Administrative Reports - 1909

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1909

Table of Contents

1 Finances

2 Trade and Shipping, industries, Fisheries, agriculture and Land

3 Legislation

4 Education

5 Public Works

6 Government institutions

7 Institutions Not Supported By Government

8 Criminal and Police

9 Vital Statistics

10 Postal Service

11 Military Expenditure

12 General Observations

A Financial Returns

B Assessment

C Registrar General's Department

D Harbour office

E Observatory

F Supreme Court

G Police Magistrates' Court

G1 Land office

H District officer, New Territories

I Police and Fire Brigade

J Prison

K Medical and Sanitary

L Botanical and forestry

M Education

N Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

O Public Works

P Post office

Q Kowloon-Canton Railway

 




HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1909.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the

Government, August 4th, 1910.

No. 231.

HONGKONG.

1

MY LORD,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 20th July, 1910.

I have the honour to submit for Your Lordship's information the following general Report on the annual Blue Book for the year 1909.

1.-FINANCES.

(1.)--GENERAL REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The Revenue for the year, exclusive of Extraordinary Revenue and Widows' and Orphans' Fund and Contributions amounted to $6,286,833 or $251,984 more than for the previous year. The Extraordinary Revenue (Land Sales, Widows' and Orphans' Pension Contributions and special Light Dues) amounted to $536,134 or $468,776 more than in 1908, when, however, no collection was made on account of the last two items. The total revenue from all sources was $6,822,967 or $718,760 more than in the previous year, and $113,971 more than the Estimate.

There were increases under every head of Ordinary Revenue, and receipts under the remaining heads were altogether $119,166 less than were anticipated, with a deficit on Land Sales accounting for $118,403.

The Expenditure for the year was $5,313,386 exclusive of Public Works Extraordinary; inclusive of that item it was $6,542,839 or $1,386,639 less than the total expenditure for 1908, which however included Railway Construction disbursements now entered in a separate account.

Rate of Exchange for both years was taken at 1/9. The expen- diture of the year was less than the Estimate by $238,327, due (inter alia) to crediting Charge on account of Public Debt with re- imbursements of interest paid in previous years on account of Advances for Railway Construction, and to no such charge having been debited in 1909.

The increase of $113,971 in the Revenue, and the decrease of $238,327 in Expenditure make a total surplus of $280,128 instead of an anticipated deficit of $72,170. The above figures exclude a re-imbursement of $354,065 from Railway Account.

2

The following Table shows the total revenue and expenditure for the five years 1905-1909 :—

1905.

1906.

1907.

1908.

1909.

$

$3

$

Revenue,

6,918,404 | 7,035,011|6,602,280 6,104,207|6,822,967 Expenditure, 6,951,275 6,832,610 5,757,203 6,573,341 6,542,839

Surplus,

Deficit,

*

202,401 845,077

**

280,128

32,871

469,134

* Railway Account Disbursements and Re-imbursements omitted.

(b.)-COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,226,441 (being the statutory contri- bution of 20% of the Estimated Revenue for 1909 together with the ascertained excess of Revenue over the Estimates on account of 1908), towards the cost of the maintenance of Military Forces in the Colony including Barrack Services and Defence Works.

(c.)—ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

At the end of the year 1909, the assets of the Colony amounted $615,438. The total liabilities were $264,340 so that the balance of assets over liabilities amounted to $351,098. The sum to be re- imbursed by Railway Construction Account was on 31st December $1,002,071 which added to balance above makes the Balance of Assets in General Account up to $1,353,169 a sum greater than in Decem- ber, 1908, by the surplus Revenue in 1909, viz., $280,128.

(d.)-PUBLIC DEBT.

A Loan consisting of Inscribed Stock at 31% interest, £341,799 was incurred in 1893 for Praya Reclamation; Central Market; Water, Drainage and Sewerage Works, &c., to be paid off on 15th April, 1943.

A second Loan consisting of Inscribed Stock £1,143,933 at 34 per cent. was raised in 1906 to cover a Loan to the Viceroy of Wuchang of £1,100,000. The Viceroy in accordance with the terms of the Loan had up to the end of 1909 repaid £440,000 which was placed to the credit of a special account for construction of the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

The contributions paid into the Joint Sinking Fund, with accrued interest from investments thereof, came to £86,980. 2s. 5d. on the 31st of December, 1909, but the value of the fund, according to market prices, was £86,577. 78. 9d.

}

II. TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES, AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.)-TRADE AND SHIPPING.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1909 amounted to 527,280 Vessels of 34,830,845 tons which, compared with that for 1908, shows a decrease in num- bers of 4,832 vessels, with an increase in tonnage of 215,604 tons.

Of this total, 43,794 vessels of 22,415,125 tons were engaged in foreign trade, and were distributed as follows:-

British Ocean-

going ships

represented,...

Foreign Ocean- going ships represented,...

British River Steamers re- presented,......

Foreign River

Steamers re- presented,......

(under 60

1909.

1908.

9.3% in Nos. and

34.5% in tonnage. 33.7%

9.8

35.1

33.2

"

""

13:2

16.5

19.2

"

""

3.2

3.3

3.3

1

""

Steam-launches

tons) repre-

sented,..

7.2

Trading Junks

represented,... 57'3

100.0

0.6

0.8

"1

10:0

9.8

22

་་

100'0

100'0

The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the above figures.

Of ships of European construction, 4,191 Ocean Steamers, 7 Sailing Ships, 3,576 River Steamers, and 1,580 Steam-launches (i.e., steamships not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 25'6, as compared with 26-8 in 1908.

The average tonnage of individual Ocean vessels visiting the port has slightly decreased-from 2,448 6 tons to 2,390-4 tons. That of British vessels has remained stationary-2,594 as against 2,593- while that of Foreign vessels has decreased from 2,309'9 to 2,205'3

tons.

I

In this connection it is interesting to note that during the past twenty years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the Colony has risen from 1,182.3 tons to 2,390'4 tons.

The average tonnage of River steamers entered during the year decreased from 6655 tons to 6206 tons, that of British River steamers from 687 to 6404 tons, and that of Foreign River steamers from 565 2 to 5381 tons.

A comparison between the years 1908 and 1909 is given in the following table :-

1908.

1909,

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No.

British

Ocean. 1

3,869

going,

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

7,505,870 4,076

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

7,735,927

207

230,657

Foreign Ocean-

4,132

going,

7,397,836 4,318 7,857,908

186

460,072

British River

6,246

Steamers,..

4,287,482 5,780 3,701,754

466

585,728

Foreign River

Steamers,.

1,297

733,065 1,370

735,682

73

2,617

:

.... J

Steamships un-

der 60 tons

4,060

181,142 3,160 140,484

900 40,658

(Foreign

Trade)....

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

25,833, 2,201,242 |25,080 | 2,243,370

42,128 743

Total Foreign

Tr. de,

45,437 | 22,306,637 (43,794 | 22,115,125 466

735,474 2,109 626,386

Steam-launches

plying in Wa-

ters of Colony,

445,724 10,460,682 439,988 | 10 328,400

5,736 132,28

Junks, Local

Trade,

*40,951

| *1,848,522 143,498 †2,087,320 2,547

238,798

Grand Total, 532.112 34,615,841 527.280 34,830,845 3,013

974,272 7,845

758,668

Net,.........

215,6044,832

Including 16,808 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 862,256 tons.

+

"1

19,094

>>

>>

of 1,022,676

""

This table shows an increase in British Ocean Shipping of 207 ships of 230,657 net register tons, or of 53 per cent. in numbers and 3 per cent. in tonnage, which points to a continuance of the revival of trade noted in my report for 1908. The improvement has been continuous throughout the year.

3

5

British River Steamers have decreased by 466 ships of 585,728 tons, or 74 per cent. in numbers and 13 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the loss of two large steamers, the "Powan" and "Ying- king" which ran for half of 1908; to the withdrawal of two smaller steamers, the "Hoi Sang" and "Kwong Fat", and to the laying up, during three months, of 1909, of another small steamer, the

Tak Hing".

Foreign Ocean vessels have increased by 186 ships of 460,072 tons, or 45 per cent, in numbers and 6'2 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due almost entirely to Japanese shipping, which has increased by 118 ships of 459,292 tons. Increases are also shown under the Norwegian and Swedish flags-of 58 ships of 64,400 tons, and 47 ships of 70,265 tons, respectively. Portuguese and Dutch flags also show small increases. The principal decreases are under French and German colours-of 45 ships of 58,133 tons, and 19 ships of 16,848 tons, respectively; small decreases being shown under Russian, Austrian, and Italian flags. Under the United States flag there was an increase of 7 ships with a decrease in ton- nage of 42,211 tons; while there was a similar fall in the average size of Chinese ships, an increase of 2 ships being accompanied by a decrease of 3,503 tons.

Foreign River Steamers increased by 73 ships of 2,617 tons, or 56 per cent. in numbers and 0:35 per cent. in tonnage, which is explained by the smaller vessels running more frequently and the larger less often. Two small River Steamers under Chinese colours were added to the West River run during the year. These vessels run only as far as Kong Mun, thus making many more trips than those running up to Wuchow.

It may not be out of place to draw a comparison here between these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 1889, 2,591 British ships of 3,242,953 tons entered the port, against 9,856 ships of 11,437,681 tons in 1909. For Foreign ships the figures are for 1889, 1,144 ships of 1,206,983 tons and in 1909, 5,688 ships of 8,593,590 tons. These figures are those for Ocean and River Steamers, which were not distinguished in 1889, and Ocean Sailing Ships (not Junks).

The actual number of individual Ocean vessels of European construction entering during 1909 was 704 being 336 British and 368 Foreign. The corresponding figures for 1908 were respectively 745, 365, and 380.

These 704 ships aggregated 1,682,845 tons. They entered 4,198 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 7,796,376 tons. Thus

compared with 1908, 41 less ships entered 207 more times, and a collective tonnage increased by 343,878 tons.

gave

Thus :-

Steamers.

No. of Times

entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1908. 1909. 1908.

1908. 1909.

1908. 1909.

Steamers 358

331 1,923 2,034 3,730,9273,854,571

British

Sailing...

7

5

10

7 21,697 17,683

Austrian,

9

7

25

24

97,789 94,288

Belgian,

1

1

...

2,903

Chinese,

16

24

229

232

291,416 290,936

Corean,

1

1

796

Danish,

6

5

15

16

34,211 31,426

Dutch,.

15

17

97

105

201,014 207,190

French,

39

32

169

148 289,222 262,459

German,

129

108

745

Italian,...

4

2

12

Japanese,

93

98

434

735 1,188,100 1,176,322

11 31,400 28,470 493 1,049,540 1,283,330

}

Norwegian,

39

43

181

212

192,278 227,341

Portuguese,.

5

4

87

94

23,487

36,927

Russian,

7

5

13

9

34,326

19,584

Swedish,

3

5

11

35

18,099 53,726

United Steamers 13

17

38

42

245,280 211,327

States Sailing...

1

1

809

Total,

745 704 3,9914,198 7,452,498,7,796,376

TRADE.

As pointed out last year, and in many previous years, the figures which used to appear under this heading were as a whole never accurate, and, in some cases, actually misleading. However, in the few items of Import Trade of which substantially accurate details can be given, the following remarks may prove of interest. These items are Coal, Kerosene Oil (including all products of Petroleum), Opium, Morphine, Compounds of Opium, and Sugar.

Coal. I find that 1,126,836 tons were imported into the Colony during the year. This shows an increase over the imports of 1908, of 108,083 tons, or 10.6 %. This would appear to be due to nothing more phenomenal than an increased demand, and to a general improvement in business and manufactures. It is a curious fact that although the imports of coal have increased to this extent, the shipment of bunker coal in the Colony has decreased. This is due to the fact that an increasing number of vessels, calling at Hong- kong, prefer to take their bunker coal elsewhere, e.g., Japanese and most transpacific liners in Japan, Chinese in Canton-whither a

**

considerable quantity of coal passes through Hongkong in transit- and many vessels on the home run at Singapore, &c. This may be due in part to the fear of detention in Hongkong, enhanced by the prevalence of typhoons of late years.

Kerosene Oil. Decreases are shown in all classes of this product, viz. :--26,235 tons of Bulk Oil, 3,858 tons of Case Oil, and 9,493 tons of Liquid Fuel. These decreases are only what might have been expected after the phenomenal increases in 1908, (indeed, my remarks on the subject foreshadowed them), and do not indicate any falling off in the trade. Liquid Fuel has increased consider- ably-(32%) over the figures for 1907-the last normal year.

Opium. The imports of Raw Opium show a decrease of 6,087 chests, or 145 per cent. while the exports declined by 3,620 chests, or 9.7 per cent. During the year 1909, the raw opium trade of the Colony is described by the following figures:-

Stock in hand, 1st January, 1909, Imported during the year,

5,808 chests.

35,734

15

Total,

41,542

""

Boiled by Opium Farmer,

Spurious Opium destroyed,

Exported during the year,

1,044 51

35,938

"

""

Total,

Stock remaining on 31st December, 1909,.

37,033 4,509

י

Of the several varieties of opium exported, Malwa decreased by 348 chests, or 6.1 per cent., Patna by 1,674 chests, or 78 per cent.. Benares by 1,228 chests, or 126 per cent., Persian by 410 chests, or 13 per cent., while no Turkish opium was either imported or exported, and Chinese opium has never formed any appreciable part of the trade of the Colony: It is obvious from the above figures that the supply does not meet the demand, as 1,300 more chests were disposed of than were imported. China took 92'4 per cent. of the exports.

Imports of Compounds of Opium increased, as compared with 1908, by 2,543 lb., or 23·83%, and exports by 1,613 lb., or 19:56%, while the amount which remained in the Colony for consumption increased by 930 lb., or 38.1%. Imports of Morphia showed an increase of 356 lb., or 5'06%. Imports and exports of Cocaine were recorded for the first time and for the period from April 22nd to - 31st December showed 68 lb. imported and 12 lb. exported.

Sugar. The imports of sugar show a considerable increase of 89,766 tons, or 36 per cent. This article is peculiarly liable to sud- den fluctuations, and the increase may be due to increase of stocks owing to favourable prices.

The following remarks upon other items in connection with which there are no official figures may be of interest.

Cotton and Yurn.-With scant Yarn supplies all round and consu- mers both in the Southern and Northern provinces favoured with boun-

tiful rice and other crops, the year 1909 opened with bright prospects. A fairly extensive business was transacted in the beginning but as the year advanced the continually increasing price of Cotton con- siderably enhanced Yarn values and consumption became in the end slightly reduced. On the whole the year was particularly re- munerative to importers and Chinese dealers alike, seeing that the market ruled ever on an upward tendency. On the other hand, owing to the increasing cost of manufacture, as the result of extra- ordinarily dear raw material, the Mills fared very badly. The year closed with stocks light and prices abnormally high.

A new feature in the Yarn Trade of the Colony was the floating of several limited liability companies with Chinese capital for the transaction of business in Cotton and Cotton Yarns, which have given a new life to the trade.

Piece Goods.-The year was a good one for dealers in piece goods. The large orders placed towards the close of 1908 went with one or two exceptions rapidly into consumption.

Silk. The year opened with but little demand from Europe and America and the market for the first quarter of the year ruled quiet. There was a slight activity in the middle of the year, and the year closed with better prospects in the immediate future.

Matting. Owing to the uncertainty which prevailed in the United States during the first half of the year as to what new rate of duty would result from the tariff revision, the trade was much interfered with. Business done showed a considerable decrease.

Mats and Carpets.-The market was fairly active during the year, the largest exports being to Europe.

Metals. Prices ruled fairly low with consequent increase in business.

Flour.-The total reported imports of flour during the year amounted to 58,583 tons as against 91,312 tons in 1908, a decrease of 35.8%. The decrease is due to the fact, noted last year, that direct shipments to coast ports are now made. Another disposing cause for the decrease is the fact that the Shanghai flour mills, which obtain their raw material locally, are now successfully competing with American flour at the coast ports:-Foochow, Amoy, Swatow, &c., and are even sending through cargoes to Canton.

Rice.-In spite of a hopeful outlook last year, Rice has failed to come back to its previous figure. It has again declined from 721,254 tons to 541,078 tons, or 25 per cent. This is due to a partial failure of the crops in Cochin China, and to the fact that many cargoes of rice from Saigon have been sent direct to coast ports, without touching, much less transhipping, at Hongkong.

The total reported Imports during the year amounted to 4,195,968 tons as against 4,169,856 in 1908, an increase of 0·6%. Exports also show an increase, from 2,102,857 tons to 2,239,731 tons or 65%; and Transit Cargo increased from 3,372,993 tons to 3,991,347 tons or 19%, but for the reason given these figures are not reliable.

Emigration and Immigration.

Seventy-seven thousand four hundred and thirty (77,430) Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1909. Of these 52,923 were carried in British ships and 24,507 in Foreign ships. These figures show an increase, compared with those for 1908, of 6,349 (or 893 %), which may be accounted for by the return of the business to normal conditions, and to the resumption of emigration to Banka and Billiton.

It may be well to note the increasing proportion of Emigrants carried in Foreign vessels. This appears to be due to the increasing numbers going to Hawaii, who can only travel in United States ships, as well as to the resumption of emigration to the Dutch Indies, which is carried in Dutch vessels.

One hundred and forty-four thousand eight hundred and twenty-one (144,821) returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 157,809 in 1908. Of these 109,633 arrived in British ships, and 35,188 in Foreign ships.

(b.) INDUSTRIES.

(Under European Management.)

Engineering and Shipbuilding.—This is one of the most impor- tant industries in the Colony. The principal establishments are the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., and the Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Co., Ld. There are a number of smaller yards, some under European and others under Chinese management, which do a large amount of work.

The Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company is an old estab- lished company. The establishment is equipped with six dry docks, the largest of which is 700 feet in length with an entrance breadth of 86 feet and a depth over sill of 30 feet; two patent slips and work- shops fitted with the most modern appliances for every class of con- structional and general engineering work including locomotives and railway rolling stock.

The Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Company is a newly established company. The establishment possesses a dry dock 787 feet in length with breadth of 88 feet and depth over sill of 34 feet 6 inches besides three slipways and engine and boiler shops capable of dealing with the heaviest classes of engines. Two vessels of over 13,000 tons (gross) each were docked by this company during the

year.

The building yard is laid out with furnaces and plant suitable for building vessels up to 20,000 tons.

The depression which existed in 1908 in this industry was continued during the year under review.

Sugar Refining. The year 1909 was a favourable one for the Sugar Refining Industry of the Colony as there was a good demand in the China markets throughout that period, and in consequence of a general advance in sugar all over the world a satisfactory margin of profit was obtainable.

}

10

As was the case in 1908 Beetroot sugar did not find its way into the China market in any appreciable quantity.

Cotton Spinning. During the earlier part of the year the local Mill was handicapped owing to the inadequate supply of labour, but this difficulty was overcome. Further difficulty was experienced in obtaining the raw material at the beginning of the cotton season as the crop although large was a late one.

Rope Manufacturing.-Business has kept steady and prices have remained the same throughout the year.

Cement. The conditions under which this industry has been carried on have been much as in 1908, and there has been a good demand throughout the year.

Brewing. The Oriental Brewery was at work during the year and its beer in spite of the strong competition of the imported article is gradually finding favour with the public. Its capacity is about 100,000 barrels per annum.

Soap Boiling.-Messrs. Blackhead & Co. manage a Soap Factory at Shaukiwan. It was established in 1896 and is equipped with modern plant capable of turning out 1,800,000 lbs. of soap per month. The principal manufactures are soft soap, salt water soap, toilet soap, and tar soap which are locally consumed or exported to North China.

(b.) INDUSTRIES.

(Under Chinese Management.)

Rattan and Fibre Furniture.-The making of rattan chairs has been an important industry in Hongkong for many years. There has also been lately a large development in the use of what is called Sea Grass (Arundo Mitis) and hemp string. The ordinary rattan easy and garden chairs are used all over the Far East and are exported to Australia and latterly to South Africa, and "sea grass" and "linen fibre" furniture is exported to India, Copenhagen and America.

Tobacco.

There are thirteen or fourteen native factories which do a small manufacturing business, importing the tobacco leaf from Pakhoi and the Canton Delta.

Tinned Goods.-The manufacture of tinned goods in Hongkong and parts of the neighbouring province of Kwongtung has acquired considerable dimensions. The products of the factories are consumed locally and exported to other parts of China and to countries where there is a Chinese population.

Samshu.-Samshu or Chinese spirit is made from rice, the fermenting material being a substance composed of rice, bean flour, red earth and leaves which are stated to be cassia leaves. Various well-known beverages are prepared by flavouring the spirit with plums, oranges and other fruits.

The retail price of the ordinary Chinese spirit is under 7 cents a catty. The most expensive beverage distilled locally and composed of roses, ordinary spirits and sugar costs 40 cents a catty. Medicated spirits have a considerable sale among the Chinese. The spirit principally used is one distilled from millet and obtained from the

11

--

North of China. To this spirit are added various drugs and the mixture is used as a tonic.

There are seven Chinese distilleries exclusive of the village distilleries in the New Territories which have an annual output of some 300,000 gallons, about one-tenth of which is exported.

Vests and Socks.-There are three small factories for the making of underwear and socks, and a fourth is shortly to open. This in- dustry appears by now to be an established one. The first factory was opened five years ago, has increased the number of machines and is now beginning to pay its way.

Hides and Leather.-There are seven or eight tanneries where an inferior kind of leather is manufactured. Gall-nuts from Japan are used in the manufacture. The greater part of the hides that reach Hongkong from the interior is sent to the Straits Settle- ments where suitable bark can be procured, to be tanned, and sent back to Hongkong as leather. There is an occasional export of hides by local dealers to Italy.

Preserved Ginger.-Canton has long been noted for its preserved ginger. The manufacture has now been transferred to Hongkong where there are a number of factories, three of which do a large export business.

Soy. Soy is a sauce made by boiling the beans of the "Glycine hispida, Maxim", adding an equal quantity of wheat or barley and leaving the mass to ferment. A layer of salt and three times as much water as beans are afterwards added, and the whole compound stirred daily for two months when the liquid is pressed and strained. Seven or eight Chinese factories are engaged in the manufacture of soy in Hongkong, and three firms export it to Europe. It is also exported to America. The wholesale price is about $20 the cask of 700 lb. Business during the year has been dull.

Paper. There is one paper mill capable of turning out 9,000 lb. of paper in 24 hours. At present only half the machinery is used and about 100 men are employed. The mill is lighted by electricity. Most of the paper is exported to China: a little goes to the Straits Settlements and elsewhere to the South. The rags are collected from all over South China: the other materials are imported from England.

Vermilion. There are three vermilion factories. Their average annual output is stated to be about 830 piculs. There is a demand for the vermilion all over the Far East from Japan to Calcutta. This business is falling off owing probably to the primitive methods of manufacture.

Lard.-There are seven lard factories in existence-the largest turning out about 60,000 piculs a year and the remaining six about 12,000. The lard is exported to the Philippines, the Straits Settle- ments, etc., and to Rangoon. Business during the year showed no increase.

(c.) FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat-population of Hongkong supports itself by deepsea fishing, in which pursuit a large number

1

ހ

12

of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan, and many others in the New Territories are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

(d.) FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE AND BOTANY.

The formation of pine tree plantations in the Harbour Belt between Lai-chi-kok and Lyemun has been continued to the extent of 300 acres, and failures in the older plantations in this area, in the catchment areas of Kowloon and Tytam Reservoirs and in the felled areas of Mount Kellet and Aberdeen have been made good. A few seedlings of the Nanmu or Coffin Wood-tree have been planted on the north side of Mount Victoria, the south side of Mount Kellet and at Aberdeen. A few Eucalyptus seedlings have also been planted at the latter place.

Shade trees in Kowloon and Hongkong have been replanted where necessary. Large quantities of brushwood have been removed from the plantations in various parts of the Colony and given to the villagers as payment for work done by them for the Government. A contract extending over three years has been made whereby 710 acres of old pine tree plantations at Mount Davis, Aberdeen and Tytam have been sold for felling. Several hundred thousand square feet of brushwood have been cleared in the neighbourhood of dwell- ings at Shaukiwan, West Point, the Peak and elsewhere in connection with the crusade against mosquitoes and malaria.

The crops of vegetables, rice, and fruits in the New Territories have not been so good as in the previous year.

Lists and samples of local plants and vegetable drugs were prepared and submitted to the Honourable Dr. Ho Kai who was good enough to make a prolonged investigation into their uses by Chinese druggists and herbalists. The lists with Dr. Ho Kai's recommenda- tions as to which of the plants and drugs were worthy of scientific investigation were then forwarded to the Director of the Im- perial Institute, London, for report as to whether any of them contained medicinal or toxic qualities, or had economic value. lists were sent by the Imperial Institute to the Pharmacopoeia Committee of the General Medical Council who reported that there were not sufficient indications of the extent or employment of in- dividual plants to justify the inclusion of any of them in the Colonial Addendum to the British Pharmacopoeia. Professor Dunstan added that none of the plants seemed likely to yield products of economic value which are not already known.

The

Seeds of Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites cordata, Soja hispida and Perilla ocymoides, barks of Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites cordata and Aleurites triloba, as well as several kinds of vegetable oils were also sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute for a report as to their commercial value and suitability for the English market.

Work on the Flora of Hongkong, the New Territories and province has been carried on during the year, and a list with a key to the species, genera and orders is now nearly complete.

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(e.) LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.

The net amount received from Sales of Crown Land and pier rights after deducting expenses of sales was $40,665, a decrease of $28,693 on the previous year and $155,230 less than the average amount received for the last 5 years. Of this amount $14,401 was received in respect of the sale of various pier sites and extensions to existing piers, 5,318 was received in respect of sales of land in the New Territories and the remainder from sales of new lots of Crown Land and grants of extensions to existing lots in the island of Hongkong and Old Kowloon. The chief items were received in respect of sales of building lots in Hollywood Road (Inland Lot No. 1836) and at Shaukiwan (Shaukiwan Inland Lot No. 418).

There has been little demand for new building sites in the City but a general improvement in the land market appears to have commenced and it is generally reported that better prices are obtained than in the previous year.

There has been a considerable number of sales of small building sites for native dwellings and industries in the New Territories where, except in the districts easily accessible to the City of Victoria, land is generally sold at the price of one cent per square foot with an annual Crown Rent at the rate of $50 or $100 per acre according to locality. With the opening up of the Territory by the Railway and the new roads now being constructed, the demand is likely to increase.

There has also been a considerable increase in the amount of waste or uncultivated lands let on annual or short term leases. This system has been adopted to meet the frequent demands of cultivators in the New Territories who were unable or unwilling to pay a premium for a long lease.

The whole of the extensive oyster beds in Deep Bay formerly held on annual permits have now been granted on leases for 21 years to the occupiers, special stipulations being inserted in the leases for the proper working of the beds.

III-LEGISLATION.

Forty-six Ordinances were passed during 1909. This number has only once been exceeded in the history of the Colony, namely in 1902, when 47 Ordinances were passed. But of the 1902 Ordinances no less than ten were for the naturalization of certain persons, a matter which under the Ordinance relating to the Naturalization of Aliens (No. 44 of 1902) no longer requires legislation in each case. Thirty- two of the 1909 Ordinances were Amendment Ordinances. The laws relating to opium were consolidated (No. 23), and the law as to trade marks was recast (No. 40). Ordinances were also passed to regulate the construction and management of railways (No. 21); to authorize the construction and maintenance of a harbour of refuge, the necessity for which was demonstrated by the disastrous typhoon of 1906, at Mong-kok-tsui, in Kowloon, (No. 39); to provide for the periodical inspection of steam boilers and prime movers (No. 32); and to provide for the collection of duties upon intoxicating liquors (No. 27).

14

IV-EDUCATION.

There are 71 Government and Grant Schools, the most important of which is Queen's College. Of these 22 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction on all subjects of the 7th Standard, and above. These latter schools have an average attend- ance of 4,337, and the medium of instruction in all of them with the exception of five girls' schools, is English. The 49 remaining schools are all Lower Grade. They comprise one school for British Indians where English and Urdu are taught; four Government and one Grant Anglo-Chinese Schools; and 43 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 2,223. The total average attendance, at both Grades of School, is 6,560.

The revenue derived from school fees is $68,204 (of which $40,792 is from Queen's College) and is rapidly increasing: this is mainly to be accounted for by the increasing numbers of Chinese desirous of an English education.

Hongkong is fortunate in including among its schools two limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Government. In 1909 the combined average attendance at them was 80. As might be expected they have a strong patriotic bias: they are supporters of the Empire League, and the boys' school provides a small but effi- cient cadet corps.

Higher eductation is represented by the Technical Institute, where instruction is given in the evening in Mathematics, Machine Drawing, Building Construction, Field Surveying and allied subjects in Chemistry and Physics; in the English and French languages, Book-keeping and Shorthand. There is also a Teachers' Class, at which the junior Chinese masters of Government and Grant Schools are expected to attend. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped laboratory. The lecturers are chiefly Civil Servants recruited from the European staffs of Queen's College and the Public Works Department. These officers receive fees for their services.

A scheme for the foundation of a University is rapidly being matured, the building fund having been furnished by the generosity of Mr. H. N. Mody and the endownment fund by private subscription. It is hoped that the University will be opened with chairs of Medi- cine, Engineering and Arts by the beginning of 1912.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

Of the principal works in progress, the Kowloon Waterworks Reservoir was not finished as anticipated owing to the necessity of having to cancel the contract and procure fresh tenders for completion. The trench for the Mongkoktsui Breakwater was also not quite completed owing to special repairs to the Dredger St. Enoch caused by the Typhoon in October. The New Government Offices and Law Courts made fair progress.

The following works were completed :-Extension to Public Works Offices (Annexe); Staff Quarters at Tai Po; Alterations for Quarantine Station at Lai Chi Kok; Permanent Stairway from Ball Room at Government House; Wongneichong and Tai Kok Tsui

-

14

IV-EDUCATION.

There are 71 Government and Grant Schools, the most important of which is Queen's College. Of these 22 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction on all subjects of the 7th Standard, and above. These latter schools have an average attend- ance of 4,337, and the medium of instruction in all of them with the exception of five girls' schools, is English. The 49 remaining schools are all Lower Grade. They comprise one school for British Indians where English and Urdu are taught; four Government and one Grant Anglo-Chinese Schools; and 43 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 2,223. The total average attendance, at both Grades of School, is 6,560.

The revenue derived from school fees is $68,204 (of which $40,792 is from Queen's College) and is rapidly increasing: this is mainly to be accounted for by the increasing numbers of Chinese desirous of an English education.

Hongkong is fortunate in including among its schools two limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Government. In 1909 the combined average attendance at them was 80. As might be expected they have a strong patriotic bias: they are supporters of the Empire League, and the boys' school provides a small but effi- cient cadet corps.

Higher eductation is represented by the Technical Institute, where instruction is given in the evening in Mathematics, Machine Drawing, Building Construction, Field Surveying and allied subjects in Chemistry and Physics; in the English and French languages, Book-keeping and Shorthand. There is also a Teachers' Class, at which the junior Chinese masters of Government and Grant Schools are expected to attend. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped laboratory. The lecturers are chiefly Civil Servants recruited from the European staffs of Queen's College and the Public Works Department. These officers receive fees for their services.

A scheme for the foundation of a University is rapidly being matured, the building fund having been furnished by the generosity of Mr. H. N. Mody and the endownment fund by private subscription. It is hoped that the University will be opened with chairs of Medi- cine, Engineering and Arts by the beginning of 1912.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

Of the principal works in progress, the Kowloon Waterworks Reservoir was not finished as anticipated owing to the necessity of having to cancel the contract and procure fresh tenders for completion. The trench for the Mongkoktsui Breakwater was also not quite completed owing to special repairs to the Dredger St. Enoch caused by the Typhoon in October. The New Government Offices and Law Courts made fair progress.

The following works were completed :-Extension to Public Works Offices (Annexe); Staff Quarters at Tai Po; Alterations for Quarantine Station at Lai Chi Kok; Permanent Stairway from Ball Room at Government House; Wongneichong and Tai Kok Tsui

-

16

The engines arrived in the Colony early in the current year and plate-laying was begun.

The general health of the employees has steadily improved during the year under review. The number of cases necessitating removal to hospital showed a marked decrease in comparison with previous years.

The expenditure during the year was $3,365,860 making a total of $9,617,499.

VI.-GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS.

(a.) HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, and the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital. The Small-pox Hospital Hulk Hygeia was sold during the year and its place will now be taken by the Kennedy Town Hospital. There is an Observation Station capable of accommodating 1,500 persons in the event of an outbreak of infectious disease in a ship arriving in the Harbour.

The Civil Hospital contains 150 beds in 20 wards. 2,384 in- patients and 16,981 out-patients were treated during 1909. 188 cases of malarial fever were admitted as against 279 in 1908 and 243 in 1907. The Maternity Hospital contains 6 beds for Europeans and 4 for Asiatics. 98 confinements occurred during the year. The Victoria Hospital at the Peak contains 41 beds. During 1909 219 patients, were under treatment. Kennedy Town Hospital con- tains 26 beds. In 1909 2 cases were treated, both Small-pox. On the Hygeia 10 cases were treated of which 8 were Small-pox.

(b.) LUNATIC ASYLUM.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 8 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds. 176 patients of all races were treated during 1909 and there were 26 deaths.

(c.) THE TUNG WAH AND OTHER CHINESE HOSPITALS.

This hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this institution. Various other services not appertaining to a hospital are performed by the institution such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. About half the number are now treated by Western methods. The Hospital is managed by a Committee of

17

Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being sub- mitted to the Governor for confirmation, and is under the supervision of a visiting physician who is a member of the Medical Department, whilst a Chinese house surgeon trained in medicine is a member of the hospital staff.

The Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals are managed and controlled by the missionaries resident in Hongkong, agents of the London Missionary Society. They consist of the Alice Memorial Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in 1893, the Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in 1904 and the Ho Miu Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in-patients in 1909 was 1,201 and the expenditure $12,600. The number of labours in the Maternity Hospital was 198. The Government makes a grant of $300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives which a removal of Chinese Plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infec- tious Diseases Hospital entailed, three District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony and a fourth is being built. They are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee and receive a grant of $2,000 a year from the Government.

Work on the hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula has commenced and at the close of the year good progress had been made with the building. The hospital occupies a site having an area of 3 acres and as designed will ultimately provide accommodation for 210 patients. The buildings in course of erection will contain 70 beds. The collection of subscriptions and the supervision of the building were undertaken by a special committee under the chair- manship of the Registrar General, but when completed the hospital will form part of the Tung Wah Hospital and be under the same management. This hospital will when opened receive a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Government.

VII.-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged but not to any considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Hongkong College of Medicine, and the City Hall; and the Chinese Public Dispensaries which receive no pecuniary assistance from Government.

The Pó Leung is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Registrar General and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The actual management is entrusted to a committee elected annually by the members of the Society.

The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance and almost all

persons detained by the Registrar General under that Ordinance are sent to the Pó Leung Kuk. During 1909 the number of persons admitted was 515 and at the close of the year 66 remained under the care of the

18

Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution under mission aus- pices founded for rescue work among the Chinese. It is now housed in the Belilios Reformatory and receives a small grant from the Government and also a contribution from the Pó Leung Kuk.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The Government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, who has always been a Government official, is President. The lecturers, who are Government officials or private medical practitioners, each receive a small honorarium, the funds being derived from the fees of the students and a Government grant-in-aid of $2,500. The minimum curriculum of study is five years, and the preliminary examination has been accepted by the General Medical Council of Great Britain. 118 students have been enrolled up to date (January, 1910); and of these 39 have become qualified "licentiates". Most of the licentiates have settled in the Colony, and are exerting a most useful influence in the direction of displacing the native medical methods and popularising Western medical and sanitary knowledge, while a considerable number of them are employed as resident sur- geons in the hospitals for Chinese, as medical officers in charge of the Public Dispensaries, and as assistant medical officers on the rail- way works. The work of the College has thus far been carried on in lecture-rooms and laboratories made available in various hospitals, &c., in different parts of the City. Steps were being taken to provide adequate buildings of its own; but action was suspended when the University Scheme was proposed. When the University is established, the College will be merged into its Faculty of Medicine.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Govern- ment. It contains a theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, &c., a museum in which are some very fair specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent ($1,280), the French Convent (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and other charitable institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths and with the services of interpreters who can assist the inmates of houses where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of in- fectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are seven Dispensaries in existence including one for the boat population on a hulk in Causeway Bay.

"

19

The total cost of maintenance, which is defrayed by voluntary sub- scriptions, was $34,100. The Dispensaries are conducted by com- mittees under the chairmanship of the Registrar General.

VIII-CRIMINAL AND POLICE,

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,819 being an increase of 257 or 2'68 per cent. as compared with 1908. In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences there is an increase in the former as compared with the previous year of 103 or 3.17 per cent.

The number of serious offences reported was 103 over the average of the quinquennial period commencing with the year 1905. The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 154 as compared with 1908, and was 1,000 below the average of the quin- quennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force for 1909 was Europeans 132, Indians 411, Chinese 511, making a total of 1,054 as compared with 1,046 in 1908 exclusive in each case of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the railway, private firms, and other government departments. Of this force the District Officer, 13 Europeans, 114 Indians and 46 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

The force of District Watchmen to which the Government con- tributes $2,000 per annum was well supported by the Chinese during the year.

These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 5,215 as compared with 4,778 in 1908. Of these 1,325 were com- mitted for criminal offences, against 1,312 in 1908. Of commit- tals for non-criminal offences there were 35 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance and 30 more for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 560, the average for 1908 being 465 and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter was 14 as compared with 14, the average percentage for the last ten years.

Owing however to the large floating population which is con- stantly moving between the Colony and Canton the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the compara- tive criminality of the residents of the Colony.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 1:38 as compared with 127 in 1908 and 1.50 in 1907.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including printing, book-binding, washing,

20

carpentry, boot-making, net-making, painting and white-washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, &c. The profit on the work done was $43,946 as against $45,420 in 1908.

There was $4,809 received and credited to Government for non- Government work against $5,012 in 1908.

The use of the Belilios Reformatory as an overtlow prison having been discontinued, it became necessary to consider an extension of Victoria Gaol and it was found possible by pulling down the offices and stores and re-erecting them in another position with economy of space, to make room for a ward containing 78 cells with yard attached. A contract for this work was let at the beginning of the

current year.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.) POPULATION.

The population of the Colony according to the Census taken in 1901 was 283,975 while at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories, New Kowloon and the Army and Navy Establishments. The estimated population at the middle of the year under review was 428,888 as follows :--

Non-Chinese Civil Community, -

14,000

Hongkong,

199,550

Chinese Population,

Kowloon,

74.600

Floating Population,

46,240

Mercantile Marine,

2,770

323,160

Army, (average strength),

4,500

Navy, (average strength),

2,217

6,717

New Territories, (exclusive of Kowloon),

85,011

Total,

428,888

(b) PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

During the year under review considerable progress has been made in rendering existing domestic buildings rat proof as a pre- ventive of Plague, 391 ground surfaces of houses have been repaired, and 1,048 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. addition 20 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated.

In

New buildings (domestic) to the number of 128 were erected during the year and in these the effect of the present Ordinance is seen in the increased amount of open space about the houses, which the law requires. Scavenging lanes which have to be provided in the rear of new houses also increase the qen space about them and tend to reduce overcrowding.

The general death rate for the year was 2168 per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 12 45 per 1,000 among the Non-Chinese Community as compared with 28:35 and 1478 respectively during 1908.

20

carpentry, boot-making, net-making, painting and white-washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, &c. The profit on the work done was $43,946 as against $45,420 in 1908.

There was $4,809 received and credited to Government for non- Government work against $5,012 in 1908.

The use of the Belilios Reformatory as an overtlow prison having been discontinued, it became necessary to consider an extension of Victoria Gaol and it was found possible by pulling down the offices and stores and re-erecting them in another position with economy of space, to make room for a ward containing 78 cells with yard attached. A contract for this work was let at the beginning of the

current year.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.) POPULATION.

The population of the Colony according to the Census taken in 1901 was 283,975 while at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories, New Kowloon and the Army and Navy Establishments. The estimated population at the middle of the year under review was 428,888 as follows :--

Non-Chinese Civil Community, -

14,000

Hongkong,

199,550

Chinese Population,

Kowloon,

74.600

Floating Population,

46,240

Mercantile Marine,

2,770

323,160

Army, (average strength),

4,500

Navy, (average strength),

2,217

6,717

New Territories, (exclusive of Kowloon),

85,011

Total,

428,888

(b) PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

During the year under review considerable progress has been made in rendering existing domestic buildings rat proof as a pre- ventive of Plague, 391 ground surfaces of houses have been repaired, and 1,048 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. addition 20 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated.

In

New buildings (domestic) to the number of 128 were erected during the year and in these the effect of the present Ordinance is seen in the increased amount of open space about the houses, which the law requires. Scavenging lanes which have to be provided in the rear of new houses also increase the qen space about them and tend to reduce overcrowding.

The general death rate for the year was 2168 per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 12 45 per 1,000 among the Non-Chinese Community as compared with 28:35 and 1478 respectively during 1908.

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During the year there were 108 deaths from Plague compared with 986 in 1908 and and 198 in 1907.

There were 2,514 deaths from Respiratory Diseases amongst the Chinese, 751 of which were due to Phthisis, a percentage of 107 of the total deaths amongst that community.

Beri-beri caused 545 deaths-as against 736 in 1908.

The deaths from Malaria were 420 as against 499 in 1908, and 579 in 1907. Military returns of admissions to hospital for Malaria show a reduction in the incidence of this disease, as compared with the year 1908. There were 268 admissions in 1909 being a ratio per thousand of the Garrison of 59, against 515 in 1908 (115 per thousand).

Owing to the general improvement in the sanitary condition of the Colony and to the simplification of the methods of dealing with Plague cases and Plague-infected houses since the publication of the final Report of the Indian Plague Commission in 1908, it has been found possible to reduce the number of Sanitary Inspectors by the abolition of five special Plague Inspectors whose duties are now per- formed by the District Inspectors. It has also been possible to effect a very considerable economy in the matter of the disinfection `of Plague-infected houses, as a cheap pulicide is now used in the place of the more expensive disinfectants.

(C.) CLIMATE,

The average monthly temperature throughout the year was 72.7° F. as compared with 718° F. in 1908 and 720 F. during the ten preceding years. The mean maximum monthly temperature was attained in August, when it reached 87·5° F., and the mean minimum monthly temperature was recorded in February, when it was 57'0° F. The highest recorded temperature during the year was 908 F. on the 30th July, and the lowest 48-7° F. on the 8th February.

The total rainfall for the year was 7572 inches as compared with an average of 8079 inches during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was October with 2398 inches, the dryest, December, when no rainfall was recorded. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 6:37 inches on the 19th October, while no rain fell on 220 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 77 per cent., as com- pared with an average of 77 per cent. during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5'4 hours being 48 per cent. of the possible duration.

These figures are those recorded at the Observatory, Kowloon, and there is a very considerable divergence between that place and Hongkong (low levels), the Peak district, or Tai Po (New Territories), both in rainfall, temperature and humidity.

X-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total receipts paid into the Treasury in 1909 by the Postal Department amounted to $657,027.65 from which sum $212,981.07 was transferred to other heads of General Revenue under which fees

22

and duties are paid in postage stamps, which are now sold exclu- sively by the Post Office, leaving the sum of $414,046.58 as the approximate revenue from the Postal Service. The total expen- diture amounted to $510,729.99. The result of the year's working shows a deficit of $66,683.41 which is due to the fourth quarterly payment of the P. & O. subsidy for the year 1908 being made in 1909 instead of in the year in which it was due; to increased transit pay- ments on the basis of the weight of correspondence despatched during November, 1907, under the Convention of Rome, and to increase in the volume of correspondence sent by the trans-Siberian Railway.

This Colony commenced to forward direct closed mails to the United Kingdom and Germany viâ Shanghai, Dalny and the trans- Siberian Railway on 24th April. The parcel post arrangement between this Colony and China came into operation on 1st October. The Cash on Delivery Service in connection with parcels exchanged with the United Kingdom was adopted by this Colony on 1st May.

XI-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

(a) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,226,441 (being the statutory contri- bution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack, Services and Defence Works

(b.) VOLUNTEER ('ORPS.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by the Colony, was $38,393 compared with $45,554 in 1908.

XII.--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The assessment made for the year 1909-1910 (1st July to 30th June), shews a slight decrease in the rateable value of the whole Colony of 0.60 per cent. In Shaukiwan, the Hongkong Villages, Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon Villages there is an increase ranging from 0'44 per cent. to 10'53 per cent., but a decrease is shewn in the City of Victoria of 2:00 per cent., in the Hill District of 031 per cent., and in Mongkoktsui of 973 per cent. There is a noticeable increase in New Kowloon of $41,543 or 66·66 per cent.

The average rate of exchange (demand on London) which had been 1/9-6727 to the dollar for 1908 fell to 1/9 0601 for 1909.

The position with regard to subsidiary coins remained unsatis- factory, and during 1909 the Government withdrew from circulation silver subsidiary coin amounting to the face value of $779,712 and copper to the face value of $40,646. These coins were shipped to England where they were melted down and sold as bullion for £57,757 1s. 4d. and £1,535 0s. 1d. respectively. The loss to revenue by this transaction amounted to $76,863.17. The discount

#

22

and duties are paid in postage stamps, which are now sold exclu- sively by the Post Office, leaving the sum of $414,046.58 as the approximate revenue from the Postal Service. The total expen- diture amounted to $510,729.99. The result of the year's working shows a deficit of $66,683.41 which is due to the fourth quarterly payment of the P. & O. subsidy for the year 1908 being made in 1909 instead of in the year in which it was due; to increased transit pay- ments on the basis of the weight of correspondence despatched during November, 1907, under the Convention of Rome, and to increase in the volume of correspondence sent by the trans-Siberian Railway.

This Colony commenced to forward direct closed mails to the United Kingdom and Germany viâ Shanghai, Dalny and the trans- Siberian Railway on 24th April. The parcel post arrangement between this Colony and China came into operation on 1st October. The Cash on Delivery Service in connection with parcels exchanged with the United Kingdom was adopted by this Colony on 1st May.

XI-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

(a) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,226,441 (being the statutory contri- bution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack, Services and Defence Works

(b.) VOLUNTEER ('ORPS.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by the Colony, was $38,393 compared with $45,554 in 1908.

XII.--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The assessment made for the year 1909-1910 (1st July to 30th June), shews a slight decrease in the rateable value of the whole Colony of 0.60 per cent. In Shaukiwan, the Hongkong Villages, Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon Villages there is an increase ranging from 0'44 per cent. to 10'53 per cent., but a decrease is shewn in the City of Victoria of 2:00 per cent., in the Hill District of 031 per cent., and in Mongkoktsui of 973 per cent. There is a noticeable increase in New Kowloon of $41,543 or 66·66 per cent.

The average rate of exchange (demand on London) which had been 1/9-6727 to the dollar for 1908 fell to 1/9 0601 for 1909.

The position with regard to subsidiary coins remained unsatis- factory, and during 1909 the Government withdrew from circulation silver subsidiary coin amounting to the face value of $779,712 and copper to the face value of $40,646. These coins were shipped to England where they were melted down and sold as bullion for £57,757 1s. 4d. and £1,535 0s. 1d. respectively. The loss to revenue by this transaction amounted to $76,863.17. The discount

#

22

and duties are paid in postage stamps, which are now sold exclu- sively by the Post Office, leaving the sum of $414,046.58 as the approximate revenue from the Postal Service. The total expen- diture amounted to $510,729.99. The result of the year's working shows a deficit of $66,683.41 which is due to the fourth quarterly payment of the P. & O. subsidy for the year 1908 being made in 1909 instead of in the year in which it was due; to increased transit pay- ments on the basis of the weight of correspondence despatched during November, 1907, under the Convention of Rome, and to increase in the volume of correspondence sent by the trans-Siberian Railway.

This Colony commenced to forward direct closed mails to the United Kingdom and Germany viâ Shanghai, Dalny and the trans- Siberian Railway on 24th April. The parcel post arrangement between this Colony and China came into operation on 1st October. The Cash on Delivery Service in connection with parcels exchanged with the United Kingdom was adopted by this Colony on 1st May.

XI-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

(a) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,226,441 (being the statutory contri- bution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack, Services and Defence Works

(b.) VOLUNTEER ('ORPS.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by the Colony, was $38,393 compared with $45,554 in 1908.

XII.--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The assessment made for the year 1909-1910 (1st July to 30th June), shews a slight decrease in the rateable value of the whole Colony of 0.60 per cent. In Shaukiwan, the Hongkong Villages, Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon Villages there is an increase ranging from 0'44 per cent. to 10'53 per cent., but a decrease is shewn in the City of Victoria of 2:00 per cent., in the Hill District of 031 per cent., and in Mongkoktsui of 973 per cent. There is a noticeable increase in New Kowloon of $41,543 or 66·66 per cent.

The average rate of exchange (demand on London) which had been 1/9-6727 to the dollar for 1908 fell to 1/9 0601 for 1909.

The position with regard to subsidiary coins remained unsatis- factory, and during 1909 the Government withdrew from circulation silver subsidiary coin amounting to the face value of $779,712 and copper to the face value of $40,646. These coins were shipped to England where they were melted down and sold as bullion for £57,757 1s. 4d. and £1,535 0s. 1d. respectively. The loss to revenue by this transaction amounted to $76,863.17. The discount

#

23

during the year on Hongkong subsidiary coin varied between 4% and 71%, and on Chinese subsidiary coin 41% and 8%. Hongkong copper cents were from 105 to 120 per $1, and Chinese copper cents from 112 to 123 per $1. Negotiations continued without suc- cess between this Government and the Chinese Authorities with a view to decreasing the excess of Chinese subsidiary coin.

In pursuance of the policy of H.M.'s Government, 26 opium divans were closed on the 1st March, 1909, and compensation amounting to $11,613 was paid to the divan-keepers. All remaining divan- keepers both in the Colony and the New Territories were notified that no licences would be renewed after the 28th February, 1910. The opium laws of the Colony were consolidated in September last and were amended so as to give full effect to the recommendations made by the International Opium Conference, which sat at Shanghai during February, 1909, and to the policy of H.M.'s Government. Tenders for the lease of a new Opium Farm for 3 years from the 1st March, 1910, were called for, and the lease was granted to Messrs. Ho Kom-tong, Ng Li-ling, Lau Chü-pak and Ch'an K'ai-meng, at an annual rental of $1,183,200. This means a loss to the revenue of $225,860 during 1910 and of $270,660 during each of the years 1911 and 1912.

The restrictions on the consumption of opium both inside and outside the Colony are as follow:

(1.) The smoking of opium is restricted in Hongkong pri- marily by the existence of a Monopoly under which the sole right of preparing opium for smoking and of sell- ing the prepared drug is vested in a Monopolist who is thus enabled to charge a very high price for the drug. The selling price of prepared opium and dross opium is $4.50 and $2.00 respectively per Chinese ounce (1 oz.). The Monopolist alone can import prepared opium.

(2.) Opium Divans (or opium dens as they are called by some) have been closed, as explained in the preceding para- graph. Heavy penalties are imposed for the illicit opening of a divan. Persons found smoking in a divan are liable to fine and persons found in, or escaping from, a divan are under the law presumed to have been smoking therein.

(3.) Penalties are imposed on any person who administers any injection or furnishes morphine to any other person except under prescription from a qualified medical practitioner.

(4.) The importation for sale or use within the Colony, the preparation, manufacture and sale of morphine and compounds of opium are restricted by licence.

Licences are restricted to a few Chemists and Druggists of good repute who have to pay a royalty to the Monopolist referred to in (1) of Ten Dollars per tael of morphine and Four Dollars per tael of compound of opium other than morphine. The price is thereby

L

24

enhanced. Under the conditions of these licences morphine and compounds of opium may not be sold to the general public in quantities less than of the value of 20 cents. The vendor must supply the purchaser at the time of sale with a counterfoil certificate.

The possession of morphine and compounds of opium without such certificate is illegal, and in quantities exceeding 12 official doses whether covered by certificates or not.

Supervision of the trade in these drugs is ensured by the compulsory keeping of books by the licensees which are open to inspection.

Opium, morphine and compounds of opium are declared to be poisons under the Pharmacy Ordinance. Under the provisions of that Ordinance the seller must mark in English and Chinese the bottle or other package containing any such article with the name of the article, the word poison and the name and address of the seller. In addition under the conditions of the licence above referred to. medicines purporting to be for the cure or relief of the opium habit, or to be substitutes for opium smoking or taking or for the morphine habit, and themselves containing opium, morphine or any compound of opium must bear a label to such effect in Chinese writing for the information of the purchaser.

The import, for purposes of export, of morphine and compounds of opium is regulated by licence under conditions for storage in a bonded warehouse and for the keeping of books, whereby the trade is supervised.

The export of prepared opium or dross opium by any person (including the Monopolist of the preparation and sale of prepared opium) to China, French Indo-China or any country which prohibits the import of prepared opium or dross opium, is illegal.

The export of prepared opium and dross opium to countries to which it is lawful to export them, is only allowed under permit.

Similarly the export of morphine and compounds of opium to countries which prohibit their import, is illegal.

Stringent regulations are in force for regulating the trade in cocaine, its derivatives and compounds with a view to prevent their use as substitutes for opium.

In order to replace the revenue lost on opium, a law was passed on the 17th of last September imposing duties on intoxicating liquors consumed in the Colony and in this connection the Imports and Exports Office was reorganized, Lieut. Beckwith, R.N., the Assistant Harbour Master, being appointed Superintendent. By the close of the year a sum of $101,844.20 had been realized from the new liquor duties.

Much progress was made with the collection of an endowment fund for the proposed Hongkong University. The Government of Macao made a donation of $8,422 and the Chinese Government one of $13,608. Messrs. Butterfield & Swire and their allied firms contributed £40,000 and H.E. Cheung Yan-tsun, Governor General

Light Dues ...

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR T

Comparative Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure for the

Revenue for

same

HEAD OF REVENUE.

Estimates, 1909.

Actual Revenue to

31st Dec., 1909.

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

80,000.00

82,473-37 79,975.68 2,497.69

Governor

Colonial S

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified 4,163,682.00 4,281,133.114,154,968.56

126,164.55

Registrar (

Audit Dep

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

524,714.00 538,905.32 514,789.49

24,115.83

Post Office

Treasury..

Post Office

:

:

:

Rent of Government Property, Land and Houses

Interest

:

Miscellaneous Receipts

:

:

420,000.00 444,046.58 412,431.60 31,614.98

·

Harbour M

Observatoi

Miscellane

794,900.00 820,563.63 783,091.80 37,471.83

Judicial an

Police and

6,000.00 51,744.50

51,744.50

Medical D

Sanitary D

64,400.00 67,966.34 89,592.01

21,625.67

Botanical

Education

TOTAL, EXCLUSIVE of Land Sales... 6,053,696.00 6,286,832.85 | 6,034,849.14 273,609.38

21,625.67

Military E

Do.

Public Wo

Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and Contributions .. 412,300.00 414,199.99

414,199.99

Light Dues, Special Assessment

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

:

:

Do.

93,000.00 90,337.67

90,337.67

Charge on

Pensions.

150,000.00 31,596.42 69,358.19

37,761.77

Charitable

Appendix A.

NCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1909.

ue and Expenditure for the period ended 31st December, 1909.

ncrease.

Decrease.

EXPENDITURE.

Actual

Estimates, 1909.

Expenditure to 31st Dec., 1909.

Expenditure for same

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

2,497.69

Governor

86,992.00

86,763-74

91,736.43

4,972.69

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ...

73,230.00

68,194.94 69,761.29

1,566.35

26,164.55

Registrar General's Department...

45,814.00

44,487.59 43,137.41

1,350.18

Audit Department ..

26,101.00 22,888,52

23,778.99

890.47

Treasury ...

... 65,967.00

62,225.79 61,669.76

556.03

14,115.83

Post Office

31,614.98

Harbour Master's Department

Observatory

Miscellaneous Services...

37,471.83

*1,744.50

21,625.67

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Prison Departments.

Medical Departments

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

3,609.38

21,625.67

4,199.99

2,337.67

- I

Education

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department

Do.

Recurrent

448,475.00 510,729.99 371,486.17 139,243.82

177,191.00 188,843.85 163,579.55 25,264.30

21,452.00 22,388.63 21,110.62 1,278.01

197,069.00 242,391.55 374,075.62

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Do.

Extraordinary

Charge on account of Public Debt

37,761.77

Pensions

Charitable Services

:

:

*

131,684.07

1

216,483.00

210,950.95

208,738.22

2,212.73

733,051.00

734,529.16

683,317-77

51,211.39

248,197.00 218,642.52

230,492.43

11,849.91

408,882.00

352,962.57 380,738.19

27,775.62

51,061.00 42,508.19 48,673.20

6,165.01

232,139.00 219,358.51 205,874.74

13,483.77

1,258,100.00 1,265,336.56 | 1,295,723.52

30,386.96

313,910.00

292,018.35

266,477.50

25,540.85

433,000.00 409,902.85 512,336.29

102,433.44

| 1,042,600.00 | 1,229,452.75 | 2,343,340.18

1,113,887.43

453,096.00

64,889.94 284,722.18

219,832.24

231,000.00 237,035.39 203,935.19 33,100.20

17,356.00 16,336.98 44,772.66

28,435.68

Light Dues..

Comparative Statement of the Kevenue and Expenditure for the

Revenue for

same

HEAD OF REVENUE.

Estimates, 1909.

Actual Revenue to

31st Dec., 1909.

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

80,000.00

82,473-37

79,975.68

2,497.69

Governor

Colonial Sec

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

4,163,682.00 4,281,133.114,154,968.56

126,164.55

Registrar Ge

Audit Depart

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

524,714.00

538,905.32

514,789.49

24, 115.83

Post Office

:

:

:

Treasury

...

Post Office

420,000.00

444,046.58 412,431.60

Harbour Mas

31,614.98

Observatory

Rent of Government Property, Land and Houses

Miscellaneous

794,900.00 820,563.63 783,091.80

37,471.83

Judicial and

Interest

:

Miscellaneous Receipts ...

:

Police and Pr

6,000.00

51,744.50

51,744.50

Medical Depa

Sanitary De

64,400.00 67,966.34 89,592.01

21,625.67

Botanical and

Education

TOTAL, EXCLUSIVE OF Land Sales... 6,053,696.00 6,286,832.85 6,034,849.14

273,609.38

21,625.67

Military Expe

Do.

Public Works

Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and Contributions ... 412,300.00 414,199.99

414,199.99

Light Dues, Special Assessment

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

:

Do.

93,000.00 90,337.67

90,337.67

Charge on acc

Pensions

150,000.00 31,596.42

69,358.19

37,761.77

Charitable Ser

TOTAL,

6,708,996.00 6,822,966.93 6,104,207.33 778,147.04

59,387.44

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1910-1911.

1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor a new Valuation has been made of the whole Colony, with the exception of purely Chinese Villages.

2. The City of Victoria.-The Ratable Value has increased from $8,806,805 to $8,961,905, an addition of $155,100 or 1·76 per cent.

3. The Hill District.-The Ratable Value has increased from $262,445 to $275,160, an addition of $12,715 or 4-84 per cent.

4. Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, and Quarry Bay.―The Ratable Value has increased from $162,154 to $344,065, an addition of $181,911 or 112 18 per cent.

5. Hongkong Villages.-The Ratable Value has decreased from $125,660 to $117,014, a reduction of $8,646 or 6'88 per cent.

6. Kowloon Point.-The Ratable Value has decreased from $502,205 to $485,975, a reduction of $16,230 or 3.23 per cent.

7. Yaumati.-The Ratable Value has decreased from $256,640 to $255,530, a reduction of $1,110 or 0'43 per cent.

8. Hunghom and Hokun.-The Ratable Value has increased from $301,304 to $301,834, an addition of $530 or 0·17 per cent.

9. Mongkoktsui.-The Ratable Value has increased from $130,490 to $141,235, an addition of $10,745 or 8:23 per cent.

10. New Kowloon.-The Ratable Value has increased from $103,858 to $109,603, an addition of $5,745 or 5·53 per cent.

11. Kowloon Villages.-The Ratable Value has increased from $99,341 to $99,858, an addition of $517 or 0'52 per cent.

12. The Whole Colony.-The Ratable Value has increased from $10,750,902 to $11,092,179, an addition of $341,277 or 3·17 per cent.

13. Interim Valuations.-Between the 1st July, 1909, and the 1st June, 1910, 340 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

!

City of Victoria.

Rest of Colony.

No.

Ratable Value.

No.

Ratable Value.

New and/or rebuilt tenements

56

86,140 157

198,530

Tenements structurally altered

replacing Assessments of

7

34,500 35,140 640

36 154,210

Assessments cancelled, tene-

85,500

ments pulled down, or be- ing in other respects not ratable...

12

7,770 72

122

143,575 10,635

209,165

25,705

No. and Increase.

75

$77,730

$183,460

265

B 2

14. Vacant Tenements.-The number of reported vacant tene- ments in the City of Victoria inspected under Section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 135 monthly as compared with 150 last year.

15. The following Tabular Statement gives a comparison of the Valuation for 1909-10 and 1910-11 :-

District.

Valuation Valuation 1909-1910. 1910-1911.

Increase.

Per-

centage.

The City of Victoria,

8,806,805 8,961,905| 175,100

1.76

Hill District and Hong-

kong Villages,

550,259

736,239 15,980

33.79

Kowloon Point and Kow-

loon Village,

1,393,838 1,394,035

197

0.01

Total,..........$ 10,750,902 11,092,179 341,277 | 11,092,179,341,277

3:17

16. Comparative Statement shewing the Ratable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each Year from 1900-01 to 1910-11 inclusive.

Year.

Ratable Value.

Increase as Decrease as Percentage of Increase

compared

compared with pre-

with pre- vious Year.vious Year.

or Decrease in Ratable

Value as compared with the previous Year.

$

$

$

%%

1900-01,

5,856,391 869.557 1901-02, 6,889,752 1,033,361 1902-03, 8,166,613 1,276,861 1903-04, 8,788,063 621,450

17:43 Increase.

17.61 18.53

44

7.60

11

1904-05,

9,929,171

1,141.108

12.98

1905-06,

10,511,163

581,992

5.86

1906-07.

10,969.203

458,040

4:35

1907-08,

10,716,173

253,030

2:30 Decrease.

1908-09,

10,816 753

100,580

0.93 Increase.

1909-10,

10,750 902

65,851

1910-11,

11,092,179

841,277

0-60 Decrease. 3:17 Increase.

Tai Tin Shang have The latter has been succession to Mr. Chan Supreme Court as Clerk

17. Staff.-Mr. Chan Kwok On and Mr. discharged their duties to my satisfaction. promoted to the post of Clerk to Assessor in Kwok On who has been transferred to the and Shroff.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, 1st June, 1910.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

„Ássessor.

APPENDIX C.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I and II.)

The revenue from all sources during the year was $104,138. On the first of July the collection of the revenue from Special Fruit Licences, Births and Deaths Registration, Laundries and Markets, was undertaken by the Sanitary Department, and the revenue from these sources is therefore only about half that obtained last year. The revenue from Hawkers' Licences though it shews an increase on the revenue for 1908 is not yet as high as it was in 1907. The number of licences issued in the six months ending the 31st March 1909 was 6,741. In the succeeding six months 3,311 new licences were issued and 4,158 old licences re-issued.

The expenditure was $43,793 compared with $43,848 in 1908, and fell short of the estimated expenditure by $2,152.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Table III.)

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897.

Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.

The number of individuals detained under warrant was 280 as compared with 226 in 1908. They were all sent direct to the Po Leung Kuk, and the action taken in respect of them is shewn in Table III. The number of women whose detention was found to be unnecessary and who were released after enquiry was 87, or 31 per cent. The cases of 58 women were still under consideration at the close of the year. Six girls were sent under warrant to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge; of these four managed to escape, the remaining two are still in the Refuge. Two were sent under warrant to the Italian Convent. One is still there; the other has been restored to her husband. Both these institutions, which are places of Refuge under Ordinance No. 4 of 1897 have been visited by me, and the inmates inspected. The Eyre Diocesan Refuge moved into the Belilios Reformatory at Causeway Bay in September. The accommo- dation afforded is very much airier and roomier than what it was in the old premises at West Point and in every way more suitable. The number of inmates at the close of the year was 41.

In addition to those women and girls sent under warrant to the Po Leung Kuk a number of others are sent there with their consent. The total number of all classes sent in 1909 was 515. Of these, three were runaway maidservants.

C 2

By the close of the year fourteen girls had been added to the list of those under bond to report themselves regularly to the Regis- trar General-a precaution taken to prevent their being forced into prostitution, but five were subsequently exempted from reporting. The total on the list is now 33. One bond under section 34 of the Ordinance has been forfeited owing to the girl being taken away from the Colony without permission. As she was returned to the custody of the Registrar General, the full penalty was not exacted.

All prostitutes are questioned before entering a brothel and the brothels and restaurants are under constant surveillance to prevent young girls entering them, and to detect any cases of compulsion. The women shew considerable reliance on the protection of this office, and apply for help when they are afraid impediments will be placed on their movements. The freedom allowed to women under British Law is well-known in Hongkong, and Chinese women here feel that they have a distinctly more independent position than they have in most parts of the neighbouring districts.

The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as miss- ing in Hongkong during the year was 238 of whom only 37 were found. The corresponding figures for 1908 were 91 and 39. The number of boys reported missing was 97 as against 37 in 1907. The total number of persons reported missing, including reports from China and Macao, was 399. Of these 50 were reported to have been found. The corresponding figures for 1908 were 181 and 48. The large increase in the number of missing children has received the serious attention of the Government.

The annual report of the Po Leung Kuk Society will be found in Annexe A to this report.

EMIGRATION.

Emigration Ordinance. No. 1 of 1889. (i.)-Female Emigration. (Table IV.)

The number of women and children examined was 11,686 as compared with 12,108 in 1908 and 15,571 in 1907. There is a decrease of 1,244 in passengers going to the Straits Settlements; an increase of 421 in those going to the American Continent and of 335 in those going to Java Ports. The former increase is equivalent to an increase of 59 per cent. The number of passengers to Java Ports was only 33 in 1908. The very great increase is due to there having been twenty-eight steamers running direct from Hongkong as against ten in 1908; over 50 per cent. of these passengers are from Kayingchau and instead of travelling as previously from Swatow to Singapore and thence to the Dutch Indies, they come to Hongkong and proceed direct. A careful record of the time taken in examination during the last six months of the year shewed that the rate of examination was 75 passengers per hour.

}

C 3

112 or '96 per cent. of the passengers were detained for enquiries as against 62 or 51 per cent. in 1908. Of these, 20 cases were still under consideration at the end of the year. Of the remaining 92. 25 (27 per cent.) were ultimately allowed to leave without any order being made.

Attention was drawn to alleged malpractices in connection with female emigration to Siam. At the time no proof could be found of an organized traffic in women being carried on, but later in the year sufficient evidence was obtained to warrant action being taken against some of those concerned in it.

(ii.)-Male Emigration. (Table V.)

The number of assisted emigrants examined was 18,511, as against 16,735 in 1908. Careful records have been kept in order to ascertain the time spent in examination. It appears that the average rate of examination may be taken at 22 emigrants the hour, and that under the present system each individual receives seven times the attention which he did when all classes of male emigrants were examined indiscriminately. This is apart from the supervision. exercised over them on their arrival in the Colony and during their residence in the boarding-house. A very watchful eye is kept on anything in the nature of organized emigration of Chinese labourers from Hongkong and from the neighouring ports, not only by this office, but by the various Chinese local societies. Estimates have been made at various times of the wealth brought back to China by labourers who have emigrated to the Malay Peninsula or the Dutch Indies. I find it stated in one of the Chinese Customs reports that one shipload of 467 labourers returning to Hoihow has brought back savings to the amount of $29,035, or nearly $65 a head, which may be accepted as the equivalent of the wages of a farm labourer for ten months.

The number of emigrants examined shews a slight increase which is formed of an increase of 5,000 in the emigrants going to the Straits Settlements set against a decrease of about 3,500 in those going to the Dutch Indies. The other figures which call for comment in Table V are the considerable reduction in the number of emigrants who declined to proceed on their voyage, a slight increase in those rejected. as unfit, and a corresponding decrease in those sent back from Singapore, who are now almost all men who have fallen ill on the voyage. There appears to be a larger emigration of men from the Swatow and Hoihow districts than last

year.

In September 100 Chinese labourers passed through Hongkong on their way to Labuan to work in the coal mines; they appeared to be assisted emigrants but had not been told that they would be asked to sign a contract to work on their arrival. I communicated with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs at Singapore who made arrange- ments to safeguard their interests.

Fifteen applications were made by relatives for assistance in recovering emigrants. In eight, the emigrants returned to China, and a ninth is expected shortly. In one of the cases, money was

sent to pay for the cost of the emigrant's return and he was sent back to Hongkong, but ran away from the steamer on its arrival, and emigrated again to Borneo. In the remaining six cases the relatives were content with an interchange of letters.

Forty-two hotel licences and 33 licences for boarding-houses for assisted emigrants were issued. The latter had accommodation for 1,461 boarders. In 1905 the accommodation was sufficient for no more than 250 boarders, and the improvement indicates not that there is an increase in this class of emigrants, for there is nothing abnormal in the number who emigrated in 1909, but that their move- ments are better controlled and their interests better protected.

REGULATION OF CHINESE.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

(i.)-Registration of Householders.

1,622 householders were registered; 69 of these were first re- gistrations. 7,606 changes in respect of tenants were registered.

(ii)-District Watchmen.

(Table VI.)

The District Watchmen Committee met nine times; the average attendance being between six and seven members. Mr. Choa Leep- chee who had been a member of the Coinmittee since 1906, died on the 23rd October, but the vacancy caused by his death has not yet been filled. Mr. Wei Yuk and Mr. Fung Wa-chün were reappointed for a further term of five years.

The balance to the credit of the Fund at the close of the year was $10,910 as against $12,154 on the 31st December, 1908. On the revenue side contributions shew a slight increase; under expenditure there is an increase of $1,000 in wages and salaries. The items that call for notice are $1,020, being the wages of the special watchmen engaged to prevent dumping of bodies, $2,706, being part cost of the extension to the West Point Watchmen's House and $1,716, loss on exchange.

The strength of the Force is 108 men. There were 20 enlistments during the year, 16 dismissals or desertions, 1 death and 4 resigna- tions. One vacancy remains unfilled. The guarantee bond of a District Watchman, who was convicted of unlawful possession, was forfeited. In addition to the usual Force, the Committee had in its pay at the beginning of the year seven special watchmen to prevent dumping. In view of the reduction in the number of cases, four were discharged at the end of August.

The number of convictions secured by members of the District Watchmen Force was 193 as compared with 173 in 1908.

The extension to the District Watchmen's Quarters at West Point was completed in May.

C 5

(iii.)-Permits.

317 permits to fire crackers were issued, 187 of these were on the occasion of a marriage. 30 permits were issued to hold proces- sions, 34 permits to hold theatricals in temporary buildings, and 42 to hold religious ceremonies. All-night performances are now per- mitted at two Chinese theatres on Saturdays. No objection has been raised to them by the neighbours.

POPULATION.

Marriages,--Ordinances No. 7 of 1875, No. 15 of 1902 and

No. 6 of 1903.

The number of marriages solemnized during the year was 205 as compared with 158 in 1908. The number contracted at the Registrar General's Office was 65. In 1908 it was 36.

Births and Deaths,-Ordinance No. 7 of 1896.

The registration of births and deaths was transferred to the Sanitary Department on the 1st July.

Exhumations.

Five permits were issued to exhume human remains for removal to China or for reburial in the Colony. The issue of these permits was suspended until statutory authority for their issue was obtained, and was transferred to the Sanitary Department at the beginning of July.

('ERTIFICATES OF IDENTITY TO CHINESE ENTERING THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

Seven certificates were issued to Chinese British subjects, resident in Hongkong, to enter the United States.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

Thirty-eight books were registered during the year as compared

with 56 in 1908.

COPYRIGHT IN WORKS OF THE FINE ARTS.

Ordinance No. 17 of 1901.

None were registered during the year.

C 6

——

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

Ordinances No. 1 of 1870 and No. 9 of 1904.

(Tables VII to XIII.)

The New Directors were elected on the 5th December and took over the charge of the hospital on the 19th. Their names are:-

Lau Chü-pak, Chairman,

Lo Süt-pó,

Chan Shüt-ngám,

Tsui Oi-tong, Sham Pak-ming,

Lo Tsung-kui,

Li Sui-kam,

Leung Kin-on,

Pun Wai-sün,

Li Wing-kwong,

Ue Tó-shang,

Wu Ting-sám, Chan Wan-sau,

Tsang Ping-kwan,

Chan Hau-hing,

Wu Wan-cho.

The first three directors on the list are in charge of the fin- ances of the hospital.

The new plague wards were completed at a cost of $11,738, and formally opened by His Excellency on the 23rd December. The purchase of the land on which these wards stand cost $54,697, so the total cost to the hospital of the improvement is $66,435. Further accommodation has been provided by the demolition of the old one-storeyed building used as kitchen and its replacement by a two-storeyed building designed to provide also quarters for the accountants and registration clerks. This will permit the account- ants' old quarters to be thrown into the office and the clerks' quarters to be used for a waiting room. A contract for carrying out this work has been made for $4,720; the expenditure on it during the year was $4,000.

In 1908 a grant was made by the Government of a site on which to erect a permanent small-pox hospital. Plans were approved and work was about to commence, when it was decided to permit the treatment of small-pox in the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital which was built in 1902. This hospital is now being thoroughly overhauled. The estimated cost of the repairs is $10,000 and $5,500 have already been spent.

The subscriptions collected to build a new small-pox hospital amounted to $69,000. Mr. Ho Kom-tong subscribed $3,000, and the Japanese community in Hongkong $3,100. Now that the new hospital is not to be built, the subscribers have decided to place their subscriptions in the hands of the directors, and have authorised them, after spending what is necessary on the repairs of the Infectious Diseases Hospital and on general repairs to the old hospital buildings, to devote the balance to the erection of a small-pox hospital on the North side of the harbour.

Alterations have been made in the management of the hospital dispensary. A contract was entered into for the year with a firm of druggists to supply drugs and manage the dispensary, the hospital merely placing an inspector in charge and abolishing the rest of the dispensary staff.

}

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At the request of the directors the Cemetery at Kailungwan has been placed under the immediate supervision of one of the Sanitary Inspectors. This will prevent waste of land and will place the sex- tons under continuous control.

The statistics of the work done by the hospital show no great variation from the statistics for 1908. The number of admissions is 10 per cent. less than the number in 1908, and the number under European treatment shews a corresponding reduction. On the other hand the number of out-patients has increased from 70,000 in 1907 to 90,000 in 1908 and 113,010 in 1909. The percentage of out-patients receiving European treatment has risen from 31 in 1908 to 45 (See Table VII). There were 987 vaccinations performed in the hospital as against 1,410 in 1908. The hospital vaccinators visited Shaukiwan, Aberdeen and Yaumati four times and Stanley twice. and vaccinated 225 persons; a visit to the New Territories proved fruitless as it was too near the end of the year, and Spring is re- garded there as vaccination season. The total number of destitutes sent home was 2,305. Of these 624 were sent at the expense of the hospital.

The finances of the hospital will call for careful attention on the part of the directors. The income for the year deducting the $69,009 subscribed for the small-pox hospital, amounts to $76,625. The expenditure exclusive of $10,500 in repayment of loans, and $20,807 spent on buildings, was $90,908. The hospital ends the year with a nominal credit balance of $23,419, but is pledged as mentioned above, by its promise to the subscribers to the small-pox hospital at Kennedy Town to spend more than this sum on certain definite objects.

The hospital has been called on twice for assistance to relieve destitution in China. In the case of the Foochow Typhoon the di- rectors made a private subscription of $995, and made a loan of $5,000 from the Kwong Shiu Flood Relief Fund in aid of the sufferers from the inundations in the Yangtsze Valley.

In addition to the usual tables there are inserted this year statements shewing the state of the various funds administered by the hospital and the way in which they are invested.

In September, I was able to report that a contract had been entered into to build the Kwong Wah Hospital at Yaumati at a cost of 76,400. The expenditure during the year was $8,294; the balance to the credit of the Building Fund on the 31st December was $69,466 and the amount of uncollected subscriptions was $6,560. The accounts have been audited by Mr. Li Yau-tsün and Mr. Tang Chi-ngong. By the close of the year the foundations of the Adminis- tration Block, of Wards No. 1 and No. 2, and of the connecting corridors, were completed and the footings were being levelled with cement concrete. The piling of the trenches of the Reception Block and of Ward No. 3 were nearly finished, and some of the trenches had been concreted and stone footings were being laid on them. Further subscriptions to the amount of $47,000 will be required, I think, to place the finances of the hospital on a sure foundation.

