1

5th Class.

...Watch ...

6th Class.

..Watch

...

7th Class.

Cheng Y Kwai ... Dictionary

8th Class.

Chan Wing Kin... Watch

Ko Tsim Un......Dictionary

Li Tsun Fan .Watch

Cheng Yan Fat...Silver Pencil Case .Mr. McKinney.

2nd Division.

Leung In Ting ...Silver Pencil Case . Mr. Gerrard. Sham Un Lun....Ivory Pencil Case...

3rd Division.

YeungShanTin... Ivory Pencil Case... Tsang U Kwan...Ivory Pencil Case...

CHINESE CLASSES.-FORTNIGHTLY EXAMINATIONS. 1st Class.

...

.Watch

Lo Un Kok Wong Kwok Fai...Dictionary

ORDINARY PRIZES.

1st Class.

Tung Ku Ling ... Watch

Lam Tat Chi......Dictionary

2nd Class.

Yung Him.......Watch LeungShuiFan... Dictionary

3rd Class.

TseSeung Hung...Silver Pencil Case .

..Dictionary

Ho Un In.

4th Class.

.

Tsang Wan.......Silver Pencil Case Fung Tsung......Silver Pencil Case.

5th Class.

.Mr. Kwok Acheong.

Cheung UnKwong Silver Pencil Case.....Mr. Kwok Acheong. S. Abram..........Ivory Pencil Case.....

CHINESE CLASS FOR EUROPEANS, &C.

A. Ramjan.

1st Division.

...Watch

U. Ramjan......... Dictionary

2nd Division.

S. Mootian.......Ivory Pencil Case... Abdool....... .....Ivory Pencil Case...

3rd Division.

R. P. Remedios...Dictionary

H. Arthur.

Mr. Nelson.

..............Ivory Pencil Case... Mr. May.

III.-PRIZE DISTRIBUTION AT GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS, AND A GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOL,

5TH AND 7TH FEBRUARY, 1880.

His Excellency Governor HENNESSY, C.M.G. went, on the 5th instant, to the Government School at Wan-tsai, to give away the rewards and prizes for the Masters and pupils of the Government Schools (outside the Central School) in this Colony. The building was filled to overflowing, many of the Chinese inhabitants of the neighbourhood being present.

His Excellency arrived at 3 P.M., when some 200 boys, representing the prize boys of 29 different Government Schools, were in waiting, together with their Masters. When the Governor had taken his seat, the Inspector of Schools, Dr. EITEL, addressed His Excellency as follows:--

May it please Your Excellency,-The Masters and pupils of the Government Schools of this Colony, outside the Central School, are here assembled to-day to receive the rewards and prizes allotted to them for the year 1879. The rewards to be given to the Masters are grants of $25 and $15, which have been sanctioned, since the year 1877, by the Secretary of State for annual distribution among

those Masters of Government Schools whose schools are classed for the year as "very good" or as "good" respectively. In the present case I have, on the basis of my periodical inspections and of the annual examinations, determined upon the following classification.

1. ANGLO-CHINESE SCHOOLS.

1. Very good.

Sai-ying-phún, Mr. Fung Fú. Wong-nai-chung, Mr. Chan Manhwong.

2. Good.

Wán-tsai, Mr. Lo Sik-ling.

II. CHINESE SCHOOLS.

1. Very good.

Sheung-wán, Mr. Lau Sui-shang.

Stanley, Mr. Ng Chéuk-ts'iin. Girls' School, M. Léung King-hám.

2. Good.

Há-wán, Mr. Léung Tsản-chi.

Tang-lung-chau, Punti, Mr. Wong Kon-t'ing.

Tang-lung-chau, Hákká, Mr. Tsang Wai-bing.

Shau-hi-wán, the late Mr. Shing Ng-hang. Yau-ma-ti, Mr. Ch'an I-hing.

Sai-ying-phun, Hákká, Mr. Ip Chiéung-shin.

Your Excellency is aware that since your arrival in the Colony three schools for English teaching have been added to the one school, that of Aberdeen, previously existing. We have therefore now four schools, outside the Central School, in which English is being taught by the Government. Taking these Anglo-Chinese Schools first, I found that the English School kept by Mr. FUNG FU in Third Street, Sai-ying-p'ún, had to be classed as the best school. I am sure that the results which the examination of this school disclosed are fully equal to the results of teaching given at the Central School in corresponding classes. But I must explain that this school was at work all the year on the optional principle which, with Your Excellency's permission, I applied to this school as an experiment. that the school was opened at the beginning of 1879 with some 61 pupils, that at first the parents of 15 pupils declared their wish that their children should be taught both English and Chinese, whilst the remainder declared for English teaching only, and that, after a few months, however, with one solitary exception, all the parents declared for exclusively English teaching. I examined the children in accordance with the standards of the Grant-in-aid Schedule, and I was surprised by the exceedingly high results they obtained, although I was aware that Mr. FUNG FU, the master, who has had a Col- legiate education in America, was a thoroughly competent teacher. The next best Anglo-Chinese School I found to be that of Wong-nai-ch'ung, under Mr. CH'AN MING KWONG, who, in accordance with the wishes of the parents, has all the year through been teaching both English and Chinese to the same boys. It is satisfactory to know that the enlightened inhabitants of that little hamlet, who first stipulated for the introduction of English teaching in their school, continue to pay one-fourth of the teacher's salary into the Colonial Treasury with never-failing regularity. I would have recommended the Master's promotion to Yau-ma-ti, but the villagers were loth to part with him, as he has gained their entire confidence.

I regret to say the Wan-tsai Anglo-Chinese School was not found equal in the results of the year's work to the other two schools, which fully deserved to be classed as "very good," but I could con- scientiously class it as "good."

"good." In the Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School, I am sorry to say, the results which the examination yielded were such that the school could not even be classed as "fair." The Master, however, can scarcely be blamed, as intermittent fever seriously interfered with his health and that of the school children, few of whom ventured to remain in school until the close of summer, when the Master, after having lost his wife, his brother and two servants, within four months, through fever, had to be sent to Hospital, and the school to be closed for six weeks. The school-house was condemned, soon after, by the Colonial Surgeon and Surveyor General, as unfit for a dwelling place, and rooms were hired in an adjoining house, where the school was subsequently re-opened, and no more trouble has since been caused on the score of health.

These four schools are the only Government Schools, outside the Central School, in which English has been taught in 1879. I have been watching these schools, with a view to form an opinion as to the comparative results of the optional and compulsory systems. I am not fully prepared to pronounce

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a definite opinion at present, but of this I am convinced, both from what I observed in the Central School in 1878 and in these schools in 1879,-that when both English and Chinese are taught side by side, the results are poor with the best teachers, and that when English is taught in a school to the exclusion of Chinese, or Chinese is taught to the exclusion of English, the results are fairly roportionate to the efficiency of the teacher. In other words, when both the English and Chinese languages are taught side by side in the same class, the children learn neither English properly nor Chinese satis- factorily. In learning the Chinese language, mere proficiency in reading and writing requires nearly ten years exclusive teaching. The children in these schools all speak Chinese without exception; they are all, or nearly all, born here, and therefore British subjects; their own interests, as well as the interests of the Government, dictate that they should learn English, and they might learn it, one and all, in six years tolerably well, if their time and strength were not wasted on the bootless attempt to learn the two languages at the same time. As the decision of the Secretary of State refers only, as I under- stand it, to the introduction of the optional system into the Central School, and not to the outside schools, I am inclined to recommend that all these outside schools be kept open for all who come to learn, but that no boy be compelled to try and do the impossible, whilst English be taught to those who wish to learn English, and Chinese to those who wish to learn Chinese, with a view rather to make the boys learn one language properly than to make them smatterers in two.

As regards the purely Chinese Schools, the schools at Sheung-wán, Stanley, and the Girls' School, had to be classed as "very good," the schools at Há-wán, Tang-lung-chau, Yau-má-ti and Sai-ying- p'ún, as "good," and the remainder as "fair," with the exception of the schools at Mong-kok and Little Hongkong, which were conducted so badly that, unless speedy improvement takes place, serious mea- sures will be necessary. I regret to have also to mention that I had to exclude two schools, that of Shau-ki-wan and that of Tai-tam-tuk, from the benefit of prizes, because, on two separate occasions, when I paid a surprise visit to these places lately, I found one school shut up and the other without scholars, at a time when both ought to have been at work.

His Excellency then distributed the rewards to the teachers, and, after putting the pupils who had been learning English through a little viva voce examination in spelling and reading, he distributed the prizes to the boys.

The GOVERNOR then said,—I am glad to have the opportunity of meeting here the representatives of the 29 Government Schools, exclusive of the Central School,-26 masters of those schools being present. It is satisfactory to see such a large assembly of school-boys, more than one hundred of whom have been learning English, whilst all, or nearly all, of these boys were born in this Colony, and therefore British subjects. No doubt you are all aware that, apart from the moral effects of education on habit and character, the high-road to worldly prosperity, to social rank and position in this Colony, lies in the direction of English knowledge. I am glad, therefore, to be able to say that, in addition to the four English Government Schools, outside the Central School, at present existing in the Colony, two more will be opened for English teaching, after the Chinese New Year. Furthermore, Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH has sanctioned the building of five new schools at a cost of $10,000, and in these schools also English will be taught.

From what the Inspector has just said, it is manifest that the Chinese residents of the Colony appreciate the advantages now offered to them by the Government in acquiring a knowledge of English. This is indeed most satisfactory, as it is clearly desirable to see from year to year an Anglo-Chinese Community rising up in this Colony, Chinese in manners and customs, but English in law-abiding devotion to Her Majesty the Queen, under whose rule you are living here in security and

comfort.

I am aware that much is to be learned in Chinese books that is not, perhaps, inculcated now-a- days to the same extent in Western literature, as, for instance, filial piety, gentleness of conduct, and the formal restrictions of social etiquette. But there need be no difficulty in combining those lessons of a Chinese education with a thorough study of the English language. Nor, in doing so, need there be any departure from the ancient modes and forms of Chinese school life.

You have an example of what can be done in this way in the Chinese residents of another British. Colony not far off, Singapore and the Straits Settlements, where many of the Chinese, without forsaking their Chinese customs and manners, make the English language their own. There is nothing to prevent the acquisition of a good knowledge of English by any Chinese youth in the Colony who may be really anxious to learn English; and no prize of material prosperity, social rank, or office so high that is not open to a British subject in this Colony, possessed of a thorough knowledge of English. I never make any distinction in giving away an office, except that I seek for the man best fitted by education, talent and character, be he of Chinese or foreign extraction. Let the Masters therefore do their duty by those willing and anxious to be taught, and let the pupils take heart, face the difficulties of the English language, and strive to gain for themselves a worthy position in this Anglo-Chinese community of Hongkong,-a community which, whilst thoroughly Chinese in family feeling and character, in sobriety and industry, and a credit to the ancient civilizations of China, will be obedient to English law and staunch in sincere loyalty to Her Majesty the Queen-Empress.

The proceedings then terminated.

IV. ST. JOSEPH'S Grant-IN-AID SCHOOL.

The annual distribution of prizes at St. JOSEPH's School took place on the 7th February, 1880, His Excellency Governor HENNESSY, C.M.G., presiding. There was a large attendance of visitors..

The proceedings having been opened with music,

Bishop RAIMONDI said--Your Excellency, ladies, and gentlemen, the Brother Director of St. JOSEPH's College, who has been the manager of this school for four years, being absent, I have under- taken to act as manager for this year, and the duty therefore devolves upon me of addressing your Excellency, and you, ladies and gentlemen, who have so kindly honoured us with your presence on this occasion. One of my most pleasant duties has been to place this school under the grant-in-aid scheme, and Dr. EITEL has been good enough to come here and examine the boys with that fairness and honesty that always characterises him. From the worthy Inspector of Schools your Excellency has, I presume, received an account of the satisfactory results of the examination. Our schools have always been open to any gentlemen in the Government departments who might wish to come and inspect them. From this place where I now address you, I spoke on the same subject two years ago, and, in my last report, I repeated that we should always be very proud if at any time any one came at any hour to inspect our school and its management. Government inspection was no part of our objection to the grant-in-aid scheme. We had two objections to it, however, an important one, involving prin- ciples which we never could allow to be interfered with, and another, a secondary one, regarding the fees allowed by this scheme. Having been invited by the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies to state my reasons for not availing of the advantages afforded by the grant-in-aid scheme, I took the liberty of suggesting some alterations therein. We have been very much gratified by the Government conceding the first seven points which we submitted, and we are extremely obliged to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies for having consented to modify the language of the rules in accordance with our suggestions. With respect to the second objection, which I have already stated was a secondary one, the Right Honourable the Secretary of State has kindly allowed a building grant, for which we are thankful; more especially as the grant-in-aid scheme requires con- ditions with regard to building, it becomes a necessity to have the money wherewith to meet that. Regarding the capitation grant, which we suggested should be raised, while suggesting a trial of the former one, the Right Honourable the Secretary of State gives hopes of some modification or alteration being made therein hereafter. Of the several points which we submitted, one has not been granted, namely, that regarding the two hundred attendances. It would have seemed like ingratitude on our part for the extreme kindness and consideration shown us by the Home Government had we refused in consequence of this to avail ourselves of the advantages afforded by the grant-in-aid scheme, and we accordingly petitioned to be placed under it, at the same time expressing a hope that the question of the attendances would not be lost sight of. I have several times, and on different occasions, expressed my opinion that it is the greatest error in this respect not to distinguish a European school from a Chinese school. If the Chinese can complete easily their two hundred attendances a year, it is not so with the European boys. It is a fact that, with all the advantages we had this year, the examination took place very late; not less than one hundred boys of the College could not be presented for examination, owing to their not having completed their two hundred attendances. At the Victoria Schools again, I know that out of sixty-five pupils only thirty could be examined, for the same reason, and that two years ago the best boy in the school could not be rewarded, owing to the same cause. Therefore it was that I asked for this question to be reconsidered when we applied to the Government for the grant-in-aid. Whatever the future may bring forth, however, it is our bounden duty at present to desire your Excellency to convey our sincere thanks to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies for having shown to us, the Catholic community of Hongkong, such consideration and regard. Our best thanks are also due to the generous donors of the prizes, and especially to Mr. BELILIOS, whom I am very glad to see present; also to your Excellency for the prizes you have given and for having kindly consented to come here to-day. On my own part, and on behalf of the Christian Brothers, I can assure your Excellency, and you, ladies and gentlemen, that, independently of any concessions, we shall all continue to labour strenuously in the cause of education. To this im- portant work we have earnestly devoted ourselves since our arrival in the Colony twenty-two years ago. No trouble or pains has been spared, and the mission has spent $200,000 in building and maintaining educational establishments in this Colony. To the same work we shall devote the rest of our life, and our motto shall always be "Educate our youth.'

An address to the Governor was then read by Master L. D'ALMADA, one of the pupils, after which the prizes were distributed by His Excellency according to the list given below, the names of the prize winners being called by Master ALFRED ADAMS, who himself took the first prize in English (a Gold Medal, presented by the Governor).

PRIZE LIST.

1st Class, 1st Division.-H. Dixon, for English, a Gold Medal, presented by His Excellency the Governor; J. Reme- dios, for General Improvement, a Watch, presented by Mr. Kwok Acheong; G. Sequeira, for Mathematics, a Drawing Box, presented by Honourable J. M. Price; A. Remedios, for English, a Gold Medal, presented by Doctor O'Brien; J. P. da Costa, for composition, a Gold Medal, presented by Mr. Justice Francis; L. d'Almada, for Christian Doctrine, a Gold

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Medal, presented by His Lordship the Bishop, and for Book-keeping, "Crabb's English Synonyms," presented by Honourable J. Russell; J. Gonsalves, for Arithmetic and Algebra, a Gold Medal, presented by J. H. dos Remedios, and for English, a Dictionary, presented by Rev. Father Sainz, Spanish Procuration; L. Figueiredo, for Book-keeping, a Silver Medal, presented by Doctor Stewart; F. Remedios, for Christian Doctrine, a Silver Medal, presented by His Lordship the Bishop, and for Geography, "Worcester's Dictionary," presented by Honourable J. Russell.

4th Class, 1st Division.-A. Silva, for General Improvement, "Stories of Birds," presented by Honourable J. Russell; B. Vieira, for Good Conduct, "Webster's Dictionary," presented by Rev. Father Sainz, Spanish Procuration; C. Hyndman, for Religious Instruction, a Pen and Kaleidoscope, presented by Mr. Noronha; F. Aguir, for Arithmetic, a Dictionary, presented by Dr. Stewart; J. Vieira, for Religious Instruction, a Dictionary, presented by Father Sainz, for Arithmetic, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios, and for Home Work, a Book, "Monsters of the Deep," presented by Mr. Kwok Acheong; G. Ranciman, for Reading, a Penknife, presented by Dr. Stewart; T. Musso, for Reading, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios; G. Thomas, for Orthography, a Book, "Life Among the Indians," presented by Dr. Stewart; James Grimes, for Writing, a Book, "Life Among the Indians," presented by the Brothers; G. Gutierez, for Writing, a Book, "Tales of Kings and Queens," presented by the Director; W. Rosc, for General Improvement, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios.

1st Class, 2nd Division.-A. Castro, for Mental Arithmetic, a Silver Medal, presented by Mr. Sharp; M. Souza, for Geography and Writing, a Silver Medal, presented by Mr. Coxon (Consul for Belgium); M. Pereira, Arithmetic, "Webster's Dictionary," presented by Doctor Stewart; C. Castro, for Analysis and Parsing, Chamber's Dictionary of the English Language, presented by Deputy Inspector-General Breen.

2nd Class, 1st Division.-F. Braga, for General Improvement, a Gold Medal, presented by Mr. Plichon, Consul for France, and a prize for Chinese, by Dr. Eitel; H. Rozario, for Grammar, a Silver Medal, presented by Dr. Gomes; C. Osmund, for Composition, "Ogilvie's English Dictionary," presented by Mr. Justice Francis; B. Remedios, for Arithmetic, a Silver Medal, presented by Honourable J. Russell; F. Soares, for Grammar, "Webster's Dictionary," presented by Mr. Kwok Acheong; G. George, for Arithmetic, a Book, "Living Pages from many Ages," presented by Honourable P. Ryrie, and Longfellow's Prose Works," for Orthography, presented by Mr. Fleming; P. Assis, for Religious Instruction, a Book, "History of America," presented by Rev. Father Borghignoli, and "The Sea and its Wonders," presented by Mr. Loureiro, Consul for Portugal; C. Ozorio, for Geography, a Pen Case, presented by Mr. Noronha; J. Braga, for Geography, an Ink- stand, presented by the Italian Consul; F. Britto, for Good Conduct, a Book, "Cruise of the Frolic," presented by Honour- able P. Ryrie.

2nd Class, 2nd Division.-G. da Costa, for Arithmetic, a Pencil and Kaleidoscope, presented by Mr. Noronha; A. Ribeiro, for Arithmetic, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios; A. Adams, for English, a Gold Medal, presented by H. E. the Governor.

3rd Class, 1st Division.-F. Jesus, for English, a Book, "Parlour Menaregie," presented by Mr. Justice Francis; P. Souza, for Arithmetic, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios; C. Barradas, for Arithmetic, a Book, "Tales of the Sea," presented by Mr. George; F. d'Almada, for Grammar, a Book, "Little Folks Holiday Album," presented by Portu- guese Consul, and for Dictation, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by the Director; J. Prestage, for Reading, a Book, "The Manners and Customs of the World," presented by Mr. George; J. Brandão, for Good Conduct, a Book, "Stories for the Household," presented by Honourable P. Kyrie; J. Mesny, for General Improvement, a Silver Medal, presented by Mr. New- ton; A. Barradas, for Christian Doctrine, a Gold Pen, presented by Mr. Belilios; C. Carvalho, for Mental Arithmetic, a Book, "Three Years at Wolverhampton," presented by the Italian Consul; E. Sequeira, for Writing, an Inkstand, presented by the Honourable J. Russell; A. da Costa, for Regular Attendance, a Book, "Nuge Syrico," presented by the Italian Con- sul; B. Braga, for Parsing, a Dictionary, presented by Rev. Father Sainz, Spanish Procuration; J. Leon, for Home-tasks, a Book, presented by Mr. A. G. Romano, Consul for Brazil.

5th Class.-E. Adams, for Reading, a Dictionary, presented by the Brothers; H. Campos, for Arithmetic, a Dictionary, presented by the Brothers; J. Remedios, for Writing, a Colour Box, presented by Mr. Belilios; W. Foley, for Reading, a Pen- knife, presented by Mr. Noronha; M. Barradas, for Arithmetic, a Dictionary, presented by Father Sainz; L. Rozario, for Writing, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios; M. Danenberg, for Orthography, a Colour Box, presented by Mr. Belilios; L. Rose, for Orthography, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios; G. Tavares, for Arithmetic, an English and French Dictionary, presented by the Brothers; L. Assis, for General Improvement, a Dictionary; P. Gomes, for Good Conduct and Application, a Book, "Life among the Indians," presented by Honourable J. Russell; F. Sequeira, for Reading, a Book, "Narratives and Dialogues," presented by Dr. Stewart.

6th Class.-C. Gutierrez, for Writing, a Colour Box, presented by Mr. Belilios; S. Figueiredo, for Spelling, a Book, "Columbus and Laperouse," presented by the Brothers; D. da Costa, for Arithmetic, a Book, "Catholic Legions"; I. Placido, for Reading, "Story of Christian Heroism"; L. Brass, for Religious Intruction, "Tales of Enterprises"; V. Musso, for Good Conduct, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios; B. Passo, for Reading, a Gold Pencil Case, presented by Mr. Belilios.

Chinese Class.-Leung Ah Mong, for General Improvement, "Worcester's Dictionary," an Ornamental Inkstand, a draw- ing Box, presented by the Honourable Ng Choy; Luy Chin Un, for Translation, a Drawing Box and a Box of Colours, presented by the Rev. Brother Leo; Hing Shang, for English Composition, a Book, "Pictures from Bible Lands," presented by Mr. A. G. Romano, the Brazilian Consul; Lam Shing Man, for English, a Silver Medal, presented by Ilis Lordship the Bishop; Leung Aut, a Drawing Box, for English, presented by Brother Idinaelis, Visitor to the Christian Schools; Tao Ah Sing, a Silver Medal, for Arithmetic, presented by His Lordship; Kan Shang, for English, a Book, "Stories of Animal Sa- gacity," presented by Kwok Acheong; Wong Wing Kwong, a Chinese and English Dictionary, for Arithmetic, presented by Mr. Noronha; He Kam Un, a Chinese and English Dictionary, presented by Doctor Eitel; Ng Au, a Chinese and English Dictionary, for Arithmetic, presented by Mr. Noronha; Leung Chin Im, Silver Watch, presented by the Opium Farmer, for English; Acheung, a Silver Pencil Case, presented by the Opium Farmer, for Arithmetic; A Ngo, a Silver Pencil Case, presented by the Opium Farmer, for English; Wong Wing Kee, a Knife, presented by the Opium Farmer, for Arithmetic; A Foon, a Silver Pencil Case, presented by the Opium Farmer, for English; Tso Aching, a Book, "Parlour Menagerie,' presented by the Opium Farmer, for Arithmetic; Ng Hing Shan, "Parlour Menagerie," and a Watch, presented by the Opium Farmer, for English; Leung Aut, "Parlour Menagerie," presented by the Opium Farmer, for Arithmetic; Lam Shang Nan, "Parlour Menagerie," presented by the Opiumn Farmer, for English; Fung Tin Sck, a Penknife, presented by the Opinn Farmer, for English; Ma Wan Nok, a Penknife, presented by the Opium Farmer, for Good Conduct.

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His EXCELLENCY then said-My lord, ladies and gentlemen,-I have now discharged the pleasing task of distributing the prizes which the pupils have obtained upon the examination of Dr. EITEL, the Government Inspector of Schools. I need hardly say that no one in this Colony is better qualified than Dr. ETTEL to test the proficiency of scholars. It affords me peculiar gratification to be present here to-day to take part with all of you in seeing the result of the instruction given by the Christain

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Brothers. As his Lordship has said, it is the first time that this school has come under our Govern- ment grant-in-aid system, although that system was established in 1873. The difficulties to which his Lordship referred have been happily surmounted, and Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, in the decision he gave, has caused universal satisfaction throughout the Colony to the School managers and the parents of the pupils. It is true his predecessor, Lord CARNARVON, addressed to me a despatch desiring me to ask the Bishop how it came to pass that in this Colony the Roman Catholic schools were not accepting any aid from the Government. Accordingly, a letter was addressed to the Bishop conveying the instructions I had received from Lord CARNARVON. The Bishop, in answering, went minutely into the objections that he and other managers of schools took to the grant-in-aid scheme, for it did so happen that he did not stand alone in the objection that he raised to it. At the very same time that his Lordship objected to the scheme as it then stood, the head of the Berlin Mission, Pastor KLITZKE, his sucessor during his absence, Pastor Louis, and our late Colonial Chaplain, Mr. KIDD, also came to me and stated their objections to the scheme. Those objections were reduced to writing and duly transmitted by me to Her Majesty's Government. They turned mainly on one point, that the scheme insisted that certain books to be used in the schools should be secular books, and that four hours a day should be given to purely secular instruction. They said-" Let us teach our schools as we ourselves "and the parents of the children think best, teaching according to the standards fixed upon by the "Government; let the Government select the subjects, let Government select its own Inspectors and "Examiners and give the grant-in-aid according to the result of their inspection and examination, "but do not tie us down to any specified class of books or four hours of secular teaching." Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH considered these objections, and of the ten points raised by the Bishop, he instructed me to grant seven, the other three being points of a different character, one of thein relating to the two hundred attendances. I shall convey to the Secretary of State the cordial acknowledgments which the Bishop has made publicly to-day to Her Majesty's Government for what Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH has done. I shall also not fail to consider most carefully the Bishop's observations with respect to the two hundred attendances. It is a fact that at Singapore there is a different rule, and indeed the rule in England also on that subject is different. It is also, perhaps, a reasonable statement to make, that whilst it may be perfectly fair to expect two hundred attendances from a Chinese boy, to expect the same from a European boy in this climate may not be equally fair. However, I shall

consider that question.

The school we are now assembled in is therefore enjoying a grant-in-aid, and the question arises, what does the Government get from this school, what advantage will Her Majesty's Government derive from the grant-in-aid given in this and similar institutions? I admit at once it is the duty of the State to assist education, but I think it is especially our duty in this Colony to assist in giving a sound English education. It was therefore satisfactory to see that the young gentleman who read out the list of prizes so clearly, got a first prize. His correct enunciation showed how well he deserves it. Dr. EITEL has reported that, as far as English speaking goes, of all the schools he has been examining he regards this as the best; in arithmetic, he reports highly of his examination, and also in the art of handwriting. In other words, the English speaking, the writing, and the arithmetic in this school show a sound basis for our mercantile requirements. The Inspector has also reported that the results of the teaching in Algebra and Geometry are excellent. But there is one defect to which I venture, as I have received a report on the subject officially, to call the attention of the teachers, and that is in English Composition. Now, it arises, I believe, not so much from the fault of the teachers as from the fact that the pupils are mostly young gentlemen of the Portuguese race. I observe my friend Mr. LOUREIRO, the Portuguese Consul, here. He sees a majority of apparently Portuguese youth in this school; but I claim them from him as British subjects, because, although they are of the Portuguese race they have been born in the Colony, and therefore it is only their fathers or grandfathers he has charge of; I have official charge of these young gentlemen. In the address, which my young friend ALMADA read, I have been invited to give the scholars advice. Acting on that invitation, I therefore recommend that they should endeavour of all things to improve their English Composition. We all know what admirable clerks the young Portuguese make; we know how accurately they keep their accounts, how clear is their handwriting; and we know their other good points,--fidelity, punctuality, and the courtesy that arises from a natural disposition to please; but they are defective in English Composition, and it is a most important thing in this Colony that they should pay attention to it, and that, in this respect, they should show they are equal to any other youths in Hongkong. I would therefore advise them to establish some organisation or society among themselves where they might read little essays in English and discuss them, and also to endeavour to form a library of English authors, not so much of instructive as of entertaining books; by reading these books and writing essays they might gain the skill they require in English Composition. I am sure in giving that advice, from what I have seen of the prizes to-day I am only doing what the donors of the prizes would like. by Dr. STEWART, the Head Master of the Central School, and all the prizes he has given are prizes I find among the prizes some contributed pointing in that direction,--to the teaching and studying of English.