In October the promoters of the Kwong Wah Hospital fogether with a number of the leading Chinese residents of the Kowloon Peninsula presented a petition praying for a grant of land on which to build a small-pox hospital in Kowloon.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES AND DISTRICT PLAGUE HOSPITALS.

(Tables XIV to XVIII.)

The dispensaries continue to be conducted on the lines described in Mr. Irving's report of the 26th February last. The three dispens- aries in Victoria and the Harbour Dispensary are managed by a Committee consisting of the Registrar General as Chairman, the Hon. Dr. Ho Kai, C.M.G., Vice-Chairman, and seventeen other members. The constitution and general objects of the Association have to receive the concurrence and sanction of the Government, and are described in a minute dated the 20th October, 1909. The three dispensaries at Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon City are managed by separate Committees elected by the inhabitants, and in his work of guiding and controlling them the Registrar General is assisted by the two Chinese Members of Council and the two Chinese Members of the Sanitary Board. To enable the Registrar General to keep in close touch with the Chinese in matters relating to sanitation, Street Committees have been appointed by the Government and are con- sulted on matters of importance and encouraged to ask advice. Attached to each dispensary in Victoria are a licentiate of the Hong- kong College of Medicine, a clerk with a knowledge of English and coolies with ambulances and dead-vans to remove patients and dead bodies. Two lecturers are maintained whose duty it is to preach against "dumping" of bodies in the streets, to point out the benefits to be derived from the dispensaries and to explain the object of the Sanitary laws; handbills are issued in profusion whenever occasion demands and photographs are taken of bodies found in the streets and are posted up in the neighbourhood, and enquiries are made in each case from the Street Committee. There is a District Plague Hospital attached to the West Point Dispensary in Victoria, another in Kow- loon City and a third at Hunghom. A fourth hospital is being built at Wanchai. The number of rats caught during the year in Victoria was 59,914, and in the Kowloon Peninsula where rat-catchers have been engaged by the dispensaries and paid by the Sanitary Depart- ment the number was 15,751.

In August, a largely attended meeting of members of the boat- population and of launch-owners, merchants, shop-keepers and others closely connected with the floating population was held, and it was resolved to open a harbour dispensary and to raise a fund for the purpose.

A committee of seventeen was elected corresponding to the existing Street Committees, and a hulk was purchased, fitted up as a dispensary, and with the consent of the Harbour Master, moored in Causeway Bay. The dispensary was opened on the 4th October and 244 new cases were attended up to the close of the year.

Hitherto the Hunghom Dispensary has occupied leased premises, but a site has now been granted by the Government adjacent to the Kunyam Temple, plans of a suitable building have been designed, and a sufficient sum promised in subscriptions to defray the cost.

4

$

}

09

The new dispensary at West Point which is attached to the West Point District Plague IIospital was occupied on the 1st Septem- ber. Additions to accommodate the ambulance coolies and house the ambulance and dead-vans, are in contemplation.

The total number of new cases attended by the dispensary doctors was 30,782, as compared with 24,353 in 1908: the number of certificates of nature of disease issued was 21 compared with 33: the number of moribund infants brought to the dispensaries was 316 compared with 228, and of dead bodies of infants $73 compared with 559. The number of vaccinations performed was 2,148: of these 1,851 were vaccinations of infants.

In 1908 I received a promise from some Chinese gentlemen interested in the dispensaries to defray the cost of the land on which the Central Dispensary in Victoria was built. This promise has now been fulfilled and the sum of 3.400 has been received from ten sub- scribers. Their generosity and that of Mr. Ho Kom-tong who erected the building are commemorated by a suitable inscription.

The expenditure of the dispensaries was:-

Victoria (including Harbour)

Hunghom

Yaumati

Kowloon City

$19,737

4,134

6,738

3,361

Thanks to subscriptions of $6,825 from the Chinese theatres, to a special donation of 4,000 from a temporary theatre at which per- forinances were held during the first three months of the year and to the $3,400 subscribed to defray the cost of the land on which the Central Dispensary is built, the Victoria Dispensaries close the year with a credit balance of $8,000, and it appears as if they should have no difficulty in future in meeting their ordinary expenditure. The financial position of the other dispensaries with the exception of the one at Yaumati does not call for comment. The expenditure in the last named for the year was $6,738 including 626 in repayment of loans, but the subscriptions for the year only amounted to $5,862.

Tables XVII and XVIII supply all the information required to judge of the progress being made in the campaign against the aban- doning of bodies in the street. The state of affairs compared with that which existed a very short time ago is one which justifies me in congratulating the leaders of the Chinese Community on the success of their efforts. That there still remains much to be done is obvious; it is only in Victoria that the number of bodies abandoned during the second half year is less than the number for the first six months. There, out of a total of 111 bodies abandoned, only 42 belong to the last six months. Of the whole number of abandoned bodies--381, 66 were bodies of infants brought to the dispensary and alleged to have been found in the street. Very possibly a number of these were brought from the houses where the infants died, but the parents were afraid to give the address. In connection with the abandoning of infants' bodies, it is satisfactory to note that 5,704 children under 5 years of age were treated at the dispensaries as compared with 2,721 in 1907.

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(6

Enquiries have been received from Singapore regarding the methods adopted in Hongkong to put a stop to dumping" and a copy of Mr. Irving's report of the 26th February was sent to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

The confidence which the dispensaries are beginning in various degrees to inspire is very well seen from the statistics given in Table XVIII which shews the number of infants-alive and dead--taken to the dispensaries and whether the address from which they came was reported or not. At the Western Dispensary, the first started, and the one in which the keenest local interest is taken, the number of live infants has risen from 207 to 256 and the number of dead bodies dropped from 268 to 151, the number of dead bodies from an unknown address falling from 167 to 20. The East Point Dispens- ary, which was opened at the same time, is more backward and there it is a matter of congratulation that although the cases in which the address is unknown have risen from 4 to 53 the number of dead bodies has risen at the same time from 52 to 166. At the Central Dispensary, opened two years after the other two, progress is marked by a large increase of the cases in which the address is known, the number of those in which the address is unknown remaining the

same.

The returns kept by the Police shew that in 1905 and the four succeeding years the number of bodies dumped was 1,068, 1,447. 1,273, 989 and 381. For the purpose of comparison between the years 1908 and 1909, I take the figures given in my office returns which are 1,005 (instead of 989) and 381.

The effect of the crusade against dumping was not apparent until August, 1908. In the first seven months of 1908 the number of bodies abandoned was 748, in the last five months 257. In 1909 the corresponding figures were 223 and 158. In Victoria the number for the year has dropped from 377 in 1908 to 111 in 1909, in Kowloon from 341 to 80. The Harbour population is the worst offender and I do not anticipate much improvement until the second half of 1910. In comparing the figures for the last two years the absence of any serious epidemic in 1909 must not be lost sight of.

DISTRICT PLAGUE HOSPITALS.

No occasion has arisen to use the plague hospitals at Kowloon City and Hunghom. The West Point District Plague Hospital attached to which is a dispensary was completed at a cost of ~15,046 and occupied on the 1st September. It was formally opened on the 20th September and the event celebrated by a "tea-party". The Government has not contributed more than $600 towards the cost of the buildings. The balance was raised by the Saiyingpun Street Committee. A gap of nearly $1,100 between receipts and ex- penditure was filled up by an individual subscription of $470 from Mr. Tong Wan-teng and by the proceeds of a twenty-five dollar "whip" among Mr. Lau Chü-pak's friends.

The site which was purchased at Wanchai for a plague hospital was placed in possession of the Committee at the end of June and in October the Government granted an adjacent area of 62 feet by 40

>

i

T

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feet. A Building Committee was formed and the plans have been designed of buildings to contain a dispensary, a hospital, quarters for nurses and ambulance coolies, and accommodation for ambulances and dead vans.

The annual grant of $2,000 to the District Plague Hospitals was divided as follows: $600 to each of the hospitals in Victoria, $550 to the hospital at Hunghom, and $250 to the one at Kowloon City.

TRANSLATION WORK.

Although it is impossible to indicate exactly the extent of the translation work done in the department every year the following statistics may be some guide to it.

Translation from Chinese

Petitions

-

Translation from English

into Chinese.

into English.

147

Ordinances

Letters

63

Regulations

23

Newspaper articles

Government Notices

<

70

and items of news

54

Minutes

3

Unspecified

60

Unspecified

18

Total

324

119

In addition to the above, translations made in other departments are revised, and on numerous occasions translation work, of which no record has been kept, is done by members of the department other than the translator.

The assistance proffered by the Hon. Dr. Ho Kai, C.M.G., to prepare a version in Chinese of all Ordinances in force particularly affecting the Chinese Community, has been gratefully accepted by the Government.

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XIX.)

The balance to the credit of the fund at the close of the year was $6,083. In 1908, $5,000 was given to the Tung Wah Hospital towards purchasing the site on which the Plague Wards have been built, but the directors found ultimately that they were unable to comply with the terms of the gift, and it was repaid accordingly during the year. The revenue for the year from the rent of stalls was $1,384 and the expenditure & 936.

CHARITABLE FUNDS.

(Table XX.) ·

The net income of the Passage Money Fund was $637 and the ex- penditure $615. The balance to the credit of the Registrar General's Charitable Fund is $285.

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LEGISLATION.

The principal Ordinances of 1909 which affected the Chinese and which are of other than technical interest are:

No. 1 of 1909.-The Magistrates and Criminal Law Amend- - ment Ordinance, so far as it relates to the punishment of the stocks

and to the prohibition of spitting in certain places.

No. 26 of 1909 which repeals section 8 of the above Ordinance. This subject is dealt with in another part of my report.

No. 27 of 1909, the Liquors Ordinance. The introduction of this Bill caused much alarm, and certain of the original provisions were strongly opposed on the ground that larger powers of search were being taken than appeared to be necessary. Amendments were introduced which satisfied Chinese public opinion. Much work was thrown on this office during the time the bill was before Council and after it became law. The Chinese dealers naturally looked to the Registrar General for explanation of the law, and for assistance in carrying out its provisions or securing a modification of them. By degrees they have learnt to dispense with this help and to address themselves direct to the Superintendent of Imports and Exports. The dealers quickly accommodated themselves to the new state of affairs which was introduced without causing any friction.

No. 32 of 1909.-The Steam Boilers and Prime Movers Ordin- ance, which will affect a number of Chinese firms.

No. 34 of 1909.-The Protection of Women and Girls Amend- ment Ordinance, which among other provisions makes under certain conditions the reception or harbouring of unmarried girls under eighteen years of age an offence. It is difficult to obtain convictions under the Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance; the rescue is often effected before an offence is committed in the Colony and in other cases the girl (who would be the best witness) is kept in ignorance of the offender's intentions regarding her; but a fear of placing too much power in the hands of subordinates has prevented. and in my opinion justifiably, an extension of the list of offences with the object of rendering a conviction more certain.

}

PROSECUTIONS..

(Table XV.)

There were 15 prosecutions under the Emigration Ordinance and 20 under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance.

INTERPRETATION SUB-DEPARTMENT.

Five student-interpreters passed the examination for a Third Class Certificate. Two received appointments in the Police and four in the Sanitary Department. Six new student-interpreters were appointed. Of the 38 student-interpreters appointed under the

C 13

present system 7 are still student-interpreters, 16 have Third Class Certificates and 3 Second Class Certificates. Twelve are no longer in the Government Service.

Five meetings of the Interpretation Board were held. Twenty- eight candidates were examined; one Second Class Interpeter Certificate and eleven Third Class Certificates were awarded.

GENERAL.

The appointments of Mr. Fung Wa-chün and Mr. Lau Chü-pak as members of the Sanitary Board terminated in March. Mr. Lau was reappointed and Mr. Ho Kom-tong replaced Mr. Fung. On Mr. Ho's resignation, Mr. Ng Hon-tsz received the appointment. Mr. Pun Yan-tsün was appointed a Justice of the Peace.

In May the Chinese became restless under the serious in- convenience caused in some parts of the town by the length of time the intermittent supply of water was continued, and in June a petition on the subject chopped by 101 of the largest business firms was presented. I issued a notice requesting all complaints regarding insufficiency of water to be addressed to me, and the Water Authority deputed an inspector to call every morning at my office to receive the list of complaints and to investigate them. This indication that the Government was alive to the inconveniences suffered did much to allay the agitation. As a consequence of the notice the department was called on on several occasions to arbitrate between the tenants of two floors in a Chinese house and to fix the time during which each party might draw off water.

In August a Society was formed by the leading Chinese for the suppression of spitting in public places. The Society has a most influential backing, and there is a genuine attempt to change the habits of the Chinese in this respect. The Society soon numbered 104 members, handbills have been distributed, notices are being carried by conspicuously clothed coolies through the streets, a lecturer has been engaged and a large number of varnished boards are being prepared to be fixed permanently to the walls of houses and in public places.

It was found possible to embody in the contract for the present Opium Farm certain conditions which had been asked for by the Chinese five years ago, regulating the powers of search. Although not actually inserted in the contract the last Farmer had agreed to observe the conditions.

Section 2 of Ordinance No. 19 of 1909 which directs the stamp- ing of receipts for all sum over ten dollars, (the limit for unstamped receipts for the last seven years being twenty-five dollars), was not opposed in Council, but after passing the Liquors Duties Ordin- ance the Chinese business world thought this source of revenue might be dispensed with, and petitioned the Government. The matter was fully discussed at a conference at Government House; the estimated revenue and expenditure for the next two years elaborated and the reasons for the Government's inability to comply with petitioners' request explained.

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At the same conference the object of the recent increase in school-fees was also discussed. The gradual increase in the fees charged in Government Schools has been accepted always with reluct- ance by the Chinese and the latest increase resulted in the presentation of a widely-signed petition on behalf of the poorer classes who endea- vour to give their children a few years' instruction in English. The question is now under the consideration of an Education Committee.

A petition was received in Noveniber from owners of house- property in the district in which it is proposed to remove ceilings. A final decision has not yet been arrived at by the Sanitary Board.

A draft Limited Partnership Bill is now being considered by the Chinese and has received their support.

Kidnapping of children-mostly boys--both in Hongkong and in the adjacent districts of China has been very prevalent. This department has had the fortune occasionally to discover kidnapped children who had been brought to Hongkong and to obtain, through the Po Leung Kuk, the restoration of children who had been taken away from the Colony. The traffic in children from Shanghai, re- ferred to in last year's report, appears to have ceased. There were only three cases discovered, all in the early part of the year.

Alongside the harmless fortune-tellers, selectors of lucky dates, palmists and phrenologists who charge a fee for telling a fortune, there exists a class of men who deal in black magic or make use of their supposed powers to extract large sums from women. The Government receives the hearty support of the Chinese in ridding the Colony of these pests.

Two appeals for the cancellation of banishment orders have been granted through this office and one refused.

At the request of the District Watchmen Committee children who are hawking without a licence are on their first offence sent to the Registrar General who cautions their guardians. This procedure seems to have proved effective in each case.

There have been numerous labour disputes but none which has caused much inconvenience. In June the jinricksha coolies succeeded in getting from the owners of the vehicles a reduction in the hire of jinrickshas from 55 cents a day for first class and 40 for second, to 47 and 35 cents respectively. The coolies presumed somewhat on their success and numerous disputes arose between individual owners and pullers but relations between them are now normal.

In July the head coal-coolies succeeded in obtaining an increase in the customary allowance for baskets and shovels which amounted to twelve or thirteen dollars on an average cargo of coal. The amount in dispute was trifling and I think the head-coolies who had recently formed a guild wished to test their strength and obtain recognition.

Similarly the Hakka quarry-masters have been organizing themselves, and much time has been occupied in settling a dispute to which the Stone-masons Guild, the Quarry Farmer and the quarry- masters were all parties.

F

1

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In October the painters went on strike. The strike was not a serious one or of long duration; it was conducted by the younger men and the older workmen took advantage of the annual Tomb Worship to leave the Colony and keep out of the quarrel; the masters were content to wait for the workmen to reduce their demands. A rise of 5 cents a day in wages-the first rise since 1901-was conceded. There was some intimidation and during the strike the apprentices and the men on yearly contracts did not dare to leave their masters' premises.

There was a small strike reported to me in one of the docks. It was soon settled but the interesting point abotu it was that it was started by the local men without consulting a large Union which has been lately formed, and the Union officials were opposed to it. This Union differs considerably from the ordinary Chinese work- men's guild, and works on very modern lines.

In each of these labour disputes the settlement of which is often a very tedious affair, I have been much indebted to the Chinese gentlemen who have readily responded to my request for their co- operation, without which no satisfactory or permanent settlement could be effected.

A Chinese leper woman found living at Aberdeen was received into the Rhenish Mission Leper Asylum at Tung Kun, and the entrance fee was raised by a private subscription among my Chinese friends. In future, leper women and children found in Hongkong will be sent to the Registrar General to arrange for their welfare, if possible.

An arrangement has been made to assist the Secretary for Chinese Affairs in Singapore in the repatriation of certain classes of Chinese: the allowances due to those who are to land at Hongkong will be sent to this office, to prevent the men spending it on the voyage and arriving here destitute. In November a large number of decrepits were repatriated from Tong Kah through the Protect- orate of Chinese at Penang; sixteen of these landed in Hongkong and were sent home.

Reports have been furnished on 24 applications for British-born Subject Certificates.

+

The issue of licences to letter-carriers carrying letters between Hongkong and the adjacent country districts of China which was instituted in 1902 and transferred from this office to the Post Office in 1906 has now ceased.

Confucius's birthday was publicly celebrated, and the day is every year more widely observed as a holiday. The celebration is a sign of the growth of a national spirit among the Chinese. Two of the other signs of the times are public theatrical performances by amateurs and amateur boxing contests.

There was a suggestion to boycott a line of steamers running to America, but the alleged grievances were redressed.

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A conference was arranged between the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department and some leading Chinese, and the possibility discussed of reducing the number of grass fires and the consequent destruction of Government plantations caused by the burning of joss-paper and the firing of crackers at the Tomb Worshipping. It was decided to try the effect of issuing posters and handbills and inserting notices in the Chinese newspapers at the appropriate season.

On two occasions there appeared to be an attempt to revive the Japanese boycott, but the attempts did not originate in the Colony nor did they receive any support from business people.

Business is reported to be good; it is said to have been a particularly favourable year for dealers in cotton-yarn, rice and flour and an increased demand for houses in the Chinese business quarters of the town confirms these reports.

Less small-pox and plague, 23 deaths and 104 deaths respec- tively among the Chinese population as against 376 and 957 in 1908, have also made the year a happier one for the Chinese. The Sanitary Board does not appear to be such a bogey as it was, and it is a pleasant relief not to hear so much of it as I have had to do of late years.

The University I find to be a subject of interest and discussion amongst all classes, and its importance is fully realised by those who have children at school in Hongkong.

Men with money have many claims on their purses in Hong- kong. In addition to the 198,000 subscribed to the University, $69,000 were subscribed for a small-pox hospital at Kennedy Town and the new District Plague Hospital at West Point was built at a cost of $10,000 by public subscription. The large hospital at Yau- mati will soon be expecting funds for maintenance and subscriptions will have to be collected to build the Plague Hospital at Wanchai. In addition to these the Chinese Community inaintains the dis- pensaries at a cost of $28,000, the District Watchmen at a cost of $25,000 and subscribes $31,000 to maintain the Tung Wah Hospital, and $9,000 for the Po Leung Kuk.

STAFF.

I resumed duty on the 8th April on my return from leave. Mr. A. E. Wood and Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe acted successively as Assistant Registrar General until the 30th June, when Mr. Hutchison took up the duties of the post and received the substantive appointment on the 30th October.

A new post of Second Assistant Registrar General, the creation of which was recommended when this department began to supervise assisted emigration, was formed on the 21st September and Mr. D. W. Tratman has received the appointment, but is now acting as Assistant District Officer at Taipo. In the meantime temporary arrangements have been made for conducting the examination of assisted emigrants.

E

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One fifth grade and one sixth grade writer were transferred to the Sanitary Department on the 1st July. Owing to much of his work now being only indirectly Government work the recommendation of the Retrenchment Committee has been adopted and two-thirds of the salary of the 5th grade shroff have been paid since the 1st November from the funds he collects.

26th February, 1910.

A. W. BREWIN,

Registrar General.

Heads of Revenue.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1908 and 1909.

Details of Revenue.

Licences and Internal Revenue not other- wise specified,

Chinese Undertakers' Licences, Emigration House Licences, Forfeitures,

Hawkers' Licences,

Marriage Licences,

Money Changers' Licences,

Ordinance under which received.

Revenue in

1908.

Revenue in

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

C.

No. 8 of 1887.

460 (1)

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908.

3,862

e.

480 (1)

3,778

C.

20 (1)

-V

1,036

150

84

886

C.

(1)

No. 8 of 1887.

26,958

29,210

2,252

No.7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902.

1,108

1,471

363

No. 8 of 1887.

3,330

3,480

150

1 of 1903.

>>

4,947

2,499

2,448

7 of 1896.

779

403

375

"

3 of 1898.

400

350

50

24

21

3

No. 3 of 1888.

459

207

252

}}

1,203

1,553

350

14

17

3

"

51

28

22

31

73

73

1,800

900

900

No. 1 of 1903.

117,788

59,471

58,317

37

37

239

7

231

Total,.

$164,459,99

104,138.88

3,250.02

63,571,13

3,250.02

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for Specific Purposes, and Reim- bursements-in-aid,

Rent of Govt. Property, Land and Houses,

Interest,

Miscellaneous,

Special Fruit Licences, -

Births and Deaths Registration,

Certificates to Chinese entering U. S. A., Chinese Gazette Sales,

Householders' Registration,

""

"}

"

Re-registration,

Removals,

Extracts,

Contribution from Chinese Dispensaries, &c., for Clerical Assistance,

Laundries,

Markets,

Interest accrued on official account, Refunds, &c.,

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

* For six months only. Transferred to Sanitary Department.

Deduct Increase,.

Total Decrease in 1909, $

60,321.11

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Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Registrar General's Department

since 1900.

Year.

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Total. Decrease. Increase. Total. Decrease Increase.

C.

C.

C. $ C.

1900,132,729.63 4,406.32 1901, 127,556.16 5,163.47

1902, 136,888.13

1903, 160,351.81

1904, 167,083.66

1905, 172,947.89 1906, 177,284.21

1907, 163,261.13 14,023.08 1908, 164,459.99

1909, 104,138,8860,321.11

12,219.69,1,870.46] 16,429.62

9,821.97 24,230.33 28,463.68 26,755.64 6,731.85 31,389.71 5,864.23 31,761.32 4,336.82 36,947.46)

Percentage of

Expenditure

to Revenue.

C.

C.

9.28

4,209.93 12-87

7,800.71| 17-70

|2,525.31| 16·68

[4,584.07 18·75

|35,630,88|1,316,58

1,198.86 43,848.51 43,793.61

54.90

421.61 18.36 5,186.14 20-84

***

21.82

[8,217.63 26·66

42.05

Table III.

'Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Registrar General under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

DETAINED PREVIOUS TO 1ST JANUARY, 1909.

DETAINED DURING 1909.

Total.

Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total.

C 20

Permitted to leave,..........

Permitted to leave under bond,. Restored to husband,

Restored to relative,

11

1

12

62

25

87

99

...

11

1

12

12

9

19

28

28

20

12

32

32

Sent to native place, Married,

1

10

1

2

13

15

16

13

17

15

32

45

Adopted,

Sent to Refuge or Convent,

Awaiting marriage or adoption, Absconded,

Under consideration,

3

4

4

6

3

1

Co

3

3

3

35

20

20

55

Si co co co

9

1

58

26

4

30

168

112

280

310

Cases brought forward, 30,

Cases dealt with during year, 252,

Cases carried forward, 58,

Table IV.

Number of Assisted Emigrants and of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Registrar General under "The Chinese Emigration Ordinances, 1889-1908," during the year 1909.

Male

WOMEN AND CHILDREN, 1909.

Male

Women

C

Assisted

Assisted

and

Whither Bound.

Emi-

Emi-

grants

1909.

Grants

Children

Women. Girls. Boys. Total.

1908.

1908.

C 21

Europe,

Japan,....

Straits Settlements, Malay Peninsula,....

Dutch Indies,

Borneo,

Honolulu,

......

Pelew Islands,

Canada,

2

5

2

1

8

5

16,803 7,081

832

1,320

9,833

11,803

11,077

5,923

172

22

293

487

2,491

152

112

20

7

68

95

54

54

3

1

2

6

8

11

436

455

274

United States of America,

56

9

649

714

444

Mexico,

South America,

Mauritius,

21

21

43

1

37

38

46

10

17

27

13

Total, 1909,

22,892

7,356

884

3,446 11,686 14,294

12,108

Total, 1908,

14,294

8,356

918

2,834 12,108

€ 22

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

REJECTED.

Year.

Examin- ed.

Passed.

Unwil- Rejected Rejected

ling. at R.G.O

by as unfit. Doctor.

Sent

Per- back Total Re- centage from Sin- jected. of Rejec

gapore.

tion.

1908... 16,735 14,294

1909.. 18,511 16,803

1,360 1,081

541 1,167

427

361 3,229

193

155

210 2.073

11-2

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1909.

Sent home by Tung Wah Hospital, ....

79

Sent through the Hospital at expense of Boarding Houses,. 1,480

Sent away,

514

2,073

Recruiting Districts.

Canton,

4,063

Wuchow,

..3,224

Hoihow,

.3,341

Swatow,.

..3.293

Other Places....

.2,882

16,803

1

Ć 23

Table VI.

Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure of District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1909.

C.

(1)

To Balance,

12,154

By Wages and Salaries :-

(1)

Grant by Government,

2,000

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

2,114

Contributions,

24,722

men,

1,572

District Watchmen,

13,557

Cooks,

432

,, Payments for Special Services,

189

Coolies,

384

Collector,

300

Interest,......

383

Interpreter.

30

Manager,

171

Writer,

60

Fines.......

37

Special District Watchmen to

"

prevent the dumping of bodies.

1,020

19,640 43

By Miscellaneous :

Crown Rent,

16

Water Account,.......

195

Premium on Fire Policies,

452

Instructors' Allowance,

96

Uniform and Equipment,

1.549

Erection of extension of build-

ing to the District Watch-

men's House at saiyingpun,

2,706

Stationery and Printing.

168

Photographs,

Gratuities and Reward.

255

Furniture,

95

1

Fittings and Repairs,

291

Coolie and Conveyance Hire,...

157

Loss on Exchange,

1,716

Oil,

360

Pension to Aú Pún's Widow,

120

Cost of Telephone,

483

Sundries.

267

8,936

21

Total Expenditure,. Balance,

28,576 64 10,910 48

Total,

39,487

12

Total,

.$

39,487

12

Disposal of Balance :-

On Fixed Deposit,

At Current Account,

Total,.......

$8,000.00 2,910.48

.$10,910.48

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Patients.

C 24

Table VII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1909.

Admitted.

Out-patients.

Male,

168

3,100 3,2682,170

903

195

66,496 2,942 | 69,438

477

749 2,258

Female,

41

623

664 344 264

56

46,514 2,372 | 48,886

510

389

47

Total,.

209 1,894 1,829 3,7233,932 2,514 1,167

251 113,010 5,314 118,324 987

9871,1382,305

Total for 1908, 205 2,118 2,004 4,122 4,327 2,678 1,440

209 87,847 2,803 90,650 2,348 1,226

| |

152

1.

°C 25

Table VIII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wah Hospital for the Ki Yau Year (1909).

Receipts.

Year,

Balance brought forward from Mo San

To rent of Hospital property,..

To Subscriptions :-

Amount.

Payments.

(1)

By Food of employees,.

900

Salaries,

"

Sick room expenses,

30,329

""

Drugs,

""

Wa

Expenses for Small-pox Hospital,.

Wages and food of employees at

Infectious Hospital,

Amount.

$

$ (1)

- 6,051

14,509

15,011

23,329

2,505

283

1. Annual Subscriptions of Hongs,....

11,975

"2

Stationery,

1,440

Sundries,.

7,323

17

2. Subcriptions of various shops,

1,475

};

Repairs to Infectious Disease

Hospital,

5,500

3.

collected on Steamers,

5,835

33

""

General Repairs,

4,482

""

Re-erection of kitchen block,..............

4,000

4.

19

and Donations,

2,366

"7

Furniture,

509

Insurance,

932

5.

"

Subscribed by chari-

Crown Rent,

624

table persons for the purpose of sup- plying medicine, quilted clothing and coffins,

6. Subscriptions from wealthy persons,

86,504

19

Free cemetery,

3,998

2,378

Coffins,

4,920

"}

Burial of bodies from Government

""

3,500!

mortuary (Victoria),

1,066

""

Coffins for bodies from Government

7.

""

by Directors, Assistant Directors and Committee,

1,152

mortuary, Burial of bodies from Government

....

1,768

""

8. 20% of Subscriptions collected by

the Man Mo Temple,

To Payments for medicine supplied, sale

of kitchen refuse and rent of Mortuary,

mortuary (Kowloon),............................... Coffins for bodies from Government

602

"?

2,500

mortuary,

1,031

31,183

13,387

>>

Expenditure on

repatriation of

6,212

emigrants,

515

""

Government Grant,

8,000

Total Ordinary Expenditure,...

100,408

>>

Total Ordinary Receipts,.....................

To Subscriptions towards building Small-

pox Hospital,

76,625

>>

Repayment of loan from Chinese Recreation Ground Fund, Repayment of loan from the Kwong Shiu Flood Relief Fund,....

5,000

5,500

69,009

"3

Building of Plague Ward,...................

10,500 11,307

Total,

"

Balance,

Grand Total,.....

...

$ 145,634.87

Grand Total,

:

122,215.17 23,419.70

$ 145,634.87

(1) Cents omitted except in totals.

C 26

Table IX.

Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the Tung Wah Hospital at the close of the Ki Yau Year (1909).

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

ASSETS.

AMOUNT.

To Loan from Relief Fund,....

"

22

""

"

Cheap Sale of Rice Fund, Subscription for Hospital

Extension Fund,

$ 8,440.60

*

29,681.33

...

:

15,226.69

""

""

Man Mo Temple Fund,

5,860.49

25

San Francisco Relief Fund,

5,470.17

"

To Further Loan from Man Mo Temple

......

">

""

">

Fund, Cheap Sale of

Rice Fund,...... 38,887.02

6,000.00

...

...

109,566.31

Balance of Assets over Liabilities,

90,707.66

""

Total,.

By Bank balance at close of year :-

With Ui Lung Bank,....

With Shing Yuen Bank,. Cash in hand,...

By House property (original value). 2 houses in Bonham Strand and Jervois Street,

"1

>>

1 house in Wing Lok Street (includ- ing cost of additions to building),. 10 houses in Aberdeen Street and Tung Wa Lane (including cost of additions to buildings),

2 houses in Connaught Road and

Des Voeux Road,

20,000.00

3,000.00

419.69

23,419.69

10,400.00

8,108.28

$ 200,273.97

Subscriptions not yet paid From Hongs,

From Individuals,

}

14,900 00

17,386.00

""

7 houses in Queen's Road, West

(including cost of additions to

buildings),..

30,363.00

2 houses in Bonham Road, West,

26,000.00

"

3 houses in Bonham Strand,

15,000.00

10 houses in Po Yan Street and New Street (at present used as Plague Hospital),

54,697.00

Total,...

.$1,635.70 1,800.00

$6,435.70

176,854.28

$ 200,273.97

[

RECEIPTS.

Table X.

Emergency Fund.

Ki Yau Year (1909).

AMOUNT.

$

PAYMENTS.

AMOUNT.

Balance from Mo San Year,

To Gift to boatman Chan Tai not yet paid, Interest,

Total,

46,766.99 Gift to boatman Chan Tai,

50.00 4,409.89 | Balance,

51,226,88

DISPOSAL OF BALANCE.

50.00

51,176.88

Total,

51,226.88

Yuen Shing Bank,

On Ue Bank,

Ming San Bank,

Tsün Mi Bank,

Cash in hand,

$20,000.00

20,000.00

10,000.00

1,000.00

176.88

Total,

$51,176.88

Note.--This Fund was formed out of the gift of 30,000 Tacls made by H. M. the Emperor of China towards the relief of the sufferers in the 1906 Typhoon. [See 7522/06 C.S.O.]

!

C 27

Receipts.

Table XI.

Man Mo Temple Funds: Ki Yau Year (1909).

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

- C 28

$

$

Balance from Mo San Year,

To Subscription from Shing Wong Temple, 3,372.78

8,499.91

By Tung Wah Hospital

2,500.00

Free schools and Sundries

6,984.77

""

9,484.77

Rent,

4,584.04

Balance at close of year :—

,, Temple Keeper,

4,007.20

Lei Ch'eong Bank

10,000.00

Refund of Crown Rent,

19.60

Tsün Mi Bank

1,000.00

Interest,

403.40

Cash in hand

402.16

"

20,886.93

11,402.16

Total, $ 20,886.93

Total, $ 20,886.93

Receipts.

Table XII.

Kwong Chau and Shiu Hing Relief Funds: Ki Yau Year (1909).

Amount.

Payments.

!

Amount.

C 29

$

Balance from Mo San Year, .

182,760.29

To Subscriptions,.............

14,249.25

"

Refund by the Kong Pak Relief Fund,

1,000.00

Notices,

>>

Interest,

2,535.00

Loss on Exchange,..

"}

200,544.54

ya

Stamps,

By Subscriptions to Flood Relief So- [ciety, Canton,

$

171,886.85

"}

"}

Kong Pak Relief Fund,

5,000.00

27.20

72.98

9.04

176,996.07

By Balance at close of year :- Ng Ün Hing Bank,

20,000.00

Tsün Mi Bank,.

3,000.00

Cash in hand,

548.47

28,548.47

Total, $ 200,544.54|

Total, $200,544,54

Table XIII.

Cheap Sale of Rice Fund: Ki Yau Year (1909).

RECEIPT.

AMOUNT.

$

To Balance from Mo San Year,

38,887.02

Total,

38,887.02

-

4

:

PAYMENT.

AMOUNT.

By Loan to Tung Wah Hospital towards purchasing property in New Street, 38,887.02

Total,.

$ 33,887.02

- O 30

you

CENTRAL.

C 31

Table XIV.

Work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Old Kowloon and Kowloon City.

VICTORIA.

OLD KOWLOON.

EAST.

WEST.

TOTAL.

1

""

-New Patients visited at their homes,

seen at the office,

Total,

2-Old Cases (home),

"

(office),

194 376 311 4,946 5,862′ 6,170 |16,978

5,140 6,238 6,481 17,859 | 6,481|17,859

6 93 58 157 1,200 2,497 2,887 6,584

881

39 171 230 263 1,617 1,880

15 233 601 834 229 2,414 7,667 10,081

244 2,647|| 8,268 10,915

6 122

593 2,323 1,171 28,459 21,613

1,764 30,782 24,353

2,740

177 570 661. 237 8,823

7,406

Total,

1,206 2,590 2,945 6,741

128

322 1,788 2,110

414 9,393

8,067

3-Certificates of nature of disease issued, Total,

1

3

8

12

5

3

8

1

21

33

"

(3A- given to persons to leave the Colony), 4-Certificates of cause of death issued, 5-Patients sent to hospital,

6-Patients removed to hospital in ambulance, 7-Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,

8-Dead bodies inspected at the request of the Sanitary Department or the Police,

9-Plague cases sent out of the colony,.... 10—Houses cleansed in presence of clerk, 11-Compensation claims sent in,

12-Applications for coffins,.....

1

1

5

6

11

12

18

...

22

40

36

98

10

88

118

152

358

·

85

84

105

274

002

79

216

295 184 587 579

8

20

35

55

16 437

542

9

46

55

331

737

125

122

130 377

:

84

395

479

28 884

867

1

:

:::

::

8

19

18

13

50

1

41

42

30

122

1,002

23

23

23

193

...

100

130

307

13-Applications for midwives,

3

36

46

:

:

26

30

11

348

509

102

102

148

99

14-Infants brought to office (alive),

31

10

256

297

18

18

1

316

228

多多

(dead),

135

166 151

452

65

335

400

21

873

559

Total,

166

176 407

749

65

353

418

22 1,189

787

15-Vaccinations at house,

4

35

19

58

:

15

1

16

2

76

325

"J

at office,

....

366

388

517 1,271

2

158

583

741

58 2,072

2,162

Total,

370

423

536| 1,329

2

173

584 757

60 2,148

2,487

HARBOUR.

HUNGHOM.

YAUMATI.

TOTAL.

KOWLOON CITY,

GRAND TOTAL.

TOTAL 1908.

RECEIPTS.

C 32

Table XV.

Victoria Dispensaries.

Statement of Account.

C.

C.

Balance,

Government Grant to the West Point

Plague Hospital,

1,393.23

600.00

Donation from Kim Shiu Theatre,....... Donation from Tai Ping and Po

4,000.00

Hing Theatres,

6,825.00

Annual subscriptions, Land,

13,734.98

620.22

25,180.20

Annual subscriptions, Harbour,

Special subscription to pay the Premium

on I.L. 1,747 Central Dispensary,... Balance transferred from West Point

Plague Hospital,

Special subscription to pay off debt of

West Point Plague Hospital, Interest,......

Total,.............

:.

:

:

EXPENDITURE.

$

19,737.26 104.44

C.

Maintenance of Dispensaries, Subvention to Kowloon City Dispensary,

Payment of Loan from Po Chak Tong,. Part cost of building the West Point

Plague Hospital,

Boat to be used as Harbour Dispensary

(including repairs),

:

$

..

19,841.70 2,000.00

1,534.09

844.00

24,219.79

J

3,400.00

BALANCE

At Current Account,

8,470.52

980.00

Cash in hand,

62.58

1,120.00

Advance money to Dispensary Clerks, Bad coins,

60.00

7.60

+

147.06

8,600.70

$ 32,820.49

Total,......

$32,820.49

C 33

Table XVI.

Kowloon Peninsula Dispensaries.

Statement of Account.

DESCRIPTION.

HUNG-

YAU-

Kow-

HOM.

MATI.

LOON.

RECEIPTS :-

Balance,....

349

1,308

242

Subscriptions, &c.,

4,034

5,562

2,219

Donation from ShamshuipoTemple,

575

Government Grant,

550

250

Grant from Dispensaries in Victoria,

101

$

Total,... 4,933.94 7,171.39 3,392,84

EXPENDITURE :—

Through Registrar General's Office, By Local Committec,

1,830 1,830 2,148

2,304 4,908 1,213

Total........

4,134,38 6,738,19 3,361.90

BALANCE :-

At Registrar General's Office,. With Committee,

520

124

279

308

30

*

Total,..................................... 799.56 433.20 30.94

Total,..........$ 4,933.94 7,171,39 3,392.84

Cents omitted except in the totals.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,..

Table XVII.

Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Registrar General to have been abandoned during the year 1909.

VICTORIA DISTRICTS.

Month.

Cen-

West.

East.

tral.

4

9

1

+ C = C

10

18

12

996

11

8

11

12

9

10

12

4

13

10

10

COCO LO

11

.10

4

24

7

14

12

12

1340 HN-N∞270

170

0

19

28

101

20

38

109

18

30

93

24

32

119

23

35

100

12

28

38

107

18

22

119

18

28

51

25

29

69

1

0

2222225

21

26

63

29

36

45

27

39

29

Total,

26

51

34

111 123

80

60

7

270 381

1,005

Total for 1908,

163

121

103 377 167

311

84

36

628 1.005

Monthly average,...

2.1

4.2

2.8

9.2

10.2

6.6

.5

5:0

22.5

31.7

July,

August,

September, October, ....

November,

December,

1

C 34 -

A

Table XVIII.

Number of Infants and Infants' Bodies brought to the Dispensaries in 1908 and 1909.

WESTERN.

CENTRAL.

EASTERN.

Alive.

Dead. Total. Alive. Dead. Total. Alive.

Dead.

Total.

1908.

Address unknown,

5

167

172

Address known,

202

101

303

<

43

45

4

56

62

7

48

55

Total,

207

268

475

8

99

107

7

52

59

1909.

C 35 -

Address unknown,.

20

21

47

47

1

53

54

Address known,

255

131

386

32

91

123

9

118

122

Total,

256

151

407

32

138

170

10

166

176

Dr.

Table XIX.

Chinese Recreation Ground, Receipts and Expenditure, 1909.

Receipts.

To Balance,.

Rent of Stalls,

Repayment from Tung Wah Hospital of

$

Payments.

634 (1) By Wages of Watchmen, &c.,

1,384

gift towards purchasing land in

New Street,

5,000

Total,..

$

7,019.11

Miscellaneous,

Balance,

"

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

ရာ

Cr.

C.

555 (1)

379

6,083

Total,...

7,019.11

:

C 36

Dr.

Table XX.

Statement of Account of Passage Money Fund.

Receipts.

$

C.

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,

at Current Account,

...$3,250

1,127

Caslı,

75

་་

Passage Money received,

4,452 (1)

1,209

Interest on Endownment Fund,

130

""

Interest on Current Account,

37

Refund of cost of repatriating emigrants,

12

Deposit for repatriation of emigrants,..

18

Miscellaneous,

Payments.

By Refund of Passage Money,

"}

"

Gifts to 48 women on being married,. Annual Charitable Allowance to six

persons,...

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital, Subscription to Eyre Diocesan Refuge, Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants, Eyre Dicccsan Refuge--Interest, Assistance to R. Wesley,

Small gifts to distressed persons,

Petty expenses,

Balance :-

Eyre Diocesan Refuge Endow-

ment Fund,

Total,.

5,867.74

Current Account,..

Cash,

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Total,.

Cr.

628 (1)

114

192

30

ខ្លួននគិសនីគឺ

130

50

50

$3 250

1,197

44

4,491

5,867.74

C 37

Table XXI.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 1 of 1889, No 2 of 1890,

No. 7 of 1896 and No. 4 of 1897.

OFFENCE.

CONVICTED.

DISCHARGED.

No. of

CASES.

M.

F.

M.

F.

ORDINANCE No. 3 OF 1888.

Bills-Posting without permission,

2

Fireworks-Discharging without permits,

17

150

3

ORDINANCE No. 1 OF 1889.

Decoving men or boys into or aw, y from the Colony, Keeping unlicensed I migration flouses,

7

6

1

Neglecting to enter names of borders on register,

1ersonating Emigrants,

ORDINANCE No. 2 Of 1890.

4

1

1

Contraventions of, and offences under, (failing to produce proper certificates of

vaccination),

ORDINANCE No. 7 OF 18"6.

Failing to report Death,

Unlawful removal of bodies

ORDINANCE No. 4 of 1×97.

2

***

3

2

2

1

Abduction of girls under the age of 18 years (Sec. 26). Decoying women and girls into o away from the olony, Detaining, harbouring or receiving women or girls. Procuration of girls under age to have carn il connection,

Knowingly deriving profits from prostitution, letting women out for hire, trading in them,

on on 00 10

8

5

3*

1

1

Including 1 committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

I

21

ANA

1

1132

2

1

Ở 38 -

$

C 39

Annexe A.

REPORT OF THE PO LEUNG KUK FOR THE YEAR 1909.

The following twelve gentlemen were elected on the 20th March to act as Managing Committee for the

ycar 1909 :-

1.—Chan Shüt-ngắm. 2.-Chau Cheuk-fán. 3.-Chiu Seung-shang. 4.-Choa Leep Chee. 5. Lam Shau-ting. 6.-Lau Sing-chai.

7.-Leung Ping-nám. 8.-Li Yau-tsün. 9.Na Hang-chau. 10.-Mok Yeuk-lim. 11.-Ng Hon-tsz. 12.-Tam Hok-po.

The Board has to regret the loss by death of Mr. Pun Yan-tsün who had been a member since 1906. The vacancy has not been filled, as the number of members was one in excess of the prescribed number.

The balance to the credit of the Society on the 31st December was $20.116 compared with $19,390 at the close of 1908. Of this sum $15,000 are placed on fixed deposit with five Chinese banks. The actual expenditure for the year was $10,282 compared with $8.919 in the previous year. There was an increased expenditure of $745 on food and the grant to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge was $900 as against $250. The subscriptions. collected during the year amounted to $8,392 as against $9.017 in 1908. The interest on the money on fixed deposit falls due according to the Chinese calendar, and this accounts for its being $2,062 compared with only $133 last year. The Visiting Justices, Mr. Bryer and Mr. Chau Siu-ki, have paid twelve visits to the Po Leung Kuk. On one occasion only did they receive a complaint which was reported to the Governor and duly investigated. Nine meetings of the Permanent Board of Direc- tion have been held. The average attendance of members was seven, and the average number of the Managing Committee present was between five and six. Among subjects of more general interest that were discussed was the building of quarters at Causeway Bay in which to house those girls whom it was impossible for one reason or another to release after only a short detention. The Board thought the exponditure would be useless, as any cases where longer detention was considered necessary were always sent to the Convent or to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge. The Board was also invited to express an opinion as to the circumstances which in their opinion justified a Chinese girl's parents in breaking off a betrothal in a case where the fiancé has left the country and the prospect of consum- mating the marriage seems remote, and certain conditions on which such a betrothal might be cancelled were approved. The appearance of the women's quarters has been much improved by removing the netting over the windows fixed there to guard against illicit com- munication with people outside; to prevent any interference with the Society's wards a watchman has been engaged to patrol the street. Arrangements have been made for the matron taking the children to walk in Blake Gardens once a week. The Eyre Diocesan Refuge has been visited by two or more members of the Managing

- C40

Committee ten times during the year. The average number of women and children in the Po Leung Kuk at the end of each month was 59.

The number in the Po Leung Kuk on the 1st January was 54 and during the year 515 more, of whom 124 were children, were received. The circumstances of their admission and the measures taken regarding them are indicated in Table A. It will suffice here to note that 3 managed to get possession of the matron's key and absconded, 193 were placed in charge of their rciatives, 49 were married and 25 adopted. The task of arranging suitable marriages is a difficult one, and in fact so is the whole work entrusted to the Managing Committee of settling the future of the Society's wards. Cases of extreme difficulty are considered at the meetings of the Permanent Board.

The matron and the other members of the staff have worked to the satisfaction of the Board.

The Po Leung Kuk has been visited regularly by the ladies of the Church Missionary Society.

On the whole the health of the inmates has been good. There have been no cases of dangerous illness and only eight slight cases of beri-beri. During the year seventeen of the inmates were admitted into the Tung Wah Hospital.

The usual tables shewing the income and expenditure during the year

and the assets and liabilities of the Society are attached. The accounts of the Elected Committee have been audited by Mr. Ku Fai- shan and Mr. Chin Chau-sam.

24th February, 1910.

A. W. BREWIN,

Registrar General,

President.

Ho Kai

Vice-President.

ار

༈ ༥་

comber, 1909,... on the 31st De-

Po Leung Kuk

Remaining in the

і

Table A.

Number of women and girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year and the

arrangements made regarding them.

5+

27

t

2

Total.

Committed under Warrant

from Registrar General's Office.

Committed under Warrant from Emigration Office, Pending the opening of the Registrar General's Office.

Sent with their own consent

by Registrar General

Sent with their own

sent

from

con-

Singapore,

Manila and Swatow.

Sent

:

}

...

Co

*

13

1

:

10

N

-

111 17 3

with their own con-

sent by the Police.

Iost Children.

Accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway maid-scrvants.

Total.

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of hus-

band.

Placed in charge of parents

and relatives.

Placed in charge of Consul

for France.

Ran away.

Sent to Charitable institu-

tions in China.

Sent to School, Convent or

Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Case under consideration.

Total.

In the Po Leung

Kuk

on

1st

January, 1909.

the year, .................. Admitted during

515

162

109

11 131

16

11

:།ཀླ

3 515 136 | 28 | 53 |133

Total,......... 569

189

114

11 148

18

49

14 23

3 569 149

28 51 138

69

38

20

7

**

...

3

...

1

...

:

69

عد

1 3 22 27 11 82 (

66 515

5 23 28 25 49 69

69 | 569

IF O

Table B.

PO LEUNG KUK.

4

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1909.

C 42

RECEIPTS.

$

C.

EXPENDITURE.

C.

$

C.

Balance from previous year--

By the Elected Committee (See Table

On Fixed Deposit,

15,000.00

C.),

9,950.00

At Current Account,

4,290.69

19,390.69 Balance-

Subscriptions--~-

On Fixed Deposit,

15,000.00

Yue Lán Celebrations, West Point,

325.00

At Current Account, -

5,116.37

Annual Committee,

325.00

20,116.37

Guilds,

4,046 32

Man Mo Temple,

1,947.00

Theatres,

Interest-

On Deposit,

On Current Account,

1,750.00

8,393.32

2,062 50

219.86

2,282.36

Total,

$30,066.37

Total,

$30,066.37

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from the 1st January to the 31st December, 1909.

RECEIPTS.

Balance from previous year,

Received from Permanent Board,

Miscellaneous receipts,

Premium on bank notes,

Total,

-

C 43

C.

EXPENDITURE.

$

C.

C.

91.96❘ Decorations,

47.00

Food,

3,330.14

9,950.00 | Grant to Miss Eyre's Refuge,

900.00

Insurance,

321.62

74.37 Light and Fire,

1,091.94

Miscellaneous,

1,166.74

343.66

Passage Money,

56.20.

Petty Expenditure,

Printing,

123.37

93.55

Repairs,

Stationery,

Telephone,

321.93

128.64

100.00

2,600.87

10,459.99

Wages,

Balance,

Total,

*

10,282.00

177.99

10,459.99

C 44

-

We, Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society, do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st of December, 1909, marked “A” and signed with our names on the 8th March, 1910, is a true state- nent, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declarations Act 1835".

招書三

古輝山

Declared by the declarants Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan at Victoria, Hongkong, the 8th March, 1910, through the interpretation of Tang Tat-hung of Hongkong the said Tang Tat-hung having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto them.

Before me,

R. O. HUTCHISON,

Justice of Peace

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you well understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants Chiu Chiu-sam and Ku Fai-shan and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to them.

TANG TAT-HUNG.

Declared at the Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, this 8th March, 1910.

Y

Before me,

R. O. HUTCHISON,

#

i

C 45

Statement "A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1909.

ASSETS.

LIABILITIES.

$ C.

On fixed deposit at the Sui Kat, Ming San, Shing Tak, Tai Fung and Shiu Cheung Banks,

15,000.00

Nu.

At Current Account with Wui Lung

and Tseung On Banks,

5,116.37

Total,

$20,116.37

This is the Statement "A" referred to in the Declaration of Ku Fai-shan and Chui Chau-sam declared before me this eighth day of March, 1910.

R. O. HUTCHISON,

Justice of Peace.

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

REPORT.

1. Shipping.

2. Trade.

3. Revenue and Expenditure.

4. Steam-launches.

5. Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping.

7. Marine Magistrate's Court. 8. Marine Court.

Masters.

9. Examination of

Mates and Engineers.

10. Examination of Pilots. 11. Sunday Working Cargo. 12. New Territories. 13. Commercial

TABLES.

Intelligence,

Board of Trade.

I. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared. III. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels entered at

each Port.

IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared at

each Port.

V. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VII. Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Summary of arrivals and departures of all vessels.

X. Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XI. Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII. Statement of Revenue.

XIV. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary).

XV. Return of Emigration.

XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

XVII. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary).

XVIII. Return of Immigration.

XIX. Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

XX. Vessels registered.

XXI. Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII. Comparison in Number and Tonnage of vessels in Foreign-

Trade entered and cleared since 1900.

XXIII. Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

XXIV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

- D2

ANNEXES.

A. Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B. Report on Imports and Exports Office. C. Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D. Report on Gunpowder Depôt.

E. Report on Lighthouses.

1.-Shipping.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1909 amounted to 527,280 Vessels of 34,830,845 tons which, compared with that for 1908, shows a decrease in num- bers of 4,832 vessels, with an increase in tonnage of 215,604 tons. Of this total, 43,794 vessels of 22,415,125 tons were engaged in in foreign trade, and were distributed as follows:-

1909.

1908.

British Ocean-

going ships

represented,...

Foreign Ocean- going ships represented,... British River

Steamers re- presented,...... 13′2

Foreign River

Steamers re-

9.3% in Nos. and

34.5% in tonnage.

33.7%

9.8

35.1

33.2

1

"

16.5

19.2

presented,.

3.2

3.3

3:3

39

Steam-launches

(under 60

tons) repre-

sented,.......

7.2

0.6

0.8

Trading Junks

}

represented,... 573

10:0

9.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the above figures.

2. Of ships of European construction. 4,191 Occan Steamers, 7 Sailing Ships, 3,576 River Steamers, and 1,580 Steam-launches (i.e.. steamships not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 25'6, as compared with 26-8 in 1908.

That

3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean vessels visiting the port has slightly decreased from 2,448 6 tons to 2,390 4 tons. of British vessels has remained stationary-2,594 as against 2,593- while that of Foreign vessels has decreased from 2,3099 to 2,205.3

'tons.

In this connection it is interesting to note that during the past twenty years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the Colony has risen from 1,182:3 tons to 2,390'4 tons.

A

A

"

D 3

The average tonnage of River steamers entered during the year decreased from 665 5 tons to 6206 tons, that of British River steamers from 687 to 6404 tons, and that of Foreign River steamers from 565.2 to 538 1 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1908 and 1909 is given in the following table :-

1908

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No.

■ Tonnage. No.

Tonnage

No. Tonnage. No. (Tonnage.

British

Ocean- /

3.869

going,

Foreign Ocean-

4.132

going,

British River

6.246

Steamers...

Foreign River

1.297

7,505,870 4.076

7,397,836 4.3 8

4,287,482 5.78 ·

78 3,065

7.73 927

7,857 908

20-

280,657

186

£60,072

3.701,754

:

466 585,728

Steamers..

735.682 1 370

73

2,617

Steamships un-

der 60 tons 4.060

181.14. 3.160

140,484

900

40.658

(Foreign

Trade)

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

25,833 2 201,242 25,080 2.243,370

Total Foreign45,437 22,3 6.057 43,794 | 22.415,125 466

Trade,

Steam-launches

plying in Wa- ters of Colony,

445,724 | 10,460,682′ 439,988 10 328,400!

42,1287.3

785,474 2,109 626.386

,738 132,282

Junks.

Local

Trade.

*40,951 | *1,848,522 | †43,4-8 †2,087,320|||2.547

238.798

Grand Total.

532,112 34.615,241 | 527,280 | 34,830,845 | 3,013

974,272 7,843

758.668

Net.

215,604 4,832

+

Including 16.808 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 862,256 tons.

19,094

"

of 1,022 676

་་

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean Shipping of 207 ships of 230,657 net register tons, or of 53 per cent. in numbers and 3 per cent. in tonnage, which points to a continuance of the revival of trade noted in my report for 1908. The improvement has been continuous throughout the year.

British River Steamers have decreased by 466 ships of 585,728 tons, or 74 per cent. in numbers and 13 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the loss of two large steamers, the "Powan" and "Ying- king" which ran for half of 1908; to the withdrawal of two smaller steamers, the "Hoi Sang'

"Hoi Sang" and "Kwong Fat", and to the laying up, during three months of 1909, of another small steamer, the "Tak Hing".

D4

Foreign Ocean vessels have increased by 186 ships of 460,072 tons, or 4'5 per cent. in numbers and 6-2 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due almost entirely to Japanese shipping, which has increased by 118 ships of 159,292 tons. Increases are also shown under the Norwegian and Swedish flags-of 58 ships of 64,400 tons, and 47 ships of 70,265 tons, respectively. Portuguese and Dutch flags also show small increases. The principal decreases are under French and German colours-of 45 ships of 58,133 tons, and 19 ships of 16,848 tons, respectively; small decreases being shown under Russian, Austrian, and Italian flags. Under the United States flag there was an increase of 7 ships with a decrease in ton- mage of 42,211 tons; while there was a similar fall in the average size of Chinese ships, an increase of 2 ships being accompanied by a decrease of 3,503 tous.

Foreigu River Steamers increased by 73 ships of 2,617 tons, or 5'6 per cent. in numbers and 035 per cent. in tonnage, which is explained by the smaller vessels running more frequently and the larger less often. Two small River Steamers under Chinese colours were added to the West Riyer run during the year. These vessels run only as far as Kong Mun. thus making many more trips than those running up to Wuchow.

It may not be out of place to draw a comparison here between these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 1889, 2,5901 British ships of 3,242,953 tons entered the port, against 9,856 ships of 11,437,681 tons in 1909. For Foreign ships the figures are for 1839, 1,144 ships of 1,206,983 tons and in 1909, 5,633 ships of 8,593,590 tons. These figures are those for Ocean and River Steamers, which were not distinguished in 1889, and Ocean Sailing Ships (not Junks).

6. The actual number of individual Ocean vessels of European construction entering during 1909 was 701 being 336 British and 368 Foreign. The corresponding figures for 1908 were respectively 745, 365, and 380.

These 704 ships aggregated 1,682,815 tous. They entered 4.198 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 7,796,376 tons. Thus compared with 1908, 41 less ships entered 207 more times, and gave a collective tonnage increased by 343,878 tons.

'

'

Thus -

- D5 -

Steamers.

No. of Times

entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1908. 1909. 1908. 190 9.

1908. · 1909.

Steamers 358

3311,923 2,034 3,730,927|3,854,571

British

Sailing...

7

5

10

7

21,697

17,683

Austrian,

9

7

25

24

97,789

94,288

Belgian,

1

1

2,903

Chinese,

16

24

229

232

291,416 290,936

Corean,

1

1

796

***

Danish,

6

5

15

16

34,211 31,426

Dutch,

15

17

97

105

201,014 207,190

French, German,

39

32

169

148

....

289,222 262,459

129

108

745

735 1,188,100 1,176,322

Italian,....

4

2

12

Japanese,.

93

98

434

11 31,400 28,470 493 1,049,540 1,283,330

Norwegian,

39

43

181

212

192,278 227,341

Portuguese,

4

87

94

23,487 36,927

Russian,

7

13

9

34,326 19,584

Swedish,

3

11

35

18,099

53.726

United Steamers 13

17

38 42

245,280 211,327

>

States Sailing...

1

809

Total,.... 745 704 3,991 4,198 7,452,498 7,796,376

No. of Entries.

No.

British.

D 6

OCEAN SHIPPING, 1909,-ARRIVALS.

STEAMERS.

No.

Foreign.

No.

Total.

Total Tons,

1

78

78

206,711

206,711 78

78

131,699

131.699156

156 338,410

338,410

2 71

142 216,830

433,660 | 55

110

129,475

258,950 126

252 346,305

692,610

43

129

146.861

440,583 38

114

101,866

305,598 81

243 248,727 ·

746,181

4

26

104

88,361

353,444 45 180

143,846

575,381 71

284

232.207

928,828

5

18

90

42,919

214,595 26

130

99,151

495,755 41

220 142,070

710,350

48

11,616

69,696 | 14

81

43,230

259,380 | 22

132

54,846

329,076

42

11,087

77,609 15

105

28,821

201,747 21

147

39,908

279,356

56

10,737

85,896 18

144

37 653

301,224 | 25

200

48.390

387,120

9 14

126

27,122

244,098 | 20

180

29,024

261,216 34

306

56,146

505,314

10

150

32,556

325,560 12

120

13,746

137.460 27

270

46,302

463,020

11

66

14 791

162,701 5

55

5.796

63,750 11

121

20.587

12

226,457

24

2,412

28.944

36 2.287

27,441

60

4,699

13

56,388

39

3,988

51,814 ୪

104

10,963

142 519 11

143

14,951

191 363

14

14

1,045

14,680

14

1,045

14.630

15

15

3.695

55,440

15

3,246

48,690

60

6.942

104.130

16

48

3,431

54.896

16

3.087

49,392

64

6518

104,288

17

17

1,418

24,106

68

4.3.9

78,763

5.757

18

97,869

18

1,047

18,846

54

2,841

51.138

19

3.88-

69.981

3,511

66,709

57

2,832

53.808

20

20

1,424

6.343!

120.517

28,480

60

3,471

69,120

21

4.895

97,900

21

989

20,769

989

22

20 769

23

24

122

22

1,215

26.730

22

299

6.578

1,514

33,308

46

2,310

53,130

2

46

1,510

34,73

92

3.820

87,860

48

2,455

58,920

48

1,397

33,528

96

25

3,852

92,448

26

28

29

31

34

35

36

37

38

43

41

18

91

--- mi - ori

25

·646

16,150

25

646

130

16,150

7,061

183,586

52

1,639

42 614

182

8.75.0

226,200

28

1,222

34,216

28

1.222

34.216

29

1,356

39,324

29

714

20.706

58

2,070

60,030

31

217

6,727

31

217

6,727

102

8.813

129,642

34

1,536

62,224

136

5.319

181,866

2

70

2.852

99,820

...

70

2.852

99.820

36

1,339

48,201

36

1,339

48,204

37

1.177

43,549

37

1.177

43,549

38 1,468

55,784

38

1,468

55.784

43

1.349

58,0 17

43

1,349

58,007

41

1,352

59.483

44

1,352

59 188

96

2,700

129,600

96

2,700

129,600

91

636

57,876

91

636

57,876

Grand

Total

Total

Total,

Sailing,

~ 1

Steamers,

1336

331 2,034 858,662 3,854,571 368

3

7.631 4 i 5,026

7.631 10,052

4

:

10

7 12,657

17,693

2,157 811,526 3,924,122 699

4.191

1,670,188

7,778,693

SAILING SHIPS.

GP ลง

7.631 5.026

7,631 10.052

7

12.637

17 683

2,041 871,319 3 872,254 369 2,157 811,526 3,924,122 704

4,198 1,682,845|| 7,796,376

D1

ק

7

The 336 British vessels carried 3,592 British Officers and 14 Foreign Officers, the latter consisting of 11 U.S.A., 2 Norwegians and I Dutch. Thus the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British vessels was 0.42% comprising 3 Nationalities. A decrease of 0.01% with a decrease in number of Officers and ships.

The 368 Foreign vessels carried 2,576 Officers of whom 125 were British as follows:

-

In Chinese vessels

1909.

1908.

72

69

"2

Dutch French

2

"

3

3

>>

"}

Japanese

46

54

"

United States vessels -

4

13

13

125

141

Thus 48% of the Officers serving in Foreign vessels were of British Nationality, a decrease of 0'5% with a decrease in number of ships and Officers.

The Nationality of the Crews in British and Foreign vessels was as follows:-

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREWS.

U. S. A. AND EUROPEANS.

ASIATICS.

1908. 1909. 1908. 1909.

British,

1908. 1909. | 1008. 1909.

365 356 23,755 24,158 417 281 118,278123,132

Foreign,. 380

369 1,536 1 336 27,446 26,955 109,818114,330

1

Total,

745

...

704 25,291 25,524 27,863 27,236 228,096,242,462

Hence in British vessels :-

And in Foreign vessels:

1908.

1909.

1908.

1909.

16.67%

15 83% of the crews were British.

1.2 %

0·95 % of the crews

were British.

0.29 %

0.18% of the crews were other Europeans.

19.7 %

18.89% of the crews

were other Europeans.

83.03 %

83.98 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

79·1% 80-14% of the crews

were Asiatics.

D&

2.-Trade.

10. As pointed out last year, and in many previous years, the figures which used to appear under this heading rere as a whole never accurate, and, in some cases, actual y n isleading. However, in the few items of Import Trade of which substantially accurate details can be given, the following remarks may prove of interest. These items are Coal, Kerosene Oil (including all products of Petroleum), Opium, Morphine, Compounds of Opium, and Sugar.

Coal. Here I find that 1,126,826 tons were imported into the Colony during the year. This shows an increase over the imports of 1908, of 108,083 tons, or 10.6 %. This would appear to be due to nothing more phenomenal than an increased demand, and to a general improvement in business and manufactures. It is a curicus fact that although the imports of cral have increased to this extent, the shipment of bunker coal in the Colony has decreased. This is due to the fact that an increasing number of vessels, calling at Hong- kong, prefer to take their bunker coal clse vhere, eg, Japanese and most transpacific liners in Japan, Chinese in Canton-whither a considerable quantity of coal pissos through Hongkong in transit- and many vessels on the home run at Singapore, &c. This may be due in part to the fear of detention in Hongkong, enhanced by the prevalence of typhoons of late years.

Kerosene Oil.--Decreases are shown in all classes of this product, viz. -26,235 tons of Bu'k Oil, 3 853 tons of Case Oil, and 9,493 tons of Liquid Fuel. These decrcases are only what might have been expected after the phenomenal increases in 1908, (indeed, my remarks on the subject foreshadowed then), and do not indicate any falling off in the trale. Liquid Fuel has increased consider- ably-(32%) over the figures for 1907-the last normal year.

Opium. The imports of Raw Opium show a decrease of 6.087 chests, or 145 per cent. while the exports declined by 3,620 chests, or 97 per cent. During the year 1909, the raw opium trade of the Colony is described by the following figures :-

Stock in hand, 1st January, 1909,

Imported during the year,

5,808 chests. 35,734

27

Total,

41,542

Boiled by Opium Farmer, ...

1,044

Spurious Opium destroyed,

Exported during the year,

51 35,928

31

17

Total,

Stock remaining on 31st December, 1909,...

37 033 4,509

12

"?

Of the several varieties of opium exported, Malwa decreased by 343 chests, or 61 per cent., Patua by 1 074 c'ests, or 78 pr ceat, Benares by 1.228 chests, or 126 per cent., Persian by 410 chests, or 1 per cent, while no Turkish opium was either imported or exported, and Chinese opium has never formed any appreciable part of the trade of the Colony. It is obvious from the above figures that the supply does not meet the demand, as 1,300 more chests were

-

disposed of than were imported. China took 92'4 per cent. of the exports.

Imports of Compounds of Opium increased, as compare-l with 1308, by 2,513 lb., or 2333%, and exports by 1,613 lb., or 19 53'o, while the amount which remained in the Colony for consumption increased by 930 lb., or 381%. Imports of Morphia showed an increase of 356 lb., or 5'06%. Imports and exports of Cocaine were recorded for the first time and for the period from April 22nd to 31st December showed 68 lb. imported and 12 lb. exported.

Sugar. The imports of sugar shows a considerable increase of 89,766 tons, or 36 per cent. This article is peculiarly liable to sud- den fluctuations, and the increase may be due to increase of stocks owing to favourable prices.

Besides the above items, I propose to say a few words on the subject of others, which, from the figures at my disposal, appear to have experienced considerable increases or decreases during the past year.

Cotton and Cotton Yarn.- The figures show the enormous increase of 135 per cent.

This increase is not borne out by facts, though a very consider- able increase has taken place,-about 40 to 50 per cent. This is a good example of the inaccuracy of the returns supplied to me and is obviously due to the fact that the cotton imported in 1908 was largely reported as general", while in 1909 the reports have been more accurate. The actual increase is due to the great improvement in the trade, the figures for 1909 being greatly in excess of any of those for the previous four years.

""

Flour. The total reported imports of flour during the year amounted to 58,583 tons as against 91,312 tons in 1908, a decrease of 35.8%. The decrease is due to the fact, noted last year, that direct shipments to coast ports are now made. Another disposing cause for the decrease is the fact that the Shanghai flour mills, which obtain their raw material locally, are now successfully competing with American flour at the coast ports :-Foochow, Amoy, Swatow, &c., and are even sending through cargoes to Canton.

Rice. In spite of a hopeful outlook last year, Rice has failed to come back to its previous figure. It has again declined from 721 254 tons to 511,078 tons, or 25 per cent. This is due to a partial failure of the crops in Cochin China, and to the fact that many cargoes of rice from Sigon have been sent direct to coast ports, without touching, much less transhipping, at Hongkong.

11. The total reported Imports during the year amounted to 4,195,908 tons as against 4,109,856 in 1908, an increase of 06%. Exports also show an increase, from 2,102,857 tons to 2.239,731 tons or 65%; and Transit Cargo increased from 3,372,993 tons to 3,091,347 tons or 19%, but for the reason given these figures are not reliable.

J

D 10

The number and tonnage of ships of European construction carrying cargo for import and in transit compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1908.

1909.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

1

Steamers,

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

3,980 7,429,992 4,191 7,778,693| 211 348,701

River Steamers, 3,770 2,510,896 3,576 2,218,977

Sailing Vessels, 11 22,506 7 17,683

194 291,919

4,823

Total,.... 7,761 9,963,394 7,774 10,015,353| 211 348,701

198 296,742

Net,.....

13 51,959

;

12. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European construction exporting cargo, and shipping bunker coal, follow:-

EXPORTS.

1908.

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

4,001

River Steamers,. Sailing Vessels,..

3,773

9

7,430,882 | 4,186 | 7,775,519 | 2,509,651 3,574 2,218,459 19,726 10

185

344,637

199 1

291,192

21,940

1

2,314

Total,

7,783 9,960,259 7,770 10,015,918

186

346,851

199

291,192

Net,

55,659

13

Bunker

Bunker

Bunker

Bunker

Strs.

Strs.

Strs.

Strs.

Coal.

Coal.

Coal.

Coal.

Steamers,

4,001

600,650 4,186

562,450

185

38,200

River Steamers,.....................

3,773

56,316,3,574

56,537

221

199

Total,.

7,774

656,966 7,760

618,987

199

38,200

185

221

185

221

Net,...

14

37,979

?

— D 11

D 12

13. The River Trade in Imports, Exports, and Passengers carried, compared with that in 1908, is shown in the following:-

1908,

1909,.

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

362,769

287,847

1,929,436

371,280

280,908

1,947,209

14. The following shows the Junk Trade of the Colony during

1909 :-

Foreign Trade,

Local Trade,

IMPORTS.

.12,546 junks measuring......1,144,264 tons.

1.

.21,795

"

Total, ......34,341

1,030,242

""

>

13

""

......2,174,506

EXPORTS.

12,544 junks measuring 21,703

""

1,099,106 tons. ...1,057,078

29

Foreign Trade,

Local Trade,

Total, .............. 34,247

"

..2,156,184

"

+

!

15. The following Table gives a summary of the Shipping and Trade of the Port for 1909. The latter, being admittedly inaccurate, is given to the nearest 1,000 tons only

D 13

TONS.

Passengers.

No. of

Ships.

Emi-

Dis-

charged.

Shipped.

In

Transit.

Bunker Coal. Total.

Registered

Tonnage.

grants.

Arrived. Departed.

British Ocean-going,

4,076

Foreign Ocean-going,

British River Steamers,

1,644,000 1,175.000 | 2,109,000 4,318 2,181,000

5,780 289,000

784.000 1,882,000 212,000

Foreign River Steamers,...

1,370

83,000

69,000

236,000 5,164,000 7,735,927 326,000 5,173,000 7,857,908 44,000 545,000 3,701,754 13,000 165,000

172,506 112,329 52,923

91,650

92,088 24,507

805,735

819,267

...

735,682

170,316

151,891

Total,.

15,544 | 4,197,000 | 2,240,000 | 3,991,000

619,000 11,047,000 20,031,271

1,240,207

1,175,575

77,430

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade, Junks. Foreign Trade,

Total Foreign Trade,

3,160

25,090

1,000

402,000

8, 00

743.000

43,794 | 4,603,000 | 2,986,000 | 3,991,000

5,000 12,000 140,484 , 1,145,000 2,243,370 624,000 12,204,000 | 22,415,125

26,595

23,347

53,720

50,031

1,320,522 1,248,953 77,430

Steam-launches, Local Trade,.

Junks Local Trade,.....

439,988

3,000

2,000

43,498

188,000

268,000

Total, Local Trade,

483,486

191,000

270,000

Grand Total,

527,280 4,794,000 | 3,256,000 | 3,991,000

31,000 36.000 10,328,400 456,000 2,087,320 31,000 492,000 12,415,720 655,000 12,696,000 | 34,830,845

3,282,070

48 415

2,185,502

40,417

3,330.485

4,651,007

2 225,919

3,474,872

77,430

D 14

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

16. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $462,469.82 as against $357,768.52 collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $104,701.30 or 29-23⁄4。 :—

Light Dues,

Light Dues, Special Assessment, Licences and Internal Revenue, Fees of Court and Office,.... Miscellaneous Receipts,

Total,

1908.

1909.

Increase. $ 79,975.68 $ 82,473 37 $ 2,497 69

90,337 67

133,391,00

156,133.38

90.60

134.40

130,594.05 147,108.19

90,337.67

2,796.95

9,025.19

43.80

.$ 357,768.52 $ 462,469.82 $ 104,701.30

1

The Amount of Light Dues collected was as follows :---

Special Assessment.

Class of Vessels.

No. of

Ships.

Tonnage.

Rate

per ton.

Fecs

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Total Fees

Collected.

Ocean Vessels,

4,336

7,751,473

I cent.

4.73

1 cent.

76,514.09

134,028.82

Steam Launches,

795

29,551

1

295.54

1

295.54

591.08

River Steamers (Night Boats),

2,607

1,449,186

-

4,642.64

7,219.17

11,861.91

>>

River Launches (Night Boats),

133

7,586

24.46

>>

ل العمر

39.60

60.06

77

River Steamers (Day Boats),

914

737,397

Nil.

56

6,097.77

6,097.77

River Launches (Day Boats),

517

20,5-7

Nil.

171.50

171.50

Total,

9,302

9,995,773

$82,473.37

$90,337.67 $172,811.04

*Including $1,000.64 arrears of 1908.

1

D 15

D 16

The principal increases are under Light Dues, $2,197.69; Light Dues, Special Assessment in respect of the Mongkoktsui Typhoon Refuge, $90,337.67; Junk Licences, $3,838.05; Fees for Storage of Explosives $2,637.73; Medical Examination of Emigrants, $7,567.25; Examination of Masters, &c., $237.50; and Sunday Cargo Working Permits, $600. The falling off in Revenue comes under the headings:-

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, $1,052.60; Sugar

Certificates and Permits, $550; Fines $430.35; Steam- launch Licences, &c., $369.75; Survey of Steam- launches, $330; Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, $270; Sale of Printed Forms, $127; and Registry Fees, $106.

17. The expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1909 was $169,672.04 including $3,204 specially expended on Buoys and the Crown Agents' charges for December 1908, but not including the Crown Agents' charges for December 1909. Compared with 1908, this shows an increase of $6,092.50 or 3'5 per cent.

4. Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, there were 291 Steam-launches (in- cluding 9 Motor Boats) employed in the Harbour, of these, 137 were licensed for conveyance of passengers, &c., 136 were privately owned. 14 were the property of the Government and 4 belonged to the Im- perial Government in charge of the Military Authorities.

Sixteen Masters' Certificates were suspended for incompetency or negligence in the performance of their duties, 3 for 6 months, 1 for 3 months, 6 for 2 months, and 6 for 1 month: one Master's Certificate was cancelled and one Master was cautioned. Three En- gineers' Certificates were suspended, 1 for 6 months, 1 for 3 months and 1 for 2 months.

Six hundred and forty-one (641) engagements and five hundred and seventeen (517) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made during the year.

As in 1908, seven (7) steam-launches were permitted to carry Arms, &c., for their protection against pirates. No new permits were granted.

5.-Emigration and Immigration.

19. Seventy-seven thousand four hundred and thirty (77,430) Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1909. Of these 52,923 were carried in British ships and 24,507 in Foreign ships. These figures show an increase, compared with those for 1908, of 6,349 (or 893 %), which may be accounted for by the return of the business to normal conditions, and to the resumption of emigration to Banka and Billiton.

D 17

It may be well to note the increasing proportion of Emigrants carried in Foreign vessels. This appears to be due to the increasing numbers going to Hawaii, who can only travel in United States ships, as well as to the resumption of emigration to the Dutch Indies, which is carried in Dutch vessels.

One hundred and forty-four thousand eight hundred and twenty-one (144,821) returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 157,809 in 1908. Of these 109,633 arrived in British ships, and 35,188 in Foreigu ships.

6.-Registry, &c., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 16 ships were registered under the pro- visions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 3 Certificates of Registry were cancelled. 128 Documents, &c., were dealt with in connection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $593 ($699 in 1908).

..

Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. Three hundred and three (303) cases were heard in the Ma- rine Magistrate's Court (325 in 1908). Breach of the Harbour Re- gulations, Disobeying the lawful orders of the Harbour Master, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Failing to observe the Rules of the Road, Using the steam-whistles for other purposes than for Naviga- tion and carrying excess of passengers were the principal offences.

8. Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899.)

22. The following Courts have been held during the year:---

On the 10th August, 1909, inquiry into charges of Miscon- duct on the part of the Master (Alexander Nelson Seaton), number of whose Certificate of Competency is 1347, Hongkong, and the Mate (William James Hanlon), number of whose Certificate of Competency is 034381, Leith, of the British Steamship Shia On, Official Number 126987 of Hongkong.

The result was that the Court ordered the Mate's Certificate to be suspended for two years.

On the 8th, day of October. 1909, inquiry into charges of Misconduct on the part of the third Engineer (R. H. Ferguson), number of whose Certificate of Competency is 33341 of Glasgow, of the British Steamship Persin, Official number 84164 of Liverpool.

The third Engineer's Certificate was suspended for

one year.

F

D 18

On the 24th day of November, 1909, inquiry into the circumstances connected with the Stranding of the British Steamship Tak Hing, Official number 109,874 of Hongkong, William Bishop, number of whose Certi- ficate of Competency is 017,537, London, was Master.

The Certificated Officers were acquitted from all blame.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates and Engineers.

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance 10 of 1899, for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed:---

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

13

Master, (Provisional Certificate), Master, River Steamers,

First Mate,

10

First Mate, River Steamers,

Second Mate,

10

Total,

39

First Class Engineer,.......

28

Second Class Engineer,..

* EN50-0

3

2

2

5

8

48

19

Total,

76

27

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Or- dinance No. 10 of 1899 :---

For Master,...

Candidates.

For Engineer,

Total,

Passed.

Failed.

36

4

28

1

61

10

5

year.

10.-Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

24. One Examination for Pilot's Certificate was held during the

One Licence was issued, and 14 Licences were renewed.

1_

D 19

11.-Sunday Cargo Working.

25. During the year 262 Permits were issued under the pro- visions of this Ordinance as compared with 282 in 1908. Of these 99 were not used as it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday and the fees in such cases were refunded.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $29,200 as against $28,600 in 1908.

12. New Territories.

Eleventh year of British Administration.

The Outstations attached to the Harbour Department, six in number have continued to perform the work allotted to them, and during the year Licences, Port Clearances, Permits, &c., have been issued by them as follows:-

1909.

1908.

Cheung Chau opened

1899

11,002

9,146

Tai O

1899

5,143

4.901

33

Tai Po

1900

6,811

6,271

Deep Bay

1901

2,458

4.882

Sai Kung

1902

2,040

4,628

Long Ket

1905

4,350

33

3,580

31,804

33,408

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Terri- tories during 1909 was $25,102.50 as compared with $22,008.05 in 1908.

13.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

27. Thirty-nine (39) letters were received during the year from firms and individuals, principally in Great Britain, asking for in- formation upon various points in connection with their business, requesting me to place them in communication with local firms, or to obtain local agents for the sale of their goods, or submitting samples or price lists. My replies have been as full as the informa- tion and time at my disposal permitted, and my negotiations have, I understand, been productive, in many cases, of desired effects.

14.-General.

28. During the year the Harbour Department has had the mis- fortune to lose, by death, two valuable officers, Mr. Botelho, 1st Clerk, Harbour, Office, and Mr. Watson, 1st Clerk, Mercantile Marine Office. The former had been 38 years in the Office, and had proved himself invaluable.

In September the Imports and Exports Sub-department was temporarily separated from the Harbour Department, and the staff largely increased to deal more especially with the Liquor trade in the Colony. The report of this Sub-Department is annexed---Annexe B.

D 20

On the 1st August two new lights were exhibited in the Harbour, one Fixed Red on the Cust Rock Buoy, and one-Red with white sector-flashing on the summit of the hill behind Chin-sal- tsui Point. This latter was designed to utilise the lenses of the old Cape Collinson Light, and is of the 6th order.

Arrangements are in progress for the exhibition of another new light on Kap Sing Island, which it is hoped will be displayed this year (1910). It will also, be of the 6th order, and will be made. distinctive. A fog signal will possibly be added.

HARBOUR OFFICE,

1st March, 1910.

BASIL TAYLOR, Commander. R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

1

12

J

Australia and

New Zea-

land.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

- D 21

Table I.--NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED in the

COUNTRIES WHENC)

Coast of China] Ships.

Coast of China] .Steamships under 60 tons.

Coast of China. Junks.

Cochin China.

Continent of

Europe.

Formosa.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

Vessels,.

Tons,.

Crews,

[Vessels,..

Tons,.

WITH CARGoes.

Car-

goes,

{ Vessels,.

Tons,

Crews,....

Discharged,.

32

15

30

2,934

71,638 25,379 108,65

2,353,216

2,245| 1,022 | 5,250

111,270

82,000 36,000 26,000

435,000

Transit,

....

18,000

30,000

511,000

:

:

49

5

160

140

180

49

254

343,646

:

:

67,426 35,280 14,031 566,611 372,598 508,741 73,209

2,999 -1,023 280 12,099 17,148 14,217 2,956

115,000 000 3,000 166,000 190,000| 235,000 125,000

41,000 8,000 | 589,000 | 191,000 310,000 28,000

7,000

15,838

:

:

2

3

1

6,538

9,632 2,744

272

251

99

66

32

15

30

3,188

49

160

142

183

60

71,638 25,379|108,665

2,696, 862

67,426

TOTAL.

Car-

goes,

Crews,.....

2,245 1,022 5,250

160,108

:

Discharged,

82,000 36,000 26,000

435,000

2,999

115,000

Transit,

18,000

30,000

511,000

· FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

Vessels,

Tons,

gocs,

Crews,..

Discharged,

33 16

68,659 20,741 1,091

2,901 998

24,000 10,000

I

35

1,000

Transit,

13,000

:

926 751 7,512

856,043 37,492 | 636,008

44,637 8,200 85,562

157,000

388,000

310,000

7,000

33

35280 14,031 | 566,611 | 379,136 | 518,373) 75,953

1023 280 12,099 17,420 14,471 3,055

7000 3,000 166,000 190,000| 235,000 125,000

41000 8,000 589,000 191,000 310,000 28,000

140 78

87

34,074 501843 | 72,300 95,722 152,2511,110,157 151,701

1,163 16155 5,001 2,511 4,031 31,228 4,965

50,000 117,000 15,000 14,000 $3,000 782,000 125,000

2,000 476,000 2,000 101,000 | 134,000 585,000 89,000

23

69

381

[Vessels,..

Tons,

Crews,.....

159 560 4,533

175,969 18,624 | 414,219

6,206 4,056 57,236

1

1

2

6

1

1

1,246

36 1,146

4,355

5,123

145

*

53

10

77

226

226

30

Vessels,.

*33

16

1

Tons,

TOTAL.

Car-

goes,

Crews,..

Discharged,

Transit,

68,659 20,741

2,901 998

24,000 40,000 | 1,000

13,000 ...

35

***

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

Car-

{CVessels,

WITH CARGOES.

--

*IVUS,"

65

31

31

Crews,...

goes,

Transit,

31,000

30,000 821,000

1,085 1,311 12,045

31 141

1,091 1,032,012 56,116 1,050,227 35,320 501,879 73,446

50,843 12,256 | 142,798

157,000

388,000

310,000

3,860 751 7,512 140,297 46,120 | 109,756 3,209,259 37,492 636,003 101,500 537,123 86,331 662,333 | 624,8491,618,898 224,910

6,146 2.200 5,285 188,907 8,200 85,562 4,462 17,178 5,281 14,610 21,179 45,445 7,921

Discharged, 106,000 76,000 27,000 592,000

388,000 165,000 124,000 18,000 180,000 273,000 1,017,000 250,000

9,000 517000 10,000 690,000 | 325,000 895,000 117,000

80

23

75

385

88

82

149

95,722 156,606 1,115,280 151,846

1,516 16,165 5,078 2,511 4,257 31,454 4,995

50,000 117,000 15,000 14,000 $3,000 782,000 125,000

2,000 476,000 2,000 101,000 134,000 585,000 89,000

83

183

209

561

136

Vessels,..

Tons,.

Crews,.......

:

:

:

413 560 1,533

1

2

8

2

519,615 18,624 | 414,219

22,044 4,056 57,236

1,246

53

36 1,146

10,893

14,755 2,889

10

77

:

498

480

129

TOTAL.

Car-

gol 8,

[Vessels,.

Tons,.

Crews,.....

65

31

31

83

150

(Transit,

110,297 46,120 109,756

5,146 2,020 | 5,285

Discharged,. 106,000 76,000 27,000

31,000

30,000

4,273 1,311 12,045

3,725,874 56,116 1,050,227 102,746 537,159 87,477 662,333 535,742 1,633,653 227,799

210,951 12,256 | 142,798

592,000

388,000

821,000

85

183

217

568

138

4,515 17188 5,358 14,610 21,677 45,925 8,050

165,000 1240 18 000 180,000 273,000|1,017,000| 250,000

9,000 517000 10,000 690,000 325,000 895,000 117,000

Great Britain.

India and

Settlements.

Straits

Japan.

Java and other

Archipelago.

Islands in

the Indian

D 21-

ERED in the COLONY of HONGKONG from EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1909.

'TRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Japan.

Į Java and

other

Islands in

the Indian

Archipelago.

Kwangchau.

wan.

Ships.

Macao,

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao.

Junks.

Macao.

Mauritius.

America. North

North and

South

Pacific.

Philippine

Islands.

Hainan and

Ports in

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Russia in Asia.

180

49

508,741 73,209

14,217 2,956

235,000 125,000

310,000 28,000

...

***

709

548,805

:

Siam.

America.

South

South Africa.

Tsintau.

of America.

United States

Weihaiwei.

TOTAL.

2

1

194

59

12

1

2

1

3

58 15

4,660

3,495 3,161

27,839

87

42

266,730

13,759

$6,000

...

2,000

78,232 [19,151

3,714 642

86,000 179,000| 5,000

7,000

11,000

68,000 |19,000

:

:

1,299 5,771 2,686 5,310 198,207|18,115 | 5,342,746

56 130 30 187 3,607 924 251,526

3,000 12,000

2,000 105,000 23,000 1.933,000

5,000 6,000 256,000 4,000| 2,119,000

1

9,632

2,744

251

99

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

183

518,373 75,953

14,471 3,055

50

...

709

548,805

...

235,000 125,000

27,839

90,000

:

2

3,485 3,161

87

12 000

1

:

:

7

1

1

8,105

1,418 1,145 2,887 3,223

424

61

60

62

70

:.

:

:.

:

271

379,338

17,140

201

60

13

2

3

1

3

58

15

4,931

274,835

74,650 (20,296

123

.:

42

14,183

310,000 28,000

7,000

68,000 19,000

87

93

381

,110,157 151,701 (36,653

31,228 4,965 4,401

782,000 125,000 12,000

585,000 89,000 1,000

22,422 [12,162 22,602

1,669 3,683 2,996

20,000 4,000 14,000

135

220

263

1

2

259

1

3,453 1,146

109 67

111

:

4,186 8,994 2,686 5,310 | 198,207 18,115 5,722,084

3,775 702

118 200 30

86,000 179,000 5,000 3,000 12,000

11,000

14

8 251

12,486 | 206,365| 9,052 271,961 | 3,460

568 10,068

262, 12,844

5,000

12

79

187 3,607 924 271,666

2,000 105,000 23,000 1 933,000

6,000 256,000 4,000| 2,109,000

3 11,394

[23,810 | 415,208 2,732 | 4,781,594

:

536 12,809 120 257,930

:

4:

1,000

2,000

9,000 262,000 |10,000 | 417,000 1,000

79,000 10,000

1,000 ...

8,000 111,000 4,000 2,669,000

1

1

5,123

145

226

30

49

236

:

:

:

~

12

5

1,871

1,964 (26,277

1,248

13,502

5,031

133

396 3,974

...

100

455

186

385

88 93

,115,280| 151,846 36,653

31,454 4,995 | 4,401

782,000 125,000 12,000

585,000 89,000 1,000

564 136 93

139 269 499

24,293 14,126 48,879

1,802

4,079 6,970

20,000 4,000 14,000

1

:

:

:

12,000

65,000

1,882,000

1

5,573

:

:

:

10,267

681,023

454

***

73,818

26

264

8

251

1

12

...

80

3

16,967

2,000

...

:

:

841 220 263 2

2

618,898 224,910 36,653

3,453 2,394 25,988 211,396 9,052 271,961 | 3,460 |

109 167 1,023 10,254 262 12,844 111

1,000

9,000 262,000 10,000 417,000 1,000

23,810 | 425,475 2,732 5,462,617

536 13,263 120 331,748

8,000 | 111,000| 4,000| 2,669,000

12,000 65,000

1,882,000

18 16,054

571,227 12,162 22,602 3,485 | 6,614 1,146 | 279,216 279,597 28,203 273.260 9,231 2,686 29,120 | 613,415 20,847 10,124;340

45,445 7,921 4,401 29,508 3.648 | 2,996 87 151

017,000 250,000 12,000 116,000

4,000 14,000 2,000 1,000

9,000

895,000 117,000 | 1,000

:

:

6714,327

13,782 904 12,900 241

›95,000| 441,000 |15,000 | 420,000 |13,000

11,000 | 147,000 |29,000

1,000

30 723 16,416 1,044 512,456

|10,000| 216,000 |27,000 | 4,602.000

5,000 18,000 321,000 4,000 3,991,000

79,000 10,000 1,000

2: 208

318

20

252

3

1

15

137

2

49 236

14,755 2,889

:

1,871 1,964 26,277

480

129

:

133 396 3,974

568

138

93

818 269 499

:..

:

:

2

19

6

1

1

1

:

1,248 - 21,607

100

879

6,449 1,145

247. 60

2,887 3,223

62

70

1

10,267

454

5,844

1,060,361

90,958

ลง

2

4

227

324

21

253

4

1

15

138

18 21,898

633,653 227,799 |36,653 573,098 14,126,48,879 3,485 6,614 2,394 300,823 | 286,046 29,348 276,147 12,454 2,686 29,120 623,682 20,847 11,184,701

45,925 8,050 4,401 29,641 | 4,079 | 6,970|| 87| 151 167

017,000 250,000 12,000 116,000 4,000 14,000 2,000 1,000

895,000 117,000 1,000

9,000

:

15,206 14,029 964 12,962 311

95,000 441,000|15,000] 420,000 |13,000

11,000 | 147,000 |29,000 1,000

30 723 16,870 1,044 603,414

|10,000 | 216,000 27,000 | 4,602,000

5,000 18,000 321,000| 4,000 | 3,991,000

1

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Australia and

New Zealand.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

:

Ceast of China, į

Ships.

Coast of China Steamships

under 60 ton

Coast of China.

slume

D 22

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED in the COLON

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DI

Cochin China.

(Vessels,

Tons,

25

11

29

3,227

10

54,320 19,761 |118,350 | 2,749,829

Crews,

2,251 893 5,049

162,463

Cargoes,

22,000 3,000| 26,000

610,000

Shipped, Bunker

Coal,...

9,000 2,000 2,000

107,000

Vessels,

3

2

:

22

Tons,

8,009❘ 5,220

38,057

Crews,

115

02

1,271

:

Bunker Coal,

1,000

4,000

Vessels,

28

13

29

3,249

Tons,.

62,329 24,984 118,350 2,787,886

:

:

Crews,

2,366 985 5,49

163,734

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

~ :

12,000

29

30,801

1,128

7,000

:

:

:

:

:

74

45

60,118

2,545

246 192

10,599 13,405

14,801 899

38,000 1,000

102,000 | 162,000

53,000 19,000

4,000

20,000

20,000 6,000

5

13

5

11,278

28,930 10,173

300

2,000 1,000 3,000

493

223

5

2

117

110

1951

21

2

117

105

182

16

13,633 9,141 453,113 | 296,834 | 557,400 23,597

90,919

3,673

246 192

Shipped, Bunker

(Cargoes,.

Coal,...

22,000 | 3,000| 26,000

Vessels,

9,000 3,000 2,000

30

610,000

111,00

38,000

1,000

13 633 9,141 453,113 308,112 586,330 33,770

10,599 13,705 15,294 1,122

102,000 162,000 53,000 19,000

19,000

4,000 22,000

21,000 9,000

7

Tons,

Crews,

64,802 16,059

2,876 812

Cargoes, 17,000 4,000

Shipped, Bunker

1,158 782 9,499

1,114,941 38,273 | 907,672

49,360 8,370 113,261

287,000

38

117

18

37

42

248

38

37,216 | 418,957 32,771| 162,537 | 116,697

798,789 81,699 52,

1,713 14,473 740 4,196 3,053

23,513

2,357 5,

707,000

12,000

66,000 12,000 | 36,000

47,000

95,000

39,000 25,

Coal,...

7,000 3,000

[Vessels,

:

Tous,

Crews,

:

12

12,939

456

Bunker Coal,

2,050

Vessels,

30

19

Tons,

Crews,

:

:

:.

63,000 5,000

12,000

32,000 3,000

11,000

47,000

6,000 7,

144 529 2,538

32

4

18

116

10

152,921 17,843 | 186,901

11,637

6,478

20,951

245,915 17,930

9,812 3,886 28.528

42.000

1,268

163

807

9,000

:

:

2,000 9,000

64,802 28,998

2,876 1,268

Cargoes, 17,000 4,000 Shipped, Bunker

Coal....

7,000 | 5,000

:

1,302 1,311 12,037

1,297,865 56,116| 1,094,573

59,172 12,256 | 141,789

287,000

707,000

105,000 5,000

70

117

22

37

60

363

5,017 465

2,000

48

78,853 418,957 89,249 162.537 137,618 1,044,704 99,629 52,

2,981 14,473 903 4,196 3,865 28,590 2,822 5,

12,000 66,000 12,000| 36,000 47,000 95,000 39,000 25,

21,000 32,000 3,000

13,000 56,000 8,000 7,

[Vessels,

55

181 29

4.385 782 9.199

83

122

20

154.

147

430

51

A-

Tous.

8

14

Tons,

8,009 18,159

Crews,

115 518

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

3.000

:

211,823 8,370 | 113,"61

897,000

707,100

170.000 5,000

166 529 2,38

190,978 17.843 186.901

11,083 3,886 28,723

46,000

119,122 35,823 118,350 3,894.773 38,273 907,72 97,334 432,590 41,912 615,650 413,531 1,356,189 105,296 52,

5,127 1,705 5,049

Cargoes,. 39,000 | 7,000 26,000

Coal,... 16 000 5,000 2,000

Crews,

Shipped, Bunker

Vessels,

4,258 14.719 932 14.795 16,463 38,341 3,256 5,

50,000

67,000 12,000 138,000 209,000 148,000 58,000 25,

24.000 32,000 3,000 4,000 31,000 67,000 12,000 7,0

61

:

4

23

128

15

72,438

6,478

32,229 271,845 28,103 |

:

2,306

163

16,000

1,107 5,540 688

6,000 10,000 3,000

58

32

29

144

Tons,

127,131 53 982 118,350

Crews,

Cargoes.. Shipped, Bunker

Coal,...

4,551 | 1,311 12.037

4,085,751 [56,116 1,091,573 169,772 482.590 48,390 615.630 445,760 1,631,034 133,399 52,

5,212 2,253 5.049 222,906 12,256| 141,789

39.000 7,000| 26,000 897,000

707,000

16,000 | 8,000 2,000 216,000 | 5,000

122

21

154

170

558

69 I

6.654 14.719 1,095 14,795 17,570 43,SS4 39,145,1

50,000 67,000 12,000 138.000 209,000 148,000 58,000 (25,C

10,000 32,000 3,000 4,000 37,000 77,000 15,000| 7,0

Continent of

Europe.

Formosa.

Great Britain.

India and

Straits

Settlements.

Japan.

Java and other Islands.

Kwonochan1.

Japan.

ES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Java and other Islands.

Kwangchau-

wan.

Ships.

Macao.

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Масао.

Junks. Macao.

D 22

the COLONY of HONGKONG for EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1909.

Manīkļus.

Philippine Islands.

Hainan and

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Ports in

Port Arthur.

Russia in Asia..

Siam.

South Africa.

America.

South

South Pacific.

of America.

United States

Wei-bai-wei.

182

16

557,400 23,597

:.

:

14,801

899

708

548,010

27,798

193

34

6

1

4

"CH

5

10

1

75

10

4,802

:

:

1,042 | 266,564

39,505

:

62 13,497

2,098

295 67 259

53,000 19,000

71,000

169,000

14,000

:

:

1,000 2,000

20,000

6,000

15,000

1,000

42,000 5,000

:

:

:

15,478 1,340 11,868 14,482 5,810| 240,403 (14,811

4.859 476 109

3,000 1,000

8',000 | 9,000

5,515,442

578 263,441

1,387,000

1,000

9,000 1,000 256,000

13

5

1

5

31

28,930 10,173

284

8,600

41,760

4

9.422 4,656

1

:

123

2,965

200,155

493

223

1,000

3,000

1951

21

60

318

1,305

161 68

:

:

:

:

709

586,330 33,770

548,324

15,294 1,122

27,858

53,000 19,000

71,000

21,000

9,000

15,000

:

:

:

:

:

1,000

3,000

1.000 1,000

:

:

:

:

52

5,586

21,000

1

198

65

10

3

4

5

76

1

10

4,925

1,042 | 275,164 81,263

62 13,815

3,403

169,000 14,000

1,000

43,000

8,000

2481

38 117

2

219 422

18

220

1

7

24,900 5,996 11,868 14.482

5,810

456 135 239 476

4,911 109

1,000 2,000

3,000 1,000

81,000 9,000

1,000 1,000

1,000

83

243,368 14,811

578

5,715,597

269,027

1,387,000

9,000 1,000

280,000

4

77

2

1

13,187

10

798,789 81,699 52,830

23,543 2,357❘ 5,185

95,000 39,000 25,000

47,000 6,000 7,000

115

1,483 12,11144,287

89 3,673 6,131

2,000 3,000 36,000

...

139

50 87

5

19,921 | 173,132 1,601 11,524 91,367

741 7,873 30 413 14,240

5,000 61,000

4,000 52,000

2,000 25,000

1,000 29,000

67

414

93

1,000 1,000

13,620 2,031 410,724 796

35 12,919

81,000

4,655,843

276,625

1,599,000

:

1,000

1,000

255,000

7

24

2

1

3,784

215,015

17,930

5,017

465

24,157| 2,015| 5,404

1,796 *406

4,968

812

206

9,000

263

2,000

1,000

70,760

2,647

1,000 11,000

11,170 25,202

417

11,076

858,981

239 1,307

46

465

58,356

1,000 8,000

:

1,000

89,000

48 117

141 269 509

23

,044,704

99,629 52,830

25,640 14,126 (49,691

28,590

2,822 5,185

1,885 4,079 6,943

947

10,520 30

*

95,000

39,000 25,000

2,000 3,000 36,000

5,000

61,000

56,000

430

8,000 7,000

51

1,000

3,000 36,000

117

219 710

422

2111 251

287

I 1+ 107

24,889 213,892 1,601 (22,994 | 116,569

652 15,547

4,000,52,000

2,000 37,000

131

3

79

1

16,971

13,620, 2,448 421,800

414 139

13,414

796

5,514,827

35

334,981

4,000 1,000 81,000

1,599,000

2,000

1,000

344,000

9

3

152

11

17.989

128

15

274,845 28,103

27,887 | 3,673 | 6,131

73,000 3,000 36,000

15,000

140 50

24,441 2,015 5,401

1,000

87

62 14,238 9,971

174,000 78,000

44,000 30,000

10

98

356,189 105,296 52,830

38,344 3,256 5,185

148,000 58,000 25,000

67,000 12,000| 7,000

549,523 12,11144,287 | 1,042 286,485 | 212,637 1,601 27,002 92,707 11,868 28,102 7,841 651,127 |15,607 | 10,171,285

30

26

708 14,307 259 890 202 17,808 613

5,000 54,000

7.000 2,000 162,000 9,000

1,000 29,000

1,000 1,000

10,000 1,000

11

540,060

2,986,000

511,000

1

3

13,568 112,520

20,892 29,858

417

14,041

3,907

1,059,139

5,540

10,000

688

3,000

1,856 406 812

1,000

524 3,952

2,000 14,000

400 1,375

2,000 9,000

46

1,000

517

63,942

113,000

69

117

148,000 58,000 (25,003 | 73,000| 3,000|36,000|

77,000 15,000 7,000 16,000

558

850 269 609

,631,034 133,399 52,830 | 573,964 |14,126 49,691| 1,042) 300,053 | 325.157

43,884 39,145,185

62 14.762 13,923 29,743 4,079 0,913

174,000 78,000

40,000 14,000

1

221

352

1

24 110

4

9

155

11

21,896

1,000

30 1,108 15,682

į 5.000 54,000

3,000 38,000

1,601 17.894 122,565 11.868 28,102 8,258 665,168|15,607|11,930,424

890 250

613 248 18,325

7.000 2,000 162,000 9,000

1.000 2,000 10,000 1,000

604,005

2,986,000

024,000

:

TOTAL.

!

(Vessels,

Tons,

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

D 23

Table III. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED

at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1909.

Crews,..

Discharged,

Cargoes,

Transit...

Vessels,

Aberdeen.

Cheung Chau.

Deep Bay.

Hunghom.

Long Ket.

Saikung.

Yaumati.

:

NAMES OF PORTS.

Shaukiwan.

Stanley.

Tai O.

:

Tai Po.

Victoria.

TOTAL.

4,660

4,660

5,342,746 5,342,746

254,526 254,526

1,933,000 1,933,000

2,109,000

2,109,000

271

271

379,338

379,338

Tons,

Crews,..

(Vessels, ...

Tons,

17,140

17,140

4,931

4,931

5,722,084 5,722,084

TOTAL.

Crews,

271,666

271,666

Discharged,

1,933,000 1,933,000

Cargoes,

! Transit,

2,109,000 | 2,109,000

Vessels,

30

3

1 461

40

2

1

10,848 11,394

WITH CARGOES.

Tons,

1,136

347

142

3 24,243

2,109

37

12

4,753,565 4,781,594

Crews,..

195

73

25

25

Discharged,

1,000

24,273

13,000

15 374

10

252,963

257,930

1,000

2,654,000 2,669,000

Cargoes,

Transit,

1,882,000 1,882,000

Vessels,

17

73

58

5,422

5,573

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

Tons,

20

815

2,608

2,606

33333

63

674,911

681,023

Crews,.

4 155

547

544

12

:

72,556 73,818

(Vessels,

Tons,

311 25

1

534

98

2

3

16,270 16,967

1,156 1,162

142

3 26,851

4,715

37

75

5,428,476 5,462,617

TOTAL.

Crews,...

199

228

25

2 4,820

918

15

22

325,519

331,748

Discharged,... 1,000

13,000

1,000

2,654,000 2,669,000

Cargoes,

Transit,....

1,882,000 1,882,000

Vessels,

30

8

3

1

461

40

Q

1

15,508 16,054

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST

WITH CARGOES.

Tons,

1,136

347

142

3 24,243

2,109

37

12

10,096,311 10,124,340

Crews,

195

73

25

2 4,273

374

15

10

507,489 512,456

{

Discharged,

1,000

13,000

1,000

4,587,000 4,602,000

Cargoes,

Transit,

3,991,000 3,991,000

Vessels,

1

17

73

58

5,693

5,841

ns,

20

815

2,608

2,606

63

1,054,249 1,060,361

Crews,

(Vessels,

4 155

517

544

-12

89,696

90,058

31

25

3

1

534

98

2

3

21,201

21,898

Tons,

1,156 1,162

142

3 26,851

4,715

37

75

11,150,560 | 11,184,701

TOTAL.

Crews,.

199

228

25

2 4,820

918

15

22

597,185

603,414

Cargoes,

Discharg

Transit,.

1,000

13,000

1,000

4,587,000 4,602,000

3,991,000 3,991,000

D 24

Table IV.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED. at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1909.

BRITISH.

IN

BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN,

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

BALLAST.

WITH

CARGOES.

NI

TOTAL.

[ Vessels,

Tons,

Crew's,

C'argoes,

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

NAMES OF PORTS.

Aberdeen.

Cheung Chaâu.

Deep Bay.

Hunghom.

Long Ket.

Saikung.

Yaumati.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Shaukiwan.

:

:

:

Stanley.

Tai 0.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Tai Po.

Victoria.

4,802

TOTAL.

4,802

5,515,442 5.515,442

263.441

263,411

1,387,000 1,387,000

256.000

123

256,000

123

200,155

200,155

5.586

5,586

24,000

24,000

4.925

4,925

5,715.597 5,715,597

269.027

269,027

1,387,000 1,387,000

280,000

280,000

Vessels,

Tons,.

Crews,.

Bunker Coal,

(Vessels,

Tons,

Tons,

16

24

464 1,053

Crews,

$8 212

Cargoes,

1,000

Shipped.

Bunker Coal, .

Vessels,.............

Co

8

7

321 297

:

1

70

419

154

2

12,565 131,187

:

10

:

:.

:

:

:

:

[21,034 7,282

3,815

37 331

4,625.572 4,655,843

1,362 15

49

271,074

276,625

10,000

5.000

:

:

:

:

:

1,583,000 1,599,000

255 000

255,000

:

54

74

:

?

:

:

...

:

2

1

97

20

72

3| 4,319

1,017

15

2 901

206

3618

3,784

23

852,929

858,981

:.

:

:

:

:

:

57,100

58,356

:

89,000

$9,000

24

31

3

:

783 1,350

142

142

286

25

2 4.716 1,568

15

53

1,000

:

10,000

5,000

:

1 516

325,353

174

2

8,299 37 351

16,213 16,971

Crews,

Cargoes,

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Shipped,

Cargoes,

(Bunker Coal,.

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

[Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Cargoes,

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,

:

24

461 1,053

70

88

212

10

1.000

:

:

:

÷

:.

:

:.

:.

:.

419

154

:

:

:

19

2

17 367

|21,034

7,282 37 331

3,815

1,362 15

49

10,000

5,000

314,000

17,989

10,141,014 10,171,283

534,515 540,066

2,970,000| 2,986,000

5,478,501 5,514,827

328,171 334.981

1,583,000 1,599,000

314,000

:

511,000

511,000

7

$

1

97

20

3,771

3,907

324

297

72

34,319

1,017

23

1,053,084 | 1,5,1SW -

54

74

15

2

901

206

62,686

€3,942

:

:

:

.:.

...

113,00

113,000

788 1,350

142

286

1,000

24

31

142

25

3

1

516

174

19

21 33

21,896

3 25,353

8,299

37 354

4,098 | 11,230,424

:

: :

2 4,716

1,508

15

53

597.201

604,008

10,000

5,000

2,970,000 2,986,000

:

:

:

624.000 624,000

D 25

Table V.--NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION

ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1909.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

4,660 5,342,746 254,526

271 379,338

17,140

4,931 5,722,084 271,666

American,

38 208,185 7,367

4 3,142

182

42 211,327 7,549

Austrian,

24 94,288 1,512

24

94,288 1,512

Belgian,

Corean,

1

796

41

1

796

41

Chinese,

456

322,153 30,645

30 27,676

1,282

486 349,829 31,927

Chinese Junks,

7,775

658,610 88,558

4,769 440,496

61,210

12,544 1,099,106| 149,768

Danish,

12

30,846 458

4

580

129

16 .31,426 587

Dutch,

90 189,874 5,639

15

17,316

630

105

207,190 6,269

French,.....

442

547,512 19,632

4

3,493

161

446

551,005 19,793

German,

657 1,076,465 41,801

78

99,857

3,760

735 1,176,322 45,561

Italian,

11

28,470 1,127

11 28,470 1,127

Japanese,

485 1,270,286 35,968

8

13,044

362

493 1,283,330 36,330

÷

Norwegian,

164 178,299 5,638

48

49,043

1,452

212 227,341 7,090

Portuguese,

227 58,336 6,032

1

299

33

228 58,635 6,065

Russian,

6

14,095 432

3 5,489

165

9 19,584 597

Swedish,

35

53,726 1,197

35

53,726

1,197

Steamships

tons trading to ports

outside the Colony,

under 60

971 49,654 11,883

609 20,588 4,452 1,580

70,242 16,335

TOTAL 1909, 16,054 10,124,340 512,456

|

5,844 1,060,361| 90,958 21,898 11,184,701 603,414

TOTAL 1908,... 16,707 10,151,970 503,811 5,993 1,012,416 86,257 | 22,740 11,161,386 590,068

D 26

Table VI.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION

CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1909.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGgoes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tous. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

British,

4,802 5,515,442 263,441

123 200,155

5,586 4,925 5,715,597 269,027

American,

39 222,333 7,849

2,986

155

43

225,319 8,004

Austrian,....

24

94,288 1,564

24

94,288 1.564

Belgian,.

Corean,

796

35

1

7961

35

1

Chinese,......

473

339,771 32,004

13 8,881

407

486 348,652 32,411

Chinese Junks,.

9,921

951,959 119,392

2,625 192,305

29,340

12,546 1,144,264, 148,732

Danish,

12

30,846 423

580

161

16 31,426

584

Dutch,

82

179,026 5,302

23 28,164

1,001

105

207,192 6,303

French,

435

538,154 19,174

7 6,281

294

442

544,435 19,468-

German,

534

941,035 36,884

206 242,371

10,910

740 1,183,406 47,794

Italian,.......

11 28,470 1,151

11 28,470 1,151

Japanese,.....

373 1,014,377 28,554

120 263,990

5,418

493 1,278,367 33,972

Norwegian,

147 159,381 6,206

64 67,020 4,567

211

226,401 10,773

Portuguese,

93

36,684 4,393

134 21,708 1,608

227

58,392 6,001

Russian,

7 15,602 494

2 3,982

112

9 19,584 606.

Swedish,

34

52,737 1,157

34

52,737 1,157

No Flag,

Steamships under 60

tons trading to ports outside the Colony,

3

858

91

3

858

91

1,001

50,384 12,043

579

19,858 4,292

1,580

70,242 16,335

TOTAL, 17,989

10,171,285 540,066

3,907 1,059,139 63,942

21,896 11,230,424 604,008

Me

E

***

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong. from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1909.

D 27

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

East Coast,... 1,491 125,127 15,299 San On Dis-

567

Cargoes

Discharg-

ed. Tons.

93,935 490

Ves-

sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Cargoes

Passen-

Tons. Crews.

Discharg-

gers.

¡ed.

Tons.

63,781 6,925

246 1,981| 188,908| 22,224

813

93,935

trict, West

i

River, &c., 5,679 489,059 66,167 10,939 284,666 3,898 343,247 48,627 41,464

3

West Coast,...

342 21,822 4,096

15

9,176

145

Macao,

263 22,602 5,996

14,299

444

7,191 1,684

45

236 26,277 3,974

499

29,013 5,780

48,879 6,970

9,577 832,306|114,794|||||52,403 284,666 487

:

459

9,176

45

14,299

Total, 1909,...

7,775 658,610 88,558 11,521

Total, 1908, .

..

8,233 679,448′ 82,633|| 12,426 | 416,410

4,723 | 430,232 57,392| 41,248 | 12,956|1,109,680(140,025 53,674

402,076 | 4,769 | 440,496 61,210| 42,199|12,544|1,099,106|149,768|| 53,720 402,076 416,410

3

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1909.

D 28

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargoes

Shipped.

Tons.

Ves-

sels.

Cargoes

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Ves-

sels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Shipped.

Tons.

East Coast,... 1,628 141,501 17,259

477

110,850 880 52,890 5,082 140

2,008| 194,391| 22,341| 617

110.850

San On Dis-

trict,

West

River, &c.,

7,491 743,262 91,083

30,251

West Coast,...{

380 22,909 4,919

17

582,126|| 2,097 131,804 | 22,908| 19,083 14,170 61 2,207 538

9,588

17

441

875,066 113,991 49,334 25,116|||||5,457

582,126

34

14,170

Macao,.

422 44,287 6,131

27

35,887 87

5,404 812

19

5091

49,691 6,943

46

35,887

Total, 1909,... 9,921 951,959|119,592|| 30,772| 743,033 2,625 |192,305|29,340| 19,259 |12,546|1,144,264148,732 50,031 | Total, 1908,.. 46,412|

748,033

9,740 876,669)107,059 26,523| 596,623 3,137214,893 31,974 19,889 12,8771,091,562|139,033

596,623

D 29

Table IX.

SUMMARY.

1909.

1908.

FOREIGN TRADE.

NO. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

No or VESSELS.

Toxs.

CREWS.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

4,660

5.342,746

254,526

Do.

do. in Ballast,

271

379,338

17,140

4,814 239

5,543,748

253,523

351,738 |

14,658

Total,........

4,931

5,722,084

271,666

5,053

5,895,486

268,181

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

4,802

5,515,442

263,441

4,876

5,530,115

261,356

Do.

do. in Ballast,..

123

200,155

5,586

186

367,231 ;

9,008

Total,.....

4.925

5,715,597

269,027

5,062

5,897.346

270,364

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

2,648

4,073,330

157,489

2,522

3,867,667

152,063

Do.

do. in Ballast,.....

195

219,939

8,156

186

201,241

7,331

Total,...

2,843

4,293,269

165,645

2,708

4,068,908

159,394

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,265

3,653,500

145,190

2,152

3,440,865

137,760

Do.

do. in Ballast,.....

580

646,821

24,724

569

622,128

21,989

Total,.......

2,845

4,300,321

169,914

2,721

4,062,993

159,749

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,...

Do.

do.

971

49,654

11,883

1,178

61,107

15,592

do.

in Ballast,..

Total,........

609

20,588

4,452

845

29,205

6,876

1,580

70,242

16,335

2,023

90,312

22,468

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,..

1.001

50,384

12,043

1,213

58,228

15,948

Do.

do.

do.

in Ballast,......

Total,........

579

19,858

4,292

824

32,602

6,645

1,580

70,242

16,335

2,037

90,830

22,593

Junks entered with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

7,775

658,610

88,558

8,233

679,448

82,633

4,769

440,496

61,210

4,723

430,282

57,392

Total,.....

12,544

1,099,106

149,768

12,956 1,109,680

140,025

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

Total,.....

Total of all Vessels entered,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

9,921 2,625

12.546 1,144,264

21,898 11,184,701 21,886 11,230,424

951,959

192,805

119,392 29,340

9,740 3,137

876,669

107,039

214,893

31,974

148,732

12,877 1,091,562

139,033

603,414 22,740 11,164,386 604,008 22,697 11,142,731

590,068

591,739

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in Į

Foreign Trade,.

43,794

22,415,125

1,207,422

45,437

22,307,117 1,181,107

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Juuks entered,

Do.

cleared,

21,795 1,030,242 21,703 1,057,078

184,999 181,575

20,567 20,384

929,238

174,421

919,284

171,578

Total Local Trado entered and cleared,....

43,498

2,087,820

366,574

40,951

1,848,522

345,999

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,..

43,794 43,498

22,415,125 2,087,320

1,207,422

45,137 22,307,117

1,181,807

366,574 40.951

1,848,522

345,999

Grand Total,..

87,292

24,502,445

1.573,996 86,388

24,155.639

1,527,806

Do.,

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1909,

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

Vessels.

}

Table X.

Return of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hongkong during the year ending 31st December, 1909.

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Cargo discharged.

Tons.

Passengers.

Vessels.

122,280

2,502,121

1908,

131,567 | 2,818,171

827,887

932,122

6,170 97,714 2,661,776 677,424

3,200 91,295 2,412,170 678,338

3,275,000

2,813,019 |

219,951 | 5,164,200| 1,505,311 222,862 | 5,230,341| 1,610,160

3,282,070

2,816,219

Tonnage.

Shamshui,

Kongmuu,

222

55

121

51

1

34

10

Kamcheuk,

:::

256

60

121

...

Total,..

15

343

106

34

5

10

16

377

111

Wuchow,

Macao,

Other places,

14 397 100

...

49 1,964

396

531 17,884 3,850

241

750 37,458 8,195

...

Total,...

Grand Total, Foreign,

594 20,245 4,346

241

609 20,588 4,452

241

970 49,620 11,878

971 49,654 11,893

23,852

3,750 26,354

3,750 26,354

...

220 12,162 o,u83 3,750 2,502

14 397 100

269 14,126| 4,079 3,750| 2,502 1,281 |55,342 |12,045

1,564 69,865 16,224 3,750 26,595

24,093

1,580 70,242 16,335 3,750 26,595

Crews.

Cargo discharged.

Tous.

Passengers.j

D 30

TOWING.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews. Passen-

Ton- Vessels.

gers.

nage.

Table XI.

Return of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the year ending 31st December, 1909.

PLACES.

TOTAL.

Cargo

Bunker Crews. Shipp-Passen- Coal. ed.Tons. gers. 'Tons.

NOT TOWING.

Crews.

Cargo Shipp- Passen-

Ton- Vessels.

ed.Tons. gers.

nage.

Within the Waters of the Colony 1909,

122,280

Do.,

1908,

122,280 | 2,502,124 129,416 2,520,327|

827,887

6,170

97,711 | 2,661,776

677,424

3,275,900

216,094 | 5,164,200| 1,505,311

3,282,070

30,508

932,762

3,260

93,446 | 2,710,v14 677,698

1,823,633

222,862 5,230,341 | 1,610,460

1,826 893

31,701

Outside the Waters of the Colony :

D 31

Shamshui,

Kongmun,

8 228

52

7

121

51

Kanicheuk,

Total,

15

349 103

14

397

100

Wuchow,

Macao,

Other places,

Total,

Grand Total, Foreign,

50 2,015 406

:

:

:

...

:

...

500 17,097 3,683 2,230

564(19,509| 564 19,509 4,189 2,230;

579 19,858 4,292 2,230

:

1

28

:

*

:

1

28

8

219|12,111

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

9 256

60

7 121

51

16

877

...

111

14 397 100

:

:

:

:

:

69

50

118

110

475

20,792, 4,657

3,673| 2,839 2,555 269 14,126 4,079 2,839| 2,555

781 38,2458,362

18,562

1,000 50,356 12,035 2,839 21,117

1,28155,342 |12,045

| 69,865|16,224 : 1,564 69,865 16,224 2,839 23,347, 5,242

1,001 50,384 112,043 2,839 21,117

1」20,084」12,042

1,580 70,242 16,335

2,839 23,347 5,360

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences issued and fees collected during the year 1909 as compared with the previous year. (Under Table U, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

10,933.75

- DĮ32-

22,709.75

6,838.00

1908.

1909.

DESCRIPTION OF BOATS.

LICENCES.

DUPLI- REPAINT- CATES.

DUPLI- REPAINT-

FEES. LICENCES.

FEES.

ING.

CATES.

ING.

Passenger Boats, Class A,

538

Passenger Boats, Class B,

813

Passenger Village Boats,

1,454

Cargo Boats,..

1,350

Lighters,

154

Water Boats,

81

Other Boats,

.....

892

Cinder, Bum, Hawker and Mar-

ine Dealer's Boats,

341

Fish Drying Hulks,

66

Repainting Fees, $0.25 cach,

TOTAL,

CO -

:

5,689

1

...

...

:.

$

519

2

10,348.00

997

1,617

25,185.75

1,242

1

6,669.00

153

+

1,493.25

76

4,309.75

1,229

717.25

410

416.25

77

81

20.25

...

00

::

...

1,454.00

5,608.80

864.00

492.25

783

195.75

81 $49,159.50

6,320

8

783 $49,096.30

D 33

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour Department during the Years 1908 and 1909.

Head of Receipts.

Amount

Amount

1908.

1909.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

Special Assessment,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not other-

$

C.

$ C. 79,975.68 | 82,473.37

90,337.67

wise specified-

Boat Licences,

49,159,50 49,096.30

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

1,305.00 1,035.00

Emigration Brokers' Licences, Ordin-

ance 1 of 1889,...

1,000.00 1,000.00

6,575.60

6,145.25

137.90

206.20

2,176.60

2,205.50

Fines,....

Fishing Stake and Station Liceuces,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899,....

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899, Junk Licences, &c., New Territories,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,

Pilots' Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimburse-

ments-in-Aid :-

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

Engagement of Masters and Engineers. of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Explosives, Storage of--Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1899,

Printed Forms, Sale of,

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for―

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,............

45,826.75 | 46,599.25

19,831.45

22,897.00

105.00

100.00

4,476.25

4,106.50

23,765.80 22,713.20

270.00

320.50

2,370.00 2,607.50 9,831.43 12,469.16

43,155.75 †50,723.00 278.50 151.50

3,480.00 3,480.00

699.00

593.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...........

3,810.00

3,480.00

Sugar Certificates and Permits, Ord.

14 of 1904,

1,155.00

605.00

Survey of Steamships, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

29,692.71

29,790.52

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,.......

7. Miscellaneous Receipts-Message Fees for

notifying ships,

28,600.00 29,200.00

90.60

134.40

Total,......

.$357,768.52 462,469,82

* † P. T. 0.

D 34

* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1908 :-

Revenue collected by.

Expenditure incurred by.

Harbour Department,

...$

43,155.75

Registrar General's Office,

3,862.00

4,000.00 (Estimated.) 3,885.40

Stamp Office, on a/c of

Bill of Health,

8,928.00

Medical Department,

14,634.46

$ 55,945.75

$ 22,519.86

Net Revenue,........$ 33,425 89

† Statement of Emigration Fees, 1909 :-

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,000.00 (Estimated.)

4,669.01

Revenue collected by.

Harbour Department.....$ 50,723.00 Registrar General's Office,

3,778.00

Stamp Office, on a/c of

7,410.00

$ 61,941.00

$ 24,632.99

Bill of Health Medical Department,..........

15,963.98

Net Revenue,....$ 37,308.01

Table XIV.

Summary of Chinese Emigration from Hongkong for Ports other thau in China, during the year ending 31st December, 1909.

BRITISH VESSELS.

21

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F. M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

To Banka,

403

103 403

403

...

Batavia,

יי

Billiton,

2.030154 | 185

4,125

18 | 2,387 2,030

154

185

18

2,387

19

15

5

4,464 | 4,425

19

15

5

4,464

Callao, Peru,

939

43

982

:

¿ 944

43

987

""

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

..

56

63| 1,545122

84

33 1,784

1.601

125

88

33

"

"

Iquique......

197

202

197

1

1,847

202

:

11

Japan Ports,

6

6

121

127

127

Q

133

Liverpool.

127

3

130

127 |

3

130

Į

""

Macassar.

Manzanillo,.

190

13

209

190

13

:

300

+

304

2

2

302

Mauritius,

270,

10

17

297

270

10

17

847

209

306

297

:

Muntok.

:

:

2,050

2,050 | 2,050

2,050

,,

Pellew Islands,

51 3 2

57

51

3

Salina Cruz,

414

16

430

20

29

443

16

අප

2

57

D 35 -

459

4

4

-4

Samarang,

""

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

599

41

642 4,911

40 540

9|5,533| 5,543

42 581

6,175

Seattle,

25

3

,

Sourabaya,

27 2

28 25

29 27

28

2

29

Straits Settlements,

Vancouver, British Columbia,

"1

"1

Victoria, British Columbia,

6

|32,117| 6,207 1,753 745 40,822 7,656 5 321 2 7,987 1,168

81

1,260

6,000 827 259 108 7,194 38,117 7,034 2,012| 7,656

1,168

853

48,016

324

7,987

6

81

5

1,260

Total Passengers, 1909,.

Do.,

1908,

43,652 6,233 2,286|752|52,923|22,048 |1,175 1,108 176 21,507|65,700 | 7,408 | 3,391 43,097| 7,168| 2,071|782|53,118|16,275|980 | 602|106 17,963 59,372|| 8,118|| 2,673|

Total Passengers by British Vessels, Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

928 | 77,430

888 71,081

|43,652| 6,233| 2,286 22,048 1,175 1,108

752 52,923

176 24,507

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

(21,604| 5,058 | 1,178

576 28,416

D 36

Table XV.

Return of Emigration from Hongkong to Ports other than in China. for Quinquennial Periods from 1876 to 1909 inclusive.

YEAR.

No. OF EMIGRANTS.

1880,

50,325

1885,

57,517

1890,

42,066

1895,

73,138

1900,

83,643

1905,

64,341

1906,

76,725

1907,

105,967

1908,

71,081

1909,

77,430

4

>>

Table XVI.

Return of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1900 to 1909 inclusive.

D 37

Whither bound.

1900.

1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908.

1909.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

61,057 48,732

49,260 53,759 53,131

8,156 8,174

8,408 9,628 9,596

45,948 51,589 71,141 40,746 9,026 8.731 11,907 8,893

40,129

7,887

Total,.

69,213

56,903

57,668 63,387 62.727

54,974

60,320 83,048

49,639

48,016

Other Ports, Males,..

14,350

Other Ports, Females,

80

12,758

113

13,967

76

19,915

82

13,499

78

9,308

59

16,348 | 22,829

21,299

28,965

57

90

143

449

Total

14,430

12,871 14,043

19,997 13,577

9,367

16,405 22,919 21,442

29,414

Grand Total,

83,613

€9,774

71,711

83,384 76,304

64,341

76,725 105,967 71,081

77,430

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the Year 1909.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

D 38

Grand ToTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F. M. F.

M. F. M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

"

"

Callao, Peru,

From Bangkok, Siam,

Batavia,

Honolulu, Sandwich

Islands,

***

739

75

...

5,009 19 10 4,115

10 5,048

5,009

19

10

...

4,415

4,415

...

...

2:

10

5,048

...

739

739

...

...

1,415

739

75 924 16

12

9

961

999

16

12

9

1,036

}}

Java and Sumatra,.

844

844

844

844

...

"

Japan Ports,

563

563

791

791

...

1,354

1,354

German New Guinea,

21

21

21

21

""

...

...

Mauritius,

274

274

274

274

...

...

Macassar,

...

389

389

389

389

...

...

"

Melbourne,

1,057

14

8

New South Wales,

488

4

00 2

1,086

120

120

...

1,177

14

8

7

1,206

1

495 157

157

11

...

645

4

2

1

652

New Zealand Ports,....│

80

80

80

80

...

Queensland Ports..........

734

13

4

5

756

734

13

4

5

756.

Salina Cruz,

75

75

75

75

"

San Francisco, U.S.A.,'

189

189 4,199

31

20

19

Seattle, U.S.A.,

46

...

46

477

Samarang,

...

1,235

South Australian Ports,

71

2

1

...

74

"

:::

14 4,264

477

1,235

4,388

31

20

14

4,453

523

523

...

1,235

...

1,235.

71

2

I

74

...

...

Carried forward,..

4,391

33

15

13| 4,452|18,581

66

42

33 18,722 22,972

99

57

46

23.174

Table XVII,- Continued.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the Year 1909.

BRITISH VESSELS,

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

D 39

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward,

4,391 33

15

13

4,452,18,581

66

89

42

38, 18,722 22.972

99

57 to

23 174

From Straits Settlements,

95,746 2,526 1,129 725 100,12615,176 || 101

42

35 15,354 110,922|2,627 |1,171 | 760 115,480

"

Sourabaya,

24

...

24] 1,112

"

Tacoma, U.S.A.,.

1,589

1,589]

Tasmania,

52

52

1,112

1,136

1,589

52

1,136

1,589

52

...

Vancouver, British

Columbia,

2,492

3 2,510

"}

Victoria, British

Columbia,.

873

2

2

8801

:

:

:

:

:

:

2,492

00

7

30

2,510

873

3

2

2

880

Total Passengers, 1909, ... 105,167 2,570 | 1,153 | 743 109,633 34,869

167 84

6835,188 140,036 2,737 1,237811

144,821

Do.,

1908,..

110,361 3,030 |1,266 | 837| 116,09441,368 || 177 | 102

68 41,715||151,729 3,807 |1,368 | 905

157,800

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

105,167 2,070 | 1,153 | 743

109,633

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

34,869

167

84 68

35,188

70,298 | 2,403 | 1,069 | 675 74,415

- D 40

Table XVIII.

Return of Emgirants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1875 to 1909 inclusive.

YEAR.

NO. OF IMMIGRANTS.

1875,

38,502

1880.

51,011

1885,

80,773

1890,

98,534

1895,

112,685

1900,

121,322

1905,

140,483

1906,

134,912

4

1907,

145,822

1908,

157,809

1909,

144,821

*

+

@

Table XIX.

Return of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for 10 years, from 1900 to 1909, inclusive.

Where from.

1900.

1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908.

1909.

D 41

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

98,782 106,923 108,362 116,705 123,542 114,653 110,525 121,935 125,228 112,093 4,580 4,943 3,891 5,778 4,842 6,210 4,043 2,403 4,422 3,387 103,368 | 111,866 |112,253 | 122,483 | 128,384 | 120,863 | 114,568 | 124,338129,650 115,480

16,870 17,326 17,826 20,447 19.291 19,848 21,387 27,869

Total,

17,661

293

17,954

29,180

294

233

242

364

329

17,164 17,559 18,068 20,811

496 97

19,620 20,344 21,484

290

28,159 29,341

161

Grand Total,

121,322129,030 129,812 140,551 |149,195 140,483 |134,912 | 145,822 |157,809 | 144,821

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1909.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Power.

Rig.

Built

of.

Where built and when.

Remarks.

La Conference,...... (Str.) | 127,002 14.44

Hoi Tung (formerly Yingking),..

8

Nil

Wood Hongkong,..

1908.

116,031 467.87 90

1903.

"}

11

15

Ship's name changed under the sanction of the Board of Trade.

Shibata Maru (for-

merly Moyune),

91,986 | 1,714,35

750

Schooner

Steel

Northsands, Sunder- land, ..1887.

Ship's name retained under the sanction of the Board of Trade.

Hong On,

Motor. 127,003

Po Koi, ............ Lighter. 127,004

47.50 70 153.20 Nil

Nil

Wood Hongkong,

1909.

"}

""

Tien Ma....

.Motor. 127,005

35.72

13

11

"}

Canton,

| Mongkok,

Hongkong.

...1906.

Kowloon,

Ladye Jessie,.

(Str.) | 127,006

32.00 20

31

"

Hongkong,...

.1909. j

.1901. Sold to Foreigners, 1909.

On Lee,

י,

127,007

396.55 80

Steel

1909.

Po Kwong, Hoi Wen.......

Lighter. 127,008

85.74 Nil

Singapore,

.1900.

(Str.) | 127,009

56.15 20

Wood Hongkong,

.1909.

"

Africus,

..Lighter. 127,010

31.86 Nil

Steel

1909.

,,

Aictos,

3

127,011

Taikoo Law,

Koo Kut,...

Koo Wo,

31.86 (Str.) 127,012 20.37 .Lighter. 127,013 86.68 Nil 127,014

.1909.

"

16.6

Wood

1909.

Steel

.1909.

**

""

33.23

1909.

>

}}

99

}}

Koo Lee,

"

127,015 53.22

1909.

>>

"

D 42

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1909,

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Registry.

Date of

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built

of.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

Wai Hoi,

109,867

53.22 1902

24

Schooner Wood

Tow.........

116,039

30.81

1904

37.5

Nil

Ladyo Jessie,.

127,006

82 00 1909

20

Cheung-sha-wan. Heng- kong.....

Hongkong,

Hongkong,

...

.1901 Ship constructively lost, 1909. 1894 Sold to Foreigners, 1909. ,1901 | Sold to Foreigners, 1909.

D 43

,

Table XXII.

Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade entered and cleared since 1899, showing increases and decreases.

— D 44

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

YEAR.

No. of

TONNAGE.

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

1900

46,365

17,274,023

113,692

9,607

1901

46,201

17,825,309

551,286

164

1902

48,706

19,514,237

2,505

1,688,928

1903

46,255

21,716,870

2,202,633

2,451

1904

51,173

22,299,582

4,918

582,712

1905*

51,578

22,653,616

405

354,031

19061

44,550

22,453,077

7,028

200,539

1907

47,660

23,032,891.

3,110

579,814

...

1908

45,403

22,305,131

2,257

727,760

1909

43,794

22,415,125

109,994

1,609

10,938

6,183,093

23,116

928,299

Net increase,

5,254,794

12,178

Not decrease,

* Steamships not exceeding 60 tons in Foreign Trade included for first time. Decrease due to Typhoon of 18th September, 1906.

,- ་ ““ ༈,,:

1

Year.

Total Revenue of Department.

D 47

Table XXIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

Total Ex- penditure of Department.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

$

C.

$

C.

%

1900,

246,039.12

96,401.59

39.18

1901,

251,597.39

128,061:74

50.82

1902,

266,765.99

187,575.65

51.57

1903,

285,288.42

158,936.52

55.71

1904,

301,128.95

146,951.90

48.80

1905,

302,817.76

147,396.72

48 67

1906,

274,008.78

160,899.99

58.43

1907,

348,300.10

160,389.48

46.05

1908,

357,768,52

163,579,54

45.72

1909,

462,469,82

172,680.55

37.34

1

=

+

D 48

Annexe A.

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

Eighteen thousand three hundred and forty-nine (18,349) seamen were shipped and 17,395 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year (20.990 and 19,529 in 1908).

One hundred and nineteen distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home, &c., of these 18 were sent Home, 11 to Calcutta, I to Colombo, 2 to Port Said, 3 to Sydney, 3 to Singapore, 14 passengers to Canton, 1 to Calcutta, 1 to New York, 1 taken charge of by Superintendent, Sailors' Home, 1 joined Chinese Customs, 1 joined Harmston's Circus, 1 employed locally, 2 disappeared, 1 remained at Sailors' Home and 58 obtained employment.

Two thousand nine hundred and fifty-six dollars and fifty-two cents ($2,956.52) were expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen.

Annexe B.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

Liquor Traffic for the period from the 17th September

to the 31st December, 1909.

Ordinance No. 27 of 1909 to provide for the collection of luties upon Intoxicating Liquors was passed on the 17th Septem- ber at 7 p.m. and steps were immediately taken to make provision for the immediate collection of such revenue.

2. A Preventive Service was at once instituted and began operation on the same evening that the Ordinance was passed by boarding and searching all incoming River Steamers, a West River boat being the first to be boarded.

The Preventive Service under the Superintendent's control is composed of :----

5 European Officers and 20 Chinese Searchers;

and the Imports and Exports Opium and Sugar Office was organized as a Revenue Office-coping with the traffic in the three commodities-Liquors, Opium and Sugar.

These premises having proved too congested an additional office adjoining the Harbour Office is now under construction and will be ready for occupation during the current month.

:

D 49

A fast launch was purchased for the Preventive Service afloat. The Water Police assist this service by a morning search to the eastward of all junks arriving in the Eastern Junk Anchor- age, and the preventive launch with boat in tow boarding all junks arriving in the Western Junk Anchorage.

3. The Revenue collected on Liquors imported into the Colony during the period under review amounted to:-

European Liquors,

Chinese Wines,

$ 32,603.61 64,490.59

Licences issued for 19 Warehouses @$250 = 4,750.00

$101,844.20

4. Table I gives a return of the working of the liquor traffic from the 17th September to the 31st December, 1909.

5. The quantity of liquors and wines in stock when the Ordin- ance came into force will somewhat delay the revenue attaining estimated figures but it is anticipated that as this old stock is liquidated the collection will show a marked increase.

6. The Godowns of the Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co., Ld., and those of the Holt's Wharf have been bonded as King's Warehouses and the following is a list of the Licensed Warehouses:

No. 1 Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co. Ld., ...Alexandra Building.

Caldbeck, McGregor & Co., ..15 Queen's Road Central.

2

**

"

""

"

"

""

34567∞DOHN

Jebsen & Co.,.......

H. Price & Co., Ld.,

Ki Fung Hong,

Radecker & Co.....

Shiu Wo Hong,

Wa Kee Hong,

Kwong Sang Hong,

Hang Lam Chong,...

.18 Catchick Street.

.10 Queen's Road Central. .20 Connaught Road West. ..8 Burrow Street, Wanchai.

.396 Des Voeux Road West. ..70 Connaught Road West.

.2 In Ku Lane.

.36 Wing Lok Street.

.22 & 24 New Market Street.

.15 Possession Street.

Caldbeck, McGregor & Co., 8 Queen's Road Central.

""

9

""

Yu Kee Hong,

10

11

""

>>

Chu Wing On,

12

""

13

""

39

14

29

""

15

""

16

""

""

17

27

Lai Wo Tseung,

18

""

""

Tin Wo Yuen,

- ၁၅

1. Ruttonjee & Son,.........4 Wo On Lane.

Kwong Man Tseung,

Kwan Tye,..........

19 The Connaught Aerated

Water Manufactory

Co., Ld.,

..4 Wilmer Street.

.112 Queen's Road Central. .5 Lee Shing Street.

.324 & 326 Queen's Rd. West.

1 St. Francis Street.

7. Up to the present there has been no friction with any of the licensees who are apparently satisfied with the administration of this Department as regards the control of these Warehouses and the interpretation of the Ordinance.

One European Excise Officer attends to the licensees dealing in Chinese Wines and another European Officer to the firms dealing in European Liquors.

?

D 50

8. Of Distilleries there are the following:-

Oriental Brewery.........at Lai Chi Kok. Victoria Distillery ......at Kowloon City. Kwong Shing Yuen......at Tseung Sha Wan. Tung Mi

.at 15 Tung Lo Wan. .........at 1 Shau Ki Wan.

Ching Kee Chan

Pan Chan

Wo Chan

...at 46 Cross Street, Kowloon City. ...at 26, Belchers Street, Kennedy Town.

Sheung Wo, On Kee..at 2, Wo Hing Street, Shau Ki Wan.

Tiu Yuen

..at 30, Kennedy Street, Yaumati.

Hop Fat..

Yee Loong.

Lun Yick....

On Tai

at Chin Wan, New Territories.

Sun Lung...

Ye Ki

Cheung On...

Wo Shun

...

Sun Hing Loong

Li Sang Un

Kwong Lung Shing ..

Tiu Hing

Kwong Lung Chan ....... Hung Hing

Tye Kiu, Un Long, New Territories.

Cheung Chow, New Territories.

9. The collection of duties on liquors from all Distilleries in the New Territories was made effective from the 1st January, 1910, but previous to that date the following Distilleries contributed

the sums shewn below :-

= 1,039.60

Hop Fat.....at Chin Wan,. 5,796 Gallons=$ 869.40 Sun Hing Lung ...at Un Long,... 6,776 Li Sang Yuen......

Kwong Lung Sing.

Tiu Hing..

at Cheung

12,995

Kwong Lung Chan

Chow,

Hung Hing

J

1,949.46

Total collected in New Territories,......25,568 Gallons=$3,858.46

No difficulty prevails in this direction and they all comply with the Ordinance; a control on the out-turn of each distillery is effected by one European Officer who frequently visits them and by Chinese Searchers.

10. In conclusion I would remark that while safeguarding the Revenue by the observance of the Ordinance much leniency has had to be shown so as to allow one and all to fall in with the regu- lations but a gradual strict application of the law will now become necessary.

D 51

Opium.

11. Eighteen thousand one hundred and sixty-three (18,163) permits for export and removal were issued from this Office during the Year being a decrease of 19 as compared with 1908 as follows:-

NUMBER OF PERMITS &C. Issued.

1908. 1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permit, (Opium),

332

285

47

Removal Export

""

"

"

8,704 8,761

60

8,827 8,829

2

Landing Permit, (Opium Skins),

140

133

7

Removal

19

3

16

"

Export

160

149

11

Memo of exports to the Commissioner Į

of Chinese Customs,

727

681

46

289 279

10

Memo of exports to the Superintendent { of Raw Opium Department, Macao, Í

A daily memo of exports to Macao and Chinese Ports was supplied during the Year to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritime Customs and a daily memo of Exports to Macao was supplied to the Superintendent of Raw Opium Department of Масао.

One hundred and twelve (112) Surprise Visits were paid to Godowns during the Year.

Morphine, Compounds of Opium and Cocaine.

12. The amount of Morphine, Compounds of Opium and Cocaine imported and exported during the Year is as follows:--

COMPOUNDS OF OPIUM.

1908.

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

lb.

16.

lb.

lb.

Imported,

10,673 13,216.12

2,543.12

1

Exported,

8,246

9,859

1,613

Difference,

2,427

3,357.12

930.12

D 52

MORPHIA.

1908.

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

Cases. lb. Oz.\Cases. Th.

Cases. lb. Oz.| Cases. Ib. Oz.

Im-

4 356. 9

ported, 289-7,053.7|293=7,410

Ex-

ported, 384-9,129.2282-7,285

102=1,894. 2

COCAINE.

1908.

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

Cases. 16.

Cases. lb. Oz. Cuses. Ib.

Cases. lb.

Im-

ported,

11-68. 12

Ex- ported,

2=12. 8

Imports and Exports of Sugar,

13. Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong by vessels of different nationalities during the Year:-

1908.

1909.

Tons.

Tons.

American Steamers,

373

6,663

Austrian

27

101

"

British

163,317 175,133

Chinese

723

2,314

""

Dutch

"

58,234

77,344

Danish

102

French

2,103

3,254

??

German

22,824

61,119

Italian

169

""

Japanese

71

Norwegian

>"

Portuguese

""

1,100

294

36 8,851 1,503

Russian

14

""

Swedish

40

""

By Junks

1,372

Total,

.....

...

2,801

271

250,469 339,684

$

D 53

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong

during the Year :-

1908.

1909.

Tons.

Tons.

From Belgium,

30

China,

""

12,101

12,108

Cochin-China,

"

7,767

5,012

Germany,

25

16

לי

Java,

178,790 278,030

22

"

""

New York,

"

Straits,

Total,

London, Mauritius,

New Territories,

Philippine Islands,

33

16

330

100

129

62

2

...

50,492

41,930

772

2,108

250,469 339,684

Ninety-one (91) Certificates of Origin for exportation of Sugar were issued from this Office during the Year 1909.

Thirty (30) Permits for Delivery of Sugar which arrived in the Colony without Certificate of Origin were issued from this Office during the Year 1909.

IMPORTS.

The Return shows that during the Year the amount of Sugar reported was as follows:-

Imported,

4th February, 1910.

1908.

1909.

Increase.

Tons.

Tons.

Tons.

250,469 339,684 89,215

CHARLES WM. BECKWITH, LT., R.N.,

Superintendent,

Imports & Exports Office.

D 54 -

Class of Liquor.

Arrivals,

Colony

(Duty

paid).

In Holt's

King's

Ware.

Table I.

Exported

ex Ship

to Ship

or ex

Bond.

Imported Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1909.

into the

In Hongkong &

Kowloon Godown In Licensed

Total in

house.

Co.'s King's Warehouse.

Warehouses.

Bond.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Brandy,

Claret,

Gin,

Liqueurs,

Ale and Beer,

Bitters,

Champagne,..

177,050

68,620

44,439

200

18,304

45,487

63,991

188

16

35

90

47

137

18,401

7,229

316

160

8,788

1,908

10,856

· 4,375

1,305

1,203

992

875

1,867

13,043

9,499

1,690

1,260

594

1,854

9,603

3,719

1,161

2,654

1,557

919

157

90

2,069

391

4,723

481

Malaga,

4

...

Maderia,.

38

16

...

Muscatel,

20

20

...

...

Marsala,

76

16

18

Medicated Wine,

42

22

Port,

3,530

700

850

00

42

20

1,140

832

1,980

222206

:

22

...

Rum,

1,072

405

667

Sako,

1,672

295

1,377

Sherry,

1,408

408

145

4

150

701

855

Stout,

29,304

4,710

9,691

856

1,980

12,067

14,903

Spirits of Wine and Arrack,

68,923

46,379

21,946

598

22,544

Still Hock,.

1,314

438

741

20

115

135

Still Red Wine,.

30,429

29,734

433

262

262

Still White Wine,

9,023

886

295

7,710

132

7,842

Sparkling Wine,

298

94

140

64

64

Vermouth,

Whisky,

1,384

750

215

158

261

419

22,483

6,136

2,019

6,334

2,248

5,674

14,256

Native Wine,

755,320

182,037

498,127

170

74,986

75,156

From Oriental Brewory-Beer,...!

1,930

13,484

From Distilleries-Native Wine,.

3,757

105,531

D 55

Table II.

The following Tables show the quantity of Opium imported and exported during the years 1908 and 1909 :-

1908.

1909.

Increase. Decrease.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Imported,

41,8211

35,733

6,087

Exported,

39,6094

35,9881/

...

3,620

Through Cargo

reported, but not

landed,

10,1361 9,4761/2

660

Imports and Exports of Opium Skins were reported as

follows:

1908.

1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Imported,... 55,178

43,472.5

Exported,... 55,106

44,278.11

11,705.11

10,827,5

1908,

1909,

MALWA.

VARIETIES OF OPIUM IMPORTED.

PATNA. BENARES.

PERSIAN.

TURKISH. CHINESE.

TOTAL

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

5,607}

22,424 10,266

3,4902

5

28

41,8211

5,2491/ 19,463

8,355

2,644

22

35,733

Increase,

...

:

Decrease,

358

2,961

1,911

8462

5

6

6,0871

VARIETIES OF OPIUM EXPORTED.

MALWA.

PATNA. BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH. CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1908,

5,681

21,093

9,700

3,1024

5

28

39,6091

1909,

5,3321

19,419

8,472

2,743

22

35,998

Increase,

...

Decrease,

348/2

1,674

1,228

3594

5

6

3,620

Through cargo repor ed in Manifest but not landed

{

1908..

1909.

10,136 chests. 9,476 "

- D 56

Table III.

PLACES OF DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED DURING 1909.

D 57

Malwa.

chests.

Patna. Benares. Persian. | Turkish. | Chinese. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Total.

Total

chests.

in lb.

By Steamers to

Amoy,

Bandarabbas,

15

239

2,884

241

3,379

532,059

4

4

547

Bushire,......

6

820

***

Canton,

D

474

4,955

...

932

6,370

460,383

Chefoo,

39

33

72

10,480

Foochow,

853

428

226

703

2,210

314,449

Hankow,

1

2

3

453

...

Haiphong,

2

2

274

Hohow,..

153

1,761

251

2,165

342,320

Hoihow,

658

62

22

742

118,133

Kong Moon,

1,021

15

1,036

165,760

Kwong Chow Wan,.

278

278

41,430

London,.

33

33

4,321

Macao,

979

49

1,028

:

161,480

Matupi,

1

1

2

297

Merida,

4

4

546

...

Mexico,

7

957

Namtao,

39

2

41

6,560

New York,

3

410

Pakhoi,..

143

73

216

31,560

Sainau,

2

2

320

Shanghai,

1,432

6,997

2,703

Swatow,

1,935

1,241

636

11,132

3,813

. 1,742,890

558,344

Tamsui,

456

544

1,673

2,673

388,765

Tamatave,

1

1

160

Tsingtau,

2

5

7

1,120

Weihaiwei,

24

2

26

...

4,113

Wuchow,

18

8

21

3,360

By Steam-launches and Junks to vari-

430

200

26

656

94,516

ous adjacent Ports in China,

Total,..

5,33219,419

8,470

2,689

22

35,932

4,996,098

The information in column 8 above is on the following assumption :—

Patna and Benares, per chest 160 lb. Malwa, Turkish & Chinese, per chest 133 lb. Persian, per chest 137 lb.

Table IV.

DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888.

D 58

MALWA.

Philip- N. & C.

Other

Total.

Year.

China. Formosa, Straits.

pines. America, Canada, Egypt. London. Ports.

Chests.

1888

27,090

2

......

1889

27,092

16,702

} ?

1890

16,703

13,404

5

1891

13,409

11,826

4

11,830

1892

11,936

9

3

1893

11,948

10,692

4

10,696

1894

10,132

53

10

2

10,197

1895

10,337

1

2

8

1896

10,348

7,464

12

1897

7,476

5,956

6

I

1

1898

5,964

6,896

6,896

1899

8,999

17

I

9,017

1900

9,391

1

9,392

1901

7,424

2

7,427

1902

7,312

7,313

1903

7,999

2

1

2

8,004

1904

8,253

15

12

1

8,281

1905

5,878

6

2

2

5,888

1906

5,853

4

1

5,859

1907

5,700

5,700

1908

5,680

1

5,681

1909

5,3321

5,332

DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888.

PATNA.

D 59

Philip- N. & C.

Other

Total.

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits.

pines. America. Canada. Egypt.

London. Ports.

Chests.

1888

23,951

17

465

437

8

24,878

1889

23,040

40

379

443

23,902

1890

22,775

250

260

908

24,193

1891

23,075

315

203

814

3

24,440

1892

18,410

410

174

954

19,948

1893

16,675

429

301

787

4

18,196

1894

16,758

16

41

330

167

3

17,820

1895

15,033

245

307

20

15,608

1896

15,783

265

334

16,387

1897

16,721

6

360

410

6

17,509

1898

17,297

1

444

37

457

18,236

1899

17,285

432

32

61

2

17,812

1900

15,892

100

618

17

2

1

16,630

1901

18,328

150

160

1,073

22

19,733

1902

21,482

300

163

323

1903

21,843

309

34

507

8

80

1904

20,152

120

320

4

105

1905

22,193

602

13

93

5

1906

24,569

...

312

8

278

10

1907

21,271

223

307

9

592

1908

20,698

61

48

280

1909

18,959

456

OONDON64

22,274

22,787

20,903

22,906

25,177

2

22,404

21,093

19,419

DESTINATION OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888.

BENARES.

D 60

Philip N. & C.

Other

Total.

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits.

pines.

America. Canada. Egypt. London. Ports.

Chests.

1888

13,390

658

86

35

7

14,176

1889

14,625

530

37

29

874

16,095

1890

14,011

560

109

38

46

14,764

1891

15,112

399

24

109

10

15,654

1892

12,309

157

332

79

1

4

12,882

1893

7,418

124

256

92

4

7,894

1894

6,569

179

26

70

13

6,857

1895

6,209

96

214

139

6,658

1896

5,185

34

30

129

5,378

1897

6,747

302

157

10

7,216

1898

7,316

1

387

17

7,712

1899

8,263

330

4

8,597

1900

7,104

300

543

1

7,948

1901

7,297

360

42

1,099

6

8,804

1902

7,606

500

10

555

8,671

1903

7,394

566

3

753

1

8,717

1904

7,775

1,120

9

578

9,482

1905

8,396

880

22

615

9,917

1906

10,667

2,000

84

432

13,191

1907

8,840

1,348

428

2

2

10,620

1908

8,491

1,191

11

6

1

9,700

1909

7,924

544

4

8,472

DESTINATION OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888.

D 61

PERSIAN.

Philip

N. & C.

Other

Total.

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits.

pines,

America, Canada. Egypt. London. Ports.

Chests.

1888

1,389 3,414

87

2

4,892

1889

1,463 3,429

1

64

14

6

5

4,932

1890

1,102

4,328

31

2

73

18

5,554

1891

1,282

4,637

9

10

41

5,979

1892

3,161

4,296

210

3

67

7,737

1893

2,555

3,795

286

7

18

6,661

1894

1,057

3,321

156

22

4,556

1895

957

2,556

69

15

3,607

1896

2,811

991

187

97

5

4,091

1897

2,584

2,035

114

3

32

22

4,790

1898

1,805

2,771

262

17

41

4,905

1899

909

3,502

572

17

43

5,034

1900

521

2,729

1,123

5

26

92

4,497

1901

466

2,160 1,237

1

90

135

4,107

1902

2,376

1,348

999

90

9

261

1

5,089

1903

3,774

762

2,104

265

15

1

7

6,928

1901

2,974

1,500

333

333

2

1

5,151

1905

1,543

1,060

231

206

35

52

3,141

1906

881

485

19

47

121

2

42

15

1,612

1907

1,396

1,209

120

149

7

778

16

3,675

1908

1,574

1,200

276

46

3,102

1909

965

1,673

15

28

11

2,692

DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888.

D 62

TURKISH.

Philip

N. & C.

Other

Total.

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits. pines.

America. Canada. Egypt. London. Ports.

Chests.

1888

92

2

9

103

......

1889

126

2

128

1890

105

105

1891

97

97

1892

111

111

1893

25

2

46

73

1894

5

44

49

1895

20

20

1896

22

32

54

1897

2

2

1898

10

2

15

7

3

37

1899

6

20

1

27

1900

17

120

18

6

94

255

1901

5

5

178

189

1902

2

2

1903

10

1

9

20

1904

7

1

8

1905

10

2

2

29

4

47

1906

1

960

14

10

985

1907

3

17

5

25

1908

5

......

1909

DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888.

CHINESE.

- D 63

Philip-

N. & C.

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits. pines.

America. Canada. Egypt. London.

Other Total. Ports. Chests.

1888

1889

1890

1891

1892

1893

1

1894

1895

1896

1897

327

1898

34

1899

37

327

34

37

1900

1901

1902

.1903

91

94

1904

34

34

1905

169

169

1906

31

621

1

1

654

1907

106

106

1908

28

28

1909

22

22

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY.