Owing to the munificence of my generous friend, Mr. BELILIOS, there is established in this Colony now a series of scholarships. The Honourable Mr. RYRIE, Dr. EITEL, and the Governor of the Colony are the trustees of the BELILIOS Scholarships. Some of these will be devoted to giving medical instruc- tion to Chinese, which I hope to see accomplished by means of the native physicians at the Tung Wah

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Hospital, in combination with a teacher of Western medical science. Some of the scholarships go to the Central School, and some to this school. I advise the pupils who may compete for the BELILIOS scholarships, to endeavour to work beyond the sixth standard, to remain a little longer at school, and to give their attention in the direction I have been pointing, namely, to English Composition and English Literature. If we have a number of pupils here who understand English thoroughly, these young men, growing up as British subjects, will certainly be as much entitled as any persons in this community to take a part in our public affairs and to attain to any position as mercantile men, or as officials, that any citizen of Hongkong can aspire to.

I

Of course, you are all aware that the number of British subjects in this Colony is now limited to those who have been born under the British flag. This Colony, unlike other Colonies of Her Majesty's empire, has no Naturalisation Ordinance, but it has been represented to me by some of the fathers of these boys, that is, by some of the leading Portuguese, and by others in Hongkong, that it would be desirable to have a Naturalisation Ordinance. Their views have been laid by me before Her Majesty's Government, and, in a few months, perhaps, I shall be able to say whether or not it will be possible for them to become naturalised British subjects. It was, indeed, in this school, two years ago, adverted first to the idea of reviving our Volunteer movement, and I now see present a good many gentlemen connected with that movement, one of them, an English gentleman, Mr. Justice FRANCIS, who has always been interested in this school, and who was recommended to me for a Captain's Com- mission by the suffrages of his brother Volunteers. No doubt, there are some here who cannot yet. take part in the movement, whatever interest they may feel in the Colony, because they are not British subjects, but I am sure they share with their children and friends loyalty to the Crown.

I congratulate the Christian Brothers on the success of this their first examination under the grant-in-aid scheme. With the exception of what I have mentioned about English Composition, the report of the Examiner has been most satisfactory. I have no doubt that, next year, when I may have the pleasure of distributing prizes here, I shall be able to notice an improvement in that important branch of education.

This is now, I think, the third or fourth time within the last two or three months that it has fallen to my lot to say a few words at schools or in connection with schools in this Colony. Not long since an honourable friend of mine who is present (the Honourable P. RYRIE), Dr. EITEL, myself, and others, assembled at St. Paul's College to assist in inaugurating a high class Church of England and Protestant school, which will be principally for European boys. That school, I am happy to say, has been well opened, and it will prove, I believe, a success. Last week I had the satisfaction of presiding at the distribution of prizes at the Central School; and it was only a day or two ago that, accompanied by my friend Dr. EITEL, I met twenty-six teachers of our other Government schools, when prizes were given to the children of twenty-nine schools, and rewards to the most efficient teachers. On that occasion I found the interesting fact, that in one native school where the Government allowed it to be optional whether the boys should learn English or Chinese, they all being Chinese, out of about sixty- one attending the school, it ultimately turned out that, in the cases of sixty, the parents elected that the boys should learn nothing but English. They thought that, as far as Chinese went, their children would learn enough of it at home, and they felt the great object of sending their boys to a Government school was to have them learn English. I had much pleasure in examining some of those boys. I found them able to speak English pretty well; they were evidently making steady progress. Therefore, ladies and gentlemen, the state of education in the Colony is briefly this, that Her Majesty's Government have sanctioned a modification of the grant-in-aid scheme, under which all classes and all denominations can now obtain the benefit of it. All classes have now come under it. The chief education difficulty that I found existing here on my arrival has been set at rest by Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH's wise decision. What seemed to me to be another grave defect in the Government scheine of public instruc- tion in Hongkong-too much Chinese teaching and too little English teaching--is being gradually removed. I believe the scheme as it is now worked is a popular and useful scheme, and will, in time to come, give a sound English education to the youth of this Colony.--(Applause.)

Another address, thanking His Excellency and the visitors for the interest they evinced in the school, was then read by Master G. JORGE.

Mr. BELILIOS then said-Your Excellency and your Lordship,-I am highly gratified, and I feel greatly obliged to you, for the encomiums you have thought fit to bestow upon me, but I think I Scarcely deserve or merit them, as in my belief I have done nothing more than what any citizen is in duty bound to do for his fellow-inhabitants. I can only hope that men of means and capacious hearts will come forward to back up the little beginning I have made, by helping to augment my little contri- bution, and thus create material support for the advancement of learning in the Colony. (Applause.) Ladies and gentlemen, when I came here to-day, I hardly expected that I should be called upon to address you on the subject now before us. The praise lavished on me has compelled me to speak, and I cannot allow this opportunity to pass without stating a few facts connected with the advantages this institution has conferred on the community. I landed in the island in the year 1862. The firm with whom I stayed for a short time had preceded me by a few months. On their way to China they were told there was a dearth of clerks here, and they therefore thought it prudent to bring along a Portuguese

assistant with them from Singapore. This gentleman left the house after the lapse of a few months, thus constraining the firm in question to again import another young man from Penang. When Í commenced business operations on my own account, I engaged a Portuguese clerk at $75 per month. This young man was a copyist, a mere drawer of figures and letters. He was more a nuisance than a help to me. In the busiest of times, whenever it was found necessary to put a few words of English together, he would come to me and ask me to draft them out for him. He did nothing but copy and some landing and shipping for me. Of course the older hotises had their staff of Englishmen from Oxford and Cambridge, drawing large salaries, but the minor ones had to content themselves by having an hour or two of attendance from two old gentlemen, who made a living by going about distributing the leisure hours at their disposal on several small houses here. Times have altered now, and com- petent young men may be found, who are prepared to occupy berths at small salaries; consequently almost every merchant's establishment and every store can boast of a clerk. I have a staff of Portuguese clerks, and I am very much pleased with them. They are steady, attentive, and painstaking, and I suppose I cannot replace them by a set of better men. To whom is all this due? I maintain it is owing to the exertions of the Christian Brothers and to the existence of the St. Joseph's College. The older firms are commencing to employ them, and they are finding situations in banks. I have no doubt that the time is not far distant when it will be found necessary to employ them generally. In lauding this place of learning, I do not mean to detract one single iota from the importance of the sister institution, the Central. On the contrary, I contend that if this has done much, the other is destined to do still more for the island. This school deals with a section of the community, whilst the other deals with the mass of the population. I dare say the time will come when a staff of Portuguese clerks and a European at their head, and, later on, a staff of Chinese clerks and a Portuguese at their head, will be capable of conducting large business establishments satisfactorily. When commerce and trade fail to afford large profits, it becomes imperative to retrench expenditure. In the principal cities of India, if you were to walk into large establishments you will see nothing but swarthy faces and turbaned heads hard at work, with perhaps one Englishman or one Eurasian to direct them. On inquiry as to salaries, you will be told that they range in rupees between the equivalents of ten to a hundred dollars. Education has done this for India, and education is certain to do the same for China. Men of business in future will have to be grateful to the managers of these two institutions for the benefits they will then enjoy.(Applause).

The National Anthem was then played, and the proceedings terminated.

[No. 21.]

V.-RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Inspectorate of Schools, HONGKONG, 25th February, 1880.

SIR, I have the honour to forward under this enclosure the annual table showing the results of the examinations I conducted under the Grant-in-aid system.

Apart from the, Government Schools and Government Aided Schools, 29 in number, the total number of Schools examined by me under the provisions of the Grant-in-aid Schedule last year amounted to 19, as against 17 in 1878 and 14 in 1877. The total number of children presented for examination amounted to 755, as against 557 in 1878 and 459 in 1877. In one School some boys were, for the first time, examined in the subjects of a higher class of education, as provided for by Rule No. 22 of the Schedule. The passes in the whole of the subjects included in the Schedule amounted to 86 per cent., as against 95 per cent. in 1878 and 86 per cent. in 1877. The reason of this decrease in the percentage of passes, as compared with the previous year, does not lie in any decrease in the effectiveness of the teaching given in 1879, but is to be found in the fact that, at the last examination, I increased the strictness of the test applied in Schools under Class I, allowing only one mistake where two mistakes were allowed formerly. In the case of one School a cumulative reduction of five per cent. on the whole earnings had to be made under Rule No. 3 of the Grant-in-aid Schedule. In the case of another School, opened on 1st March, 1879, payment has been calculated pro rata, this being the condition under which the School was accepted by the Government. As regards St. JOSEPH'S College, I have to state that the figures in the enclosed table refer only to the results of the examination of those boys who, from 1st January, 1879, up to the day of examination, 29th January, 1880, had completed the 200 attendances required by the Schedule, but that I have kept a Memorandum regarding the results of the examination of those boys whose attendance was insufficient, which Memorandum can hereafter be referred to, if required.

The sum total earned by the Grant-in-aid Schools amounts for last year to $6,124.54, as against $4,811.53 in 1878 and $3,752.90 in 1877. Out of this sum the grant earned by the Victoria School, amounting to 370.74, has already been paid under an advance warrant, leaving a balance still due of $5.753.80.

i

The actual amount payable under the revised Schedule for passes in extra subjects under Rule No. 22 of the Schedule is at present under consideration, but I have meanwhile calculated the amount at the rate of $2 for an extra pass in each extra subject of Standard VI of Schools in Class IV, as fixed by the Schedule in Rule No. 22.

The amount total provided for Grants-in-aid in the Estimates for 1880 is $6,000. Of this sum we have already spent $230 iu gratuities for those Masters of Government Schools whose schools were classed respectively as "very good", and as "good." There will therefore be an excess of $354.54 over the sum estimated, in explanation of which I have but to refer to the fact that several schools were accepted under the Grant-in-aid Scheme after the Estimates for 1880 had been prepared.

I did not employ an Assistant Examiner, but as regards the classification of the merits of the needlework in Girls' Schools, the following Ladies kindly undertook to act as Judges, viz., Mrs. BURDON, Lady SMALE, Mrs. CHALMERS Miss S. J. ANDERSON, M.D., Mrs. VIRGINIA A. R. DO ROZARIO, Miss SCHROEDER and Miss JOHNSTONE.

As there has been considerable delay in the preparation of this complicated account, in consequence of circumstances over which I had no control, I beg to recommend that an advance warrant for the sum of $5,753.80 be issued at once, so that the Managers may, without delay, receive the sums which their schools have earned in the past year.

I reserve all comments regarding the educational results of the year 1879, as disclosed by these examinations, for my general report.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

E. J. EITEL. Inspector of Schools,

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.]

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS IN 1879.

No. of Scholars who Passed.

No. of Scholars who Failed.

Sums to which the School is entitled,

Needle Work.

Total Passed.

ance during School

Average Daily Attend-

Year.

Total Failed.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Extra Subjects.

Very

Good.

Good.

Fair.

Average Daily At-

tendance.

Assistant Examiner's Fee.

To Teacher.

To Manager.

Grant-in-Aid.

Total

Grant.

REMARKS,

1. Baxter Girls' School, D'Aguilar Street,.

I

13 1 6 2

2

2. Baxter Girls' School, Hollywood Road,

I

179 7

1

3. Baxter Girls' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,..

I

30

8874

4. Bishop Burdon's Boys' School,D'Aguilar Street,

I

41 15

9

11

4

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

...

:

...

5. C. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, St. Stephen's,...] I 6. C. M. S. Boys' School, Queen's Road,.

35 6 11 5

1

1

:

:

...

I

16 6

8...

1

1

6

3

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

...

:

...

...

...

:

:

7. C. M. S. Boys' School, Sai-ying-p'ún,

I

39 14 8

8

3

...

8. C. M. S. Boys' School, St. Stephen's Church,..

I

68 16 27 16

2

1

:

3

***

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

9. L. M. S. Boys' School, Tank Lane,..

I

49

5 15 10 7

4

2

...

***

10. L. M. S. Boys' School, Wán-tsai,..

I

46 13

13

7

ས་

4

:

A

11. L. M. S. Boys' School, Yau-má-ti,

I

23

2

11

1

3

3

...

1

...

:

2

12, L. M. S. Baxter Girls' School, Staunton Street, I

55 11 12

10

11

2

7

1

13. L. M. S. Girls' School, T'ái-p‘ing-shán,

I

31 10 5

8

2

2

3

1

:

...

...

14. L. M. S. Girls' School, Wán-tsai,.

I

23 7 6

5

1

1

2

...

...

:

:

...

15, Basel Mission Boys' School,..

III

15 35

2... | ...

3

...

1

1

1

...

:

16. Basel Mission Girls' School,

17. Diocesan Home & Orphanage, (Boys & Girls), IV

13. St. Joseph's College, (Boys), .

19. Victoria School, (Boys & Girls),.

III

51 9 11 9 7 3 4

:

1

1

4

2 2

25 5 3 3

IV 148 10

2

4

1

1

2

:

:

:

:

55 36 17

3

6

4

6

1

1

3

IV

30

2

Է-

7

7

4

4

2

:

:

***

:

:

...

:

Luspectorate of Schools, Hongkong, 25th February, 1880.

1

I

1

2

2

1

2

43

6

58.39 25

1

5

37

9

49.73 65

17

6

30.10 10

1

46

9

64.47 55

27

4

31.82 50

...

20

3

29.15 35

11

2

16.66

69.10

5

14

18

17

20.36 45

42

7

:.

2

27

3

34.67 40

48

49

32

:

...

...

1

39

2

47.14 75

54

77

32

:

***

:

1

1

24 11

43.03 30

66

35

8

10

:

14 2

23.67 25

40

...

:

62

33 23

6

54.92 70

48

56 24

...

:

:

6 |111.75 80 | 162 | 112

16

10

...

2 2 2 2 2 9

70

299

66 36 20.

49! 32

7

70

20

88 18

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

56

35

16 18

#

:

28

30

లు

527.50

$

**

:

...

...

16.66

20.36

34.67

47.14

$

$

$

$

29.41 88.25

117.66

:

36.84 110.25 | 147.36

65.79 197.38

71.28213.86

263.17

285.14

...

:

1628.50

9

43.03

61.38 184.15

245.53

Cumulative reduction of

...

5 per cent.

19.67

54.92

21.17) 63.50

84.67 Payment.

pro rata.

63.23 189.69

252.92

...

...

90

:

:

:

...

R

116,79 350.37

467.16

...

78

84

...

58.39

49.73

30.10

88.85 266.54

355.39

...

68.43 205.30

273.73

32.77 98.33

131.10

:

72

71

24 8 64.47

118.37 355.10

473.47

...

30

46

36

..

3

15

12

1

31.82

65.20.195.62

260.82

:

40 3

1

29.15

49.03 147.12

196.15

10

5

20

31.29 18

35

16

31.29

25.0775.22

100.29

...

43

00

8

50.53 54

77 72

18

7

30.82 30

24

30

22 285

63

30 48

64 24

3

50.53

121.38 364.15

485.53

24

56

16

8

3

2

30.82

55.95 167.87

223.82

127 13 171,89] 60 |440|360 204| 42 | 96

16

171.89

|647.47 1,042.42 | 1,389.80

28

2

38.74 12

56

70

48

56

6-1

22

1

38.74

92.68 287.06

370.74

:

(Paid in

January.

...

TOTAL GRANT,

.$ | 6,124.54

Less paid in January..

370,74

5,753.80

E. J. EITEL, Inspector of Schools.

'

No. 127.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following Return is published for general information.

By Command,

FREDERICK Stewart,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 25th May, 1880.

RETURN of the NUMBER of CASEs tried and ACTIONS commenced in the Supreme and Vice-Admiralty Courts of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1879.

A

Court.

Supreme Court:-

Number of Cases and Discharges in Bankruptcy, and Probates and Letters of Admi- nistration

granted.

Cases tried in 1879.

Judgment.

Total.

Amount of Debt

and Damages

Struck out

claimed.

Plaintiff.

Defendant. Nonsuit.

or

Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Settled.

Summary Jurisdiction,

758

Original Jurisdiction,.

7

$93,138.62 58,873.84

574

76

15

93

$61,370.03

4

1

2

Chancery,

D

Bankruptcy,

1

Probate,

65

*****

******

Appeals,.

...

Vice-Admiralty Court,..

5

...

13,715.97

3

13,715.97

Actions commenced in 1879.

Num-

Amount of Debt

Court.

ber of

and Damages

Cases.

claimed.

Settled without Trial.

Supreme Court:-

Summary Jurisdiction, 1,246

Original Jurisdiction,-

$162,067.74

56

536,743.24

477 17

574 10

76

15 1

93

2

Judgment.

Plaintiff. Defendant. Nousuit. Struck out.

Remaining in Depend-

ence.

· Total.

Cases. Debt & Damages.

$61,370.03 96,683.34

11 26

Chancery,

...

...

Bankruptcy,

8

( Assets in Schedule, $41,868.76

Debts, Assets valued at.... 400,173,69)

493,895.17

...

8

Probate,

65

...

...

...

Appeals,

་་་

Vice-Admiralty Court,...

4

10,965.97

4

10,965.97

HENRY FREDERICK GIBBONS,

Registrar.

CHARLES BUShe Plunket,

Registrar, Vice-Admiralty Court.

No. 129.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following Report from the Superintendent of the Botanical Gardens and Plantations is published for general information.

By Command,

}

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 25th May, 1880.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

REPORT ON THE GOVERNMENT GARDENS AND PLANTATIONS.

BOTANIC GARDENS, 15th April, 1880.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my Report on the Botanic Gardens and Tree Planting Department.

2. Thinking that it would be interesting to know the number of visitors to the Gardens, I had all who entered on two days in March, 1879, counted, and the result was as follows:-

First day, Second day, ...........................

.............1,339

Chinese. 635

Others.

190 826

Total.

825 2,165

Rain fell during the greater part of the first day, which accounts for the smaller numbers, but which shows that even then the Gardens were a source of much pleasure. The result of the second day's counting represents about the number of visitors usually frequenting the Gardens in fine weather.

3. The general appearance of the Gardens has been decidedly in advance of previous years. This was owing considerably to the weather, the rains during the past summer having been unusually re- gular, and no heavy downpours having occurred to damage the walks and beds. Besides, the work- men are becoming better trained to their work and appear to take much more interest in it, although it requires an immense lot of careful and constant direction to keep them working up to the standard which I am anxiously desirous they should reach. The boys, nominally called apprentices, but only being so in the sense that they are employed at the age that apprentices are taken, and that they are carefully instructed in garden operations, are giving great satisfaction.

4. The collection of Cacti which has been made and is now very fairly represented, continues to thrive well. All the plants of the orders Amaryllideœ and Liliacea, consisting of Agaves, Yuccas, &c., which were growing amongst the Cacti, have been carefully transplanted and formed in two collections, keeping the two orders distinct.

5. On the sides of the walk next to the Fountain Terrace the trees of Grevillea robusta, the Australian "Silky Oak," have made excellent progress and now form a very effective avenue.

The trees were planted when they were one year old,-in 1876-and they are now about thirty feet high.

6. Near the Fernery in the Old Garden a collection of Orchids indigenous to Hongkong has been made.

7. Many of the more beautiful and interesting plants of this Colony have been introduced to the Gardens and I am now continuing this work. The beautiful and rare Rhododendron Championi has been propagated and introduced to cultivation during the past year. Most of the species of Hongkong Oaks are now well established in the Gardens. The Hollies, of which there are 6 indigenous species, are being introduced.

8. The collection of Coniferous trees in the New Garden has been partly rearranged this year. For want of more space the number of these plants cannot be increased much farther.

9. As with the Conifers so also the Palms have quite filled the ground which was set apart for this family, and, excepting very dwarf kinds, no more can be planted in the New Garden, but as Palms are so interesting and beautiful, and such general favourites, it would be desirable to find other places for new introductions.

10. The Fernery in Glenealey Ravine in the New Garden, which was made about five years since, has succeeded admirably. During the past year nearly all of the Ferns were labelled, but I much regret that it has been found almost impossible to keep the labels in their places, they are either fre- quently removed and misplaced or taken away entirely. The walk through this Fernery being such a public thoroughfare between the Robinson and Caine Roads, it will, I think, be better to make the Fernery in the Old Garden, the one for the labelled Ferns.

11. The glass-roofed Fern and Orchid house, which has done good service, is in a very decayed condition, the material, wood of which it is constructed, is quite unfit in a climate like this where white ants, in combination with the moisture which is requisite for the cultivation of plants, work such ruin. This house is undergoing repairs sufficient to keep it standing for a little time, but if the Government could see fit to sanction the erection of a more ornamental house in a better situation in the Garden, it would, I am sure, be much appreciated by the public.

12. By His Excellency the Governor's instructions I designed and had constructed a Fence of iron set in granite on the verge of the precipitous banks near the Palmery, and on the side of the walk leading from Glenealy Ravine to the monkies' house. Before this was erected it was extremely dangerous to children walking near those places.

+

13. The Garden Rules and Regulations on the notice boards at the entrances, which were formerly lettered in English only, have been translated, in the Chinese Secretary's Department, and lettered. in Chinese also. In consequence, the Chinese visitors who are not acquainted with English now give next to no trouble.

14. The following is a list of plants which have flowered for the first time in these Gardens:-

Abutilon Thompsoni.

Agave ixthioides, Hook.

Aloe scaberosa.

Aristolochia cymbifera, Mart.

"

indica.

"

hians, Willd.

barbata, Cham.

Arundo donax, Linn. Aucuba japonica, Koem. Arundina bambusifolia.

Buddleia madagascariensis, Lam. Beaumontia grandiflora, Wall. Bixa orellana, Linn.

Callicarpa integerrima, Champ.

tomentosa, Willd.

Cassia florida, Vall.

Cereus grandiflorus, Mill. triangularis, Haw. pugiuiformis, Lem.

Clematis Meveniana, Walp. Coccocypselum discolor. Combretuin purpureum, Vahl. Cryptocarya glaucescens, Br. Cypripedium Lowii.

niveum.

Cestrum nocturnum, Murr. Corydalis suaveolens, Hance. Dracaena mauritana, Lam.

Dysoxylon Muellerii, Beath.

Echeveria atropurpurea.

Euphorbia fulgens, Karn.

Euchlaena luxurians, Dur.

Franciscea confertiflora, Pohl.

Franciscca eximia, Scheidw.

Gesnera exoniensis.

Grevillea robusta, Cunn.

Hedychium Gardnerianun, Wall.

Higginsia gheisbregtii, Lindl.

Hastingen coccinea.

Jacaranda mimosifolia, Don. Lithospermum Zollingeri, A. DC. Macadamia ternifolia, F. Muell. Melalenca cajuputi.

Melodinus suaveolens, Champ.

"

monogynous, Roxb.

Muhlenbeckia sp.

Millingtonia hortensis, Linn, fil. Nandina domestica.

Opuntia aurantiaca, Lindl.

"

""

frutescens.

Tuna, Mill.

Eccoclades falcata, Ldl.

Passiflora mutabilis.

Phyllocactus latifrons, Dyck.

Phalaenopsis Schilleriana..

Plerandra jatrophifolia, Hance.

Quercus Fabrii, Hance. Renanthera coccinea.

Sambucus attemnata.

Sanchezia nobilis variegata.

Stephanotis floribunda, Pet. Th.

Tetranthera citrifolia, Juss.

Vernonia solanifolia, Benth.

Vanda concolor, Blume.

Wahlenbergia grandiflora, Selraad.

Watsonia corymbosa.

$

15. Since my return from leave of absence in England, the labelling of plants in the Gardens has been proceeded with as fast as circumstances permitted.

16. Interchanges of plants and seeds have been actively carried on with various Gardens and correspondents in British Colonies, England and other countries.

17. The number of Plants sent out was 3,687, and of packets of Seeds 295 to 48 recipients, included in 68 consignments.

18. The contributions were 903 Plants and 233 packets of Seeds from 31 different sources; of these the principal were:--

AH HEEP, Compradore Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE;

Chinese Fibres.

ALDERTON, Captn.; choice ornamental Japanese plants

and seeds of Pinus Massoniana.

BERNAYS, L. A., Vice-President, Queensland Acclimatisa-

tion Society; three Wardian cases of orchids, palms, ferns, and various plants; and three consignments of seeds, including a large quantity of Eucalyptus citrio- dora.

BRAND, E., Shanghai, Geraniums.

CARROLL, J. D., Kobe, Japan; Japanese plants.

COOTE, H. E., Vice-Admiral, R., C.B.; Marattia sp. from

Perak.

CHOW CHEE BEE; Chrysanthemums.

COCK, JULES DE, Ghent, Belgium; collection of seeds of

annuals.

CRAWFORD, D. R.; Geraniums from Shanghai. DEARE, Major; Manila orchids.

FRAMJEE ARGANEE; plants of Jasmine.

GERLACH, Dr.; Coleus, Crotons, Pandanus, and various

plants from Duke of York's Island.

HAAGE AND SMIDTT, Messrs., Erfurt; plants of Epiphyl-

lum, and Cereus, seeds of Solanum, &c. HENNESSY, Lady POPE; Japanese Conifers, Rhododen-

drons, and Azaleas.

HANCE, Dr. H. F., Canton; seeds Wilkstræmia, Zingiber,

Cycas, Ailanthus glandulosa.

HOOKER, Sir J.D., Royal Gardens, Kew; four consignments of seeds, including Euchlaena luxurians, Papaya microcarpa, Cytisus proliferous, palms and various other kinds.

HILL, WALTER, Brisbane Botanic Gardens; seven Wardian cases containing fine plants of Acrostichum grande, A. alcicorne, Dendrobium Hillii, ferns, palms, and various useful and ornamental plants, and seeds of Eucalyptus citriodora, fodder grasses, &c. HELLAND, ADOLPH, Foochow; bamboos "mow chuk." HUMPHREYS, J. D.; seeds of trees, shrubs and annuals. JOHNSON, Captn.; orchids.

KURODA, His Excellency, Japan; Japanese Conifers and

Azaleas.

MATSUGATA, His Excellency, Minister of the Interior,

Japan; Valuable Japanese plants.

MARIES, CHARLES; collection, Japanese plants and seeds. MURTON, H. J., Singapore Botanic Gardens; two Wardian

cases, Garcinia Hamburyii, Willughbeia murtabanica, Bolbophyllum Beccari, and valuable palms, ferns, and other plants and seeds.

PASEDAG, J., Amoy; case of ornamental plants. POATE, T. P., Tokio; seeds, Hechima (Lufju œgyptiacn)

and roots "Wagaba.”

RAPP, F.; Begonias, Gloxinias and Acacias.. ROMANO, A. G.; Coleus and Geraniums.

SAMPSON, T., Canton; Cheilanthes mysurensis, Aneilema Loureiri, seeds Liquidambar formosana, Glyptostrobus heterophylla. -

SMITH, A. F., seeds, annnals.