The comparison of weather-forecasts issued daily with the weather subsequently experienced has been conducted on the same system as heretofore (compare Annual Report for 1896 § 5). The results are as follows:-

Success 58 per cent., partial success 32 per cent., failure 2 per cent., partial failure 8 per cent. Following the method used in Meteorological Offices and taking the sum of total and partial success as a measure of success, and the sum of total and partial failure as a measure of failure, 90 per cent. of the weather-forecasts were success- ful in 1909. -

The average results for the three preceding years were as follows:-

Success 58 per cent., partial success 32 per cent., failure 1 per cent., partial failure 9 per cent.

2. The number of typhoons directly affecting the North part of the China Sea was, as in the previous year, greater than usual, but the gales which resulted in the Colony were not of great severity with the exception of that of October 19th, when storm-force was reached.

The centre of this disturbance passed a few miles to the South of Gap Rock where typhoon force of wind was experienced for twelve hours. At the Observatory the maximum hourly wind velocity was 75 miles. At Victoria Peak the wind had attained an average hourly velocity of 90 miles when the cups of the Anemo- graph blew away.

3. From the commencement of the month of June, the weather map made daily for use in the Observatory has been reproduced on a scale suitable for exhibition, and copies have been posted at the following notice boards: the Harbour Office, Blake Pier and the Ferry Company's Pier. These maps while showing the broad features of pressure distribution are necessarily lacking in detail. It must be remembered that the telegraphic reporting stations are situated almost entirely on the sea-board and. with the exception of a couple of stations on the Yangtze river, the interior of the con- tinent is unrepresented.

Notwithstanding these disadvantages it is believed that the public has found the maps useful and applications for copies have been received from several persons. But as those at present ex- hibited have to be made by hand, it has not been found possible to meet their wishes, and in the present state of our communications the expense of reproducing the map for distribution would not be justified.

4. Under the arrangement mentioned in my last report (§8) the ordinary daily meteorological telegrams were supplemented oc-

E 2

casionally by extra observations from stations in the Philippines and Southern Formosa, during the prevalence of typhoons in those localities. The fullest use could not be made of this arrangement owing to the interruption of telegraphic communication, so apt to occur at these times, in the islands.

These observations were forwarded by the courtesy of the Directors of the Philippine Weather Bureau and the Formosa Weather Service, and many of them proved of great value.

5. The Imperial Maritime Customs authorities at Swatow kindly forwarded an observation made at 9 p.m., from May till October. Unfortunately owing to delay in telegraphic transmission the greater part of these messages failed to reach the Observatory until next morning. Nevertheless they have been frequently useful.

6. It is to be regretted that the meteorological telegrams for- warded from Hoihow and Pakhoi, while showing some improvement in the time of receipt as compared with former years, are still received too late for forecasting purposes.

7. At the request of the Government I visited Manila Observa- tory in the spring, when I was received with the greatest courtesy by the Reverend Fr. Algué, the Director. During my short stay he was good enough to afford me every facility for seeing the equipment and the working of the establishment under his control.

Opportunity was taken to arrange details for the forwarding of the extra meteorological observations mentioned in paragraph 4.

8. In addition to the ordinary warnings, special warnings of the approach of typhoons have been sent regularly to the Authorities in Canton,

9. By the courtesy of the Naval Authorities meteorological messages were received occasionally from H.M. Ships during the year by wireless telegraphy, and in the case of the typhoon over the China Sea in November which caused so much delay to shipping, some valuable observations were received by this means from H.M.S. Kent, then en route to Singapore.

10. As already announced by His Excellency the Governor, the Chinese Authorities have promised to erect a Wireless Telegraph Station on Pratas Island, and this Government has agreed to allow the staff for the station to attend at the Hongkong Observatory in order to receive some training in making the necessary meteorological observations.

These latter will be of material assistance in the framing of weather-forecasts and storm-warnings.

11. The thanks of the Government are due to the Telegraph Com- panies who continue to forward meteorological telegrams from outports to Hongkong free of charge; and also to the staffs of the Eastern Extension, Australasian and China Telegraph Company at Sharp Peak, Iloilo, Bacolod and Cebu, who make and transmit observations twice daily.

12. During 1909 in addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations on shore, 1,480 ship logs have been copied on board

!

E 3

or forwarded by the captains. The total number of vessels whose log books have been made use of was 194. The total number of days' observations (counting separately those made on board different ships on the same day) was 14,726. Acknowledgment is here måde of the courtesy of those masters of vessels who have been good enough to forward their observations.

13. The entry of observations made at sea in degree squares for the area 9° South and 45° North Latitude, and between the longitude of Singapore and 180° East of Greenwich has been continued by Mr. Jeffries and, after her return from leave of absence on November 3rd, by Miss Doberck, and 347,190 in all have now been entered.

The means of these observations have been taken for the degree squares comprised in the following areas:-Equator to 6° South Latitude and from the Longitude of Singapore to 125° East for the months of January to December inclusive; Equator to 25° North Latitude and from 100° to 125° East Longitude for the month of January.

14. The tracks of the typhoons of 1909 have been laid down by Mr. Plummer, and they will be printed and distributed as soon as possible.

15. During the past year several hundred indirect comparisons of barometers and aneroids on board ship have been made. A few barometers and aneroids have been compared for various people in the Observatory.

16. The rainfall in inches recorded by the gauge placed in the Police compound at Taipo, New Territories, was as follows:- January 1.21, February 2.08, March 2.87, April 2.30, May 8.15, June 10.45, July 19.42, August 9.28, September 7.07, October 25.58, November 0.07, December 0.00, the total for the year 1909 being 88.48 inches. On an average of the four years during which this gauge has been in operation the rainfall measured at Taipo has exceeded that recorded at the Observatory by 20 per cent.

17. The Dines-Baxendell pressure-tube Anemograph ordered from London in the spring had not been received at the close of the year. It has since arrived and is now being mounted, and it is expected that it will be brought into use shortly.

A chronograph of inexpensive form ordered at the same time, was received in December, and has since, by means of an electrical device, been made available for obtaining a record of the revolutions of the cups of the Beckley Anemograph during short intervals of time, whenever required.

The registering parts of these instruments are placed on the ground floor where the record can be inspected at all times, which is a great advantage.

18. In 1909 the number of transits observed was 431. The axis of the transit instrument was levelled 262 times, and the collimation and azimuth errors were determined 18 times by aid of the meridian mark. The whole of these observations have been made by Mr. Plummer. Both the standard clocks have been cleaned during the

E 4

year, the Mean Time clock on the 7th May and the Sidereal clock on the 29th of the same month. The Time-ball clock was oiled and the escapement cleaned on the 27th March. The going of all of them subsequently, has been satisfactory.

19. The errors of the Time-ball are given on Table I. The ball. is not dropped on Sundays nor on Government holidays. There were no failures in 1909. On the 14th July and on October 19th it was not dropped in consequence of heavy gales, and on October 20th and December 8th because the line was out of order. It was there- fore dropped successfully on 296 days. The probable error was in January 0.22, in February± 0.24, in March± 0.18, in April +0.15, in May ± 0.13, in June ± 0.17, in July ± 0.16, in August +0.18, in September ± 0.15, in October ± 0.17, in November + 0.11, and in December ± 0.13.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY,

25th February, 1910.

F. G. FIGG,

Director.

1

}

Table I.

Errors of the Time Ball in 1909.

- means too late.

+ means too early.

Date. January February March April

May

June

July

August

Sept. October Nov.

Dec.

E 5

10

12345678GO

0.1

+1.1

-0.3

0.1

+0.2

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.4

-0.3

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

-0.3

+0.4

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

+0.3

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.2

0.1

+0.3

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

+0.2

0.2

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

...

01

0.1

+0.2

+0.2

.0.3

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.5

-0.3 +0.2

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

9

+0.3

0.2

+0.2

+0.3

0.1

+0.7

+0.2

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.3 +0.3

+0.2

0.1

+0.2

+0.4

+0.3

0.1

+0.2

11

+0.5

-0.3

+0.3

...

0.1

+0.2

+0.4

+0.2

-0.6

+0.2

0.1

12

+0.4

-0.4

+0.3

0.1

0.1

+0.4

+0.3

-0.2

+0.3

13

0.1

0.1

+0.3

+0.2

0.1

+0.6

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

Q.1

14

-0.2

...

0.1

-0.2

-0.3

+0.4

+0.3

0.1

0.1

15

0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

-0.2 +0.9

+0.2

+0.2

0.1

0.1

16

-0.4

0.1

-0.2

0.1

+0,2

+0.3

0.1

+0,2

+0.2

0.1

0.1

1.

Table I-Continued.

Errors of the Time Ball in 1909.

- means too late.

+ means too early.

Date. January February March

April

May

June

July

August

Sept. October

Nov.

Dec.

17

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.3

-0.3

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

18

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

+0.2

+0.2

0.1

0.1

19

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

...

20

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

21

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.4

0.1

22

+0.2

0.1

+0.2

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

23

+0.4

0.1

+0.3

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

24

+0.6

0.1

+0.4

+0.2

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

25

0.1

+0.7

0.1

+0.4

+0.3

+0.2

0.1

0.2

26

0.1

+0.9

0.1

+0.4

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1

27

0.1

+1.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

28

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

..{

-0.2

29

0.3

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.4

30

-0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.6

31

:

-0.2

:

0.1

0.1

0.1

- E 6

Table II.

Monthly and Annual Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements at the Hongkong Observatory for the year 1909, and departure from the mean of 25 years (+ excess; — defect).

Jan.

Feb. Mar. Apr. May. June.

July. Aug.

Sept. Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Year.

Bar. Pressure at M.S.L.*

Rel. Humidity %.

Departure

Temperature

Departure

Departure

Vap. Tension (Inches of Mercury)

+ 0.5+ 2.4 + 80

30.100 30.106| 30.046] 29.951| 29 883| 29 791 .060 .039 .013 006 + .022 + .029 60.6 60.4 61.1 71.1 1.4 + 10

29.765 | 29.781

29.78

29.888

30.067 | 30.175

29.945

+ .036) + .038

74.9 82.1

82.2 82.8

-.057

82.2

-.097 ~ .040 | + .001 77.8 70.4 63.6

.015

72.7

1.9

1.4

+ 0.4│+ 1.5+ 1.8+ 1,5 + 1.2 +0.9 + 1.0

81

81

79

83

80

81

81

+ 6+

2

6

0

3

1

2+

80

3+

77

62

59

77

7

0

Departure

Sunshine (Total hours)]

Departure

57.8

2.2

0.431 0.431 0 497 +.0301+ .052} + .014] 85.0 85.6 64.2 155.4 18.2 [+51.1

0.612

0.720 0.876

0.891

.025

0.909 0 880 0.740 .002.025+.078]+ 088

Cloudiness%

83

80

92

Departure

+19+

4+

78

3

70

+ 1+ 2+ 2

64

이+

053+.009 113.9 230.3 252.0 215.3 202.6 137.5 187.1 249.7 1978.6 39.9 +74.1 + 50 2 + 137]+ 60 85 78

0.469

+.009

0.357

0.651

032+.015

74.8

63

80

Rainfall (Total

Inches)

1.460 1 660

Departure

+0.002 |—0:090

Wind Direction

Departure -

NS..

2.345 2.455 6.700 7.385| 12.825 -0.518—3.427 -5.595 -8.998+0.055 -5 861 E 15° NE 11° NE 5° NE 8o VE 5o NE 780 SE 15° SS 32° W 1° + 3° + 2°;

8.340

-1.13219.423)

-1.387

6+ 29+ 6

0.065 8.505 23.985

E 2° SE 24° NE51° NE 18° N E 1° S

2.5+70.5 + 70.2 72

57 30

6

21+

0.000 75.725

-1,185) -8.713

18° +25°

11°

73°

13°

no

22° 7°

Wind Velocity

(Miles per hour)

14.1 142

+ 0.3

16.5

14.1

13.4

12.5

14.1

7.8

9.0

0.3 + 0.6

0.8,

0.4 +0.1

+ 3.2

1.9

16.8

2.9 + 2.2

12.6 11.4

13.0

0.5

1.0

0.1

Departure

NB-The observations for 1909, as above, are compared with the 25 year means for the period 1884 to 1908 inclusive. *Not corrected to Standard Gravity.

- E 7

E 8

Table V.

Number of Days with Wind from eight different points of the Compass during each month of the year, 1909.

Month.

N.

NE. E. SE.

S. SW.

W. │NW.

January, February,

3

4

March,

2

April,

2

May,.

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

6

November,

11

December,

6

62442 - AT+

19

19

23

19 24

18

3

18

12

10

*202

2-20 caco -:

⠀⠀0624O DO THEN

2

1

1

1

1

12

3

1

18

2

2

3

1

1

Sums,.

35 39 192 21

21

37

13

7

Table IX.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered during the year, 1909.

E 9

BAROMETER,

TEMPERATURE.

MONTII.

HUMIDITY.

VAPOUR

TENSION.

RAIN.

VELOCITY.

WIND

RADIATION.

Max.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Min.

Max.

Daily

Min.

Max.

Hourly

Max.

Max. Sun Max.

January,

30.223 29.757

73.4

50.8

52

February,

.275

.739 73.4

48.7

41

24

0.636

0.255

1.160

0.600 40

121.2

0.676 0.189

0.450

0.165

39

126.9

March,...

.276

.647 77.8

53.0

46

0.838

0.243

1.000

0.300

40

128.1

April,

.001

.640 85.7

61.6

28

0.863

0.195

0.790

0.650

40

137.3

May,

29.931

.600 85.5

62.0

36

0.924

0.341

2.260

0.620 34

137.1

June,

.835

.467 90.0

73.9

57

1.005

0.666

2.610

0.550 40

141.5

July,

.874

.436

90.8

74.6

56

1.065

0.708

2.820

0.740 48

144.5

August,...

.838

.481

90.5

74.9

51

1.008

0.707

1.720

0.705 34

141.1

September,

.866

.386 90.7

76.2

42

1.017

0.506

2.685

1.800 37

142.8

October,

30.003

.101

90.5

65 3

49

0.939

0 492

6.375

0.830 75

139.2

November,

.203

.764 82.8

54.8

20

0.794 |

0.171

0.035

0.015

34

138.8

December,

.328

.791

77.9

50.8

23

0.626

0.129

31

126.0

Year,

30 328

29.101

90.8

48.7

20

1.065

0.129

6.375

1.800

75

141.5

E 10

Table XIV.

Statement of Annual Expenditure on the Observatory Department.

Year.

Total Expenditure.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

cts.

$

cts.

$cts.

1900

18,651.55

1901

18,111.10

540.45

1902

22,480.98

4,369.88

1903

22,780.97

299.99

1904

21,937.15

843.82

1905

21,220.40

716.75

1906

19,995.17

1,225.23

1907

20,110.53

115.36

1908

21,110.61

1,000.08

1909

22,388.63

1,278.02

N.B.-Tables III, IV, VI, VII, VIII, X, XI, XII and XIII omitted

from this report will be found in "Meteorological Observations for 1909 ".

1

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR 1909.

1.-ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1909 was 181, and there were 316 pending at the commencement of that year as against 206 and 280 respectively in 1908. 116 were disposed of during the year, 41 being settled or withdrawn before trial; I transferred to Summary Jurisdiction and 1 transferred to Probate, leaving a balance of 379 undisposed of, as against 168, 58 and 316 respectively in 1908.

The total amount involved was $1,321,363, as against $2,466,274 in 1908.

The debts and damages recovered amounted to $531,247, as against $902,846 in 1908.

The total fees collected amounted to $15,370, as against $15,341 in 1908.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages (0. 2), (0. 3), (0. 4) and (Y. 3) and (Y. 4) of the Blue Book for the current year.

2. SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted was 1,417 during the year and 122 were brought forward from 1908, as against 1,735 and 225 respectively in 1908. 1,417 were disposed of, 518 being settled or withdrawn before trial, 185 being struck out, dismissed and lapsed Writs, and 80 struck out of the Cause-Book as having been standing over generally for more than a year, leaving a balance of 122, as against 1,838, 724, 184 and 135 respectively in 1908.

The total amount involved was $281,047, and the debts and damages recovered amounted to $110,222, as against $345,051 and $111,283 respectively in 1908.

The total fees collected amounted to $7,809 as against $9,261 in 1908.

The number of Distress Warrants for Rent issued was 522, representing aggregate unpaid Rents amounting to $34,212, of which the aggregate sum of $11,616 was recovered, as against 512, $60.687 and $17,579 respectively in 1908.

337 Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties, as against 270 in 1908.

The total fees collected amounted to 32,701 as against $2,729 in 1908.

3. CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 66 cases and 120 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 26 and 59 respectively in 1908.

F2

The number of persons actually indicted was 100, of whom 73 were convicted and 27 were acquitted. Against 20 persons no In- dictments were filed. In 1908 the figures were respectively 53, 26 and 6.

4.-APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

There were 12 Appeals instituted during the year, viz. :-

From the decision of the Chief Justice, 8 as against 3 in 1908.

"

15

of the Puisne Judge, 4

多少

少爷

of the Magistrates, - 0

12

of which the following were disposed of, viz. :-

From the Chief Justice,

Puisne Judge, Magistrates,

1

1

""

10

5

21T

"

The decision of the Privy Council in the case of Chan Hang Kin and six others committed to gaol for perjury reached the Colony on the 1st April, 1909. The appeal was allowed, no order as to costs. On the 21st June, 1909, another decision of the Privy Council in the Bankruptcy of the Lai Hing Firm, ex parte Ma Lung Ko, was received. The appeal was dismissed, no order as to costs.

Leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted in two cases,

viz. :--

(1) in Hip On Insurance Co., Ld. c. Li Po Lung (0. J.

Action No. 57 of 1907).

(2) in Imperial Bank of China v. Leung Shiu King (O. J.

Action No. 73 of 1904).

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

There was no action instituted during the year.

Of the two

cases that were pending in 1908, one was disposed of, leaving one pending.

No vessel was arrested.

The total fees collected amounted to $117 as against $352 in 1908.

6.-BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

There were 30 Petitions filed, 20 being Creditors' Petitions, and 10 being Petitions by the Debtors themselves. The figures for 1908 were respectively 34, 23 and 11.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 12, being 7 on Creditors' Petitions, and 5 on Debtors' Petitions. The figures for 1908 were respectively 30, 21 and 9, and 1 Administration Order.

The number of Public Examinations held was 9, as against 22 in 1908.

$

&

F 3

There were 9 Adjudications and 2 Compositions. The figures in 1908 were 14 Adjudications and 1 Scheme of Arrangement approved by the Court.

There was 1 Discharge, as against 2 in 1908.

The aggregate amount of declared Assets was $65,803 and declared Liabilities $189,155, as against $776,144 and $1,261,136 respectively in 1908.

The fees amounted to $14,104, including the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors, as against $6,176 in 1908.

7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

There were 210 Grants made by the Court, being:-

Probates, -

- 90

Letters of Administration,

- 120

210

The figures in 1908 were respectively 101 and 133.

The aggregate value of the Estates was $3,422,250, as against $3,405,400 in 1908.

Probate Duties amounted to $95,647. Additional Probate Duty paid in 1909-$2,375. Court Fees amounted to $8,290 and Official Administrator's Commission to $1,154. The figures in 1908 were respectively $81,136, $120, $8,236 and $1,812.

There were 18 Estates vested in, or administered by, the Official Administrator during the year, representing an aggregate value of $25,900. The figures for 1908 were respectively 69 and $14,978.

19 Estates were wound up during the year, representing an aggregate value of $10,210, as against 28 in 1908 representing $42,479.

8.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The total number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of 1909 was 23 and the aggregate amount of Trust Funds $88,067 as against 25 Estates aggregating $115,052 in 1908, and certain house property.

The amount of Commission collected was $396, as against $234 in 1908.

9.-REGISTRATION OF COMPANIES.

The total number of Companies registered from the commence- ment of the "Companies Ordinance, 1865," was 599 with an aggre- gate capital of $270,240,647.

Of the 599 Companies on the Register 99 are defunct, 2 were not floated, 132 were wound up and 67 were in the course of being wound up, leaving 299 on the Register at the end of 1909 represent- ing an aggregate capital of $264,464,647.

The figures in 1908 were respectively 561, $256,761,334, 561, 99, 2, 123, 66, 271, and $353,246,635.

F4

There were 38 Companies registered in 1909, as compared with 31 in 1908, the revenue from which was :-

Registration Fees,- Filing and other Fees,

$5,917 as against $4,858 in 1908

1,939

$1,931

"

$7,856

$6,789

The number of licences granted under section 4 of "The Com- panies (Local Registers) Ordinance 1907" (No. 16 of 1907) enabling Companies operating outside the Colony to keep local registers of members was 115.

The fees collected in respect of such licences amounted to $14,873.

The number of authorizations issued under section 5 of the same Ordinance to Companies to keep their registers of members at their head offices instead of at their registered offices in this Colony was 14.

The fees collected in respect of such authorizations amounted to $32.

10. FEES AND COMMISSIONS.

The total sums collected during the year by way of Fees and Com- missions amounted to $45,861 as against $46,592 in the previous year.

11. STAFF.

Mr. Arathoon Seth, 1.5.0., Registrar, retired on pension on 30th October and was succeeded by Mr. Joseph Horsford Kemp, Head of the Sanitary Department, who, previous to his appointment, acted as Registrar from 30th June to 29th October.

Mr. John Roskruge Wood, Deputy Registrar & Appraiser, was promoted to Second Police Magistrate on 30th June and Mr. Charles Alexander Dick Melbourne was appointed to succeed him.

Mr. James Dyer Ball, 1.8.0., Chief Interpreter, retired on pension on 25th January and was succeeded by Mr. Nicholas George Nolan, First Interpreter, Magistracy.

Mr. Li Hong Mi, Second Interpreter, retired on pension on 1st February, and Mr. Wong Kwong Tin, Second Interpreter in the Regis- trar General's Office, succeeded him on the 9th June.

Mr. Mackie, Third Interpreter, was transferred to the Magistracy on the 15th June to be First Interpreter there, but returned to this Department on 6th October. In the meantime Mr. Ng Yuk Shu, Clerk in the Police Office, performed the duties of Third Interpreter in this Department.

a

Mr. Wong Kwok U, Clerk and Translator, resigned on 30th October and Mr. Wong Kwong Tin, Second Interpreter, was appointed to do his work until the appointment of a successor, Mr. Mackie doing the work of the Second Interpreter and Mr. Ng Yuk Shu that of the Third Interpreter.

;

F 5

Mr. Leung Tsau, 4th Grade Clerk and Shroff, retired on pension on account of ill health on 1st May and was succeeded by Mr. Wong Kin Wo, 5th Grade Librarian in this Department, who was succeeded by Mr. Wong Po Keung, a Clerk in the Post Office.

Mr. Wong Po Fuk, Temporary 4th Grade Clerk, resigned on 30th November and Mr. Wong Po Ki was appointed in his place.

Mr. Wong Po Keung, 5th Grade Librarian, resigned on 31st October and was succeeded by Mr. Wong Yui Sham, 6th Grade Usher and Process Server, Magistracy.

19th March, 1910.

J. H. KEMP,

Registrar.

}

*

Table I.

Table showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.

(FROM 1900 To 1909.)

Total No.

Expenditure.

Revenue.

Percentage

Year.

of Cases

dealt

with.

Total.

Increase. Decrease.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

of Revenue

to Ex-

penditure.

$

$

$

..

c.

$ C.

%

1900,

646

1901,

1902,

1903,

968

1904,

1,038

57,091.55 4,948.44 764 62,179.09 5,087.54 1,070 | 70,617.65 8,438.56 75,544,52 4,926.87 58,681.03

40,234.91

3,172.96

70.47

...

39,904.72

330.19

64.17

30,275.42

9,629.30

42.87

41,758.83

1,483.41

55.27

16,863.49 49,108.37

7,349.54

83.68

1905,

1,166 66,711.72 8,030.69

61,984.69 12,876.32

92.91

1906,

1,039 69,667.23

2,955.51

52,904.11

9,080.58

75.93

1907,

1,031 69,592.75

74.48

56,156.78 3,252.67

80.69

1908,

1,014 87,270.40

17,677.65

46,592.80

9,563.98

53.38

1909,

1,030 89,555.52 2,285.12

45,861.55

731.25

51.21

- F 6-

A

}

APPENDIX G.

REPORT ON THE POLICE MAGISTRATES COURTS.

Mr. H. H. J. GOMPERTZ acted as and drew half pay of Puisne Judge and half pay as First Police Magistrate from 1st January to 20th March: he was appointed Puisne Judge on 21st March. Mr. J. H. Kemp acted as First Police Magistrate from 1st January to 29th June and drew half pay of First Police Magistrate and half pay as Head of the Sanitary Department from 1st January to 22nd June. Mr. F. A. Hazeland was on leave from 1st January to 26th March and resumed duty as Second Police Magistrate on 27th March: he was appointed First Police Magistrate on 21st March but did not sit as First Police Magistrate until 30th June: he drew half pay of 1st Police Magistrate from 21st March to 26th March while on leave and full pay from 27th March: he acted as Attorney General from the 27th October to 31st December. Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as First Police Magistrate from the 28th October to 31st December. Mr. J. R. Wood acted as Second Police Magistrate from 1st January to 28th March and drew half pay of Second Police Magistrate and half pay as Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, Supreme Court, from 1st January to 20th March: he was appointed Second Police Magis- trate on 21st March but did not sit as Second Police Magistrate till 30th June: he drew Second Police Magistrate's pay from date of appointment. Mr. C. A. D. Melbourne acted as and drew half pay of Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, Supreme Court, and half pay as First Clerk from 1st January to 27th March: he acted as Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, Supreme Court, from 30th June to 20th September in addition to his own duties and was transferred to Supreme Court on 21st September as Deputy Registrar and Appraiser. Mr. C. F. W. Bowen-Rowlands acted as and drew half pay of First Clerk and half pay as Principal Clerk, Sanitary Department, from 1st January to 27th March. Mr. G. A. Woodcock. was appointed First Clerk on 21st September.

21st February, 1910.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Police Magistrate.

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Magistracy

for the years 1900 to 1909.

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE.

YEAR.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

S

$

3

C.

Total

Number

of Cases

tried.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

/%

- G 2 -

1900

20,914.59

438.99

71,884.61

31,159.57

14,081

29.11

1901

23,794.23

1902

29,050.62

2 879.61

5,256,39

68.764.55

3,070.06

14,531

34.60

96,723.26

27,958.71

16,070

30.03

1903

38,046.30

8,995.68

71,310.77

...

25,412.49

14,268

53.35

1904

38,486.48

440.18

95,405.12

24,094.35

14,505

40.34

1905

35,762.86

2,723.62

88,145:26

7,259.86

13,450

40.57

1906

39,303.16

3,540.30

79,557,64

8,587.62

13,871

49.40

1907

40,455,52

1,152.36

67,133.26

12,424.88

13,414

60.26

1908

46,018.18

5,562.66

68,696.43

1,563.17

10,555

66.98

1909

40,119.69

5,898.49

69,986.42

1,289.99

10,771

57.32

1

Appendix G 1.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER.

1.-REGISTRATION.

During the year one thousand four hundred and fifty-four (1,454) Deeds and Documents were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 affecting two thousand five hundred and ninety-two (2,592) lots of land particulars of which are shown in Table I.

2.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The total area of land sold and granted on Lease during the year was 284 acres 3 roods 03 poles of which 200 acres 1 rood 21 poles was in respect of lands dealt with by the District Offices. The total area resumed was 210 acres 2 roods 37 poles leaving 74 acres O rood 3 poles additional land granted during the year. Particulars

of the Grants are shown on pages W 2 and W 3 of the Blue Book for 1909.

3. GRANTS OF LEASES.

The number of Crown Leases granted during the year was 45 particulars of which are specified in Table II.

4.-FEES.

The total amount of fees collected by Stamps during the year amounted to $25,863.75 being $1,205 less than the previous year.

The amount of fees collected under the different headings for the years 1900 to 1909 is shown in Table III.

5.-CROWN RENT ROLL.

The total Crown Rent due in respect of leased lands in Hongkong and Kowloon (excluding certain Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon entered in the Village Rent Roll) amounted for the year ending 25th December to $417,172.63, an increase of $11,451.90 on the previous year and the total amount due in respect of leased lands in the Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon appearing in the Village Rent Roll for the year ending 30th September was $2,517.03, a decrease of $36.80 due to certain resumptions for public purposes.

The total number of Lots of Crown Land as appearing in the Rent Rolls with the total rents appears in Table IV.

6.-NAVAL AND MILITARY LANDS.

During the year the formal documents transferring Victoria Battery, Stonecutters' Island, Gun Club Hill, Kowloon, Central Block, Kowloon, and land at Crown Point in the New Territories to the War Department under arrangements already agreed upon were completed as were also the transfer from the War Department to the Colonial Government of areas of land at King's Park, Kowloon, the Time Ball Station, Mount Cochrane, Garden Lots 21, 48, 49 and 50, the Kowloon Dock Battery and Position Finder Station and also a small piece of land in Queen's Road formerly part of the Military Cantonment.

G1 2

}

7.-NEW TERRITORIES.

The sanction of the Secretary of State was obtained during the year to dispense with the practice hitherto in force of holding an auction for every small piece of Crown Land granted on a longer lease than 5 years in the case of building lots not exceeding 1,000 sq. ft. or agricultural lots not exceeding of an acre when the Land Officer certifies that there is no probability of any competition and that the applicant is the only person interested and that the land is required for bonâ fide Chinese occupation and there is no probability of much development in the neighbourhood. By this means a con- siderable saving of expense has been effected in advertisements.

Rules requiring the registration of graves have been made by which it is hoped the many disputes regarding graves and grave sites may be lessened.

The system of issuing annual or 5 years leases of waste lands for agricultural purposes at double the usual Crown Rent to persons who were unable or unwilling to pay a premium and take up the ground on long leases, which was sanctioned at the end of 1908, has been much appreciated. Many such leases in which suitable pro- vision is made for the compensation of tenants in the event of their leases being determined have already been applied for and granted.

Owing to the difficulty of access to the portion of the Northern District known as the Hang Hau Peninsula in Junk Bay from the District Office at Tai Po, it was decided to transfer this area to the Southern District Office at Hongkong and the necessary transfer has now been carried out.

The provisions of the Foreshores and Sea Bed Ordinance, 1901, necessitating advertisements in the Gazette of every small plot of foreshore in the New Territories having been found to hamper sales of land owing to the cost of advertisement frequently exceeding the purchase money of the land, Ordinance 41 of 1909 was passed exempting lands in the New Territories from the provisions of the Ordinance as regards notices of the sale, the provisions of the Ordin- ance regarding posting of notices on the land which alone are likely to be seen by the inhabitants still however continue in force.

In order to shorten notices of sales in the Gazette special condi- tions of sales were drafted to meet all ordinary cases; these conditions are now referred to only by number.

Apart from the portion known as the Southern District Mainland in which district fees for registration are already charged under the Order in Council of 17th August, 1908, it is considered that the time has not yet arrived when the fees for registration can be charged without the disadvantage of preventing registration.

In accordance with the promise made by His Excellency Sir Matthew Nathan not to increase the Crown Rents of lands held by the original leaseholders after the expiration of the first 10 years of the lease a notification was issued in June stating that the Director of Public Works had fixed the rents originally payable as those to be paid during the remainder of the unexpired leases which are mostly for 75 years expiring 30th June, 1973.

·

G1 3

As it was found that it was necessary for the proper working of the Southern Distoict including Lantao and the other Islands that a Land Bailiff should be appointed, Mr. R. H. Craig was temporarily appointed to that post during the year and arrangements made for a permanent Bailiff to be appointed during the ensuing year.

Mr. D. W. Tratman, Assistant Land Officer, was transferred from the Southern District to the Northern District in May in the place of Mr. S. B. C. Ross who was appointed to act as District Officer and Mr. G. N. Orme reverted to his substantive post as Assistant Land Officer for the Southern District. Mr. A. R. Wellington, one of the Land Bailiffs for the Northern District, absconded on 30th June and has not since been heard of. Mr. W. J. Unwin was appointed to succeed him on the 1st August following.

8.-STAFF.

Mr. A. G. M. Fletcher was appointed as Deputy Official Receiver on the 1st January and took up the duties of that post in May. Mr. P. Jacks, Assistant Land Officer, was on vacation leave from 12th June to 12th September.

16th June, 1910.

Table I.

G. H. WAKEMAN, Land Officer.

Particulars of Deeds and Documents registered in the Land Office.

Description of

Documents.

No. Regis- tered.

No. of Lots or portions of Lots affected.

Total Con-

sideration..

$

C.

Assignments,

439

589

6,215,769.07

Mortgages, Transfers of

Mortgages, Reassign-

ments and Satisfactions,

812

1,429

11,011,232.73

Surrrenders,

12

27

Judgments and Orders of

Court,

43

188

Probates and Letters of

Administration,

Miscellaneous Documents,...

8888888

68

169

80

190

Total,.......

1,454

2,592

G1 4

Table II.

Crown Leases granted during the year 1909.

Hongkong.

Kowloon.

New Territories.

Marine.

Inland.

Hill District.

Villages.

Marine.

:

11

Inland.

29

223

Quarries.

Pier.

New Kowloon

Marine.

Inland.

New Kowloon

Tai Po.

Sai Kung.

:

:

Table III.

Fees collected during the 10 years from 1900 to 1909.

Registra- Searches and Grants of

Year.

tion of

Deeds.

Copies of Documents.

Total.

Leases.

C.

$3

$

C.

1900,

12,716.50

1,837.75

1,305.00

15,859.25

1901,

10,258.00

1,742.50

1,895.00

13,895.50

1902,

10,128.00 1,915.25

2,135.00

14,178.25

1903,

*

27,664.00 1,507.00

2,805.00

31,976.00

1904,

30,209.00 2,029.00

2,355.00

34,593.00

1905,

34,161.00

2,567.05

1,220.00

37,948.05

1906,

27,565,00 2,219.30

1,310.00 |

31,094.30

1907,

1908,

21,507,00 2,010.05 23,178.00 1,920.50 1,970.00

1,835.00

25,352,05

27,068.50

1909,

22,325.00

2,268.75

1,270.00

25,863.75

*Scale of fees increased,-Ordinance 36 of 1902.

Total.

45

G1 5

Table IV.

Crown Rent Rolls.

Locality and Description.

Nos.

of

Total Crown Rent.

Lots.

C.

Hongkong, Marine,

259

63,153.14

""

Praya Reclamation to Marine,

178

19,843.00

Inland,.

""

1,433

132,957.13

Quarry Bay, Marine,

3

14,589.00

Inland,

7,231.00

Hongkong, Farm,

42

1,845.80

Garden,

29

"

781.00

""

Rural Building,

111

9,670.84

"

19

Aberdeen, Marine,

Inland,

Apleechow, Marine,

Shaukiwan Bay, Marine,

5

579.16

61

2,106.16

20

150.56

Inland,

20

172.72

10

2,006.00

""

Inland,

Stanley, Inland,

127

2,249.74

4

4.00

Kowloon, Marine,

61

46,292.13

"J

Inland,

Farm,

"

>>

Garden,

781

47,127.38

8

199.37

3

64.00

Hunghom, Marine,.

Inland,

Shek O, Inland, Tai Tam, Inland, Tong Po, Inland,

Lantao, Marine, Quarries,

New Kowloon, Marine,

2

3,862.00

220

6,775.50

1

1.00

1.00

1

1.00

2

1,300.00

24

41,428.00

5

6,020.00

Inland,

26

2,359.00

""

Farm,.....

2

940.00

Rural Building,

1

14.00

Tai Po, Inland,

1

100.00

Sai Kung, Marine,.

Inland,

Ping Chau, Farm,

Mining, .

212

564.00

2

225.00 2,560.00

Total,...

3,454

$ 417,172.63

G1 6

Village Rent Roll.

Nos.

Locality and Description.

of

Total Crown Rent.

Lots.

C.

Wongneichung,

126

81.00

Aberdeen,

29

87.50

Pokfulam,

36

73.03

Taihang,

158

635.50

Ahkungngam,.

26

18.25

Kailungwan,

1

9.80

Sowkiwan,

181

269.00

Taikoktsui,

11

18.00

Mong Kok,

53

112.50

Hok Un,

105

304.50

To Kwa Wan,

190

331.00

Shek Shan,...

31

69.00

Sun Shan,

19

59.50

Ma Tau Kok..........

32

46.50

Mati,.

5.50

Ho Mun Tin,

Ma Tan Chung,

9

37.50

58

138.50

Ma Tau Wai,

127

220.50

Total,..

1,194

$ 2,517.08

ř

A

2

Appendix H.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES.

A.-NORTHERN DISTRICT.

1.-ADMINISTRATION.

Certain changes were made during the year in the administra- tion of the district.

Formerly the district was administered by a Police Magistrate who was also an Assistant Superintendent of Police and by an Assistant Land Officer. The Magistrate had no power to hear land cases and the Assistant Land Officer had no power to sit as Magis- trate. The collection of rent was supervised by the Police Magistrate.

In 1907 the offices of Police Magistrate, Assistant Superintendent of Police and Collector were amalgamated under the title of District Officer but no separate department was created and the District Officer had still no power to hear land cases. The District Officer was subordinate to the Captain Superintendent of Police and the Treasurer while the Assistant Land Officer was subordinate to the Land Officer.

Early in 1909 the Assistant Land Officer was given the title of Assistant District Officer and was made subordinate to the District Officer and at the beginning of 1910 a new department was created under the title of District Office. The District Officer and the Assistant District Officer have equal powers in all cases. They are both Assistant Superintendents of Police and as such subordinate to the Captain Superintendent of Police. A certain continuity of policy is thus attained which was not possible under the old system.

During the year 1909 Mr. Hallifax, the Distrist Officer, acted from February 1st to March 23rd. I acted as District Officer for the remainder of the year. Mr. Tratman acted as Assistant District Officer from May 15th to December 31st.

2. POLICE.

At the end of the year the force stationed in the district con- sisted of 8 Europeans, 60 Indians and 24 Chinese. The waters of the district are patrolled by No. 2 Launch with a crew of 2 Europeans and 15 Chinese. There were also 15 Indians quartered in the district during the year for railway purposes. A reduction of the European force was made on September 1st, by the withdrawal of the Sergeant from Au Tau Station. This station is now visited by the Ping Shan and San Tin Sergeants and is for purposes of discipline under San Tin.

ག་

1

H 2

3. REVENUE.

I have set forth in Table I, under the various heads, the sums collected as revenue. The total collection at Tai Po amounted to $97,928.20. But in order to arrive at the real revenue from the district the fees collected by the water police for licences of various descriptions under the Merchant Shipping Ordinance must be added. These fees are paid to the Harbour Office. During 1909 they amounted to $5,377.80. The gross revenue in cash is therefore $103,306.00. Something should moreover be credited to the district on behalf of the opium monopoly.

The annual sales of opium within the Territory appear to amount to something like $57,800.00.

The

No difficulty was experienced in collectiug the revenue. rent collection began on the 1st July and the collection was completed in two months. During the month of July alone $55,396.81 was collected. In the Sha Tin District the entire sum due was collected without the issue of any summons or warrant. This is the first time that anything of the sort has happened.

4. MAGISTRACY.

The following Table shews the number of cases heard by the Police Magistrate :-

Cases heard,

Fines imposed,

Persons imprisoned,

Warrants issued,

Opium fines paid to Farin,

1908.

1909.

481 $1,442.15

382

$1,947.27

177

116

374

300

$766.63

$476.80

During the year 274 licences to carry arms were issued and 341 miscellaneous permits. These permits are issued without fee and are for the most part permits to repair houses but they include a large variety of subjects, viz., permission to hold unicorn dances, to erect altars, to rebuild bridges, to repair roads and to hold theatrical per- formances.

5. LAND OFFICE.

In the Land Office 2,544 deeds relating to dealings in land were registered. The Land Ordinance came into force on July 7th, 1905. The following Table will shew the number of deeds which have been registered since that date:-

No. of deeds registered.

1905,

- 1,794.

1906,

- 1,407.

1907,

- 2,160.

1908,

- 2,384.

1909,

- 2,544.

H 3

This gives a total of 10,289 deeds registered since the Ordinance came into operation.

During the year 179 auctions of land were held and 147 58 acres were sold. The figures for 1908 were 173 anctions and 4:12 The difference in area is accounted for by two large lots which were sold in the neighbourhood of Castle Peak,

acres.

A system of grave registration came na. force during the year. Quarrels relating to graves have given

many cases it was found impossible to come decision. By the time that a grave case came b ton feelings on both sides had become so embittered that alles was false.

54

and in at sfactory

art the

Ph

Owners of graves can now register themselves and ohtam a certificate to the effect that at the date of registration they were the persons entitled to conduct the worship at the grave. It is hoped that this system of registration will make it possible to arrive at some decision when conflicting claims as to the right of worship are made.

6-PUBLIC WORKS.

The section of the Castle Peak-Sha Tau Kok road from Castle Peak to Ping Shan was completed. The land required for the extension of this section to Un Long was resumed and work was commenced on this section.

7.-CROPS, ETC.

The two rice crops were good in all districts but somewhat late owing to lack of rain. The pineapple crop in the Tsun Wan district was good and pines were sold for from $1.80 to $2.00 a picul as against $1.20 in 1908. The laichi crop around Fan Ling was for some reason a complete failure.

There was large reduction in the number of railway coolies towards the end of the year. The majority of these men came from the Kwai Shin district and in spite of the fact that there were some 3,000 on the various railway works no disturbance of any sort took place.

The general prosperity of the Territory is proved I think by the case and rapidity with which the collections are made, by the fact that the old type of mud house has been practically abandoned and that a much better type of houses is being constructed throughout the district and by the number of theatrical performances, unicoru and pi yau dances which were held during the year.

S. B. C. Ross,

12th April, 1910.

District Officer.

}

H 4-

Table I.

Revenue collected in the Northern District, New Territories.

1908.

1909.

Crown Rent,

80,095.47

79,752.82 (1)

Kerosene,

230.00

226.00

Distillery,

2,873.97

2,759.86

Wine and Spirits,

3,861.53

3.912.67

House Rent Clerks),

-

150.00

}

Water Wheels,

46.00

44.00

Ferries,

13.50

13.50

Oyster Beds,

70.00

140.50 (2)

Distress Warrants,

10.00

21.00

Matsheds,

50.75

49.25

Pineapples, -

1,323.80

1,096.71

Land Sales,-

2,013.80

3,044.00

Stone Quarries,

244.00

340.00

Earth Permits,

241.00

155.00

Forestry,

35.00

3,489.67 (3)

Grave Certificates,

61.75

Certified Extracts,

88.00

164.00

Sun Prints,-

65.00

15.00

Miscellaneous Receipts,-

16.20

111.70

Warrants, Rent,

281.00

144.00

Fines, -

1,442.15

1,947.27

$93,001.17

$97,928.20

(1) Crown Rent of Hang Hau and adjacent villages were transferred to the Southern District. $1,647.67 rent was thus transferred.

(2) Oyster Beds leased for 21 years.

(3) Forestry Licences previously collected by the Botanical and Forestry Department.

H 5

B.-SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

1.-REVENUE.

The total revenue collected by the Assistant Land Officer, Southern District, during the year 1909 was $33,978.32 as compared with $28,317.07 in 1908. A Table is attached showing the amounts collected under their different headings. This does not include fees paid direct to the Treasury and other departments, e.g., for Kerosene Licences, Spirit Licences, Licences under the Merchant Shipping Ordinance, etc., and does not therefore represent the real revenue of the District. Increases are shown, as compared with 1908, in the amount collected for Assessed Taxes in New Kowloon and Crown Rent, the latter being due to the transfer of the Hang Hau District from the Northern to the Southern District. The collection of rent from the Stone Quarry at Chü Lap Kok, Lantao Island, and of fees for Forestry Licences was transferred to this department in May, 1909. Fees for the registration of transactions in land have been imposed in New Kowloon since October, 1908. No fees are charged for the Islands or the Hang Hau District.

2.-LAND OFFICE.

In the Land Office 1,022 deeds were registered during the year. The following Table shows the number of deeds registered since 1905-

1905, =

1906, -

1907, -

1908, -

1909, -

681

1,061

714

644

1,022

4,122

The large number registered in 1906 was due to the issue of leases in Cheung Chau Island. The whole of the island was adjudged to belong to the Wong family and it is let out to various tenants on leases renewable every five years. All these leases were registered in 1906.

409 acres of land was sold by public auction and 52 acre by private treaty. The amount realised from these sales was $1,415.00.

During 1909. 205 land cases were heard under the Land Ordin- ance of 1905, 7 writs of execution were issued and one person was imprisoned.

3.-SMALL DEBTS COURT.

Twelve cases were heard under the Small Debts Court Ordin- ance of 1908 and 3 distress warrants were issued.

H 6

4.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The new road from Kowloon City to the top of Shatin Pass was completed during the year. The land required for this road was resumed between December, 1908, and August, 1909, at a total cost of $1,118.49.

5.--CROPS, ETC.

The crops in the District were good and the people generally seem to be prosperous. Crown Rent was collected with greater ease and rapidity than in former years.

6.-STAFF.

Mr. D. W. Tratman acted as Assistant Land Officer till May when Mr. G. N. Orme took up his duties as Assistant Land Officer and acted for the remainder of the year.

HONGKONG, 21st June, 1910.

R. O. HUTCHISON,

Assistant District Officer.

Southern District.

Revenue collected by Assistant Land Officer, Southern District.

1908.

1909.

$

C.

$

c.

Land Sales,

Crown Rent,

1,917.78

1,415.00

20,033.47

21,200.44

Assessed Taxes, -

Lease of Stone Quarries,

Forestry Licences,

Earth Permits, Matshed Permits, Boundary Stones, Sunprint Plans, Writs of Summons, Pineapple Licences,

5,657.51

7,612.88

1,059.67

1,404.38

56.00

66.00

89.00

234.00

57.00

18.00

www

55.00

35.00

27.00

22.00

38.66

30.32

Registration Fees, October, 1908,

169.65

723.35

Building Plans, -

5.00

Warrants of Attachment,

196.00

144.00

Miscellaneous Receipts, Arrears of

Revenue,

10.00

13.28

Sale of Street Index,

5.00

Total,

$28,317.07

$33,978.32

i

!

Appendix I.

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE AND OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE.

A

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,819 as against 9,562 in 1908 being an increase of 257 or 2·68 per cent.

In the division of these cases into Serious and Minor Offences, there appears an increase, as compared with 1908, of 103 cases or 3:17 per cent.. in the former, and of 154 cases, or 243 per cent., in the latter.

The increase, as compared with 1908 in Serious Offences of 103 is shown as follows:-

Increase

Robbery,

11

Assault with intent to rob, Larcenies,

1

273

285

Decrease

Murder,

Burglary or Larceny from dwelling 35

Kidnapping and Protection of

Women and Children,

Unlawful Possession,

Other Felonies,

Net Increase,

33

88

20

182

103

2. Table I shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during 1908 and 1909 and number of person's convicted and discharged in connection with these offences.

1

MURDER.

3. Nine murders were reported to the Police during the year as against 15 in 1908.

In connection with three of these reports no arrest was made. In the remaining six cases arrests were made as follows:-

In one case

1 Discharged

1 Convicted

31

1

"

11007

"

3

""

11

1

MANSLAUGHTER.

4. Three cases were reported to the Police.

case no arrest

In one cas

25

>>

1

"}

and discharged.

1

}}

I 2

MURDER OF POLICE.

5. On the night of the 21st January an armed robbery took place at 43 Kennedy Street in the Yaumati District. Lance-Sergeant Mills, who was on duty at Yaumati Station, hearing police whistles blown, at once ran out into the street where he saw some of the rob- bers running away.

He gave chase, and while in the act of arresting one of the robbers was shot by the latter through the abdomen with a revolver. The murderer was pursued by other police and finally shot by P. C. Hedge, whom he was also attempting to shoot. Sergeant Mills and his assailant were both removed to hospital in a dangerous condition. The latter died soon after admission and the Sergeant succumbed to his injuries at 6.15 a.m. on the 24th. Four other men were arrested, two of whorn were convicted of robbery and sentenced respectively to 7 years and 5 years imprisonment, the other two being discharged.

}

MURDER OF INDIAN POLICE IN THE NEW TERRITORIES.

On the 20th of August Indian Lance-Sergeant 627 Karm Deen and I. P. C. 877 Nawab Khan left Au Tau Station at 7 a.m. in charge of money (Crown Rent) to escort to Tai Po. The constables arrived at Tai Po Gap at about 8.45 a.m. when they were suddenly attacked from both sides of the road by 6 men armed with choppers and other weapons.

The Indian Sergeant was killed on the spot, the constable was found about 200 yards from the road down the hillside. He survived about one hour and was able to give an account of the crime. Three men were arrested in September and one in October. One was convicted of murder and hanged, the others being discharged. A fifth man was arrested in Chinese Territory where at the close of the year he was still awaiting his trial for the crime.

GANG ROBBERIES.

6. Thirty-six gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 26 in 1908.

In 17 cases no arrest was made, in the remaining 19 cases arrests were made as follows:-

In one case

رو

""

1 Discharged.

Ι

3 Convicted

1

1

">

1

2

J

>>

>>

1

1

"

>>

1

>>

,

2

2

31

""

5

""

""

"

">

2)

1

""

>>

2

""

1

""

""

""

>>

>>

AAA

A CO 50

1

1

>>

31

1

3

>>

23

33

I 3

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

7. Seventeen street and highway robberies were reported during the year as against 15 in 1908.

In connection with 11 of these no arrest was made, in the re- maining 6 cases arrests were made as follows:-

In one case,

99

1 Discharged.

1

2 Convicted.

2

1

One case undecided.

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND JUNKS.

8. Nine cases were reported to the Police during the year as against ten in 1908. In connection with 5 cases no arrest was made.

In the remaining 4 cases arrests were made as follows:-

-----

In one case,

2 Convicted.

1

1 Discharged.

1

OTHER FELONIES.

9. Under this heading are comprised the following:-

Arson and attempted arson, - Malicious damage to property

1909. 1908.

3

1

1

Cutting and wounding, -

13

9

Demanding money by menaces,

3

5

Embezzlement,

26

30

Forgery,

28

11

Housebreaking,

108

151

Murder,

15

Manslaughter,

Indecent assault and rape,

Shooting with intent to murder,

Wounding with intent to do grievous

bodily harm,

Abominable offences,

Throwing corrosive fluid,

Total,

1

1

10101

1001

5

2

206

232

GAMBLING.

10. One hundred and fifty-three gambling warrants were executed and convictions obtained as against 132 in 1908.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

11. The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $210,160.42 as against $199,211.10 in 1908.

1

I 4

The value of property recovered by the Police and restored to owners was $21,953.31 as against $20,711.19 in 1908.

LOST PROPERTY.

12. The following is a return showing property lost or recovered.

Year.

Articles reported Value lost.

lost.

Articles recovered and articles found which were not reported lost.

Value

found.

1909

292

$13,338.90

83

1908

309

19,043,26

115

$1,612.60

6,898.58

OPIUM WARRANTS.

13. One thousand six hundred and eighty-six (1,686) Search Warrants for prepared opium were executed by the Police and Excise Officers of the Opium Farnier, as compared with 1,821 in 1908. In 177 cases opium was found and 640 persons were arrested as against 672 in 1908.

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

14. The Examiner of Weights and Measures made the following verifications:-

European Scales,

Chinese Scales,

Yard Measures,

Chek Measures,

Examined. Correct. Incorrect.

237

227

2,356

2,319

25

10

37

138

138

384

381

3

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance :

No. of Cases.

50

Convictions.'

50

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

Total amount of

Fines.

$2,150.

15. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Danger- ous Goods Ordinance :-

No. of Cases.

9

Convictions.

9

Total amount of Fines.

$865

I 5

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

16. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance :-

No. of Cases.

5

Convictions.

5

Total amount of Fines.

$285

Samples collected and sent to the Government Analyst were as follows:-

Ale.

6

Whisky.

12

Brandy.

All these samples were certified to be genuine with the exception of five samples of brandy.

MENDICANTS.

17. Sixty-nine beggars were dealt with by the Magistrate and one sent to Tung Wah Hospital. 130 were sent to Canton as follows :--

How often sent away.

Once, Twice,

Thrice,

Total,

!

Canton.

119

10

1

130

DEAD BODIES.

18. Table II shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year.

LICENCES.

19. The following licences were issued during 1909 :----

1,100 Hongkong Jinrickshas.

50 Quarry Bay Jinrickshas.

345 Kowloon Jinrickshas.

24 Private Vehicles (16 Carriages, 3 Hearses and 5 Motor

Cars).

1,155 Truck Licences.

605 Hongkong Chairs.

60 Hill District Chairs.

13,772 Drivers and Bearers.

I 6

From the 7th July when the issuing of certain licences was transferred to this Department, the following were issued :-

2 Auctioneers' Licences.

7 Billiard Tables.

1 To store Calcium Carbide.

1 To deal wholesale in Cocaine and its Salts.

1 To store Detonators.

3 Distillery (New Territories).

12 To store Dymanite.

9 To store Ether and Alcoholic Liquids. 138 Game Licences.

1 Gunpowder (Storage).

5 Kerosine Storage (in Godowns).

439

4

16 Marine Stores.

(Ordinary). (New Territories).

5 To store Naphtha and Benzine.

1 To store Nitrobenzene or Oil of Mirbane. 18 Pawnbrokers' Licences.

2 To store Petroleum in Bulk.

1 To store Phosphorus.

3 To store Rockets.

8 Spirits (Chinese, New Territories).

14 To store Sulphuric Acid and Nitric Acid.

DOG ORDINANCE.

20. 1,702 Dogs were licensed during 1909.

85 Watch dogs were licensed free of charge.

49 Dogs were destroyed.

122 Stray dogs were impounded and restored to owners or

ransomed.

ARMS ORDINANCE.

21. Four licences to import and deal in arms and two to deal in sporting arms and ammunition were issued during 1909. During the whole year a Proclamation has been in force prohibiting the ex- port of warlike stores from the Colony. The following arms and ammunition were confiscated during the year, riz. :—

68

Eight rifles, 26 revolvers, 16 muskets, 13 knives and daggers, 83 lb. dynamite, 1 sporting gun,. 8,313 rounds rifle and revolver ammunition, 194 rounds sporting ammunition, 9 boxes detonators, 43 boxes caps, 12 boxes primers, 58 lb. gunpowder, 100 empty shells, a small quantity of fuse, 2 sets refilling tools, 1 rifle barrel, and 3 fighting irons.

EDUCATION.

22. During the year 6 Europeans and 177 Indians obtained certificates for knowledge of Chinese and 54 Indians obtained certi- ficates for English.

V

I 7

MUSKETRY.

23. The Europeans and Indians were put through the usual course of Musketry, 32 Europeans and 55 Indians qualified as marksmen.

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

24. 190 persons were identified as having previous convictions against them. This number is 32 more than during the year 1908. 109 identifications were those of criminals who had returned from banishment; 8 were on record as having paid fines in lieu of going to gaol.

CONDUCT.

25. The conduct of the European contingent (average strength 122) was good. The total number of reports against them was 55 as against 37 in 1908. There were 8 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 6 in 1908; 4 for sleeping on duty as against 2, 1 for disorderly conduct and 9 for neglect of duty.

The conduct of the Indian contingent (average strength 380) was on the whole good. There were 335 reports as against 401 for the preceding year. For drunkenness there were 29 as against 38, for disorderly conduct 24, as against 30, for neglect of duty 37 as against 33, for absence from duty 48 as against 38, for gossiping and idling on duty 67 as against 77, and sleeping on duty 31 as against 24. 208 men had no report. Seven Indian constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (4 dismissed from the Force):-5 for assault, 1 for misconduct and 1 for larceny.

The behaviour of the Chinese contingent (average strength 328) was good. There were altogether 896 reports as against 1,044 in 1908. There were two reports for drunkenness (same as last year), 134 for sleeping on duty as against 112, 12 for disorderly conduct as against 17, and 263 for minor offences as against 374. Twelve constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (10 dismissed) for the following offences-6 for assault, 1 for desertion, 1 for being watchinan in a common gambling house, 1 for assault and attempting to obtain a bribe, 1 for unlawful possession of prepared opium, 1 for keeping a common gambling house and 1 for aiding and abetting a man to carry a letter into Victoria Gaol.

142 men of this contingent were not reported during the year.

The seamen, coxswains, engineers and stokers (average strength 114) had 213 reports as compared with 215 for last year. For drunkenness there was no report (same as last year), and 100 for absence from station and late for duty as against 106 in the previous year.

Two seamen were convicted by the Police Magistrate (both dismissed), one for larceny and one for desertion.

53 had no report recorded against them.

POLICE LAUNCHES AND BOATS.

26. The outer waters of the Colony were, on the recommendation of the Retrenchment Committee, patrolled by two launches, one of which is stationed at Tai Po, instead of three, from the 17th June. Each has a crew consisting of 1 European Sergeant, 1 European Constable, 2 coxswains, 2 engineers, 2 stokers, 1 boatswain and

- I 8

8 seamen. The third patrol launch (without crew) is kept in reserve for use when either of the above is under repairs.

The harbour is patrolled by two small launches and two pinnaces (not all on duty at once) manned by 8 European Police, 8 coxswains, 8 engineers, 8 stokers and 16 seamen; and two rowing boats each manned by 1 European and 4 seamen. There is also one spare boat in reserve.

REWARDS.

27. One European Sergeant was commended by His Excellency the Governor for his services in the Sha Tau Kok murder case, and one European Constable was granted a medal for plucky conduct in connection with the case of robbery and murder at Yaumati.

One Indian Sergeant was granted a reward for the smart capture of a burglar and one Indian Constable for smart and plucky conduct in in arresting a burglar with stolen property.

One Chinese Constable was granted a medal for zeal and activity displayed in connection with the capture in Chinese Territory of the men who committed a murder at Sha Tau Kok, and two Chinese Constables were granted rewards for plucky conduct, zeal and activity shown in the discharge of their duties.

HEALTH.

28. Admissions to Hospital during the last three years were as follows:-

NATION-

ALITY.

1909.

1907.

1908.

Strength.

Ad- mission.

Strength.

Ad- mission.

Strength. mission.

Ad-

Europeans,...

135

132

135

97

132

72

Indians,.

410

427

410

394

411

371

Chinese,

503

187

501

136

511

136

Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever from 1st January to 31st December, 1909:-

NATIONALITY.

OLD TERRITORIES.

NEW TERRITORIES.

Strength. Treated. Strength. Treated.

Europeans,

119

4

13

1

j

Indians,..

297

60

114

23

Chinese,

465

18

46

1

۲

I 9

In addition to cases treated in hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever, the cases treated for Fever in the various stations in the New Territories without being removed to hospital were:----

Europeans 4, Indians 55 and Chinese 7.

EXECUTIVE STAFF.

29. The Deputy Superintendent (Captain F. W. Lyons) returned from leave on 21st October. Mr. G. N. Orme acted during his absence. The District Officer (Mr. E. R. Hallifax) left for England on leave on 24th March and returned on 27th October. Mr. S. B. C. Ross acted during his absence. The Assistant Superintendent (Mr. P.P.J. Wodehouse) returned from leave on 12th May. Mr. T. H. King acted during his absence.

POLICE FORCE.

30. Thirteen Europeans were engaged during the year, two were recruited from England and eleven enlisted locally. Table III shows changes in the personnel of the Force during the year, and Table IV the strength, expenditure and revenue for the past ten years.

NEW TERRITORIES.

31. The District Officer for the New Territories reported as follows:-

"The strength of the Police in the Northern District was until September :-

9 Europeans, 60 Indians and 24 Chinese.

During September the Force was reduced by one European owing to the withdrawal of the Sergeant from Au Tau.

The waters of the District are patrolled by No. 2 Launch with a force of 2 Europeans and 15 Chinese.

15 Indian Police are stationed in the District for railway duty. The total Police Force in the Territory at the end of the year was therefore 124 men.

The health of the Force was only fairly good. Forty-six cases were admitted to hospital and in twenty-five of these cases the cause was Malaria. Over fifty cases of fever were treated in station and one death from Malaria occurred at Sheung Shui. The staff at Tai Po suffered from fever throughout the year.

Twelve armed robberies and three murders were reported.

At the end of the year there was a great reduction in the num- ber of railway coolies owing to approaching completion of the works. No statistics are available as to the number of strange coolies who found employment in the Terrritory but the number can hardly have been less than 5,000. These coolies caused very little trouble to the Police though they kept the Small Debts Court busy."

F. J. BADELEY, Capt. Supt. of Police.

25th April, 1910.

I 10

ANNEXE A.

Report on the Police School.

POLICE SCHOOL, VICTORIA, HONGKONG, 7th February, 1910.

SIR, I have the honour to submit to you the Report on the Police School for the year ending 31st December, 1909.

2. The following changes took place among the staff :-----

(a) 11th May, 1909. Mr. Birbeck went on six months leave. Mr. Sutherland of Queen's College acted during his absence.

(b) Mr. S. Baboo retired on pension 20th September, 1909, his place being filled by Mr. Golam Kadir on pro- bation.

(e) 16th November, 1909.

Mr. Birbeck resumed duty.

(d) 29th November, 1909. I. P. C. Mohander Singh went

on six months leave, I. P. C. Badam Singh acting.

3. Exanimations for European, Indian and Chinese Police took place in June and November, out of 40 men who presented them- selves for examination, 24 succeeded in gaining the necessary certificates of exemption, as follows:-

European,

Indian, Gaol Staff, Chinese,

6

14

3

4. Total of men on roll:-

European,

Gaol Staff,

Indian,

Chinese,

5. Total attendances :-

Central Station,

No. 8 Station,

Total,

24

10

- 169

38 - 195

1

Total, 412

5,912 816

Total, 6,728

School was open on 93 days during the year.

Average attendance 72. Largest attendance on any one day (18th March, 1909), 93.

6. The average attendance is better than in 1908; in that year it was 71 while the total of units on roll was 491 as against 412 in 1909.

To the Honourable,

I have, &c..

ARTHUR W. GRANT, B.A. (Cantab.),

Master-in-charge.

The Captain Superintendent of Police.

1

1908.

Robbery with Violence and Assault with

intent to rob.

}

I 11

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1908 AND 1909.

Burglaries,

Larcenies and Larcenies in Dwelling

Other

Assaults and Disorderly

Gambling.

Kidnapping.

Felonies.

Women

and Grils

Protection

Unlawful Drunken-

Nuis-

Possession. ness.

ances.

Miscellaneous. †

Conduct.

Ordinance.

Ilouses.

1

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

7

7

Q

2

:

:

:

Co

9 9

35

888

69

103

48

:

...

:

:

Chinese,

56* 21

113

15

2,414 898

230 115

828 1,241

...

Total,

56

21

113 15

2,430 1914

232 117

932 1,392

1909.

:

:

:

...

:..

...

...

...

...

:

...

:

302 2,234

302 |2,234

...

17

14

17 14

...

Cases.

Convicted.

Cases.

Convicted.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

:

:

:

:

:

:

41

41

1

1

43

:

:

3333

48

14

14 9

9

19

22

97

86

97 86

888

297 254

14

14 742 742 4,203 4,818

|

297 254

69

69 752 7524,2654,888

:

:

:

Total of

all Cases.

163

86

9,313

9,562

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

:

1

1

:

:

:

:

1166

4

Co

388

£5

15

2

1

:

34 34

4

4

30

31

8

173

...

18

6 14 4

2

4 30

31

3

:

:

...

:

:

:.

1

1

8

8

1

1

19

45

1

81

:

Chinese,

67

44

19 131

20

Total,

68 45

19 131

20

0162,621 854 346 198 162,650 866 366 206

62

815

42 828 1,203 199 3142,303 104

19

15

14

60 51

14 208 190

54 6 6 873 873

|

4,239 4,903 525

9,565

49 946 1,319 217 3142,303 104 104

19 15

14

62

52

15 209 190

55

48

48 878 878

4,288 | 4,979 534

9,819

* 1 Robbery case 1 prisoner undecided (Chinese).

† 1 case undecided with one prisoner (Chinese).

1

VICTORIA.

KOWLOON.

I 12

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1909.

1 year and under 5 years.

years and under

15 years.

15 years Under and

one

over. month.

1 month

Under

one month.

and under

1 year and

5 years

and

¡one

years.

under five

15 years.

under

15 years and over.

Under

one

month.

1 month and under 1 year.

year,

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

| sex junk.

sex

m. f. m. f.

f. m

f. m.

નં

unk.

sex

unk.

m.

2

Co

9

10

21

42

3

6

6

11

HARBOUR.

1 month

and under

1 year under 5 years.

and

5 years and

15 years and

Under one

under

over.

1 year.

15 years.

ELSEWHERE.

month.

1 month and under

1 year.

1 year and under

5 years.

15 y

f.

sex unk..

m.

f.

m. f.

H

f.

sex

lunk.!

m. f. m. f.

sex

m. f. m. f.

Sex

sex

junk.

m.

f.

m. f.

junk.

m. f.

junk.

18

15

10

8

48 3 2 2

6

3

*

3

со

10

34 10

2

4 8 17

12

Males,.....

Females,.

261

114

Unknown,

381

years

and

15 years

and

under

over,

5 years.

m. f. m. f.

Total.

10

5

3 35 2

381

"

I 13

Table III.

Return showing the Establishment, Enlistments and

C'asualties in the Police Force 1909.

Nationality.

Establishment of the Force.

Enlistment.

Deaths.

Resignation

through

sickness.

Resignation through expiry of

terms of service

or otherwise.

Dismissal or

Desertion.

Total number of Casualties.

Europeans,. 132

Indians,.

411

Chinese,..... 511

108

2888

12

1

38

aag

200

9

12

9

20

37

40

51

: 104

Total,..... 1,054, 158 12

10

58

73

153

This number includes the Police paid for by other Departments and Private Firms and also the Engineers, Coxswains and Stokers, but it is exclusive of :-

1 Captain Superintendent.

1 Deputy Superintendent.

1 District Officer.

I Assistant Superintendent.

I Probationer.

1 Accountant.

1 Clerk and Hindustani Interpreter.

4 Clerks.

6 Telephone Clerks.

81 Coolies.

Strength on 31st December, 1909-

128 Europeans (4 short of establishment).

411 Indians.

511 Chinese.

Total, 1,050

NOTE.-3 Europeans, 46 Indians and 13 Chinese are paid for by other Departments and 6 Indians and 17 Chinese by Private Firms.

I 14

Table IV.

Year.

Table showing the total Strength, Expenditure and Revenue of the Police and Fire Brigade Departments for the years 1900 to 1909.

Total Strength.

Revenue Collected by

Expenditure.

the Police

Police

Fire

Police

Fire

Force.

Force. Brigade.

Force.

Brigade.

$

$

$

1900...

929

96

1901...

920

96

1902...

919

1903...

921

1904...

993

1905... 1,018

1906...

1,047

1907...

1,048

1908.

1,046

1909... 1,054

2856566885

393,485

18,240

90,028

380,787

18.592

97,343

97

392,248

25,992

118,160

97

512,860

25,167

141,491

97

506,008

27,428

133,597

97

509,298

28,956

130,873

97

515,874

25,499

134,212

96

522,406

46,250

138,417

96

556,607

31,172

124,288

97

564,835

72,227*

125,958

NOTE. No revenue is collected by the Fire Brigade.

* $44,120 was for the New Floating Engine.

4

+

1

1

I 15

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF

THE FIRE BRIGADE.

There were 31 Fires and 63 Incipient Fires during the year as against 31 and 59 in 1908. Details are given in Table I.

The estimated damage caused by Fires was $548,838.00 and by Incipient Fires $1,497.00 as against $198,219.00 and $1,025.80 in 1908.

The Brigade turned out 47 times during the year.

2. There was a constant supply of water in the fire mains through- out the year.

3. Three Fires occurred in the harbour during the year.

4. There was no prosecution for arson during the year.

5. There are 34 Despatch Boxes kept in different places in Vic- toria and 12 in Kowloon, 8 different Telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with Central Station in the event of a fire and 16 Fire Alarms.

6. I enclose a copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of Fire Engines (Annexe A).

7. The conduct of the Brigade has been good.

8. The pumps and other machinery for a new floating fire en- gine, furnished by Messrs. Merryweather, were received during the year, and the hull constructed locally was nearing completion at the end of the year under review.

29th March, 1910.

F. J. BADELEY, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

ANNEXE A.

HONGKONG, Sth March, 1910.

SIR,I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on the condition of the Government Fire Engines and gear for the year ending 31st December, 1909.

1

Steamer No. 1.

FLOATING FIRE ENGINE BY SHAND, MASON & Co.

This vessel has been used at Fires and Drills during the The Hull, Machinery and Boiler are all in good order and fit for service at Fires in the Harbour or on the lower levels on shore.

year.

Steamer No. 2.

LAND ENGINE BY SHAND, MASON & Co.

This Engine has been regularly used at Fires and Drills for Drivers. The Machinery and Boiler were overhauled in December and are in good working order.

I 16

Steamer No. 3.

LAND ENGINE BY SHAND, MASON & Co.

This Engine and Boiler were thoroughly overhauled in April. It has been regularly used at Fires and Drills for Drivers and is now in good working order.

Steamer No. 4.

LAND ENGINE BY SHAND, MASON & Co.

This Engine and Boiler have been overhauled as required during the year and are now in good order.

Steamer No. 5.

LAND STEAMER BY SHAND, MASON & Co.

This Boiler was renewed in 1907, it was cleaned and tested in June, and has been regularly used at Drills for Drivers and Fires and is now in good working order.

MANUAL ENGINES AND GEAR.

All the Manual Engines and Gear, Hose, Reels, Ladders and supply carts have been kept in repair and are now in good working order. All the Bamboo Ladders have been replaced by 1st Floor Fire Ladders.

FIRE ALARM.

The Fire Alarm of 12 Points installed last year has worked very satisfactorily and is now in good order.

I have, &c.,

(Sd.) D. MACDONALD,

Engineer, Fire Brigade.

F. J. BADELEY, ESQ.,

Capt. Supt. of Police.

*

L

A

I 17

ANNEXE B.

STRENGTH OF THE FIRE BRIGADE.

Superintendent,

Deputy Superintendent,

Asssistant do.,

Engineer,

Assistant Engineer and Station Officer,

Clerk,

Engine Drivers,

Assistant Engine Drivers,

Fitter,

Blacksmith,

Carpenter,

Stokers,

Sailmaker,

Overseer of Water Works,-

Inspector of Dangerous Goods, Assistant to

Foremen,

-

Assistant Foremen,

do.,

Firemen, -

Interpreters,

;

FLOATING ENGINE

Foreman and Engine Driver,

Engine Driver,

Coxswain, -

Stoker,

Seamen,

Europeans, Chinese.

1

Ι

2

1

1

1

7

1

1

4

22

3

1100

28

1

I

1

2

Total,

46

51

No.

Date.

Time.

Situation.

Table I.

Fires during the Year 1909.

No. of Buildings Destroyed.

amage.

Wholly. Partly

1 Jan. 2nd

O OD TE LO TO 1-

5.45 p.m. House No. 1, Sutherland Street

4th 4.20 a m. 4th 4 30 p.m. 25th | 10.00 a.m 28th 11.45 p.m.

noon.

1.05 p.m.

""

106, Des Voeux Road West A matshed, Reclamation, Hunghom House No. 6, Nam Hong, K'loon City Junk No. 1159, Victoria Harbour.. Cement Works, Hunghom House No. 1, Pottinger Street

Feb. 28th Mar. 20th

8

}}

21st

11.40 p.m.

"}

43, Gough Street.

April 7th

3.00 p.m.

10

11

11

9th

15th

1,00 a.m.

12 May 1st

1.15 a.m.

A matshed at Ma Ti..

House No. 109, Queen's Rd. Central Hunghom Cement Works

:

Cause.

$12,000 | A lighted candle setting fire to a bale of medicine,

Some medical herbs caught fire. ,000 | Carelessly throwing a lighted match 300 | Sparks from a furnace

1.400

matsheds

4.430

300

1

Unknown

Overheating of drying room.

10,000 | Sparks from cook-house fire ignit- ing some papers and candles. 1,500 | Sparks from cook-house fire ignit- ing a quantity of firewood.... 585 | Dropping of a lighted end of a ci- garette amongst the matting.. Explosion of a kerosine lamp. Overheating of the stove drying chambers

matsheds.

2.700

450

5.20a.m.

House No. 130, Des Voeux Road Central

8,000

Unknown

13

4th

"

14

"

29th | 12.45 a.m. 16 June 4th 5.15 p.m.

3.00 a.m.

A matshed at Tai Po Tau

matsheds

4,000

A matshed at Cheung Sha Wan House No. 20, Tsat Tze Mui..

1

matshed

150

>5

Remarks.

- İ 18 —

No.

Date.

Time.

Situation.

Table 1,-Continued.

Fires during the Year 1909,

No. of Buildings Destroyed.

Wholly. Partly

Damage.

Cause.

Remarks.

1 matshed. $ 1,500 | Unknown.

16 June 7th

17

18th

"

5.30 a.m.

4.00 a.m.

18

19

20

21

23

24

26

29

30

31

222228 222 22 2 2 87

25th

*;

5.15 p.m.

July 6th

}}

3.40 a.m. 6th | 12.50 a.m.

"}

31

Aug. 7th

3.45 a.m.

"

21st

28th

"

Tsui,

Oct. 16th 25 Nov. 9th

7.50 p.m.

4.30 a.m.

24th

}}

27 Dec. 4th

3.40 a.m.

8.15 a.m.

28

2nd

"}

A

15th

7.00 a.m.

}}

A matshed at Wong Nei Chung.. On board S.S. "Keet Sang' Victoria Harbour

House No. 428, Des Voeux Road 61, Wing Lok Street.. 21, Tai St., Sham Shiu Po.| 6, Bonham Strand East 3.00 p.m. A matshed at Tai Po Kau,. 1.00 a.m. | House No. 53, Kramer St., Tai Kok

8.25 p.m.

A matshed on Mount Davis.. House No. 360, S'hai St., Mong Kok

Military lines at Whitfield Barracks A hut at Tso Pai Tsui Village, Hung hom District..

mat-hut at Tai Shu Keuk Village, 2 mud-house. Cheung Sha Wan

On board S.S. "Prinz Ludwig" in Victoria Harbour

in

...

70,000

45,000

"

"1

1

21,000

""

33

7

96,688

17

8,000

}}

3matsheds.

700

13

1

10 matsheds.

I

...

3matsheds.

3,000

1,450 Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

6,000

1,000 Oil thrown on a fire to make it burn. Over-heating of paper which was drying over a charcoal fire...

Unknown.

25 huts.

850

16 Wooden & mat-huts.

225,000

2,500 Hot ashes placed near a matshed.

Unknown...

21st 1.55 p.m. 30th 10.20 a.m.

A matshed on Conduit Road. Houses Nos. 1 & 2, Tsat Tsz Mui..

1 matshed

2

250

10,000

}}

Total, $548,838

- I 19

ཡ=

1.

Appendix J.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISON.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for the year 1908 were as follows:--

Convicted by Ordinary Courts,

"

"1

Courts Martial,

,, Capt. Supdt. of Police,

91

Commodore, R.N.,

Supreme Court for China and Corea,

High Court, Weihaiwei,

1909.

4,183

1908.

4,005

10

18

1

Siam, -

3

Debtors,

75

86

On remand or in default of finding

surety,

933

665

Total, -

5,215

4,778

49

"

"}

There was thus an increase of 437 on the total number of admissions as compared with the year 1908. There was a decrease of prisoners convicted for Larceny during the year under review the number being 799 against 845 for the previous year.

2. The number of prisoners admitted to prison for offences not of a criminal nature was 2,957 made up as follows :-

Convicted by Courts Martial, -

*

Debtors,

Commodore, R.N.,

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

Gambling Ordinance,

10

5

75

595

561

,, Market Ordinance, -

421

11

17

""

Arms Ordinance,

21

♦ ។

Vehicle Ordinance,-

59

>>

""

""

Sanitary Byelaws,

73

"

,, Harbour Regulations,

166

11

for Drunkenness,

17

27

35

Cruelty to Animals,

2

1

Trespassing, -

128

J

Disorderly Conduct,

161

22

"7

Vagrancy,

14

23

"}

Contempt of Court,-

1

Assault, -

141

"

"3

Obstruction,

149

24

Cutting Trees,

38

"

>"

Fighting,

Carried forward, -

2,641

J 2

Brought forward,

Convicted for Mendicancy,

under the Post Office Ordinance,

Police Ordinance,

2,641

66

>

for Rogue and Vagabond,

83

under the Women and Girls' Pro-

tection Ordinance,

""

**

""

"

Stowaway Ordinance,

77

25

16

་་

Servants' Quarters Or-

dinance,

16

3

:

11

"

39

3

93

Chinese Wine and Spirit

Ordinance, -

Public Health and Build-

ings Ordinance, Dangerous Goods Or-

dinance,

for Malicious Damage,

under the Prison Ordinance,

8

6

19

14

2

A

9

21

Stamp

Total,-

2.957

3. The above figures show that 69 per cent. of the total admis- sions to prison were for non-criminal offences.

The following Table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine:

WITHOUT

IN DEFAULT OF PAYMENT OF FINE.