SHARP, W. F., Sec., Municipal Council, IIankow; Adian-

tum capillus veneris.

TIFFEN, H. S., New Zealand; ferns and N. Z. shrubs. VIDAL, Señor Don SEBASTIAN, Manila Botanic Gardens ;

Wardian case, orchids.

19. Thanks are particularly due to Messrs. GIBB, LIVINGSTON & Co., the Agents of the E. A. R. M. S. S. Company, for their great kindness in conveying plants and seeds free of cost, to Messrs. SASSOON, JARDINE MATHESON & Co., DOUGLAS LAPRAIK & Co., and the CANTON STEAMBOAT COMPANY for like kind services; and also to the Captains and Officers of the many steamers for the care which has been bestowed on the various consignments.

}

20. Rhagodia hastata, the "salt bush" of Australia, which cattle and sheep feed upon during droughts has been introduced and planted on the hills for trial; it has grown vigourously during the past dry season, and will probably be useful in future for fodder, which is much required by cow keepers in the dry season.

21. Euchlaena Luxurians, a new fodder grass, was received from Kew Gardens, and grown last year. Under cultivation it grew very rapidly and reached a height of 15 fect, but plants which were planted on the hill-side and left to themselves only attained 5 feet high and were yellow and sickly. For our soil I think it is unsuited.

22. Another Shrub, indigenous to the Canaries and called "Tagasaste" (Cytisus proliferous) is said to be much liked by goats and cattle. Seeds of it have been received from Kew Gardens and plants raised from them have just been planted on the hills.

23. In consequence of the change announced by His Excellency the Governor in Council on November 6th, 1879, which restored the Botanical Department to independency and entirely discon- nected it from the Survey Departinent, the business of this Department has been much facilitated and increased in usefulness. The working of the Tree Planting Establishment with Chinese assistants only has given me much satisfaction.

24. With the contemplated extension of usefulness which is desired from these Gardens, similar to the work done by other Botanical Gardens, I shall endeavour to accomplish, with the aid that is always accorded to institutions of this kind, the work that is expected from us. I would take this opportunity of inviting the aid of all persons interested in Botanical work. Persons travelling, or located in different parts of China, frequently have opportunities of obtaining information on vegetable products, and of collecting plants and seeds, which I should be pleased to receive so as to make these Gardens the "head quarters of investigation, whether scientific or merely utilitarian, into Chinese vegetation" as suggested by Sir JOSEPH D. HOOKER.

25. As showing the good which Botanic Gardens may do for the different British dependencies as well as for their own respective colonies or countries, I extract the following remarks from Sir JOSEPH D. HOOKER'S Report for the year 1878 on the Royal Gardens, Kew:---

"Exchanges and correspondence are constantly maintained between Kew and the numerous Botanic Gardens which exist in Bristish dependencies. This constant intercommunication is, on the one hand, indispensable to the maintenance and prefection of the Kew Collections, on the other hand, it is of great advantage in facilitating the exchange from one garden to another of the vegetable products of different parts of the Empire. I am anxious, however, to see the Botanic Gardens establish to a greater extent than at present, a chain of independent interchanges, which would increase their own usefulness and enormously facilitate the work which is done at Kew. We have attempted, for example, to send plants to Fiji, but with but little success, on account of the great distance. Any particular plant could, however, be established in Ceylon with moderate difficulty, from thence it would be sent to Singapore and so on to Brisbane and Sydney, and finally to Fiji. At each successive stage, in case of a failure, the difficulty of renewing the attempt would be much smaller than if it were necessary to start afresh from Kew. I am the more led to make these remarks from having had my attention repeatedly drawn by applications made to Kew from residents in the colonies, to the fact that some of the most important functions of a colonial Botanic Garden are often apt to be lost sight of. Such institutions are obviously likely in most cases sooner or later to develop into the pleasure grounds of the towns and cities near which they are situated. But without disparaging their public usefulness in this respect, it is important that their primary function of promoting the botanical interests of their respective colonies should not be forgotten. That there is some risk of this happening, I can only assume from the constant applications made direct to Kew for information, seeds or plants which it is clearly the business of the Botanic Garden of the applicants' colony cither to supply or procure. This leads to another point. No colonial garden can discharge its functions efficiently if the superintendent does not occasionally make journeys with a view to discovering new and interesting plants for the purpose of interchange with other Establishments. But the demands made upon his time often prevent the superintendent attending to this part of his duty, which is so important in keeping up an imperial system of exchange, besides promoting the interest of the garden under his charge, and varying the monotony of a life of unintelligent routine. I am afraid that this is sometimes overlooked by the local governments and managers; one superintendent is tied by meteorological observations, another by growing vegetable for sale. In every case where some obstacle of this kind is allowed to override the legitimate freedom of action of the superintendent, I am convinced the interests of his establish- ment suffer in a variety of ways, and that the policy is a short-sighted one."

26. Dr. Gerlach very kindly allowed me to send a coolie, with his expedition up the North River, to collect plants for this establishment. Besides many plants which were valuable additions to our Gardens, the following new species were discovered:-

Aster Gerlachii, Hance.

Dolichadrone sp.

Senecio phalacrocarpus, Hance. Cheilanthes (Adiantopsis) Fordii, Baker.

Asplenium (Euasplenium) fuscipes, Baker. Polypodium (Niphobolus) calvatum, Baker.

(Phymatodes) cantoniense, Baker.

">

27. The collection of plants for the "hortus siccus," or herbarium, which I have made during the last nine years, has been rearranged and labelled according to Bentham's classification in the "Flora Hongkongensis," and placed in cabinets made for the purpose. A dried collection of the plants cultivated in the Gardens has been commenced; and another one of Chinese plants not indigenous to Hongkong. In this work, as well as in contributing living plants and information on Chinese vegetable productions, persons resident in different parts of China could render good services to botanical science by collecting and presenting dried specimens of plants in flower and fruit, which I would gladly receive and make use of.

28. When the Sweedish "Vega" Expedition was here on its way home, a collection of nearly 200 species of South Chinese dried plants was prepared here, and presented by His Excellency the Governor to Professor Nordenskiold for the Expedition.

29. Very valuable assistance has been rendered by the Royal Gardens, Kew; Dr. H.F. HANCE, F.L.S., H. B. M.'s Vice Consul at Whampoa; and Mr. THEO. SAMPSON of Canton in botanical work; by the two former in the identification of plants &c.; and by Mr. SAMPSON in the contribution of nearly 200 dried specimens of Chinese Plants which I have placed in the herbarium. Upwards of 60 dried speci- mens of plants have been sent to correspondents for botanical investigations.

ZOOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS.

30. The Aviaries and Monkies' house are in a very dilapidated state and require thorough repairs or rebuilding. The Monkies' house is in a very bad situation for the welfare of the monkies. In consc- quence of its shaded position sufficient sunlight cannot be obtained to keep the animals in good health. All of the buildings are made of wood and are being constantly destroyed by the monkies and birds biting and pulling them to picces. The most economical thing would be to re-erect the buildings of more durable material, if the Zoological collection is to be maintained in these Gardens. It would probably be better if a site could be obtained elsewhere for these things, and some more additions made to form a fairly good small collection of animals for the amusement and instruction of those people who are fond of such things.

31. The following were the contributors and their donations to this Department:--

EASTLACKE, F.; one Python. ELLIS, Captn.; two Wallabies. HANCOCK, W.; three Pythons.

QUINSEY, W.; one Cockatoo.

WHARRY, Dr.; two Kites.

WHITEHEAD, W. T.; one Siamess Honey Bear.

TREE CULTIVATION.

32. In this Establishment there is not much for me to report on as to what has been done, in consequence of the management of the tree-planting and plantations having been so short a time in my hands, since my last Report on the work was furnished. On the eve of my departure for England, in February, 1877, I submitted a Report, which was, however, not published, but it was a source of gratification to see that it bore good fruit, as the Surveyor General, the Honourable Mr. PRICE, who was acting for me during my absence, in compliance with His Excellency Governor Sir JonN POPE HENNESSY'S wishes, drew up a Report on an extended scheme of tree-planting and was able to make use of many of the statistics which my Report supplied. The management of the tree-planting remained in the hands of the Surveyor General, assisted by Mr. CERNEAU during most of the time, from February 1877, until December 1879, when it was restored to me. Therefore, for this period, I cannot do more than refer generally to what has been done, not being in possession of details and statistics.

.

33. In 1878, with the increased vote which was granted for tree-planting, it appears that many new large nurseries were made and a great number of seedlings of Pinus sinensis reared, about half of which were planted on the hills in 1879, and the other half, with the exception of those planted this year, remain in the nurseries until the time arrives for planting them also. The seedlings in the nurseries which have been prepared this year, since the management was restored to this Department, all look very promising.

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7

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}

Ľ

34. Although nurseries will always be necessary for rearing trees in for certain purposes, especially for trees of other kinds than Pinus sinensis, which I propose to introduce, now that the plan- tations of the latter are sufficiently large to afford the requisite shelter to other species requiring protection for a few years, still they will probably not be essential on so large a scale as was commenced

in 1878.

35. British Colonial Governments only introduce new cultures and then, when they are shown to be profitable, expect private individuals to pursue them. This may not unreasonably be applied now to some extent to the planting of this Island. There are a number of Chinese here who are anxious to do something in this way if the Government will give them the necessary encouragement. The rough out- line of the scheme would be that the planters should have certain districts allotted to them, that they should plant the ground with trees-certain portions of land to be allowed them for other cultures as vegetables, fruit trees, pine-apples, and possibly tea to a small extent, and that the planters should have the thinnings of the plantations for a certain number of years, say 10 or 15, at the expiration of which, the plantations, with a certain number of trees per acre in them, should be resumed by the Government. In the execution of this scheme proper rules would have to be drawn up and observed by both parties. A plan of this kind, I think is quite feasible.

36. To afford more variety to the Trees bordering streets and roads I planted in 1875 and 1876, trees of the following kinds which have succeeded :—

Castanospermum australe (Moreton Bay Chestnut).

Putranjiva Roxburghii (an Indian tree).

Pithecolobium pruinosuni.

Cedrela australis.

Erythrina sp.

Dryandra cordata.

Camphora officinarum (Camphor-tree).

Ailanthus glandulosa. Quercus Harlandi (Oak). Celtis sinensis. Sterculia nobilis.

Bauhinia purpurea.

Swietenia Mahogani (Mahogany-tree).

I hope now to continue the introductions of a further variety of trees as circumstances permit. During the last five or six years a very large number of trees chiefly the so-called "banian "Ficus retusa--have been sacrificed in the streets to make room for improvements and alterations in streets and building.

I have the honour to be,

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1

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0

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1

E

The Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent, Botanic Gardens and Plantations.

1

No. 131.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure in 1879 and 1880, is published for general information.

By Command,

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 29th May, 1880.

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT of REVENUE and EXPENDITURE in 1879 and 1880.

Receipts

Receipts Estimated

HEAD OF SERVICE.

April,

April.

1879.

1880.

for the

Year 1880.

Receipts Receipts 1st Jan., to 1st Jan., to Both April, 30th April,| 1879. 1880.

Increase. Decrease.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Payments Payments Estimated April, April, for the 1879. 1880. Year 1880.

Payments Payments 1st Jan., to1st Jan., to 30th April, 30th April, 1879. 1880.

Increase.

Deere ase.

$ c.

$

.0.

Land Revenue,

1,521.48

$

C. $ 7,849.86 | 155,500.00| 54,096.40| 56,264.27

C.

$

2,167.87

$

C.

$ ..

$ C.

$

$ ..

:

ESTABLISHMENTS,

EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISH-

41,761.08 43,068.58 | 532,382.00 | 160,271.87|166,460.86

$ C.

$

C.

c.

6,188,99

Rents exclusive of Lands,

4,753.15

Licences,

Stamps,

4,973.20 | 62,000.00 | 19,691.80 | 19,798.70 3,752.20 38,186.67 | 250,260.00| 70,656.66|| 83,568.55 12,911.89 9,193.08 9,916.62 115,000.00| 39,427.69 39,150.79

106.90

MENTS:—

The Governor,

...

Colonial Secretary,

15.00

199.50

199.50

Colonial Treasurer,

1.500.00

276.90

Surveyor General,

150.00

150.00

1,800.00

Postmaster General,.

447.55 19,700.61

62,600.00

594.67

3,324.28

600.00

24,977.23

5.33

21,652.95

Police, Lighting, Water & Fire) Brigade Rates, ......

S

Postage.

Fines and Fees,

Fees of Office.

Sale of Government Property,. Reimbursements,

Interest,

Miscellaneous Receipts.

17,582.81| 19,672.08 183,400.00 58,777.73 77,343.00 | 18,565.27 3,709.63 7,807.72 | 93,800.00| 33,282,59| 32,650.55 1,402,12 343.70 15,500.00 15,402.13 1,527.98 6,720.67 7,896.14 74,230.00 29,302.62 28,656.96 354.65 500.00 251.01 596.51 345.50 2,021.16 2,381.22 44,138.00 6,073.27 7,511.62 1,438.35 4,563.01 4,750.00 20,000.00 4,563.01 4,982.87 419.86 833.12 479.88 9,700.00 2,918.61 2,158,59

Registrar General,

25.00

...

Harbour Master,

Judicial,

500.00

128.70

632.01

Educational,

197.00

174.00

9,576.00

5,800.53

330.00

7,052.54

201.30

1,252.01

Medical,

882.43

943.29

13,572,00

7,754.50

4,000.55

13,874.15

Police Magistrates,

8.10

10.40

390.00

175.10

52.40

3.753.95

122.70

Police,

923.01

846,77

41,275.00

3,259.17

9.145.75

5.886.58

645.66

Gaol,

1,683.35

1,482.89 | 20,620.00

6.206.11

6,600,51

394.40

Fire Brigade,.

248.25

3,300.00

2.386.28

2,386,28

Pensions, &c.,

468.46

700.64 24,000.00

1,349.93

2,223.71

873.78

Charitable Allowances,

205.00

215,00

4,000.00 1,155.00

1,155.00

300.00

Transport,

Works and Buildings,

1,578.34 3,650.81

Roads, Streets and Bridges, Lighthouses,

6.482.29

4,500.00 53,500.00 16,105.84 2,248.20 | 42,720.00 | 18,190.70

416.66

836.24

119.58

15.220.22

885.62

12,127.38

6,063.32

8,000.00

760.02

TOTAL.............

56,052,43 | 104,111,74 1,024,028.00 | 334,443.52 | 354,210.39

35.955.64 16.188.77

NOTE.-Exclusive of Crown Agent's Account.

Miscellaneous Services,.

Land and Houses Purchased,. Military Contribution,.. Government Gardens,

TOTAL,..

5,630.34 2,327.41

40,984.00 | 10,550.41/

138,56

11,153.66

138.56

28,070.17| 26,519.34 104,348.00

$0.00

56,172.53

5,896.78

$0.00

52,606.29

3,866.24

1,196.00 9,680.00

3,691.32 3,691.32

88.787.37 | 103,279.00 | 974,272.00| 300,522,31 318,571.72 40.901.30 22,854.89

Colonial Treasury, Hongkong, 25th May, 1880.

M. S. TONNOCHY, Acting Colonial Treasurer.

SANITARY REPORTS (HONGKONG).

5

The following documents have been laid before the Legislative Council.

SANITARY STATE OF THE GAÖL (1877-1878) AND THE DRY EARTH SYSTEM.

EXTRACT FROM THE REPORT OF THE GAOL COMMITTEE LAID BEFORE HIS EXCELLENCY GOVERNOR SIR ARTHUR KENNEDY, K.C.M.G.

The Superintendent and Warden have called the attention of the Committee to the vitiated state of the air in the wards in the early morning caused by the stench proceeding from the night buckets. It is not easy to suggest a complete remedy as there is great difficulty in procuring mould in Hong- kong. The soil of the Island, à sort of laterite or disintegrated granite, does not absorb the urine so well or deodorise it so thoroughly as mould.

thoroughly as mould. The great point, however, seems to be that the earth of whatever kind (except clay) should be dry and well sifted; when mixed with a small quantity of the common carbolic acid it would, it is believed, mitigate the nuisance.

F. SNOWDEN, Chairman.

Victoria, Hongkong, 21st April, 1876.

""

(Signed) )

C. MAY.

)

P. RYRIE.

21

)

W. M. DEANE.

)

M. S. TONNOCHY.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

On visiting the Gaol I found that a system of latrines is in use that has long since been condemned in similar institutions elsewhere; such a system may lead at any time to a serious outbreak of disease. Refer the Acting Superintendent's memorandum, and any other documents on the subject, to the Colonial Surgeon for his observations.

(Signed) J. POPE HENNESSY.

28th May, 1877.

COPY OF MEMORANDUM MADE BY THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT IN REPLY TO THE GOVERNOR'S ENQUIRIES ON HIS EXCELLENCY'S VISIT TO THE GAOL, 26TH MAY 1877.

I find from the records that in July 1874, on the recommendation of Mr. TONNOCHY, a number of wooden Closets were put up in the Cells with a view to introducing the earth system, which I am informed was tried for a short time, but owing to a difficulty in procuring suitable earth and getting the prisoners to use it, the system was abandoned.

Mr. SCUDDER, the Head Turnkey, tells me that during the short time the dry earth system was being tried the smell in the Corridors was more offensive than it had been before.

The old system was reverted to, viz.: a wooden bucket with a close fitting cover is provided for each Cell which the prisoners use at night-the contents are removed in the morning by the Govern- ment scavenger. During the day time the prisoners go to the latrines provided in the five Upper Yards, but those employd in the Lower Yard use the buckets, which are emptied every morning.

Female prisoners use buckets day and night, which are emptied into the drain running through the Yard.

Prisoners confined in the Remand or Debtors' Ward or in solitary or separate confinement use the buckets both day and night.

(Signed)

GEO. L. TOMLIN, Acting Superintendent.

MINUTE BY THE COLONIAL SURGEON.

Nothing can be done here on the dry earth system, as the proper soil cannot be procured in the Island or none at hand, so that the expense would be very great. The same system is pursued all through the town. In the Chinese quarter proper tubs are under every bed and only emptied once in 2 to 5 days; the average being 3 days. There is no choice but to procure earth from a great distance, to use charcoal or make water closets; all of those systems would be a great expense.

The stench in the Warden's Quarters at times in the hot weather is sickening, and the previous Warden's health suffered very much in consequence.

PH. B. C. AYRES.

29th May, 1877.

(Signed)

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

I fear the Colonial Surgeon is not as fully alive as he should be to the grave consequences of allowing the existing system of Gaol latrines to continue.

Under the present system, a solitary case of cholera or of typhoid fever in the crowded and badly situated Gaol of Hongkong, might speedily destroy a large proportion of the Community.

Nor is the danger confined to that part of the town of Victoria (the centre of the European Quarter) where the Gaol is situated. On proceeding towards the place (Lap-sap-wan, West end of Victoria District) where the contents of the prisoners' tubs are ultimately deposited, I found the stench so great as to be offensive outside a radius of an eighth of a mile.

I am not disposed to allow this to continue till some calamity compels the responsible officials to carry out the instructions given more than once by the Secretary of State on this subject.

An abundance of proper earth can be obtained (especially from the neighbourhood of the Wong- nei-chung Valley) for the Gaol.

Means must at once be taken for collecting, kiln-drying and properly sifting this earth, and using it according to the printed instructions which accompanied the Secretary of State's despatch of 2nd December, 1867.

I shall hold the Chief Authorities of the Gaol, and especially the Colonial Surgeon, gravely re- sponsible if any unnecessary delay occurs in carrying out these instructions.

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY.

6th June, 1877.

EXPLANATION BY THE COLONIAL SURGEON.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 11th June, 1877.

SIR,--I have the honour to acknowledge receipt of your letter No. 389 of the 7th instant, and deeply regret to think that His Excellency the Governor should think I am not fully alive to the evils referred to.

2. In 1875, partly at my instance, an attempt was made to put the dry earth system into operation in the Victoria Gaol. During the time it was on trial and apparently working satisfactorily, I was attacked with typhoid fever, and was subsequently absent for some months on sick leave. Before my return the dry carth system had been abandoned as impracticable, for what valid reason I was never able to discover.

3. Dr. MOUAT, the Inspector General of Gaols, mentioned in the Indian Report as one of the promoters of the dry earth system in India, being a personal friend of mine, I have been able to obtain from him the results of its success, and these results I have been able to verify for myself when I was in charge of Indian Gaols and Hospitals.

4. At the same time, I may perhaps point out that being only consulting physician of the Victoria Gaol, I have myself no practical means of putting in practice the dry earth system in that Establish- ment, and that my duties in regard to it are limited to indicating to its Superintendent whatever sanitary measures may occur to me from time to time desirable.

5. I am however by no means desirous on this account to limit myself to giving good advice, and Would be glad to assist is Excellency the Governor practically, and in any way which the Govern- ment may wish, in the work of Sanitation. On this matter I would respectfully invite the attention of His Excellency to the sanitary portion of my Annual Report, which deals with a variety of subjects, requiring reform.

6. In applying the dry earth system to the Victoria Gaol or any other Public Building, I would strongly recommend, in spite of the increased expense, the use of some other earth than that obtainable in the Island, as its deodorising qualities, from the prevalence of quartz, are extremely feeble.

The Honourable J. GARDINER AUSTIN,

}

A

Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

[No. 54.]

VICTORIA GAOL OFFICE, 12th June, 1877.

SIR,-I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th instant, enclosing copy of a minute of His Excellency the Governor directing the immediate introduction of the dry earth system of sewerage into this gaol, and have the honour to report that I at once took the necessary measures for carrying out His Excellency's instructions. I beg to request that I

I beg to request that I may be furnished with a copy of the printed instructions which accompanied the Secretary of State's despatch of the 2nd December, 1867, as there is not a copy on record in this Department.

I have, &c.,

GEO. L. TOMLIN, Acting Superintendent.

The Honourable J. G. AUSTIN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

HONGKONG.

No. 34.

GOVERNOR J. POPE HENNESSY, C.M.G., TO EARL OF CARNARVON.

GOVERNMENT House, HONGKONG, 14th June, 1877.

MY LORD,-I enclose for Your Lordship's information a copy of my Minute of the 28th May referring the question of the state of the latrines in the Gaol to the Colonial Surgeon, Dr. AYRES. In his reply of the 29th of May, he gives his reasons for thinking that nothing could be done to carry out the dry earth system in the Hongkong Gaol: though he admits that even in the Warden's Quarters, the stench is, at times, sickening; and that the previous Warden's health suffered much in consequence. In my Minute of the 6th of June, I pointed out that, under the present system, a solitary case of cholera or typhoid fever in the crowded and badly situated Gaol of Hongkong might speedily destroy a large proportion of the Community, and I directed proper steps to be taken, without any unnecessary delay, for establishing the dry earth system.

There will be in fact no real difficulty in getting this system into operation in the Gaol. Gentle- men who bave also resided here for many years, tell me they have used the system with complete success and with no more trouble than in other places.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY,

Governor.

The Right Honourable The EARL OF CARNARVON,

Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State, &c.,

&c.

&c.,

No. 80.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 1st August, 1877.

MY LORD,-In Mr. Administrator AUSTIN's despatch No. 53 of the 14th of March, 1877, he announced the resignation of Mr. GREY, the Warden of the Hongkong Gaol, on the ground of ill health, and the provisional appointment of Mr. CORCORAN to the post of Warden.

2. In my despatch No. 34 of the 14th of June, I laid before Your Lordship copies of some Minutes on the defective sanitary arrangements of the Gaol, in one of which, dated 29th May, 1877, the Colonial Surgeon, Dr. AYRES, said:-

"The stench in the Warden's Quarters at times in the hot weather is sickening, and the previous Warden's health suffered very much in consequence.'

11

3. On referring to the papers on which Mr. GREY was pensioned, I find the Melical Officer of the prison certifying that the Warden had been continually suffering from intermittent fever and bowel complaints; being the diseases that in my experience of hospitals and prisons are generally traceable to the want of such sanitary arrangements as the dry earth system.

1

4. I also transmitted to Your Lordship a copy of the instructions I felt it to be my duty to issue (after some preliminary Minutes) on the 6th of June to the Acting Superintendent of the Prison and to the Colonial Surgeon directing that means should be taken at once for establishing the dry earth system in the Prison.

5. Mr. CORCORAN's letter of the 24th of July complains of his quarters and says the confinement is not suitable to his health. Unfortunately on making enquiry on the 28th of July, I found that, up to that date, the dry earth system had not been introduced.

6. I have asked for some explanation of what seems to have been an unnecessary delay in carry- ing out an urgent and not very difficult reform; but I apprehend it will not be necessary to take any further notice of it, as I now learn that in two or three days after my enquiry of the 28th of July the practical result was actually accomplished, by the commencement of the dry earth system; and it is at this moment in operation in the Gaol.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY.

The Right Honourable the Earl of CARNARVON,

Sc.,

&c.,

&c.

COLONIAL SURGEON TO ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, August 2nd, 1877.

SIR-In replying to the Minute of His Excellency the Governor in regard to the date when the dry earth system was introduced into the Victoria Gaol, I would refer you to my letter of the 11th June, a copy of which I enclose.

In that letter I explained that in respect to the Gaol my functions were not executive, and being purely consultative, I limited myself to arranging with the Honourable Surveyor General for the carrying out of His Excellency's wishes.

Mr. PRICE now informs me twenty dry earth closets have been working in the Gaol since the date of His Excellency's first Minute, that ninety-one are on the verge of completion, and that the remainder will be finished during the month.

A better quality of earth than that heretofore used is to be brought from Kowloon, and observa- tions will be made of its efficacy after a sufficient trial.

I may add that the new buckets are being prepared as I have recommended, so as to insure a more perfect deodorization.

The Honourable C. C. SMITH,

I have, &c.,

PII. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

[No. 3.]

Acting Colonial Secretary.

VICTORIA GAOL,

7th January, 1878.

SIR,--With reference to the "dry earth system" in Victoria Gaol, which up to the present time has worked satisfactorily, the earth having been supplied by the Surveyor General's Department, I have the honour to state that the last supply is exhausted and that more is urgently required.

In auswer to my requisition to the Surveyor General's Department on the 1st January, I was informed by Mr. BOWDLER that "from the first of the current year dry earth would be provided by the Gaol Department," and as there are no records in the Gaol office to show that any arrangement had been made on the subject, I have the honour to request that I may be informed how the earth will be provided.

The Honourable J. GARDINER AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

T. C. DEMPSTER, Capt., Acting Superintendent.

MINUTE BY THE SURVEYOR GENERAL.

I regret this unfortunate delay should have occurred through my absence from the office last week. The earth is now being sent to the Gaol. I had arranged with Captain DUCAT to supply the earth—while he was to pay for it out of the Gaol grant voted expressly for the purpose. earth service will now continue uninterruptedly through the year.

8th January, 1878.

The dry

J. M. PRICE.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

Is the dry earth system now in force in the whole of the Gaol?

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY.

19th January, 1878.

REPLY OF ACTING SUPERINTENDENT.

The dry earth system is not carried out in the female ward and all the yards and Turnkeys' and guards' closets. It is in force in all the cells and body of the Gaol. Partly carried out in tubs by five coolies, and partly emptied down a drain. The Surveyor General has been communicated with on the subject, and this morning all the contents of the buckets were taken away by ten coolies. When the system is in force all through the Gaol, more coolies will be required.

21st January, 1878.

(Signed) T. C. DEMPSTER, Captain,

Acting Superintendent.

1

EXTRACT FROM AN ENTRY IN HONGKONG GAOL VISITING JUSTICES' BOOK BY

DR. O'BRIEN AND MR. WODEHOUSE.

We think it right to state in connection with our report that, in describing the order which we found, we refer more particularly to the actual discipline of the prisoners, and there are one or two matters foreign to this to which we would take the opportunity to draw attention.

1. It appears that for a very long time past the night-soil contractor for the time being has been in the habit of supplying so few coolies for taking away the night-soil, that when the regulation time in which this work has to be completed is expired, much still remains to be taken away. This is disposed of by emptying it into the drain which connects with the drain in Old Bailey Street. At the present time as much as two-thirds of the Gaol night-soil is so disposed of, and moreover the dry earth is thrown into the drain with the excrement. There are now only five night-soil coolies for the whole of the Gaol, and this at a time when the introduction of the dry earth system renders necessary a larger number than formerly.

2. We observe that the dry earth system has not yet been introduced into the female prisoners' wards nor into any of the yards.

3. Having examined the blankets supplied to the Chinese prisoners, we beg to express our opinion that in weather such as that now prevailing one blanket is quite insufficient, and we would strongly recommend that, if only for the sake of putting a stop to the prisoners in each cell all huddling them- selves up together in a heap as they do now, two blankets be allowed to each prisoner, and not to those only under sentence of solitary confinement by the Supreme Court.

4. It is perhaps so obvious as not to require special comment, that were it possible to detain debtors elsewhere than in the body of the Gaol, it would be very desirable that it should be done. There would no longer then be the anomaly of an entire ward being occupied sometimes not at all, and at no time by more than four or five, while the rest of the Gaol is inconveniently crowded. Nor does it appear to us ought there to be anybody confined in the body of the Gaol not wearing Gaol uniform.

18th January, 1878.

(Signed) (")

R. A. O'BRIEN, J.P. H. E. WODEHOUSE, J.P.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

In

my Minute on the morning report of the 18th of January, I asked for information on these . subjects, as I had heard from Captain DEMPSTER and Dr. O'BRIEN that the supply of blankets was in-

sufficient and the dry earth system not properly carried out.

Let a proper supply of blankets be ordered; and a sufficient number of coolics be employed for the removal of the poudrette.

How long has the system of emptying any of the night-soil into the drains been in existence?

(Signed) J. POPE HENNESSY.

22nd January, 1878.

ا

REPLY BY ACTING SUPERINTENDENT.

From information received from officials in the Gaol, it appears that the system of emptying part of the night-soil down the drain has been in force for at least six years.

(Signed)

T. C. DEMPSTER, Captain,

Acting Superintendent.

25th January, 1878.

No. 58.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 23rd July, 1878.

SIR,-On visiting the Hongkong Gaol on the 22nd instant I noticed an improvement in the sanitary arrangements as contrasted with those described in my despatches to Lord CARNARVON NO. 34 of 14th of June, and No. 80 of the 1st of August, 1877.

2. In the Report of the Gaol Committee of April 1876 (transinitted by Sir ARTHUR KENNEDY in his despatch No. 40 of the 28th of February, 1877) they refer to the vitiated state of the air from the night buckets. The Colonial Surgeon had admitted that this was the cause of the frequent attacks of illness which ultimately led to the retirement of the late Warden, Mr. GREY: but owing to the supposed difficulties in the way of getting a proper supply of dry earth in Hongkong, the obvious remedy had not unfortunately been applied. A part of the night-soil was usually conveyed to the western end of the town and deposited in pits adjoining Belchers Bay, but a considerable portion was simply flung into a sewer that ran beneath the centre of the Gaol, and from which open gratings communicated with the Gaol yards.

3. I put a stop to the system of depositing night-soil near Belchers Bay, and by having a kiln constructed for baking dry earth I was able to provide a supply of deodorizing material sufficient not only for the Gaol but for all the Government establishments.

4. After nearly a year's trial of the system of conservancy, I have now the satisfaction of being able to report that, though Hongkong Gaol is almost as crowded with prisoners as it was in 1876,—there is not a trace of vitiating air arising from the cause referred to by the Gaol Committee.

5. Mr. HAYWARD, the new Warden, and Mr. COLES, the new head turnkey, say they never saw the dry earth system more efficiently carried out, and that in this respect they find Hongkong Gaol a

model of cleanliness.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY.

&c.,

&c.

The Right Honourable Sir MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, Bt., M.P.,

&c.,

HONGKONG.

No. 80.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH, Bт., M.P., тo GOVERNOR J. POPE HENNESSY, C.M.G.

DOWNING STREET,

23rd September, 1878.

SIR, --I have received your Despatch No. 58 of the 23rd of July respecting the system of dry earth conservancy now carried out in Hongkong Gaol.

I note with satisfaction the success which has attended your efforts in this matter.

Governor HENNESSY, C.M.G.,

Sc.,

&c.

f.c.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

M. E. HICKS-BEACH.

EXTRACT FROM THE REPORT OF THE MEDICAL COMMITTEE ON THE MODE OF FLOGGING

AND ITS EFFECTS.

"The sanitary arrangements of the Gaol are good, the dry earth system recently introduced "works well."

(Signed)

SAM. S. D. WELLS,

(")

Deputy Inspector General, R.N. RICHARD A. O'BRIEN, M.D., L.R.C.S.E.

Hongkong, 8th October, 1878.

SANITATION-DRY EARTH SYSTEM OF CONSERVANCY.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

No other residences should be permitted on the land draining into the reservoir that supplies the city with drinking water.

Furthermore, one of the sanitary officers should inspect each existing house (including my own) and see that suitable dry earth closets are provided, and that the servants know how to attend to them, and especially how to dispose of the contents of the buckets according to Dr. MOULE's plan.

I take this opportunity of adding that each house should be provided with a dry earth latrine, in a covered outhouse, for the coolies and servants. At present the paths about the Peak are defiled on account of this want.

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY,

17th July, 1877.

MINUTE BY THE SURVEYOR GENERAL.

Inspector MCKINNEY will prepare and submit a report on the present condition of the sewage arrangements of all the residences at the Peak.

18th July, 1877.

[In C.S.O. No. 1865 of 1877.]

(Signed) J. M. PRICE,

Surveyor General.

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S LETTER ENCLOSING REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF NUISANCES.

No. 96.

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, 8th August, 1877.

SIR,-I have the honour to enclose from Inspector MCKINNEY, for the information of the Governor, the report commanded by His Excellency to be made upon the treatment and removal of refuse matter by the occupants of houses at the Peak.

2. Mr. MCKINNEY'S intelligence and truthfulness leave no room to doubt the accuracy of his statements, some of which I have been able to confirm by personal observation.

3. Of the thirteen houses he has examined, it appears only three use the dry earth system, the Police at the Gap Station using lime in preference, while the tenants of Mr. ......'s bungalow have adopted the still better plan of having all excreta conveyed daily before sunrise to the proper public receptacles in town. It is true that in these five houses the sanitary arrangements are by no means as satisfactory as one would wish, but at all events they do not by any means present so objectionable an aspect as the remaining eight houses, where matters will be found to demand immediate reforın.

4. I have ventured to detain Mr. MCKINNEY'S report for some days until I could carefully consider and accompany with it some practical remedy for the evils he depicts.

5. One remedy-unquestionably the best-will be to insist upon all Peak residents sending daily down to the town the soil and garbage at present thrown out on the hill sides. According to para- graph 9 of Mr. MCKINNEY'S report this is already done by some, and I see no reason, other than that of expense, why the good example should not be generally followed. In this case, however, I think expense neither could or would be set up as an objection, as most of those who can afford the luxury of a summer residence on the hills can equally well afford the cost of so absolute a necessity as a scavenger at two dollars a month.

6. Should His Excellency deem the foregoing too arbitrary a measure, I would submit the less preferable alternative of an agreement with the city scavenging contractor to remove daily before 6 A.M. from every house at the Peak all excreta and other refuse, depositing and deodorizing the sam» by dry earth in properly constructed and water-tight cesspits, to be situated not far from the Gap or some equally central and convenient neighbourhood. These pits might be voided periodically by the contractor at proper hours, and they could be placed under the special surveillance of a proposed rural Inspector of Nuisances, whose appointment I have already, in a previous letter on kindred sub- jects, had the honour very respectfully to recommend.

7. AU LEUNG, the city contractor, with whom I have been for the past week in negociation, offers to establish a proper scavenging service for $25 a month, which amount, I think, could be easily collected, the Government paying its corresponding share.

1

8. Proper and systematic scavenging will, however, only partially mend the evils pointed out in His Excellency's minute of the 17th ultimo. A more direct personal interest in sanitary matters and a closer and more constant watch over the acts of servants appears necessary upon the part of masters, many of whom I have found quite dead to the necessity of kitchen drains, cesspits and dust bins.

9. If His Excellency approves of my suggestion in paragraph 5, 1 will place myself in friendly communication with the Peak residents to have it carried out. I may add that, were it necessary, its conditions could be enforced under section 1 of clause II of Ordinance No. 14 of 18-45, and clause XIV of Ordinance No. 8 of 1856, but the enlightened class of persons with whom one will have to deal in this matter renders recourse to the law improbable.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

*

Your obedient servant,

J. M. PRICE,

Surveyor General.

Honourable CECIL C. SMITH,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

[In C.S.O. No. 1865 of 1877.]

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF NUISANCES.

HONGKONG, 1st August, 1877.

SIR,-I have the honour to inform you that, in obedience to your orders, I have inspected the bungalows at Victoria Peak, and discover the arrangements adopted by their tenants for the disposal of house sewage and refuse matter to be as follows:---

1. The Signal Station.

The night-soil from both the houses is used for garden purposes by the people residing here. The drainage from the cookhouse of the man in charge is also caught and used for the same purpose, but that from the cookhouse of the Chinese assistants flows down the hillside southwards towards a little valley lying N. E. of Mountain Lodge. The cookhouse rubbish is carried about 200 yards W. of the flag-staff and thrown on the N. side of the hill.

2. Mr. ......'s house.

The night-soil is carried to about 400 yards distance in a S. W. direction and thrown over the brow of a hill overlooking the village of Shek-t'ong-tsui. The dry rubbish is carried in the same direction, but is deposited close to the pathway leading from Mountain Lodge; there are numerous heaps of it along this pathway. The drainage from the cookhouses flows through a sewer and out at the eastern corner of the boundary wall into the valley mentioned in the preceding paragraph. In this valley are two wells, from which the water supply is obtained for the inmates of the Signal Station, Mr. ......'s family, the officers' quarters at the Pavilion and the Governor's household. There is also a stream passing through it which eventually reaches the Pokfoolum Reservoir. The distance between the spot where the house sewage is absorbed into the ground and the water-supply is 320 feet.

3. The Pavilion.

The night-soil and rubbish are taken and deposited near Mr. ......'s heaps; the ravine into which it is thrown forming the head of the watershed of the Shek-t'ong-tsui and the slaughter-house water- supplies. There is a chunammed and covered cesspit close to the cookhouse for the reception of the house and kitchen refuse waters, but it does not appear to be used by the servants, and the whole of the drainage is, by preference, led into the hollow in front of Mountain Lodge, which formerly, I understand, was a kitchen garden. The distance from the Pavilion to its nearest dry rubbish heap is about 250 yards.

4. Mountain Lodge.

Dry earth is used in the closets. All waste matters appear deodorized and inoffensive, and are removed in the same manner and to the same heaps as the foregoing. There is no latrine at either the Pavilion or Mountain Lodge provided for the use of the coolies; they are forced to go on the hillside. The drainage flows in both front and rear of the house, that in the rear finding its way into the valley already mentioned, while that in front flows in a direct manner almost into the ravine above the Reservoir; about 150 yards from the Lodge in a westerly direction is a heap of dry rubbish.

5. Mr. ......'s Matshed.

The night-soil is removed by a coolie daily and is thrown on the hillside facing Victoria. The dry earth system is not used. The rubbish and cookhouse refuse are carried up on the hillside and thrown near the same place at the end of a disused path on the northern slope overlooking the city. Water for domestic purposes is obtained from the stream named in paragraph 2.

6. The ......$.

Dry earth is used in the closets, which are cleaned out daily, the night-soil and rubbish being carried to some pits situate about 100 yards in a N.W. direction from the house. These pits were very offensive, and would be greatly improved by having the rubbish, &c., covered over by a layer of dry earth daily. The kitchen drainage trickles down on to the southern slope of the hill in the direction of the Reservoir, at the rear of the premises, especially at the back of the bathrooms.

7. Mr. ......'s House.

Dry earth is used and the night-soil is taken away daily and thrown into a pit about 200 yards from the house, S.W. The rubbish is also carried there and in the same direction, and about 100 yards from the house there is a heap of ashes lying at the foot of some rocks. The drainage flows in the same direction, but the drains do not extend beyond the boundary walls of the grounds. The side of the hill in which the rubbish, night-soil, &c., are buried overhangs the ravine which is above the Reservoir. Water for use is carried from the well below the Austin Arms.

8. No. 6 Police Station.

Lime is used in the latrine; the night-soil and rubbish are removed to a cesspit about 250 yards in a N.W. direction on the hillside overlooking Victoria. There is a concrete covered cesspit for the reception of cookhouse refuse, &c., which is emptied periodically, the contents being carried to the first mentioned cesspit. The surface drainage flows south towards the Reservoir. Water for use is

carried from the well at the Austin Arms.

9. Mr.......'s Bungalow.

The dry earth system is not in use. The night-soil, &c., is removed by a coolie daily and is carried down into town in covered buckets; the dry rubbish is carried to a pit about 70 yards to the rear of the cookhouse. The drainage from the cookhouse, which is offensive, flows down in the direction of the Reservoir by two different channels. Water is obtained from a hillside stream and also from the Austin Arms' well.

10. Captain......'s House.

The night-soil is removed and disposed of in the same way as that from Mr.......'s bungalow. The dry earth system is not in use. Dry rubbish is deposited in the pit belonging to Mr. bungalow, which is about equidistant from the two places, and a good distance from the road. The cookhouse drainage flows along the pathway E. for a distance of 50 or 60 yards; then passes underneath the Aberdeen Road and down towards the Reservoir. It looks very offensive, and must be really so in dry and hot weather.

11. Mr. ......'s Matshed.

The night-soil and rubbish are carried about 70 yards up the hillside and thrown into a hole. The dry earth system is not in use. House drainage flows down the hillside from the cookhouse into the vally of the Reservoir, but the nuisance is very little as yet, owing to the short occupancy of the house. Water is obtained from a hillside stream.

12. Colonel ......'s Matshed.

The night-soil and rubbish are thrown at random on the hillside at a distance of about 200 yards from the house, but, from the same cause as the foregoing, the nuisance is scarcely yet perceptible. The dry earth system is not in use. The cookhouse and stable are situate at the head of a marshy piece of ground about 30 or 40 yards from the matshed; the drainage and refuse from the cookhouse lie about, and the nuisance is considerable. Water is obtained from a stream on the hillside.

13. The......'s Bungalow.

The dry earth system is not in use; the night-soil is carried up on the hillside about 70 yards and thrown on the ground amongst some rocks on the hill slope draining into the Military water- supply. The cookhouse and surface drainage flow down the northern slope, and the dry rubbish is also thrown down the northern slope. Rain-water is caught in tanks and used for domestic purposes,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

The Honourable J. M. PRICE,

Surveyor General, fc.,

&c.,

&c.

(Signed)

W. MCKINNEY. Inspector of Nuisances.

[C.S.O. 1890 of 1877.]

THE GOVERNOR'S MINUTE ON THE FOREGOING REPORT AND LETTER.

1. The actual facts as they now appear in Inspector MCKINNEY's Report are worse than I had anticipated, though from the evil consequences to my own health and to another member of my house- hold from using the water from the little valley N. E. of the Governor's Mountain Lodge, I was con- vinced that what was called the Government sanitary station was a dangerous place to reside at.

2. I have the utmost confidence in Mr. PRICE's sound judgment and eminent professional skill in dealing with the very diflicult question of the sanitary state of this Colony, of which the facts now disclosed in his Inspector's Report constitute, comparatively, a very insignificant part; but I do not concur with him in thinking that the best remedy, in this particular instance, would be to insist upon. all the residents at Victoria Peak sending down daily to the town the night-soil and garbage which at present tend to contaminate the water supply, not only of the houses at the Peak, but to poison the streamlets flowing into the Pokfoolum Reservoir, from whence the inhabitants of the town get their drinking water.

3. It is quite possible to put a complete check to the contamination of the water supply and to the improper system by which the few paths near the Governor's so called sanitarium are defiled, without sending down buckets of excreta every day to the town.

4. I have already intimated, in a former minute, what the real remedy is, namely, the efficient and general working of the dry earth system.

Let instructions accordingly be issued, with as little delay as possible, to the following effect: a. Every residence in the neighbourhood of the Peak to have a proper supply of dry earth closets,

and dry earth latrines for the servants.

b. The mixture to be disposed of in the way pointed out in Dr. BUCHANAN'S Report, which was transmitted to Hongkong in Lord KIMBERLEY'S despatch of the 11th of August, 1871, and which I annex herewith. Such cesspits as Mr. PRICE proposes in para. 6 of his letter would, if completely sheltered from the rain or from water drainage, comply with Dr. BUCHANAN'S most essential requirement.

c. No night-soil to be removed in future from any house without being first subjected thoroughly

to the dry earth system.

d. No drain from any residence to be permitted into any well or stream supplying a reservoir for

drinking water.

5. I entirely approve of Mr. PRICE's idea of inducing the residents at the Peak to adopt those essential sanitary reforms, by friendly communication with them, so as to avoid the necessity of en- forcing the penalties provided by Ordinance No. 14 of 1845 and No. 8 of 1856.

6. When my instructions have been carried out, let me receive a report to that effect. Looking to the injury my own health has already sustained by the flagrant neglect of sanitary arrangements in the vicinity of the Governor's Lodge,--should any great delay occur in inducing the residents con- cerned to do what I now require, I shall be compelled to quit the Lodge and, in spite of the incon- venience of removing at this season, to return to Government House.

J. POPE HENNESSY.

9th August, 1877.

MINUTE BY THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Forwarded for the information and guidance of the Honourable the Surveyor General.

10th August, 1877.

By Command,

C. C. SMITH, Acting Colonial Secretary.

MINUTE BY THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

The Office Register contains an entry showing that the foregoing document, with the Acting Colonial Secretary's minute of 10th August, 1877, was sent to Mr. PRICE the same day, together with C.S.O. No. 1865, of 9th August 1877, and the Secretary of State's Circular Despatch of the 11th August 1871.-C.S.O. No. 1890 of 1877, was returned to this Office on the 15th instant on being called for. No report thereon has as yet been received from the Surveyor General, nor is there any record of any instructions having been issued.

21st September, 1880.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COLONIAL SURGEON (FOR 1879).

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL, HONGKONG, 4th May, 1880.

SIR,I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for the year 1879, together with the usual Tables showing the working of the different Establishments in my Department.

I also forward the Report furnished by the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital concerning the working of that Establishment. I regret that my Report has not been sent in before, but the absence of the Superintendent on leave caused some delay in furnishing the Hospital Report: and Tables.

POLICE.

The health of the European and Indian Police has been much better than in 1878, but the Chinese portion of the Force has suffered more severely from sickness, the admissions to Hospital being nearly double that of the previous year.

The Police Hulk and Aberdeen have furnished between them more than half the number of sick. Special Reports have been made on both these Stations. Aberdeen is an unhealthy district, but much has been done lately to improve the Station, and it is hoped some improvement in the health of the Police Force stationed there may be shown this year. The Police Hulk is old and rotten, is greatly deficient in accommodation required, and has, I believe, been condemned.

But though sickness has been much greater among the Chinese, there have been only two deaths among them as compared with one last year. The mortality among the Indian portion of the Force remains the same as in 1878. The mortality among the Europeans being three this year as compared with one last year. One died while away on leave; another was accidentally drowned.

Many of the Police Stations are greatly deficient in accommodation and cubic space, the Chinese, especially, sleeping in much overcrowded rooms, the Central Station and the Police Hulk being among the worst in this respect.

TROOPS.

The numbers admitted to the Military Hospital show a considerable increase, though the mortal- ity among the Troops has decreased by two as compared with 1878. Yet, though more have been admitted to Hospital, the percentage of sick as regards strength shows a slight decrease, as will be seen by reference to Table IV.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The buildings occupied by this Establishment were totally destroyed by fire, December 26th, 1878, and in the beginning of the year 1879, the Lock Hospital was given up for use as a Government Civil Hospital, there being no other building in the Colony equally suitable in accommodation.

It is needless to say that this building falls very short of the requirements of a general Hospital, but as Aladdin's Lamp is not in possession of the Government, the loss of a Hospital is not to be repaired in a day.

I am happy to say there appears some prospect of the new Civil Hospital being completed by next year. Still the accominodation afforded by the Lock Hospital is not so despicable as might be sup- posed; it is in every way far superior to the building that was occupied as a Government Civil Hospital when I arrived in the Colony in 1873, and the quarters occupied by the staff, as well as the wards occupied by the sick, are much larger as well as lighter and more airy.

The staff of the Hospital now consists of the Superintendent, a properly qualified European Apothecary and Analyst, a Steward, a Clerk, a Portuguese Wardmaster and a Chinese Wardmaster, both of whom have been in the service some time, the latter over sixteen years. The Nurses, all Chinese, are a better class and better paid than they were, and are similar in all respects to the nursing staff of the Naval Hospital.

The staff as I found it in 1873, consisted of the Superintendent, an aged, unqualified Apothecary, who was Clerk, Storekeeper, Collector of Accounts, Hospital Record and Apothecary all rolled into one. How he did all the work, and how he managed to do it so well as he did, is a marvel to me. There were also two European Wardmasters, both being continually reprimanded for drunkenness, and both were ultimately dismissed for that reason. The Chinese Nurses were by no means as good as they are now, nor were they as well paid.

I think that the staff we now have is all that is required. I do not think there is any necessity for another Surgeon; on an average there is not more than three hours' work for one to do daily. I have done the work of the Superintendent for many months at a stretch, as well as my own, without inconvenience to myself or the patients. I am only aware of one case that has not received prompt attendance, and that might have been avoided. As a rule, where injuries are so severe as to require immediate attendance, they are generally past help by the time they are brought to Hospital.

I am not prepared to recommend an expenditure of over £500 a year for the services of a Surgeon, which are so rarely required; the risk that is run is no more than is incurred in many County Hospitals at home. In the largest work-house infirmarics at home there is only one resident Surgeon, and in many there is no resident Surgeon. In the largest Gaols at home there is only one resident Surgeon, though their infirmaries often have more than fifty beds, and the work is far more arduous. The wealthiest man must run this risk, even when retaining his own private Surgeon; he may not be on the spot at the moment his services are required.

t

The situation chosen for the Hospitals is as good as could be procured in the Colony. The new Lock Hospital will not, as formerly, be visible from the upper roads, and very few Europeans make use of that part of the Queen's Road from which it is visible or the women approach the Hospital. There are few visitors to the Hospital in the morning when the women attend at the Lock, and they are not of a class likely to be shocked by the sight of them. Some nuisances are unavoidable; the new build- ings cannot be constructed without noise, and if the Hospital were so far removed from the working part of the town as to be beyond reach of noise, it would be so much farther for the sick to come or he brought.

.

Table V shows the diseases of those admitted to Hospital during the year, as usual. Fevers and bowel complaints are most numerous, and after them diseases of the chest.

Table VII shows the number of admissions during each month of the year, which were greatest in the months of May, July, August and October. The total admissions were 1,071 as compared with 1,287 in 1878; the deaths being 55 this year and 50 last.

Table VIII shows the number of dead bodies brought to the Hospital; the number increased by one as compared with 1878.

SMALL POX HOSPITAL.

At the beginning of the year some rooms in the ruins of the old Civil Hospital were used as a Small Pox Hospital, and it was then in charge of Dr. WHARRY, but these ruins being pulled down at the end of this year, an old house in Hollywood Road was made use of, and as it was a considerable distance off the Hospital, I took charge. Now a good airy building is provided on a site not far from the Civil Hospital, and Dr. WHARRY again has charge. There were thirteen admissions and one death as compared with seven admissions and no deaths in 1878.

VICTORIA GAOL.

There has been a considerable increase in the number of admissions to the Gaol Hospital, and a great increase in the number of sick altogether, but I am happy to say a great decrease in the mortality; only six deaths against fourteen last year.

A great number of Europeans suffered from Diarrhoea, but these were principally merchant seamen who had been leading a riotous life on shore and were arrested for drunkenness.

Among the Chinese prisoners there are a great number of half starved and debilitated creatures, who have to be taken into Hospital in many cases at once, on admission to Gaol, and some serve nearly their whole time in Hospital; these furnish the cases of Fever, Diarrhea, Anaemia and Debility. There was a considerable outbreak of Mumps in the Gaol; 21 cases are recorded in Table X.

The prisoners, as a rule, improve in health during their stay in Gaol, and some are hardly recog- nizable on their departure as the miserable wretches they were when they came in. trouble is caused by the numbers who come in suffering from itch or swarming with lice, many of A good deal of them so filthy as to have large sores in their heads from this cause. I have somewhere seen it said that Chinese do not suffer so much from corns as Europeans, on account of the peculiar make of their shoes, but that statement is not at all borne out by many of those received in the Gaol. They are not troubled, as a rule, much with corns on the side of the foot, but the peculiarity of their shoes scems to be to create corns on all the knuckles of the toes, and a good many suffer from bunions.

The opium smokers have been treated as heretofore, that is to say, their habit entirely ignored, and I have had no trouble with them at all. A Chinese merchant was one day lamenting that his son gave him much trouble owing to his giving way to this vice. I recommended him to send him to Gaol for debt and I would undertake his cure. The only trouble in the opium smoker's case is his want of strength of will to give up the habit without he is compelled. I cannot find that its discon- tinuance produces any serious effects, the most annoying being the want of sleep for the first few nights; sometimes they complain of slight Diarrhea, but it rarely requires any treatment.

There were four exccutions. In no case was the neck dislocated, neither was there ary struggle; the shock of the full caused insensibility, and strangulation completed the execution; the drop is now a full six feet,

Some new industries have been introduced into the Gaol, and very good and strong grass matting is now made by the prisoners, as well as capital coir mats and matting, for which orders are gladly

received.

The solitary cells do their work well, and it is a rare event to see the punishment cells all full. Very few floggings have taken place this year; the cane on the breech seems to have made a great im- pression; its marks once made are never got rid of, but the men can now show their backs without advertising to the world that they have been Gaol-birds.

Altogether, the health of the Gaol has been very good; the greater part of the cases taken into the Hospital are men who were suffering from disease on their arrival in the Gaol.

TEMPORARY LUNATIC ASYLUM.

This is at present at an old house in the Hollywood Road which is fast becoming uninhabitable. I have heard nothing about the intended new Lunatic Asylum, although the money for it was voted long ago and the site chosen.

Six lunatics were admitted this year; one of them still remains in the Asylum, one was discharged cured, two were relieved and two sent home.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

The total number of cases admitted into this Hospital was 1,470; of these 796 died, most of the admittances being moribund cases or incurables; 77,467 out-patients were treated.

Into the Small Pox Wards 128 cases were admitted, of whom 73 died, but it must be remembered that the majority of these cases were infants under two years of age.

The number of vaccinations performed by the native Doctors belonging to this Hospital in the city of Victoria and in the villages and rural districts of Hongkong, was 1,769.

LOCK HOSPITAL.)

There were more admissions into this Hospital this year,-129 as compared with 105 in 1878, but the average number of days' detention was considerably less, being 13.6 as compared with 19.0 in 1878, showing that the cases were of a milder type. See Table XV A.