OPTION

OF FINE.

Served the imprisonment.

Paid full

fine.

Paid part fine.

TOTAL.

1,361

1,660

615

571

1.207

4. There were 128 juveniles admitted into prison 39 of whom were sentenced to be whipped in addition to various terms of impri- sonment varying from twenty-four hours' detention to eight weeks' imprisonment with hard labour.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 13'6 as compared with 12.0 for 1908.

6. There were 82 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Police Courts in the New Territories against 151 for the previous year.

7. The following Table shows the number of prisoners in cus- tody on the 31st December for the past ten years and the percentage borne by this number to the estimated population of Hongkong.

Year.

Estimated Population.

No. of Convicts.

J 3

Percentage Daily aver- Percentage

to

10

age number Population. of prisoners. Population.

1900

347,689

141

·040

486

•139

1901

385,671

180

*046

199

•129

1902

396,835

215

*054

576

•145

1903

410,642

245

*059

653

•159

1904

446,217

243

*054

726

•162

1905

462,861

216

*046

697

•150

1906

414,049

156

*037

518

•125

1907

414.415

146

⚫035

502

⚫121

1908

420,741

130

*038

165

·110

1909 428,858

180

⚫012

560

•130

8. There were 775 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline being an average of 1.38 per prisoner as compared with 593 with an average of 127 for the preceding year. There were 4 cases in which corporal punishment was inflicted during the year. There were 121 prisoners whipped by order of the Courts.

9. There was one escape but the prisoner was recaptured within a few days by an Assistant Warder.

10. There were 9 deaths from natural causes and 2 executions. 23 prisoners were released on medical grounds.

11. The industrial activity referred to in my last year's report continues and no efforts have been spared in all its branches to secure the attainment of the objects desired, viz., employment for every available long sentence prisoner on useful industrial work.

12. There were 4,185,706 forms printed and issued to the various Government Departments and 19,381 books bound and repaired dur- ring the year under review.

13. To improve the ventilation of the old prison the window areas on the East, South and West sides have been considerably enlarged.

14. During the year under review and especially in the months of April, May and June the Prison was very much overcrowded. For 191 days during the year the daily population of the prisoners confined in the Prison varied between 551 to 639. From 29th April to 25th June a number of prisoners were bedded out in the main corridors, cell accommodation being insufficient. In consequence of the above on the 30th April, 1909, I submitted a scheme for increas- ing the prison accommodation by 78 cells. The scheme involved the demolition of the Old Offices, West portion of the Hospital. Prisoners' Reception Room, etc., the removal and reconstruction of the steps to the Entrance Hall and the Inner Gate; the old materials to be used in the re-erection of these structures on improved lines

/

J 1

the work of demolition and reconstruction being done by prison labour; and the building of a IIall of 78 cells by the Public Works Department. This was approved by the Government and the work was immediately put in hand and is now being rapidly carried out. The scheme when completed will increase the yard area of the prison by 1,669 square feet. The use of the building known as the Belilios Reformatory as a Branch Prison has been discontinued.

15. The sanitary condition of the prison is good.

16. The buildings generally are in good repair.

17. The conduct of the European Officers has as a rule been excellent and that of the Indian Staff on the whole good.

18. The appliances for use in case of fire are in good condition and the water supply adequate.

19. The rules laid down for the government of the Prison have been complied with.

20. Mr. R. H. A. Craig, Assistant Superintendent, returned from leave on the 14th January, 1909, and resumed immediate charge of the Prison.

21. I append the usual returns.

24th February, 1910.

F. J. BADELEY,

Superintendent.

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the Year 1909.

EXPENDITURE.

AMOUNT.

INCOME.

AMOUNT.

C.

C.

Pay and allowance of officers including

Earning of prisoners,

43,946.88

uniforms, &c.,-

66,855.44

Victualling of prisoners,

16,522.74

Paid by Military for subsistence of Mili- tary prisoners,

30.90

Fuel, light, soap and dry earth

8,441.61

Paid by Navy for subsistence of Naval

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, furniture,

prisoners,

142.80

&c.,

6,107.01

Debtors' subsistence,

514.25

Wei-hai-wei prisoners' subsistence,

700.80

Shanghai prisoners' subsistence,

485.40

Subsistence for prisoners sentenced by

Marine Magistrate,

533.70

Waste food sold,

-

68.40

Actual cost of prisoners' maintenance,

51,503.67

$97,926.80

$97,926.80

Average annual cost per prisoner $91.97-in 1908 $102.09.

J 5 -

J 6

Table II.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the past 10 Years.

Year'.

Expendi-

Actual Cost of Average

Income.

ture.

Prisoner's Maintenance.

Cost per

Prisoner.

$.

1900,

63,946.94 19,721.70 44,225.24

90.99

1901,

73.102.37 29,053.70 44,048.67

88.27

1902,

96,311.53 33,523.09 62,788.44

108.92

1903,

108,139.60 34,136.64 | 74,002.96

113.33

1904,

113,251.48 37,186.64 76,064.84

104.77

1905,

110,687.83 39,444.50 71,243.33

102.21

1906,

96,202.08 39,613.26 56,588.82

109.24

1907,

89,711.39 40,079.90 49,631.49

98.86

1908,

95,537.85 48,066.33 47,471.52

102.09

1909.

97,926.80 46,421.13 51,505.67

91.97

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1909.

I

2

4

Value of

5

Value of Ar-

6

Value of

Stock on

Nature of Industry.

band Jan-

uary 1st,

1909.

Value of

Material

Purchased.

Value of Ar-

ticles Manu-

Total Dr. factured or

ticles Manu- factured or work done for

Stock on

hand

Total Cr.

work done

December

G.ol or othe

for payment.

Departments. 31st, 1909.

Oakum,

Coir,

Netmaking,

Tailoring,

Rattan.

Tin-smithing,

Carpentering,

Grass-matting,

Shoemaking,..

Laundry,

Printing and Bookbinding,

Building,

Total,..

Value of

Earnings

(Difference between

Columns

3 and 7)

J 7

$

C.

C.

c.

$

C.

C.

1,559.36

1 559.36

1,394.33

436.08

1,830.41

886.63

1,035.10

1,921.73

2,166.94

260.95

318.47

2,946.36

c.

271.05

1,62 1.63

28.00

150 25

178.25

295.17

20.85

316.02

137.77

448.70

1,984.08

2,432.78

96.61

2,744 83

650.56

3,492.00

1,059,22

64.42

64.42

29.10

176.90

4.00

210.30

145.88

1.60

9.25

10,86

1.17

205.55

4.90

211.62

200.76

587.87

403.09

990.96

253.65

877.66

403.80

1,537.11

546.15

1.60

19.20

20.80

.84

24.84

.66

26.34

5.54

144.29

1,558 1.9

1,702.98

163.72

1,991.95

117.92

2,273,59

570.61

3.20

4,434.30

865 58

10,487.85

868.78

14,922,15

7.10

348.90

5,919.64

41,341.75

2.47 7,456.34 | 49,146,99

5,929.21

5,060.43

34,224.84

...

700.00

700 00

700.00

8,095.55

16,577.52 | 24,673.07 | *4,757.83 | 54,244.07

9,618 05 68,619,95

43,946.88

$

* Paid into Bank during 1909 which sum includes $213 70 for work · xe :uted in 1908, $4,809.78. Value of work executed during 1909 for which payment was deferred to 1910, $161.75.

+

1

J 8

Table IV.

Return showing the Employment of Prisoners and the Value of their Labour, during the year 1909.

Rate

Daily Average Number of Prisoners.

Value of

Description of Employment.

per

diem.

Prison Labour.

Sunday, Christmas Day, Good Fri-

day and Chinese New Year Day:-

Cooking..

Cleaning,

Non-productive.

Males. Females Total.

C:

10

22:

1

12 c.

9

17

28

50 40 1540)

509

14

523

645

15

560

Other Days

Debtors, Remands, On punish-

ment, Sick,

43

43

Crank, Shot, Shot and Stone,....

104

104

In Manufactories :-

Bookbinding,

Printing,..

Printing labourers,

Oakum picking,

Coir-matting,

Shoemaking,

20

Tailoring,

Net-making, String-making, &

Ships' fender making,

In Building:

Carpentering and Fitting,

In Service of the Prison :-

2 525NINO NO

20 c.

40

20

10

18

སདྡོ ཨཱ

2.480.00 2.728.00

55.00

103

106

657.20

15

28

28

1,302 (0

9

55.00

15

19

21

976.50

10

40

40

1,240.00

-

200

20

14

:

14

868.00

Laundry,

Cooking,

Cleaning,

Whitewashing,

Total,..

*222

15

32

9

1.906 50

12

10

10

ཁ་སྶ

9

34 80

27

28

868 00

15

465.00

545

15

560

13.155.40

Appendix K,

MEDICAL AND SANITARY REPORTS.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Page.

- 1

3

ANNEXE A.—Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department, ANNEXE B.-Joint Report of the Principal Civil Medical Officer

and the Medical Officer of Health,

Sintendent, Civil Hospital, -37

al Officer in charge of Victoria Women and Children,-

ANNEXE C.-Report of the ANNEXE D.-Report of the

Hospital

ANNEXE E.-Report on the Lunatic Asylum,

-

ANNEXE F.-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the

Hospitals for Infectious Diseases,

ANNEXE G.-Report of the Medical Officer to Victoria Goal,

-45

-47

-19

-

-50

ANNEXE H.-Report of the Railway Medical Officer, -

-52

ANNEXE I.

Report on the New Territories,

-54

ANNEXE J.-Report of the Inspecting Medical Officer of the Tung

Wah Hospital,

-56.

ANNEXE K.-Report on the Alice Memorial and Affiliated

Hospitals,

ANNEXE L.-Report of the Government Bacteriologist, ANNEXE M.-Report on the Public Mortuary, Victoria, ANNEXE N. Report on the Public Mortuary, Kowloon, ANNEXE O.Report of the Government Analyst, - ANNEXE P.-Report of the Health Officer of the Port, ANNEXE Q.-Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon,

-64

-65

-69

-73

-75

-79

-83

APPENDIX K.

Annexe A.

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY

DEPARTMENT.

1. Mr. R. O. Hutchison acted as Head of the Sanitary Depart- ment until June 30th, when I was appointed to act as Head of the Sanitary Department. This appointment was confirmed on October 30th, 1909.

Dr. W. W. Pearse continued to act as Medical Officer of Health until Dr. Francis Clark's return on March 4th. Dr. Pearse there- upon relieved Dr. Macfarlane as Assistant Medical Officer of Health in Kowloon, the latter going home on leave.

Owing to the death of Dr. W. Hunter it was decided to appoint Dr. Macfarlane to succeed him as Government Bacteriologist. He will therefore not return to this Department. The Government, acting on the advice of the Board, decided not to replace Dr. Macfarlane, the former Second Assistant Medical Officer of Health, and at the same time the number of Sanitary Inspectors was reduced from 28 to 24, as it was considered that the work of the special Plague Staff might now be undertaken by the District Inspectors in addition to their other duties.

2. The year has been singularly free from epidemic disease except that the number of cases of enteric fever was above the average. Further details on this subject appear in the joint report of the Principal Civil Medical Officer and Medical Officer of Health.

3. The incidence of Malaria in the Colony shows a reduction as compared with recent years. During the year various works have been carried out in rural districts and especially in the village of Shau Ki Wan with a view to reducing the number of breeding places for the mosquito; while the byelaws dealing with the prevention of mosquito breeding have been amended by the Board, so as to make it possible to deal more effectively with their breeding places.

4. The Public Health law was amended during the year so as to give fuller powers for dealing with cemeteries especially in reference to the disinterment of unclaimed bodies after a lapse of years. Certain duties in regard to the registration of births and deaths, the control of vaccinations, and the letting of market stalls were trans- ferred from the Registrar General to the Head of the Sanitary De- partment. The byelaws dealing with cemeteries, depôts for animals,

K 2

markets and slaughter-houses were amended by the Board; and a new handbook of the Public Health laws, regulations and byelaws was compiled.

5. The total number of permits issued to remove bodies out of the Colony in 1909 was 538. The total number of bodies exhumed under exhumation permits issued by this Department was 129. Of these 108 were removed from the Colony and 21 re-buried within the Colony.

6. The report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon deals in full with markets, slaughter-houses and cattle depôts, also with cattle disease. It shews an increase in the revenue derived from slaughter- houses of $5,656.00* and of $1,561.08 from the markets. The number of animals slaughtered is roughly the same as in 1908.

7. The total revenue collected during the year including that derived from undertakers' licences, market licences, and market stalls collected by the Registrar General during the first six months of the year amounted in all to $203,070.76. The estimated revenue for the year was $226,780.00. The total expenditure during the year was $352,826.64 compared with $376,736.14 in 1908. The estimated ex- penditure in 1909 was $408,882.00.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Head of the Sanitary Department.

1

31st March, 1910.

*The sum of $166 of this amount although collected during 1909 was not paid into the Treasury until the early days in 1910 and these figures do not there- fore correspond with the Treasury returns of revenue, but shew the exact particulars of the fees collected.

7

!,

K 3

Annexe B.

JOINT REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF

HEALTH, FOR THE YEAR 1909.

1

AREA.

The Sanitary Board's jurisdiction extends to the Island of Hongkong, which has an area of 29 square miles, and to that por- tion of territory on the mainland between the shore and the first range of the Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay, on the East, to the village of Kau Pa Hang on the West-with a sea frontage of about thirteen miles and an area of about sixteen square miles. Old Kowloon, with an area of about 24 square miles, has been in British occupation since 1861, but New Kowloon was leased to this Government in 1898, as part of what is known as the New Territories. The remainder of the New Territories is not under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board.

The City of Victoria, built on the Northern shore of the Island of Hongkong, has a frontage to the sea of nearly five miles and is separated from the opposite mainland of Kowloon by the Harbour, which is rather less than a mile and a third wide opposite the centre of the City and widens out to somewhat over three miles at its widest part, contracting again at Lyemun Pass on the East to little more than a quarter of a mile in width.

The domestic buildings of the City of Victoria number 9,677 exclusive of Barracks and Police Stations, of which 946 are Non- Chinese dwellings, while there are also 160 European dwellings in the Hill District. The number of new houses completed during the year was as follows:-City of Victoria 44, Kowloon 54, Outly- ing districts 27, and Peak 3, making a total of 128.

In addition to the above there were erected miscellaneous buildings such as offices, godowns, etc., to the number of 78.

ADMINISTRATION.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten health districts and Kowloon into three health districts with a Sanitary Inspector in charge of each district. The Inspector in charge of No. 3 health district of the City (the principal European quarter) is also in charge of the Peak.

There are in addition four Inspectors in charge of the scaveng- ing work of the City and of Kowloon, one Inspector of Cemeteries and one Inspector in charge of the City Disinfecting Station.

K 4-

The supervision of the sanitary work in the villages of Hong- kong and in Kowloon City and Sham Shui Po is done by the Police Inspectors in their respective districts.

The Inspectors in Kowloon work under the personal direction and supervision of the Assistant Medical Officer of Health.

Owing to the general improvement in the sanitary condition of the Colony and to the simplification of the methods of dealing with Plague cases and Plague-infected houses since the publication of the final Report of the Indian Plague Commission in 1908, it has been found possible to reduce the number of Sanitary Inspectors by the abolition of the five special Plague Inspectors, whose duties are now performed by the District Inspectors.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION.

In connection with anti-plague measures to render as far as possible houses rat-proof, 391 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired and 1,048 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. In addition 20 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated, while permits for the use of 19 basements and for 40 base- ment kitchens have been issued.

An open space in the rear has been provided to one existing house while exemption from the provision of a yard has been granted in the case of 568 houses and modification in the case of 420 houses erected previous to 1899. Obstructions have been removed from backyards, under notice, in 274 houses. Nuisance notices to the number of 1,951 have been issued during the year.

In addition to the above improvements carried out under the supervision of the Sanitary Department various other permanent improvements have been effected by the Public Works Department. These include the training of nullahs to the extent of 792 feet, and the building of public latrines in the village of Wong Nei Cheong, in Kennedy Road and in Chuk Hing Lane in the City, and at Tai Kok Tsui (Kowloon).

A considerable improvement is always taking place in the matter of scavenging lanes but the full effect of the Ordinance in this respect will not be noticeable for a considerable number of years. Nevertheless the total area of lanes obtained for scavenging purposes during the year has been 11,450 sq. ft., the length being 1,756 ft. while a further area of 7,906 sq. ft. was resumed for the construction of a new roadway.

During the year one well, the water of which was unsatis- factory, was closed.

رف

K 5

METEOROLOGICAL RETURN.

The following Table records the meteorological conditions which prevailed during the year :—

Month.

Barometer

at M. S. L.

TEMPERA- HUMI-

TURE.

DITY.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Rain.

January, February,..

March,

April.

May,

June,.

July, August,

ins.

Max. Mean] Min. Rel. Abs.

30.10 61.1 60.6 57.6 80 0.43 30.11 64.3 60 4 57.0 81 0.43 30.05 67.6 64.1] 60.8| 81 | 0.50 29.95 75.8 71.1] 67.4) 79 [0.61 29.88 78.6 74.8 71.5 830.72) 29 79 86.5 81.8 78.6 81 0.88) 29.77 86.5 81.9 78.2 82 | 0.89) 29.78 87,5] 82.8| 78.8| 81 |0.91) September,. 29.78 87.0 82.2 78.5 800.88] October, 29.89 81.5 77.8) 74.0 77 0.74 November, 30.07 75.5) 70.4) 65.4| 62 | 0.47) December, 29.96 68.9 63.6) 58.9] 59 0.36)

Dir.

Vel.

о

о

p. c. ins. p. c.

hours. ins.

Points.

miles p. h.

83

85.0 1.460

E by N

14.1

80

85 6

1.660

E by N

14.2

92

64.2

2.345

E

16.5

78

155.4 2.455

E by N

14.1

85

113 91 6.700 E

13.4

78

230.3 7.385 S by E

12.5

70

252.0 12.825; E by S

14.1

64

215.3 8.340 SW by S

7.8

G3

202.6 8.505 E

9.0

80

137.5 23.985 ENE

16.8

57

187.1 0.065 NE by N

12.6

30

249.7 0.000 ENE

11.4

Mean or Total, 23,94 76.7 72.6 68.9 77

0.65

72

1978.6 75.725 E

13.0

+

The average annual rainfall during the ten years ending 1899 was 83.16 inches and ranged from 117·12 inches in 1891 to 45-83 inches in 1895; the average for the decade ending 1909 has been 81-09 inches. The rainfall for last year is therefore somewhat below the average of recent years.

/POPULATION.

The population of the Colony is primarily divided into Chinese and Non-Chinese. The Non-Chinese comprised at the Census of 1906 a white population of 12,925 of whom 6,085 were civilians while 4,429 belonged to the Navy and 2,411 to the Army. The coloured races (Non-Chinese) numbered 8,500 and included East Indians, Asiatic Portuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians, and a few others. The Table on page 12 shows a similar classification of the Non-Chinese population for the year 1909 and from this it will be seen that the total Non-Chinese population for 1909—inclusive of Army and Navy-is estimated at 20,479 (including 446 Malays), while the total Chinese population- inclusive of Army and Navy-is estimated at 323,398.

K 6

The estimated population to the middle of 1909 is as follows:- Non-Chinese Civil Community,

Chinese :-

City of Victoria (including Peak and

Stonecutters' Island),......

14,000

180,750

Villages of Hongkong,

18,800

Kowloon,

74,600

Floating population,

46,240

Mercantile Marine,

·

2,770

Total Chinese Civil Population,

323,160

Army (average strength),

4,500

Navy (average strength),'

2,217

343,877

Total Population of the Colony in 19091

exclusive of the New Territories (except New Kowloon),...........................

The Chinese population of the New Territories (exclusive of New Kowloon) was 85,011 at the Census taken in 1901 but there are no data as yet on which to base an estimate of the increase in population (if any) in this portion of the Colony since that date.

The following is the distribution of the population as estimated above:--

Europeans and Americans, Africans,

East Indians,

according to nationality

11,390 13

Chinese and Malays,

Mixed and Coloured,

Total,

4,384

323,844

4,246

343,877

The Civil population consists chiefly of male adults. At the last Census (1906) the proportion of males was 70.1 per cent. of the total Civil population; at the 1901 Census the proportion was 72.6 per cent., so there was an increase in the proportion of females (which means an increase in family life among the Chinese) during that interval.

Of the Chinese population in 1906 70-3 per cent. were males, and over half the Civil population (56.9 per cent. of the Chinese and 52.6 per cent. of the Non-Chinese) were between the ages of 20 and 45 years.

The average strength of the troops in Garrison during 1909 was 106 British Officers and 1,942 British N. C. O.s and men with 37 Indian Officers and 1,864 Indian N. C. O.s and men, and 51 Chinese attached to the Royal Engineers. There were also 453

K7

British women and children, and 47 Indian women and children, making a total of 500.

The average strength of the British fleet was as follows:----- Europeans permanently in the Colony 250, Europeans occasionally in the Colony 5,340, Chinese permanently in the Colony 140, Chinese occasionally in the Colony 140-making a total of 5,870: For the purpose of estimating the population it is considered a fair average to include one-third only of those "occasionally" resident in the Colony; this gives 2,217 and of these 187 are Chinese.

The Chinese boat population (exclusive of the New Territories), is estimated for 1909 as 46,240 and the number of boats belonging · to the Port and the villages of Hongkong, is as follows:-

Passenger boats,

Cargo boats,

Steam-launches,

Lighters,

Harbour boats,

Fishing boats,

Trading junks,

2,605

1,242

291

153

1,736

4,960

2,874

13,861

This gives an average of 3.3 persons per boat,

The number of boats enumerated at the 'ensus taken in November 1906 was 6,459 but this was only a month after the great Typhoon by which many boats were destroyed. There are in addition 9,016 boats in the New Territories.

City of Victoria, Health District.

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and the inmates per house City of Victoria as estimated for the year 1909.

and per

floor

in

the

One storey Dwellings.

Two storey

Dwellings.

Three storey Dwellings.

Four storey Dwellings.

Five storey Dwellings.

Total Dwellings.

Total Floors.

Average Number of Floors per Dwelling.

* 2

Number of

Number of.

persons per Dwelling.

persons per

Floor.

1

161

425

227

32

2.

3

348

585

82

2222

Nil.

845

1,820

2.1

Nil.

1,018

2,782

2.7

15.3

20.3

Most of the Chinese of

7.1

7.2

3.

Nil.

11

18

Nil.

Nil.

29

76

2.6

this district live in quarters

attached to offices.

8

48

562

437

11

1,066

3,593

3.4

22.5

6.6

5.

14

135

547

264

Nil.

960

2,981

3.1

19.1

6.2

6

52

39

381

416

41

929

3,142

3.4

17.5

5.2

7.

11

59

450

396

9

925

3,108 3.4

20.7

6.2

1

75

576

333

16

1,001

3,291

3.3

18.5

5.6

28

471

501

107

Nil.

1,107

2,901

2.6

22.9

8.7

10.

61

358

345

87

Nil.

851

2,160

2.5.

17.2

6.8

Total and Averages 1909

339

1,969

4,192

2,154

77

8,731

25,854

2.9

20.5

6.9

Total and Averages 1908

326

1,939

4,188

2,202

63

8,718 25,899

2.9

20.1

6.7

>

K 8

M

Kowloon sub-districts.

K 9

The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each such district as estimated for the year 1909.

Health Districts.

Total

Built-

over

Non-

Chinese

Chinese

Chinese

Acreage. Areas in

Dwell-

Dwell-

Popula-

Non- Persons Chinese per Acre

Acres.

ings.

tion.

Popula- (built-

ings.

tion. over).

1,

531

134

845

159

12,954

1,104

105

1,800

2,

243

140

1,018

73

20,735

2,501

179

troops

3,

232

137

4,

56

5,

29

30

36

8,

49

9,

44

10,

252

106

222548

29

428

9,070

3,040

88

53

1,066

163

24,014

1,276

477

27

960

22

18,375

416

696

27

929

19

16,232

380

615

31

925

7

19,150

84

620

47

1,001

5

18,510

234

399

44

1,107

16

25,390

160

581

851

54

14,620

356

141

Total 1909, 1908,

1,502

746 8,731

946

179,050

11,351

255

1,502

746 8,701

932 175,430 9,173

247

The number of Chinese living at the Peak and Stonecutters' Island is estimated at 1,700.

The following Table shows the distribution of the Chinese population of Kowloon according to Houses and Floors in the different sub-districts into which Kowloon is divided:--

Three

Four

One storey||Two storey

storey

storev

Dwellings. Dwellings.

Dwell-

Dwell-

ings.

ings.

178

8

188 382 2.0

1.190

108

2,

17 69 74

6

3,

8

310

2 389

191

1

78 1 331

7

2.8

166 561 3.4 3,600 | 25.2 | 7.1 801 2,166 2.7 418 1,180

126

19,310 24.4 8.9

198

9,230 22.1 7.8

163

20

161 13 11

205 401 1.9

5,020 26.1 13.4

319

19

163 69 292

23

566 1,451

323

601 452 5 4

1,062 1,527

926 1 208

636 1

48

Total

1,139 1,351

686 735

1909, 2,213 2 1,420 290 1,096 9195 65,231 9,754 1908, 2,250 2 1,433 290,1,080 9 195 6 5,265 9,761

2.6 12,010 24.2 9.1 1.3 10,750 10.2 7.1 2.758 1.2 8,620 7.6 6.4 2,068 1.1 4,870 7.1 6.6 732

1.8 74,600 151 8.2 6,795 1.8 74,350 150 | 8.1 6,795

Sub-districts 7 (Kowloon City) and 8 (Sham Shui Po) are in New Kowloon, the remainder comprise the whole of Old Kow- loon and are distributed as follows:-Health District 11 comprises

K 10

sub-districts 1, 6 and 9, Health District 12 comprises sub-districts 2 and 3, and Health District 13 comprises sub-districts 4 and 5. The Non- Chinese population of Old Kowloon at the 1906 Census was 2,269 civilians and 2,215 troops, most of whom reside in sub-districts 1 and 2, while the Non-Chinese population of New Kowloon was 17.

BIRTHS.

The births registered during the year were as follows:-

Males.

Females.

Total.

Chinese,

874

328

1,202

Non-Chinese,

170

145

315

Total 1909, ......1,044

473

1,517

"

1908,

937

475

1,412

This gives a general birth-rate of 44 per 1,000 as compared with 4.2 per 1,000 in 1908 and 4.3 per 1,000 in 1907.

The birth-rate amongst the Non-Chinese community was 15:38 per 1,000 as compared with 14:43 per 1,000 in 1908 and 15·95 in 1907.

The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows:- British 134, Portuguese 91, Indian 47, Malay and Filipino 13, Ger- man 11, American 5, French 3, Jewish and Spanish 2 each, Swedish, Roumanian, Brazilian, Italian, Annamese, Japanese and Norwegian 1 each.

The number of Chinese births registered does not give an accu- rate record of the number of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese of not registering births unless the child has survived for a month and often in the case of female children not at all, it is probable that the majority if not all of the infants which are sickly at birth or die before they have lived one month have not had their births registered. It is customary, there- fore, to assume that all children of one month old and under who are admitted to the various convents (being brought there sick by poor people) and all young infants found dead in the streets, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the Police, have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to the number of the registered births it is assumed that a somewhat more correct number of births is obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth-rate.

The number of such children in 1909 was 425 males and 646 females, total 1.071, which being added to the registered births, makes a total of 2,588 as compared with 2,264 in 1908. The corrected birth-rate is therefore 7.5 while amongst the Chinese community alone the rate becomes 70 instead of 3-7 per 1,000.

1

1

K 11

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked amongst the Chinese, there being 266 males to 100 females; in 1908 the proportion was 233 males to 100 females. With the addition of the 1,071 above mentioned unregistered births the proportion becomes 133 males to 100 females.

In the Non-Chinese community the proportion of male births to female births for 1909 was 117 to 100, as compared with 108 to 100 in 1908 and 119 to 100 in 1907.

DEATHS.

The deaths registered during the year numbered 7,267 (9,271 in 1908). The death-rate was therefore 21.13 per 1,000 as against 27-55 in 1908. These deaths include 108 from Plague (986 in 1908).

The total number of deaths amongst the Chinese community was 7,012 which gives a death-rate of 21.68 per 1,000 as against 28.35 in 1908 and 22:52 in 1907.

The deaths registered amongst the Non-Chinese community numbered 255 of which 226 were from the Civil population, 26 from the Army and 3 from the Navy.

This gives a death-rate for the Non-Chinese community of 12:45 per 1,000 as compared with 1478 in 1908 and 15:46 in 1907.

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 86, Portuguese 53, Indian 50, Japanese 29, Malay and Filipino 11, German 8, American 7, French 3, Spanish 2, Jewish 2, Swedish 2; Dutch and Greek 1 each.

The total number of deaths which occurred amongst the Non- Chinese resident civil population was 201 and allowing 1,500 for the Non-Chinese floating population this gives a death-rate of 16:08 per 1,000 for the resident Non-Chinese civil population.

Table I shows the number and causes of deaths registered during the year.

K 12

The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purpose of ready comparison with similar tables given in the reports from other Colonies:-

Total.

Number of Inhabitants in 1909 11,390

of Births

in

159

1

:

of Deaths

in

110

"

,,

of Immigrants in

13 4,384 323,814 4,246 313,877

47 1,215 96

50 7,023

144,821

1,517

84 7,267

""

of Emigrants in

"3

77,430

of Inhabitants in 1908 | 11,252

10

4,116 316,850 4,260 | 336,485

Increase,

138

3

268 6,994

7,403

07

Decrease,

14

11

There is an enormous passenger traffic between Hongkong and the mainland of China, the passenger figures by river steamers alone being as follows:--

Arrivals 1,240,207: Departures 1,175,575.

It must not be assumed, however, that the excess of passenger arrivals by steamer over the departures (64,632) or the excess of immigrants over emigrants (67,391) represents an increase in population of the Colony, for thousands of those who arrive by passenger steamer subsequently leave for China and these figures are not available.

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 2,295 or 31.6 per cent. of the total deaths, as compared with 22.6 per cent, in 1908 and 22.9 per cent. in 1907.

The infant mortality amongst the Non-Chinese community during the year was 111 per 1,000 as compared with 91 per 1,000 in 1908 and 91 per 1,000 in 1907. This increase in the Non- Chinese infant mortality was not due to any extensive epidemic but to the fact that the climate during the year was unfavourable to infant life.

K 13

Among the Chinese population the known deaths of infants numbered 2,260, while only 1,202 Chinese births were registered. Taking the corrected birth figure to be 2,588 (as explained on page The 8) this gives an infant mortality of 873 per thousand. Census return for 1906 showed 1,329 Chinese infants under one year of age, and 14,980 Chinese children between the ages of one year and five years; it is very evident therefore that the majority of these children are not born in the Colony but are brought here from the mainland of China.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 2,564 of which 50 were among the Non-Chinese community leaving 2,514 among the Chinese population; 823. out of this total occurred in infants under one year of age.

Phthisis alone accounts for 773 deaths of which 751 were Chinese. Pneumonia caused 1,156 deaths of which 1,136 were Chinese; many of these bodies were examined in the Public Mortuaries, and were not deaths from Pneumonic Plague. 563 of these deaths from Pneumonia occurred in infants under one year of

age.

The death-rate among the Chinese from Respiratory Diseases was 7.8 per 1,000 as compared with 7.8 per 1,000 in the previous year and 5.8 per 1,000 in 1907; that for Phthisis alone was 2.3 per 1,000 as compared with 2-3 per 1,000 in 1908.

The deaths from Phthisis amongst the Chinese were 10.7 per cent. of the total deaths amongst that community, as compared with 9.8 in 1906--a sure indication that deaths from tubercular disease are proportionately on the increase, although the total mortality is less.

Nervous Diseases.

The number of deaths under this heading for the year 1909 was 494 as compared with 419 in 1908 and 522 in 1907. Of these 376 were of Chinese children under 5 years of age, 273 being in- fants less than one year old. These deaths of Chinese infants com- prise 212 deaths from Tetanus, Trismus and Convulsions, 60 deaths from Meningitis and one from Hydrocephalus. The figures com- pare favourably with those of previous years, though they are not so satisfactory as the figures for 1908, the past year having been, as already stated, somewhat unfavourable to infant life-both native and European. The influence of the Public Dispensaries and of the Public Midwives is however being gradually felt, and it is to be hoped that these figures will show further large reductions within the next few years.

Malarial Fever.

The total number of deaths from Malarial Fever during the year was 422 (as compared with 499 in 1908 and 579 in 1907), of

K 14

which 5 only were Non-Chinese, 3 being from the civil population, and 2 from the Troops. Of these 417 Chinese deaths, 123 oc- curred in the City of Victoria (133 in 1908), while there were 120 deaths in Kowloon (141 in 1908), 165 in the villages of Hongkong (173 in 1908) and 9 in the Harbour (9 in 1908). Some of the deaths however which occurred in the City were cases brought over from Kowloon or from the Harbour for treatment in the various City Hospitals. Of the deaths which occurred in the villages 85 were at Shaukiwan (50 from the land population and 35 from the boat population) as compared with 67 in 1908, 76 at Aberdeen (26 from the land population and 50 from the boat population) as compared with 106 in 1908, and 4 at Stanley.

Anti-malarial measures were first inaugurated in this Colony in 1899 and during the past year considerable attention has been paid to this work--special visits have been made by the Inspectors in search of breeding places for mosquitoes, dense tangles of brushwood in the neighbourhood of houses have been cut down, the trained nullahs have been regularly swept to prevent the formation of water weed and algae, and standing water has in places been treated with kerosene at regular weekly intervals, while such cases of Malaria as have come to the knowledge of the Sanitary Department have been investigated and steps taken to prevent the breeding of mosquitoes in the neighbourhood of such cases. Certain basements and coolie quarters were also fumigated with sulphur during the late autumn to kill off any mosquitoes that might be hibernating in the dark corners of these retreats. The amounts spent on nullah training for the years 1908 and 1909 were respectively $9,998 and $7,737.

5

A

YEAR.

Government

Civil

Tung Wah

Hospital.

Hospital.

The following Table shows the Admissions for Malaria to our two largest Hospitals during the past ten years

Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Case-mortal-

Total.

ity per cent.

Deaths.

Govt. Civil

Hospital.

Tung Wah Hospital.

1900,

679

4

541

159|1,220

163

0.6

29.4

1901,

787

10

507 122 1,294

132

1.3

24.1

1902,

349

403 119 762

128

2.6 29.5

Average admissions 855.

1903,

347

1904,

221

1905,

266

1906,

233

1907,

247

8

1908,

282

3

1909,

188

1

2267 ∞ MI

221

61 568

63

0.6 27.6

Average deaths 109.

212

56 433

58

0.9 26.4

153

48

419

54

2.2 31.4

248

96

481

103

3.0

38.5

305

87

552

95

3.2 28.5

Average admissions 535.

355

93

637

96

1.0 26.2

Average deaths 87.

396

87

584

89

0.5 21.9

- K 15-

K 16

The Police admissions to Hospital for Malaria are shown in the following Table :-

Police Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

From

From

Average

the

rest of Total. Strength

Percent-

City.

the

of Police Force.

age of Strength.

Colony.

1900,

167

223

390

929

42

1901,

243

164

107

920

44

1902,

121

55

176

919

19

1903,

83

81

167

921

18

1904,

40

67

107

993

11

1905,

42

85

127

1,018

12

1906,

37

37

74

1,047

7

1907,

40

65

105

1,049

10

1908.

32

76

108

1,018

10

1909,

50

87

1,050

8

The next Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years :-

Total Deaths from Malaria.

Year.

Deaths in the City Total Deaths.

(Chinese only).

1900,

242

555

1901,

281

574

1902,

189

425

Average

1903,

152

300

431.

1904,

90

301

1905,

87

287

1906,

134

448

1907,

138

579

Average

1908,

133

499

447.

1909,

123

422

i

A distinct diminution in the last two years, although the average for the past five years is more than that in the previous quinquennial period; this may be accounted for by the large number of natives employed on the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

The fact must also not be overlooked that the Malarial in- fection is not in all cases contracted locally, for the Chinese

F

K 17

population is constantly receiving additions from the mainland of China, and the resident Chinese pay somewhat frequent visits to their native land, but for the purposes of comparison the figures given are fairly reliable as an indication of the effect of the anti- malarial measures undertaken in the Colony.

Hygiene is taught systematically in all the schools in the Colony and special attention is paid to the teaching of the mode of conveyance of the infection of Malaria by the mosquito and the manner in which the mosquito breeds.

The Military return of admissions for Malaria is by far the lowest on record due undoubtedly to the active anti-malarial measures now adopted.

~

Year.

Admissions for Malaria, European Troops.

Strength. Admis- Deaths. Invalided. Ratio per 1,000.

sions.

1900,

1,484

629

16

423.8

1901,

1,673

1,010

15

603.7

1902.

1,381

1,523

24

1,102.8

1903,

1,220

937

6

768-0

1904,

1.426

390

9

273'5

1905,

1,370

348

1

254.0

1906,

1,525

480

15

314-7

1907,

1.461

287

12

196'0

1908, 1909,

2,012

515

17

256'0

1,943

269

10

138.4

There was again a marked diminution of admissions for Malaria amongst the Native Troops, there being only 104 admissions from this disease during 1909. The ratio of admissions per 1,000 for the last three years were 574 in 1907, 102-8 in 1908 and only 54.3 in 1909.

Beri-Beri.

There were 545 deaths (736 in 1908 and 562 in 1907) from this disease during the year, of which 3 only were among the Non-Chinese community; one of them was an Indian destitute, the second was a Japanese sailor and the third a Japanese tallyman. Attention has been drawn to the fact that the cause of this disease is probably due to the eating of white or polished rice, and further. investigations are being made into this subject.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The total number of cases of infectious disease notified during the year was 292 (1,668 in 1908) of which 135 were of Plague.

K 18

The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases :--

CITY OF VICTORIA HEALTHI DISTRICTS.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Peak.

Kowloon.

Harbour.

New Territories.

Villages of Hongkong. No Address.

Imported.

Totals 1909.

Totals 1908.

Plague,...

5 6 510 2:2 2

4

'91, 5

3

Typhoid,.

5 5 6 51 6,2

64 18 20 1

Cholera,

Small-pox,

3515

12145

00

Diphtheria,

13 331

6112

Puerperal Fever,.

115

31

Relapsing Fever,..

10 135 1073

23 75 38

56

10 38 472

1 22

14

19

15

1 1

Table II (page 30) shows the number of notifiable diseases recorded in cach

month of the year.

Plague.

There was a small outbreak of Plague during the year, the total number of cases registered being 135 as compared with 1,073 in 1908, 240 in 1907 and 893 in 1906. Of these 135 cases 91 occurred in Kowloon and 10 were imported. Thirty-one of the Kowloon cases occurred in Kowloon City--a native city of old rat- ridden dwellings which only came under British jurisdiction in 1899 and has not yet been rebuilt. The Non-Chinese cases comprised 3 Indians, 1 Asiatic Portuguese and 1 Japanese, all resident in Kow- loon, and 2 Japanese cases imported from Japan.

The deaths from Plague numbered 108, including 4 Non- Chinese deaths, so that the mortality among the Non-Chinese was 57 per cent. and among the Chinese 81 per cent.

Some 650 small bius have been fixed throughout the City and Kowloon and in the more important villages, for the reception of dead rats. These bins are one gallon drums with hinged covers and are fixed to telephone and lamp standards and filled two-thirds full of a 5 per cent. solution of carbolated creasote which is changed once a week. The native population is encouraged to put all rats which they may catch or find dead on their premises into these bins. The bins are visited once daily in the cool weather and twice daily in the hot weather by rat-collectors (one for each Health District), and the rats duly ticketed and delivered at the Mortuary for classification and bacteriological examination.

4

1.

K 19

When a Plague-infected rat is found in one of these bins men are specially detailed to fill up all rat-runs in the houses adjoining such bin, rat poison is offered to all the neighbouring householders, and special attention is paid to the integrity of all gratings for the exclusion of rats from the houses.

In addition to the foregoing special measures rat poison and traps are distributed throughout the year to all householders on application, and the Chinese generally are encouraged to keep cats in their houses and godowns, while a special rat-poisoning campaign is instituted just before the onset of the usual epidemic season, i.e., during January, February and March.

Throughout the year there is also a continuous house to house cleansing of native dwellings with a view to the removal of all rubbish which may serve as nesting places for rats, while the floors and skirtings are washed with a one per cent. solution of kerosene emulsion to destroy fleas and other vermin.

During the year 60,113 rats were caught or found dead in the City of Victoria and 16,022 in Kowloon. Those from the City were examined by the Government Bacteriologist at the Public Mortuary and those in Kowloon by Dr. Pearse, the Assistant Medical Officer of Health, with the result that 399 of those from the City and 108 of those from Kowloon were found to be infected with Plague. It is somewhat remarkable that throughout the whole year there was a marked preponderance of female over male rats caught, the numbers for the City being 28.946 males and 31,167 females.

Table III shows the monthly distribution of the Plague-infected rats during the year.

Typhoid Fever.

The number of cases of this disease during the year was 75 as compared with 38 during 1908 and 66 in 1907: 23 of the cases were imported, namely, 14 Europeans, 5 Chinese, 3 Indians and 1 Japanese. The cases of European or American nationality numbered 27, while the Chinese cases numbered 35, and 13 cases occurred amongst the other Asiatic races in the Colony. Seven of the European cases, three of the "other Asiatic cases and 23 of the Chinese cases died. The case mortality among the European cases was therefore 26 per

cent.

In most of the cases of Typhoid Fever that occur in this Colony the infection is probably contracted by eating salads of raw vegetables, which have been grown in Chinese market-gardens, where it is customary to water and manure the plants with diluted human excreta-both urine and nightsoil. Residents in the Far East should carefully avoid such articles of food as water-cress, lettuce, etc., in view of this danger of contracting Typhoid Fever, Cholera or Intestinal Parasites, all of which diseases may be conveyed in this manner. Oysters from neighbouring Chinese ports are also occasionally the source of infection.

K 20

It will be seen from the above figures that this disease is much less prevalent among the Chinese than among Europeans in this Colony, the ratio of cases to population being in the case of Europeans 2.4 per 1,000 and in the case of Chinese 0·018 per 1,000.

Small-pox.

During the year 38 cases of Small-pox were certified, of which 2 were Europeans, 28 were Chinese and 8 were of other races; 10 of the cases were imported. One Japanese case and 24 of the Chinese cases died.

The number of vaccinations for the year was 6,721 as compared with 7,655 in 1908.

Efforts were made during the year to secure the re-vaccination of school children, and a memorandum was issued to all school teachers in the Colony setting forth the advantages of re-vaccina- tion, while arrangements were made for this to be done free of cost at the schools on application. A copy of the memorandum is appended to this report. As a result, 91 re-vaccinations were per- formed in Government Schools and 138 in Grant Schools-which cannot be regarded as altogether satisfactory in view of the fact that the children in the above schools number more than 6,500.

Diphtheria.

Twenty-two cases of Diphtheria were notified throughout the year, one of them being an imported case. Four of these were Europeans and four were "other Non-Chinese" leaving fourteen Chinese cases. Eight of the cases occurred in March and four in December while nb case occurred during the months of July, August and September. Eight of the Chinese cases were infants left at the various convents, without addresses, and one of the European cases was a Sister at the Victoria Hospital.

Eleven of the Chinese cases died, and also one Portuguese

infant.

Puerperal Fever.

Nineteen cases of this disease were certified throughout the year. Eighteen of these were Chinese and the remaining patient was an Indian; all of these cases died. The average number of known deaths from this disease for the decade ending 1908 was nine.

ALICE MEMORIAL MATERNITY CHARITY.

The Government employs eight Chinese midwives, trained in Western methods, to attend the poor in their confinements, and dur- ing the year 1,381 cases were attended by these women as against 1,043 in 1908. Two of the mothers died of Puerperal Fever, while there were 40 cases of abortion and 46 still-births. 43 of the infants died during the year, 21 and were taken back to China, while 63 were lost sight of owing to removals; the remainder of the infants are well.

K 21

INTERMENTS.

The following number of interments in the various cemeteries of the Colony have been recorded during the year :--

General Cemeteries.-Colonial Cemetery,

Roman Catholic Cemetery, Mahommedan Cemetery,

Jewish Cemetery,

Parsee Cemetery,

132

805

45

2

989

Chinese Cemeteries.-Mount Caroline Cemetery,..

610

Kai Lung Wan

214

Tung Wa Hospital

""

3,591

Protestant

24

Shaukiwan

290

**

Aberdeen

178

Stanley

24

*

Shek O

1

""

Ma Tau Wai

1,106

Shai Yü Shek

197

""

Sham Shui Po

131

>>

Christian

""

Kowloon City 16

Eurasian

1

19

.

Chung Leung Tin

2

27

6,385

One hundred and forty-four of the bodies buried at the Tung Wa Hospital Cemetery were inported into the Colony from various foreign countries.

There were in addition ten cremations of bodies during the year. Many of the interments in the Roman Catholic Cemetery are the bodies of Chinese infants that have been baptized at the convents and die there shortly after admission.

DISINFOTING STATIONS.

During the year the two Disinfecting Stations dealt with 23,739 articles of clothing, bedding, etc.

Victoria Station.

K 22

Articles were received for steam disinfection according to the

following Table:-

Articles from Private Houses,..

7,468

Kennedy Town Hospital,

741

""

Tung Wa Hospital,

175

喝啰

Government Civil Hospital,

1,360

Peak Hospital,...

31

""

"

Alice Memorial Hospital,.

189

53

Victoria Hospital,...

415

Police Stations and Gaol,.

593

Convents,

28

Government Clothing lent to Contacts,...

133

Clothing and Bedding of Staff,.

Ambulance covers and stretchers,....

311

481

11,925

The disinfecting apparatus was in use on 212 days, and in addition 4,928 articles were washed, 12 public vehicles were disinfected and 248 articles were fumigated.

Kowloon Station.

Articles from Private Houses,

Military Clothing,

Police Clothing,

3,238

3,034

354

6,626

The disinfecting apparatus was in use on 105 days,

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

The free Public Bath-houses erected by the Government at Wanchai and in Pound Lane, Taipingshan, and also the temporary bath-houses, fitted up in Chinese tenement houses rented for this purpose, at 92 Second Street and 2 Sheung Fung Lane, have been în considerable demand by the poor class of Chinese and the follow- ing figures show the total number of persons who have used these bath-houses during the year 1909:-

Wanchai, Pound Lane,

149,747

210,648

Second Street,

70,610

Sheung Fung Lane,

21,671

Total,......

452,676

K 23

Separate baths, with an ample supply of hot water, are furnished at each of these bath-houses-that at Wanchai is for men only, and is largely used by the coal coolies engaged in coaling ships in the Harbour, and that at Second Street is also for men and boys only. The Pound Lane bath-house has separate buildings for men and for women and children, and the Sheung Fung Lane bath-house is for women and children only.

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

A complete ambulance service has been established throughout the City, and ambulances can now be procured not only at any hour of the night or day by telephoning (No. 363) to the Disinfecting Station, Taipingshan, but additional ones have been stationed at the following places for use by the Police in all cases of emergency:-

The Bay View Police Station.

No. 1 Police Station.

The Recreation Ground, Happy Valley.

Eastern District Sanitary Matshed (near No. 2 Police

Station).

The Sailors' and Soldiers' Home, Arsenal Street.

The City Hall.

The Supreme Court.

The Central Police Station.

The Fire Brigade Station, Queen's Road Central.

The New Western Market.

The Tung Wa Hospital.

The entrance gate in Queen's Road West to the Govern-

ment Civil Hospital.

The Western District Sanitary Office.

The Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town.

Outside the City limits ambulances have also been stationed at the Pokfulam Police Station, at No. 6 Police Station, Peak, at Aberdeen, Shaukiwan and Stanley Police Stations, at the Water Police Station at Tsim-sha-tsui and at the Kowloon-Canton Railway camps. The Kowloon Disinfecting Station (Telephone No. 44 K.) also serves Kowloon in the same manner that the City is served by the Taipingshan Disinfecting Station.

These are all hand ambulances on bicycle or light wooden wheels, with rubber tyres, and of the St. John Ambulance pattern. Those stationed in the City are in the charge of the various District Inspectors, whose duty it is to see that they are kept clean and efficient, and that they are disinfected after use. At the Sanitary Stations coolies are always available for the conveyance of these ambulances, but at the other stations the Police obtain volunteers or engage street coolies for this purpose, while if the ambulance has been soiled or used for an infectious case, the Sanitary Department is notified so that it may be cleansed and disinfected at once.

K 24

The European ambulances at the City Disinfecting Station were used 148 times while those at the Eastern and Western Sani- tary Offices in the City were used 151 times. No complete records are kept in this Department of the number of times the Police emergency ambulances were used.

The European ambulances at the Kowloon Disinfecting Station were used 15 times and the Chinese ambulances 142 times, while the ambulance at the compound of the Water Police basin was used 10 times.

ADULTERATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS.

Thirty-three samples of milk were taken for analysis during the year, four of which were found to be adulterated.

A number of cases of tinned fish and a quantity of fruit which had become unsound, were seized and destroyed. The purity of alcoholic liquors is dealt with by the Police, who periodically sub- mit samples for analysis.

PROSECUTIONS.

A list of prosecutions undertaken during the year for breaches of the Sanitary Laws and Regulations of the Colony is given in Table IV.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B. (Lond.), M.R.C.S., L.S.A., D.P.H.. Principal Civil Medical Officer.

FRANCIS CLARK, M.D., M.R.C.P., D.P.H., D.T.M.& H.,

Medical Officer of Health.

1st February, 1910.

1

- K 25

DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING 1909.

:

:

46 2 231

4

20

1

3. 17

3 6

2

18 18 22 2 4 5 6

N

21

...

:

I

6

...

:

***

:

Small-pox.

Measles.

Whooping Cough.

Typhoid Fever.

Diphtheria.

Cholera.

Diarrhoea.

Dysentery.

Plague.

Influenza.

Chicken-pox.

Malarial Fever.

Puerperal Fever.

Septic-infections.

Syphilis (congenital).

Syphilis (acquired).

Poisoning.

Injuries.

Alcoholism. Developmental Diseases.

Old Age.

General Tuberculosis.

Beri-beri.

Cancer.

Paralysis and Convulsions.

Heart Diseases.

Pneumonia.

Phthisis.

Gastritis.

Enteritis.

Cirrhosis of Liver.

Peritonitis.

Nephritis.

Other causes.

Unknown.

All causes.

:

:

:

Civil,

1 2

Navy,...

British and

Foreign { Army, Community.

Chinese

Community.

:

...

:

6

:

:

...

:

5 11

2 I

2

:

:

:

31 3

:

:

2

...

:.

:

:.

1

:

. 15

8

00

:

23 38 3

:

123 15 25 76

4

3

6

1

4

1

1

1

12

2

6 3

77 37

1

1

I

1

:

:

:

4

788

18 292 312| 15 |418114 906, 444

6

20

20 37

63 4682

81

3

2 59 3

8

23 35 591

I 2

1 3

...

43 361

1

47

31124 5

15 64, 182 159

... 10

11

8

10 187

68 1350

7

1

46

18 5 9, 84

:

1

:

4 31

15 410

2

40

4

:

45

2

6

:

:

:

:

:

185

5

24

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

1

:

:

:

20

76

:

...

:.

:

:

F:

42 63

222

:

:

:

ེ མཚེ

18 10

1 1 2

:

21 6

I 1

1

دت

...

I

33

:

:

...

I

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Totals,

24

13

3

:.

:.

4

33 12

2395165 | 108

115

422 19 45

79 11 7 155

5

863 207 346545 31464 227 1156 773

6

25

27

35

835

63 806191 7267

K 27

P

RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDER-

MENTIONED INSTITUTIONS

During the Year ended 31st December, 1909.

The Government Civil

The Tung Wa Hospitals.

Cystitis,

Diarrhoea,

Diphtheria,

Dysentery,

Empyema,

Enteritis,

Hepatic Abscess,.

Hospitals.

Causes.

Abscess of Liver,

Acute Pancreatitis,

Alcoholism,

Anæmia,

Apoplexy,

No.

Causes.

No.

1

Apoplexy,

10

1

Ber:-beri,

258

Bright's Disease,.

19

Bronchitis,

47

Cancer of Breast,

3

Beri-beri.

5

of Cervix,

1

Bright's Disease,

of Face,

2

Calculus,

of Liver,.

1

Cancer of Liver,..

f Neck,

1

Cancer of Uterus,

Cirrhosis of Liver,

of Tongue,.

2

of Uterus,

Cane.mm Oris,

1

Cercial Concussion,.

Cholera,

Embolism,

Choleric Diarrhoea,

Curhesis of Liver,.

Convulsions,.

1

5

Leprosy,

Debility,

12

Malarial Fever,

Diarthera,

83

Mania,

1

Dysentery,

69

Meningitis,

4

Epilepsy,

Nephritis,

1

Fractine of Skull,

Peritonitis,

2

""

of Spine,

Phthisis,

16

Heart Disease,

Plague,

Hemiplegia,

Pneumonia,

5

Immaturity at Birth,.

Septicæmia,

3

Malarial Fever,

Shock,

Marasmus,

Suustroke,

Meningin,

1

49

5

1

90

2

8

Syncope,.

Multiple Injuries,

Tubercular Disease of Spine,

1

Nephritis,

Tuberculosis,

3

Old Age,...

Typhoid Fever,

Opium Poisoning,

2

Peritonitis,

6

Phthisis,

305

Total,

94

Plagne,

27

Pneumonia,

83

Puerperal Fever,

5

")

Eclampsia,

1

Scalds, Septicaemia, Shock,...

Carried forward,..... 1,136

K 28

RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDER-

MENTIONED INSTITUTIONS

During the Year ended 31st December, 1909.

Tung Wa Hospitals,-Cond.

Mortuary, Continued.

Causes.

No.

Causes.

No.

Brought forward,... 1,136

Brought forward, 960

Small-pox,

5

Puerperal Fever,

6

Syphilis,

3

Rupture of Aorta,

2

Tetanus,

of Spleen,

Tuberculosis,

4

Septicemia,

7

Typhoid Fever,

14

Small-pox,

3

Tetanus,

6

Total,

1,171

Tuberculosis,

Typhoid Fever, Undiagnosed,

Mortuary.

Causes.

Total,......... 1,000

No.

Acute Yellow Atrophy of

Liver,

1

The Alice Memorial and

Aneurysm,

Nethersole Hospitals.

Apoplexy,

7

Causes.

No.

Beri-beri,

138

Abscess of Buttock,

1

Bright's Disease,

3

Anæmia,

3

Bronchitis,

78

Beri-beri,

1

Cerebral Concussion,..

2

Bright's Disease,

1

Convulsions,....

49

Bronchitis,

4

Debility,

5

Burns,.

1

Diarrhoea,

119

Dysentery,

1

Drowning,

2

Eclampsia,

1

Dysentery,

13

Empyema,

1

Eclampsia,

1

Epiphysitis,

1

Endocarditis,

1

Heart Disease,

Fracture of Skull,

Inmaturity at Birth,.

Gastritis,

5

Marasmus,

Hanging (Suicide),

1

Meningitis,

Heart Disease,

33

Ovarian Cyst,.

I

Hernia,

1

Peritonitis,

1

Immaturity at Birth,...

29

Phthisis,

4

Inanition,

1

Placenta Prævia,

1

Malarial Fever,

42

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,

1

Marasmus,

31

Pneumonia,.

6

Measles,

Nephritis, Old Age, Peritonitis,

6 Premature Labour,

1

Puerperal Fever,

1

1

Rupture of Uterus,..

1

2

Septicemia,

1

Phthisis,

152

Tetanus,

1

Plague,

10

Tuberculosis,

1

Pneumonia,

219

Uræmia,

i

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,

3

Total,.......................

50

Carried forward,

960

K 29

RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDER-

MENTIONED INSTITUTIONS

During the Year ended 31st December, 1909.

The Italian Convent.

L'Asile de la Ste. Enfance.

Causes.

No.

Causes.

No.

Atelectasis,..

5

Abscess of Chest Wall,......

1

Beri-beri,

3

Anæmia,

1

Bronchitis,

79

Apoplexy,

1

Convulsions,

1

Atelectasis,

5

Chicken-pox,

1

Beri-beri,

2

Cirrhosis of Liver,

1

Bronchitis,

72

Diarrhoea,

81

Cellulitis,

1

Diphtheria,

6

Cerebral Thrombosis,

1

Dysentery,

Convulsions,

1

Enteritis,

6

Diarrhoea,

19

Erysipelas,

Gastritis,...

I

Diphtheria,

2

Dysentery,

1

Gastro Enteritis,

1

Epilepsy,

1

Hepatitis,

Fracture of Skull,

1

Hydrocephalus,

Gastro Enteritis,

1

Icterus Neonatorum,

8

Heart Disease,

3

Immaturity at Birth,

41

Hydrocephalus.

1

Inanition,...

6

Icterus Neonatorum,

1

Intussusception,

3

Immaturity at Birth,.

26

Malarial Fever,

6

Iuanition,

9

Marasinus,

298

Malarial Fever,

3

Meningitis,

37

Marasmus,

186

Nephritis,

2

Measles,

1

Oedema of Lung,

1

Meningitis,

98

Pericarditis,

3

Nephritis,

3

Peritonitis,

Old Age,

11

Phthisis,

3

Osteomyelitis,

1

Pleurisy,

14

Pericarditis,

2

Pneumonia,

337

Peritonitis,

Rickets,

19

Phthisis,.

4

Septicæmia,

1

Pleurisy,

16

Small-pox,,

1

Pneumonia,

178

Syphilis,

35

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,..

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

45

Syphilis,

35

Tetanus,

20

Tabes Mesenterica,

17

Trismus,

27

Tetanus,

114

Tuberculosis,

143

Tuberculosis,

122

Tumour of Brain,

1

Total,......... 1,248

Typhoid Fever,

2

Undiagnosed,

11

Total,

960

FRANCIS CLARK,

Superintendent of Statistics.

SANITARY BOARD OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 1st February, 1910.

E. D. C. Wolfe,

Registrar General of Deaths.

Table II.-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASE RECORDED IN EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR 1909.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

September. October.

August.

November.

December.

Total, 1909.

Grand

Plague,

European,

Chinese,

6

Others,

European,.

2

Typhoid,

Chinese,

Others,

1

European,

Cholera,

Chinese,

2

Others,

....

European,.

1

Small-pox,

Chinese,

Others,

European,

Diphtheria,

Chinese,

21:2

Others,

European,

Puerperal Fever,

Chinese,

Others,

Relapsing Fever,...... Others,

....

Total, 1909,..

1908,

16 22 32 38

1

2 1

4

3

NOWNO:

:

4

:

451

...

128

1

3

~~

Total, 1909.

Total, 1908.

Grand Total, 1908.

3

135

1,039

1,073

7

31

27

26

35

75

5

38

18

:

2

N

53

56

2

:.

2

17

11

2

Co

2

:

3

1

28

38

447

472

8

5

2

14

22

14

1

~

4

2

1 2

1 5

3

18

19

14

15

1

1

::

1

1

1

1

11 19 37 34 93 156 147 175

57 53 28 1,455426 141

16

5 11

9

12

292

45

19

1

2

8

1,668

- K 30 -

1

7

K 31

Table III.

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF THE PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS

DURING THE YEAR 1909.

CITY OF VICTORIA,

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

Mus Rattus,

4

3

18

1 35 34 42 31

Mus Decumanus,. 3 11 30 2 33 21 Mus Musculus,

1

23 12 13 13 11 184

8

Totals,... 7 14 48

3 68

58

52

60 43 19 15 12

.o ] Novembor : { ܗܶ

December.

Total.

6 2 1 200

15

399

Human cases of

Plague,

1

:

3

12

15

3

1

1

36

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

KOWLOON.

Mus Rattus, Mus Documanus, Mus Musculus,

Totals,...

Human cases of

Plague,

10

21. 15

8

17

:00:

10:

7: 31 24 8 25 11

formed

7 11 18 19 25 5 3

:

Juno.

July.

September.

:

August.

October.

November.

December.

223

32

76

1

1

108

91

Total.

Offences.

A

Table IV.--LIST OF PROSECUTIONS DURING THE YEAR 1909.

Summonses.

Convictions.

Penalties.

$

Remarks.

Breaches of Market Bye-laws,

15

"

"

Cowshed Bye-laws,.

"}

""

Laundry Bye-laws,

Bake-house Bye-laws,..

6

16

> }

"}

Dairy Bye-laws,

Offensive Trade Bye-laws,

B-002 L

15

1

6

16

SHO02 4

· 140

20

39

151

12

5

>>

Bound over to come up for judgment | when called upon.

Carrying nightsoil through public streets

3

3

7

during prohibited hours,

Conveying buckets full of nightsoil with-

1

1

1

K 32 -

out covers,

Depositing rubbish in streets,

41

40

229.50

1 discharged.

Harbour,

10

10

138

""

Urine in drains,...

2

8

""

>"

Nightsoil in streets,

33

Pig-wash in streets,

4

Dirty latrines,

Failing to fill up rat-runs,

30

Case withdrawn.

,, limewash,

20

2 cautioned.

Hawking fish in a market,

1

20

Carried forward,

114

110

$852.50

Table IV.-LIST OF PROSECUTIONS DURING THE YEAR 1909,—Continued.

Offences.

Summonses. Convictions.

Penalties.

Remarks.

$

Brought forward,

114

110

852.50

"

Illegal cubicles,

occupation of basements,

Overcrowding tenements,

82∞

2

20

10

4 ordered to remove the cubicles. 1 discharged.

64

1 absconded.

Obstructing lane by refuse,

1

20

Occupying latrine as dwelling,

3

25

Refusing to sell milk from dairy,

1

75

Selling pork without licence,

4

275

""

unwholesome pork,

1

150

milk,.

1

}}

food,

1

5

.

""

Stealing 3 bottles the property of the Government,..

Absconded.

Case withdrawn.

Storing timbers in market stall,

1

1

5

Unlawfully trespassing on Government

1

1

10

property,

Wilfully damaging the property of His Majesty the King,

1

Case withdrawn.

Total,

146

133

$1,511.50

K 33

K 34

Memorandum on the subject of Vaccination and Re-vaccination for

the information of School Masters and Others.

One of the diseases which has caused the greatest number of deaths in Europe in past years, and which still causes many deaths and much disfigurement in China, is Small-pox.

It is very seldom indeed that a person suffers from a second attack of Small-pox and there are some seasons during which out- breaks of very severe and fatal Small-pox occur, and other seasons in which the disease is not so virulent. This no doubt suggested the idea that if healthy persons were deliberately given an attack of the disease during a mild season they would have a very good chance of recovery and would thus be protected from contracting the disease again should a virulent outbreak occur at some later date. This method of what is called "PROTECTIVE INOCULATION was practised in India several hundreds of years ago and was introduced from In- dia into Europe and became quite common in England from the year 1700.

,,

The same method of protection found its way into China, and even at the present day this method is largely practised throughout this country, the usual procedure being to place some of the Small- pox crusts, perfumed with a little musk and wrapped in wool, into the nostrils of the person. This is followed, some days later, by the usual Small-pox rash over the face and body, with fever and general sickness, and if the person is fortunate he recovers and has thus acquired, in most cases, protection against future outbreaks of Small-pox, but at the cost of at least two or three weeks of serious illness, and at the risk of his life, for many of these inoculation cases die.

Fortunately, however, the discovery was made in Europe at the end of the eighteenth century that cows and calves suffer from a disease very similar to Small-pox, and that if we take the inoculation crusts from this animal, instead of from a human case of Small-pox, we can protect persons from Small-pox without producing any serious illness or running any risk of loss of life. This process is called 'Vaccination" and its introduction is associated with the name of Jenner who first tried it in England in 1796. It is now in general use throughout almost the whole world, and there is usually a law that infants shall be vaccinated before they are six months old and that inoculation with human Small-pox material is illegal and will be severely punished.

The result of this general vaccination of infants has been to enormously reduce the number of deaths from Small-pox and to alter very materially the age-incidence of the disease. In the 18th cen- tury almost all the cases of Small-pox occurred in infants and very young children, as many as 90 per cent. of the total deaths from this

K 35

disease being children under 5 years of age, whereas nowadays the bulk of the cases occur in persons over ten years of age and this is well shown by the following analysis of some 10,000 cases treated within recent years in the London Small-pox Hospitals:-

Vaccinated; good marks

Ages

Vaccinated; imperfect marks

Said to be

vaccinated; Unvaccinated

no marks

Cases Deaths Cases Deaths Cases Deaths Cases Deaths

0-5

51

(

182

21

128

47

677 383

5-10

267

2

714

48

325

87

1187 563

10-20 1045 17

1976

98

419

81

521

160

20-40 725 37

1898 258

420

140

382

181

40+

48

266

51 131

44

79

34

'

It is very evident from this Table that the influence of Vaccination performed in infancy fades gradually, and although its power against death remains to a considerable extent, reducing that is to say the chance of a fatal ending to an attack of the disease, yet its power to prevent an attack gradually becomes less from the age of ten years onwards. This is why Germany passed a law in 1874 that every child must be re-vaccinated at the age of 12 years. This law applies to all children, whether boys or girls, but boys have again to be re-vaccinated when they enter the Army at the age of about 19.

As a result of this law Germany has been able to practically eradicate Small-pox from the country as will be seen from the following figures: The population of Germany is 56 millions and from 1891 to 1902 inclusive there were 607 deaths due to Small-pox, or less than one death per million of population per annum. It is stated that most of these deaths occur near the frontiers of the country, where it is not so easy to exercise such absolute control over the re-vaccinations as it is in the interior. England with a population of 32 millions had during the same period 6,761 deaths from Small-pox or more than 17 deaths per million of population per annum, The death rate in fact from Small-pox in England is almost twenty times as heavy as in Germany, and this result has been obtained by Germany solely through insisting on the re-vaccination of school children at the age of 12 years and by the further re-vaccination of all boys who enter the Army.

All school children of whatever age should therefore be at once vaccinated if they have not been vaccinated in infancy, while if there is evidence of infant vaccination they should be re-vaccinated at the age of 12 years, and it is well to explain to the children that the discomfort attending re-vaccination is very small indeed, and so many improve- ments have taken place in the preparation of the lymph that there is no risk whatever now attending it.

K 36

Vaccination is usually performed by making three or four very small scratches on the muscular part of the upper arm and applying the vaccine to the scratches. In the case of re-vaccination this will produce a small pimple on the second or third day which then becomes a small blister, while on the seventh or eighth day there will be a scab or crust. There will be a small amount of itching for the first two or three days, and the child must take care not to knock the arm roughly, but there will be no ill-health, the child will be able to take its meals as usual and will be able to run about and play, so long as it does not join in rough games with its school fellows.

This re-vaccination will be performed free of cost at any of the Public Hospitals or Dispensaries or arrangements can be made for it to be done at the School. A certificate should always be obtained by the child from the Doctor who performs the re-vaccination and this should be handed to the School-master or School-mistress.

FRANCIS CLARK, Medical Officer of Health.

July 14th, 1909.

K 37

Annexe C.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

CA

}

REPORT BY DR. J. BELL, Superintendent.

STAFF.

From May to November I took over duties as Principal Civil Medical Officer, Dr. Koch acting as Superintendent and Dr. Moore as Assistant Superintendent of Civil Hospital. On my return to duty here Dr. Koch proceeded on home leave.

Sisters Millington and Stollard left for home, the latter leaving the service on transference to Nairobi. Sister Lee returned from England.

Sisters Johnstone, Park, Luckman and McLeish joined the service, the last named resigning after a few months' service.

Nurse Poole, Probationer Nurses Kennett, senior and junior, Wilson, Chisholm, Olsen and MacGowan resigned and Probationer Nurses Mooney and Kennedy joined. Maternity Nurse Ma Fong left and was succeeded by Nurse Evans.

Mr. R. Chapman, Accountant, left for long leave in Australia, the first taken since he joined the service in 1892.

Wardmaster Cooke went home on leave. Wardmaster Brown was dismissed and was succeeded by Wardmaster Grant.

STATISTICS.

The total number of admissions was 2,384 as against 2,527 last year and 16,981 out-patients were treated as against 18,207.

The following Tables are attached :-

I. Admissions and Deaths under respective diseases from

all Government Hospitals.

II.-Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police Station

during 1909.

The following Table gives the number and class of patients admitted during the past ten years and the deaths:-

YEAR.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

1908.

1909.

Police,

920

937

938

759

707

726

742

776

660

633

Paying Patients,

928

858

956

794

794

866

720

762

724

659

Government Servants,

266

339

460

319

267

271

339

367

315

250

Police Cases,

347

348

300

276

262

329

307

318

285

287

Free,

569

466

454

646

555

512

637

488

543

555

Total,

3,030

2,948

3,108

2,794 2,585

2,704

2,745

2,711

2,527

2,384

K 38

Total Deaths,

155

153

140

142

128

150

167

170

157

131

Percentage.

5.1

5.2

4.5

5.0

4.1

5.6

6.0

6.2

6.2

5.4

I

K 39

This shows a decrease in all classes but "Free" as compared with last year.

Deaths.-There were 131 during the year making a percentage of 5'4. Of this number 47 died within 24 hours of admission.

year.

The average daily number of sick was 90'2 as against 886 last

Women and Children.-There were 236 women admitted as against 185. Of this number 25 died (13.5 %). 64 children were admitted, with a death rate of 50% as against 49.

Nationalities.-Europeans-548 against 594. Indians and co- loured-778 against 874. Asiatics-1,058 against 1,059.

The death rate amongst the nationalities was European 4.3 %, Indians 3.2 and Asiatics 7.7.

DISEASES.

The most prevalent diseases were:---

1909.

1908.

Increase or Decrease.

Malarial Fever,

188 against 282

94

Febricula, -

98

93

""

Influenza,

80

140

"

Dysentery, -

40

84

1

Tuberculosis,

66

45

"}

Beri-beri,

42

56

Rheumatism,

59

69

++ |

5

60

44

+21

14

1

"1

Diseases of Respiratory

1)

System,

159

123

21

+ 36

System,

240

226

+14

Injuries,

505

482

+ 23

19

Diseases of Digestive

The largest number of deaths occurred in the following dis-

eases :-

Tuberculosis, -

Diseases of Digestive System,

Respiratory System, Urinary System,

""

""

"

Typhoid Fever,

Plague,

Injuries,

23 deaths.

13

""

7

""

39

9

>1

6

32

>

New Growths.The following cases of malignant diseases were under treatment :-

Chinese male aged 42

Carcinoma of neck.

33

Sarcoma of neck.

17

31

50

21

female

34

""

uterus.

32

"

11

་་

Carcinoma of uterus.

42

Schirrus of breast.

""

""

"J

22

""

"

Sarcoma of neck.

46

Carcinoma of uterus.

38

Schirrus of breast.

"}

"1

A

K 40

Fractures.-The following were

treated:-

the principal fractures

1 with 1 death.

Spine,

Skull,

Jaw,

Thigh,

Forearm,

Arm,

Leg,

7

6 deaths.

"}

6674N

2

7

2

5

Malarial Fever.-There was a decrease under this disease—188 as against 282 in 1908, 247 in 1907 and 239 in 1906.

Dengue Fever.-No cases of this disease were under treatment. Typhoid Fever.-28 with 9 deaths (32.14%) as against 12 with 1 death (8.33%).

Appendicitis.-Four cases were under treatment. All recovered after operation. Two were Chinese.

Liver Abscess.-3 cases with 3 deaths. The two Europeans were imported cases and the Chinese came from Tung Wa. All were in an advanced stage and the operation was performed as forlorn hope.

OPERATIONS.

a

A total number of 195 were performed during the year (147 in 1908). Chloroform was administered 200 times whilst a few minor operations were done under local anesthesia. No casualties occurred under the administration of the anaesthetics. Eight cases of radical cure of Hernia were done by Dr. Koch-all successful. Two cases of Ovarian Tumour were also operated on successfully (and four cases of Appendicitis.

VACCINATIONS.

During the year 521 were performed as against 627 last year-300 primary vaccinations of which 220 were successful and 221 re-vaccinations with 86 successful.

SICKNESS AMONGST THE POLICE, GAOL AND SANITARY STAFFS,

Police.

Admissions.-633 were under treatment as against 660, a decrease amongst Europeans and Indians and a slight increase amongst the Chinese (2).

Table II gives the admissions for Malarial Fever from each station.

Deaths. There were seven deaths during the year, two Europeans, one from heat stroke and one from a bullet wound received on duty, three Indians from Leprosy, Phthisis and Pneumonia and two Chinese from Dysentery and bullet wound.

Invaliding.-Four Indians for Leprosy, Phthisis, mental instabi- lity and paralysis, four Chinese for Phthisis (2), Heart Disease and Hernia.

/

K 41

Sick Rate.—59'80 per cent. for Europeans as against 87:52 in 1908, 99 75 for Indians as against 117 51, 21:18 for Chinese as against 28.98.

Mortality Rate.-151 per cent. for Europeans as against nil, 0.73 as against nil for Indians and 0:39 for Chinese as against 0·20.

Malaria.--87 cases as against 108 last year. The Europeans suffered to the extent of 37 per cent., the Indians 16.7 per cent. and the Chinese 25 per cent. The percentage incidence of the whole Force shows a decrease of 2.9% as compared with last year. There were 6 re-admissions for this disease as against 15 last year, all amongst the Indians, five coming in twice and one three times. The worst stations are Sai Kung (87-5), Tsat Tse Mui (500) Stanley (426), Sham Shui Po (411), Tung Chung (285), Sheung Shui (214), Bay View (200), and No. 2 (13-16) whilst Water Police only suffered to the extent of 2·3 %.

Other ailments call for no comments.

Gaol.-There were 61 admissions as against 53 (685 against There were no deaths and one Indian was invalided for

62.9%). Phthisis.

Sanitary.-There were 70 admissions against 50. No deaths occurred and no invaliding.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

There were 122 admissions as against 82-the largest number since the building was opened. There were 4 deaths, 3 amongst Chinese due to Albuminuria, shock following Cæsarian section and Peritonitis due probably to a ruptured duodenal ulcer and one Japanese due to Albuminuria. Of those admitted 24 were wives of Government servants, 59 private paying and 35 free.

FEES.

The total amount of fees received from the Civil Hospital and its annexes (excluding Victoria Hospital) was $24,346.90 as compared with $26,970.30.

K 42

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1909 at the Civil, Victoria and Gaol Hospitals.

DISEASES.

Remaining in Hospital at

end of 1908.

Yearly Total.

Total Cases Treated.

Admissions Deaths.

Remaining in

Hospital at

end of 1909.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox,

Measles,

Mumps,

.....

Chicken-pox,

Influenza,

Diphtheria,

Febricula,

Enteric Fever,

Dysentery,

...

Relapsing Fever, Plague,

1

8

84

1

85

77

2

124

126

30

σ

9

30

N

88

9

90

INNN

2

2

2

1

1

7

6

7

Malarial Fever:

1. Quartan,

2. Simple Tertian,

3. Malignant,

Malarial Cachexia,.

222

:

3

:

3

92

95

121

1

126

2

2

Beri-beri,.......

1

50

5

61

6222

Erysipelas,

5

6

Septicemia,

3

2

3

: :

Tubercle,..

6

60

23

66

3

Leprosy,

1

1

1

Syphilis,

3

47

50

3

(a.) Inherited,

1

1

Gonorrhoea,

5

63

68

4

Scurvy,

5

Alcoholism,......

50

~ 2

1

5

2

50

Rheumatism,

Cyst,

New Growth, Non-malignant,

New Growth, Malignant,

3

67

70

2

• 3

3

:

8

8

11

Anæmia,

Debility,

105

នេះគ

16

2 3 4

12

17

109

O O - CI

2

2

1

2

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System.

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Nerves :—

Neuritis,

Meningitis,

Carried forward,

1

♡ -

:

1

1

6

38 1,087

77

1,125

42

K 43

Table II,-Continued.

Diseases and Deaths in 1909 at the Civil, Victoria and Goal Hospitals.

DISEASES.

Brought forward,..

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders :-

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Chorea,

Epilepsy,

Neuralgia,

Hysteria,..

SUB-SECTION 3.

Mental Diseases :--

Remaining in

Hospital at

end of 1908.

Yearly Total.

Total Cases Treated.

Admissions Deaths.

Remaining in

Hospital at end of 1909.

38

1,087

77

1,125

42

2

Qm

8

1

10

1

5

11

3

51

10 11

2

1

11

3

Mania,

1

1

Melancholia,

3

3

Dementia,

1

6

Delusional Insanity,

1

Disease of the Eye,......

10

5

54

59

2

Ear,

11

Nose,

2

:::

11

2

2

,,

Circulatory System,...

1

43

4

44

"?

Respiratory System,..

184

8

191

}">

Digestive System,

5

268

13

273

"

Lymphatic System,

3

69

72

"

Urinary System,

2

33

9

35

"

Male Organs,

1

76

77

""

Female Organs,

1

31

32

"

Organs of Locomotion,

4

68

72

Cellular Tissue,

80

404

80

""

1251 pm CO LO T

1

3

1

6

5

Skin,

1

32

33

"

Injuries,

Effects of Heat,

Malformations,

Poisons,

Parasites,

Under Observation,

In Attendance,

Parturition,...

124

:

20

492

32

512

12

1

19

20

1

8

::

5

5

16

16

...

2

188

190

1

1

31

3'2

...

27

1

28

1

TOTAL,.

98

2,871

151

2,969

88

Table II.-Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police Station during 1909.

· K 44

Station.

Central,.

No. 2,

""

7,

Bay View,

Tsat Tse Mui, Shaukiwan,...

Stanley,....

1

I

...

2

2 3 2

612

00-

:: co

+:

13 16+

January.

February. March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

Septmber.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

Percentage to Strength.

Increase or Decrease over 1908.

4

26

8.4 + 0.32

5

2.66

I

6

9.2 + 4.6

:

2

2

20.0

80·0

1

1

2

50.0

30.0

3

3

42.6

+ 33.6

Aberdeen,

Pokfulam,.

1

1

2

4

19.04

23.6

...

1

16.6

16.6

Kennedy Town,.

Yaumati,

1

14.2

+ 0·08

1

Ι

2

1

14.6

+ 4.9

Sham Shui Po,...

1

1

1

3

1

7

41.1

5.5

Au Tau,

Ping Shan,.

Sheung Shui,

1

1

2

12.5

0.8

2

2

14.2

1

2

3

21.4

24.0

Tai Po,

Tung Cheung,

1 4.5

21.8

1

2 | 28.5

Sha Tin,

Sai Kung,

Mt. Gough.....

Lamma Island,

Water,

1

1

3

16.6

58.4

2

1

1

87.5

+ 37.5

5.2

+ 5.2

1

20.0

+ 20·0

:

:

1

1

3

2.3

2:0

Total,.

3

3

6

13

11

12

10

11

87

8.3

2.9

L

K 45

Annexe D.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

REPORT BY DR. J. M. ATKINSON, Medical Officer in Charge.

Staff. Dr. Atkinson was in charge of the Hospital until the 4th of May, Dr. Bell from May 4th until November 18th when Dr. Atkinson returned to the Colony and resumed charge.

Nursing Staff. During the year there were seven of the Nursing Sisters and five of the Nurses of the Medical Department on duty for varying periods of the year when required.

Buildings.-These were maintained in a good state of repair. The walls of the wards were plastered and re-colourwashed and the bath rooms of some of the private wards tiled.

Admissions, Diseases and Deaths.-There were 219 admissions during 1909 as compared with 234 in 1908. Table I gives in detail the diseases and causes of death during the year, from this it will be seen that there were eleven deaths, a percentage of 502 as compared with 3·3 in 1908.

thus:

The admissions during the last three years may be classified

1907.

1. Age:-

1909.

1908.

Under 3 years,

82

Between 3 and 12 years,

24} 106

66

Over 12 years,

113

44 124

} 110

29

60189

122

2. Nationality:-

Europeans, Asiatics,

196

208

166

23

26

45

3. Class of Patients :-

Paying Patients,

131

108

134

Government Servants,

2

3

13

Wives and children of

Government Servants,

50

65

41

Free,

36

58

90

Malarial Ferer.-There were 26 admissions as compared with

23 in 1908.

They are classified as follows :-

Simple tertian,

10

Malignant,

13

Mixed infection (simple tertian & malignant), 3

K 46

Of the tertian cases four were from Lyemun, two from Kowloon, one each from Victoria Barracks, Murray Barracks, Magazine Gap and Bay View Police Station.

The malignant cases were from Kowloon (3), Lyemun (2), Victoria Barracks (2), Bowen Road Hospital (2), and one each from Quarry Bay, Tai O Police Station, Sai Kung Police Station and South Face Camp.

The three mixed infection came from Lyemun.

In the month of December there were no less than eight European patients admitted suffering from Malaria, seven of whom came from Lyemun. Five were children from one family, all had enlarged spleens, three were suffering from mixed infection (simple tertian and malignant) and two from simple tertian.

Operations.—The following were performed during the year:-

Curétting,

Fistula in âno,

2

1

Abcess (incision),

Tonsillotomy,

Paracentesis Thoracis,

Lachrymal Sinus,

1

1

Vaccinations.-There were 14 during the year.

Confinements.-There were 25 confinements during the year with one death from peritonitis.

Fees.-$7,203.37 were received during the year as against $5,119.89 in 1908.

1

K 47

Annexe E.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

REPORT BY DR. W. B. A. MOORE, Medical Officer.

During the year there were 176 patients under treatment. Seven Government Servants were admitted and of these, four were treated for alcoholism, one was under observation and three were certified to be insane (2 Indian Policemen and 1 Chinese Lighthouse- keeper). Eighty-seven cases were brought in by the Police.

There were 34 paying patients, (39 in 1908). The deaths numbered 14, nearly 8% of the number under treatment (5% in 1908).

Table I.

Nationality and Sex of Patients treated in 1909.

Other

Europeans. Indians. Chinese. Nation-

alities. Total.

M. F. M. F. M. F.

M. F.

Remaining

at end of 1908,

9 1

w

3

1

1 18

Admitted,

26

تن

81

34

6

1 158

Total number treated

35

4

84 37

7

2

176

Discharged,

27

1

66

34 4

136

Died,

1

1

11

1

14

Remaining

at end of 1909,

7

3

N

7 2

3

2

26

K 48

Table II.

Return of Diseases and Deaths in 1909.

Remaining YEARLY TOTAL.

Diseases.

in Hospital at end of 1908.

Ad- missions.

Deaths.

Remaining

Total Cases in Hospital

Treated.

at end of

1909.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Delirium Tremens,

Alcoholism,......

Acute Nephritis,

A

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous Sys-

tem :-

SUB-SECTION II.

Functional

Nervous

orders :-

Epilepsy,...

Bulbar Paralysis,.

SUB-SECTION III.

Dis-

2

1

25

26

1

1

201

1

1

1

Mental Diseases

mada

Idiocy,

Mania,

Melancholia,...

Dementia,

Delusional Insanity,.

General Paralysis of the

Insane,

Poisoning,

Under Observation,

17341

2

3

1

51

58

11

9

21

25

11

222

12

3

6

12

1

1

1

1

1

31

31

లు

Immersion,

2

2

:

Total, 1909,

18

158

14

176

26

1908,

21

191

II

212

808

18

"

*

K 49

Annexe F.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITALS.

REPORT BY DR. G. H. L. FITZWILLIAMS, Medical Officer in Charge.

Dr. W. B. A. Moore was medical officer in charge of the hospitals for infectious diseases from the beginning of the year until May 4th. Dr. J. C. Thomson from May 5th until December 28th when I assumed charge. The facts for this report were supplied by Dr. Thomson before his departure.

Cases of Plague being now treated in the General Hospitals only cases of Small-pox or other infectious disease are now admitted to the Kennedy Town Hospital. Ten cases of Small-pox came under treatment in the Government Hospitals (90 in 1908) and eight cases in the Tung Wah Small-pox Branch Hospital (69 in 1908).

Kennedy Town Hospital.

Two cases were admitted :-

---

A Japanese, confluent Small-pox, died. An Indian, discrete Small-pox.

Hospital Hulk Hygeia.

Ten cases were admitted:

European, one confluent, one discrete.

Indian, six discrete.

European, one for observation (Syphilis).

Chinese, one for observation (Gastritis). All recovered.

The Hulk Hygeia has now been sold.

The Tung Wah Small-pox Brunch Hospital.

Eleven cases, all Chinese, were treated at the matshed hospital:-

Four confluent, four discrete, cases. Three for observation (Acue Vulgaris, Syphilis, Erythema). Three cases con- fluent died.

The Government having given permission that the buildings hitherto used for a Plague Branch Hospital at Kennedy Town, and not now required for this owing to the erection of a Plague extension of the main hospital in the City, may be utilized as a Small-pox Branch Hospital, extensive repairs and improvements are being done to fit them for their new purposes.

K 50

Annexe G.

VICTORIA GAOL.

REPORT BY DR. G. H. L. FITZWILLIAMS, Medical Officer.

Dr. W. B. A. Moore was Medical Officer of the Gaol until May 4th, Dr. J. C. Thomson from that date until December 28th, when I assumed charge. The facts for this report were supplied by Dr. Thomson before his departure.

Buildings. The prison buildings are well maintained and in good sanitary condition. In the old prison the windows have been enlarged in the corridors and stairs on all the floors, greatly impro- ving light and venlilation both of which in this building are now adequate and satisfactory.

for

Towards the end of the year the West end of the Prison Hospital and the Gaol Offices were taken down in order to make way the erection of a new hall capable of accommodating seventy-eight additional prisoners. Besides this hall, a new reception room, offices, bathroom for new prisoners, boiler house and clothes store are to be erected on the site of the buildings removed. In the plan- ning of this re-arrangement, inprovement of the ventilation of the prison has been held in view.

Statistics. The general health of the prisoners throughout the year has been good. There have been no cases of serious epidemic

disease during the year.

Admissions to the Gaol Hospital were 360. Of these 91 were admitted under observation and found to be malingering, so that the admission for genuine illness only totalled 269, a percentage of 5'1 to the total admission to the Gaol (5'8 in 1908). Malaria has been less prevalent this year. The number of cases treated in the Gaol Hospital during the past ten years are as follows :---

1900 - 1901 -

1902

1903

1904 -

163 1905

98 1906

63 1907

93 1908

59 1909

52

22

50

68

13

Most of the cases classed as Fchrieula occurred almost simulta- neously in September, and consisted of a transient fever of less than 48 hours duration, influenza-like in character, but leaving no debility or tendency to other illness. At the same time a similar febricula

was prevalent outside the Gaol.

A number of cases of mild Scurvy occurred in the same month, and one proved fatal in a man who was debilitated by previously discased conditions of important organs. The prison dietary was carefully overhauled, and precautions are being taken to prevent a recurrence of the probable cause of this disease next summer.

There were 8 cases of Beri-beri (13 in 1908). The disease was in all cases contracted before admission to the prison.

There were 35 cases of Dysentery (17 in 1908).

K 51

The total number of out-patients treated was 1,137. principal diseases so treated were :—

Syphilis,

50

Gonorrhoea,

17

Rheumatism,

66

Diseases of the Respiratory System,

119

Scabies,

124

Ringworm,

160

The

!

Twenty-three prisoners were discharged on medical grounds (Phthisis 12, Leprosy 3, Beri-beri 2, Bright's Disease 1, Pregnancy 1, Peritonitis 1, Dysentery 1, Mental Conditions 2).

There were 9 deaths from natural causes, and 2 deaths by hang- ing in execution of death sentences.

Vaccinations.-2,594 prisoners were vaccinated during the year of which 1,413 were successful, 319 unsuccessful and 862 not in- spected owing to early discharge.

No case of corporal punishment required any after treatment.

The following Table is appended:—

I.-Rate of Sickness and Mortality for 1909.

Table I.

Rate of Sickness and Mortality in Victoria Gaol.

Total Number of :-

Daily Average

Number of:-

Rate per cent. of :-

Pisoners admit-

ted to Gaol,

Admissions to Hospital.

Cases treated as

Out-patients.

Deaths due to

Disease.

Prisoners in

Gaol.

Sick in

Hospital.

l'ospital

Out-patients.

Admissions to Hospital to Total Admis- sions to Gaol.

Daily Average of Sick in Hospital to Daily Average of Prisoners.

Daily Average of All Sick in Gaol to Daily Average of Prisoners.

Deaths due to Disease to Total Admissions

to Gaol.

#

1909 5,215 360 1,137 9 560 7-80 26 66

6.90

1.21

6.01

0.17

1908 4,778 432 750 10465 6-18 23:11

9:00

1.32

6.29

0.2

-K 52 -

Annexe H.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

REPORT BY DR. J. W. HARTLEY, Medical Officer.

Staff.

Mr. Naidu has been stationed at North Face Camp, Beacon Hill Tunnel, throughout the year.

Dr. Chan Tsan Kun was Assistant Medical Officer at Taipokau until the 5th April, when he was transferred to the Bacteriological Institute in Hongkong and his place was taken by Mr. Lam Yun Hae who remained until the end of June when the post was abolished.

Mr. Kelly has superintended the Sanitary Work in the Camps along the line.

At each of the three Dispensaties, Kowloon Chai, Shatin and Taipokau, a Chinese dresser has been on duty, day and night, and from each Dispensary an Indian Foreman has made a daily round of coolie quarters on his section, issuing quinine, etc., to those in need and bringing in or reporting cases requiring medical attendance.

Quinine pills were issued daily to coolies whenever practicable during the months of June, July, August, September and October.

As the population was such a shifting one, it was impossible to carry out the regular issuing of quinine with any degree of thoroughness.

Coolie lines and all drains were regularly cleansed with disinfectant fluids throughout the year.

Camps are all supplied with Sanitary Dust Bins and Refuse has been burnt daily.

Pools of water which afforded harbour for mosquitoes and which for one reason or another could not be drained, have been regularly treated with kerosine oil.

The general health of the Railway employees has shewn a steady improvement; there was a decrease in the number of entries from Malarial Fever and Dysentery in spite of the fact that a much greater proportion of the sick men came forward for Western treatment than formerly.

There was an increase under the heading of "Injuries" but the cases were for the most part slight—very few being serious enough to necessitate hospital treatment.

Beri-beri still causes a fair amount of sickness and several deaths have occurred from this cause, some with remarkable rapidity.

In November four coolies died at Kowloon Chai on four succes- sive days, three of the deaths taking place in the same room.

The coolies had apparently been in fairly good health, at any rate they had been working as usual when they suddenly

1

- K 53

developed symptoms of acute Beri-beri and died shortly afterwards. Post mortem examination confirmed the diagnosis. The building in which these deaths occurred was promptly disinfected and closed, since when there have been no more deaths from Beri-beri at Kowloon Chai.

The Camps at No. 5 Tunnel, Tai Po, have shown distinct improvement since drainage and other prophylactic measures, which were made possible by the appointment of an axtra Assistant Medical Officer at the end of last year, could be carried out with some degree of thoroughness.

Until the headings of Beacon Hill Tunnel met, allowing a free current of air through, there was considerable trouble caused by the irritating vapours given off from the gelatine used for blasting purposes. The vapours given off from a well and thoroughly detonated charge do not appear to do much damage but if for any reason part of the gelatine is lighted and burns slowly before detonation takes place, the fumes given off from the slowly burning part of the charge are exceedingly dangerous causing stupefaction very quickly and death is liable to result owing to fixed chemical compounds being formed in the blood, thus destroying its oxygen- carrying property.

come through dense They all complained

On June 10th, a gang of coolies had to fumes on their way out of the Tunnel at Shatin. of feeling sick and dizzy and three of them died very shortly afterwards. The rest had completely recovered by the following morning.

The total number of cases seen at the three Dispensaries was 2,192 against 2,064 in 1908 and 3,667 in 1907. Of these the following were the principal cause :—

Tunnel No. 2.

Tai

Disease.

1909.1908. | 1907.

Po.

South Face. North Face.

Malaria,

140

113

197

450

556 1,168

Dysentery,

8

10

11

Beri-beri, -

1

7

44

Injuries,

84

264

260 608

298

29

53

124

52

58

81

354

371

K 54

Annexe I.

NEW TERRITORIES.

REPORT BY DR. J. W. HARTLEY, Medical Officer.

Dr. Li Ho Ching was in charge of the Dispensary and Cottage Hospital at Taipo and the Leper Asylum at Au Tau until October 31st when he resigned.

Since that date there has been no Chinese medical officer at Taipo, but a trained "dresser" has been constantly on duty at the Dispensary to attend to the numerous minor cases which have occurred and to report more serious ones.

Routine fortnightly visits have been paid to the following stations during the year by the Chinese medical officer :-

Taipo, Sheung Shui, Sha Tau Kok, Au Tau, San Tin, Ping Shan.

The Assistant Railway Medical Officer has regularly visited Sha Tin station as he was in residence at Sha Tin railway camp close at hand.

An outbreak of Small-pox occurred in the Castle Peak district in March and occasioned a few deaths but never became very serious

In May Plague broke out in the Chinese town of Sam Chün with disastrous results to the populace. It was feared that villages in the British territory would became infected as a result but the only place attacked apparently was the small village of Loi Tung near Sha Tau Kok where eleven deaths occurred in 21 days. By the end of the month the disease had totally disappeared. The Head- men of the neighbouring villages were instructed in the methods to adopt to prevent the spread of such an epidemic, and made use of the best means at their disposal.

These were the only epidemics in the territory during the year.

Vaccinations.--112 vaccinations were perforined, out of which 108 were successful, 2 were unsuccessful, and 2 were not seen again.

Leper Asylum.-13 lepers have been inmates of the asylum during the year.

Y

K 55

Taipo Dispensary.-2,200 new cases were treated at the dis- pensary and 453 old cases. The following Table shows a detailed list of the cases:-

New Cases.

Old Cases.

Malaria,

956

43

Injuries,

150

23

Diseases of the Skin,

285

49

Respiratory Organs,

120

68

""

,,

Digestive

173

44

""

Eye,

42

13

""

Ear,

24

1

}"

""

Nervous System,

20

11

Circulatory

11

10

>>

""

Urinary

2

""

Ulcers, Abscesses, &c.,

265

85

Dysentery,

20

Beri-beri,

8

Rheumatism,

45

Febricula,

12

52152

Adenitis,

7

Anæmia,

6

6

Tumour,

2

Kerosine Poisoning,

1

Debility,

7

6

Diseases of Women,

5

Venereal Diseases,

39

59

2,200

453

Taipo Cottage Hospital.-The hospital was closed from October 31st to the end of the year. During the ten months it was open 35 new cases were admitted. Out of these 4 were transferred to hospitals in Hongkong and there were 7 deaths.

The following shows a list of the cases :—

Diseases.

Malaria, Dysentery,

Ulcers, Abcesses, &c., Heart Disease,

Pneumonia, Pleurisy, &c.,

Phthisis,

co co

3

рай сонсл

Remaining

in hospital

from 1908.

Admissions.

Deaths.

INN

Injuries,

3 15

Trachoma,

Epilepsy,

Orchitis,

Total,

6

-

35

7

--

Transferred

to Hongkong.

#1

3

1

·

K 56

Annexe J.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. G. H. L. FITZWILLIAMS, Inspecting Medical Officer.

Dr. J. C. Thomson was Inspecting Medical Officer throughout the year until his retirement from the public service towards the end of December: I assumed temporary charge of this duty and the data for the following report have been supplied by Dr. Thomson.

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT.

The year has been one of rapid advance in the organisation and equipment of the Tung Wah Hospital. In March all the wards were thrown open by the Directors for the purposes of the clinical instruction of the students of the Hongkong College of Medicine, and the Inspecting Medical Officer became Lecturer on Clinical Me- dicine to the College. An equipment of clinical apparatus for all ordinary purposes was procured from England, and is now in regu- lar use, with a corresponding improvement in the value of the work being done by the institution.

Three large plague wards and seven private wards have been added to the accommodation of the hospital, and were formally de- clared open by His Excellency the Governor, Sir F. J. D. Lugard, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O., on the 23rd of December.

New convenient accommodation for a receiving ward has been provided, and the former receiving ward has been transformed into an out-patient department for out-patients desiring European treat- ment. Out-patients being treated by Chinese methods are seen in the large hall of the extension hospital on the opposite side of Po Yan Street. An improved European dispensary has also been pro- vided.

There is now a well equipped laboratory, and the office accom- modation has been increased considerably.

The hospital kitchen is being rebuilt with new quarters for part of the hospital staff on the floor above it. Arrangements have been made for a complete overhauling of the extension hospital be- fore the Chinese New Year, when all defects and results of wear and tear will be made good.

STATISTICS.

There has continued to be a greater demand for admission to the wards than it has been possible to meet, and many cases that might suitably have been received as in-patients have had to be re- fused admittance, and treated in the out-patient department. Over- pressure has also had to be relieved repeatedly by the transfer of batches of chronic cases, especially cases of Beri-beri, to a hospital in Canton, by arrangement with the Directors of that institution.

The admissions to the Hospital were 3,723 as against 4,122

for 1908.

1

K 57

At the beginning of year 1909 there were 209 patients remain- ing in the wards from the previous year, and 3,723 patients were admitted during the year, making a total of 3,932 cases treated. 2,514 were discharged, and 1,167 died, leaving 251 remaining in the hospital at the close of the year.

Of the 3,932 cases, 40 were transferred elsewhere for treatment as follows:-20 to the Government Civil Hospital, 1 to the In- fectious Diseases Hospital, 2 to the Ho Miu Ling Hospital, and 17 to Canton.

Of the fatal cases 290 were in a dying condition at the time of admission and 'died within the 24 hours.

There remains a total of 3,433 patients actually treated in the Hospital, of whom 1,710, i.e., 50 per cent. were under treatment by European methods, and 1,723, i.e., 50 per cent. under Chinese native treatment. The percentages in the preceding year were European 496, Chinese 50'4.

The number of visits to the out-patient department was 118,324 (90,650 in 1908). 113,010 were seen by the Chinese native doctors, and 5,314 by Dr. Jeu Hawk and Dr. Leung Chik Fan.

One thousand two hundred and twelve (1,212) persons were vaccinated at, and in connection with, the hospital (2,348 in 1908). Vaccinations continue to be performed by Dr. Leung Chik Fan, who also attends at the villages named on Table IV for this purpose. Two thousand three hundred and five (2,305) destitute persons were temporarily sheltered and fed, until they could be sent to their native villages, or otherwise be provided for (2,425 in 1908). Of these 1,681 were sent in by the Registrar General.

One thousand one hundred and thirty-eight (1,138) dead bodies were brought to the Hospital Mortuary to await burial (1,258 in 1908). For purposes of registration, diagnosis of the probable cause of death is made in all possible cases by inspection of the bodies and cross questioning of relatives as to the symptoms preceding death. Where internal examination is considered necessary, for medico-legal or public health reasons, or because of contradictory statements regarding the fatal illness, such examination is made at the Public Mortuary. During the past year 61 bodies of persons brought in dead, and also 79 bodies of persons who died in the Hospital, chiefly of persons who were moribund at the time of admission, i.e.. 140 in all, were sent to the Government Public Mortuary for post-mortem examination (239 in 1908).

Free burials were provided by the Hospital for 3,690 poor persons (4,112 in 1908).

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The Plague Branch Hospital was not opened during the year, all cases of the disease brought to the Tung Wah Hospital being retained there for treatment.

The Government having given permission that the buildings. hitherto used for Plague purposes at Kennedy Town, and not now required for this use, owing to the erection of a plague extension of

{

7

K 58

the main hospital, may be utilized as a Small-pox Branch Hospital, extensive repairs and improvements are being done to fit them for their new purposes.

The Small-pox Matshed Hospital West of Kennedy Town was opened when required during the year. The number of admissions

was 11 (69 in 1908).

EYE DISEASES.

Dr. Harston continued his Eye Cliniques on Mondays and Fridays at 4.30 p.m. until his departure from the Colony in Sep- tember. Since then the work of the department has been carried on by Dr. Leung Chik Fan, who has become proficient in eye practice and Dr. Marriott has acted for Dr. Harston as consultant for eye cases. 603 new cases were seen (687 in 1908), and 2,542 visits were made to this department. Of the new cases 258 were Trachoma. 96 pupils were sent from various schools to be examined for this disease, and of these 82 were found to be cases of Trachoma, the remainder suffering from other diseases of the eye.

112 eye operations were performed, of which the following were the more important :-

Excision of Fornix Conjunctivæ,

Jaesche-Arlt operation for Trichiasis, Snellen's operation for Entropion,

Ectropion,

Mules' operation for evisceration of eyeball, Enucleation of eyeball,

www

Hess's operation for Ptosis,

Cataract,

Iridectomy,

Glaucoma Iridolysis,

Pterygium,

Symblepharon,-

5

2

25

1

3

1

22

28

1

4

3

Paracentesis in Corneal Ulcers,

6

Table V is a classification of the diseases treated in the eye department.

BERI-BERI.

During the year 709 cases were admitted of whom 261 (36%) died as compared with 941 admissions and 368 deaths (39%) in 1908.

MALARIA.

There has been a large number of cases of Malaria, chiefly from the railway works and the outlying villages. Three hundred and eighty-three (383) cases of whom 88 (23%) died were admitted as against 355 (93 deaths,-26 %) in 1908.

INSPECTION.

The hospital has been duly inspected by the Visiting Justices twice monthly, and has been certified by them to have been found on all occasions clean and in good order. Certain of them have call- ed attention to the necessity for repairs in the Extension Hospital;

- K 59

the reason for the delay in this has been the overcrowded condition of the institution, which has made it desirable to wait until the new wards should be opened, to allow temporary emptying of those now about to be overhauled.

THE DIRECTORS,

The Inspecting Medical Officer has again to acknowledge the courtesy and consideration he has throughout the year received at the hands of the Directors in all his relations with them.

OPERATIONS.

Cases requiring serious operations are so far as possible persu- aded to be transferred to the Government Civil Hospital, and this is much more easily done than in former years, few cases when such a transfer is recommended by the Inspecting Medical Officer refusing consent, and sometimes the native doctors recognising the wisdom of the proposal have joined in the efforts to secure transference to more favourable surgical conditions than can be provided in the Tung Wah Hospital. Operative cases in the Tung Wah Hospital itself are usually dealt with by Dr. Jeu Hawk, whose results have been very successful. Amongst the operations undertaken during the past year have been the following:-

Cataract,

6

Pterygium, -

1

Entropion,

13

Amputation,

4

Harelips,

1

Fistula in ano,

3

Lateral Lithotomy

6

Enucleation of eyeball,-

1

Fibroid,

2

Removal of breast,

Glands in neck,

4

Trachoma,

Phymosis,

2

Paracentesis Abdominis,

The following Tables are appended:--

I. Returns of Diseases and Deaths.

II.-Proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese

native methods respectively.

III.-Vaccinations.

K 60

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1909 at the Tung Wah Hospital.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1908.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

ing in

Cases

Hospital

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1909.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox,

3

ลง

Measles,

1

Influenza,

Febricula,

2

3

1

1

2

32

Enteric Fever,

Cholera..

Dysentery,

Plague,

Malarial Fever :—

1. Quartan,

2. Simple Tertian, 3. Malignant,

Malarial Cachexia,

Beri-beri,

Erysipelas,

Pyæmia,

Septicæmia,

Tetanus,

Tubercle,

Leprosy,

Syphilis:-

(a.) Secondary, (b.) Inherited,

Gonorrhoea,

Rheumatism,.

New Growth, Non-malignant,

Do.,

Anæmia,

Debility,

Malignant,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Nerves:

Neuritis, ....

Meningitis,

Myelitis,

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders :-

2

32

19

14

1

I

- 2

19

8

168

529

70

176

29

27

249

8

2

:

:

: / ::

188

199

195

88

195

24

2

24

52 2

53

709

261

762

53

10

10

1

1

13

11

13

:

10

9

10

1

3

3

5

5

8

101

12

17

ཌྭ ལྤ རྞ ལ ས ཥཿ

1

20

32

2

35

1

198

109

12

...

14

18

1

34

...

38

38

17

38

3

3

14

13

14

2

2

1

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Epilepsy,

CO N

Neuralgia,

16

13

16

3

40

43

2

5

7

1

343

1

Hysteria,

4

Carried forward,...... 97 1,752

556 1,849

109

E-

K 61

Table 1,-Continued.

Diseases aud Deaths in 1909 at the Tung Wah Hospital.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain-

Yearly Total.

Total

ing in Cases Hospital

at end of 1908.

Admissions Deaths.

Treated. at end of

1909.

Brought forward,..............

97 1,752

556

1,849

109

SUB-SECTION 3.

Mental Diseases :-

·

Idiocy,

1

Mania,

5

Melancholia,

Dementia,

4

...

4

4

Diseases of the Eye,

71

76

""

Circulatory System,

143

50

151

"}

Respiratory

36

803

437

$39

21

""

""

Digestive

10

282

91

292

""

""

"

Lymphatic

2

20

22

10333

"

19

Urinary

6

49

20

55

6

}}

Male Organs,

15

15

Female

5

5

"

++

"

""

Organs of Locomotion, Cellular Tissue,

26

27

5

95

100

14

"

Skin,

21

107

128

23

Injuries :-

General,...

Local,

15

2 10

181

121

Malformation,

1

Poisons,....

5

Parasites,

1

Parturition,

22

х

~

183

19

136

8

5

5

22

Total..............

209

3,723 1,167

3,932

251

DISEASES.

K 62

Table II.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wah Hospital during 1909, with

the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

European

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

Total.

European Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

Small-pox,

3

3

2

2

Measles,

1

1

Influenza,

2

2

Febricula,

32

32

Enteric Fever,.

19

19

14

Cholera,....

1

Dysentery,

57

111

168

23

Plague,

29

29

27

+222

47

70

:

4227

14

Malarial Fever -

1. Quartan,.

2

2

:

2. Simple Tertian,

134

54

188

3. Malignant,

152

43

195

54

34

88

Malarial Cachexia,.

11

13

24

1

1

2

Beri-beri,....

250

459

709

184

221

Erysipelas,

10

10

...

Pyæmia,

1

Septicæmia,

6

Tetanus,

4

General Tuberculosis,

1

1-82

6

Leprosy,

5

13035

:

762

11

9

3

:

Syphilis :-

(a.) Secondary,

16

1

17

(b.) Tertiary,

23

9

32

12

1

2

2

Gonorrhoea,,

1

1

Rheumatisın,

42

59 101

...

New Growth, Non-malignant,

12

12

""

Malignant,

11

6

17

6

14

Anæmia,

Debility,

17

22

27

34

21

38

1

1 3

...

17

Neuritis,

1

3

Meningitis,

14

6

13

Myelitis,

2

Apoplexy,

9

16

7

6

13

Paralysis,

25

15

40

3

4

Epilepsy,

3

2

5

3

3

Carried forward,

896

851 1,747 239

317

556

Total.

DISEASES.

K 63

Table II,-Continued.

Showing the Admissious and Mortality in the Tung Wal Hospital during 1909, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

European

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

Total.

European

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

Brought forward,

896 851 1,747

239 317

556

Neuralgia,

....

:

1

1

Hysteria,.

3

1

4

Idiocy,..

7

8

Mania,...

5

10

Melancholia,

Dementia,

1

Diseases of the:

Eye,......

71

71

Circulatory System,

66

77

143

:སེ

30

50

Respiratory System,

317

486

803

134

303

437

Digestive System,

115

167

282

35

56

91

Lymphatic System,

13

7

20

Urinary System,

23

26

49

6

14

20

Male Organs,

13

15

Female Organs,

4

5

Organs of Locomotion,

18

26

Cellular Tissue,

54

41

95

Skin,

52

107

Injuries, General,

107

181

3

5

Local,

55

66

121

1

1

201

Malformations,

Ι

Poisons,

5

1

::

:

Parasites,

4

Parturition,..

22

22

2

2

Total,

1,829

Less moribund cases,.

119

1,894 | 3,723

171

441

726

1,167

290

119

171

290

Less transferred elsewhere,

1,710 | 1,723 | 3,433

31

322

555

877

9

40

Net Total,

1,679 1,714 3,393

322 555

877

Total.

-K 64

Table III.

Vaccinations at, and in connection with, the Tung Wah Hospital during 1909.

Victoria.

Shauki-

wan.

Sham-

Aberdeen Stanicy Shek 0.

Yaumati.

shuipo.

Pingshan

1909,

987

63

55

19

Nil.

36

52

Nil.

1908.

1,410

60

49

28

20

98

135

548

Total 1909

1.212

1908 2.348

Annexe K.

ALICE MEMORIAL AND AFFILIATED HOSPITALS, 1909.

Vice Memorial Hospital,

Total in-patients

Miu Ling Hospital,

Nethersole Hospital,

Mice Memorial Maternity Hospital,

Total,....

1

Deaths.

treated.

88

405

IS

473

66

1

1201

60

·

4.

K 65

Annexe L.

BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

REPORT BY DR. E. A. SHAW, R.N., Acting Bacteriologist.

Staff.

Early in June, 1909, owing to the most unfortunate death of Dr. W. Hunter, the then Government Bacteriologist, my services were asked for to carry on his duties until the arrival in the Colony of the officer appointed to permanently succeed him. It thus falls to my lot to prepare this report for the year 1909, which is based in part on records left by Dr. Hunter, and by Dr. C. M. Heanley whose appointment as Assistant Bacteriologist terminated on April 4th. The newly appointed Bacteriological Assistant, Mr. Chan Tsun-kon, who commenced duty on 5th April, is showing very considerable aptitude for his work, and bids fair to thoroughly justify his selection for the post he occupies.

Buildings.

These have been maintained in good repair. During the Sum- mer, I had the whole of the micro-photographic apparatus, which was placed in the upper storey of the Institute where its efficiency was much interfered with by its susceptibility to vibration, and consequent blurring of photographic plates, transferred to the basement where it now stands on a concrete floor, is much more steady and correspondingly increased in efficiency.

The Preparation of Vaccine Lymph.

On taking over the duties at the Institute in June, 1909, I found the prepared vaccine lymph was being stored in chambers cooled to a constant temperature of 65° F. Finding that from time to time many tubes of lymph had to be rejected because of an obvious growth of contamination in them, and further finding on microscopical examination that this was fuugoid in nature, for the growth of which 65° F. was a most favourable temperature, I determined to store the lymph at a temperature of 40° F. This answered admirably, and it is now very rarely necessary to reject a tube of lymph for the above mentioned reason; moreover the duration of potency of the lymph is by this procedure greatly prolonged; to as much as six months certainly in the case of lymph prepared in the hot weather and reported on by various vaccinators just recently.

In every case the lymph used for vaccinating the calves has been first intensified by passing through rabbits, which is found to greatly increase the potency of the final product.

In August specimens of calf vaccine (a.) dried, and (b.) lano- linated, and intended for tropical use, were received for examination and report from the Lister Institute, these were tested by myself on rabbits and by Dr. J. C. Thomson at Victoria Gaol on cases requir- ing vaccination, but neither was found by either of us to be as efficient as that made in this Institute. This dried and lanolinated

K 66

vaccine was intended to survive a long sea voyage through the tropics. With a view to seeing whether storage at 40° F. would effect this, I arranged accordingly with Capt. Mann of the transport 'Rewa", to take specimens of Hongkong prepared lymph thus stored to England for report, which will be made later.

44

During the Autumn I made an exhaustive examination of vac- cine vesicles of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 days growth respectively, in an attempt to discover the organism of Vaccinia, but without success.

Nine thousand five hundred and ninety-one (9,591) tubes of vaccine were issued during the year.

Bacteriological Examination of Water Supplies.

The routine monthly examinations of the Kowloon, Pokfulam and Tytam have been carried out regularly during the year. These waters are of high bacteriological purity, comparing favourably with those of all Colonies whose reports are at present available.

In addition, Dr. Hunter in May made an exhaustive examina- tion of the waters passed through the Albany Filter Beds near Bowen Road, also various other samples of water from scattered sources were examined during the course of the year.

Examination of Pathological Material sent for the Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases of Man.

1908. 1909.

76 Specimens of blood for Typhoid Fever.

17

7

16

from throat

"

>>

"

6

1

chest abdomen

Diphtheria. Tuberculosis.

"

33

of urine

"

>>

211

10

from intestines,,

">

13

17

""

of urine

Cholera. Typhoid.

"

Degenerated

Sarcoma of lung.

Tumours &c. sent for Examination.

Placenta. Cancer of breast. Sarcoma of arm. Cancer of Orbit. Fibro-sarcoma of Ovary. Fi- broid of Uterus. Adeno-myxoma of neck. Carcinoma of Pancreas. Sarcoma of lung. Enchondroma of Metatarsal. Lympho-adenoma of Axilla. Gumma. Ovarian Cyst. Fibro-adenoma. Sebaceous Cyst. Adeno-myxoma. Lipoma.

Various other specimens not included in the foregoing have been also exhaustively examined.

At the request of His Excellency the Governor, with the assist- ance of Mr. Gibson, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon, Stomoxys Cal- citrans, a biting fly which is known to convey Trypanosomiasis, was obtained at the Slaughter-house in somewhat limited numbers. He and I having both verified the identity of these flies, I commenced

}

K 67

an investigation as to the presence of Trypanosomes in them, and the possibility of their transmitting these parasites to infected animals. At the time of writing this investigation is still proceeding, as is also one into the distribution of Spirochetes in Gummata.

Examination of Rats.

On taking over the Victoria Mortuary, where this work is done, early in June, I found that the rat returns had been kept in the manner shown in Table I.

Table I has been completed for the year and from it will be seen that the number of rats placed in the rat-bins and sent for examination is larger in the hot weather months than in the cool and further that the proportion of plague infected rats decidedly increases in the hot weather and decreases in the cool, from 10 per 1,000 of rats examined in June, July and August to 32 per 1,000 in October, November and December.

Table II, so far as it goes, indicates that in all three species of rat the male shows a greater predominance of plague infection than the female. It also shows that Mus Ruttus presents a far larger proportion of infected rats than either of the other two species.

Particulars of rats caught in Kowloon will be found in the Kowloon Mortuary Report.

Table I.

5,087 2,465 2,621 7 146

: : :

TOTAL.

MALE.

FEMALE.

PLAGUE

INFECTED.

PREGNANT.

PHOSPHORUS

POISONING.

NEWLY-

BORN.

January,

February,

3,805 1,908 1,897

14

69

March,

5,616 2,802 2,814)

48

162

264

April,.

5,491 2,737 2,754

3

151 363

May,

6,209 2,916] 3,096

68

162 1,560

197

June,

5,737 2,623 2,872 58

79

965 242

July,

5,879 2,745 3,005)

52

72

822

129

August,

5,335 2,409 2,794

60

90

821

132

September,

4,818 2,152 2,525

43

139

760

141

October,

4,597 2,050 2,400

19

149

660 147

November,

December,

4,678 2,176 2,373 4,115 1,963 2,016

15

170

654 129

Total,... 61,367 28,946 31,167

12 160 580 136

399 1,549 7,449 1,254

K 68

Table II.

Six months:

Males

Males

July to December

ex-

inclusive.

Ratio Females Females Ratio

per amined. infected. 1,000 amined. infected. 1,000.

Plague per ex- Plague

M. Decumanus,

7,225

51

7:0

8,279

30

3.6

Rattus,

3,936

54 13.7

4,045

51

12-6

"

Musculus, ...

2,334

3.0

2,789

2.9

7

K 69

Annexe M.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA.

REPORT BY DR. E. A. SHAW, R.N., Acting Bacteriologist.

During the first three months of the year the work at the Mortuary was done by Dr. C. M. Heanley; by Dr. Hunter from April till the commencement of his fatal illness, then by Dr. J. C. Thomson till I took over in June. Mr. Chan Tsun-kon has ably assisted in the work since his appointment to the Department in April, 1909.

Report on Post Mortems.

1909. 1908.

Male bodies examined,

Female

Sex undetermined,

1,006 1,329

1,015 1,373

3

Total,...

2,021 2,705

Claimed bodies sent from Hospitals and

other places,

1,766 2,006

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned,

255

699

Total....

2,021 2,705

Epitome of Causes of Death.

I. General Diseases, ...

1909. 1908.

882 1,165

II. Local Diseases :-

(a.) Of the Nervous System,

44

3

(b.)

>>

Circulatory System,

30

33

""

Respiratory System,

715

865

(d.)

Digestive System,

207

260

Genito-Urinary System,

11

10

""

27

Other Systems,

2

III. Death from Violence,

IV. Decomposed Bodies,

63

106

67 263

Total,...

..2,021 2,705

- K 70 -

General Diseases.

(b.)-Of the Circulatory System :---

1909. 1908.

1909. 1908.

Small-pox,

16

245

Pericarditis,

10

Plague,

30

300

Aortic Aneurism,

6

Cholera,

2

9

Cardiac Failure,

Beri-beri,

21

65

Malaria,

25

50

Septicemia,..

3

18

Heart Disease,

Fatty Degeneration of

Heart,

++

4

4

11

Diphtheria,

6

6

Mitral Regurgitation,

Typhoid,

11

2

Aortic Regurgitation,

General Tuberculosis,

152

63

Prematurity,

88

113

Marasmic Condition,

354

287

Pyæmia,

Cellulitis,

1

2

Congenital Heart Disease,

Hæmo-pericardium,

Valvular Disease of Heart, Acute Endocarditis,

Acute Dilatation of Heart,

6121)

5

3

Syphilis,

21

Abscess,

2

Total,

30 33

Still Birth,

31

48

Tetanus,

65

9

Erysipelas,

3 (c.)-Of the Respiratory System

Broncho-Pneumonia

Old Age, Atelectasis,

1

10

15

1909. 1908.

Convulsions,

1

Ι

Leprosy,

1

and Bronchitis,

476 620

Tuberculosis of Joints,

2

Tuberculosis of Pleura,...

1

Congenital Syphilis,

26

Pleurisy,

32

24

Senile Debility,

1

Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 14

48

Icterus Neonatorum,

9

Empyema,

15

Neglect at Birth,

Debility,

Chicken-pox,

Measles,

1215

Pneumonia,

187

130

Oedema of the Lung,

1

9

Congestion of the Lung,

15

3

Chronic Bronchitis,

2

2

Inanition,

18

Abscess of Lung,

1

1

Other Diseases (Skeleton),...... 2

Asphyxia at Birth,

1

Embolism of Lung,

Total....

882 1,165

Total,

715

865

Local Diseases.

(a.)-Of the Nervous System:--

(d.)—Of the Digestive System :-

1909. 1908.

1909. 1908.

Softening of the Brain,...

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

65

24

Epilepsy,;

1

Peritonitis,

11

Meningitis,

40

1

Worms,

Hydrocephalus,...

1

Gastro Enteritis,

2

26

Cerebral Embolism,

Liver Abscess,

1

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,..

2

Diarrhoea,

106

173

Dysentery

3

6

Total,...

44

Carried forward, ... 187

239

K 71

Sp

...

Cancer of Liver,

Intestinal Obstruction,...

N HOW I CO

3

3

6

(d.)—Of the Digestive System,→Contd.

Injuries (Death from Violence).

1909. 1908.

(a.)-General:-

Brought forward,... 187 239

Imperforate Anus,

Intussusception,

Strangulated Intestine,..

Overfeeding with King

Sze,

Gastric Tetany,

Jaundice,

Cirrhosis of Liver,

3

N W

122

Opium poisoning,

Hanging,

Multiple injuries,

1909. 1908.

Asphyxiation,

Burns,

1101

27

2

4

3

Drowning,

11

26

1

+

8

Electrocution,

Arsenic poisoning,

1

1

Scalding,

2

Strangulation,...

ICO

1

6

Acute Distension of

Fracture of Ribs and

Stomach,

1

Internal Hæmorrhage,.

1

Tubercle of Mesentry,

4

Loss of Blood through

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

1

Appendix Abscess,

wounds Shock,

1

1

Duodenal Ulcer,

1

Hepatitis,

1

Total,...

27 73

Acute Yellow Atrophy

of Liver,

S

Total,...

1

207

260 | (b.)-Local:-

(e.)—Of the Genito-Urinary System:-

1909. 1908.

Acute Nephritis,

6

Chronic Nephritis,

2

Dislocation of the neck, Hæmorrhage from wound of Brachial Artery, Concussion of the brain,

Bullet wound of the head

Child Birth,

Spinal Hæmorrhage,

Hydronephrosis,

1

Ruptured Intestine,

Abortion,

1

Bullet wound,

1909. 1908.

1

1

4

1

2

1

Miscarriage,

Ruptured Spleen,

Laceration of the brain,

Total,...

11

10

Bullet wound of chest,...

1

Fractured Skull,

24

12

Fractured Spine,

2

Abdominal Injury,

1

(f.)—Of Other Systems :-

Bullet wound of abdomen,

Cut Throat,

1

1909. 1908.

Shot through the head,

Ruptured Liver and

Acute Osteomyelitis,

2

Spleen,

1

Total,

2

Total,...

36

33

Nationality of Bodies.

- K 72

1909. 1908. 2,010 2,678

Nationality of Bodies,-Contd.

1909. 1908.

Brought forward,.. 2,017 2,698

1 Portuguese,

1

Chinese,

Canadian,

Indian,

Spanish,

European, German, Japanese,

..

Malay,

3

3 | Norwegian,

1

American,

12

11

Filipino,

2

Polynesian,

1

English,

1

Total,

Carried forward, ..2,017 2,698

:

1

3

2,021 2,705

K 73

Annexe N.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON. REPORT BY DR. H. MACFARLANE, Medical Officer.

The total number of Post Mortem examinations made during 1909 was 898, as compared with 1,137 during 1908.

The causes of death may be classified as follows:-

1909. 1908.

General Diseases,-Contd.

General Diseases,

359 684

1909. 1908.

Diseases of the Nervous

Brought forward,... 175

396

System,

Diseases of the Circulatory

0 Prematurity,

Still-births,

18

47

49

38

System,

25

25 Senile Decay,

2

Diseases of the Respiratory

Debility at Birth,

0

System, -

399

259 Decomposed Bodies,

103

199

Diseases of the Digestive

System, -

64

12

351 682

Diseases of the Urinary

System, -

3

Diseases of the Hæmopotic

Local Diseases.

System, -

3 Circulatary System.

1909. 1908.

Diseases of the Reproduc-

tive System,

Acute Pericarditis,

7

5

6

Septic Pericarditis,

2

3

Diseases due to Internal

Valvular Disease of Heart,-

7

16

Parasites,-

1

3

Aortic Aneurysm,

1

1

Diseases of the Organs of

Anæmia,

1

0

Locomotion,

1

0

Endocarditis,

1

Developmental Diseases,

2

0

Fatty Degeneration of Heart,

6

New Growth,

1

0

Injuries, General,

24

128

25

25

Do., Local,

13

14

898 1,137 Respiratary System.

1909. 1908.

Lobar Pneumonia,

71

65

General Diseases.

Broncho-Pneumonia,

- 138

158

1909. 1908.

Septic Pneumonia,

6

3

Plague,

31

98

Pulmonary Tuberculosis,

28

28

Small-pox,

-

2

84

Empyema,

2

Enteric Fever,

1

Emphysema,

Diphtheria,

1

Pulmonary Hæmoptysis,

1

2

Puerperal Fever,-

1

2

Pleurisy,

33

0

Septicæmia,

6

Pulmonary Hæmorrhage,

2

0

Saproemia,

0

Capillary Bronchitis,

39

0

Leprosy.

2

1

Atelectasis,

39

0

Beri-beri,

33

31

Bronchitis,

32

Dysentery,

10

9

Bronchiectasis,

1

0

Malaria,

25 63

Syphilis,

4

General Tuberculosis,

Marasmus,

38 69

****

Gangrene of Lung,

2

0

2

Infarction of Lung,

0

16 29 Other Diseases, -

1

399

259

Carrivd forward,... 175 396

Digestive System.

K 74

1909. 1908. | Developmental Diseases.

Abscess of Liver (Amoebic), Hepatitis,

2

1

Congenital Malformation

1

0

of Diaphragm,

1

Catarrhal Jaundice,

1

Abdominal Hernia,

1

Icterus Neonatorum,

2

Cirrhosis of Liver,

7

0

2

Peritonitis,

1

Septic Peritonitis,

1

4

New Growths.

Tubercular Peritonitis,

1

1

Sarcoma of lower Maxilla,

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

10

1

Noma,

Diseases of Organs of Locomotion.

Gastritis,

Gangrene of Foot.

1

O

Intestinal Obstruction,

1

0

Perityphlitis,

1

0

Diseases due to Intestinal Parasites.

Diarrhoea, -

29

0

Distomiasis of Liver,-

1

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

0

Other Diseases,-

1

Enteritis, -

2

Other Diseases, -

4

1

3

72

14

Injuries.

1. General.

1909. 1908.

Urinary System.

Drowning,

14

2.5

Multiple Injuries,

1

1

Acute Nephritis,

Chronic Nephritis,

Chronic Tuberculosis of

Kidneys,

10 20

Syncope following gaseous

poisoning,

1

0

Asphyxia,

1

9

0

6

3

Syncope,

Shock following lightnings

Hæmopatic System.

Abscess of Spleen, Splenic Anæmia, Other Diseases,

120

Reproductive System.

Placenta Prævia,

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,-

NO

troke,

2

0

contusion

of Abdomen,

CHH

(

89

24

128

Burns, Other Injuries,

2. Local.

3

Fracture of Skull,

Concussion of Brain,

Intercranial Hæmorrhage,

241

2

4

1

MC0

3

Laceration of Abdomen

Viscera,

Rupture of Spleen,

4

9

Hæmorrhage from Wound, -

1

Other Injuries, -

0

1

6

13

14

A

K 75

Annexe O.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

REPORT BY F. BROWNE, Government Analyst.

The number of analyses performed was 594 (517 in 1908).

The following classification shows the nature of the work done:—

I.-Chemico-legal.

VI.-Prepared Opium Ordinance.

1909. 1908.

1909. 1908.

Substances,-

5

8

Toxicological (including

Opium Pills (from various

17 stomachs),

27 58

Ports in China), -

43

Articles for stains,

19 19

Powders,

Articles for fire enquiry,

0

4

Lozenges,

00 01 00

Il-Potable Waters.

VII.-Pharmacy Ordinance.

56

-

10

Public Supplies,

Wells, &c.,

Petroleum Oil,

-

Liquid Fuel,

III.-Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

IV. Food and Drugs Ordinance.

36

36

Medicines for Poisons,-

1

4

-

31

25

VIII.-Mineralogical, &c.

0

16

11

9

17

12

1125

82❘ Coins,

8 Metals,

Ores,

Coal,

Brandy,

Flour,

Milk,

Whisky,

14

3

44

67

Port Wine,-

Beer, Opium,

Stout,

1

Cheese,

Rum,

Other Articles,

V.-Building Materials.

ILOINN ∞

7

56

OHEORTOOooo

6

IX.-Liquors Ordinance.

1

16 20 Chinese

European Liquor,

do.,

3

Denatured Spirit,

7

84

0

65

7

0

0 Aërated Waters,

0

0

Cement,

Concrete,

Powder for waterproofing

concrete,

Bricks,

Stones,

1

3

0

1

Silk Wrappings,

ONM

1

Cigarettes,

0

Guano,

0

Florida Water,

A.-Miscellaneous.

Coal-tar Disinfectants,

Rat Destroyers,

Codeine Phosphate.

Crucibles, -

Chloride of Lime,

Chemicals,

Condensed Milk,

Public Gas Supply,

22

1

2

1200100

12

0

0

1

Deeds for forgeries, Stamps for chemicals,

Ice,

Pyroligneous Liquid,

Tar, - Salt.-

K 76

P

X.-Miscellaneous,--Contd.

1909. 1908. Galvanised

OCOHOO

4232~NN

Plate, Tea Dust, Tea Seed Husk, Suppository, Bran. Serum, Bird Lime. Bean Curd, Vul- canite-one each,

0 Other Substances,

1909. 1908.

9

Total,

-

594

517

TOXICOLOGICAL.

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations conducted were 18 cases of suspected human poisoning. Nux Vomica was present in one, Datura Alba in one, Phosphorus and Opium together in one, and Opium in eight cases. The Nux Vomica seeds in the examination referred to had been roasted then powdered so that much of the active con- stituents (Strychnine and Brucine) had been destroyed. None of the powders so prepared for medicinal purposes could be obtained at Chinese shops in the Colony, but some was bought without difficulty at Canton. One-sixtieth part of a grain of Phosphorus and much Opium was separated from a case in which the deceased had taken rat-poison, and Opium later.

WATERS.

3. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month from the Pokfulum, Tytam and Kowloon reservoirs, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

4. Of petroleum oil 66 samples were tested during the year. Most of the oil that now arrives here is already covered by certificates, so that there has been a large decrease in recent years in the number of oil examinations.

}

K 77

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

5. The following Table gives the results of 61 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Board :

DESCRIPTION.

NO. OF SAMPLES.

NO. FOUND GENUINE.

NO. FOUND ADULTERATED.

Beer,

6

Brandy,

Cheese,

Milk,

33

29

Whisky,

12

12

OGO+⇒

Many other samples were examined for the public, mostly at the low fee prescribed by the Ordinance.

PHARMACY ORDINANCE.

6. Informality was proved in the sale of a depilatory containing a compound of arsenic. Three patent medicines said to be made up with poison were obtained for examination but co poison was con- tained therein.

MINERALOGICAL.

7. More Mengtze tin came through last year, so that it seems that miners are tired of holding stocks with a view to a rise in the price of the metal. A fair number of coals were examined. For steam- raising purpose Hongay lump (unmixed or mixed with Japanese) and Kaiping Loco seem to be economical coals.

LIQUORS ORDINANCE.

A good

8. A few samples of European liquor, many of Chinese make, and numerous kinds of denatured spirit were examined. deal of Chinese liquor was analysed to see if the names, under which the brands were sold, indicated to any extent the strength in alcohol. With the assistance of the Registrar General it was found to be possible to classify these beverages into groups. In connection with this work much was learnt of the nature and composition of Chinese Wines and Spirits. These particulars have been compiled by Mr. A. C. Franklin, F.I.C., Assistant Government Analyst.

K 78

MISCELLANEOUS.

9. Gas Examinations.-The amount of carbon monoxide in the public supply is limited by the Government to 16 per cent.

The following Table shows the proportion present for each month :---

Percentage by volume of Carbon Monoxide.

Percentage by volume of Carbon Monoxide.

January,

13.6

July,

11.4

February,

11.2

August,

6.6

March,

13.4

September,-

4.6

April, -

7.1

October,

8.0

May,

-

16.0

November, -

9.6

June,

10.0

December, -

4.6

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

10. The public continue to take advantage of the Laboratory and have forwarded a great variety of samples for examination on pay- ment. The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $2,518 as against $2,010 in 1908.

SPECIAL REPORTS.

11. Special reports have been supplied on :--

Thebaine. Naphtha Licence Conditions. Osmium. Cheap Whisky. Spirit Standards. Classification of Chinese Wines. Denaturing of Spirits.

12. The value of the year's work as determined from the tariff of fees (Government Notification No. 285 of 1907) is $8,287 ($7,085 in 1908). The amount does not include anything for the special reports mentioned above, and there is much beside for which nothing has been set down.

LIBRARY.

13. Several standard works of reference have been added, and some old editions of useful books replaced by new.

A

K 79

Annexe P.

HEALTH OFFICE OF THE PORT.

REPORT BY DR. F. T. KEYT, Health Officer of the Port.

During the year the work of the department was carried on by Dr. Jordan, Dr. Keyt, Dr. Gröne and Dr. Aubrey. On March 10th, Dr. Jordan left the Colony on vacation leave for twelve months.

The duties of the Health Officer of the Port may be considered under three seperate divisions :-

(a.) The daily inspection of Shipping.

(b.) The inspection of Emigrants.

(c.) Quarantine duty.

(a.)-The Daily Inspection of Shipping.

This duty consists in regularly boarding all ships as they arrive in Port between the hours of 5 a.m. and 6 p.m.. ships arriving after 6 p.m. are boarded early the next morning.

"Infected" and "Suspected" ships, from ports which are de- clared to be infected, are not permitted to enter the Port after 6 p.m., they anchor outside the harbour limits, and come into the Quarantine Anchorage at six o'clock the following morning and their crews and passengers are then examined and the ship, dealt with under Section 23 of Ordinance 10 of 1899. "Healthy' ships, however, are exempted from these restrictions provided they have on board a qualified Ship's Surgeon. Two forms are then signed by the Master and the Surgeon certifying that there has been no sickness, nor deaths during the voyage.

During the year there were 4,198 arrivals, of these 2,041 were British vessels, and 2,157 Foreign vessels. These figures do not in- clude the River Steamers from Canton and Macao; these are not boarded except when cases of an epidemic nature are reported to us. H.M. Ships and Foreign Ships of War are also not boarded by us.

(b.) The Inspection of Emigrants.

This is an important part of the Health Officer's duties, and consists in the Medical Examination of all Emigrants leaving the Port of Hongkong. They muster on board a few hours prior to the sailing of the ship, provided with their tickets, and in the case of assisted emigrants, women, and children, with photographs as well.

In this work the Harbour Office and the Registrar General's Department send representatives who check the tickets and examine the photographs so as to prevent any substituting or kidnapping of children.

The emigrants pass in single file, and those who appear to be suffering from any communicable disease, and those physically unfit for labour are stopped and sent ashore. This examination at best can only be a superficial one, but yet sufficient to detect febrile con- ditions, skin diseases, eye diseases, physical debility, and the more pronounced symptoms which make themselves evident in Beri-beri, Syphilis, and Tuberculosis.

K 80

Emigrants for the American Ports, Mexico and British Colum- bia, are previously examined on board the hulk of the Disinfecting Bureau, where they receive a bath, have their temperatures taken, and their clothing and baggage thoroughly disinfected; they then embark and undergo a final examination before sailing.

The total number of emigrants passed during the year amount- ed to 76,430, of these 48,016 were for the Straits Settlements, while the remaining 28.414 were for San Francisco, British Columbia. Honolulu, Mexico, and other Ports.

Table I shows emigration figures for 1908 and 1909, and also the numbers rejected for each Port during the two years. The monthly figures reached their maximum in the month of April, when 9,121 left the Colony.

One thousand five hundred and ninety-two (1.592) Filipino labourers arrived in Hongkong during the latter half of the year, and were trans-shipped by the Pacific Mail Steamers in batches twice monthly. These men are under contract to work for the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. Thus the figures for Honolulu show a marked increase over those of last year, being 1,831 as compared with 30.

The total numbers rejected during the year amounted to 923 and the following Table gis, the causes and the numbers und -r each heading:---

Skin Diseases.

Scabies,

Tinea,

Other forms,

239

27

9

Eye Diseases.

Trachoma,

- 112

Ophthalmia and blindness,

21

Fevers.

Such as Malaria, Small-pox, Plague, etc..

-

152

Syphilis.

Showing well marked Secondaries,

Tuberculosis.

Including Phthisis, enlarged cervical and

inguinal glands,

-

11

5

Jaundice.

From various causes,

17

Leprosy.

Beri-beri.

With cardiac dilatation and ataxia,

Hernia.

Inguinal, -

Deformities.

Such as kyphosis, scoliosis, paralysis, etc..

61

Insanity,

Other causes.

Including advanced old age, emaciation,

and great physical debility,

Total,

257

923

{

K 81

(c.)-Quarantine Duty.

During the year seven vessels were detained in Quarantine for the following reasons:-Small-pox, 5; Cholera, 1; Plague, 1.

The causes of detention, and the number of ships for the past three years were as follows:-

Small-pox 5 (10 in 1908), Cholera 1 (2 in 1908), Plague 1

(2 in 1908), Dengue nil (1 in 1908).

Several cases of Enteric Fever from ships arriving in the Port were treated at the Government Civil Hospital. In disinfecting these ships, special care was taken in dealing with the clothing and bed- ding of the patients, and in the cleansing of the water-closets.

The Port was singularly exempt from such minor infectious maladies as Parotitis, Measles, and Chicken-pox.

At the beginning of the year the following Ports were under Quarantine restrictions:-

1.-Singapore, for Cholera, dating from December 5, 1908. 2.-Bangkok, for Cholera, dating from December 19, 1908. These restrictions were removed on February 3rd and April 28th respectively.

Amoy was declared to be an infected Port, on account of Plague, from July 14th until August 14th, but no cases were de- tected on ships arriving from that Port.

Table I.

Table showing Emigration Passes and Rejections for 1908 and 1909.

1908.

1909.

Ports of Destination.

Passed. Rejected. Passed. Rejected.

Straits Settlements,

49,643

740 48,016

713

San Francisco,

5,105

6,192

39

British Columbia,

7,888

32

8,247

57

Java Ports,

4,789

82

9,546

93

German New Guinea,

329

57

Salina Cruz,

2,301

458

4

Callao,

710

28

987

2

Seattle,

42

28

Tacoma,

48

Honolulu,

30

1,831

12

Mauritius,

196

297

Japan,

132

Iquiqui,.

203

Manzanillo,

306

1

Liverpool,

130

1

Other Ports,

Total,

71,081

882

76,430

923

K 82

Table II.

Showing Monthly Numbers of Emigrants,

Rejections and Crews of Steamers.

Month.

Emigrants.

Crews.

Rejections.

January,

2,616

1,654

12

February,

4,033

1,661

57

March,

8.937

2,222

122

April,...

9,121

1,928

98

May,

8,758

2,137

115

June,

7,102

2,242

95

July,

6,627

2,317

53

August,

3,379

1,458

23

September,

6,923

2,309

100

October,

6,569

2,471

72

November,

5,778

2,290

59

December,!

6,587

1,887

87

Total,.........

76,430

24,576

923

Table III.

Number of Cases, Dates, Causes, and Period of Detention.

Name of Vessel.

Port.

Cases.

Date.

Cause.

Detention.

Capri ", "Ghazee

Singapore.

">

"

"Loosok

13

"Catherine Apcar

Bangkok. Singapore.

Jan. 8. 21. Feb. 14.

Cholera. Small-pox.

21 hrs. 28 hrs.

24

19

"

19.

18

""

"1

"

"Montgomeryshire

Shanghai.

23.

28

"

23

"

"Helios

Bangkok.

"Fudo Maru

Wakamatsu.

April 2. July 15.

24

"

""

Plague.

23

""

K 83

Annexe Q.

REPORT BY ADAM GIBSON, M.R.C.V.S., Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

General Statistics.

The total number of cattle admitted to the Government Depôts for the year was 42,742, an increase on the previous year of 644. In Kennedy Town 37,490 were admitted. To this number, however, requires to be added 10,493 being the number of cattle that were tran- shipped in the harbour for the Philippines without passing through the depôt. This arrangement was come to to facilitate shipping operations. The export fees were paid as usual. In Ma Tau Kok, Kowloon, 5,252 cattle were admitted, an increase of 1,136 on last year. In Kennedy Town 118 were rejected as unfit for food on admission to the depôts and in Ma Tau Kok one was rejected.

The total number of pigs admitted to Kennedy Town was 167,831, a decrease of 851 on 1908.

The total number of sheep and goats admitted to Kennedy Town was 30,979, au increase of 861 on 1908.

Disease in Depôts.

Foot and Mouth Disease.-This disease existed throughout the year in the cattle depôt and was of a fairly virulent type.

Anthrax.-Six cases of Anthrax occurred, two in March and one each in April, July, October and November. All the cases developed in cattle immediately after admission.

Rinderpest.This disease was met with practically throughout the year. Dr. Shealy, an American veterinarian, working under the auspices of the cattle exporters to Manila, had a very fair measure of success in inoculating cattle shipped to Manila against Rinderpest and in immunising cattle. The cattle depôts are not well suited for this kind of work and foot and mouth disease interfered with his results.

Tuberculosis.--Four cases of Tuberculosis were met with, all in cattle with European blood in them and used as dairy cattle. In all, the disease was generalised and the carcases were destroyed. There were no cases in purely native cattle.

Buildings.

There were no alterations or new buildings.

Crematorium.

The carcases, &c., destroyed in the Crematorium for the year

were:

Cattle including Calves,

100

Sheep and Goats,

144

Swine, -

111

Horses,

4

Dogs and various Animals,

85

Condemned Meat from Slaughter-house, - 12,391 lb.

K 84

In addition to these, bones, discarded Police uniforms, papers from Government Departments, tinned goods, and unwholesome foods from shops and markets were destroyed.

The total amount of fuel used was tons 25 cwts. 2 lb. 46 besides firewood and kerosene from the Slaughter-house account for lighting fires.

Slaughter-houses.

Kennedy Town.--The total revenue was $73,590.55, an increase on last year of $5,656.00.

The revenue was made up as follows:-

Slaughtered.

1909.

1908.

Cattle @ 40 c.,

25,898-$10,359.20

Sheep 20

17,733

24,812-$ 9,924.80 3,546.60 17,391 3,478.20

>>

Swine 30

""

Exported.

Cattle @ 50

""

152,822

45,846.60

149,234

44,772.90

""

21,832

10,916.00

13,378

6,689.00

"

Sheep 10

13,362

1,336.20

12,243

1,224.30

多多

2

Swine 10

15,857

1,585.70

18,453

1,845.30

"

Duplicate of one order lost

.25

$73,590.55

$67,934.50

Ma Tau Kok. This slaughter-house is let to a contractor. The total housing fees collected were $450.49, a decrease of $12.90 on last year.

There were a greater number of cattle killed but fewer sheep owing to the fact that the Indian regiments in Kowloon now kill in their own lines and fewer swine owing to the opening of a slaughter-house in Sham Sui Po by the contractor, who thus kills all the pigs for the Mong Kok Tsui and Tai Kok Tsui Markets.

Shaukiwan and Aberdeen are also leased to a contractor.

The total revenue from Animal Depôts and Slaughter-houses works out as follows:-

Kennedy Town, fees collected

1909. $73,590.75

1908.

$67,934.50

Ma Tau Kok

450.49

463.39

Blood and Hair contract

7,608.00

6,888.00

Contractor's tender for Ma Tau Kok,

Aberdeen and Shaukiwan

9,930.00

11,232.00

$91,579.24 $86,507.89

There is an error in this table in the 1908 figures in last year's annual report. The figures given as $12,066.00 are those of the 1907 contract and should have been as above, riz., $11.232.00.

7

1909.

Cattle. Sheep &

K 85

The total number of animals slaughtered for food were :-

1908

Swine. Cattle Sheep & Surine.

Goats.

Kennedy Town, 25,770

17,733

Ma Tau Kok, 5,078

122

Gouts.

152,312 24,812 17,391 149,243

20,211 4,800 713

25,652

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwan,

2,996 7,272

3,242

7,094

30,848 17,855 182,791 29,612 18,104 185,231

Grand total of all animals, 231,494

232,947

The figures for Aberdeen and Shaukiwan are got from the contractor.

The following table shows the numbers of animals slaughtered in the Colony during the past ten years:-

Year.

Cattle.

Swine.

Sheep & Goats.

1900,

23,939

165,760

18,364

1901,

24.938

172,205

18,544

1902,

25.669

202,495

20,780

1903,

28,335

187,265

22,918

1904,

30,829

181,046

23.736

1905,

26,758

186,059

19,774

-

1906, 27,141

200,586

16.403

1907, 27,631

206,124

18,279

1908,

29,612

185,231

18,104

1909,

30.848

182,789

17,855

Dairies and Cowsheds.

Rinderpest, which now appears to be an annual epidemic, occur- red at the Dairy Farm, Pokfulam. Following the practice of former years inoculations of serum only were given to adult sick and in- contact cattle and simultaneous inoculations of serum and virulent blood to all non-immune young stock. The results were very satis- factory.

Foot and Mouth Disease also prevailed during the latter part of the year at Pokfulam but by the end of the year the epidemic had ceased. The treatment of this disease which inflicts heavy loss among milch cattle is still far from satisfactory.

The Chinese dairies, as usual, escaped all epidemies.

K 86

-co

As noted elsewhere in this report four cases of Tuberculosis generalised, were sent in from dairies to the slaughter-house. This number, however, does not indicate the degree of prevalence of this disease as immediately the Chinese owners recognise that a cow is suffering from Tuberculosis, and they are alive to the danger as far at least as the individual cow is concerned, the animal is removed out of the Colony. It is difficult to trace the ultimate destination of these cows.

Importation of Beef and Mutton.

The importations of fresh beef and mutton were respectively 310,171 lb. and 306,678 lb. The Dairy Farm Company are the only importers. The meat is imported from Australia.

Markets.

Up to July, 1909, the Registrar General's Department had the control of the markets as far as the letting of the stalls and the col- lection of revenue was concerned while the Sanitary Department looked after the sanitary condition of the markets. On that date the Sanitary Department took over the full control of the markets, collecting the revenue, letting the stalls and generally supervising the whole work.

The following statement shows the average revenue derived from the markets from 1898 to 1907, the revenue for 1908 and the revenue for 1909 :-

Markets.

Central Market,

Des Voeux Road Market, Hung Hom Market, - Mongkoktsui Market,

1898 to 1907 (Aver- age for 10 Years).

$ 43,683.53

917.73*

$ 52,798.03 1.383.10

1908.

1909.

$ 52,801.87

1,701.89

3,758.46

1,597.70 3,817.79

945.75†

949.73

992.40

Sai Wan Ho Market,

1,611.37

1,978.88

Saiyingpun Market,

10,124.19

13,514.09

13,694.99

Shaukiwan Market,

815.06

1,243.30

1,404.74

Shek Tong Tsui Market,

339.22

603.10

694.80

So Kun Po Market, -

930.44

1,326.00

1,330.60

Tai Kok Tsui Market,

638.261

409.89

652.93

Wanchai Market,

2,819.71

4,001.71

4,303.77

Western Market, (New)

13,276.02†

11,898.41

11,678.71

Do.

(Old)

23,722.36

18,112.49

17,964.42

Yaumati Market, -

4,281.61

6,179.18

6,436.34

2

$104,195.80

$117,788.86

$119,349.94

† 2

* +++

3 years average.

‡ 9

do.

co.

1

Appendix L.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL & FORESTRY DEPARTMENT.

K

GARDENS AND GROUNDS.

Botanic Gardens.--With the exception of the month of October, the year on the whole was a very favourable one for gardening.

The rainfall for October was the greatest on record, and, in addition there was a gale of considerable force on the 19th of the month.

For many years endeavours have been made, with little success, to flower Sweet Peas, although at Kowloon and at West Point, places which get much more sunshine than the Botanic Gardens, the results have been more satisfactory. This year, seeds from Australia, pre- sented by Mrs. Rowe, flowered freely in April, and were better than anything previously obtained in the Gardens. It is very pleasing to be able to record a still greater success. A few seeds of an early flowering variety were obtained from Messrs. Sutton and Sons and were sown on the 18th October, and the plants were in full flower on the 30th December.

There was an exceedingly fine show of Gladioli in both the Old and New Gardens in May, and Gloxinias made a brilliant display in the No. 3 house in June. In the same house earlier in the year Primula obeonica was very attractive.

The old double-flowered Daffodil, bulbs of which were presented to the Gardens by Mr. J. Barton, flowered well on the bank above the Grevillea walk in the Old Garden.

A very pretty addition to our winter flowering plants was made in Monochosma riparium, a small shrub with panicles of small white flowers which are produced in large quantities. The plant is easily grown, and is sure to become a general favourite.

An addition to local vegetables was made by the Tiger Bean, known botanically as Mucuna niveu. Besides being useful as a vege- table, cooked in the same way as French Beans, it is of great interest botanically. It was first described by Roxburgh, in his Flora Indica in 1832, from cultivated plants at Calcutta. Hitherto the plant was not known by Europeans in China, but it was described in Chinese botanical works centuries ago. The seeds from which the plants were raised, were presented to the Gardens by one of the gardeners who brought them back from his native village in Kwangtung, where he says it has been grown to his knowledge for the last forty years.

The flower and vegetable show of the Hongkong Horticultural Society was held in the Gardens on the 26th of February, and was a great success horticulturally, but the financial results were greatly marred by the wet weather.

і

12

The sale of plants by the Department having been stopped, surplus plants remaining over at the end of the previous year, instead of being thrown away, were distributed, without pots, to members of the Horticultural Society, as it was found that they would produce scarcely anything if sold by auction.

The scheme for the proposed tramway through the New Garden having been dropped, very necessary repairs to the lower walk were taken in hand. The old chunam was taken up and replaced with cement and disintegrated granite.

Government House

Grounds.-The construction of the new staircase to the Ballroom necessitated the removal of a small shrubbery on the north side of the ground. Any shrubs which were worth sav- ing were transplanted elsewhere.

The lawns on the north side of the house were re-laid as they had become very uneven.

Caterpillars were again troublesome in the Autumn on the tennis ground, but were kept under by applications of Jeyes' Fluid and

water.

Blake Garden.--The vacancies caused by the trees which were blown down in the previous year were planted up with young trees, and the turf which was damaged by cockchafers was partly renewed, and partly replaced with blue grass (Ophiopogon ).

Peuk Garden.-An extension was begun by continuing the old culvert a distance of 125 feet, but it was not possible to do any levelling.

West End Park.-Several trees were planted and the park kept in as tidy a condition as funds would allow.

King's Park.-Planting was commenced by putting in upwards of 400 trees of various kinds, but it is to be regretted that several of these were afterwards stolen by persons unknown.

Colonial Cemetery.-Trees were planted in various places and a good deal of turfing was done.

Roadside Banks.-The planting of Battery Path Bank was con- tinued, and the Bank between Wyndham Street and Ice House Lane was planted with blue grass and other ornamental plants. The Bank between Upper Albert Road and Garden Road was planted with several species of Palms.

Dr. E. A. Voretzsch, the Consul for Germany, presented several showy South American orchids to the Gardens in exchange for others.

A large number of seedlings of the Coffin Wood tree, Machilus Nanmu, Hemsl., were raised in the Albany Nursery from seeds sup- plied in the Autumn of 1908 by the British Consul. Chengtu, Szechuen; and 14 wardians cases containing 70 plants each, were despatched to various British Colonies and India, and one case each to Manila and Tsingtau. As showing how much depends upon the treatment of the cases on board ship, and the weather encountered

L 3

on the voyage, it is only necessary to say that the seedlings sent to Pretoria, with transhipment at Calcutta, and which were nearly three months on the voyage, arrived in good condition whilst those shipped to Ceylon suffered severely, although it was stated in the letter of acknowledgment of the latter, that the packing left nothing to be desired.

THE GALE OF OCTOBER 19TH.

Although the destruction of large trees was small, very consider- able damage was done to shrubs in the various gardens and grounds. Botanic Gardens.-Four small trees including Bauhinia Blake- ana were blown down but were afterwards raised. Numerous Rose bushes and shrubs were destroyed. Poinsettias in beds which are nearly always a feature in the Gardens in November, were very much damaged and, as they had not time to recover, were more or less a failure.

Street Trees.-Upwards of 150 young trees in Hongkong and Kowloon were blown over but were afterwards raised, but few big trees were blown down and killed.

The Bamboos planted along the Peak Road suffered severely.

HERBARIUM.

The Superintendent, Mr. S. T. Dunn, described a dozen new species of Chinese plants, principally from Hongkong and the New Territories, in two papers which were published in the Journal of Botany.

A collection of plants from Swatow was made by the Superin- tendent when on short-leave and presented to the Department.

The Superintendent also presented 16 books, mostly botanical, to the Library, many of which were in several volumes.

The Bureau of Science, Manila, presented 478 Philippine plants, Professor Sargent of Harvard University 223 plants from Kiangsi, and the Assistant Superintendent 1,500 plants from Central China, to the Herbarium.

During the year a list of the native plants of Hongkong, the New Territories and Kwangtung Province has been drawn up with a key to the orders, genera and species, and is now nearly complete.

Mrs. Gibbs, whose recent untimely death we have to deplore, presented many specimens of local plants to the Herbarium and Captain Hodgins of the S.S. IIaiyang presented several specimens collected principally at Foo-how.

The list of additions to the Flora of Hongkong and the New Territories is given in a supplement.

FORESTRY.

A.-Demarcation.-Letters and numbers were painted at their proper places, for the assistance of the Forest Guards, in the vicinity of Victoria (Blocks 1 & 2), at Little Hongkong (Block 5), at Aberdeen (Block 6) and at Pokfulam (Block 7.)

Level lines were marked out at Shing Mun (Block 11) for planting purposes.

L 4

B.-Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.-An area of about 300 acres in the Harbour Belt was sown (in sites) to the eastward of the plantations formed in 1908, and the failures in last year's plantations in this neighbourhood, in the catchment areas of the Kowloon and Tytam Reservoirs and in the felled areas of Mt. Kellet and Aberdeen were made good. Fifty pounds of pine seeds were sown broadcast in the Shing Mun Valley. In all 389,290 pits were sown or planted at a cost of $3,281.