One Chinese unregistered woman petitioned for admission, suffering from extensive and numerous sores on the body and limbs, and having lost a portion of the soft palate from ulceration; she has been in the Hospital some six months.

The total number of examinations made was 10,991.

Only one case of Secondary Syphilis has occurred this year among the registered women.

To the Military Hospital 183 men were admitted suffering from venereal disease as compared with 188 last year; of these 14 were cases of Secondary Syphilis, 7 of which were contracted in Hong- kong, exactly the same number as was recorded in 1878.

To the Naval Hospital 293 were admitted suffering from venereal disease; of these 67 cases were not contracted in Hongkong. In 1878 only 221 were admitted, of which 57 were not contracted in Hongkong. The number of cases of Secondary Syphilis was 39, of which 16 were contracted in Hong- kong. Last year the admissions for this cause were 35, of which 11 cases were contracted in Hongkong.

So that there has been a slight increase of disease among the Naval Seamen, the number of cases among the Military remaining much the same.

Among the Police there were thirty-two cases admitted to Hospital as compared with forty-one in 1878; and three cases of Secondary Syphilis as compared with two in 1878.

Forty-two cases of venereal were admitted to the Civil Hospital as compared with ninety-eight in 1878; of the forty-two, twenty-four were not contracted in Hongkong, and of the ninety-eight, thirty- seven were not contracted in Hongkong.

The trouble is with the women of the boat population, and it is from these that most of the soldiers and sailors contract, disease.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

Table XVI shows the rate of mortality among the European residents for the last ten years, and it will be seen that only one year in the ten bears comparison, as regards mortality, with 1879 }; 55 deaths occurred this year as compared with 49 in 1873; the next nearest year is 1875, when the number of deaths was 59.

Table XVII shows the work done by the Inspectors of Nuisances. $619.15 as compared with $2,111.83 in 1878; the number of notices issued, 10,000 in 1878.

The fines amounted to 6,000 as compared with

x

The principal decrease in fines has been from Government Contractors, who have done their work better this year.

Table XVIII is the Meteorological Report for the year, in which it will be observed that the rainfall was 94.70, which has only been exceeded by two years out of the last ten.

The temperature

has also only been exceeded by two years out of the ten.

66

As regards sanitation, especially of the Chinese quarters of the town, it progresses but slowly. The only improvement in the houses lately built that I have noticed, is they are not so liable to take fire, having less woodwork about them, but whether this can be called an improvement is doubtful in a town where a fire in the Chinese quarter, at least, might be looked upon in the light of a sanitary dis- pensation of Providence. Says Dr. B. W. RICHARDSON in one of his works, "Pure air, pure water, purity from damp, pure light and equable temperature. These are the five fingers of the right hand of health." I should be glad to know any one of these necessaries of health was ever discovered in a Chinese house. Pure air is hardly to be obtained in houses without chimneys, or with such as will not work. Pure water Chinese do not get much of, and it is not likely to continue pure long after being carried into a Chinese house. Purity from damp! why the whole of the back of the houses where the kitchens are reeks with it; the walls are not only saturated with water but also with urine. Pure light! how much light of any sort gets into a Chinese house? Equable temperature,--well you do get that, it is equable enough to suffocate any but those inured to it. The nearest approach they get to the five fingers of the right hand of health is in Gaol, though, as regards air, even there a very great deal might be done still.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

بخیر

Your most obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL TO THE COLONIAL SURGEON.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 22nd April, 1880.

SIR,---I have the honour to forward the Hospital statistics for the year 1879, with observations thereon.

The Hospital work during the past twelve months has been carried on under many and great disadvantages.

When the year opened, the Superintendent and the Hospital staff had just been installed in the Lock Hospital building at West Point. The staff consisted of the Portuguese Steward, who did the dispensing as well as he could, a Portuguese, who performed some of the Steward's duties, the Chinese Clerk, one Portuguese and one Chinese Wardmaster, and a number of Chinese coolies.. Nearly all the stores of bedding, clothing and drugs, and Hospital furniture and fittings had been destroyed in the fire, and had to be replaced; and the limited space of the Lock Hospital building had to be adapted as far as possible to the requirements of the Civil Hospital Establishment. This adaptation entailed a certain amount of carpentering and bricklaying, and the building itself being somewhat out of repair. it had to be thoroughly overhauled; the business of the Hospital being carried on as usual during the alterations and repairs.

The cold was severely felt both in the beginning and end of the year, but stoves have now been placed in most of the rooms which were not so provided.

The description of the temporary Civil Hospital building contained in my last report, is tolerably accurate. The accommodation for patients, however, is there overstated, as, if each patient in the large wards be allowed 90 square feet and 1,200 cubic feet of space (not a large allowance), the numbers which can be accommodated must be stated as under:-

Ordinary cases,

Special,

Private,

Medical and

Surgical Venereal

Female 1st Class

2nd

.29

12

7

4

1

The fire-bell in the Hospital compound alluded to last year, no longer annoys the patients, but for some months past from daylight to dark they have had to bear the noise of stone-masons and builders engaged in the construction of a new Lock Hospital.

The new Lock Hospital, as it has risen from the foundations, has interfered with the light and ventilation of the lower wards of the Civil Hospital, from which, at one corner, it is only 6 yards distant, and when completed in due course, it appears to be intended that the inmates of the Civil Hospital shall be able to see the prostitutes come up for examination every day. It seems rather a pity that a house for the examination and seclusion of prostitutes should have been erected in such a conspicuous position, but it is still possible for a private entrance to be made, by which the women may enter and leave without attracting attention.

The notice of the Government was last year directed to two dangerous nuisances in the immediate neighbourhood of the Hospital; one is the public dead-house of the Colony, situated at the South-west corner of the Hospital at 11 yards distance. This is frequently made the receptacle for bodies in advanced stages of decomposition, pending the Coroner's inquest, and when the South-west monsoon is blowing, the sickening effluvia from these bodies are carried into the Hospital. The other nuisance is a public latrine, which adjoins the west side of the Hospital compound and can hardly be looked upon as a fit neighbour for a Hospital. Both these nuisances are still in existence.

Another annoyance to which the patients are exposed, is from the noisy occupations of the tenants of the houses which have been erected in the neighbourhood during the last few years. Some of these,--coopers, tin and brass-smiths, &c.,--are wont to carry on their work from early morning till late into the night. Street hawkers, too, are very noisy at times; and the Chinese theatres add to the din with the clash of cymbals and drums, which is kept up till 11 p.m.

In the beginning of the year, the post of Apothecary being vacant, it was proposed to fill it by the appointment of a qualified medical man, and a requisition was sent home for a Surgeon, who was to be Apothecary and Government Analyst as well. It is to be presumed that the search for such a combination of qualifications was not successful, for the Home Authorities were content to send out a gentleman who is an Apothecary and Analyst, but not a Surgeon.

Mr. MCCALLUM, who arrived in November, is a very able man, of considerable experience, and he satisfies a great want in the Establishment. The medical stores are now properly cared for and dis- pensed with economy and accuracy, and the Government analyses, many of which were formerly handed over to the local chemists, are now all undertaken by Mr. MCCALLUM, and a considerable saving effected to the Government. A properly fitted laboratory still remains to be constructed, analyses being at present performed in the Hospital building, the occupants of which get the benefit of the noxious fumes generated.

A good deal of trouble was experienced in getting the Steward's duties properly performed. For the first ten months of the year the Steward, Mr. SENNA, was acting as dispenser, and during that time there were no fewer than three successive acting Stewards.

At the end of the year there was some difficulty in connection with the money collected for Hos- pital charges. These charges are now almost entirely collected by the Treasury, and the supervision of the accounts has been committed to the Superintendent of the Hospital. Under the new arrangements there will be no occasion for any large sum of inoney to remain in the hands of the Steward.

The assistant Surgeon who was hoped for has not yet arrived, although he is needed as much as ever. It has happened that patients have experienced considerable suffering, and even lost their only chance of life, owing to the absence of the Surgeon from the Hospital when they were brought in. The Hospital is open day and night for the reception of accidents and cases of emergency, and such are frequently brought in from ships in the Harbour and elsewhere. The care of the sick in Hospital, too, demands the constant attendance of a medical man. These and other reasons for the appointment of an assistant Surgeon have been represented to the Governinent, and it is possible that at some future time steps will be taken to supply the want.

In the absence of any provision against fire in the Hospital, several lengths of hose with nozzles, &c., were obtained from the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade, and the Ilospital coolies have occasion- ally been exercised in connecting these with the hydrant in Hospital Road. This hydrant is some little distance below the Hospital, but it is so much the nearer to the Chinese houses in Sai-ying-poon, and on several occasions when fire broke out in the neighbouring houses, the Hospital employés were able to keep it in check till the arrival of the firemen.

;

The Hospital Register for 1879 records 1107 cases; 36 of these, comprising superficial wounds, with one case of mercurial poisoning and one bitten thumb, were treated in the surgery and then dismissed ; two of the others were brought in moribund and died in a few hours. Thus 1,071 represents the number of patients who underwent treatment in the Hospital, (not including those-37-who remained in Hospital on the 31st December, 1878). Of these, 570 were Police, and 501 were seamen, private residents, destitutes, prisoners, &c.

The number of Police sent to Hospital in 1878, was very large; and in 1879, it was still larger. It is remarkable, however, that, while there were 29 fewer Europeans and 101 fewer Indians sent to Hospital, the Chinese part of the Force sent 135 more than in 1878.

From Table III it will be seen Water-Police, and from Aberdeen. admitted in 1878 and 61 in 1879.

that the increase came principally from the Central District and The greatest increase was from Aberdeen, whence 11 Chinese were Of these, 52 were registered as cases of fever, and one of the latter,

a severe case of remittent fever, was fatal in five days.

The Police were lodged in the Dock Company's premises from July 12th to October 2nd, during which period the largest amount of sickness and the one fatal case occurred. A representation of the extraordinary amount of sickness in Aberdeen was made to the Government in June.

The state of affairs at Aberdeen deserves the serious consideration of the Government, for every year a large number of men become infected there with malarious fever, and these men are more or less disabled for the rest of their career as constables, some of them, indeed, having to be discharged from the Police Force as unfit for further service.

The unusual number of Chinese constables admitted from the Central District and the Water Police probably arose from a variety of causes. First, the introduction of the eight hours' continuous duty, then the fact of a number of those infected with malaria being removed from Aberdeen to the Central District, and then overcrowding of the Chinese quarters and the unwholesome state of the Police Hulk.

The Chinese and some of the Indian constables complained very much of the lengthened hours, and I was at first disposed to attribute their coming to lospital mainly to unwillingness to perform the extended term of duty. A more prolonged observation, however, has caused me to alter this opinion, for I have since found that while the Chinese ceased to complain of their long hours, there was a real increase of sickness among them.

Some of the more weakly inen were recommended to be discharged from the Force, and it is sible that these having been replaced by stronger men, the strain will be less severely felt.

pos-

It may be that eight hours' continuous night duty is too much for the Chinese, but before a definite opinion can be formed upon this point, the men must be provided with more sleeping room. Great powers of endurance are not likely to be found in those who sleep in a vitiated atmosphere.

The total number of days spent in Hospital by Police constables was 5,381 as compared with 4,162 in 1878, and 3,391 in 1877.

Table V shows the varieties of disease among the patients generally, with the mortality from each. Fevers form a prominent item, but four-fifths of the fever cases were furnished by the Police. Venereal cases generally were much less numerous, those of Syphilis remaining about the same. Anæmia, usually associated with enlarged spleen, was more frequent.

Dysentery and Diarrhea were less frequent.

Opium poisonings were about as numerous, and three cases of poisoning by mercurial fumes were recorded.

Contused wounds of the scalp were tolerably numerous, as usual, among the Chinese, resulting in most cases from blows with a bamboo.

Fractures of all kinds were well represented, and gunshot wounds were not below the average. A case of parturition may be noted at the end of Table V. This was a Chinese woman, who was in need of surgical assistance. There is no accommodation for lying-in women in the Civil Hospital, and such cases are never admitted into surgical or medical wards at home.

There were 55 deaths as compared with 50 in 1878.

The receipts from paying patients amounted to $2,478.44; in addition to which the Board of Trade paid into the Treasury for the treatment of Merchant Seamen, the sum of $1,150.50, and Hospi- tal stoppages for the Police amounted to $675.63.

The number of dead bodies brought to the post mortem room by the Police was 119, of which 39 were Chinese children; the latter mostly exposed in the street or on the hill-side, or thrown into the water to save the trouble and expense of burial.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES, ESQ., M.R.C.s., &c., &c.,

Colonial Surgeon.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

POLICE.

I.-TABLE showing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1879.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Admissions. Deaths.

January,

February,

10 4

11

...

9

5 16

26

29

March,

10

15

34

...

April,

20

1

33

59

1

22

May,

33

1

64

1

June,

4

12

26

42

July,

11

24

34

69

August,

10

1

23

35

68

1

September,

4

17

21

42

2

October,

12

25

19

56

1

November,

12

14

21

47

December,

6

9

19

34

...

Total,.....

97

1

196

Co

3

277

d

2

570

6

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

II. TABLE showing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1879.

AVERAGE STRENGTH,

TOTAL SICK.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS. RATE OF MORTALITY,

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

Total. European. Judian.

Chinese. Europeau. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian. Chinese.

European,

Indian.

Chinese.

101 174

351 625

97

196

277

3*

3

2

per cent.

93.27 112.64 78.92 per cent. per cent,

2.88

1.72

0.57

per cent.

per cent.

per cent.

* Two of them did not die in the Hospital.

III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1879.

CENTRAL No. 5

No. 2

No. 7--

8

3

"

9

WATER POLICE

HULK,

SIM-SHA-TSti

WHITFEILD.

[SHAU-KI-WAN. POK-FU-LAM.

ABERDEEN.

STANLEY.

YAU-WA-TI,

HUNG-HOM.

SUNDRIES.

January,

February, March, April,

May,

18 14

European.

00 20 00 10 0

K 11

8 6

B 11

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indiau.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

COCINN

Jane,

11

.::::::

2274 FS 1

14

9

11

July,..

17 13

August,

3

11

September, October, November, December,

6

5 17 10

4

11

3

2

4 6

1

4

2

122125T-

8

8

3 12

10

1

European.

Indian.

K....OG...... | Chinese.

1

European.

Indian.

Chinesc.

European.

----¦ ¦ Indian.

3

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

50 133

94

3

7 18 6 17 14 17

3

80

3

5 3

7

4

10 6 61

3

6

4

9

2 1 3 ]

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

IV. TABLE showing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1879.

STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS.

RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY TO STRENGTH.

White.

Black. Total. White. Black. Total.

White. Black. Total.

White. Black. White. | Black.

982

88

1070

932

103

1035

6

2

6.51 3.54 0.61 0.44 per cent. per cent.per cent. [per

cent.

tay in the "sidering the gilim. 2.

V.-TABLE showing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY la the GoVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1879.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

Typhoid Fever,

4

Febricula,

14

27

88 129

Continued Fever,

2

2 5

9

Intermittent Fever,

14

19

31 67

Remittent Fever,.....

28 3

16

42

Dengue,

Rheumatism, Acute,

2

3

Do., Subacute,

3

Do.,

Muscular,

4

Do.,

Chronic,

Sciatica,...

Lumbago,

I

1

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total,

Europeans,

Coloured.

Chinese.

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ∞ ∞ | Total.

DISEASES.

Europeaus.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

2

Cirrhosis of the Liver,. Jaundice,.....

Syphilis, Primary,—

Hard Chanere,

11

4

Soft Chancre,

8

3

Plagedaenic Sore,

183

19

2.

J3

Brought forward........

208 179 226

613

15

3

1 5

3

Enlarged Spleen,

3

2

Bright's Diegose,

Irritable Bladder.

Catarrh of the Bladder,

Hematuria,

Retention of Urine,

Urethral Calculus,...

Gonorrban,

29

15

Gleet.

4

Stricture of the Urethra,

2

Rupture of the Urethra,

Excoriations of l'enis,

1

Local Affections,—

Phimosis,..

Ulceration of Tongue,...

5

5

Do. of Face,

2

2

Do.

of Throat,

2

Do.

of Leg.

2

3

Do.

of Aim

Do.

of Prepuce,

Hydrocele Testis,

Lacorated Scrotum,

Enlarged Inguinal Clands,

Menorrhagia,

Periostitis,

1

Periostitis.

1

Enlargement of Lower Half

Necrosis of Frontal Bone

Enlarged Testis,

N_N

1

of Femur,

}

Scleroma,

Chinese.

Toral,

VI.-TABLE

Rate to Total

Admissi

2

1870,.

1871,.

1872,.

1873,

1874,

1875,.

1876,.

1877,

1878,

1879,

Tubercles on Scrotum,

Iritis,

Rheumatism,

2

4

Anemia,

5

9

17

Anasarca,

2

Ascites,

1

1

Meningitis, Subacute,.

1

1

Do., Spinal,

1

Apoplexy,

1

1

Risolation,..

2

2

Paralysis of Facial Nerve,

Hemiplegia,

1

Paraplegia,

Vertigo,

1

Cephalalgia,

13

15

Delirium Tremens,

Alcoholism,.

4

Mania,

Dementia,

Conjunctivitis,

Tumourover Left Shoulder Joint

Necrosis of Phalanx of Foot,

Do. of Os Calcis,

Arthritis (Wrist )......

Do.

(Knee),

(Shoulder),

Do.

Thecal Abscess,

Flat Foot,

Abscess,

Carbuncle,

Urticaria,. Prurigo. Ringworm, Seabies,

Ulcer,

:

VII

3

MONTHS.

5

Catarzet in both Eyes,

Iritis,

Corneal Opacities,

Deafness,..

1

Otitis...................

1

Bubo,

Boils,

Burns and Scalds,.

Debility,

17

3-සසය:

1

6

15

Poisoning Opium,

8

Do. Mercurial,

3

Do. Alcoholic,

Privation.

Inebrietas,

Moribund,

6

Morbus Cordis..

2

Do. Aortic Insufficiency

Do. Fatty Hemt,.

1

Hypertrophy of the Heart,

1

2

1

Observation,

31

36

34

101

2

Dog-bite,.

2

1

Contusions,

2

Sprain of Ankle,

January, Pebrnary, March, April, May,

June,. July, August, September, October, November, December,.

Dilatation of the Heart,..

Varicose Veins,.............

1

Nasal Catarch,

Epistaxis,

2

Tussis,

Laryngeal Irritation,

1

Bronchial Catarrh,

14

Do.

Do. of Knee,

Do. of Wrist,.... Do. of Shoulder, Do. of Groin,.... Wounds, Contused,

Do.

Do. Incised,

Tota

of Scalp,

Bronchitis,

Do.

Lacerated,

Asthma,..

Do.

Gunshot, of Lung,

1

Hiccough,

Do.

Do., of Clavicle,

1

Pneumonia, Acute,

3

Do.

Do.,

of Hand,

VII

Do., Chronic,

7

Do..

Do.,

of Thigh,

Tuberculosis,.....................

Do.

Phthisis,

12

3

Do., of Head of

Tibia and Upper Arm,

Picurisy,

Wounds, Punctured,

Picuro-pneumonia,

2

3

Do.,

Do.,

of Abdomen

1

Parotitis,

Do.,

Do.,

of Lung,

1

MO

(Edema of Face,

Do.,

Do.,

of Eyelid....

Fibro-cystic Tumour of Neck,

Do..

Do.,

of Leg

Alveolar Abscess,...

2

Do.,

Do.,

of Thigh,

1

Necrosis of Lower Jaw,

Cut Throat,.

2

Aphthce,

Tonsillitis..

Ulceration of Pharynx,

Concussion of Brain,.

Do. of Spine,... Dislocation, Partial, of Ankle

1

1

1

Abscess of Pharynx,

Gastritis,

Dyspepsia,

Joint, Dislocation, Partial, of Lower】

Dorsal Vertebra,

1

:

:

:

:

:

440

Cancer of Stomach,

1

1

Fracture, Simple, of Base of

1

January, February,

March,

April,.

May,

1

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

Skull,

Dysentery,

6

2

10

2

Do.,

Do.,

of Radius,

Do.

Chronic,

3

3

Do.,

Do.,

Do.

Diarrhoea,

8

38

Do. Chronic,

10

3

14

3

4

Tape Worms,

1

1

Round Worms,.

1

Do.,

Do.,

Colic,.

Constipation,

Hernia,

Hæmorrhoids,

12

2

14

and Ulna and Ribs, j

Do., Do., of Humerus,

Do., Do.,

Femur, Intracapsular, (

of Femur,

of Neck of

1

1

June, July, August, September, October, November, December,

2

3

6

Do.,

Do.,

of Tibia,......

1

2

3

Do.,

Do., of Patella,

1

Do.

Do..

of Skull......

1

Fistula in Ano,

Rectal Abscess,..

2

Do.,

Do.,

of Cervical

2

1

1

1

1+

Do. in Perino,..

Condylomata,

Excoriations of Anns,.

Do.

Do. with en-

larged Inguinal Glands,. Congestion of the Liver, Hepatitis,

Abscess of the Liver,

Carried forward,.

203 179 226 613 9

2

3

Do.,

Do.,

1

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

263

2

Do.,

Do.,

1

641

Do.,

and Lower Jaw, J Do.,

1

1

Parturition,..

15 8 32

TOTAL,..

Vertebra, j

of Lambar

Vertebra,

Compound, of Skull,

of Fingers ofThigh

of Fibula,

352 274 445 1071 11 23 21 55

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent,

1

1

***

1

IMMAT

Srs {

VI. TABLE showing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of

Admissions.

Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

1871,

1870,..

Per cent.

6.48

1870,

Per cent.

4.05

Per cent.

T'er cent.

1870,

3.86

1870,

15.38

6.61

1871,

4.20

1871,

3.98

1871,

13.18

1872,.

6.82

1872,

4.86 1872,

2.39

1872,

12.03

1873,..

6.33

1873,

3.33

1873,

7.93

1873,

7.14

1874,

9.12 1874,

9.06

1874,

6.22

1874,

12.50

1875,

4.55 1875,

4.35

1875,

4.08 1875,

5.76

·

1876, 1877,.

2.49 1876,

2.81

1876,

2.53

1876,

1.76

5.15

1877,

4.16

1877,

3.25

1877,

8.12

1878, 1879,

3.88 1878,

3.46

1878,

3.08

1878,

5.70

..

5.13 1879,

3.12

1879,

8.39

1879,

4.72

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

P

VII. TABLE showing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVII. HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1879.

EUROPEANS.

MONTHS.

COLOURED.

+

CHINESE.

TOTAL Admissions.

TOTAL Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Admissions. Deaths.

January,

35

1

13

1

11

59

February,

29

15

2

28

3

72

March,.

28

18

3

39

85

April,.

16

27

43

86

4

May,

30

34

52

4

116

10

June,.

28

22

1

43

4

93

}

July,

34

28

47

-

August,

24

34

September,

30

19

October,

40

29

November,

32

2

17

December,.

26

1

18

87888

53

27

38

QAH LO

2

109

3

1

111

4

1

76

4.

5

107

7

32

81

32

76

Total,

352

11

274

23

445

21

1,071

55

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

January,

February,

March,

April,.

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Superintendent.

VIII.-LIST of DEAD BODIES brought to the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL for Examination during each Month of the Year 1879.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL.

Adults.

Children. Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

6

5

2

12.00

7

8

11

7

11

4

1 1

1

3

8

8

07 08 09 10 19 19 C9 Uni

77

18

8

10

14

3

5

871129

Total,..

00

8

1

1

70

39

119

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,.

July,

August,.

September, October,

November,

December,

IX.-TABLE showing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT SMALL POX HOSPITAL during each MONTH of the Year 1879.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL Admissions.

TOTAL Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

2

...

***

1

...

3

1

...

...

...

*

1

PI AON

2

...

...

De

...

...

...

1

...

...

*

TOTAL,........

7

1

4

2

...

...

***

...

...

13

...

...

1

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

X.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and the MORTALITY, during the Year 1879.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1879,

Fever (Simple continued),

Do. (Intermittent),.

Gout,

Phthisis Pulmonalis,

Rheumatism,

Syphilis (Primary),

Apoplexy,

Epilepsy,

Insanity,

Otalgia,

Ophthalmia,

Disease of the Heart, (Functional),

Do.

"

do. (Organic),

Anæmia,

Bubo,

Asthma,

Bronchitis, (Acute),..

Do. (Chronic), and General Debility,

Pleurisy,

Pneumonia,

Cancrum oris,

Parotitis,

Cynauche,

Colic and Constipation,

Diarrhoea,

Dysentery,

Dyspepsia,

Gastralgia,

Hepatitis,

Icterus,

Hæmorrhoids, Bright's Disease,

Hæmaturia,

Orchitis,

Gonorrhoea,

Paraphymosis,

Stricture,

Hydrocele,.

Periostitis,

Synovitis,

Abscess,

Boils,

Carbuncle,

Ulcer,.....

Pemphigus,

Onychia,

Debility,

Alcoholisın,

Strangulation, (Suicidal),

Burns and Scalds,..

Contusions,

Fractures,

Wounds, contused,

Do.

lacerated,

TOTAL,..

3 Indians,

Other Deaths:-

Executed.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Euro- Coloured peans. Persons.

Chinese.

Total. Euro- Coloured

peans.

Persons.

Total.

Chinese.

3

...

11

14

601

1

23

30

9

1

14

....

1

1

10

2

1

1211221

...

1

...

1

1

...

3

3

I

...

...

3

1

1

1

10

12

1

10

11

*

4

...

6

...

2

13

5

1

1

...

...

1

1

...

1

1

20

21

4

...

...

6

...

49

70.

3

11

...

3

12

2

2

***

3

1

6

...

1

1

1

...

...

2

1

2

...

་་་

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

1

...

1

1

2

2

...

1

1

...

...

1

17

17

...

6

6

1

...

5

1

1

1

1

26

29

1

2

2

1

2

2

1

3

1

2

1

9

3

***

95

10

259

364

...

...

...

...

1

...

...

...

...

...

I

XI. TABLE showing the CASES, not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treatea by the COLONIAL SURGEON in VICTORIA GAOL

during the Year 1879.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1879,

Fever, (Simple continued),

Do. (Intermittent),

Phthisis Pulmonalis,.

Rheumatism,

Apoplexy,

Epilepsy,

Disease of the Heart, (Functional),

Do. do.

Anæmia,

do. (Organic),

Bronchitis, (Acute),

Canerum Oris,.

Parotitis,

Diarrhoea,

Dysentery,

Dyspepsia,

Hæmorrhoids,

Bright's Disease,

Stricture,

Boils, Debility, Alcoholism,

TOTAL,...

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

2

00020010) NY C) Co la

2

IQHHHQQ :QONG ::

1

3

4

3

1

+

1

1

2

4

1

1

1

-

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

...

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

18

25

3

3

30

2

49

81

Daily

Total

Total

XII. TABLE showing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1879.

Total No. of

Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Average

Sick

No. of Prisoners.

in Hospital

Sick, Total Trifling Deaths.

Cases.

Serious Sickness

to Total.

Rate of Sickness.

Rate of Mortality.

To Total. To Average. To Total.

To Average.

3,669

576.13

364

81

6

9.921

12.129

2.929

0.165

1.041

Remaining in Hospital on the 1st January, 1879.

Admitted during 1879.

Total Cases Treated in the

Discharged.

Died.

XIII.—TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during the Year 1879.

Death Rate per cent.,

including

Hospital.

Number of Out-Patients Treated at the Hospital.

Incurables and Moribund Cases.

Death Rate in the Total of the 79,237 Treated at and in the Hospital.

Remaining in Hospital

on 1st January.