C.-Care of Trees in Plantations.-Large quantities of under- growth were given to the villagers in Hongkong and Kowloon in return for work done by them for the Department. The work done. by the villagers was of various kinds, such as cleaning fire barriers, digging pits for sowing seeds, path making and cord making. In all 27,216 loads, of about 80 catties each, were disposed of in this way, and taking the value of a load at 6 cents, (the villagers had to cut it themselves under the supervision of Foresters), it was a saving to the Government of about $1,700 in cash. The undergrowth was taken out of the following plantations:-Victoria (1), Wongneichung (2), Shaukiwan (3), Little Hongkong (5), Aberdeen (6), Pokfulam (7), Mongkok (8), Taipo Road (9) and Kowloon Reservoir (10). In the two latter blocks pine tree branches were given as no undergrowth was available. The villages which participated in this work were Aberdeen, Aplichau, Little Hongkong, Mongkok, Pokfulam, Shauki- wan, Tai Hang and Wongneichung. This method of paying for work cannot be carried on indefinitely as the undergrowth in the plantations is the result of many years' growth and protection, and its removal will also lower the price of future tenders for tree felling.

D.-Protection from Fire.---Old fire barriers were cleaned to the extent of 118,905 feet at a cost of 10,116 loads of brushwood and $52.80 in cash. New barriers, 17.914 feet, were made at Tytam and in the Harbour Belt at a cost of 644 loads of brushwood and $92 61 in cash. Fifty-seven fires were reported, the largest occurring in 6B where 56 acres were burnt.

E.--Forest Guards' Service.--There were more reports of pine tree and brushwood stealing during the year and more convictions than in the previous year. Notwithstanding the amount of brush- wood given to the various villagers for work done, in every case, with the exception of Aberdeen and Wongueichung, the reports of fuel stealing have nearly doubled, and for Pokfulam they have more than trebled. See Tables II and III.

During the year an Ordinance was passed amending the Malicious Damage Ordinance of 1865. This will enable the Department to deal with the destruction of trees near villages, when the damage. may be reasonably supposed to be the action of residents of the village where such destruction has taken place.

One fuel stealer was banished, on a second conviction, for the unlawful removal of trees from a Government Plantation. With regard to the agreements made with the occupants of matsheds mentioned in last year's report, a sum of $30 was received for dam- age done to trees within a radius of 500 yards from such matsheds.

1

+

L 5

F.--Revenue Felling.-In October a contract was signed where- by the Government agreed to sell 710 acres of pine tree plantations to be felled under the Block System. These plantations were situat- ed at Mt. Davis (7G), Aberdeen (7D & 6E), and Tytam (4B & E). The contract is to extend over 3 years and not more than 280 acres or less than 200 acres are to be felled in one year. All trees within 30 ft. of main roads are to be left and all pine trees under 6 inches in circumference. The first instalment received by the Government in connection with this contract amounted to $4,091.67. A system of selling brushwood by cord was adopted during the The brushwood was cut down by the villagers of different places and the largest of it put into cords, the villagers receiving a certain amount of the small shrubs in return for the work done by them. The cords were then sold to a contractor at a fixed rate. A sum of $546.83 was received from this source. The total amount received from felling, including thinning, was $6,145.79.

year.

Grass-cutting. Considerable discussion has taken place in the past year in regard to the question of allowing villagers to cut grass on the hillsides for fuel and fodder. It was proposed at first that licences for specified areas should be issued to the villagers, but, on fur- ther consideration, it was found that the suggested areas were unsuit- able for the purpose intended as they were nearly all above the 1,000 ft. level. It was finally decided that the villagers should be allowed to cut sufficient grass on Crown land anywhere outside of Govern- ment plantations for village needs, but not for the purpose of sale. If grass is cut for sale, leases or licences must be applied for, and the grass must not be cut on lands assigned for village use.

G.-Planting and Care of Roadside Trees.-No new planting of street trees was undertaken but a considerable number of failures in Hongkong and Kowloon were made good. Altogether 243 trees were used for this purpose consisting principally of Poinciana and Aleurites. The large number of trees required to be replanted every year shows one

of the great difficulties of establishing street avenues in such a wind-swept place as Hongkong. A sum of $433.49 was spent on the care of street trees during the year.

H.-Nurseries, Agriculture and Economic Planting.-Two hundred seedlings of the Coffin Wood tree, Machilus Nanmu, were planted on the hillsides, 50 at Aberdeen, 100 on the Mt. Kellet and 50 on the north side of Mt. Victoria. The tree is not likely to be of any economic value in Hongkong judging by the rate of growth of the tree which grew in the Botanic Gardens, where the conditions were more favourable than on the hillside. This tree was blown down in the year 1908 by the typhoon and subsequently died.

At Kang Hau Nursery there are several kinds of economic plants in the experimental stage. These include Aleurites Fordii, Sisal Hemp and Tea Oil, but none of them at present show promise of being of any practical value. The cost of the upkeep of the nurseries is shown in Table IV.

1-Forestry Service Paths.-Paths were made during the year from the Peak Road to Hatton Road, from Peak Road to Magazine Gap Road, from Magazine Gap Road to Wanchai Gap Road, from

L 6

Wanchai Gap Road to Wongneichung Road and from Wanchai- Aberdeen Road to Wongneichung-Little Hongkong Road. Although these paths greatly facilitate the work of the Forest Guards they have, also, unfortunately been of great assistance to fuel stealers.

New Forestry Service Paths.

Length in Cost of Con-

Miles.

struction.

Description of Paths.

From

Peak Road,

Peak Road,

Magazine Gap Road,.

Wanchai Gap Road, Wanchai-Aberdeen

Hatton Road,

Road,....

Το

$

78.24

Magazine Gap Road,

60.93

Wanchai Gap Road,

96.53

Wongneichung Road,

232.86

Wongneichung-Little

Hongkong Road,..

4

510.62

Total,.

10312

$979.18

The cost of keeping in repair the old paths was $176.80. The heavy rainstorms which frequently occur here will render it neces- sary to spend an annual sum on this item.

K-Clearing Undergrowth around Houses.-The clearing of brushwood around houses, to the extent of a million and a half square- feet, was carried out at Shaukiwan, Bonham Road, Kennedy Town, Babington Path, Conduit Road, Kennedy Road and Bowen Road at the expense of the Government in connection with the crusade against mosquitoes and malaria. A clearing of 140,000 sq. ft. was also done at the expense of private individuals at the Peak, Bowen Road and Wongneichung.

As showing the futility of this work as long as breeding places for mosquitoes remain, it is only necessary to state that after the brushwood had been cleared in one of the districts where malaria was rife a tin was found nearly full of water and containing large quantities of Anopheles and Culex larvae in the garden of, and close- to, one of the houses whose inmates were suffering severely from, malaria.

FORESTRY LICENCES.-NEW TERRITORIES,

These fees are now collected by the District Officer at Taipo for the Northern District, and by the Assistant Land Officer in Hongkong for the Southern District. The total sum collected for the year as furnished by them was $4,890.59. The terms of these licences were altered during the year, and one of the conditions now is that trees may not be cut within 250 yards of a village or within 50 yards of such main roads as are specified in the licence.

L7

T

COMMERCIAL INVESTIGATIONS.

Lists of the vegetable drugs of Hongkong, samples of many of which had already been forwarded, were sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute, London, for a report as to whether any of them. contained medicinal or toxic qualities, or had economic value. These lists were submitted by the Director of the Imperial Institute to the British Pharmacopeia Committee of the General Medical Council, the Secretary of which replied that the Committee did not feel there were sufficient indications of the extent of employment of individual plants to say which, if any, should merit inclusion in the Colonial Addendum to the British Pharmacopoeia. The Director of the Im- perial Institute added that he did not think any of the plants in the list were likely to yield products of economic value not already known.

The Government is greatly indebted to Dr. Ho Kai for supplying valuable information in regard to these drugs, without which the investigations would have taken years to complete.

Seeds of Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites cordata, Aleurites trilobu, Soja hispida, Perilla ocymoides and barks of the above three species of Aleurites, as well as several kinds of vegetable oils, were also sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute for a report as to their com- mercial value and suitability for the English market.

Professor Dunstan reported that the bark of Aleurites Fordii could be used locally as a tanning agent and would yield leather of fair quality, especially if employed in admixture with a mellower and richer tanning material, such as myrabolans, but that the barks of the other two species were useless as tanning agents.

The following are Professor Dunstan's general conclusions on the three species:-

The suggestion that the barks of Aleurites cordata and Aleurites Fordii might be examined as tanning materials was made in a letter dated 21st May, 1909, from the Imperial Institute to the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department at Hongkong as the result of statements made in German technical journals, that the bark of Aleurites cordata is rich in tannin. A similar assertion has recently been made regarding the bark of Aleurites moluccana (Aleurites triloba).

The results now recorded do not bear out these statements, since neither the bark of Aleurites cordata nor that of Aleurites triloba con- tains enough tannin to made it suitable for use as tanning material, whilst the amount of tannin present in the bark Aleurites Fordii is small. Of the three barks, only that of Aleurites Fordii could be used for tanning, but even this material contains too little tannin to be worth exporting and it would only be suitable for local use.

It seems unlikely that the present results differ from those previously recorded owing to differences in the ages of the trees yielding the barks. The three samples of bark forwarded from Hongkong were apparently obtained from fairly old trees, and as a rule the percentage of tannin in the bark increases with the age of the tree. It is therefere improbable that the deficiency of tannin in the present specimens is due to collection at too early a stage.

1

L 8

If these samples of various Aleurites barks from Hongkong may be taken as typical and fairly representaive of the barks produced by these trees elsewhere, it would appear that the statements made regarding their richness in tannin are inaccurate, possibly owing to the examination of unauthenticated material."

STAFF.

The Superintendent Mr. S. T. Dunn was absent on vacation leave for 9 days between the 6th and 19th April, and from the 23rd October to the end of the year, and the Assistant Superintendent Mr. W. J. Tutcher from the 26th April to 24th May, and from the 4th to 31st August.

REVENUE.

The percentage of

Details of Revenue are given in Table V. revenue to expenditure was 26·12 as compared with 23-66 in the preceding year. A comparative statement of Revenue and Expendi- ture for the last 10 years is shown in Table VI.

W. J. TUTCHER,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Forestry Department.

March 4th, 1910.

Table I.

RAINFALL, 1909.

Botanic Gardens,

DATE.

Jan. Feb.

Mar. Apr.

Apr. May June July Aug. Sept.

Oct. Nov.

Dec.

inch

inch

inch

inch

inch inch inch inch

inch

inch

inch inch

.01

.01

.03

.13

.76

.07

2

...

.01

.20

.43

.03

.01

3

.03

.12

.01

.13 .02

:

.02

858

4.

.54

:

:..

.04

.04

.09

.24

1.61

.03

6

.16

.05

.60

.06 .84

.05

.68

.37

.43

.03

1.22

.21

.44

:

.01

.15

.02

.01

.12

.02

.04

.19

9

1.36

.53

.01

.01

.64

.40

76

10.

.01 .06 .03

.01

.52

74

.6)

11.

.03

.07

.09

.४४

.02

.57

.16

12.

.03

.21

.34 2.38

2.17

.07 .01

13.

.05

.01

.02

.03

.84 .91

.06

:

14.

.20

.02

.07 .47 .01

15.

.26

.10

2.49

.11

30

16.

.10

.09

.05

3.70 |

.12

:

- L 9 —

Table I,-Continued.

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July

Ang. Sept.

Oct.

Nov. Dec.

inch

inch inch inch inch

inch

inch

inch

inch

inch inch inch

17.

18.

19.

20.

21

22

23.

24.

:::: :སྤྱ

.11

1.45

.87

.18

.09

.02

.03

.22

.05

.02

.40

.39

10.45

.02

1.61

.06

.26

.57 2.42

.43

2.69

.48

.11

2.11

.28

.14

.85

.17

1.05

.05

.01

.02

.02

.12 .28

2.83

.59 .15

.17

.04

25.

.13

...

.29

.80

.18

.02

26.

.15

.02

.69

.98

.60

3.10

27

.20

.12

.02

.02

.03

28.

.48

.01

.02

.37

3.09

2)

may be

.10

.08

.19

30.

.13

.38

.69

.02

31

.02

TOTAL,

1.89 1.70

266

2.36

8.11

7.33

12.72

8.24

10.40 | 23.80

.14

:

Total for the year, 79:35 inches. Average for the last ten years at the Botanic Gardens, 89:33 inches. Total for the year at the Hongkong Observatory, 75-725 inches.

— L 10 —

Reports of

Table II.

FOREST GUARDS SERVICES: OFFENCES.

Village or District.

Compart-

Block.

ment.

Convictions.

Pokfulam,...

7

A.C.D.E.

9

12

18

3

Ι

19

Nil.

West Point,

7

G.A.B.C.

16

20

9

1

Nil.

1

"9

Central,

1

A. E. F.

3

10

2

Nil.

Nil.

""

""

Wongneichung,

2

A.C.D.E.F.

Nil.

9

15

3

4

"}

Tsat Tze Mui,

3

B.

1

4

13

1

Nil.

3

""

Shau Ki Wan,

D. E. F.

14

21

44

7

3

34

19

Wan Chui,

1,2

E., G.

Nil.

1

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

A

""

Aberdeen,

6

29

27

9

12

14

وو

"}

"}

Stanley,

5

E. F.

4

4

13

10

8

6

""

>>

Tytam,..

4

B.C.D.E.

Nil.

4

9

1

Nil.

99

39

Tai Hang...

2,3

A., A.

10

24

2

}}

Cheung Sha Wan,

9, 10

A.,

3

10

Nil.

"}

Shek Li Pui,

10

12

2

5

Nil.

2

""

Kowloon City,

9

B.C.D.E.

6

4

17

1

22

"

"

Kowloon Reservoir,

11

Nil.

Nil.

1

1

1

......

Yaumati,

8

38

13

10

5

10

4

1

9

>>

Totals for 1909,

101

156

214

49

}

59

131

11

Totals for 1908, .............

88

103

142

17

3

26

71

4

- L II -

L 12

Table III.

POLICE COURT RESULTS.

PUNISHMENT.

1909. 1908.

5- 7 days' imprisonment,

38

79

8-14

55

51

"

15-31

13

10

50 cts.-$1 fine,

3

17

$2

31

48

17

$3

29

15

$4-$5

87

31

"

$10-$25 $50

17

2

11

2

Discharged,

47

85

322

338

Table IV.

NURSERIES.

Locality.

Cost of Typhoon Other Expenses.

Total.

Damages.

C.

$ c.

C.

Ngau In Tau,

112.60

112.60

Kang Han,.

50.00

285.60

335.60

Total,...$

50.00

>

398.20

448.20

Table V.

REVENUE.

Timber Sales,

1909. $6,145.79

1908. $3,733.44

Sale of Plants,

60.50

648.05

Loan of Plants,

315.60

205.17

Sale of Old Tools,

2.40

4.46

Forestry Licences in New Ter-

ritories,

4,890.59

Interest on Current Account, Sale of Forestry Pamphlets,

$11,441.51 $11,586.43

19.13

6,986.03†

9.28

7.50

* Sale of Plants abolished.

† 14 years' fees.

L 13

Table VI.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND

EXPENDITURE FROM 1900 TO 1909.

Year.

Total Expenditure. Totul Revenue. % of Revenue to

Expenditure.

('.

C.

1900

1901

21,519.95 25,561,70

1,819.10 1,716.29

8.45

6.71

1902

31,46 11

1,208 80

3 84

1903

31,924.01

2,311 58

7.24

1904

49,688.98

25.201 44

30.72

1995

46,70.14

3,468.94

7.43

4

1906

46,79 .19

6,898.64

14.74

1907

44,131.14

7,780.52

17.52

1908

48 973,20

11,586.43

23.66

1909

43,694.46

11,441.51

26.12

SUPPLEMENT.

Additions to the Flora of Hongkong and the New Territories.

Clematis filamentosa, Dunn.-A species new to science, and discovered by Mr. Dunn at Ha Hong, near Taipo.

Tutcheria microcarpa, Dunn.-This is a second representative of this new Ternstræmiaceous genus and has been found in Hong- kong, Kwangtung and Fokien.

Microtropis reticulata, Dunn.-Collected by Mr. Dunn on Lantao Island and not previously named.

Sapindus Mukorossi, Gaertn.—A tree about 20 feet high of this species was found in the Little Hongkong woods in April last. Previously known from Chekiang, Fokien and Kwangtung.

Tephrosia Tutcheri, Dunn.-This species, which is new to science, has been found at Aberdeen, Little Hongkong, Sheko and on Lantao Island. It grows to a height of 20 feet.

Pileostegia viburnoides, Hk. f. et Thoms.-A member of the Hydrangea family with the habit of Ivy. Collected on the hills above Taitam reservoir and on Taimoshan.

Eugenia Sp.-A shrub 5 or 6 feet high found growing on the hills above Taihang.

Ammannia peploides, Spreng.-Collected in a paddy field near Kung Tung in the new Territories. Also known from Canton and from Persia eastward to Japan, and southward in Malaya.

Lagerstroemia subcostatı, Koehne.-This tree is not uncommon in the Little Hongkong woods where it grows to a height of 40 or 50 feet. Its birk is very distinctive, and it is strange that it has not been detected before. Previously found in Kwangtung and Formosa.

L 14

Cnicus arvensis, Hoffm.-Collected on Victoria Peak. from Western Europe to Eastern Asia.

Bonnaya brachiatu, Link et Otto.-Found by Mr. Dunn near Saiwan. Known from India, Ceylon, Malaya, Philippine Islands, South China and Formosa.

Aristolochia Thwaitesii, Hook. f. This plant has now been found on Lantao Island. It was not known out of Hongkong previously.

Peperomia dindygulensis, Miq.-This plant is known from Kwangtung, Loochoo Archipelago, Formosa and Eastern India. Collected on Taimoshan in March.

Antidesma microphyllum. Hemsl.-A small leaved species detected on the south side of Mt. Gough. Only known previously from Ma On Shan in the New Territories, and from Szechuen.

Ficus laceratifolia, Level.-Collected in Hongkong and the New Territories. Only known from China.

Quercus litseoides, Dunn.-Discovered on the rocky slopes of Lantao at 1,000 feet. A new species forming a shrub about 8 feet high.

Bulbophyllum radiatum, Lindl. An addition to the flora of the New Territories. Previously known from Hongkong, Hupeh and Burmah.

Cirrhopetalum delitescens, Rolfe.-Found on Lantao, and another addition to the flora of the New Territories. Only previously known from Hongkong.

Calanthe verutrifolia, R. Br.—This orchid is known from South India, Ceylon, Malaya Islands and Tropical Australia. It was col- lected in Hongkong a few years ago and recently on Lantao.

Cryptostylis Arachnites, Bl.—This plant is an interesting addi- tion to the orchids of Hongkong. It was found growing on a shady bank on the hills above Taihang, and is a native of Java and Ceylon, but has not hitherto been collected in China.

Alpinia Kumahate, Mak.-Discovered at Little Hongkong by Mr. Dunn. A Japanese species.

Calamus latifolius, Roxb.-This is the name of the fifth species of Calamus found in Hongkong, and mentioned in the Annual Re- port for 1906. Only known from India previously.

Pandanus forceps, Martelli.-Recorded from the New Territories in last year's Report and has now been found in Hongkong.

Pycreus pulvinatus, Des.-Found at Aberdeen by Mr. Dunn. Cosmopolitan in the Tropics.

Woodwardia Kempii, Copeland.-Discovered on Taimoshan some years ago by a native collector, but only recently named. Not known outside of Kwangtung.

Polypodium dilatatum, Will.-—An additional fern for Hongkong, and collected on the north side of Mt. Gough. Previously known from Kwangtung and India.

A

Appendix M.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION.

NUMBERS AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS.

The number of Government Schools, of which details are given in Tables I and III, remains unchanged; but Aberdeen School has proved unsuccessful, and was closed at the end of 1909. For reasons given below, the two sides of Belilios Public School have been treat- ed as forming one school.

No important changes have taken place in the number and clas- sification of the Grant Schools. One small Vernacular School has been closed, number 32.

NUMBERS OF PUPILS.

The numbers in average attendance are dealt with in Tables I, II and III. The total number is 6,560 as compared with 6,178 last year. Table I shews the numbers at Government Schools to be 2,326 as compared with 2,223 last year. The numbers were purposely re- duced at Queen's College.

The three feeders to the College on the other hand, and especially Saiyingpun, shew marked increases, (932: 771). The two British Schools, Kowloon Girls' Scol and Victoria School shew a combined slight decrease. Several the less important schools also have declined in numbers. The increase at the Belilios Public School (Girls) is noteworthy. Further details are given below under the headings of the schools.

The considerable increase in the numbers at Grant Schools (4,234: 3,927) is chiefly due to the increase of Chinese pupils in the lower Classes of the Ellis Kadoorie School and St. Joseph's College.

The steadily increasing numbers taking an English Education as shewn in Table II does not adequately describe the rush for places in English Schools during the past year. If the numbers admitted had not been limited to suit the capacity of the Staffs and Class rooms, several hundred more pupils might have been enrolled.

The same Table (No. 1) shews that the numbers taking a Verna- cular Education have increased. The increase is due entirely to the development of the Belilios Public School. The small Vernacular Schools managed by the various Missions shew a decline (2,011: 2,149). The satisfactory nature of the education given in these schools is considered under the heading Vernacular Education below; but their worldly success is very easily surpassed by that of the Private Vernacular Schools. Of these, careful records, so far as it is possible to obtain them, have been kept for several years. If the numbers shewn by the black dotted line in Table II exaggerates their comparative importance as it undoubtedly does, it probably gives a true record of their rate of growth.

1

M 2

The fees charged in the Private Vernacular Schools average $1.25 a month; the Grant Vernacular Schools make no charge in most cases. It is probably fair to say that except the Belilios Public School and one or two others, the Vernacular Schools under the Education Department represent the leavings of Vernacular Education.

The contrary is the truth as regards an education in English. The dotted red line in Table II marking the progress of the Private English Schools seems to prove that there is little money to be made out of teaching a smattering of English at low fees. Among the Private Schools are included two of great importance, St. Stephen's College (maximum enrolment 120) and St. Paul's College (50): there is also an institution known as the South China Academy. In the remaining 24 Private Schools the fees average $2.75 a month. There are also 28 night schools in which English is taught to 659 pupils.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The expenditure upon education has increased by $13,484 ($219,359: $205,875), as is shown in Table V; and the revenue has increased by $13,611 ($68,214: $54,603) as is shown in Table I. The net result is a percentage of Revenue to Expenditure of 43 84, which is a high figure. At Government Schools the cost per unit (average attendance) fell to $37.15, the lowest it has been since 1902. At the Grant Schools on the contrary it is higher than ever before. This is due to the higher proportion of pupils in the Upper Grade Schools. Indeed there is no simpler and fairer indication of the progress of education in Hongkong than the steady increase in the average cost per pupil at Grant Schools since 1903, when the new Code and new rates of Grant came into force.

DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION.

Upon the retirement of Dr. Wright in April, to which allusion is made below, Queen's College was placed under the control of the Head of the Education Department, whose title was changed from "Inspector of Schools" to that of "Director of Education".

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

A list of Government Schools with the usual statistics is given in Table I.

The Retrenchment Committee, while recommending but few reductions in the Staff of the Department, pointed out the advisability of increasing the fees charged in some Government Schools. The fees for new pupils were consequently increased from $4 to $5 at Queen's College; from $2 to $4 at Saiyingpun; from $2 to $3 at Yaumati and Wantsai; and from 50 cents to $1 at the Belilios Public School, Vernacular Side.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

The Annual Report of the Headmaster, extracts from which are given below, sets forth the general history of the College for the year under review.

1

M 3

Queen's College stands, as regards the numbers in its three highest Classes, far above any other school in the Colony. In other respects I am unable to report that it has acquired the predominance which it is the hope of the Staff and myself that it may win before long.

Some weak points however have already been remedied; and others are easily remediable with time and patience.

Staff. While I have nothing but good to say, from what I have seen hitherto, of the energy and willingness of the Chinese Masters, they are not all at present quite fit to cope unaided with the work required of them. At the end of the year, the following Divisions were under Chinese Masters in independent control, IV a, c, d, e and two Divisions of Class V.

I have with the concurrence of the Headmaster decided that all these six Masters shall be put under the orders and control of the Normal Master, whose excellent work is producing valuable results.

Course of Instruction. The school has not yet published any formulated and comprehensive course of instruction. This is a serious defect. Without one, neither parents nor boys, perhaps not even the Staff, can clearly see the scope of the education which it is intended to provide. Simple courses have during the last few years been drawn up for the District Schools, the Girls' Grant Schools and the Vernacular Schools. Something on the same lines but more elaborate, is required for Queen's College.

More elaborate, because the College still presents as an organism. a degree of homogeneity, all out of keeping with the heterogeneous wants it needs fulfil. Its organisation admits of far too brief a des- cription. It consists of six Classes each of from two to five Divisions. Almost all the Divisions of a Class do the same work. Practically all boys are promoted from one Class to the next higher once a year. As to which Division they enter, that depends solely on the number of marks they earn at the annual or Headmaster's examination. In that examination all subjects count equally.

The first and over- whelming objection to this simple arrangement (which will be modified in future) is that it does not meet the various and legitimate wants of the pupils. It contrasts curiously with the scheme of any great English School with its Classical and Modern Side, its Army, Commercial and Engineering Classes, and so on.

I have arranged with the Headmaster that in future the standard set for the A Divisions of Classes in the Upper School shall be that of the Oxford Local Senior, Junior and Preliminary examinations respectively.

In drawing up a curriculum, special attention will have to be given to the subject of Chinese, in which the College is weak, especially in the Upper Classes.

English cannot be learned without reading. read without books. Queen's College differs from senior schools of the Colony in having no library. being made good.

Pupils cannot all the other This defect is

$

M 4

Overcrowding. Even under the present rules, this still occurs though it has been greatly reduced.

The following extracts are from the Headmaster's report. His sympathetic reference to Dr. Wright will appeal to all who knew him :-

Dr.

"By the retirement on pension of Dr. Wright, this institution has lost one whose services have been at its disposal for considerably over a quarter of a century. Wright arrived in Hongkong, and assumed duty, on 22nd January, 1882, and finally retired on 7th April, 1909, having thus completed more than 27 years' service In all, 9,401 boys were enrolled during the term of his connection with the College. Dr. Wright's capacity for work was, at all times, amazing. His tireless devotion to duty was a model for all with whom he officially came in contact. His name, like that of the first Head- master, Dr. F. Stewart, will be honourably and imperish- ably bound up with that of Queen's College and its traditions. The measure of the high esteem in which he is held cannot be better gauged than by the fact that whilst he was still with us, three of his old pupils, in pious gratitude, created the Wright Scholarship to perpetuate his name. A widespread movement is now afoot to found a further Scholarship, possibly at the local University, to record the lasting services that our late Headmaster so conspicuously rendered to educa- tion in the Colony.

The average attendance has fallen to 805, from 911 last year. The smaller numbers are attributable chiefly to the fact that we no longer feed our Lower School from a Preparatory Division, the last Class of which was abolished in 1908; partly to the increased and increasing educational facilities offered elsewhere in the Colony; as well as to the strict enforcement of an age-limit. At least a score of boys have been refused admission on the ground of over-age: others, doubtless, have not presented themselves knowing that their age was a bar.

Generally speaking, attendance is very regular. There is still, however, too much importance attached to certain family festivities-birthdays and other anniversaries. A portion of the central flat roof over the Hall was again partly blown off by the typhoon which visited the Colony in the night of the 18-19th October.

The Revenue of the College, smaller numbers notwith- standing, shows a satisfactory increase of $9,745 over that of 1908. In consequence, the average cost of each scholar for the year has been considerably reduced, while the percentage of Revenue to Expenditure is higher than it has been in any year since 1901. The general health of the school has been satisfactory: 23 boys ve been off the roll on account of beri-beri, 12 for

4

M 5

scabies, 4 for small-pox; consumption, pneumonia, fever and dysentery account for 5 others; 12 cases of mild trachoma were gratuitously treated at the Govern- ment Civil and Tung Wa Hospitals, the boys, accord- ing to regulation, being allowed to come to school while undergoing treatment: 2 virulent cases of this disease were off the roll for 5 and 6 months respectively. Two new classrooms have been added to our accommodation : a large room capable of seating 50 pupils, at the back of the Hall Gallery, and a small room for 30 pupils, in the East wing. These additional classrooms are both fitted with dual desks, similar in pattern to those with which it has been decided to reseat, during 1910, the whole of the classrooms on the first floor.

Our max-

imum seating space, inclusive of three 50-classes in the Hall, is now 996.

The total examination results over the whole school are a slight improvement over those of last year. English subjects show marked improvement. This is especially evident in the composition exhibited in the Upper School. Mathematics in IA and IB, in IIB and in IIIA and IIIB were good in IIA very good. In the difficult but highly useful subject of Book-keeping, taken entirely by Mr. Grant, excellent results were got in IA, IB, and IC, and very fair results in IIA, IIB and IIC. In the Lower School, Elementary Algebra was well tackled by IVA, IVB and IVC: Geometrical Drawing was also well done in IVA2, IVB and IVD: in the other sections of this Class, these subjects were but fair. The Gen- eral Intelligence paper, given only to the three sections in Class I, was exceedingly well answered by the top section. Non-Chinese boys, in the Upper School only, take Physiology and Science in place of translation from and into Chinese. They are divided into Seniors and Juniors. The results were better than those of last year.

Of 11 Seniors, all passed in each subject; and of 9 Juniors, 1 failed in Physiology and 2 in Science. Optional Classes are taken in Model and Freehand Drawing, and also in Trigonometry. These classes are volun- tary, and extra to the Time Table. The results in both Drawings were very poor. The Trigonometry Class, in charge of Mr. Grant, was divided into Seniors and Juniors. Of the 6 Seniors, 5 passed on a fairly difficult paper and of 11 Juniors, 9 passed: these results give 83 per cent. and 82 per cent. respectively. In the coming school year, an attempt will be made to instil into our boys a sound liking for good literature, by providing, in higher Classes, more than a single reader for the year's work. Boys will be encouraged in what has been happily termed silent reading which, under suitable guidance, should create a wholesome capacity for organised study, and a healthy taste for good books. The system is now being tried at home; and there is much to be advanced in its favour.

M 6

On the Vernacular side, confined to the Lower School, 395 boys, arranged in 5 Classes and 15 sections, were examined, 362 or 91.6 per cent. passing. It has hitherto been the practice to insist on a boy passing the 4th Vernacular Class before he can be promoted from the Lower School to the Upper, i.e., before he can pass from Class IV. Boys entering the lowest Vernacular Class have so far been expected to have had a preparatory grounding equivalent to 2 or 3 years' work in Chinese studies. The standard will now be raised at each end: we now hope to get boys with a still better Vernacular training in the Upper School, where they will be able to do more advanced translations, and thus be better equipped for the University later on.

The Normal Master, Mr. Tanner, reports that the Pupil Tea- chers in his charge have given him every satisfaction : their work has been systematic and regular. He draws attention to the fact that they have been considerably hampered, owing to the lack of suitable accommodation for criticism and training lessons-most vital parts of any systematised scheme of normal work. This con- dition has been brought about partly by the increased number of Pupil Teachers now under the Normal Master, and partly by the fact that we have not hitherto had a properly equipped Normal Room. The disad- vantages named, however, will entirely cease to exist, when we come into possession of the new Normal Room now on the point of completion. As to the thoroughly sound work done by the Pupil Teachers, I can add my own testimony, based on close daily observation throughout the school year and on the Annual Ex- amination.

During the year under review, 113 boys are recorded as having got situations immediately on leaving school: 31 ob- tained appointments, chiefly clerical, in different departments of the local Government; 11 went into the service of the Imperial Chinese Government, 31 into various mercantile firms in the Colony, while 10 found openings abroad.

The Tennis, Cricket, Football, Hockey, and Bathing Clubs keep up a vigorous and successful existence, providing for the physical needs of those who care for the more active forms of exercise."

I note with pleasure a distinct all round improvement in the practical nature of the teaching as compared with what it was a few years back.

The separate studies of the Non-Chinese boys and the optional Classes are a step towards the differentiation of courses which I have recommended above. The change in the readers and in the method of teaching reading has my hearty approval. The changes in Vernacular Education were the result of a meeting between the Headmaster, the Vernacular Masters and myself. They are an instalment of a general scheme of improvement.

M 7

DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

The three District Schools of Saiyingpun, Yaumati and Wantsai fully shared in the general increase of attendance at Anglo-Chinese Schools, as can be seen from Table I. The fees collected were $20,703 as compared with $16,708.

All three schools were practically full for the greater part of the year, and during a considerable part of it were overcrowded in the lowest Classes, where the pressure makes itself manifest. Regulations which will prevent overcrowding in future have now been made.

The following increases in the establishments over those of last year were provided:-

Saiyingpun.-One Grade II, one Grade III, two Grade VI

Chinese Masters.

Wantsai.-One Grade II, one Grade V one Grade VI Chinese

Masters.

In addition, Mrs. Morris, Headmistress, Victoria School, was attached to the Staff of Saiyingpun. The experiment of putting a junior Chinese Class under an English lady was new in Govern- ment Schools, and has proved most successful. I have never seen a better Class of beginners than hers was by the end of the year.

On the whole the three schools are doing very satisfactory work. There are several points of detail which require more attention, and these can be conveniently considered under the next heading.

Entrance Examinations to Queen's College. There have for many years been four scholarships awarded to boys from the District Schools tenable at the College. In 1909 the number offered was increased to 17. The examination in previous years was held with- out any particular reference to the work done by the candidates at their schools. This year I decided that it should be conducted strictly on the lines of the school work; and, that it might form a convenient test of the work in the highest Class, all boys who were eligible were compelled to compete.

Of the 17 scholarships, 7 fell to Wantsai, 6 to Saiyingpun and 4 to Yaumati. It is interesting to note that two of the successful candidates were already free scholars, one from Tanglungchau and one from the New Territory. The success of Wantsai is remarkable and a matter of congratulation for the Staff of that school. Saiyingpun obtained one or two places less than might have been expected from the numbers of the school, and Yaumati about her just share. I do not attach overmuch importance to the results of a single examination in weighing the merits of schools, but the relative precentages of marks gained are interesting. They form a curious contrast with the eighty and ninety per cent. averages which will be found given,

M 8

in entire good faith, to any Class by its own master. Table summarises the result of the examination :—

The following

School.

Algebra.

Average Marks per cent.

Saiyingpun,... 25

Yaumati,.

Wantsai,

52

51

27

48 22 54

38

888

14 52 40

19

51 61

9

11 36

52

45 33 60 8 30 72 40

37 58 46 71

48 16

2

72

74

=

The Chinese Compositions are most disappointing and a revelation to me. Poor at Wantsai, they were very feeble at Saiyingpun and very bad at Yaumati. The fault is probably to be found partly in the quality of the teachers, who were most of them recruited on the offer of very small salaries at a time when the work of the District Schools was considered less seriously than it is at present. A second obstacle to good work lies in the inability of the Headmasters (with the exception of Mr. Young Hee) to follow the work done in Vernacular School. A third impediment is defective organisation. Some system of pari passu promotion, ensuring that a pupil cannot be promoted for proficiency in English while very backward in the Vernacular, will now have to be adopted. Special attention to Vernacular Education should be made a feature for 1910.

Composition was remarkably poor at Yaumati and Saiyingpun, especially the latter, and Dictation was a hopeless failure, though a new voice and strange surroundings affect the results in this subject so greatly that I do not attach very much importance to them.

Very fair all round results were obtained in Reading, Colloquial and Grammar. Geography was distinctly good, and so were the mathematical subjects, except Geometry which had however only been begun towards the end of the year.

I am of opinion that in future it will be well to assign a fixed number of scholarships to each school, so as to avoid competition of school against school. Such competitions while apparently stimula- ting have sometimes inconspicuous but untoward results. Masters have only a limited time at their disposal, which it is not desirable that they should bestow-upon the special coaching of any particular Class or section.

Fees. At the beginning of the winter term the fees for new boys were raised at Saiyingpun to $4, and at Yaumati and Wantsai to $3, without any apparent effect on the numbers seeking admission.

General. The following extracts from the report of the Head- master of Saiyingpun are of general interest :---

"The first complete year spent in the new building has been a most prosperous one. The school has been quite full, and for over three months fresh applicants for admission were refused.

M

M 9

Following the practice of previous years, swimming was taught during the summer months, and our picnics took us fur- ther afield. On Empire Day two large launches conveyed the Masters and boys to Tun Mun where a most enjoy- able time was spent, the day concluding with sports. Deep Water Bay, Silver Sand Bay and Laichikok were among some of the other places visited. These excursions exercise a most beneficial and refining influence upon the boys, and besides being of great educational value, enable a master to get more in touch and sympathy with his pupils.

Football has received more attention. Out of 7 matches played we have won 3 and drawn 2, so that at the present time this school comes second. For several months the school was seriously handicapped by the want of a ground for practice, as the privilege of us- ing the ground at Kennedy Town was withdrawn in May. Latterly we have been given a share in the use. of the Western, Park Ground.

Physical Instruction has received due attention, and each day a short time is spent in extension movements and breathing exercises. Already they have had a marked effect upon

the posture of the boys in class. With the erection of the covered shed a more extended syllabus can be taken.

Improvements in the latrines and urinals have been effected. By the erection of a new block they have been extended considerably and may now be considered as adequate.

The playground has been relaid in lime concrete.

35 boys entered Queen's College during the year.

Five have

gone to America to continue their studies there. Two typewriters were subscribed for and purchased, and in spare time the boys in the top Classes are allowed to practise on them.

Mr. Li Ping has very kindly sent a special prize for the

best conducted boy in the school."

The educational value of excursions such as those above mention- ed is very great.

A model course, drawn up for the District Schools, was in force during the latter half of the year. It is the result of the combined experience of the Staff of the District Schools extending over a num- ber of years, and aims at preparing the pupils for Class III at Queen's College. It is given in Annexe A.

DISTRICT SCHOOLS, LOWER GRADE.

The Indian School was in 1908 housed in the Belilios Reforma- tory, which proved however too distant to suit most of the boys. In July this year it was moved back to Wantsai, since when there has been a considerable improvement in attendance, which was 30 in December. Both the Masters have passed their first examination at the Technical Institute.

t

M 10

Ping Shan School shews far more vitality than the other rural schools of its class. The Master has taken pains to keep up his know- ledge of English, and is enthusiastic. Sanction has been obtained for the engagement of a Vernacular Master in 1910.

Of Tai Po and Cheung Chau Schools little good can be said. The attendance has fallen off by 40 per cent. at each of them. The Masters are out of touch with educational affairs and what knowledge they once had of method and English has deteriorated. This applies particularly to the Master of Tai Po. Aberdeen School was closed during the year on similar considerations.

The root of the trouble with these schools lies in the lack of supervision. The Masters are quite unfit to go uncontrolled and unwatched for months at a time.

BRITISH SCHOOLS,

The cost per

Kowloon School (Girls).-This school continues to fill a useful purpose. The number in average attendance is 53. unit has fallen to $115 from $143 last year.

Experience has shown the limitations which are set to the use- fulness of Kowloon School. It provides schooling in a healthy and bright atmosphere for a number of children, but the very short average of attendance of the pupils makes it impossible to follow out any comprehensive school course. Half the girls in the top Class are foreigners.

Victoria School (Boys).-On resuming charge of the Department in April, I found this school in an unsatisfactory condition. The Headmaster went on leave shortly after, and the elder boys were taught for the rest of the year partly by Mr. James of Kowloon School and partly by Mr. Curwen of Yaumati. There was an im- provement by the end of the year.

The Upper School consists at present of 11 boys, most of whom are the sons of Government servants. They are backward, and do not seem to have been well grounded; but they are making progress. Most of them are now being prepared for the Oxford Local Prelim- inary. This Class promises to be of much value to the Colony.

The attendance has fallen off very considerably. The Head- mistress was transferred elsewhere early in the year; but still the cost per unit reaches the altogether preposterous figure of $220 per unit ($124 in 1907 and $166 in 1908).

The numbers are not likely to increase materially in the near future. They were 27 for the year as against 41 for 1908.

The following extract is from the report of the Acting Head- master :-

"The Cadet Corps.-There is a uniformed corps, attached to the Hongkong Volunteer Corps, drawn from Victoria, St. Joseph's, Diocesan and Garrison Schools. All the boys at this school who are big enough belong to it, but I do not remember seeing more than four strange boys present. Occasionally, when enough names offered I took a party of my own pupils down to the range

M 11

for shooting. A Drill Instructor took drill and rifle- practice and a Band Instructor trained the buglers and drummers, each for one hour a week. A number of new cadets joined in December, when there was a rumour that the corps was going out to camp with the Volunteers. The corps was not taken however."

Belilios Public School (English and Vernacular Sides).- Reference to past reports will shew a radical change which has taken. place in the nature of the Belilios Public School. Once perhaps the most important girls' school in the Colony, it gradually fell from this position and became mainly a resort for girls whose special edu- cational needs were unprovided for elsewhere, viz., Jews, Eurasians, Japanese, etc. The attendance on the English Side, though eked out by a number of small boys, fell in 1905 to 85.

By that year however to quote my annual report, there were signs of an increasing desire on the part of the Chinese parents to give their daughters an English Education". To meet the new demand special Divisions of the lower Classes were formed where the instruction ran strictly on English lines. By 1907, the Chinese pupils preponderated so greatly in the lower Classes, that it was possible to do away with the Non-Chinese Divisions altogether, and the school became organised as an "English School", to suit the requirements of the great majority of the pupils. It is hardly necessary to add that pupils of all nationalities were and are still welcomed. Nevertheless by 1908 the lowest Classes had become almost exclusively Chinese.

Under the same roof as this English School but quite independent of it there had been for many years a Vernacular Chinese School of a not very high type, but with a large attendance. In 1905, this Vernacular School fell under the management of Mr. Sung Hok-pang to whose singularly able control is due the remarkable im- provement which has taken place. In his time the average attendance has risen from 175 to 326; the fees collected from nil to $1,921. The curriculum now includes elementary music and painting. But more significant still is the remarkable change for the better in the bearing and intelligence of the pupils. It was due to Mr. Sung's influence that in 1909 the two highest Standards expressed a desire to learn English for an hour a day. Their request was complied with, and the experiment has proved so successful that I have arranged for the four highest Standards to do so in future, the time spent on the subject increasing in the higher Standards. As the Chinese girls on the English Side are daily taught Chinese, the amalgamation of the Vernacular School (under Mrs. Tutcher) with the Vernacular School (under Mr. Sung Hok-pang) is practically complete.

The following extracts are from the annual report of the Head- mistress:

"I am glad to be able to report that the arrangements made last year with a view to the drawing together of the two depart- ments of the school have been a great success, and the ultimate fusion of the English and Chinese sides of the school to which His Excellency the Governor adverted at the prize distribution two years ago, is already well within sight.

M 12

Instead of a graduated scale of fees according to the numbers

attending from one family, there is now a uniform rate of one dollar over the whole school. There are at present ten Free Scholars in attendance. Four of these are internal scholarships; the other six were bestowed on girls from various Grant-in-Aid Schools. That these favours on the part of the Government are appreciated, is shown by the fact that all the ten Free Scholars have given a good account of themselves.

Besides the weekly tests which have been continued throughout the year, a thorough examination was made at Midsummer and again in December. All the Classes made a most credit- able appearance, especially as regards the neatness and ac- curacy of the written work. The standard in Arithmetic has been raised considerably, the girls now taking the same syllabus as that of boys' schools. Reading and explanation were very good indeed, showing no trace of the hesitation in the use of English, observable in former years.

As in former years, Mr. R. E. Belilios generously sent six hand- some books to be given as prizes for English Composition, and the awards were made in June.

The attendance has been steady all through the year."

GRANT SCHOOLS.

Attention has

The usual statistics are given in Table III. already been drawn to the increased numbers in the English Schools. At the Ellis Kadoorie School, the average attendance increased from 498 to 596, and the Grant by $2,500.

The following Table sets forth the authorised figures shewing the fees, numbers of boarders and the percentages of different nationalities in each of the English Grant Schools.

There are however many remissions of fees made in individual cases. distinction between English and Eurasian is one not always very easily made.

l'ercentages of different

nationalities.

The

Fees.

1

School.

Total Pupils.

Total Boarders.

! que qutoen[

American other

than Portuguese.

l'ortuguese.

Eurasians.

1.-St. Joseph's College... 400

57

2.-Italian Convent,..

243

103

3.- French Convent,

63

18

4.-Anglo-Portuguese,

75

FEAS

41

51

25

99

1280

36

10

$3.00

12

12

11

200

16

2

3

3.00-

2.00

2.00

7.--DiocesanGirls' School.

69

50

23

9

65

to

15.0

8.

Boys'

271

97

40

8.00

9-St. Mary's...

91

54

11.-Ellis Kadoorie.

596

13.

St. Francis'.

35

5

65

2131

18

2.00

2.00

20

200

Chinese.

Other Asiatic

nationalities.

Per mensem.

M 13

The Vernacular Schools keep up their numbers, though not in proportion to the increase of population. This is inevitable, since the number of new schools is only occasionally increased, and many inefficient ones have been weeded out in the past few years. More than 25 per cent. of these schools are now returned as "thoroughly efficient"

A national habit inclines Chinese pupils in the direction of meticulous but unintelligent imitation. Drawing, rightly taught, tends to cultivate the powers of observation and should be a valuable corrective. I am glad to report that an English Mis- tress at the Training Home (School No. 20) has begun to teach her pupils to draw from life; the results are promising and the methods worthy of study.

OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.

Table VI A shews the results. The two schools, St. Stephen's Boys and Girls, are not under the Education Department. Exclud- ing these, eighteen pupils, out of the four thousand studying English in the Department, passed the Oxford Senior. Of these, sixteen had not sufficient knowledge of English to be excused responsions; and had the Hongkong University been opened, would have had to enter it, if at all, with lower attainments than would have been necessary to secure their admission to Oxford University. Their chance of eventually graduating would then depend upon their making up this initial disadvantage during their University careers. To pass the Oxford Local Senior can be, and usually is, accomplished by the study of a variety of subjects, such as Book-keeping, which will not project the candidate far on his way to a degree.

This unsatisfactory condition of affairs requires the earnest attention of all Managers and Heads of Schools.

The results of the last five years are given in Table VI B.

SCHOLARSHIPS.

After omitting the scholarships which had lapsed, as well as two which were cancelled, there remained at the close of the year 35 old free scholarships (26 for boys and 9 for girls). At the end of the year there were granted thirty-two new free scholarships, 25 for boys and 7 for girls. The large increase in the number of the former was made in consequence of the increased revenue derived from fees at Queen's College and the District Schools.

Scholarships held at the end of 1909.

""

Boys, (old) 1909. Girls, (old)

1909.

25

Queen's

College.

Saiying-

pun.

Yaumati.

81

17

сост

5

7

3

1

co

Wantsai.

64

Belilios

School.

9

15

Total.

782895

26

8

10

16

67

M 14

These scholarships are in each case the equivalent of the school fees, i.e., from $5 to $1 a month. They are tenable for the remain- der of the pupils' career at the school, and in the case of those held at Queen's College are limited to pupils who have been in the District Schools for at least a year. The scholarships tenable at the three District Schools are given to the senior boy in each of the Lower Grade Government English Schools and of certain Grant Schools.

INSTRUCTION ON THE EMPIRE.

Visual Instruction.—The lanterns and slides were issued in the usual way to the following schools :-

Ellis Kadoorie School, Victoria School, Diocesan School (Boys), Queen's College, and the Training Home for Girls.

Notes by His Excellency the Governor.-Notes for lectures upon the Empire were prepared by His Excellency the Governer early in the year, and were issued to schools. They are given in Annexe B.

I have called for reports upon the results obtained: it seems to be the general opinion among Masters, and I am inclined to concur, that the subject matter is best assimilated when imparted in connec- tion with the ordinary school courses, such as Geography and History. The Headmaster, Queen's College, reports:-

"Some very valuable notes on this enthralling subject, specially drawn up by His Excellency the Governor, were circulated among the Masters to be embodied in the course of instruction given in Geography, History, and General Intelli- gence in the Upper School. Several questions in the General Intelligence paper, set to test the value of the work done in this direction, were answered in such a manner as to prove that the boys had signally benefited."

The Headmaster, Diocesan School for Boys, reports :-

"His Excellency's Notes were found very useful. A copy was supplied to each boy in VII and VI Standards and the information was embodied in the ordinary teaching in Geography and in the Lantern Lectures. The whole course can be conveniently covered in one year and is of great practical benefit generally, and especially to the Oxford Local candidates. The Lantern Lectures including His Excellency's Notes should be repeated each year as part of the School syllabus."

The Director of St. Joseph's College reports:--

"The Notes have been used with advantage in the Oxford Class and to a less extent in the lower Standards. We have found them useful in connection with the teaching of the "Historical Geography of the Britsh Empire" by Sir Charles Lucas, and "The Origin and Growth of the British Colonies" by the same author. Both of these are used as text books for the Oxford examination. These Notes may also be used in connection with the Oxford Senior Geography. In the Senior Division the students are expected to know the Geography of the British Empire in general, and must possess in addition a fair knowlege of its history.

B

M 15

With regard to the course of Visual Instruction, I must say that our Oxford boys derived very great profit from it last year. We regret however that it is not complete. At present there is only one set of lantern slides available, that is, on the British Isles. If we had two more sets, one on the British Empire, and another to illustrate a trip around the world showing some of the most important places with their pro- ducts, etc., we believe the course would be complete."

HYGIENE.

Examinations on the Hygiene Manual.

The usual shield competition was held among the schools in December, the papers being set by Dr. Pearse. There were 12 competing teams with 107 competitors. The Diocesan School was first. Four schools including Saiyingpun earned over 60% of marks. I must congratulate the Hollywood Road (Lower Grade) School on its success.

The whole of its top Classes were needed to form the team, which beat among others Queen's College. Queen's College did very badly, when the circumstances are fairly considered, includ- ing its very big field of selection. Yaumati should have done much better.

The reason given by the French Convent for their weakness in the subject this year is that it has only been studied since September. This is however no real explanation, since Hygiene is a compulsory subject. The Diocesan School (Girls) did not compete, which seems a pity. Kowloon School and Victoria School did not compete either, on the ground that they had not enough pupils who had been under instruction for the full year. I am of opinion that all Government and Grant Schools should compete, unless especially excused, even if only small teams can be sent in; and that any school intending to send in a reduced team should obtain sanction for so doing from myself at least a month before the date of examination. following Table gives the details :-

Results of Hygiene Team Competition, 1909.

The

l'osition. Name of School.

Marks obtained.

Max. 700.

No. of Com-

petitors.

Percentage.

Remarks.

1st

Diocesan Boys',

444

10

2nd

Ellis Kadoorie,

429

10

63.42 Showed the best results. 61.28 Fair.

3rd

Belilios Public School...

384

60 95

4th Saiyingpun,

421

10

60.14 Fair.

5th St. Joseph's,

410

10

58.57 Fair.

6th Anglo-Portuguese,

160

4 57.14

7th Italian Convent,

383

10

54.71

8th Hollywood Road,..

364

10

52.00 Fair.

9th Wantsai,

341

10

48.71 Fair, 3 poor papers.

10th Queen's College,

311

10

41.42 Poor, 2 fairly good papers.

11th St. Mary's,

103

4

36.78

12th Yaumati,

210

10

34.28 Very poor.

1

M 16

The next Table shews the average place taken by each compet- ing school during the past 5 years. The District Schools send in teams from Classes IV & V ; the other schools from Classes III & IV; the former are thus somewhat heavily handicapped. Saiyingpun has thus done very well. The Diocesan Boys' School is an easy first. Having regard to their numbers and the nature of the schools the Anglo-Portuguese School and the Belilios Public School have done very creditably.

Average Place in Hygiene Competition 1905-1909.

School.

Average

Place.

Remarks.

1. Diocesan Boys' School,.... 2-6 Competed with full team each year.

2. Anglo-Portuguese,

3.6

"

""

"

reduced 3 years.

3. Belilios Public School,.

4.2

""

"

""

""

4 years.

4. Italian Convent,

4.7

full

37

"

""

4 years.

4. Saiyingpun District School,

4.7

""

""

4 years.

6. Ellis Kadoorie School,.

5.0

each

"

27

وو

year.

6. St. Joseph's College,

5.0

3

29

+

""

22

years.

8. Queen's College,

5.6

""

>>

""

each year.

9. Diocesan Girls',

7:0

""

وو

21

4 years.

10. Wantsai District School,....... 11. Yaumati District School,...

8.0

"

33

each year.

8.2

>>

17

"

#

"

year.

12. Hollywood Road,..

13. French Convent,

10.0

وو

"

reduced,, 3

years.

12.5

2

29

22

years.

12.5

2

11 *

"J

years.

13. St. Mary's,

An advanced paper was also set by Dr. Pearse in December and done by the various schools. His criticisms are given below. They are probably rather more severe than those of a schoolmaster would be who is more used to the defects common to the written work of immature persons.

His conclusion is that a course of elementary instruction in natural science is always required before Hygiene can be studied intelligently, and that the pupils have not had this is very evident". Both the dictum and the deduction are true. The subject, Hygiene, has been forced untimely into the curriculum of schools, because it was considered politically desirable that all pupils, even those leaving early, should have some knowledge of certain facts closely related to the health of the community. The subject is admittedly crammed, and does not harmonise with the other courses of study. I am endeavouring to obtain a consensus of opinion as to whether any remedy can be found.

Report on the Hygiene Examination by Dr. Pearse.

Elementary Papers.

The results were on the whole fair and some papers were quite good. The questions set were such as could easily be answered if the text book only had been carefully read, and no great tax was imposed on the students' ability

"

}

M 17

to understand what style of answers would suit the questions. In teaching elementary Hygiene to stud- ents who have had no preliminary instruction in the elements of natural science, all that can be done is to impress on them certain rules and make them learn them, taking most of the reasons for them on faith. In Victoria School the results were poor, the knowledge shown

being too small.

The girls' papers (except Kowloon School) were on the whole good. A superior knowledge of English enabled the girls competing to express their ideas much better than was generally done, and they appear to have studied the subject with interest.

Advanced Papers.

1. Queen's College. The answers were poor, a result evidently largely due to the fact that the students did not under- stand the questions, which were so worded as not to permit generally of an answer by quoting directly from the text book.

Even if no further study of the subject than could be given to it by reading only the school text book were expected from the advanced students, yet much higher marks could have been obtained if the questions had been carefully thought over.

So many of the boys evidently rushed into their answers, writing about something related to the answer required, but not the correct answer.

2. Diocesan School and Orphanage.-The VII Form produced mostly fair papers and one good one. The amount of knowledge of the subject is small, but the questions were fairly well understood so that the most could be made of the knowledge acquired.

In Form VI the results were poor as in Queen's College, and

apparently from the same reasons.

3. Ellis Kadoorie School.-This school produced mostly fair papers and one good one, the result being similar to that of the Diocesan School.

4. St. Joseph's College. From this school the results were mostly poor, but slightly better than those from Queen's College, owing probably to the boys being better able to grasp the meaning of an indirect question.

5. Italian Convent and Diocesan Girls' School. These two schools sent in very fair papers and some good ones. The English used was on the whole good and showed that the questions were understood, enabling the replies to be reasoned, so that the pupils made the most of their knowledge, which might however have been more

extensive.

Generally. There is ample evidence that the meaning of the terms used in the subject are not understood. Thus hardness of water does not seem to convey a correct idea to the pupils. Germs of disease are as is usual with the public generally confused with insects, etc., etc.

M 18

A course of elementary instruction in natural science is always required before Hygiene can be studied intelli- gently, and that the pupils have not had this is very evident."

INSTRUCTION BY MEANS OF LANTERN SLides.

In a circular dated 28th March, 1907, the Secretary of State for the Colonies wrote as follows:-

"I think that arrangements can be made in this country for the preparation at a small cost of sets of magic lantern slides suitable to the circumstances of each Colony and, if your Government desires to participate in the scheme, I request that you will furnish me with particulars as to the number of slides required, the special diseases which they should illustrate, &c. On the receipt of this information an esti- mate of the cost would be obtained and a further commu- nication sent to you."

""

Accordingly 51 “Danger to health" slides and 14 slides illus- trating Malaria, Plague and other parasites were procured from home. These slides were made the subject of a special course at Saiyingpun, Yaumati and Wantsai Schools. In the case of Saiying- pun the lessons were given immediately after afternoon school. The rooms had to be artificially "darkened by closing the jalousies and doors with the result that they soon became stuffy and close, although the number of pupils present was limited to 50 or 60, and hardly fit to keep boys cooped up in for any length of time". The quotation is from a report by the Headmaster.

At Yaumati and Wantsai the lectures were taken after dark. The Headmaster of Yaumati reports:---

"It is impossible to darken the school by artificial means as the windows are not provided with jalousies, so the lectures had to be taken after dark, and this makes it exceedingly awkward for boys who live a considerable distance away from the School, e.g., Kowloon City."

The following comments are extracted from a joint report made to me by the three Headmasters :-

"Set 1. The slides illustrating:-

Contamination of water, dampness in houses, vitiation of air by sewer gas, ventilation, "made" sites, defective drains. cesspits, &c., were interesting; but those showing w.c.'s, traps in sculleries and kitchens, failed to interest the pupils; and not unnaturally, since they concern "foreign" houses only, Chinese kitchens and latrines being managed on altogether different lines.

Set 2. This set dealt principally with Micro-organisms; bacilli of Typhoid, Cholera, Consumption, Small-pox, &c. They were beyond the pupils; though they might do for medical students and others interested in bacteriology. Consequently they were regarded as so many illustrations of but passing interest. Old friends like the culex and anopheles mosquitoes, acarus, flea, louse, varieties of intestinal worms,

J

M 19

&c., appearing as they did on the screen in a highly magni- fied form possibly did a great deal of good, as Masters fre- quently have to write chits to the different Dispensaries for Sulphur ointment, Iodine and Quinine for the treatment of Itch, Ringworm and Malaria.

For the boys to derive material benefit, the slides should deal with local conditions of life. It is not of much use show- ing defects in the ventilation of a bedroom when a boy occupies at the most a cubicle; showing faults in the con- struction of a trap in a well equipped kitchen and scullery when their food is cooked entirely differently, perhaps in a room without a chimney and with utensils of the scantiest; or shewing a well appointed w.c. when they have possibly an earthenware pot or a public latrine to resort to. Such generalities only detract from the educational value of the

whole series and tend to defeat its object. *

*

*

A teacher by the judicious use of diagrams and coloured chalks, could in the majority of cases, achieve as good results as those obtained from these Lantern Lectures, and still be free from the petty annoyances and trouble occasioned by the state of the climate, defective apparatus, &c.

The Headmaster of Wantsai says that-

:---

"The Lantern obtained from the Education Department

was not strong enough to show the pictures to advantage."

I have ventured to point out that Hygiene as hitherto taught in our schools is not, strictly speaking, educational. I cannot say that a further course based on these lantern slides is likely to improve matters in this respect. The fact that the lectures have to be given out of school hours is a serious objection. (They must be since Hygiene cannot again as at Saiyingpun be taught at the expense of the pupils' health.) But if given at night, such a course brings boys into the streets when they ought to be at home, interferes with their home studies, and after the charm of novelty has passed, is unpopular with both boys and Masters.

These objections do not apply so strongly to boarding schools. There are however certain defects attaching to lantern lectures as means of instruction. The room is dark and it is im- possible for the Master to see whether (a) pupils are attending, (b) whether what he says is going home. These are points which a schoolmaster fully appreciates, and will become apparent to any one who watches a good teacher,-how all the time he is recall- ing the wandering attention of the units of his class, watching his class and recapitulating again and again, till he sees his points are understood and absorbed.

Lantern slides have in my opinion a distinct and limited func- tion as an educational instrument. Where the subject is a large and general one and needs to be seen as a whole, such as the study of the Empire, it may well be illustrated by views taken of it from many points and passed before the eye in rapid succession. Thus a general and almost kinematographic effect is produced. The eye passes to the brain a number of transitory impulses, and the brain

İM 20

is able to form from them a general if somewhat vague impression. In a subject like Hygiene, on the contrary, great attention to detail is essential. Representations of bacilli, or a system of drainage, re- quire to be closely studied. This can better be done by the use of wall diagrams.

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

Extracts from the report of the Director of the Technical Institute are given in Annexe C. The number of students in attend- ance since its opening is shown in Table II. After the first novelty wore off and many students who had joined out of curiosity dis- appeared, the attendance fell. It is now rapidly increasing, and there can be little doubt as to the value of the work done.

The numbers presenting themselves for examination were 120 as compared with 91 in 1908; of whom 102 obtained certificates. The total enrolment is 256.

The subjects taught and the numbers passing are given in Table VII A.

Statements of accounts are given in Tables VII B and C.

Perhaps the most hopeful augury for education in Hongkong is the success of the Masters' Class, attendance at which is now obliga- tory upon all Masters in Government and Grant Schools. The costliness of English Masters makes any great extension of their employment improbable. But it is lamentable to observe how mis- takes of pronunciation, grammar, idiom, and mistaken methods of instruction picked up by pupils, are perpetuated by them as Masters. If this vicious circle can be broken by the Technical Institute, it will have done indeed a good work.

PHYSICAL EXERCISES.

Football. Anyone who has visited a Chinese School will be struck by the narrow chests, round shoulders and weedy physique of most of the pupils. A bad habit prevalent in some schools of making the pupils sit arms folded over their chests accentuates these weak points.

The development of a love of games is therefore much to be encouraged. Unfortunately the available recreation grounds are few and distant, so that only a fraction of the pupils can derive benefit from them.

The following is the report of Mr. Barlow, Honorary Secretary of the Hongkong Schools' Football League. It is encouraging to see a purely Chinese School, and not even a school for big boys, like Wantsai, taking a leading place in the Senior Shield Competition. It shews what can be done.

"As was anticipated the season 1909-10 has been more suc- cessful than the previous one. The Cup presented by His Excellency the Governor added considerable interest to Schools' football. Two competitions were run :--

Senior competing for the Schools' Shield. Junior competing for the Governor's Cup.

1

1

Order.

M 21

wFlamm.co

The competitions, according to fixture, terminate at the end of March, and up to now a good proportion of the fixtures has been fulfilled. The lack of suitable grounds for matches is responsible for much delay in playing off fixtures.

Results to date.

Senior.

School.

Matches played.

Won.

Lost.

Drawn.

Goals.

1

1. Diocesan..

6

3

1

2

00

2. Wantsai

6

1

O

5

10

4

t-

3. St. Joseph's

4. Queen's College

4

1

2

2

3

4

0

ลง

2

N

O

OC

2

Order.

School.

Matches played.

Won.

Junior.

Lost.

Drawn.

For.

Goals.

1. Diocesan

12

9

1

1

18

3 19

2. Saiyingpun

3

S

c

Q

8

6

8

3. Wantsai

4. St. Joseph's

6

~

2

6

7

6

N

00

6

5. Queen's College

4

2

1

6

2

ما

6. Ellis Kadoorie..

7

2

7 5

7. Yaumati

7

6

1

20

2

Victoria School and St. Joseph's "B" scratched during the season.

Against.

Total Points.

For.

3

Co

Against.

Total Points.

7

M 22

The season opened with 9 teams in the Junior, but some time ago Victoria and St. Joseph's (who had entered two teams for the Junior) withdrew, being unable to raise teams. Finance.-The competitions are in a better position than ever they were in former years, and at the close of the present season I hope to show a small balance on the right side. The last instalment due on the shield, purchased some four years ago, will be paid this season. Medals are provided in the Junior Competition, and the expense incurred is covered by the entrance fees.'

"

Hockey. A good deal of hockey is played, but I have received no details.

Simple Physical Exercises within school hours were introduced late in the year at Saiyingpun. A month later on entering the school I noticed immediately the improved bearing of the pupils. The Board of Education "Syllabus of Physical Exercises for Public Ele- mentary Schools is now in the hands of the Headmasters of all the principal schools, and should be productive of good results in the coming year.

""

Excursions. Such excursions as are described in the report of the Headmaster at Saiyingpun quoted above are of great value. I propose in the coming year to obtain fuller information of what is being done elsewhere in this way. Such developments are and must be voluntary on the part of both boys and Masters.

STAFF.

The Staff of the Department was increased during the year under review by ten Chinese Masters and Pupil Teachers. It now

consists of

English Masters,

English Mistresses,

Chiness Masters, Chinese Mistresses,

Indian Master,.......

Pupil Teachers,

17

10

27

64

7

1

15

87

114

The Inspecting Staff besides myself consists of one Sub- Inspectress of Girls' Schools and one Sub-Inspector of Vernacular Schools.

I was absent from the Colony during four of the summer months. Mr. Dealy, Headmaster, Queen's College, acted for me, his place being taken by Mr. Ralphs.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

11th March, 1910.

EDWARD A. IRVING, Director of Education.

No.

M 23

Table 1-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS. [The figures in Red are those for last year.]

STAFF.

umber of

Name and Nature.

English. Anglo-Chinese.

Vernacular.

Number Maximum | Average AL-

Standards, of School Monthly Classes or Days. Enrolment. tendance.

Forms.

Rate of

Fecs.

Gross Cost.

Fees

Collected.

$

C

Queen's College,

2

Kowloon British School--Children of European British Parentage. Boys under thirteen and Girls,

3

Victoria British School-Children of European British Parentage. Girls under thirteen and Boys,

4

Belilios Public School,

5 Saivingpun Anglo-Chinese School, (Boys),

2

7 Masters, 2

6

Yaumati

do..

do.,

Wantsai

ქი .

$10.,

8 Anglo-Indian School, (Boys),

9

Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School, (Boys),

10

Tai lo

do.,

do.,

11

Ping Shan

do.s

do..

12 Cheung Chan

10.

do.

Ditto for Net Cost to each unit in]

Govern-

ment.

Average

Attendance.

ረ.

$

224

1,103

911

11

11

6

229

911

905

$4 to $5

70.761.00

66,596.59

31,125.00 39,636.00

43.51

40,792.00 | 25,804.59

32.05

202

63

46

6

196

69

53

$2 10 $5

8,300.49 1,715.50 6,584.99 7,984.24 1,908.50 6,075.74

143.15

114.63 :

and Infant Class

2011/

59

41

8,125.80

1,307.50

6,818.3)

166.30

6

197

38

27

$2 to $5

6,911.50

893.50

6,018.00

222.88

and Infant Class.

Pupil Teachers.

4 Masters, 2 Pupil Teachers.

4 Masters.

3 Mistresses.

ers.

2 Nedlework.

234

494

350

50 cents,

11,474.36

4 Pupi Tech-

8

205

513

427

$1.50 & $1 12,588.46

3,009.50 3,281.25 9,307.21

8,464.86

24.18

21.79

198!

381

297

12,428.73

6,704.00

5,724.73

19.27

188

490

400

$2 and $4, 16,696.74

9,152,00

7,544.74

18.86

194

278

225

10,514.37

4,977.00

5,537.87

24.61

10

1853

289

230

$2 and $3 12,348 57

5,018,00

7,330.57

31.87

239

8 Masters, 2 Pupil Teachers,

3

"

188

*

I

223

1

222

1

N

209

1965

1

205

1984

2023

3

2053

ཀྑཱུ ཧྰུྃ ཏུ སིཾསྶོ ཡསྶ

304

249

7,994.31

5,027.00

2,967,3!

11.91

302

$2 and $8 11,369.08

6,531.00

4,838.08

16.02

43

27

1,796.78

389 50

1,407.28

52.12

24 $1.50

1,779.90

321.75

1,458,15

60.75

17

13

789,75

66.25

723.50

65.65

13 50 cents.

767.77 |

66.75

701.02

53.92

26

18

10

18

xx xx

753,05

110,50

642,55

35.69

50 cents.

834.90

60.75

774.15

77.41

705.49

87.75

617.74

31.32

50 cents.

754.80

96.75

658.05

36.55

1265

35

28

285.25

84.00

201.25

7.18

223

27

17

50 cents.

572.09

91.50

480.59

28.27

'Indian.

2,861

2,223

133,929.38 | 54,603.50

79,325.88

2,788 2,326

139,204.64 68,213.75

70,990.89

{-

علم

REMARKS.

*་ ༈ ༈

Number of Fupils (Average

Attendance).

4,300

4,200

4,100

4,000

3,900

3,800

3,700

3,600

3,500

3,400

3,300

3,200

3,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

2,600

2,500

2,400

.2,300

2,200

2,100

2,000

1,900

1,800

1,700

1,600

1,500

2,400

1,300

1,200

1,100

1,000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

¿

M 25 Table II.

CHART.

1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909.

2,392

962

857

659

256

RED Line

BLACK Line

DOTTED RED Line

DOTTED BLACK Line

VIOLET Line

BLUE Line

=Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction in English (with Queen's College).

Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction in the Vernacular. Private Schools, giving instruction in English (Max. monthly enrolment ). Private Schools, giving instruction in the Vernacular (Max. monthly eurolment). =Technical Institute.

Night Schools.

e population of the Colony increase 1901 and 1906 from 284,443 to 264,444

2,546

4,335

4,014

F

TABLE III.

ANNUAL GRANT LIST.

DESCRIPTION.

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

GRANT.

Number

of

PRINCIPAL GRANT.

REMARKS.

Maximum

No.

Name and Nature.

Mission.

School Monthly

Rate.

Grant in

aid of

Total.

Enrolment.

Rent.

Days.

£ S d.

9

12345780R

St. Joseph's College, (B.)

*

Italian Convent, (G.)

***

French Convent, (G.) *

Victoria Anglo-Portuguese, (M.)

*

Bridges Street, (G.)

*

Diocesan School, (G.) *

Diocesan School, (B.) *

St. Mary's, Kowloon, (G.) St. Franc.", (M.)

*

9

ENGLISH

SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade (Code Sec. 34 ii.).

Thoroughly efficient."

"Inefficient."

4 years running.

"Thoroughly efficient." 4 years running.

"Thoroughly efficient."

Non-Chinese.

R. C. M.

7

245

486

399.86 35/- 699

7,997

7

202

286

243.40 30/- 365

0

4,173

7,997

4,173

66

6

221

84

""

62.84 25/- 78

898

898

229

95

??

75.08 35/- 131

9

1,502

360

1,862

206

47

""

35.43 251-

44

9

506

506

C. of E.

2081

84

68.57 30/- 102 17 1

1,175

320

1,495

118

295

""

271.49 35/- 237

0

2,715

2,715

R. C. M.

6

200

108

93.59 30/-

140

8

1,604

1,604

""

:

203호

49

37.59 30-

56

644

644

1,534

1,287.85

21,211

680

21,894

Do. 6 years running. Grant on 6 months.

Anglo-Chinese.

11 |

Ellis Kadoorie, (B.)

| Secular. | 9 | 230 |

751

| 596.20 | 30|- | 1,341 | 8 | 11 | 15,331 ||

15,331 | Grant on 18 months.

7

Lower Grade (Code Sec. 34 i.). Anglo-Chinese.

14 |

Hollywood Road, (B.)

* *

C. M. S. | 4 | 227 |

176 I 129.36 | 7 | I

...

|

906 |

906❘

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

ULAR SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade (Code Sec. 35 ii,)

17

Berlin Foundling House, (G.)

**

Ber. M.

7

255

49

}

18

Fairlea, (G.) **

C. M. S.

210

72

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.)

**

234

73

20

Training Home for Girls, (G.) **

L. M. S.

221

48

****

60.75

65.36

47.44 17/6 41 10 17/6 17,6 57 3 9

53

3

35.90 20/-

35 18

2600

474

474

607

607

66

654

654

410

4

242

209.45

2,145

Thoroughly efficient." "Thoroughly efficient."

410"Thoroughly efficient." "3 years running.

2,145

T

!

}

35

36

37

Reclamation t

No. 28 D'Aguilar Street, (G.) Wantsai Chapel, (B.) *

Hospital Chapel, (B.)

**

*

མི མི མི

""

38

No. 84 Canton Road, (G.)

*

"J

39

Hunghom, (B.) *

"5

40

42

43

44

45

No. 343 Queen's Road West, (B.) ** Tanglungchau Chapel, (B.) **

No. 171 Portland Street, Yaumati, (B.) No. 20A Aberdeen Street, (G.) **

Tanglungchau Chapel, (G.) * *

""

5

"2

**

"2

17

""

46

Wantsai Chapel, (G.) **

29

47

Bridges Street, (B.)

*

48

Shamshuipo, (M.)

**

A. B. M.

B. M.

49

Shaukiwan, (M.) *

22

50

Tokwawan, (B.)

**

وو

51

High Street, (G.)

**

53

No. 218 Hollywood Road, (B.) **

C. M. S.

55

No. 36 Lyndhurst Terrace, (G.) * *

57

No. 6 Western Street, (G.)

**

""

58

No. 366 Shanghai Street, Yaumati, (B.) * *

""

59

Yaumati Chapel, (G.) **

""

60

No. 232 Hollywood Road, (G.) ·

""

61

No. 22 Pokfulam Road, (G.) **

""

62

Shaukiw an, (G.)

**

""

63

64

68

69

No. 35 Pottinger Street, (G.)

70

72

Yaumati, (B.) *

Stanley, (M.)

No. 263 Queen's Road West, (B.) ** No. 5 Elgin Street, (G.) *

Kowloon City, (G.)

74 Kowloon City, (B.)

*

**

"

R. M.

**

**

**

W. M.

"

C. M. S. Secular. B. M.

PEG4 LO CO LO LO CO

10 10 65 10 10 10 5 1 6 10 7 3 0 10

1441

221

45

32.38

223

64

47.90

209

71

49.33

6

236

31

21.33

6

220

40

26.66

6

224

76

58.75

229

62

41.67

247

41

33.68

6

239

61

34.43

208

30

24.68

6

210

87

71.57

226

87

58.15

6

228

114

100.03

221

58

50.85

219

68

55.18

233

80

58.62

233

66

61.13

244

57

49.97

2514

58

40.39

5

234

34

24.07

259

62

41.61

234

65

46.25

6

4

242

43

33.69

217

33

19.06

2591/

45

36.33

228

88

67.68

5

233

60

45.14

237

62

58.38

248

38

19.64

6 241

52

39.94

5

229

110

85.62

77GOONPOOONOMI-ENONOFNOGIEFFOLO OS O

งบป

240

503

444

...

192

120

240

411

176

292

2

› Grant at $6.00.

202

64

26L

207

160

367

ant at $7.00.

148

148

Do.

501

501

349

349

...

700

700

356

356

386

...

...

386

410

410

Last year's Grant at 17/6.

550

244

794

350

233

583

202

136

338

"Thoroughly efficient." 3 years running.

"Inefficient." Last year's Grant at $6.00.

168

45

213

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

291

...

291

...

277

...

277

Last year's Grant at $7.00.

202

104

306

133

72

205

254

...

254

474

272

746

316

192

508

"Thoroughly efficient."

525

200

725

...

"Thoroughly efficient."

3

98

90

188

359

92

451

...

"Thoroughly efficient."

9

::

years running.

2 years running.

771

112

883

"

Thoroughly efficient." 2 years running.

43

2,661

2,010.95

15,839

3,356

19,195

58

59

(1909.) Total Number of Schools. (1908.)

NOTE.-R. C. M.-Roman Catholic Mission.

C. of E. Church of England.

=

C. M. S. Church Missionary Society.

Ber. M.Berlin Mission.

L. M. S. London Missionary Society.

A. B. M.-American Board Mission.

Rh. M. S.

B. M. W. M.

Rhenish Missionary Society

Basel Mission.

Wesleyan Mission.

5,364 4,233.81 5,394 3,926.91

55,435

4,036

59,471

44,709

3,800

48,509

B.

=Boys.

G.

Girls.

M.

Mixed.

*

**

=School year ends 30th June, 1909.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of 1s. 9d. School year ends 31st December, 1909.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of 1s. 9d.

No. 32 Closel,

Nos. 29-39 Grant on 18 months.

1

ར།

Table XXIV.

at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1909 inclusive. ipping Tonnage only.

its

man Shipping Tonnage only.

2 Shipping Tonnage only.

1 Tonnage only.

Shi

and Freign Shippiť † Tonnage. Tonnage orly, exclu ng Local Trade,

·launch Toni, age on

xcluding Local Trade.

: entire Foreign

Ti

in British and

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

الاتات

Foreign Ships, Junks and Steam-launches.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1901.