1880.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Total.

Male.

Fe- male.

Total.

Per cent.

Male.

Fe- male.

Total.

62

15 1,334

359 1,390 871 728 157 599* 197† 63,786 13,681 77,467 42.91 52.67 45.23

1.005

69

20

20

69

* Including 278 Incurables and Moribund Cases.

† Including 102 Incurables and Moribund Cases.

XIIIa.—CASES of SMALL POX treated at the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during the Year 1879.

ADMITTED INTO HOSPITAL

DURING 1879.

DISCHARGED.

DIED.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

REMAINING IN HOSPITAL ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1879.

Male. Female. Total.

70

58

128

22

14'

36

35

38

73

13

6

19

XIV.-VACCINATIONS performed by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during the Year 1879.

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

IN VILLAGES AND RURAL DISTRICTS.

TOTAL NUMBER OF VACCINATIONS.

1,672

97

1,769

XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A.

SHOWING the ADMISSION into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the 22 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued and the AVERAGE LENGTH of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858,

12-1

1858,..

4,797

1858....

43.8

1859,

162

1859,

5,389

1859,

30.8

1960,

261

1860,

9,107

1860,

28.7

1861,

442

1861.

10,778

1861,

28.4

1962,

485

1862,

12,193

1862,

22.0

1869,

420

1863,

11,707 1863,

23.7

1-6-4,

412

186-1,

11,940

1864.

27.0

1965,

890

1865,

11,803 1865,

28.0

1st,

406

1866,

13,000

1866,

28.6

107,

434

1867

13,120

1867.

1818,

679

1868

16,462

1868.

23.6

1869,

546

1869,.

16,799

1860,

24.8

1870,

722

1870,

18,382

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871,.

12,308

1871,

18.5

1872,

656

1872,

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1873,

11,219

1873,.

19.5

1874,

345

1874,

6,814

1874,

18.6

1875,

134

1875,

2,916

1875,

187

1876,

168

1876,

2,730

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877,

8,069 1877.

16.6

1878,

195

1878,..

2,242 1878,

19.0

1879,

129

1879,.

2,199

1879,

13.6

Number of

Beds in

Lock Hospital.

18

TABLE B.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 10 of 1867 during the Year 1879.

Number admitted

into Hospital

on Certificate of Visiting Surgeon.

129

Number who. submitted

voluntarily.

220

Number against whom it was necessary to proceed by Information before the

Registrar General.

12

Total Number brought under the Provisions of the Ordinance.

232

TABLE C.

Total Number of Examinations made during the Year.

10,991

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

10,862

Total Number Discharged from Hospital.

126

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No. of Females

admitted

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil

Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

ADMITTED INTO

Total No. of Men Diseased.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1879.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN Garrison and PORT (per Month).

Average No. of

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

Men in Mer- Garrison chant and Port Seamen. (per month).j

Average Percentage

of Men Diseased (per month).

129

183 293*

32

42+

550

1,066

666

624.

8,818

11,204

0.41

Average No. of

upom zod sep

on which Exami-

nations were held.

Total Number of

Examinations made during the

year.

Number admitted

into

Hospital.

Total Number of

Examinations made when no Dis-

case was found.

TABLE D.

REMARKS.

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1879.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

21

10,991

129

10,862

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do..

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined, Secondary Syphilis,

TOTAL,...

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1878.

: comi

1

Admitted.

Total Treated.

*67 of the Admissions into the Naval Hospital

were not contracted in Hongkong.

24 of the Admissions into the Civil Hospital

were not contracted in Hongkong.

TABLE E.

SHOWING the NUMBER of UNLICENSED PROSTITUTES apprehended under Ordinance No. 10 of 1867, during the Year 1879.

In Houses,

No. of Women,

16

TABLE F1.

Convicted.

12

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1879.

Discharged. Found Diseased.

4

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated,

Do.,

and Bubo,

Gionorrhea, uncomplicate },

Bo., and Epede ymitis,

Do.,

and Bubo,

Do.,

and Orchitis,

Do., and Primary Syphilis,

Gonorrhoval Rheumatisin,

Secondary Syphilis,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Gonorrhoea and

Primary and

Kubo,

do.,

do.,

CU 34

45

45

52

31

1*

44

53

50

34

32

1

1

129

133

126

DISEASES.

Military Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

71 •

80

5

8

5

98

146

21

17

3

4

12

1

13

17

19

3

10

do.,

3

and Gonorrhœa,.

1

1

TOTAL,.....

....1879, ................

183

203

32

42

TOTAL,.....

..1878,......

188

221

41

98

Cured.

1321

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1879.

~

1

1.8

1.8

1.7

1.0

1.7

40

1.0

46

ab bb 4 à 5 & 6 1 & 6 6 6655675

January,.

February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September,. October,. November, December,

er

pital

pital

1

January February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October,

November,

December,

TABLE F 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT.

Tuble showing the Numbers of Naval Men admitted into Naval Hospital during the Year 1879.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

Contracted at Hongkong.

...

...

2

2

Contracted Elsewhere.

૩૭

2

:: ::

Total.

4277

3

vi avi na:

2

6

Total Number,..

TABLE F 3.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT.

39

Table showing the Numbers of Military Men admitted into Military Hospital during the Year 1879.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Monthis.

Contracted at Hongkong.

Contracted Elsewhere.

Total.

3

11

2

4 3

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

Total Number,..

14

XVI. TABLE showing the RATE of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years,

Years.

Number of European and

American Residents.

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to

1870,

1871,

1872,

1873;

1874,

1875,

1876,

1877,

1878,

1879,

Average of 10 Years,......

Number of Residents.

2,289

71

3.10

2,736

83

3.03

2,520

65

2.57

2,520

49

1.94

2,520

72

2.85

2,520

59

2.34

2,520

74

2.93

2,767

84

3.03

2,767

67

2.42

2,767

55

1.98

2,593

68

2.62

XVII. TABLE showing the Work performed by the INSPECTOR of NUISANCES for the Year 1879.

No. of Summonses No. of Persons

Arrested.

Issued.

No. of Persons Discharged.

No. of Persons Fined.

365

60

33

391

No. of Notices Issued.

6,000

Total Amount of Fines in Dollars.

$619.15

}

T

XVIII. TABLE showing the ANNUAL MEAN STATE of the ATMOSPHERE during the Year 1879, as recorded at the TEMPORARY GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, 86 feet above mean low level of Spring Tide.

FAHRENHEIT THERMOMETERS.

HYGROMETERS.

WINDS.

1879.

BAROMETER.

Self Registering in Shade.

Dry Bulb.

Wet Bulb.

In Shade.

Mean.

Max. Max. Sun Sun Bulb Bulb

in

on

ex-

Max. Min.

Vacuo. posed.

Min.

Min. in soil

6

Grass. inches

deep.

Quarter

(prevailing.)

In Shade.

In Shade.

RAIN IN INCHES

MONTHS.

January,

February,

March,..

April,

29.89

9 A.M. 3 P.M. 30.11 30.08 79.0 57.0 45.0

30.00 28.86 77.0 45.0 73.0

30.05 29.97 89.0 29.99

Max.

87.0

55.0

74.7

70.9 54.6

55.5 76.5 03.0 71.6

61.7 60.1

Min.:9 AM. | Noon. [ 3 P.M.

605

60.6 66.2

9 A.M. 3 P.M. 9 A.M. [3 P.M.

9 A.M.

P.M.

DURING THE MONTH.

STATE OF WEATHER.

No.

OF

DAYS

HAV-

ING

RAIN.

Average during the Month.

9 A.M.

3 P.ML.

G3.7 104. 81. 51.8

46.2

61.0 62.7

51.7

51.7

N & NE

É & NE

0.73

3 Fine, 21 days. Overcast, 10 days. Fine, 13 days. Overcast, 18 days.

6.1.1 [31.

94.

61.8 64.4

04.4

130.

94.

::

60.9

63.9

57.0

59.4

N & NE

N & NE

2.02

27

1

23

"}

"

"

}}

">

62.8 64.4

58.0

59.6

NE & NNW

| NE & NNW

7.08

11

25

23

8

19

}}

"}

"}

75.0

74.6

132.

97.

71.4

74.9

67.2

68.7

NE & E

NE & E

6.04

20

14

16

29

}}

"}

"

>>

May,

29.93 29.88

91.0

08.0

June,

30.25

29.86

93.0

65.0

July,

29.85

29.82 94.0 69.0

August,

29.89

September,

October,

November,

December,

Annual Mean,.

82.4

72.5

82.7

81.9 72.7 83.4 87.0 73.8 83.4 85,5 83.5

78.9

88.1

70.0

29.86 93.0 29.91 29.86 90.0 70.0 30.10 30.05 91.0 €5.0 83.0 49.0 75.1

30.11 30.03

69.8

45.0

30.10 76.0

30.18

30.03 29.85 58.5

87.1 79.6

86.0

85.0 81.9 145.

106.

74.2

77.3

82.3 85.0 76.9

77.8

E & W

E & SW

6.75

17

14

16

15

77

77

17

11

"

83.4 141.

103.

73.9 74.3

82.4 83.6 77.6

77.8

E & SW

E & SW

11.32

20

17

13

17

"1

77

19

77

">

}}

85.5

146.

108.

75.3

74.6

83.4 85.3 78.2

78.5

E & W

E & SW

18.19

21

18

13

77

1

"

86.6

86.5 146.

109.

75.0

76.0 83.4 86.7 78.0

79.2

E & SW

E & SW

13.06

14

19

12

21

10

""

""

>>

19

}}

19

85.2

81.5

73.0

83.8

84.1

139.

101.

74.6

72.1

84.3

81.4

76.7

77.8

E & W

E & W

22.58

16

13

17

19

11

"}

"

"

爷爷

}}

83.8

70.8 79.1

82.4

82.0

134. 103.

71.9

68.9

61.8 70.1 73.7 73.6

130.

95.

€3.8

64,6

55.2

68.6

69.0

125.

90. 56.8

73.1

65.7

76.7 76.3

134.

98.

60.7 69.9 73.7 51.7 64.2

68.5 67.2 73.5

79.0 82.2 72.6 63.9

57.7

69.0

74.7

E & NE

E & NE

4.19

9

18

13

17

14

66.1 E & NE 60.6 E & NE

E & NE

2.14

* c

"}

}}

>>

}}

>>

18

12

20

10

""

""

"}

77

"}

}}

E & NE

27

4

27

...

3)

27

,,

1,

76.3

67.9

69.3

94.70

123

Total

Total

THERMOMETER, FAHRENHEIT.

RAINFALL IN INCHES.

during | during

the the year. year.

1872.

1871.

1873. 1874. 1875. 1876. 1877. 1878. 1879.

1871. 1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876. 1877. 1878. 1879.

89.0

Maximum, Minimum, 36.0

89.5

91.0

90.0

91.0

90.0

95.0

95.C

91.0

43.5

49.0

47.0

41.0

37.0

41.0

38.0

45.0

99.24 62.92

75.47

84.98

83.43 103.55 76.72 84.40 | 94.70 |

Range,...

53.0

46.0

42.0 43.0 50.0

53.0

54.0

57.0

49.0

LETTER FROM COLONIAL SURGEON ENCLOSING COPIES OF HIS REPORT OF THE

YEARS 1874 AND 1875 HITHERTO NOT PRINTED IN EXTENSO.

No. 37.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL, Hongkong, 28th July, 1880.

SIR,I have the honour to forward three reports made by me, referring to the sanitary condition. of the city of Victoria, at the request of His Excellency the Governor. These reports were made within a year and a half of my arrival in the Colony, and are,-first, a report on the sanitary condition of the brothels, dated January 19th, 1874; secondly, a report on the sanitary condition of the town, dated April 15th. 1874, and my Annual Report for 1874, dated April 5th, 1875.

ment.

The first-the report on the sanitary condition of the brothels-was made by order of the Govern- I found this order had been laying on the Colonial Surgeon's desk for some months before my arrival, and was in consequence of a great number of typhoid cases being brought in from the brothels licensed by Government. I first went round all the brothels with Mr. TONNOCHY, then Acting Registrar General, and afterwards with the Inspectors, taking notes of each brothel, the number of women that they could accommodate, and the sanitary improvements they required. These notes were sent in after each inspection to the Acting Registrar General, and the improvements I recommended were ordered to be made in cach case.

The inspections were made in the afternoon,-which was the least inconvenient time to the women,---- and the greatest care taken not to give offence in any way. Numbers of these houses were owned by Europeans, and the improvements required by me were especially grateful to the inhabitants, but caused much disgust among the owners. No one, I will venture to say, can read this report, which is merely a plain statement of facts, without a feeling of disgust that such a filthy state of things should exist in any dwelling receiving a special licence from Government, or wonder that, with such a condition of things, typhoid fever was raging among them.

The second report on the sanitary condition of the town was the result of a series of inspections made by myself in company with Inspectors O'BRIEN and HAZLITT, who were then the only Inspectors of nuisances allowed by Government. This report, also, is a very mild statement of the state of things I saw. In one house alone 172 pigs were found kept under the beds by Government licences of from one year to five years' date, to continue in force till further orders. The dearth of water among the poorer classes is a terrible thing to think of, and not only that, but the fact of their being compelled to use water out of foul wells or tanks or go without, and this state of things still exists as I pointed it out six or more years ago. Nor is the construction of houses much improved; many new ones have been built back to back as I have described, precluding all chance of decent ventilation or admission of light. Houses here, containing on an average five to ten families, paying between them £2.10 to £5 a month, would not be considered fit to put pigs in by any decent person.

These houses are owned by Europeans and wealthy Chinamen, who squeeze those who have no power to make their complaints known, without scruple. The Europeans, in fact, know little or nothing about their properties, and the poor wretches who inhabit these houses are at the mercy of the Chinese compradores employed by Europeans,-men who are able to find good security to their masters, and who out-rival in their extortions any of the Irish land agents of whom so much has been told.

The above reports were the result of inspections made by myself within the first six months of my arrival in the Colony. The sanitary report in my annual report for 1874 was the result of in- spections made in conjunction with Mr. PRICE, the Surveyor General, with Mr. R. G. ALFORD acting as interpreter by order of Sir ARTHUR KENNEDY. In this report many things are commented on be- sides sanitation, and I desire here to remark that in this report I brought to notice the smallness of the Prison cells, especially with regard to the Hospital accommodation, also the desirability of change in the diet scales, and also the impropriety of confining lunatics in the Gaol; but this matter had already been laid before the Secretary of State in the case of a lunatic confined in the Gaol by order of the Colonial Secretary, a clerk in Messrs. BOURJAU & Co.'s employ, concerning whom I had occasion to request His Lordship's decision.

The sanitary report made here was written before the series of inspections before mentioned had been completed, but quite enough has been said to give a general idea of the state of things which still exists to a great extent. I specially call attention to the state of the down-spouts and house drains herein reported; if they were not to some extent flushed by the heavy rains descending on the roofs, matters would be still worse than they are, but they ought not to depend on this alone.

I also partic- ularly call attention to the way the night-soil is kept in covered pots under the beds from two to five days according as the inhabitant has power to remunerate the scavenging contractor for its removal. I also request notice of the state of the water supply in the poorer quarters of the town, which is a sub- ject of many bitter complaints, and justly so. I also call attention to the condition of the houses them- selves, for which, taking into consideration the rents paid, the landlords might be held solely responsible; and I submit that it is not improper interference with Chinese prejudices, to insist on proper sanitation of their dwelling houses or to attend to the interest of the poorer classes, who represent the majority. I see in the newspapers lately that in Manila most stringent regulations have been made concerning the sanitary arrangements for the Chinese quarters of the town in that Colony.

I speak with authority for what I say in these reports. Many and many a time have I come out of the houses to vomit in the street, in spite of using strong scents and essences to prevent it, and I closed this series of inspections with an attack of typhoid fever, which nearly cost me my life, which was entirely owing to infection caught in these foul suns; and I say, as I said before, that while this state of things continues we stand in danger of being visited at any moment by some fearful epidemic, and I do not think the most advanced sanitary authority at home would combat this opinion.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

Honourable F. STEWART, L.L.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary, fc.,

&'c.,

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

SANITATION IN HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE LICENSED BROTHELS IN HONGKONG, 1874.

HONGKONG, 19th January, 1874.

SIR-I have the honour to forward the following report on the sanitary condition of the brothels of Hongkong. I have made over twelve inspections, varying from three to four hours each, and have not yet succeeded in completing the round, but have quite sullicient data to express an opinion on.

.

With regard to the form headed "Contagious Diseases Ordinance", enclosed in the Acting Registrar General's letter No. 39, dated 5th August, 1873, I am of opinion it is useless. A certain number of feet might be laid down, as a rule, for the accommodation of each individual, other things being equal, but other things are in no case equal,--situation is different, ventilation is different, the forms of the houses are different, and so are the lengths of the rooms; so that a rooin in one house sixteen feet square may sufficiently accommodate four persons, but a room in another of exactly the same dimensions be totally unfit for one.

The Inspectors of Brothels cannot be expected to be judges of the sanitation of houses, entirely uninstructed as they are, and in my opinion, no brothel should be sanctioned without a certificate from a medical officer that it is a fit and proper place for sanction and the accommodation of so many women. The inspection of brothels appears to have been left entirely to the Inspectors of Brothels, men of limited education and certainly unable to perform the duties required of them without efficient super- intendence and instruction, which has not apparently been the duty of my predecessors in the Colonial Surgeoncy of Hongkong, and that this is evidently required this report will show. The Inspectors have simply confined themselves to seeing that the laws laid down by the Contagious Diseases Act have been carried out, and nothing in the way of sanitation has been done at all.

I have found invariably in every house the kitchens in filthy condition. Many without chimneys, the smoke of wood and charcoal fires distributing itself all over the house and rendering the air difficult to breathe--the drainage more or less deficient, and, where existing, in a most deplorable condi- tion-greasy soot lying thick on the walls and ceilings-floors saturated with decaying animal matter, washed off the dressers and thrown out of pots, &c., and left to drain away how it can. The floors being broken bricks or decaying boards, there were no proper receptacles for rubbish, which accumulated in corners or was heaped in broken baskets, and only removed when it became of sufficient importance, by taking up too much room and becoming inconvenient.

In the kitchens were generally one or more hutches used as privics, consisting of a few boards knocked together to form a rickety screen, and from age and neglect they were saturated with filth. No proper receptacle for night-soil was found in these hutches,--sometimes a broken pot, sometimes a leaky old tub, sometimes nothing at all, the night-soil being deposited on the floor and the urine draining away, as best it might, into the surrounding floors. I've a pretty good stomach and don't stick at trifles, but I found the inspection of these places acted as a very unpleasant emetic.

The girls' rooms, next the kitchens, nearly all had ventilating openings into the kitchen,-of what benefit to the inhabitants of the rooms may be gathered from the foregoing paragraphs. In at least a dozen instances I found a girl's room separated from the privies by a boarded partition, through the interstices of which the inhabitants of the room could see into the privies and vice versa. As often, rooms were over the privies, with floors in a similar condition.

of

d

LS

285 2

d

In all cases almost without exception the floors of the rooms and passages, the walls and ceilings or roof were in filthy condition; so thick was the greasy dirt on the floors that it could be scraped aside

with the foot.

In many cases the houses were quite unfit for use as brothels or human habitation, there being no ventilation at all, and many more were much overcrowded, rooms being built in rooms, not only sub- dividing the floor of one room, but, by building other rooms above the subdivisions, making one floor into two and so destroying the small amount of ventilation there was originally.

Such being the case, it is not at all wonderful to find cases of typhoid fever continually brought to hospital. I am bound to say these cases do not only come from brothels, and therefore do not merit the name of brothel fever given to them; for in many private houses of the poorer class that I have inspected the state of things is a hundred times worse than in the brothels; and if some remedy is not found for this state of things, sooner or later the fever that originates in the hovels of the poor will be found a formidable invader of the houses of the rich, and bring back to Hongkong, with good reason, its not enviable notoriety as a grave of Europeans. For it must be remembered that it is to these houses and to the Chinese brothels the servants go, and from them may bring the infection into the houses of their masters.

I have written out instructions, some of them applying to all the brothels, some to individual houses only, for the use of the Inspectors, and allowed a certain time for them to be acted upon; if not fully carried out in that time, the houses to be closed until the orders are obeyed. Some houses, about eight in number, I have ordered to be closed. But without continual and efficient superintendence and instruction as to what is required, the Inspectors cannot be of much use as regards sanatory arrangements, the impracticability of the blind leading the blind having been demonstrated by reliable authority.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

>

}

t

3

Honourable J. G. AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

Your obedient servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

;

MINUTE BY THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

If without exaggeration, this report reflects seriously upon the Government in respect to the past, and throws much responsibility upon it as regards the future.

There is no object to which I would devote time and attention more willingly than the amelioration of those parts of the town which are inhabited by the Chinese, but to do anything effectually in the matter would occupy much preparation and much time, and involve very consider able outlay. We cannot therefore move in the matter on the spur of the moment. As regards the brothels, however, we can take immediate action, and I therefore suggest that the houses which are irremediably bad should be closed at once, and that the others should be left open only on condition that they shall be made satisfactory in all respects within a specified time.

I quite approve of the suggestion made by Dr. AYRES, that no brothel should hereafter be licensed without a certificate from a Medical Officer, but I think that the Surveyor General should also have some voice in the matter.

The Honourable the Registrar General will be good enough to give his opinion in the matter.

20th January, 1874.

J. G. AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

MINUTE BY THE REGISTRAR GENERAL.

I am already in communication with the Colonial Surgeon on this matter, and have arranged to cancel or suspend the licences of those brothels which are not fit for occupation at all or in which the alterations required by Dr. AYRES are not effected within a reasonable time.

I entirely concur with him as to the obvious necessity of a Medical inspection of houses already licensed, which should be periodical, and of houses before they are licensed.

The former duty was contemplated when Section XV of Ordinance No. 10 of 1867 was drafted, and the latter can now be enforced by a Departmental Order or by a Regulation by the Governor in Council, if such a course would not conflict with the powers of Section VII.

In my opinion it is not necessary for the Surveyor General to inspect or report upon the houses to be licensed.

21st January, 1874.

C. C. SMITH,

Registrar General.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE Governor.

This is a horrible revelation, and I feel under obligation to the Colonial Surgeon for the pains he has taken in bringing the subject to notice.

Measures must be adopted to remedy the evils pointed out. Send for the perusal of members and bring before next Executive Council.

22nd January, 1874.

A. E. KENNEDY.

MINUTE BY THE GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING THE Troops.

In the first place I should cancel all licences to keep brothels. I cannot think these establish- ments more necessary here than in any of the other British Colonies. I have never known thein to exist except at Hongkong and Singapore.

When sailors and others arrive at Hongkong, I know there are such places of resort; they imme- diately fly to them on landing, for a spree, when they get drunk and become riotous, and finish with a visit to the police office.

As to improving these houses in any way, it is impossible; they are so saturated with filth that they cannot be properly cleansed. The streets are so narrow and the houses so badly constructed and ventilated, that it would be impossible to make the present buildings healthy, or habitable except for

Chinese.

I would therefore recommend that they are all knocked down and proper healthy houses built, after the streets have been levelled and widened; the longer they are allowed to remain in their present state the worse they will be.

I think that a certain number of comfortable, clean, well-ventilated houses might be built and let to the most respectable women of this class, and not rented by old women, who make a living by keeping girls for prostitution. The girls would then be induced to keep a clean, tidy place, or men would not care to visit them.

H. W. WHITFEILD,

26th January, 1874.

Major General.

No. 11.

REPORT OF THE COLONIAL SURGEON ON HIS INSPECTION OF THE TOWN OF VICTORIA, AND ON THE PIG LICENSING SYSTEM. HONGKONG, APRIL 1874.

COLONIAL SURGEON, DR. AYRES, TO HON. J. G. AUSTIN, COLONIAL SECRETARY.

HONGKONG, 15th April, 1874.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward to you a report on the result of my rounds with the Sanitary Inspectors, for the information of His Excellency the Governor.

As I have already stated in my reports on the inspection of brothels, there are many things brought to notice there that are equally applicable to private houses, such as bad drainage, deficient ventilation, foul privies, filthy condition of houses, &c., &c.; but if I was astonished at the state of the brothels, they did not at all prepare me for what I was to find in private houses. As was the case with the brothels before I came, so it is with the back slums of the town; little or no superintendence has been thought of over the Inspectors. The Inspectors of Brothels, the Sanitary and Market In- spectors, have all been left pretty much to their own devices, as I have shown and shall show, nor does it seem to have come within the province of my predecessors to do this work.

d.

in

il.

IS

d

O T

t

P

r

Pigs are universally kept in the houses all over the town, the usual place for their reception being the kitchens, but they are by no means confined to that part of the house; if the droves are too large or the kitchens too small, they are kept in the same rooms the inhabitants of the house occupy, and are as frequently to be found in upper stories as on the ground floors; a very favourite place for them is under the bed. I have seen four of the usual divisions the Chinese make in one room, cach division having a bed, and underneath each bed a pig-sty, containing from five to seven pigs, the occupant of the house having a Government Licence to keep pigs, and having no other place to keep them in. Attached to this report I send eight Licences, by the authority of which the occupants of the houses kept pigs under their beds, and two others where the pigs, though not kept under the beds, were in the same room the people slept. and lived in. I could send many others.

This is an inaccu- rate statement.

C. C. Smith Registrar Gen.

The construction of this class of houses is against every sanitary rule as regards drainage, ventila- tion and cleanliness, which is rendered impossible to the inhabitants, which you will easily under- stand by what I shall show you. Many houses, being built back to back, have no yards; having only windows in front, there is nothing to promote a current of air through them. In others which are not built back to back, no yard is provided, but a narrow gully exists between the backs of the two sets of houses, about a yard wide, not used for passengers, but down which an open sewer exists, in which foul and fetid matter lies in pools, or slowly trickles from one pool to another, a slight descent assisting. The private drains existing are of the most complicated description, beginning in the kitchen of the house, and terminating goodness only knows where,in but too many cases in the earth itself (with no outlet), through which the filth percolates till it finds the water level.

The upper floors of the houses are made with very thin boards, which, not lying close together, render it impossible to attempt to wash them, as that would result in giving the inhabitants of the rooms below a dirty shower bath. The ground floors are, for the most part, mud, though sometimes badly tiled or covered with stone; on this mud floor, every imaginable filth falls, from saliva to the pigs' urine draining from the pens, so that the earth is saturated with decomposing animal and vege- table matter of all descriptions, and the floor cannot be washed or cleaned.

I don't think the value of this sort of property is known, or the enormous prices for which these houses let. Repairs cost little or nothing yearly. In nearly every room three or more families reside. up to as many as six or eight; the rooms being partitioned off, cach partition pays a dollar and a half to two dollars a month rent, and a house with three rooms about fourteen feet square, with miserable little kitchens attached, will fetch from £55 to £70 a year; if it is a brothel, from £80 to £100 a year.

No. 130.

*SPECIMENS OF LICENCES ENCLOSED.

NOT TRANSFERABLE.

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE, VICTORIA, HONGKONG, 5th January, 1872.

CECIL C. SMITH,

Registrar General.

WONG A-FUNG is licensed to keep Three Pigs, on her Premises No. 4, Cross Street, till further notice.

No. 74.

NOT TRANSFERABLE.

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE, VICTORIA, HONGKONG, 8th September, 1874.

LI A-LAI is licensed to keep Four Pigs, (4) on her Premises No. 7, Hing Wan Lane, 15th June, 1875, till further notice.

CECIL C. SMITH,

Registrar General.

1. This licence is only issued for the number of Pigs stated on it.

No.

2. If any more than that number are kept, all the Pigs will be confiscated.

3. If the Pig-styes are not kept clean, the holders of the License will be fined, and the Licence will be cancelled.

4. If any Pigs are found in a house the owner of which has no Licence for keeping them, the Pigs will be confiscated, and the owner fined.

at

1. This License is only issued for the number of

NOT TRANSFERABLE.

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

VICTORIA, HONGKONG,

187

is licensed to keep.

stated on it.

'until further notice.

Registrar General.

2. If the Pig-styes, or other places where the animals are kept, are not clean, the holders of the Licence will be fined, and the Licence will be cancelled.

3. If any Pigs, or other animals injurious to the public health, are found in a house the owner of which has no Licence for keeping them, the animals will be confiscated, and the owner fined,

I saw one room with four partitions, for which the woman of the house paid $16 a month rent, the girls paying her $9 a month for each partition. So that it is evident, it is better to own property of this description, which requires little or no repair, than to own houses in better quarters, which pay less rent and require frequent repair. I mean that the inhabitants have no choice in the one instance, and the landlord none in the otlier, as to whether repairs shall be done or not, when they are required. I now proceed to give a few notes of things I saw in certain localities, which notes are applicable to many other places.

Fuk On Lane.-Ground floors of most houses are mud; upper floors, open spaces between the boards, so that neither floors admit of proper chimney; kitchens, poky little holes, overcrowded, and occupied by pigs. Steps at the upper end of this house were out of repair, underneath which are cavities containing liquid black and putrid filth.

Open space below Hospital Road, and east of Tung Hing Theatre, used as a place to shoot all sorts of rubbish, and a disgusting stench pervading the place.

Pound Lane.-South end filthy; no drainage; four cases of small-pox occurred here this year. Houses with broken floors, containing puddles of filth, from which a stench arose enough to make any one sick; outside, standing pools of filth in open drains. Tanks sunk in the ground floors of these houses containing filthy water, in which vegetables were being washed for the markets; also cake- making going on in these rooms, for sale in the markets; as many as from seven to twelve pigs kept in the kitchens here, the people having Licences.

Rutter's Lane consists of a passage about four feet wide, paved with large stones, with large cavities beneath them into which I could poke my walking-stick up to the handle without finding bottom, these cavities containing black and putrid liquid filth. The houses horribly filthy, and having pigs in them; in one house three children just recovered from small-pox.

At the top of this Lane is an open space, in which all sorts of rubbish are shot. Four wells in this space, which all, more or less, receive the drainings from the rubbish collected about. From three of these wells, the water only being used for cleaning clothes and vegetables, and the fourth used for drinking. Downspouts of the houses generally in a bad state of repair, and badly made.

Along the back of the houses in Upper Station Street runs a horizontal wooden trough, about six feet above the ground, which is used for conveying refuse water from the houses; this is not in good repair and leaks, the filthy water trickling down and polluting the walls of the houses. The foun- dations of these houses look anything but safe; the inhabitants expect them to tumble down before long, as the houses in front of them have already done.

Back of Market Street, Tai-ping-shan, a gully three feet wide, down which an open drain runs, the black and putrid filth trickling slowly along or standing in puddles.

Back of Tank Lane, a gully with no name. Pigs in the upper and lower stories, and in holes let into the foundations of the houses. Place filthy, baskets of putrid rubbish standing about outside the houses. In the midst of puddles of filth in the broken pavement, saw a hole sank in the ground, with a machine for pounding rice in it opposite to the doorway of a hole which could not be called a room, as it was not more than seven feet square, and was only large enough to contain a bed, in which a family slept, and underneath which were a lot of pigs.

Another gully with no name, one end of which opened into Caine Road, just below Dr. ADAMS' house; the other end into Market Street. This gully is floored with a platform of boards, raised about two feet above the ground; the earth below is sodden with black liquid filth, and underneath this foot- way fowls are kept, which afterwards go to the markets. The houses here are cramped-up little hovels, with filthy floors, and the inhabitants are licensed to keep pigs, as many as ten each.

First Street, Say-ing-poon, is a wide street, in which the houses look well from the front; pigs kept, of course. At the back of these houses are gullies of the foulest description, the stench from which is horrible, and in the rooms in these gullies the people keep pigs.

Wai On Lan. A gully at the back of, and composed of the basement floors of Third Street; nearly every room contained pigs, there being nearly a hundred in the place. I could not stay to inspect it properly, as the strench drove me out retching violently. These places, taken from different quarters of the town, arc quite sufficient to illustrate what I have said.

An intimate acquaintance, during the course of my student life in hospital practice, with the worst quarters of Lambeth, Waterloo Road, St. Giles and Somers Town, enables me to say that I do not believe there could be found in London worse places than are to be found in Hongkong, if so bad, and in Indian towns filth of the description found here would not be permitted by the "Caste" of the inhabitants.

Here the people inhabiting the worst quarters are not so poverty stricken; they wear good clothes and pay high rents, indeed, exorbitant rents, and nowhere have I seen anything approaching to the poverty I have seen in London or India.

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Few European residents of this generally supposed clean town know of or would believe the things I have brought to notice in this and my report of the brothels, and it is no wonder, under the circumstances, that, in their ignorance, they think the town is clean enough and more water is not required, secing, as they do, only the best quarters, and those that are fair enough outside but foul within and behind.

In many places the people have to go long distances for water, or else get it from foul wells; so that they have to do without it as much as possible, not because they don't want it, but because it is a great deal of trouble to procure. They never wash or clean the floors of their houses, because the construction of the floors does not admit of it; so water is not used in this way.

I am of opinion that, in the town, there is no fit or proper place for pigs to be kept at all, and this, at all events, should not be sanctioned by Government; but that places should be found out of town, over at Kowloon, and the pigs brought to market when required.

No house in the town should be permitted to have floors so constructed that they cannot be properly cleaned; in upper floors the boards should be well fitted together, so that they can be washed, and all ground floors should be well tiled and kept in repair. For the same reason, no mud floors should be permitted; every house should be well whitewashed within, ceilings and all, every six months, or at least every year. The landlord should be held responsible for these things, and for the drains being in proper order that belong to the house.

In some cases, however, the house drainage cannot be managed, as there is no proper drainage to the streets or gullies.

In future, no houses should be built without sufficient yard space at the back, and in no case should they be built back to back.

With such a state of things as I have reported here, no one will dispute, I think, that there is good reason for my prognostications as regards typhus and typhoid fever, and it is not to be won- dered at that cases become more and more frequent. I have seen three this week. A cholera epidemic here would be something too dreadful to think of, and small-pox, crowded as the inhabitants are, is by no means to be thought lightly of.

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Honourable J. G. AUSTIN,

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Colonial Secretary.

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[In C. S. O. No. 2321.]

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

THE PIG LICENSING SYSTEM.

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BANK BUILDINGS, HONGKONG, 6th August, 1874.

purpose of

SIR, Several applications have been made to me for ground to the westward for the keeping pigs, and I propose to prepare two considerable areas for this object,, viz., Inland Lots Nos. 671 and 674 Shek-tong-shui.

As these places are almost close to the slaughter house and removed from the neighbourhood of foreign residences, will you have the goodness to inform me whether the locality would be deemed unobjectionable.

с

Honourable C. C. SMITH,

Registrar General.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

GRANVILLE SHARP.

No. 68.

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE, VICTORIA, HONGKONG, 6th August, 1874.

SIR,—I beg to transmit to you, for His Excellency's consideration, a letter from Mr. Granville SHARP, who proposes to let out two of his lots (Nos. 674 and 671) for the erection of pig-sties.

I apprehend that I ought to issue the licences required, and allow them to continue in force so long as the places are kept clean and no nuisance is created.s

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

The Honourable the COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

CECIL C. SMITH,

Registrar General.

MINUTE BY THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

J. G. AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

Referred to the Surveyor General.

7th August, 1874.

MINUTE BY THE SURVEYOR GENERAL.

Honourable COLONIAL SECRETARY,

Public business connected with the licensing of places as pig-sties appertaining to the Depart- nent of the Registrar General, I would be obliged by your kindly referring this document to Mr. SMITH in the first instance. It is true that lately I have been prominently connected with pigs, but only indirectly so. Pig-sty nuisances had arisen from the inefficiency of Inspectors of Nuisances, and I undertook to explain and to make them understand what places were fit, and what places were not fit, from a sanitary point of view, for the reception of pigs. I think that soon they will thoroughly understand the matter and learn to act and judge for themselves, and that they will conse- quently become of somewhat more use to Mr. SMITH; then, of course, my services will not be required.

J. M. PRICE,

Surveyor General.

7th August, 1874.

MINUTE BY THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Referred to the Honourable Mr. SMITII.

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J. G. AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

10th August, 1874.

MINUTE BY THE REGISTRAR GENERAL.

I very much regret being wholly unable to understand why this letter, which I wrote myself, should be referred back to me. I cannot find anything in the Surveyor General's remarks calling for comment from me, except perhaps I may refer to the error which he has fallen into of supposing that I have anything whatever to do with the Inspectors of Nuisances.

11th August, 1874.

CECIL C. SMITH,

P.S.-Mr. SHARP is anxiously waiting for an answer to his application.

Registrar General.

MINUTE BY THE SURVEYOR GENERAL.

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30

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MR. AUSTIN,

I see no reason why Mr. SHARP should not convert the lots 671 and 674 into pig-sties, provided he paves the latter and keeps them sufficiently drained and free from filth and smell. I avail myself of this opportunity to respectfully, request some explanation in regard to questions of this kind, especially as to what office the Nuisance Inspectors are to report upon the eligibility of sites. I was under the impression that, as Mr. SMITH issues the licences, he would most naturally be the person to whom they should report. Had this been the case, the abuses lately discovered by Dr. AYRES as regards pig rearing in bed rooms could never have arisen. It may, perhaps, be worth while to con- sider the advisability of empowering the Inspectors to report directly to Mr. SMITH in the event of his requiring information upon the fitness or otherwise of sites which the public are constantly asking him to license as pig-sties.

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12th August, 1874.

J. M. PRICE,

Surveyor General.

MINUTE BY THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I think that the Inspectors should report on the eligibility of sites to the Colonial Surgeon, who would take care that all sanitary arrangements were provided for, and then refer any application to the Registrar General for issue of the licence.

12th August, 1874.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

J. G. AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

Inform Mr. SHARP in substance of Surveyor General's Minute. The duty of Inspectors of Nuisances is ill-defined and requires reconsideration. I think it desirable that some one officer

should be responsible that licences to keep pigs are not granted unless the locality and premises be suitable, and the locality and premises should be specified in the body of the licence.

A. E. KENNEDY. 12th August, 1874.

MINUTE BY THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

The Registrar General will be good enough to inform Mr. SHARP that the Government has no objection to the erection of proper pig-sties on Inland Lots 671 and 674.

13th August, 1874.

14th August, 1874.

15th August, 1874.

J. G. AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

MINUTE BY THE REGISTRar General.

Done.

C. C. SMITH,

Registrar General.

MINUTE BY THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

File.

J. G. AUSTIN,

Colonial Secretary.

ORIGINAL ANNUAL REPORT OF COLONIAL SURGEON FOR 1874, NOW PRINTED IN FULL, WITH

MINUTES AND MARGINAL NOTES."

C.S.O. No. 1081 of 1875.

Hongkong, dated April 5th, 1875.

Received, 6th April, 1875.

From Dr. РH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

To Honourable C. C. SMITH,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Annual Report of the Colonial Surgeon.

MINUTE BY THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I think that the Government is much indebted to the Colonial Surgeon for this Report, but I do not consider that it would be in any way advisable to print it in its entirety. It contains details which should be the subject of special Reports, and is in some parts misleading.

6th April, 1875.

MINUTE BY THE ADMINISTRATOR.

CECIL C. SMITH, Acting Colonial Secretary.

I quite agree with you that this cannot be printed in its entirety. I leave it entirely to your discretion to apply the pruning knife.

8th April, 1875.

MINUTE BY THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Forwarded for the perusal of the Honourable the Attorney General.

17th April, 1875.

19th April, 1875.

By Command,

MINUTE BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

J. G. AUSTIN,

Administrator.

C. C. SMITH, Acting Colonial Secretary.

Seen and returned.

JOHN BRAMSTON, Attorney General.

To Government Printer.

Proof to be sent to ine.

C. C. Smith,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 5th April, 1875.

SIR,---I have the honour to forward my Annual Report, for the year 1874, concerning the health of the Colony and the working of the different establishments under my supervision.

This year, the first of my service in the Colony, I have gained considerable experience to guide me in making this Report, for I made long and careful sanitary inspections of the town, both at the beginning and end of the year.

I made two Reports to Government, the result of my sanitary inspections of the town and brothels at the beginning of the year, and this winter another series of inspections have been made in company with Mr. PRICE, the Surveyor General, who has kindly given me the benefit of his experience in draw- ing my attention to many things he considered worthy of note. I have also to thank the Officers in charge of the different Departments for much information requisite for making up the accompanying Returns.

POLICE.

1

The health of the Police is much improved. Table I. shows that the admissions this year to Hos- pital have been less by 130, as compared with 1873, though that year was good when compared with previous years.

The Indians have suffered most, principally from mild attacks of Intermittent Fever, Diarrhea, and affections of the respiratory organs. Many of them suffer from Intermittent Fever in their own country before coming here, and the cases recorded have been mostly repetitions of previous attacks, and of quite a mild type. Those that have been brought over this year have been a stronger and better built set of men, and more care has been apparent in their selection. I had occasion last year in my Report to bring to notice the deficiency in this respect of many of the recruits, and, I am glad to see, with good results.

The admissions among the Europeans and Chinese have been principally from slight attacks of Intermittent Fever, and slight injuries received in execution of their duties.

Table II. shows the strength of the Force as compared with the sickness and mortality. The deaths in Hospital have been 8, as compared with 11 in 1873. Four other deaths occurred, of men who were not under treatment in Hospital. Three of them from causes not under control, and one while away on leave. These deaths are specially noticed in Table II.

In Table E. is seen the number admitted to Hospital for venereal disease, being 21, as compared with 59 in 1873; this will be referred to under the head of Lock Hospital.

TROOPS.

Table III. gives the strength, sickness and mortality of the Troops in Hongkong in 1874. Last year the rate of sickness and mortality had much diminished as compared with previous years. This year the admissions to Hospital, as compared with 1873, have been 379 less in number, showing a still further improvement; and the number of deaths have been 4 less than last year.

The admissions to Hospital for venereal disease this year have been only 65, against 223 in 1873; of these, 4 cases only were Primary Syphilis, and 50 Uncomplicated Gonorrhoea (see Table E).

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

I am happy to say some progress has been made towards building a new Civil Hospital; the site has been prepared, and the plans have arrived from England. That it is badly wanted, what I have to say under this head will show.

The working of this establishment has been exceedingly good, under the able superintendence of Dr. WHARRY, and also, during his absence on three months' leave, of Dr. W. C. S. CLAPHAM.

With the Wardmasters, considerable trouble has been experienced. Two were dismissed for drunkenness, and one resigned after serving his probationary term, dissatisfied with the appointment.

I drew special attention to these appointments in my last Report, as I considered them underpaid, and therefore not likely to attract the class of men required, or rendering them disgusted with their posts. The work is arduous and disagreeable, and requires a great amount of patience and tact.

As a rule, the newcomers are perfectly ignorant of their duties, and it is for the interest of the Establish- ment and the comfort of the patients that changes in these appointments should be rare, and the holders a superior class of men. The other subordinates have worked well. I desire specially to mention the Apothecary, Mr. A. A. BOTELHO, who has served in his present capacity over 20 years, and, For considera- I think, he is much overworked. All the books, accounts, &c., are kept by him, in addi- Estimates are tion to his duties in the Dispensary, and though he has done his work exceedingly well, much improve- ment is to be desired in the keeping of the Hospital Records, &c. This cannot be obtained unless a clerk is allowed, and I would recommend that a Chinese clerk should be obtained, for it is quite impossible for any one man to do the work required of Mr. BOTELHO, with the efficiency to be desired, work as hard as he may.

tion when next

prepared.

The number of admissions to the Hospital has somewhat decreased this year, being 829, as com- pared with 952 in 1873. Of these, 18 cases were moribund when brought to Hospital. The decrease in the number of admissions is specially worthy of notice, as it is owing entirely to the decrease of admissions from the Police Force, which I have before brought to notice. The number of patients ad- mitted, exclusive of Police and venereal cases, was 431, as compared with 404 in 1873; these numbers represent seamen, destitutes, and paying patients.

t.

Table IV. shows the varieties of disease and their relative frequency; the increase in the number of deaths being chiefly due to Phthisis, Fever, Intestinal Affections, and Surgical Injuries. Five of the deaths set down under the head of Chinese, from Remittent Fever, and two under the same head from Typhoid, were women brought from the licensed brothels, and occurred at the beginning of the

year; these I shall refer to hereafter.

One class of patients that contribute largely to the death rate, are the coloured destitutes, some of whom earn a precarious livelihood as watchmen; they are usually miserably clad and half starved, and are therefore more than ordinarily liable to disease, and when it does come, less able to resist it.

The case of Small-pox that died was a European engineer of a steamer, who contracted the disease in Shanghai in the month of June.

The two fatal cases of Typhoid among Europeans were brought from off a schooner (that came into this Port after the Typhoon) by my orders, while I was doing duty for Dr. ADAMS, who was un- well, and the other European cases were brought from Manila, Whampoa and Shanghai.

The number of dead bodies brought to Hospital for examination during the year was 150, four of them Europeans, and three coloured persons; many of these were brought in after the Typhoon.

The amount paid into the Treasury on account of paying patients was $3,036.73, compared with $2,440.08, the amount paid in 1873.

On the night of the 22nd September, 1874, this Colony was visited by a terrible and most destruc- tive Typhoon. The old Civil Hospital suffered severely; it was more than half unroofed; the back verandah of the upper floor, which was supported by large stone pillars, was blown down, and also the outer walls of one of the rooms. The inner walls bulged and cracked fearfully, and the whole building rocked and shook with each gust, in the most frightful manner; to add to the troubles of the inmates, the gas went out, and the alarm of the patients can better be imagined than described. Dr. W. C. S. CLAPHAM was then in charge, and it is entirely due to his courage and presence of mind, and his admi- rable arrangements, that no fatal accident occurred, for the panic among the patients was so great that, at one time, some of them tried to leave the building, which if they had succeeded in doing, it is more than probable that they would have been killed, or severely injured, by the falling masonry. However, under Dr. CLAPHAM's superintendence, the patients were all removed into the lower rooms, most of them into his own quarters, and he went round them the whole night quieting their fears and making them all as comfortable as circumstances permitted, though he himself was, at the time, suffering from a most painful affection of the knee joint. I visited the Hospital early next morning and arranged for the removal of the patients into the Lock Hospital, of which four of the largest wards were given up to them. Fortunately, the number of patients in the Lock at that time was small, and this was done without inconvenience; arrangements being made, so that the inmates of the Lock were completely cut off from the part of the Hospital made over to the patients brought from the Civil Hospital, and before night all was comfortably settled, though the accommodation was barely sufficient, owing to the number of cases of injury, &c. that were brought in during the day. This arrangement continued till the middle of November. Meanwhile, a block of buildings near the Central Police Station, formerly a Hotel, had been hired by Government, and was being fitted up and repaired, and, as far as possible, arranged for a temporary Civil Hospital until the new one is built. Under Dr. CLAPHAM'S superin- tendence, on the 13th of November the patients, stores, &c. were removed from the Lock and old Civil Hospital to the new buildings, and, with much trouble, everything was, in a few days, got into working

order.

I have much pleasure in testifying to the admirable way in which Dr. CLAPHAM per- formed all his duties while Acting Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, and the courage and ability he showed in their discharge during and after the terrible night of the Typhoon. His kindness and courtesy made him generally esteemed by all with whom he came in contact, and a more satisfactory substitute for the Superintendent of the Govern- ment Civil Hospital could not have been found.

Omit.

The buildings now used as the Government Civil Hospital, though the best that could be obtained, are by no means satisfactory; being situated in the centre of the town and surrounded by buildings, they will be very hot in the summer, and will hardly get a breath of air. There is no ground attached to them, [only one water-closet in the whole block,] and in many other ways they are unsuitable; besides, Government has to pay a very high rent for them, and it is therefore to be hoped that the building of the new Hospital will be proceeded with as speedily as possible.

Omit.

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TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

There is little more to say concerning this Institution than has been said in previous Reports. As Professor WYVILLE THOMPSON, of the Challenger Expedition, observed, when visiting this establishment with me: "As a Hospital it is beyond criticism." Formerly, I am told, there used to be what were called "dying houses," the Chinese having the greatest possible objection to any one dying in a dwelling house; to these places people were brought in the last stage of disease, to die. The attendant in charge of the house was only omit. obliged to supply the dying people with water, and if they took hours or days to die, that was all they got. The Tung Wah Hospital has taken the place of these "dying houses," but the Chinese have a great objection to going to Hospital, except in the last stage of

disease.

This year 1,008 patients were admitted, as compared with 959 in 1873, and 505 died, as compared with 388 in 1873. So that it appears the mortality, which was about 40 per cent. in 1873, has increased to over 50 per cent. this year. This, I think, shows that the Chinese do not go into this Hospital with any confidence; the treatinent amounts to nothing, except in surgical cases, and then what is done is more harm than good. Twenty one Small-pox patients were admitted, and fifteen died. A great number of out-patients come for advice. There were 39,359 attended this year, but a Chinaman is very ready to take advice, for it is not uncommon to see a Chinese patient taking the remedies of half a dozen native Doctors, besides those of several old women, at the same time. On my inspec- tions round the town, I saw an old woman very busy making pills. I asked her what drugs she was using. She said she did not know, but the pills cured everything. I asked what their action was, but she could not say; she could not tell whether they purged, as she had never tried them herself, but they were good for every complaint, and she sold plenty of them. I gave Professor THOMSON a Chinese native Doctor's prescription. It con- sisted of vegetables entirely, which might be caten with impunity in any quantity; the patient for whoin it was written died, but the Chinese Doctor did not know what was the matter with him.

Omit.

All that can be said for the Tung Wah Hospital is, that it is kept fairly clean; the patients get good food, and, according to Chinese ideas, very comfortable accommodation. The one great good that this Hospital does is vaccination, which it has greatly assisted in spreading; 1,246 were vaccinated this year.

VICTORIA GAOL.

Table VII. shows the actual number of Hospital cases. Table VIII., the number of prisoners treated in their cells. The Hospital consists of seven small wards, only capable of holding two patients in each ward; so none but the worst cases are taken into Hospital, and even this accommodation is only for men; all women becoming seriously sick have to be sent to the Civil Hospital. There has been only one death in the Gaol this year, and most of the cases have originated outside. Diarrhoea, Dysen- try, Fever, Bronchial Affections and old Ulcers have been the principal complaints treated. I find the average number of prisoners who desire to see me daily is about fifty, but these are not all cases of disease, but applications for change of diet, alterations in their work, &c., and these are about the admissions daily to be inspected. I have been compelled to give extra diet to the European prisoners in a great many cases, and I would suggest an alteration in their diet,--that, instead of a pint of tea for breakfast, they should have a pint of gruel; for I find that the tea in the morning causes a great deal of indigestion, and as the hardest labour of the day is done between breakfast and dinner, tea, I think, is a mistake. Short sentence prisoners, such as drunken sailors sent in for 14 days, have the whole time on bread and water, which, I think, is too severe; seven days bread and water should, I think, be the longest time in this climate. It renders a man totally unfit for work when he goes out, and a glass of beer given by a friend would be quite enough to send him to Gaol again for being drunk and disorderly.

Omit.

Omit.

Table IX. shows the number of prisoners, as compared with the sickness and mortality in the Gaol. During this year several lunatics have been sent to Gaol, simply because they were lunatics, and there is no other place of safety in which to put them. The noise they make in the Gaol Hospital not only keeps the whole Gaol awake, but also the whole neighbourhood around. One case this year caused violent public indignation, and the patient, who is a woman, has been removed to a room in the half ruined Old Civil Hospital. I would suggest that the upper story of this building be cleared away and the lower one repaired and roofed and kept for cases of this description, which not unfrequently occur. They should not be put in either the Hospital or the Gaol, for patients ought not to be disturbed by the frightful crics of a lunatic day and night, and I am sure the prisoners get sufficiently punished with hard fare and hard work without being deprived of their sleep at night.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

Vide.C.5.0, No.

14th April, 1875.

The improvement of having stoves in the wards of this building, as I suggested in my Report last year, I am glad to say has been carried out, and that leaves nothing to be desired.

Hardly any damage was done to the building by the Typhoon; only a jillinill here and there was broken and a few panes of glass.

Table X.A. shows the number of admissions, which have been much less than usual, compared with the last few years. Table B. shows the number of women brought under the provisions of the Contagious Diseases Ordinance, and this number is also less than that of 1873.

Table C. shows the number of men diseased during the year, which is 207, as compared with 421 in 1873, or rather less than half the number.

Table E. shows the character of the diseases. It will be observed that only 3 cases of Primary Syphilis occurred among the Military, and only 4 cases among the Police. Of the Navy, out of 85 cases of venereal disease, of all classes, 50 were not contracted in Hongkong, and very few of the cases recorded as Primary Syphilis were contracted here. But the Military and Police show the working of the Ordinance best, as they are residents and know the licensed brothels better, not being so apt to be led away by sly prostitutes. With a considerable number more men in Port and Garrison, the amount of disease is shown to be less than half of what it was in 1873.

The largest number of women in Hospital this year at any one time was 58, and that was in the month of June. For the first time this year, the European and American women were brought under the Ordinance in August last, with good results, as several who were engaged in spreading disease quitted the Colony. They are visited at their own homes.

Owing to the number of cases of Fever of a Typhoid type being brought to the Civil Hospital from the Chinese licensed brothels, I received a request from the Government to inspect and report upon them. [This I found had never been done by any of

my predecessors.]

This is hardly correct.

Omit.

C. C. Smith.

J. G. Austin.

I went through all the brothels, took note of every house, and reported the number of women it could decently contain, and what repairs or alterations required to be made.

Without exception, these places were filthy, overcrowded dens. The floors, walls, ceilings, black with filth and smoke; with sleeping rooms next to the privies and over them, separated from them only by thin planks, with wide apertures between the boards; buckets of night-soil of several days accumulation standing putrifying in the privies, and no disinfectants used; filthy kitchens, having no chimneys and the smoke pervading the house; drains choked up and stinking. In fact, I found all the conditions favourable for the production of Typhoid Fever.

Omit.

In consequence of my Report, many houses were closed altogether. For the others, I wrote out instructions, some of which applied to all the brothels, others to individual houses only, concerning whitewashing, painting, cleaning, &c., the removal of privies, sleeping rooms, &c.

This winter, making the inspection, I find a wonderful change has been effected; the houses look clean, light and airy for the most part, and, by the end of this year, I hope to have them all in good condition. I have again gone through every house, and entered in a book what I desire should be done. To fairly inspect these houses, requires about 15 inspections of an afternoon each, but the results have been well worth the trouble, for since the carrying out of my suggestions, no cases of Typhoid have been found in these houses. There are 123 licensed Chinese brothels, containing 1,358 prostitutes now, besides the keepers, servants, &c.

I think I may fairly claim that good and efficient work has been done in this department under my charge.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

Table XI. shows the mortality among the Europeans and Americans in the Colony during the last ten years, and by this it would appear that the Colony had been less health than during the pre- vious two years, but this in reality is not the case. Deducting the number of those that were drowned or otherwise killed during the Typhoon, the death rate has not increased appreciably. The rainfall last year was considerably above the average, nearly 10 inches over that of 1873, and 23 inches over that of 1872, as shown in Table XIII.

SANITATION.

Table XII. shows the work of the Inspectors of Nuisances in part ouly. The number of persons fined has been much less than usual, but the fines have been much heavier than before.

To Govt. Printer. The report should end here,-I have the honour

C. C. Smith.

Omit.

On the subject of Sanitation I also made a long special Report at the beginning of this year, and, for that Report, I made a series of inspections in company with my Inspectors. I have this winter made another series of inspections in company with Mr. PRICE, the Surveyor General. The result of these inspectious goes to prove that however much on the surface the town of Victoria may appear cleaner than most Eastern towns, beneath the special report surface it would be difficult to find a filthier condition of things.

My first series of inspections discovered that pigs were kept in houses all over the town, by hundreds, and that pigsties were to be found under the beds and in the kitchens

It seems to me that all may be omitted from this. We have the

and action will be taken so soun

us means and circumstances

permit.

J. G. Austin.

Մ

I

1

t

1.

t

{

:

of first, second and third floors. I visited many houses in which over a hundred pigs were kept; every bed in these houses had from five to seven large pigs in a sty constructed underneath it, and either from the connivance or ignorance of a late Inspector of Markets, whose duty it was to see that the pigs were kept in proper places, many of the people had Government Licences so to keep their pigs. Imagine houses whose upper floors are con- structed of thin boards, with wide interstices between them, and whose lower floors are mud, and the state they would be in under these circumstances, with pigs' urine, &c. dropping through from floor to floor! It is needless to observe that the minute this state of things was brought to the notice of Government, it was at once put a stop to, and that now all pigs found in houses are confiscated, and, on repetition of the offence, the owner is fined as well.

The late inspections were still more thoroughly done, and nearly every street, lane and gully in the lower quarter of the town were visited, and notes of the condition of the houses, draius, &c. were taken carefully, with the following results:--

There are three different styles of construction of houses in the lower quarters of the town. First, houses which are constructed in blocks, back to back, with no ventilation except from the front. Secondly, houses with narrow gullies from 1 foot to 6 feet wide at the back, down which a filthy open drain runs, or a very dilapidated closed one. Into these drains the downspouts of the different floors of the houses on each side of the gully empty themselves. Thirdly, houses with lanes at the back, for the convenience of the inhabitants of the cellar floors, the back of these floors being formed of the ground of the street above, owing to the hilly nature of the ground on which the house is built.

Otherwise, the construction of these houses is the same throughout the town. Each floor consists of a large main room and a small kitchen; generally the kitchen is at the back, but in cases where the back of the floor is against the hill-side, the kitchen is in the front, and whatever ventilation there is, the air has to come through the kitchen before it reaches the inhabitants in the main room.

The average size of the main rooms is 26 feet by 14 feet by 10 feet high, containing eight partitions, averaging 7 feet by 6 feet by 7 feet high, over which a sort of loft is often built to increase the accommodation, and in a room of this description, from 16 to 25 people live. It is extremely rare to find that walls or ceiling (which is composed of the bare rafters and boards of the floor above, or of the roof) have ever been whitewashed; if they have, it was only when the house was first built; the walls are generally bare bricks. The ground floor is, in nine cases out of ten, composed of mud; in the other case, it is composed of tiles or stone flags, and is generally very damp. The upper floors are com- posed of rough quarter-inch planks, with wide interstices between them.

In no case, from the time the house had been built, had the floors ever been washed, their construction, as a rule, rendering it impossible. The first-floor tenants cannot wash their floors, because they are mud; the upper floor tenants cannot wash theirs, because they would, if they attempted it, half drown the inhabitants of the floors beneath them.

In each partition of the main room, a family, or several members of a family, sleep. The men go to the public privies; the women and children use covered pots, which are kept in the partitions under the beds; the night-soil is removed, on an average, every third day; it varies in some cases from two to five days.

Women of the lowest class rarely wash themselves; men, only the exposed parts of their persons.

I have seen many women who have candidly confessed that they have not even wiped themselves down with a damp cloth (which is the Chinese mode of washing) for years, and I saw no reason to doubt their words. If any washing is done, either of bodies or clothes, it is generally done in the kitchen. Clothes-washing varies from once or twice a month to once in several months, or not at all, and a cotton suit will last, I am told, from five to six years, and more; if they were washed often they would not last. so long.

long. Many articles of clothing are never washed at all, on any account; those that are quilted, for instance. Bedding is composed of quilted cotton, or a stuff resembling soft felt, covered by a light net to prevent it from tearing, and in no case is ever washed ; sheets are never used. I never saw any entirely new bedding; the newest I saw was three years in possession of the owner, and he had bought it second-hand. I have seen bedding twenty years old, and that was bought second-hand. It is taken out and aired occasionally, and a few of the vermin picked out, if they are found to be too numerous.

The average quantity of water used daily by each individual is about two quarts, and this is considered sufficient, as a rule, for cooking, drinking and washing purposes. Often it has to be brouglat from a considerable distance, and this is troublesome and expensive, so they do with as little as possible.

Kitchens' average size is 13 feet by 6 feet by 10 feet high, with stone or tile floors, always very wet and dirty. It is rare to find a chimney; there is generally a square opening in each of the floors above, forming a sort of shaft, without walls to it, and the smoke gets up through these if it can, or escapes by a small window; that is to say, part of it; the

Vide Ordinance

No. 9 of 1867,

S XIV.

:

rest pervades the house. In each kitchen there is a small drain in the upper floors; the opening is connected with a downspout, which either passes outside the house or down through the kitchens below. All the inhabitants, when at home, of every floor urinate in their kitchen drain; this is a rule without an exception. The walls and ceilings of the kitchens are always covered with a thick layer of soot.

Ground floors, as a rule, are very dark; the rooms usually have only one window, averaging 3 fect by 2 feet, and the door, for light and air to come through, and they require lamps to be burning day as well as night in order to see anything. The upper floors are

often not much better.

The house drain is generally in filthy condition, and in many cases choked; the downspouts are often in the same condition. These latter are, for the most part, com- posed of unglazed pottery piping, and on the walls down which they run, on either side of them is seen a dark, damp stain, showing how the filthy liquids they convey filter through them, or escapes from the joints, into the walls of the houses.

The drains in the gullies, lanes and smaller streets appear originally to have been very badly constructed of rough cut and unfaced stones, loosely put together, which, in many places, have sunk into the ground quite out of their original position, and quite as much liquid as the drains carry off filters out of them into the ground. I have found in many cases from six to eighteen inches of semi-solid, black, putrid filth stagnant in them, accord- ing to their size. Many of them have never been opened since they were first constructed twenty or thirty years ago, and some of them have been built over at parts, and their outlets choked, lost and forgotten; but of such places as these tons and tons of filth have been removed only to accumulate again.

In some streets large new sewers have been lately constructed by Government. I notice that the house drains are not connected with these sewers, and I am informed that, in the existing state of the law, householders cannot be made to connect their drains with the new sewers.

Many houses in Tai-p'ing Shan have wells either in the main room or kitchens of the ground-floors, and these wells are invariably within one or two feet of the house drains and downspouts. In some cases the water smells or tastes so bad that it is not used for drinking, but in others, where there is no smell and the water is only apparently slightly foul, the water is used for drinking. In some of the lanes large public well exist, and the drains invariably run close alongside them, and the condition of things is such that the sewage must filter through the earth in many cases, and mix more or less with the water in the wells. When the water is not used for drinking, it is used for washing vegetables for the markets, for washing clothes, and often for preparing food, &c., &e.

This is a simple statement of facts as I have found them, and I think it will not be found difficult, after this explanation, for those who read this account to present in their imaginations a slight idea of the state of filth in which at present the lowest class of Chinese exist. I have not spoken of the state of the drains in the better quarters of the town, for that is patent to the eyes and noses of the public and attracts sufficient atten- tion. If it were not for the heavy rains flushing them frequently in the hot weather, matters would be worse still.

The Typhoon was a great sanitary visitor in the lower quarters of the town, and though it caused a great amount of destruction of rotten old buildings, it did a world of good. From this it will be seen that every condition exists for the development of cholera or fevers of a typhoid character; if the seeds are once sown, they will have a fair start. Port Louis, Mauritius, a town similarly situated at the base of high hills, with

every similar convenience for a good drainage, and having an equally bad state of things, but certainly not worse, has suffered most severely from epidemics, though once it was a renowned sanitarium. I was in the Colonial service there in the fever epidemic of 1867 and 1868, and I sincerely hope I may never see such another, the death rate at one time exceeding 600 people daily. Let the rains fall short, or the monsoons cease to blow here for a time, and Hongkong would be the scene of a similar catastrophe. That condition of things occurred in the Mauritius, and it is not impossible it may occur here.

Hongkong has still an evil name; that it once deserved it, there is no doubt, though it does not at present; whether it will ever deserve it again is the question which, unless some improvement take place in the water supply and drainage, it is possible may

be answered in the affirmative in the future.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Sent to Surveyor General.

C.S.O. No.

Omit from this.

J. G. Austin.

It is a little surprising to find the Colonial Surgeon or any Professional man with a knowledge of the position of the two Colonies, comprising the one with the other.

C. C. Smith.

The Honourable CECIL C. SMITH,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

HONGKONG.

Your obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

Note.-Those portions of the foregoing report not marked to be omitted, were printed as the Colonial Surgeon's Annual

Report in the year 1874.

or

ad

=

WATER-CLOSETS IN HONGKONG.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

Let me have a return and a report from the Inspector of Buildings showing what water-closets are in existence in the Colony, distinguishing those in public and in private buildings, and the dates when they were put up.

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY.

3rd August, 1880.

MINUTE BY THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Will the Surveyor General be good enough to get a report from the Inspector of Buildings?

3rd August, 1880.

MINUTE BY THE SURVEYOR GENERAL.

(Signed) F. STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Return herewith. I gave Mr. NEATE the Governor's instructions in respect of this work on the same day I got the document, i.e., the 4th instant.

The return has taken long to prepare, as it had to be made from actual house to house visitations from one end of the town to the other.

23rd August, 1880.

(Signed)

J. M. PRICE,

Surveyor General.

LETTER FROM INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS TO SURVEYOR GENERAL.

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, August 20th, 1880.

SIR,-In accordance with your instructions that I should, with the assistance of Mr. GERMAIN, make for His Excellency the Governor a Return of the water-closets in Victoria which run soil into drains, I have the honour to hand you the accompanying schedule, which contains the best informa- tion I have obtained.

I remain,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. R. NEATE,

Inspector of Buildings

PREMISES IN VICTORIA IN WHICH THERE ARE WATER-CLOSETS.

No.

WHEN FITTED UP.

in

of

East Point, Ice House,

Messrs. Kyle & Bain,

1

h.

>>

Sugar Refinery,

Praya East, Dwelling, Praya Central, Offices,

Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.,

4

1873. Uncertain.

Messrs. Meyer & Co.,

1

""

Messrs. D. Sassoon, Sons & Co.,

7

Four about 1878; three about 1875.

""

>>

""

""

Peddar Street,

""

Praya Central,

"}

""

>>

>>

Messrs. Russell & Co.,

2

Uncertain.

Messrs. Holliday, Wise & Co.,

3

>>

Messrs. Melchers & Co.,

""

Messrs. Carlowitz & Co.,........

""

Messrs. Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

2

""

""

Pottinger Street,„,

Queen's Road Central, City Hall,

Messrs. McEwen, Frickle & Co.,

1

""

Messrs. Gibb, Livingstone & Co., Committee,

3

4

>>

HK. & S'hai Bank, Corporation,

""

Offices,

"

""

"

Store,

>>

""

Hongkong Hotel,

Messrs. Adamson, Bell & Co., Messrs. Heuermann & Co.,...... Lessees,

1

""

1869.

Re-arranged 1877. Uncertain.

1

"

9

">

2.

"}

"}

Hongkong Club,......] Committee,

6

Re-arranged 1876.

Carried forward,.

51

al

+

PREMISES IN VICTORIA IN WHICH THERE ARE WATER-CLOSETS,—( Continued).

No.

WHEN FITTED UP.

Brought forward,...

51

Praya Central, Offices,

Queen's Road Central, Store,

Messrs. D. Lapraik & Co,

1

Uncertain.

Messrs. Falconer & Co.,

3

"?

>>

""

""

Medical Hall,

Wyndham Street, Club Germania,

"

"

Hollywood Road, No. 9,.. No. 7,..

"

Gage Street, No. 17,....

Gough Street, Central School, Arbuthnot Road, Residence,...

""

Magistracy,

"

Offices,

"

"

""

Messrs. Eça da Silva & Co.,.

27

China Traders' Insurance Co., Mr. Th. Koffer,

2

"

""

Committee,

3

""

Daily Press Office, Hotel de l'Univers,..

Mr. R. C. Wilcox,

1

>>

Mr. V. Favre,

5

??

Mr. Stainfield,

"

Messrs. Framjee & Co.,.

">

Messrs. Asgar & Ismail,

Head Master,

1

""

Dr. Young,

1

·

29.

First Clerk,

1

""

""

""

Gaol,

Residence,....

Superintendent,

1

Mr. G. L. Tomlin,

1

""

"

No. 3, No. 4,

""

""

Duart,

Upper Albert Road, Government House,

""

St. John's Place,...

Lower Albert Road, Government Offices, Albany, Residence,

Albany Terrace, No. 1,.

""

Seymour Road, Seymour Terrace, Castle Road, Woodlands, Mosque Terrace, Residence, Caine Road,

"}

""

""

>>

""

>>

>>

>>

Italian Convent,

Residence,

Spanish Procuration, Residence, Kingsclere,.

Japanese Consulate,. Residence,

""

Peel Street, No. 19,

Shelley Street, Club Lusitano,

Praya Central, Harbour Master's Office, Hospital Road, Government Hospital, Bonham Road, Fairlea,

Praya West, Gas Works,

Queen's Road Central, Stag Hotel,

Seymour Road, Idlewild,

Wanchai, Naval Hospital,

Queen's Road East, Commissariat Offices,

Mr. A. Coxon, Mr. J. Squier,. Mr. J. A. Smith, Mr. Lowcock, Lessees,

Mr. A. dos Remedios, The Rev. F. Saintz,

Mr. H. L. Dalrymple, Mr. E. R. Belilios,. Consul,

Sir John Smale,.

Dr. Adams, Health Officer,..

Dr. Ayres, Colonial Surgeon,.

Officers Commissariat Department,. Committee, Harbour Master, Superintendent, Mr. A. G. Aitken, Mr. A. Newton, Mr. J. Cook,.... Dr. Murray,

Naval Authorities,

....

Military Authorities,

The Honourable P. Ryrie,

2

""

Mr. A. G. Romano,

1

""

The Governor,

4

Dr. O'Brien,

Government Officers,

4

1877. Uncertain.

The Honourable F. Snowden,

""

Lieut. Friend,.

1

Mr. H. Stolterfolt,

1

>>

Mr. C. Hermann,

1

Mr. C. Champeau,

1

"

1

>>

""

"

""

""

About 1870.

,,

Uncertain.

""

"

""

""

""

10

Re-fitted 1878.

1873. Uncertain.

""

1873. Uncertain.

North Barracks,

"

""

""

West Murray Quarters,

>>

"}

"

Ordnance Store,.

>>

""

>>

Murray Barracks,

""

1876.

17

6

1879. Uncertain.

1

""

1

""

2)

}"

TOTAL NUMBER OF WATER-CLOSETS,......

182

The Military Authorities have also Latrines which run soil into the drains, at-

The Victoria Barracks,

The Wellington Barracks,

The Murray Barracks,

1

2

1

4

NOTE.-Those marked “Uncertain" were, I believe, fixed before I joined the Department, and several probably many years ago when the buildings were erected.

SUMMARY:

Water-Closets, Private,

"}

""

Colonial Government, Naval,.....

""

Military,.

.131

23

17

11

182

Military Latrines,

the

EXTRACT OF REPORT BY INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS.

In my Return of the 20th instant I have distinguished the public, i.e., Government, and private water-closets, and stated the dates of their erection to the best of my ability.

I now beg to add that but few water-closets have been fitted in private buildings, to my knowledge, within my term of office.

Many of the existing water-closets' may have been fitted up in the belief that they were in accordance with the requirements of section 10 of Ordinance 8 of 1856; such impressions have, however, been erroneous, as by section 14 of Ordinance 8 of 1856, and sub-section 1 of section 2 of Ordinance 14 of 1815, they are prohibited from connection with the sewers, and by section 14 of Ordinance 8 of 1856, cesspits are rendered illegal; therefore, the water-closets of Ordinance 8 of 1856 become simply water-commodes.

Were it legal to run soil into the sewers, it would, in my opinion, still be unadvisable, even with an ample supply of water all the year round, because the filth would still be washed to and fro in front of the town, or lie on the foreshore for certain periods.

The town's being on the hillside is an additional and important reason why the drains should be kept as free from night-soil and other filth as is possible, as the rapid incline of the drains facilitates the movement of the gas, which, in escaping, contaminates the atmosphere of the neighbour- hood above each drain opening throughout the town.

Water-closets generally, when in order, for the reason that they conduct foul sewer gas into the dwellings, are objectionable, but when out of order, which is commonly their condition, they are much more so."

The system generally adopted in Hongkong of removing from the town daily the contents of commodes is, in my opinion, the best adapted to the place.

I further think that the community would benefit were the flow of excrement into the sewers from the existing water-closets prohibited in future by virtue of section 14 of Ordinance 8 of 1856 and sub-section 1 of section 2 of Ordinance 14 of 1845.

26th August, 1880.

(Signed)

S. R. NEATE, Inspector of Buildings.

COPIES OR EXTRACTS OF DESPATCHES FROM GOVERNOR SIR JOHN POPE HENNESSY, K.C.M.G., TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THE EARL OF KIMBERLEY.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 8th July, 1880.

MY LORD, The Ordinance No. 8 of 1856, "An Ordinance for Buildings and Nuisances," gives the local Government complete control over the construction of all buildings in the Colony. This law contains a series of minute and stringent rules, with adequate penalties, framed to prevent the construc- tion of any houses that are not built on what was then supposed to be the best sanitary principles. Mr. O'MALLEY, the Attorney General, tells me that the Ordinance was evidently copied almost entirely from certain Sanitary and Building Acts in force, at that time, in England. I cannot find that the Chinese householders were in any way consulted on the subject when it was being framed and passed; and the result is that some of its provisions are entirely unsuited to this Colony and would do more harm than good if enforced. Amongst other things, Clause VIII provides that it shall not be lawful to construct or re-construct any house without a sufficient water-closet or privy. This is copied from an English Metropolitan Act, but the system of water-closets and house privics is a system quite out of place in a tropical Colony, and not in accordance with the customs of the Chinese people.

The Chinese house-bucket system, especially when combined with the dry earth system (which in various ways more or less perfect they have practised for centuries), is far better than a system of water-closets and house privies. The Chinese inhabitants maintain that the attempts now and then made by successive Surveyor Generals and Colonial Surgeons to force what is called "Western Sanitary Science" upon them, are not based on sound principles. As I stated in the Legislative Council in November, 1878, in a discussion in which I referred to Ordinance 8 of 1856, the leading Chinese residents had said to me:-

"Nothing alarms us more than the Government projects of drainage and water supply for flushing "house sewage. They are not consistent with our mode of living."

On that occasion I quoted the views of one of the most experienced medical men in China, Dr. DUDGEON of Pekin, in support of the Chinese house-bucket system as opposed to the underground drainage system, whether connected with water-closets or house privies. In his work on "The "Diseases of China contrasted with those of Europe," he says:-

«

"Much that is recommended at home in the way of ventilation, water supply, and disinfection of privies is rendered in China unnecessary. All the advantages claimed for the dry earth system are gained here free of expense to the individual or public. The industrious and frugal habits of the

The

Chinese, and even their very poverty, thus work to their advantage (all sanitary measures more than repay their cost), for it compels them to utilise all excrementitious matter. Every particle of every "kind of manure, besides rags, paper, etc., are collected and preserved with the greatest care.

private privics, which are all out of doors, are visited daily by these manure collectors, and so great is the demand for it, that no payment is made to these scavengers. Foreigners pay a trifle monthly "to guarantee respectability, cleanliness, and regularity on the part of the collector. The healthiness of our foreign settlements in China is, in a great measure, owing to the absence of water closets in "the dwelling-houses, which, in Europe, are a fruitful source of discase. Gases, such as sulphuretted "and carburetted hydrogen, are not so injurious to health when given off in the open air, as when "escaping from sewers. China is, par excellence, the country of bad smells, and yet, as we have seen, "the people do not seem to suffer from them.

i.

"The removal of excreta and the disposal of sewer water is the sanitary problem of the day in "Great Britain. Our sewers allow transference of gases and organic molecules from house to house "and place to place; occasionally, by bursting, leakage, or absorption, the ground is contaminated, "and the water supply is constantly in danger of being poisoned and contaminated; and all these "dangers are greater from being concealed and being beyond individual control. Fevers and cholera. "are thus possibly propagated from house to house. In China we are entirely free from this danger."

With the best possible intentions, the Colonial Surgeon and the Surveyor General have, from time to time, been arguing against Dr. DUDGEON's views and the long established practice of the Chinese community. Those Officials advocate an underground net work of drains and sewers in Hongkong, and of compelling the Chinese to build their houses and to modify their domestic arrange- ments in accordance with "the methods of Western Sanitary Science." I have pointed out to them. that the methods of Western Sanitary Science of a few years ago, which they are so fond of quoting, are no longer considered infallible; and that some Public Health Officers in England seem even disposed to take a lesson now from the experience of China and to adopt views similar to those of Dr. DUDGEON. I have reminded them that the only fatal cases of Typhoid fever that occurred in Hongkong since my arrival, have been in European built houses with water-closets; and that the Chinese residents never suffer from Typhoid fever or Diptheria.

Some of the provisions of Ordinance 8 of 1856, have undoubtedly done good, and I have insisted on those provisions being strictly enforced. In addition to this Ordinance, I have been able in all cases where verandahs are built over road ways or Crown Lands to supplement the existing law by stipulating for some extra sanitary improvements. Lot 4 was originally sold by the Government in the year 1841. Some of the buildings that were still on it last year, and some of the buildings now standing on the adjoining lots, were erected before the Building Ordinance of 1856 was passed. As I pointed out in December last, the new buildings were to be better than the old ones. It was only after reciving a report from the Surveyor General to that effect that I then recorded upon the plans my sanction to the proposed verandahs. The result has been in this case that some Chinese houses of an inferior class have been replaced by houses of a superior class, substantially built, and particu- larly well ventilated.

enclose for Your Lordship's information a copy of the Building Ordinance No. 8 of 1856, and a copy of the Verandah Regulations. I also enclose a copy of four clauses that, after consulting the Surveyor General and the leading Chinese householders and builders in July 1878, I was able to add to the Verandah Regulations, with a view to improved sanitary measures being adopted. The Memo- rial of the Chinese, out of which these four new clauses originated, was published in the Government Gazette in July 1878. It is an interesting document, and I venture to ask Your Lordship's attention to what they say in paragraph 3, respecting the recent rules of Western Sanitary Science.

For Your Lordship's information, I also transmit copies of a correspondence that passed in August and October 1879, respecting the old Chinese houses in the neighbourhood of Lot 4, and the necessity for securing proper sanitary arrangements in the vicinity of the Barracks.

I have nothing to say in defence of some of those old houses that were built thirty years ago. Under the operation of the existing law, better houses, not open to sanitary objections, replace them from time to time. All I can do is to have them clean, whitewashed and not overcrowded, and to insist that the Sanitary Officers keep the streets, nullahs and public latrines in the vicinity in proper

order.

With respect to the alleged overcrowding, unusual sickness, and want of cleanliness in the vicinity of those houses, the Colonial Surgeon reported on the 29th of August, 1879:--

"These houses can hardly be called overcrowded. In no case is there less than 250 cubic feet "for every individual inhabitant, men, women and children included; and never reckoning the space "in verandahs and kitchen, the average space would be about 400 cubic feet for each individual.

"There has been no unusual sickness in these houses that I can ascertain."

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY.

The Right Honourable THE EARL OF KIMBERLEY,

Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies,

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GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 15th July, 1880.

MY LORD,-Adverting to my despatch No. 99 of 12th instant, I now lay before Your Lordship some copies of the original Annual Report of the Colonial Surgeon, Dr. AYRES, for the year 1874, which I ordered to be printed in full with the minutes and marginal notes.

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Two special reports of the Colonial Surgeon, made in 1874, have also been found in the Colonial Secretary's Office, one on the Sanitary state of the brothels licensed by the Registrar General's Department, and the other on the state of certain houses where pigs were kept under licences from the Registrar General's Department. Both of these reports have been sent to the printer, and copies will be transmitted to Your Lordship by the next Mail.

In paragraph 12 of my despatch No. 97 of the 8th instant, I referred to the fact that I had insisted on certain useful provisions in Ordinance 8 of 1856 being enforced in all new buildings or re-constructions. As an illustration of this, I enclose for Your Lordship's information an application (with the various minutes showing the official action thereupon) that came before me in January 1879 from the leading European Architects in the Colony, suggesting that I should allow certain houses which were to be built for a Chinese Bank and a Goldsmith's Shop to be constructed without kitchens or cooking places. As I usually do in such matters, I desired to see the opinions of the leading Chinese on the question before I finally decided it; and I venture to draw Your Lordship's attention to the sensible views these gentlemen expressed. The Acting Chinese Secretary's report, dated 1st February, 1879, is as follows:-

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"I consulted the leading merchants of the Nám-pak-hong Guild on the subject. They are of opinion that in Section VIII of Ordinance 8 of 1856 we have a very good and useful rule, viz., that "in all buildings which are used or liable to be used, either partly or entirely, as dwelling houses, there "should be safe cooking places. With reference to the arguments adduced in Messrs. WILSON and "SALWAY's letter, they are of opinion that, although the owner of the premises may wish his tenants or " employés to obtain their food from cook-shops, there is no certainty that they would always do so. On "the contrary, they are of opinion that the employés on the premises would be certain to boil, at

rate, their tea on the premises, and boil water every evening for bathing, the consequence of which any "would be that the smoke would become a nuisance to the other tenants, and that the lighting of fires "in unsafe places would endanger the whole house and the surrounding houses too."

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The statement of the native merchants that the Chinese tenants and employés would have to boil water every evening for bathing purposes, would not surprise any one really acquainted with the habits of even the poorest Chinese. No doubt, certain Europeans in Hongkong, as well as in California and Australia denounce the Chinese as a dirty race, who never batle, and even the Colonial Surgeon has, in the suppressed passages of the enclosed report, made a few general statements on this subject that are somewhat misleading. The fact is that, in this important sanitary practice, they are a clean people, and even in the lower classes set a good example, which our soldiers and sailors here would do well to follow.

In another despatch I shall do myself the honour of proposing the formation of a separate Sani- tary Department in this Colony, somewhat similar to the Department of the Public Health Your Lordship established in 1872 in Sierra Leone. No fresh legislation will be required to start such a Department in Hongkong, as clause XIII of Ordinance 9 of 1867, and clause XXXV of Ordinance 10 of 1867, give the Governor ample power to appoint a Medical Inspector of the Sanitary State of the Colony, and an Inspector of Hospitals. Those clauses have not been hitherto availed of, princi- pally, I understand, on account of the unwillingness of my predecessors to increase the establishment charges. The satisfactory state of the Colonial revenue will, however, enable Your Lordship to appropriate a reasonable sum for this object in future.

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(Signed)

J. POPE HENNESSY.

The Right Honourable THE EARL OF KIMBERLEY,

Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonics,

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