1905.

1906.

1907.

1908.

1909.

Toss.

11,500,000

|11,300,000

||11,200,000-

$11,000,000

*10,000,000

9,800,000

9,700,000

-9,600,000

-9,500,000

9.400,90€

-9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9.600,000

--9,500,000

: 9.400,900

- 9,300,060

9,200,000

9,100,000

-9,000,000

--8,900,000

8,800,000

-8,700,000

8,600,000

8.400,000

8.200,000

18.100,000

ܩܩܩܕܘܘܘ 8

ܘܩܩܘܘ8ܐܟ7.

ܘܩܟܘܘܟ.ܟ.

7,600,000

ܘܘ,7,50 .

7,400,000

7,300,000

ܘܘܘܝܘܘ7:2..

7,100,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

ܘܘܘ,6,100

6,000,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

.3,600,000

.3,500,000

3,400,000

|---3,300,000

---3,200,000

--3,100,000

3,000,000

-.2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,0GO

2,600,000

2,500,000

2.400.000

الامور الدلالية

2,600,000

| 2,500,000

2,400,000

2 300,000

2,200,000 |

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1.500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1

1,000,000

900,000

200,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100.000

90,000

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

11,500,000

11,300,000

11,200,000

11,000.nnn.

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000

8,900,000

8,800,000

8,700,000

1867.

1868.

1869.

1874.

1$75.

1876.

{

Table XXIV.

IAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1909 inclus

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

man Shipping Tonnage only.

2 Shipping Tonage only. r Tonnage only.

Foreign Shippiı | Tonnage.

DOTTED BLACK LINE represents DOTTED RED LINE represents & BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shi GREEN LINE represents British and YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only, exclu VIOLET LINE represents Steam-launch Ton, age on HICK BLACK LINE represents entire Foreign T

ng Local Trade,

xcluding Local Trade.

in British and Foreign. S.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

+

1881.

1882.

10081

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

མ་

8,700,000

8,600,000

8,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

BLACK

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

3./

*

1,600,000

dad de moda Val d

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

V

1,500,000

1,400,000

YELLOW 1,300,000 GREEN 1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

RED

800,000

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

DOTTED

100,000

BLACK

LINE

90,000

VIOLET

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

DOTTED

RED

LINE

20,000

:

*

=

1

#

Table IV.

Table showing Expenditure, Revenue and Average of Pupils under instruction in the Education Department, for the years 1900 to 1909.

Total Expenditure on

Education including Technical Institute

Percentage Percentage

Total Revenue from Education Average of Pupils under including Technical Institute.

Instruction.

Average Cost per pupil.

of

Revenue

of

Revenue

to

to

- M 29

and excluding Grants.

Year.

Govern- Techni.

Govern-

ment cal In-

Total.

ment

Schools. stitute.

Schools.

Techni-

cal In-

stitute.

Govern-

Techni- Govern-

Techni-

Total. ment Grant.

Schools.

cal In- ment Grant. stitute. Schools.

cal In-

stitute.

1900,

$

56,233

$

$

$

C.

c. No.

No.

No.

$

C.

:

56,233

30,033.85

30,033.85

1,750

3,870

14.97

6.14

:

0.

Expenditure Expenditure excluding including Technical Technical Institute.

%

Institute.

%

53.40

1901,

67,072

67,072 29,802.15

29,802.15 1,557

3,197

23.93

6.22

44.43

1902,

.....

73,291

73,291 | 32,422.35

32,422.35

1.661 3,107

24.56

6.14

44.23

1903,

112,780

112,780 | 34,366.30

34,366.30 1,618 3,542

48.48

5.37

34.45

:

1904,

115,701

115,701 36,251.59

36,251.59

1,665 3,305

47.71 10.86

31.33

1,

118,785

118,785 | 41,201.50

41,201.50

1806,

118,952

2,731 121,683 | 46,436.07

645.00 | 47,081.07

1,797

1,932 3,561

3,526

43.17 11.31

:

:

34.68

...

191

37.53 11.34

10.92

39.03

38.69

1907,

142,072

7,755 149,827 | 49,238.00

1908,

157,366

2,184.50 | 51,422,50 9,891 | 167,257 54,791.11 3,742.00 58,533.11

2,144

3,780

253

43.30 11.10 22.01

34.65

34.32

2,251

3,927

317

45,57

12.35 19.39

34.81

34.99

1909,

154,626

9,379 |164,005 | 68,204.25 |3,699.50 | 71,903.75

2,326 4,234

256

37.15

13.07

22.18

44.10

43.84

X

M 30

Table V.

Percentage of Colonial Revenue spent on Education.

Years.

Total Revenue Total spent on

excluding

Land Sales.

Percentage.

Education.

$

$

1900,

3,235,330

79,994

2.47

1901,

3,973,578

86,946

2.18

1902,

4,329,712

92,356

2.39

1903,

4,728,692

130,620

2.76

1904,

6,322,949

151,589

2.39

1905,

6,526,144

158,678

2.43

1906,

6,622,070

159,373

2:40

1907,

6,442,530

184,028

2.85

1908,

6,034,849

205,875

3:41

1909,

6,286,833

219,359

3:48

f

SCHOOL.

Queen's College,

Diocesan Boys';...

Diocesan Girls',

St. Joseph's,

St. Stephen's,

Table VI A.

Oxford Local Examinations, 1909.

PRELIMINARY.

Honours.

Pass.

JUNIOR.

Honours.

Pass.

St. Stephen's ((),

Total,,

1st Class.

2nd Class.

13

3rd Class

1st Division

(within age

limit).

2nd Division

(over age).

1st Class.

:

:

2nd Class.

:

:

3

16

25

SENIOR.

Honours.

Fass.

:

iv

3rd Class.

1st Division (within age limit).

2nd Division (over age).

1st Class.

2nd Class.

:

:

:.

:

T

1

8

...

:

18

26

Total

3rd Class.

1st Division (within age

limit).

2nd Division (over age).

:

:

:

:

:

:

1 excused

respon-

sion.

M 31

2

35

18

7

lexcused,

respon-

Aion.

36

19

1

24

23

116

!

Year.

Table VI B.

Oxford Locals.

Queen's

Diocesan

Diocesan.

St. Joseph's.

Victoria

British

St. Stephen's.

St. Stephen's Girls',

Private

Total.

Tuition.

College.

Boys'.

Girls'.

School.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior,

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior,

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

1905,

12 2

7

1906,

2 3 8 5 4 3

3 2

1907,

2

*

| 3

8

3

8

...

1908,

3

3

Y

3

F

11

...

1909,

6 | 19

10

مد

7

I

6

1

1

3!

8

t

6

4 11

7

15

9 16

7 | 14 15

:..

:

:

:.

:

:

:

2

2

2

4 6

3

...

6

6

1

6

I

Preliminary.

:

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

2

Senior.

Junior,

Preliminary.

6

6

17

34

16

27

14

20

39

38

12

25

35

...

...

...

39

30

44

38

M 32

M 33

Table VII A.

Examination Results, Technical Institute, June, 1909.

Subjects.

Stage.

Building Con-

Number

Examined.

Passed

Percentage

with Distinction.

Passed. Failed.

of Passes.

struction,

II

1

Field Surveying,

I

Machine Drawing,

II

[

Steam,

I[ I

Mechanics,....

7

Mathematics,

II

5

10044&O-NOO

00 10 10 10 00 10 2011-12

2

Chemistry

Theoretical,

II

I

4

Practical,

11

3

I

Physics,

I

10

Teachers' Class,

24

English,

II

I

11

French,.......

II

Book-keeping.

Shorthand,

Pre.

Elc.

-OXINSOOH-022 p

1

Adv.

3

1

Total,.

ONNONH-ONNE

%

100

60

71 4

100

75

80

66.6 100

3

71.4

60

10

47.6

100

75

100

100

90

13

66.6

75 72.7

100

75

66.6

100

85.7

40

183

33

103

45

75.4

M 34

Table VII B.

Revenue and Expenditure of Technical Institute, 1909.

REVENUE.

EXPENDITURE.

*

$

Students' Fees Received, 8,907.00

Lecturers,........

8,067.00

Do. Refunded, 207.50

Equipt. of Classes

296.60

3,699.50 Examiners' Fees,

275.00

Sanitary Institute Donation,

Li Shing Grant,

Paid by Government,

90.26 Fans and Light,

1,127.00 Incidentals,

381.80

323.15

5,652.94 Crown Agents,

Apparatus,... 1,226.15

Total,

$10,569.70

Total,... 10,569.70

Table VII C.

Increase.

Decrease.

1907.

1908. 1909.

1908. 1909.

1908. 1909.

$

$

S

Expenditure....... 7,878.81 9,591.20 10,869.70 2,012.39| 678.50

2,184.50 3,712.00; 4,916.76 1,557,50 1,174.76

Revenue,

Paid by Govt., . 5,694.31 6,149.20 5,652.94 454.89

Table VIII.

College of Medicine Contribution Account.

496.26

C.

$

JA

C.

Laboratory Attendant,

Balance from 1908,

202.22

Wages,

130.00

Hongkong College of

Laboratory Stores and

Sundries,

189.80

Medicine Contribution for 1909,

300.00

Balance at Bank, 31st

December, 1909,

235.42

Sale of old books, etc., received from the Li

Shing College,....

49.65

Interest,...

3.35

Total,

555.22

Total,

555.22

M 35

Annexe A.

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION FOR DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

CLASS VIII.

1. Reading.-Accurate pronunciation and explanation of text

of:

(a.) The Royal School Primer.

(b.) The Royal Reader No. 1.

(e.) The Regina Reading and Object Lesson Sheets, First

Series.

2. Writing:-

I. Dictation (from Reader).

II. Sentence Building, with special reference to—

(a.) Object Lessons (see No. 6 below).

(b.) Pictures (Pictorial Language Series, No. 1).

III. Copy Books (Vere Foster's, Medium Series, Nos. 1-5). 3. Recitation.-To recite about 40 lines selected from Reader.

4. Colloquial:-

I. According to List of Verbs (Appendix A 1).

II. From Pictures (Pictorial Language, Series No. 1, and

Regina Reading and Object Lesson Sheets, No. 1).

5. Geography:-

I. Plan of School and neighbourhood.

II. Cardinal Points.

6. Object Lessons.-Cat, Clock, Compass, Cow, Dog, Hen, Horse,

Pig, Sheep, Slate.

7. Arithmetic :-

I. Notation and Numeration.

II. The Four Simple Rules.

III. Mental (to preface each lesson).

CLASS VII.

1. Reading. Slow and distinct reading and explanation of :---

(a.) The Royal Reader No. 2.

(b.) The Regina Reading and Object Lesson Sheets,

Second Series.

M 36

2. Writing:-

I. Dictation (from Reader).

II. Composition on easy subjects with special reference to

(a.) Object Lessons (see No. 7 below).

(b.) Pictures (Pictorial Language Series No. 2).

II. Copy Books (Vere Foster's, Medium Series, Nos. 6

and 7).

3. Recitation.—To recite about 50 lines selected from Reader.

4. Grammar.-Nonns and Verb (to pick out).

5. Colloquial:--

1. According to List of Verbs (Appendix A 2).

II. From Pictures (Pictorial Language Series No. 2 and

Regina Reading and Object Lesson Sheet No. 2).

6. Geography--

I. General Geography of--

(a.) Hongkong, (b.) Kowloon, (e.) New Territories. II. How to read a map.

7. Object Lessons :

Bamboo, Blackboard, Coins, Fish, Frog, Orange, Rice, Tea.

Animal, Vegetable and Mineral kingdoms, Water.

8. Arithmetic :-

J. The Four Rules applied to English Money.

II. Calculations in Chinese Money and Measures. III. Mental (to preface each lesson).

CLASS VI

1. Reading.--Clear and intelligible reading and explanatio n

of :-

(a.) Royal Reader No. 3.

(b.) Course of Hygiene-- Elementary.

2. Writing:----

I. Dictation (from Reader).

II. Composition on easy subjects with special reference to-

(a.) Object Lessons (see No. 7 below).

(b.) Pictures (Pictorial Language Series, No. 3).

III. Copy Books (Vere Foster's. Medium Series,↑ Nos. 7

and 8).

3. Recitation.--To recite about 70 lines selected from Reader.

"

M 37

4. Grammar

I. The Parts of Speech (to pick out).

II. Number, Gender and Person of Nouns and Pronouns.

5. Colloquial:

I. According to List of Verbs (Appendix A 3).

II. From Pictures (Pictorial Language Series, No. 3).

6. Geography-

I. General Geography of China.

II. Kwong Tung Province in detail.

III. Trade Routes.

7. Object Lessons:-

Coal, Cotton, Electric Tram, Gold, Iron, Paper, Ship-

building, Sugar, Silk, and Wood.

8. Arithmetic :

1. Reduction of Weights and Measures.

II. L. C. M. and G. C. M.

III. Four Rules of Decimals.

IV. Mental (to preface each lesson).

9. Hygiene.-Course of Hygiene-Elementary.

CLASS V.

1. Reading. Intelligent reading and explanation of:----

(u.) Royal Reader No. 4.

(b.) Couse of Hygiene-Elementary.

2. Writing:-

1. (Dictation (from Reader).

II. Letter Writing (to contain at least 50 words).

III. Simple Essays.

IV. Copy Books (Vere Foster's, Medium Series, Nos. 9

and 10).

3. Recitation.-To recite about 100 lines selected from Reader.

4. Grammar:

I. Analysis and Parsing of simple sentences.

II. English Prefixes.

5. Geography:-

---

1. General Geography of Asia.

II. China in detail.

III. (a.) Day and Night, (b.) Seasons, (c.) Latitude and

Longitude.

- 1

M

M 38

1

6. Object Lessons :-

Cork, Fur, Glass, Knife. Lead-pencil, Leather, Needle,

Pen, Soap, Sponge.

7. Arithmetic.-Vulgar Fractions.

8. Algebra. Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division.

(Simple Exercises).

9. Geometry. The following or similar constructions :--

Bisection of angles and of straight lines; Construction of perpendiculars to straight lines, of triangles

and quadrilaterals from given data, of parallels to a given straight line, of angles equal to a given angle: Division of straight lines into a given number of equal

parts.

(See Syllabus for Oxford Local Preliminary.)

10. Hygiene.--Course of Hygiene--Elementary.

CLASS IV.

1. Reading.-Fluent and intelligent reading and explanation.

of :-

(.) Royal Reader No. 5.

(b.) Course of Hygiene-Elementary.

2. Writing: -

I. Dictation (from Reader).

II. Letter Writing (to contain at least 100 words).

III. Essays on Concrete Subjects.

IV. Copy Books (Vere Foster's, Medium Series, Nos. 10

and 11).

3. Recitation.-To recite about 120 lines selected from Reader.

4. Grammar:-

I. Simple Analysis and Parsing of Sentences.

II. Latin and Greek Prefixes.

5. Geography:

--

I. The British Empire.

II. Interchange of Productions.

III. Outlines of the Government of Hongkong.

IV. Ocean Tides and Currents.

6. Object Lessons:---

Barometer, Camphor, Flax and Linen, India Rubber, News- paper and Printing, Pottery, Rope, Salt, Thermo- meter, Wood.

Appendix O.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS.

Expenditure.

1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings were as follows:-

Amounts voted.

In Estimates.

Supplemen- tary Votes.

Actual Expenditure.

Total.

$

(i) Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges,

(ii) Annually Recurrent Works,

313,910.00 10,558.00 324,468.00 292,018.36

433,000.00 38,810.00 471,810.00 409,902.85

(iii) Extraordinary Works, . 1,012,600.00 75,829.40 1,118,429.40 1,214,498.28

Total,

S 1,789,510,00 125,197.40 1,914,707.40 1,916,419.49

Detailed statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B.

With regard to (i), the saving is due to vacancies in the Staff, lapsing pay of officers on leave and refunds on account of supervision of work executed by the Department for various public companies.

In the case of (ii), the following were the sub-heads under which the principal savings occurred :-

Maintenance of Buildings in New Territories,...$ 2,476.96 Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

Maintenance of Public Cemetery,..

Dredging Foreshores,

Miscellaneous Services, ...

1,783.44

2,885.28

4,255.35

3,278.24

Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks, 13,975.34 Water Account (Meters, &c.),

11,331.92.

The saving on Dredging Foreshores was due to less dredging being done than usual owing to frequent typhoon scares and ne- cessary repairs to the dredger; that on Miscellaneous Services to the withdrawal of many charges such as had previously been defrayed from this vote; that on Maintenance of City and Hill District Water- works to less pumping being done than was provided for; and that on Water Account to its not being found possible to greatly extend the meter system owing to the available staff being engaged on the supervision of the rider main system which was in operation for nearly 9 months.

Excesses occurred in two sub-heads only, namely:

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,...

Maintenance of Kowloon Waterworks,

$21,700.25

1,585.34.

02

The excess on the former was due to the Rainstormn of 19th October, 1909, and that on the latter to the fact that the amount voted, viz., $7,000, proved to be insufficient. The water supply of Kowloon has recently been converted from a pumped supply to a gravitation one and, as the conditions differ from those prevail- ing in the City, there were no reliable data on which to base the estimated expenditure under the new conditions.

The large excess under (iii) was due mainly to extensive resumptions of land at Kowloon Point for the Railway Terminus, which cost $438,699.25, and to the rapid progress made with the Deepening of Causeway Bay. The excesses under these and other sub-heads were however largely counterbalanced by savings under others.

The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1909, as com- pared with that of the previous year :—

Fersonal Emolu-

ments and Other

1908.

1909.

Increase.

De rease.

. Charges,

266,477.51

292,018.36

25,540.85

Annually

Recur-

rent Works.

512,336 30

409,902.85

102,433.45

Extraordinary

Works,

1,000,935.45

1,214.498.28

213,562.83

Total,

1.779,749.26

1,916,419.49

239,103,68

102.433 45

The increase in the first item is due partly to the fall in exchange, the salaries of the Senior Officers having been paid at the average rate of 1/9 as compared with 19 d. during the preceding year and partly to the transfer of certain expenditure from Public Works Recurrent to this head making it necessary to supplement the vote "Other Charges" by the sum of $10,558.

The large decrease in the second item is principally due to reduced expenditure on the following votes:-

Maintenance of Lighthouses,

Maintenance of Telegraphs,

Dredging Foreshores,

Miscellaneous Services, -

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

Maintenance of Kowloon Waterworks,

Water Account (Meters, &c.),

-

$11,104.87

2,876.17

2,356.19

3,603.02

61,395 80

5,905.99

11.294.41.

The large increase in the third item is due to the extensive

resumptions of land already mentioned.

0 3

Land Sales and Surveys.

2. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, &c.-The following tabulated statement gives particulars of these:---

No. of LOTS.

AREA IN SQ. FEET.

ANNUAL RENT.

PREMIUM.

Total.

Total.

Total.

Total.

Sales by Auction, Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula, N. T., New Kowloon,

39

""

Southern District, Northern

SA

C.

$

59.737 105,782

280.00

606.00

31,836

18.00

13,483.00 15,968.00*

500.00

66

112,820

82.58

1,405.00

187

7,863,514

342.09 |

3,175.00

263

8,173,689

1,328.67

34,531.00

Sales without Auction.

Island of Hongkong,

6,020

14.00

829.00

Kowloon Peninsula, .

New Territories,

2

6,020

14.00

829.00

Extensions Grunted.

Island of Hongkong,

908

6.00

327.45

Kowloon Peninsula,

718

26.00

108.00

New Territories,

1,626

32.00

435.45

Grants on Nominal

Ferms.

Island of Hongkong,

6,605

2.00

Kowloon Peninsula,

New Territories,

Grants on Short Leases,

Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula, New Territories,

Permits to occupy Lond for Short Period, &c. Island of Hongkong,

4,080

1.00

10,685

3.00

211

31,872 9,900

17,700.00 114.00

41,772

17,814.00

313

5,727.92

Kowloon Peninsula,

135

6,466.38

N. T., New Kowloon,

223

2,652.10

19

let by A.L.O.,

Southern District,

161

300.00

let by A.L.O..

繁体

Northern District,.

197

544,00

1,029

15,690.40

Extensions of Short

Period Leases to

75 yours.

Island of Hongkong,

Kewloon Peninsula,.. New Territories,

Quarry Lenses, Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula,. N. T., New Kowloon,

500.00

165.00

2

665.00

Mining Licences.

New Territories,

Northern District,...

1

[27,878,400

250.00

1

27,878,400

250.00

Total,..

1,306

36,112,192

35,797.07

35,795.45

* Includes an amount of $15,830 to be paid by four equal annual instalments, the first of which was not paid until January, 1910. A payment of $25 for boundary stones for the lot was also made in January, 1910.

04

The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $40,665.14 or very much less than the Estimate which amounted to $150,000. It included the following sums which do not appear in the above tabulated statement :-

Premium derived from sale of right to

. erect piers,

Fees for Boundary Stones to mark lots, Re-adjustments in Hongkong and

Kowloon,

Premium for encroachments, Kowloon, Premium for conversion into Building

Lots, N. T.,

$14,401.90

321.00

5,670.79

171.00

160.00

3. Sales by Auction.-There was only one lot in the New Territories sold by the Public Works Department,-it realized $500. The Assistant Land Officer at Taipo sold 187 small lots which re- alized $3,175, and the Assistant Land Officer at Hongkong 66 small lots which realized $1,405.

The only sale worthy of special mention was that of Kowloon Marine Lot No. 90, To Kwa Wan, which contained about 105,000 square feet. Under the conditions of sale the purchaser had the option, of which he availed himself, of paying the amount of the premium in four equal annual instalments, the outstanding sums bearing interest at the rate of 7 per cent. per annum. The sale did not take place until practically the close of the year and the first instalment was not paid until 1910. None of the other sales which took place were of sufficient importance to justify the insertion of details.

4. Sales without Auction. The only items under this heading were two Garden Lots in Hongkong (Nos. 32 and 33), the areas of which were 2,500 and 3,520 square feet respectively.

5. Extensions granted.-The extensions granted in Hongkong comprised two small areas of 683 and 225 square feet respectively, both adjoining Inland Lot No. 1,300.

The extension in Kowloon consisted of an area of 718 square feet adjoining Kowloon Inland Lot 1,211 which was granted in exchange for House No. 1, San Shan, resumed in connection with the New Cattle Depôt.

6. Grants on Nominal Terms. These consisted of an area of 2,480 square feet in Stone Nullah Lane granted to the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee, an area of 4,125 square feet as an extension to the Corinthian Yacht Club's ground at Wanchai and an area adjoining the Kun Yam Temple at Hunghom, Kowloon, for a Chinese Dispensary.

7. Grants on Short Leases.-There were two in Hongkong, viz., Inland Lot 1,689 opposite the Central Market, area 23,520 square feet, let by tender for 3 years from 1st November, 1909, and Inland Lot 1,758a, consisting of the old Harbour Office, area 8,352 square feet, let for 5 years from April, 1909. There was only one in Kow- loon (Kowloon Inland Lot 1,144-old tile factory), area 9,900 square feet, which was let for 1 year.

J

8. Permits to occupy land for short periods.-These were as usual of a very miscellaneous character and are too numerous to admit of individual mention; most of them were for small areas to be held quarterly.

9. Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75 years.--There is nothing to report under this heading.

10. Quarry Leases.-A Quarry at To Ti Wan on the South side of the Island was leased for a term of two years commencing from the 1st March, 1909. The lease of Quarry No. 6 at Ngau Tau Kok, New Territories, was extended for six months, the lessee being subsequently allowed to remain in occupation until the end of the year on a monthly permit.

11. Mining Licences.--During the year a Mining Licence was issued for an area of one square mile in the vicinity of Ho Ching Village, New Territories.

12. Resumptions.-Extensive resumptions for railway purposes were undertaken, Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 443, 1,140 and 1,141, containing a total area of 159,527 square feet, being acquired for $438,699.25. An area of 10,225 square feet was resumed from Marine Lot 29 by private treaty for the sum of $20,451.50, partly for the purpose of constructing a new road from Queen's Road East to Praya East and partly for scavenging lanes provided in accordance with the requirements of the Buildings Ordinance. An area of 6'1 Mows (Tai Hang Lot 77) was resumed at a cost of $37.50 for the extension of Queen's Recreation Ground; another small area (the remaining portion of Mongkok Lot 55), containing 11,520 square feet, was resumed by private treaty for the Kowloon-Canton Railway at a cost of 41.00 and a third area, 73,177 square feet, was resumed from Kowloon Farm Lot 4 by private treaty for $13,690, in connection with the extension of Argyle Street, Kowloon.

The following lots in Hongkong and Kowloon were resumed for non-payment of Crown Rent, viz. Aplichau Inland Lot 25, Kow- loon Inland Lots 977, 1,082, 1,083 and 1,084, Mongkok Lots 54 and 56, Sai Kung Inland Lot 37, and Sai Kung Farm Lot 3.

In the Southern District of the New Territories, 116 lots were resumed by the Assistant Land Officer, of which 26 were acquired for public purposes and 90 were voluntarily surrendered.

Particulars of the resumptions effected in the Northern District will be found in the Land Officer's report.

13. Lease Plans.-Plans and particulars (in duplicate) of 148 lots and 6 piers were forwarded to the Land Officer in connection with the issue of leases. Notable among these were the plans of practically the whole of the Taikoo property at Quarry Bay, in which extensive readjustments were made in connection with the large works carried out during recent years.

14. Boundary Stones. -Boundary Stones were fixed for 14 lots in Hongkong, 16 in Kowloon and 2 in the New Territories.

06

15. Surveys. Many surveys of considerable extent were under- taken for the purpose of defining the boundaries of lots or preparing Sale or Lease Plans. The most extensive works of this nature were surveys of the whole of the Green Island Cement Co.'s property at Deep Water Bay including an area of about 5 acres applied for for obtaining a supply of clay in connection with their works: Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.'s property at East Point (Marine Lot 52): Farm Lots 70 and 71 at Pokfulam: a large area between the Albany Filter Beds and May and Peak Roads for the issue of new leases: the proposed site for the Hongkong University: traverses of Conduit and Robinson Roads including the whole of Inland Lots 1,544, 1,712, 1,801, &c., for the issue of leases and certain new lots for Messrs. Butterfield & Swire at Quarry Bay. Extensive surveys have also been carried out in Kowloon, practically the whole of the Western and Southern portions of the Peninsula having been surveyed and partially plotted on the New Ordnance Sheets to the scale of 1,2,400 and 1/600. This work has been considerably delayed owing to sickness amongst the staff and the necessity of withdrawing surveyors for other urgently required surveys. Progress was made with the New Triangulation of the Colony which was extended to Taipo, and, in connection with it, two bases were carefully measured, one at Taipo having a length of 2,168 feet and the other at Ngau Shi Wan, New Kowloon, having a length of 2,270 feet, steel tapes being used for this purpose.

As there was some doubt as to the correctness of the existing Standards of length in the Colony, a certified 100-foot "Konstat" wire was requisitioned from England and on its arrival the two bases were re-checked and a considerable difference was found to exist between the two series of measurements, which, if the 'Konstat" measurements are accepted as correct, will necessitate a re-solution of the whole triangulation. Nineteen main triangulation stations have been fixed in Hongkong, Kowloon and the New Terri- tories and 18 minor stations, mostly in Kowloon; 21 main triangles and 29 minor triangles have been observed and 2 Azimuths checked. One surveyor is partially engaged on this work at present.

46

16. Sites for booths at the Race Course.-A sum of $5,060 was realized by the letting of sites for the erection of booths and stands at Happy Valley during the Race Meeting.

17. Squatters' Licences.--During the year the claims of all the outstanding squatters were heard and adjudicated upon by the Squatters' Board and, where the claims were good, recommendations for the issue of Crown Leases were forwarded to Government. The number of villages dealt with was 29. All Squatters' Licences were cancelled at the end of the year and the work of the Squatters Board was completed.

18. Military Lands.-Surveys were made and Agreements pre- pared for the Sanitarium and Reserve at Magazine Gap. Victoria Battery, Stonecutters' Island (for which the W.D. plan was accepted) and a Position Finding Cell above the old Dock Battery. The fol- lowing areas of War Department land were handed back to the Colonial Government, Agreements being prepared accordingly:- Kowloon Dock Battery: 4 Kowloon Garden Lots: the old Time Ball

1

07

Station at Kowloon Point; Mt. Cochrane, Kowloon; Gascoigne and Jordan Roads, Kowloon; and various areas on the East, West and North sides of King's Park, Kowloon, classed as Building Land.

As the result of quarrying operations, Mount Cochrane is fast disappearing and the area occupied by the hill will become available for building purposes.

A small area containing about 360 square feet, being a portion of the Military Cantonment near Arsenal Street, was handed over to the Colonial Government for the purpose of constructing a Urinal, the value of the site at $1.00 per square foot being credited to the War Department in the Colonial Military Lands Account.

Permission was granted for the following encroachments, ciz. :- (1.) By War Department on Colonial Government Land.

(a.) 2 Datum Points on Lamma and Kau I Chau Islands. (b.) Rifle range (300 yards) situated South-east of Sani-

tarium Reserve.

(c.) Two Jalousies to the Army Ordnance Store which project over the footpath in Queen's Road East near Arsenal Street.

(2.) By Colonial Government on War Department Land.

Telephone Pole on War Department Land at Murray

Battery.

19. Naval Lands.-The ouly item under this heading was an encroachment by the Naval Authorities at Lai Chi Kok, New Kowloon, by the erection of a beacou, granted on payment of $1.00

per annum.

20, Piers.--The right of erecting piers under long leases was granted in one case in Hongkong and in three in Kowloon. An extension of one permanent pier in the New Territories was granted. Licences for the following temporary piers for various periods were issued:-10 in Hongkong, 8 in Kowloon and 12 in the New Territories. Licences were also issued or renewed for 9 slipways in Hongkong, 4 in Kowloon and one in the New Territories, the fees for which amounted to $2,040. The permia derived in respect of pier rights amounted to $7,721.90 for permanent piers and $6,680 for temporary piers.

21. Cemeteries.--During the year the Government Cemetery at Cheung Chau Island, New Territories, was surveyed and stones fixed, the revised area being 5'77 acres.

Work under the Buildings Ordinance.

22. Amending Ordinance, 1908.-The two additional overseers mentioned in last year's report were appointed during the year.

23. Amending Ordinance, 1909.-A further amending Ordinance which dealt principally with the transfer of certain duties from the Registrar General's Department to the Sanitary Department and the exhumation of bodies but which also contained a few amendments relating to buildings was passed in May.

08

24. Plans. The number of plans dealt with shews an incraese as compared with 1908, the greatest difference being in the number deposited for alterations and additions to existing buildings. The following is a tabulated statement of those deposited during the year, the figures of 1908 being given in a parallel column for pur- poses of comparison :----

European Houses,

Chinese Houses,

Buildings and Structures other

than above,

Alterations and additions to

existing buildings,

Verandahs,

Balconies, -

Sunshades,

Areas,

Piers,

Total,.....

1908. 1909. Increase. Decrease.

18

22

104 50

54

88

146

58

1,305 1,395

90

59

36

23

30

31

1

32 25

7

1

^

5

1,642 1,702 157

97

25. Certificates.-The following certificates for new buildings were issued :-

59 for 154 domestic buildings under Section 204 of Ordinance

No. 1 of 1903.

54 for 78 non-domestic buildings or works.

These figures show an increase of 26 in the number of non- domestic buildings certified as compared with 1908, the domestic buildings being one less than in 1908, or a net increase of 25.

26. Notices and Permits.-Notices relating to structures in a daugerous condition were served in 270 cases, whilst 876 permits, 269 notices of a miscellaneous nature, and 5,349 notices dealing with nuisances reported by the officers of the Sanitary Department were issued. These figures show increases of 127 in the dangerous structure notices; of 134 in the number of permits issued; and of 61 in the notices of a miscellaneous nature. The nuisance-notice work having only been transferred to the Public Works Department

09

during the latter part of 1908, no useful comparison can be made with the figures for that year, but it may be mentioned that the increase amounted to 4,607. The fees collected on account of the issue of permits to obtain sand and stone from Crown land amounted to $1,228.55.

27. Resumptions for Scavenging Lanes, &c.-A statement of the work done will be found under the heading "Public Works Extra- ordinary".

28. Private Streets.-Resurfacing and other repairs under the provisions of Sections 186 and 187 of the Buildings Ordinance were carried out by this Department at the cost of the frontagers in the following streets :---

Tsz Mi Alley.

Li Yuen Street East.

Li Yuen Street West. Yuk Sau Lane.

29. Improvements, &c., of l'ublic Streets.-The new public street, referred to in last year's report, leading from Queen's Road East to Praya East about midway between Arsenal and Ship Streets has been resumed by the Government and named Gresson Street. The buildings on the adjacent lots (Marine Lots Nos. 295 and 296 and Inland Lots Nos. 1,797 to 1,800) were nearing completion at the close of the year and the new street will be formed and opened to public traffic in due course.

Schemes for raising the levels of certain areas in Hongkong and Kowloon have received careful attention, and a number of houses have been rebuilt at higher levels in order that the adjoining streets may he raised whenever practicable.

30. Footways. Attention has been given to the footways under balconies and verandahs. Numerous notices have been served calling upon owners to repair such footways and in several cases the ne- cessary work has been carried out by this Department and the cost thereof recovered from owners. In most cases the areas dealt with were small and are not worthy of specific mention.

31. Typhoon and Ruinstorm Damages.-Comparatively little damage was done to buildings in the Colony by typhoons and rain-

storms.

In the typhoon of October 19th there were several small slips of earth and roofs generally suffered to a slight extent. Nothing of a very serious nature occurred but the following buildings in Kowloon were rendered to some extent dangerous :--

18 and 19 Fuk Sing Lane. Parts of the walls of these houses collapsed. The occupiers had previously been ordered to vacate the premises and no one was injured.

12 Main Street, Fuk Tsun Heung. These premises were considerably damaged but no collapse occurred.

129 Temple Street, Yaumati. The verandah was damaged

and parts were rendered dangerous.

32. Collapses.-No serious collapses occurred.

V

O 10

33. Tests of Mortar.-Attention was given to the testing of mortar, 169 samples being taken from works in progress. Though still not up to the standard desirable, in no case was the quality found to be so inferior as to warrant a prosecution.

34. Prosecutions for Defective Building Work. There were no cases of a serious nature in which it was found necessary to take legal proceedings for defective work.

35. Prosecutions for other Nuisances.-Legal proceedings were taken in 161 cases for non-compliance with notices issued in connec- tion with nuisances reported by officers of the Sanitary Department. In the case of 118 of these fines were inflicted.

36. Cemeteries.--Surveys for the purpose of defining the various sections in which each Cemetery has to be sub-divided were put in hand, but owing to vacancies on the staff the progress made was not satisfactory. The large new Cemetery at Kai Lung Wan was completely surveyed and a detailed plan prepared. Some sections of the Colonial Cemetery were also mapped and a start was made with the survey of Mount Caroline Cemetery.

Work in connection with forming new terraces, &c., to afford additional grave spaces was carried out at Mount Caroline, Kai Lung Wan, Aberdeen, Kowloon Tong and Ma Tau Wai Cemeteries.

Exhumation was carried out in accordance with the usual practice at Ma Tau Wai, Sham Shui Po and Aberdeen Cemeteries.

Questions having arisen as to the procedure adopted in carry- ing out exhumations, provision was made in the Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance of 1909, specifying the action to be taken. Six months' notice of intention to carry out exhumation has now to be given and such notice in respect of a large area in Mount Caroline Cemetery was published in the Government Gazette of September 10th, 1909. When cleared, this area will be laid out in terraces for future burials and it is intended to carry out a regular system of burial and exhumation in proper rotation at stated intervals.

\37. Principal Works by Private Firms.-Messrs. Butterfield & Swire continued work on the sea-wall of their Shipyard at Quarry Bay and the erection of Quarters for their employees at Shaukiwan West. The latter were approaching completion.

The Standard Oil Company's works at Lai Chi Kok were completed during the year. Some extensions however are still being made.

Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.'s new premises in Pedder Street were completed in September.

Work is still in progress on the reconstruction of the southern portion of the Hongkong Hotel.

Work on the extension of the Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co.'s No. 1 Dock at Hunghom was carried on during the year but is not yet completed.

+

O 11

Several extensions of the Green Island ('ement Co.'s works at Hok 'n were made during the year.

Among other works which have been commenced or completed during the year the following may be mentioned:----

Works commenced.

14 Chinese houses on I.L. 796, Third Street. Seamen's Institute on M.L. 295, Praya East.

4 Semi-European houses on M.L. 296, Praya Ea-1.

3 houses and godowns on I.L. 1,588, Whitfield.

6 European houses on K.I.L. 522 R.P. and K.J.L. 548 Sec. d.,

Nathan Road, Kowloon.

Hospital near Q.B.I.L. 7, Quarry Bay.

4 Chinese houses on K.I.L. 1,211, Shek Shan.

Swimming Bath at Murray Pier for Victoria Recreation Club. Rope Factory extension on LL. 906, Smithfield Street, Ken-

nedy Town.

6 Chinese houses on S.I.L. 377, Shaukiwan.

4

រូ

418,

>>

Kwong Wah Hospital on K.I.L. 1,213, Dundas Street, Yaumati, 8 Chinese houses on N.K.I.L. 17, Sham Shui Po.

Extensions to the Italian Convent on I.L. 58 R.P., Caine Rd.

Works completed.

5 Chinese houses on K.I.L. 1,078, Mongkok.

6 European houses on K.I.L. 609, Nathan Road, Kowloon.

6 Chinese houses on Lot 1,568 S.D. II, Peng Shek.'Ngau Chi

Wan.

4 Chinese houses on K.M.L. 31, Sec. A, 70-74, Reclamation

Street, Yaumati.

5 Chinese houses on K.M.L. 30, Secs. A and B. 78-86, Re-

clamation Street, Yaumati.

4 new European houses on I.L.'s 341, 342. Nos. 21-27,

Shelley Street.

6 new Chinese houses on I.L. 1,780, Shaukiwan Road.

12 new Chinese houses on I.L.'s 1,798, 1,799. Nos. 62-84.

Queen's Road East.

New Plague Hospital on I.L. 1,793, Third Street.

4 new houses on K.I.L. 198, Nos. 157-163, Kramer Street,

Taikoktsui.

Extension of St. Stephen's College on I.L. 694.

5 blocks of hospital buildings for Tung Wah Hospital, New

Street, on L.L.'s 835, 1,208, 1,209.

Terrace of houses on I.L. 1,300, Hill Road.

65 blocks comprising 32 houses on S.M.L.'s 5-10, Shaukiwan.

38. Fires.

0 12

A serious fire occurred at Shamshuipo ou the 5th July when 36 houses were burnt down and many more were damaged. A considerable number of houses were shored up by this Department, and some were pulled down as they were in a dangerous condition. The cost of these operations was subsequently recovered from the owners, There were no casualties in connection with this fire. Several other fires occurred in the Colony but none were of large dimensions.

39. Reclamations.-The following is a statement of the private reclamation works in progress during the year :----

****

Completed.

Area, Sy. ft.

N.K.M.L. 2. Lai Chi Kok,

345,928

Do. 3.

do.,

140,250

In Progress.

Areu, Sq. ft.

N.K.I.L. 26, Shamshuipo,

22,500

Do. 41.

do.,

20,240

+

The areas stated are those of the lots which in several cases extend for some distance further inland than old high water mark, and, though largely so, are not therefore exclusively reclaimed from the sea.

In some cases additional areas beyond those stated have to be reclaimed for roads.

40. Theatres and Public Performances Regulation Ordinance.— Regulations under this Ordinance were made by the Governor-in- Council on the 19th of August.

In addition to introducing many requirements in the case of existing and future buildings for public performances, they authorize the Building Authority to issue licences for such performances. Seven such licences were issued during the year, the fees received amounting to $330.

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

41. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings upon which any considerable sum was expended were the following :-

Central Police Station-General repairs and painting

throughout, -

-

Government Civil Hospital:---

"A" Block-General repairs and

painting throughout,

"B" Block-Repairs, -

Staff Quarters General repairs

T

$2,308

324

-$4.990

-

and painting throughout. - 1,883

Kennedy Town Cattle Depot-Limewhiting, painting and tarring throughout; also renewing concrete to Compound,

4,515

3,055

O 13

Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station--General repairs and

painting throughout, -

Government Buildings Generally-Cleansing drains

-$2,505

-

1,817

and repairing and hanging punkahs, 1,898 Victoria Gaol-Supply of materials and repairs, Government Offices-Reconstructing ceilings and re-

pairs, -

Wanchai Market-Reconstructing a portion of the roof, general repairs and limewhiting and painting throughout, -

1,779

Government House-General repairs and external

painting, -

1,760

Central Market-General repairs and limewhiting in-

ternally, -

1,499

Public Laundries--Colourwashing

and painting

throughout, -

1,448

1,445

throughout, -

-

1,270

1,248

throughout,

-

-

1,230 1,068

-

1.021

Aberdeen Police Station --General repairs and painting

Kennedy Town Sheep and Swine Depot-Limewhiting

and tarring throughout,

No. 8 Police Station-General repairs and painting

Victoria Hospital-Repairing roof, etc., Gough Hill Police Station---General repairs and paint-

ing throughout,

Wanchai Stores and Quarters -General repairs and

limewhiting and painting throughout,

Shaukiwan Police Station---General repairs and paint-

ing throughout,

Magistracy--General repairs and painting throughout, Saiyingpun Market--General repairs and limewhiting

and tarring throughout,

Queen's College-General repairs to wood work, Mountain Lodge--General ̈ repairs and painting

981

919

877

809

768

throughout, -

688

Kowloon Disinfecting Station-General repairs and

painting throughout

676

Kowloon British School--General repairs and painting

throughout.

666

and small repairs, -

Kennedy Town Hospital-Concreting to Compound

Kennedy Town Cattle Depôt, Inspector's Quarters-

General repairs and painting throughout, Hongkong Disinfecting Station, Inspector's Quarters- General repairs and painting throughout, Yaumati Police Station-General repairs, limewhiting

and tarring throughout,

654

638

625

577

*

Yaumati Market-General repairs, painting and lime-

whiting throughout,

561

Wanchai School-Reconstructing a portion of the roof, Yaumati School-General repairs and painting through-

533

out,

523

Old Western Market-General repairs and limewhiting

internally,

506

O 14

Branch Prison (Belilios Reformatory)—General repairs,

limewhiting and painting throughout,

Public Mortuary-Colourwashing

throughout,

repairs,

$475

and painting

453

No. 5 Police Station--Reconstructiong floors and small

-

General Post Office and Treasury-General repairs,

limewhiting and painting throughout, New Western Market-Limewhiting and tarring

internally,

Saiyingpum School-Concreting Compound and small

448

427

1

127

repairs,

380

Sookunpoo Market-General repairs and limewhiting

and tarring throughout,

379

Hunghom Market-Small repairs and limewhiting and

painting internally,

360

repairs, limewhiting and tarring,

355

Victoria School-Repairs,

337

Chatham Road, Nos. 16, 18, 22, 28 and 32-General

Mongkoktsui Market-General repairs and limewhiting

and tarring throughout, -

314.

The use of the Branch Prison, formerly known as the Belilios Reformatory, having been discontinued, the buildings were, with the sanction of the Secretary of State, granted to the Eyre Diocesan Re- fuge for charitable purposes on certain conditions after being put into a reasonable state of repair.

42. Maintenance of Buildings, New Territories. In the case of the New Territories Buildings, the following are those which entailed considerable expenditure:---

Tai Po Police Station-General repairs and painting

throughout and alteration to Cells,

Sha Tin Police Station-General repairs and painting

throughout,

Ping Shan Police Station-Repairs, Sheung Shui Police Station--General repairs, painting

- $1,766

857

699

563

Tai Po Island Quarters-Repairs to floors and general

repairs and painting,

542

Au Tau Police Station-Repairing, painting and colour-

ing throughout,

100.

and colouring &c. throughout,

The work on some of these buildings was still in progress at the close of the year.

43. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-The following sums were expended upon the various lighthouses

Gap Rock, Waglan, -

Green Island, Capsuimun,

Cape Collinson,

$3,246

602

393

121

102.

The expenditure on Gap Rock Lighthouse included providing and fixing 13 pairs of Muntz Metal Shutters which completed the replacing of the decayed iron ones.

A

O 15

44. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City. lue mad sur- faces were maintained in a satisfactory condition.

That portion of Kennedy Road between the Peak Tramway bridge and the nullah East of the German Club, 657' 0" long, and that portion of Robinson Road between the Peak Road and Glenealy, 610' 0" long, were laid with tar macadam. Part of Robinson Road at its junction with Castle Road was concreted with 4′′ lime and cement concrete.

The granite paving in Shelley Street between Staunton Street and Caine Road, and in Pottinger and Peel Streets between Queen's Road and Hollywood Road was taken up and relaid. Queen's Road Fast between Arsenal Street and Wanchai Market was improved by reducing the cross fall.

The footway in Leighton Hill Road opposite Inland Lot 488 was concreted with lime and cement concrete, 4′′ thick, and the footway in Morrison Hill Road opposite Nos. 31 to 41 was similarly surfaced.

45. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City.—The road surfaces generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner.

That portion of Barker Road between Plantation Road and Rural Building Lot No. 91 was laid with tar macadam.

46. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in Kowloon.--The roads were maintained in good condition. Some interference was unavoida- bly caused with some of the roads on the East side of the Peninsula by the progress of the Railway works. Kowloon City Road be- tween Hunghom and the Cement Works and Shanghai Street (formerly Station Street North) between 1 and 2 miles were macadamized.

47. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in New Territories.- These roads were maintained in such order as the Vote would allow. A further length of two miles of the Tai Po Road, viz., from the 6th to the 8th milestone, was coated with macadam, thus completing the surfacing of it with this material from its commencement to the 11th milestone. A contribution of $2,750 was received from Railway funds on account of this work, the macadamizing of the road being necessitated by the heavy traffic over it in connection with the construction of the railway. A further contribution of $2,583.61 was received from Railway Funds on account of the extra cost of maintaining the road during the years 1908 and 1909, the ordinary cost of maintenance having been assessed at $8,000 per annum, the Railway paying for any expenditure in excess of this amount.

`48. Maintenance of Telegraphs.-The lines and instruments were kept in good repair. One of Ericsson's 6-line Switchboards was fitted at the Harbour Office; a 30-line board at Tsim Sha Tsui Water Police Station and a 20-line board at No. 1 Motor House.

The cable houses at Hunghom were rendered more secure against burglars by the construction of a reinforced concrete roof, sheathing the doors with mild steel and fitting them with safety bolts.

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The Morse telegraph instruments at Green Island and Cape Collinson Lighthouses were removed and replaced by telephones, the line to the latter lighthouse being put into metallic circuit.

49. Maintenance of Telegraphs in New Territories.--The lines and instruments were maintained in working order. Some inter- ference was caused to the Tai Po route by the progress of the Railway works and the positions of poles had to be altered in places to suit the circumstances.

50. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.-The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs were systematically cleansed and maintained in good condition and the flushing tanks were periodically worked.

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations,

Repairs,

Tools for cleansing operations, General incidental expenditure,

$14,253.21

3,686.30

1,226.94

50.11

$19,216.56

as against $19,224.08 in the previous year.

51. Gas Lighting, City of Victoria and the Peak.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City was 990, an increase of 20 over the previous year and in the Hill District 114, an increase of 2. The lighting of the Military Cantonments by 15 lamps remained on the same footing as formerly.

52. Electric Lighting, City.-No alteration has been made in the number of lamps which remains at 75.

53. Gas Lighting, Kowloon.—No alteration has been made in the number of lamps which remains at 241.

54. Electric Lighting. Kowloon.-No alteration has been made in the number of lamps which remains at 22.

55. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The following is a statement of the principal items of expenditure under this vote:-

Blake Pier (painted with anti-corrosive paint), $1.084 Murray Pier,

Water Police Pier, Kowloon Point,

Ship Street Pier,

Harbour Office Pier,

Causeway Bay Breakwater,

Queen's Statue Wharf,.......

Green Island Pier

Kennedy Town Pier,

Arsenal Street Pier,

735

450

448

321

310

246

230

230

220.

56. Maintenance of Public Cemetery.-An extension of the Cemetery to provide an area for the burial of Non-Christians was taken in hand and the work was nearly completed at the close of

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the year.

The new terrace which is situated at the south side of the Cemetery will provide for about 120 interments. 40 tombstones were renovated at a cost of $421.00.

The duty of issuing permits for the erection and repair of monuments in the Cemetery was transferred to the Sanitary Depart- ment on the 1st July.

57. Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds.-An improve- ment was effected at the Wongneichong Recreation Ground by altering the positions of plots D, D1 and E which enabled the Royal Hongkong Golf Club to lay out their links in a more satisfactory manner. A considerable portion of the turf on plot E was taken up, the ground levelled and the turf relaid at a cost of $427.07 of which $244.04 was paid by the Military Recreation Club.

A sum of $265.82 was spent on the Queen's Recreation Ground turfing bare patches. The extension of this ground referred to in last year's report was completed at a total cost of $2,730.13, of which $630.13 was expended during 1909. To permit of further extension, an area of cultivated land on the East side of Tai Hang Nullah was taken over, the tenant being compensated, and a commencement was made with the filling up of this area as it was at a considerably lower level than the rest of the ground. The sum expended during the year on this work amounted to $1,000.

53. Dredging Foreshores.-The Dredger was employed at the following places during the year:-

Causeway Bay Refuge,

8,609 cubic yards.

Typhoon Shelter, Mongkok tsui, 3,102 Kowloon City Pier, -

་་

- 2,558

*

Stormwater Outfalls,

- 2,513

Dust Boat Stations, -

- 1,470

- 4,714

546

Various, -

Outside Messrs. Jardine, Ma-

theson & Co.'s premises,-

Total,

י

23,512 cubic yards.

The vessel was slipped and overhauled at a cost of $318,94 and is in good working order and condition.

59. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-A special report on this subject was submitted after the Typhoon and Rainstorm which occurred on the 19th and 20th October. The damage estimated at the time was as follows:-

Government Buildings,

Do..

Lighthouses,

$ 4,500

New Territories,

300

1,000

Praya Walls and Piers,

3,500

14,860

outside

7,550

5,000

in New Territories,

1.800

Roads inside City,

37

in Kowloon,

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Telegraphs and Telephones,

Public Lamps,

Cemeteries, -

Sundries, Matsheds, &c., and various

small items,-

Waterworks, Hongkong,

Kowloon,

Drainage,

$1,000

700

100

1.060

3,500

1,500

1.000.

Most of the damage had been repaired by the close of the year.

Repairs to the Breakwater at Causeway Bay damaged in pre- vious years were completed at a total cost of $5.838.73 of which $3,371.35 was expended during the year.

60. Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks.-- Constant supply was in force until the end of January, when the rider mains were brought into operation. Owing to the comparatively small amount of rainfall during the Summer, constant supply could not be resumed again until the 25th of October, after which it remained in force to the end of the year.

The quantity of water stored in the Impounding Reservoirs onl the 1st of January amounted to 549,968,000 gallons and it reached a minimum on the 17th May when it amounted to 131,335,000 gallons. The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow levels for the following periods:----

Reservoir.

Total Capacity.

Gallons.

Tytam,

384,800,000

Tytam Byewash,

22,366,000

Tytam Inter-

mediate, -

195,914,000

Wongneichong,

30,337,000

Pokfulam,

66,000,000

Period.

Oct. 20th to Dec. 8th (50 days).

to Nov. 8th (20

).

August 7th to Dec. 31st (190, ). Various periods, amounting to 45 days, between August 14th and December 1st. Various periods, amounting to 86 days, between July 18th and November 18th.

The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 597,720,000 gallons. Pumping was begun at Tytam Tuk on the 1st of February and continued until 28th May. It was also found necessary, owing to the deficiency in rainfall, to resort to pumping between the following dates:-21st to 28th June, 30th August to 13th September, 4th to 20th October. The total quantity pumped from the Tytam Intermediate Reservoir was 199,764,000 gallons or an amount equal to the total contents of this Reservoir. Both sets of pumping engines were in operation for 21 days and one set for 132 days.

¿

0 19

A comparative statement of the total rainfall recorded at various points during the year is given in the following Table :-

Month.

Kowloon

Observatory.

Public

Gardens.

Tytam

Reservoir.

Tytam Tuk.

Pokfulam

Reservoir.

Taipo

Quarters.

January,

1.46

1.89

1.41

1.80

1.52 1.21

February,

1.66

1.70

0.98

1.22

1.04

2.08

March,

2.34

2.66

1.98

1.89

1.89

2.87

April,

2.45

2.36

2.33

2.62

2.06

2.30

May,

6.70 8.11

7.94

9.51

6.37 8.15

June,

7.38 7.33

8.79

8.67

5.82

10.45

July,.

12.82 12.71

13.73

13.46

10.13

19.42

August,

8.34 8.24

6.29 6.56

9.90

9.28

September.

8.50 10.40

9.55 9.09

8.51

7.07

October,

23.98 23.80 19.51 21.96

19.76

25.58

November,.

December....

0.06 0.14 0.13 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.18

0.09 0.07

0.00

0.00

0.00

Total, 1909,

"

1908,

75.69 79.31 72.64 76.96 67.09 88.48 91.84 | 102.00 . 92.22 92.87 86.46 119.69

The total quantity of water supplied during the year was 1.512,546,000 gallons filtered and 24,255,000 gallons unfiltered, mak- ing a grand total of 1,536,801.000 gallons, or 146,594,000 gallons less than in 1908. This decrease is due to the long period of restricted supply by rider mains.

The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes amounted to 199 gallons, taking an estimated popula- tion of 208,560.

Full details of the consumption, contents of reservoirs, &c., will be found in Annexes C and D.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst show the water to have been of excellent quality throughout the year. Bacterio- logical examinations also gave satisfactory results.

The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District during the year amounted to 65,651,000 gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of 180,000 gallons, whilst 30,074,000 gallons were pumped to the Hill District giving an average daily consumption of $2,000 gallons. As compared with 1908 there was an increase of 1,644,000 gallons in the quantity pumped to the High Level District and of 2,516,000 gallons in that pumped to the Hill District.

The grand total pumped during the year amounted to 95.725,000 gallons as compared with 91,610,000 gallons in 1908

444

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Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities pumped to the High Levels and the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E.

All motors and station buildings were kept in a good state of repair during the year.

The number of meters in use at the end of the year was 1,139 in the City and 169 in the Hill District, or a total of 1,308 as com- pared with 1,070 and 165 in 1908, or a total of 1,235.

Filtered- -Trade.

The quantity of water supplied by meter was as follows:

194,272,000 gallons. Domestic (City), .. 106,643,000 Do. (lill District), 30,074,000

Unfiltered,

Total,...

24,294,000

355,283,000

This shows an increase of 30,453,000 gallons in the quantity of water supplied by meter over 1908.

New services were constructed or old ones repaired, altered, improved or connected to the mains to the number of 593 and 12 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The number of inspections of private services was 2,895; all defects were made good after the usual notices (195 in all) had been served.

61. Maintenance of Kowloon Waterworks.-The total quantity of water supplied amounted to 293,171,000 gallons which gives a daily consumption of about 803,000 gallons, or, taking an estimated population of 87,700, 92 gallons per head per day. These figures show a decrease of 3,626,000 gallons under the quantity supplied during 1908. Details are

Details are given in Annexes F and G.

The supply was constant throughout the year and the Govern- ment Analyst reported that the water was of excellent quality.

The various buildings were maintained in good repair.

There were 346 meters in use at the end of the year, an increase of 3 over 1908.

In last year's report, the figures for the Hill District meters were erroneously given instead of those for Kowloon. The correct figures are as follows:--

1907. 313

1908.

343

1909.

346

No. of meters in use,.. Private services were constructed, altered or repaired in 42 in- stances and 8 building supplies were laid on.

62. Maintenance of Aberdeen and Shaukiwan Waterworks.— A satisfactory supply of water was maintained throughout the year at both these villages, the total consumption amounting to 5,302,000 and 20,940,000 gallons respectively, or about 15,000 and 60,000 gallons per day. Details are given in Annexes H and J.

0 21

The supply to Sai Wan Battery, which is included in the Shau- kiwan returns, amounted to 3,464,000 gallons for the year.

There were 6 meters in use at Aberdeen and 9 at Shaukiwan.

63. Maintenance of Lai Chi Kok Waterworks: Water-Bout Supply. The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 61,414,000 gallons, or about 168,000 gallons per day. Details are given in Annexe K.

There were 13 meters in use at the end of the year as compared with 16 in 1908.

64. Water Account.-The fixing of meters to properties not supplied by the rider mains was continued and at the end of the year there were still some left to fix.

The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 987.

The following is a statement of the expenditure under the

vote :-

Difference in value between 101 meters issued and

90 meters returned to Store,

Cost of fixing new meters and repairs to meters,

Total...

$1,243.20

7,424.88

$8,668.08

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

65. Law Courts-Contract for Superstructure.-The granite balustrade above the main cornice was completed with the exception of four bays which were left open for the purpose of hoisting stone for the drum of the dome. The balustrade of the first floor colonnade was also practically completed.

The statue of Justice, which surmounts the pediment on the West or principal front, was hoisted into position and fixed during August.

The walls of the Second and Third Courts were built to the re- quired height, the steel trusses for the roofs being fixed and the tiling practically completed at the close of the year.

The Library walls were also completed, the necessary ironwork fixed and the granolithic slabs and rolls forming the covering of the roof were laid.

The main girders to support the dome and the steel framing of the inner dome of the Great Court were hoisted and fixed and the circular wall of the dome was built to a height of 2 feet above the level of the square base.

The walls of that portion of the second storey intended for offices were built to the required height, the steel framing for the roof was fixed and the flat concrete roof laid.

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The concrete flooring of the first floor colonnade and the concrete roof of same were completed.

A considerable proportion of the stone for the pinnacles, cir- cular wall of dome, &c., was prepared ready for setting.

Towards the close of the year a start was made with the dress- ing down and pointing of the granite face work.

The average number of Masons employed daily on the site was 84.

66. Law Courts-Contract for Joinery, Fittings, &c.-The teak panelling for walls of Courts, the floor and ceiling boards and a number of doors, &c., were prepared ready for fixing. The ceiling joists of the Second and Third Courts and of the offices and stores on the second floor were fixed and a start was made with the plastering of the walls on this floor.

1909. Estimates, ...$130,000.00 | Total Estimates, $796,200.00 1909. Expenditure. 81,150.21

81,150.21 Expenditure to

31/12/09..

644,473.30.

67. Post Office. The whole of the walls of the building, with the exception of those of the Clock Tower, were practically built to the required height.

The main cornice extending round the verandahs was fixed. For the balustrade of the verandahs, a large proportion of the plinth was set and many of the granolithic balusters and much of the coping were fixed. The flat concrete roof of the verandahs was also constructed.

The central gables on the three principal fronts were built to about half the required height; the small gables on these fronts and those on the West front being nearly completed.

The main granite cornice round the towers at the South-east and North-east angles of the building was partly fixed.

The steel framing for the flat roof covering that portion of the main building adjoining the central yard was fixed and the cornice round walls of same was set.

The steel trusses and a number of the steel joists used as principals in the construction of the roof of the main building were fixed and also the steel girder carrying part of the tower at the North-east angle.

Most of the timber framing for the roof of the Chinese Quarters on the West front was fixed.

A large proportion of the special cement tiles for the gable roofs was made.

The plastering of the internal surfaces of walls and pointing of external surfaces were both well advanced at the close of the year.

Doors, casements, floor and ceiling boards and other portions of the joinery work were prepared ready for fixing

1

..

81.

O 23

The average number of Masons employed daily on the site was

1909. Estimates, $180,000.00 Total Estimates, $930,000,00 1909. Expenditure, 153,454.63 | Expenditure to

31/12 09,.....

673,751.04.

68. Public Latrines and Urinals.-The following latrines were completed during the year:---

(i.) One containing 20 seats and 2 urinal stalls at Taikok-

tsui Village.

(ii.) One containing 16 seats and 2 urinal stalls in Chuk

Hing Lane.

(iii.) One containing 24 seats and 2 urinal stalls at Wongnei-

chong Village.

(iv.) One containing 3 seats in Kennedy Road, West of the

Peak Tramway.

The following structures were begun :-

(v.) One latrine containing 30 seats for men and 10 for women, in addition to 2 urinal stalls. in Nelson Street, Mongkoktsui.

(vi.) One urinal containing 8 stalls adjoining No. 1, Queen's

Road East.

All the above were constructed of brickwork pointed in cement

mortar.

1909. Estimates, . 1909. Expenditure,.

$12,000.00 $ 9,093.00.

69. Extension of old Stables to provide additional office accom- modation required for the Public Works Department.—This work, begun in 1908, was completed during the year.

*

The extension consisted of an addition of 38 feet to the length of the building at its Western end and the raising of its walls so as to provide an additional storey, thus making it 2 stories high throughout. By these additions, six rooms, ranging in size from 28′ 0′′ × 15' 6" to 21' 6" x 15' 6" were rendered available for the Public Works Department, four being used to accommodate the Engineering Staff, one for an Overseers' Office and one for a Telephone Workshop and Store. Three rooms, one measuring 31′ 0′′ × 15′ 7′′ and the remaining two 14′ 10′′ x 15′ 1′′, were devoted to messengers' quarters and a small cement-testing room was also pro- cured. A covered way was erected across Lower Albert Road to connect the new offices with the main block. Lavatory accommoda- tion was provided in a small outbuilding and a trough closet, sup- plied with water from Albany Nullah, was installed in part of the old outhouses for the use of the messenger staff.

The above extensions enabled the old Praya Reclamation Office and a matshed adjoining the Government Offices, which had been occupied as an overseers' office for a number of years, to be dispensed

7

O 24

with, both structures being pulled down. They also admitted of the conversion of a portion of the main block hitherto occupied as a store and cement-testing room into an additional office.

1909. Estimates, .$7,450.00 Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure,... 6,871.30

$12,000.00

Expenditure to 31/12/09, ..

13.723.07.

A supplementary vote for the excess was obtained.

70. Market at Kowloon Point.-The walls of the market, with the exception of the Western temporary wall, were built to 15' 44" above first floor level, ie., to the underside of the concrete lintels.

The Eastern portion of the building, which contains the neces- sary offices in connection with the market, was built to its full height, ready for the concrete roof. The concrete floors in it were laid and the tiling of the walls was commenced.

The work had to be stopped at the end of October owing to the non-arrival of the columns and girders ordered from England and it was still suspended at the close of the year.

$66,000.00

1909. Estimates, $50,000.00 Total Estimates. 1909. Expenditure, 17,662.32 | Expenditure to 31/12/09. 18,554.90.

71. Staff Quarters, Tui Po.-The contract for this work, which comprised the erection of a bungalow, servants' quarters and stable. was completed in June.

The bungalow contains a hall or sitting room, 16′ 0′′ × 17′ 0′′; a dining room, 22' 0" x 16' 0"; an office, 16'0" x 8' 6"; 3 bed-rooms. 16' 0" × 15′ 0′′-each with a separate bath-room--and a drying room, pantry and stores. An open verandah runs practically round the building, the greater portion being 10 feet in width. A semi- basement under the bungalow contains the European kitchen and some additional store accommodation.

The walls are built of Canton red bricks, generally in lime mortar, pointed externally and plastered internally. The floors of the rooms are of 11" hardwood on China fir poles, and those of the drying room, bath-rooms, verandah and semi-basement are of cement concrete finished with granolithic 1" thick. The roof is of double pan and roll tiling carried on hardwood rafters and China fir poles.

The servants' quarters contain 5 rooms, each 7′ 0′′ x 9′ 0′′, a Chinese kitchen 6′ 0′′ x 9' 0", a small tool-house and a latrine. A covered way is provided where necessary round the building.

The walls are of Canton brick in lime mortar pointed externally and finished fair and whitewashed internally. The floors are of cement concrete finished with 1" granolithic. The roof is of double pan and roll tiling on China fir poles.

The stable is a two-storied building containing a loose-box. 10' X 10'; stall 6' x 9'; coach-house, 10′ 0′′ × 12′ 6′′; harness-room, 6' x 10'; 2 servants' rooms, each 10' x 10'; a mafoo's room, 6' 8'. and a kitchen, 6' x 10'.

>

O 25

The building is of a similar description to the servants' quarters already described.

In connection with the above buildings, a considerable amount of work was necessary in forming the sites and an approach road to the stable.

The total cost of the bungalow, servants' quarters and stable was $26,574.41, there being a balance of $601.05 to be paid in 1910.

The cost of the four native houses for the clerical staff, described in last year's report, was $2,622.10. Partitions in the living rooms and rails to the cock-lofts were afterwards added at a cost of $286.93 but this part of the work was defrayed out of "Miscellaneous Works" Vote.

1909. Estimates, $16,880.00 Total Estimates,... $30,000.00

| 1909. Expenditure. 16,599.27 | Expenditure to 31/12/09, 28,595.46.

Furniture for the bungalow was supplied at a cost of $1,142.50 but this was charged to a vote provided under the Police Depart- ment Estimates.

72. Quarantine Station at Lai Chi Kok.--The ten corrugated iron sheds and the various kitchens, latrines and outhouses, &c., in connection with them, which were acquired in 1908, were repaired at a cost of $4,157.41, of which $2,157.41 was expended during the

year.

A stone boundary wall, 9 feet high, coped with cement and broken glass, was built round the site at a cost of $6,874.56.

The old Customs building at the pier was put in good repair for use as a guard-house at a cost of $1.709.39.

The construction of a hospital was not undertaken.

1909. Estimates. ..$10,777.00 Total Estimates,

.$16,000.00 1909. Expenditure, 10,776.48 | Expenditure to 31/12/09, 12,782.48.

3. Additions to No. 2 Police Station. A contract for this work was let and a start with it was made but no expenditure was incurred up to the end of the year. The demolition of the old buildings with small exceptions was necessary before any new work could be begun.

1909. Estimates.

1909. Expenditure,

|

$12,000.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure to 31/12/09,

$14,000.00

74. Extension of Tai Po Land Office to provide accommodation for District Officer.-A contract for this work was let to Mr. Luen On in April and at the close of the year the brickwork was practi- cally completed and the roof trusses were in position. 1909. Estimates,...$10,000.00 | Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 2,212.44 | Expenditure to 31/12/09, 2,212.44.

$11,700.00

75. Permanent Stairway to Ballroom, Government House.-A contract for the erection of this stairway was entered into with Mr. Chan A Tong on the 31st March and the work was completed

O 26

at the end of October. It consists of a stairway from the ballroom verandah affording direct access to the grounds. A wide stairway from the verandah descends to a landing and roof garden, below which it branches into two flights of steps leading to ground level. A summer house is provided underneath the roof garden and stores underneath the flights of steps.

The work generally was constructed of brickwork in cement mortar, finished with plaster; the steps and landings being of granite.

The summer house and roof garden were paved with 4′′ × 4′′ titles, laid on cement concrete, a layer of asphalte being provided underneath the tiling of the roof garden.

It was found necessary to pile the foundations.

$4,500,00 Total Estimates,

1909. Estimates,

.$5,800.00 1909. Expenditure, 4,486.45 Expenditure to 31 12 09, 4,486.45. 76. Additional Room at Queen's College for Pupil Teachers.- This work was completed with the exception of some minor details and some extra work that was ordered towards the close of the year.

It consisted of the erection of a detached building at the South- west angle of the main building, with which it is connected by a covered way.

It contains one room, 30′ 6′′ square, provided with verandahs, 7' 6" wide, on two opposite sides, the whole being constructed on pillars and arches so as to provide a space under- neath, 11 feet in height, which is open all round and forms a small covered playground. A portion of one of the verandahs is enclosed to form an ante-room for the use of the master. The room is fitted up with desks, black-board, electric-light fittings, &c., and a small raised gallery is constructed along one side.

$8,000.00

1909. Estimates, ...$8,000.00. | Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 3,275.68. Expenditure to 31 12-09, 3.275.68.

|

77. Market at Aberdeen.-In consequence of a proposal to lease an area of foreshore, which included the site proposed for the market and under which a considerable improvement in the locality would have been effected, this work was allowed to stand over.

1909. Estimates, ..$2,200.00 | Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure,

| Expenditure to 31/12 09,

$2,200.00.

78. New Roads in Kowloon. --The following were the works executed under this vote:-

(1.) Extension of Argyle Street, Mongkoktsui.-This work was undertaken for the purpose of affording communication with Yaumati Railway Station. It necessitated the resumption of an area of 73,177 square feet from Kowloon Farm Lot 4, which was effected at the same rate as that paid for the area acquired by arbitration in 1907 for the railway, namely 161c. per square foot. The cost of the resumption was $13,690.20, which included $1,516 for buildings and $100 for trees.

O 27

The work consisted of the formation of a considerable embankment and the construction of one of the side- walls of a nullah which had to be provided for the drainage of the locality. As communication with the station was also required from Waterloo Road and as this involved a considerable amount of cutting, provi- sion was made in the contract for obtaining the necessary material for Argyle Street embankment from this source. The work was begun towards the close of the year, the expenditure on it, exclusive of the resumption already mentioned, amounting to $1,000. (ii.) Continuation of Nathan Roud from Waterloo Road to K.F.L. 2.-This work was completed at a total cost of $8,961.09 of which $446.73 was expended during the year.

(iii) Road from Ma Tau Kok to Tai Shek Ku.-This work was completed, the expenditure on it amounting to $627.79, making the total cost $3,723.94. length of the road is 0:48 mile̟ and its width 8 feet.

1909. Estimates, 1909. Expenditure,

$30,000.00. 15,778.52.

The

79. New Roads in New Territories.--The works executed under this heading were the following:--

(i.) Road from Kowloon City to Shatin Pass.--By arrange- ment with the Military Authorities, a new road was constructed from near Kowloon City to Shatin Pass by way of Chuk Un Village. The road is 21 miles long and 9 feet in width. It was originally designed to be 7 feet in width but was subsequently widened to 9 feet. From near Kowloon City to beyond Chuk Un Village, it is practically level, but beyond this point it ascends the Kowloon range of hills with gradients varying from 1 in 43 82 to 1 in 5′26 until it reaches Shatin Pass at an elevation of about 960 feet above Ordnance Dutum. The surfacing is of decomposed granite except where the road passes through rocky ground where it has been surfaced with concrete. There are 20 culverts, some of which are of consider- able size. A side channel of lime and cement concrete has been constructed throughout that portion of the road ascending the hill and numerous cross drains have been provided for the escape of storm water. work was nearing completion at the close of the year.

The

The arrangement made with the Military Authorities was that they should contribute one-third of the cost of the section extending from near Kowloon City to Chuk Un and defray the entire cost of the remainder of the road, the Colonial Government undertaking to maintain the whole road in future. The estimated amounts of the Military contributions were $2,000 and $5,700 or a

O 28

total of $7,700. In view of the widening of the road to meet their requirements, their total contribution was subsequently increased to $10,332, of which only $2,000 had been paid up to the close of the year. The total cost of the road has been :-

Resumption of land,

Construction of road,

$1,605.94

17,309.14

$18,915.08

Deduct contribution by Mi-

litary Authorities,. ... 10,332.00

Net expenditure by Govern-

ment,

$8,583.08.

A balance of $4,492.68 remained to be paid in 1910.

The expenditure during the year amounted to $11,221.78, of which $11.26 was for resumption of land. (iì.) Road from Castle Peak Bay to Ping Shan.-This road is 4 miles long and 6 feet in width, except in some of the cuttings, where its width is increased to 8 feet. It runs through a flat valley and is generally on em- bankment, but, to afford a good alignment and obtain material for the embankment, it was found advantageous to carry it in cutting through some of the spurs of the adjoining range of hills. In setting out the road, the possibility of laying a light railway along it at some future period has been provided for and both gradients and curves have been determined with this in view. The maximum gradient is 1 in 100 and the road is surfaced throughout with decomposed granite. There are five bridges, four of one span (varying from 10 to 15 feet) and one of two spans (each 25 feet). The bridges are 14 feet in width, being constructed for the full width to which it is ultimately proposed to widen the road. The abutments are of lime concrete faced with rubble masonry in lime mortar and the decking is of reinforced concrete. Some stream diversions were made in carrying out the work. The road com- mences at a rocky promontory on the East side of Castle Peak Bay where it is proposed to construct a pier to enable launches to come alongside at all states of the tide. The work was practically completed with the exception of a causeway and some minor works within the first mile where the road skirts the bay. expenditure during the year amounted to $14,485.15, which included $4.83 for land resumptions and $393.96 for surveying and certain expenses of supervision. (iii) Extension of Ping Shan Road to Un Long.-A survey was made with the object of extending the road above described to the important village of Un Long. The only expenditure that had been incurred up to the close

The

?

O 29

of the year was $550.35 for land resumption and $180 for surveying expenses. The length of the extension is 1.7 miles.

(iv.) Road from San Tin to Au Ha Gup.-A survey was also in hand for the construction of a road between the places mentioned. It is intended eventually to link up this road with the one to Un Long and to extend it to Sha Tau Kok, thus providing a good road from Castle Peak Bay to the place last-mentioned. Crossing the railway near Fan Ling Station, it will open up communication with it from the extensive districts which it traverses. The only expenditure during the year was $81 in connection with the survey.

1909. Estimates,

1909. Expenditure,.

$25,000.00. 24,518.08.

30. Forming and Kerbing Streets.--The following is a state- ment of the works executed under this heading, except those of a trifling nature. The sum stated is in some cases only a part of the cost owing to the work extending into more than one year :-

HONGKONG.

(i.) Improving Shaukiwan Road from S.M.L. 1 to a point midway between S. L.'s 395 and 397:

Diverting Tramway..

$5,396

Kerbing and channelling road,

1,326

$6.722

(ii) Improving Shaukiwan Road below Quarry Bay

Dam No. 4,

$1,108

(iii) Forming and kerbing streets intersecting

S.M.L.'s 2-10,

1,961

J

(iv.) Raising footpath in front of Inland Lots Nos.

1,575 and 1,576, Causeway Bay,

(v.) Forming Forbes and Cadogan Streets, Ken- nedy Town, and constructing retaining wall to prevent further slips,

(vi.) Forming path from Bowen Road to May Road,

East of Peak Tramway,

306

5,213

253

(vii.) Widening Belchers Street opposite Marine

Lot 266,

425

(viii.) Straightening line of kerb on West side of Pedder Street and making good footpath, roadway, &c..

463

-$16,451

KOWLOON.

(ix.) Reclaiming North ends of Reclamation Street and Macdonnell Road adjoining Kowloon Inland Lot 1,077 and constructing side wall of nullah,.

(x.) Raising level of Reclamation Street, including kerbing and channelling, opposite K. M. L.'s 29, 30 and 31, Yaumati, ..

$5.939

4,712

0 30

(xi.) Forming, kerbing and channelling Hi Lung

Lane,

(xii.) Partly forming Salisbury Road between Nathan and Chatham Roads for access to K.M.L. 88,

(xiii) Filling in Dundas Street from sea wall to Re-

clamation Street, ..

$1,511

1,050

450

$13.662

NEW TERRITORIES.

(xiv.) Laying out new streets at Tai Wo Shi, Tai Po,

(xv.) Repairs to the 10-span Bridge, Tai Wo Shi,

$500 › 254

$754

1909. Estimates,

$35,000.00.

1909. Expenditure,...

$31,821.54.

Items (i) & (ii). These are a continuation of the works referred to in last year's report.

Item (iii). This calls for no comment.

Item (iv). Consequent on the raising of the level of the old Shaukiwan Road on the East side of Causeway Bay, it was found advisable to raise the footpaths opposite the lots mentioned. The locality has been much improved by the work carried out.

Item (v). This is a continuation of the work referred to in last year's report, which has now been completed, no further slips having occurred.

Item (vi). Advantage was taken of the opportunity afforded by the deposit of material from the Albany Filter Beds to form a small pathway and steps from May Road to Bowen Road.

Item (vii). This work consisted of cutting away a portion of the hill opposite the lot mentioned to form Belchers Street to its full width. As the work involved blasting, it was considered advisable to carry it out before the lot was built upon.

Item (viii). The line of kerb on the West side of Pedder Street was formerly very irregular, partly owing to a large portico which projected from Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.'s old offices, causing the footpath to be of exceptional width where it was situated, and partly to the obstruction of the roadway by the Clock Tower which caused the footpath to be greatly narrowed opposite it. The portico having disappeared, the opportunity was taken to make the footpath of uniform width as far as possible though it is still narrowed at the South end on account of the presence of the Clock Tower.

Item (ix). This is a continuation of the work mentioned in last year's report, which has now been completed.

Item (x). A considerable area of the older part of Yaumati is too low to admit of proper drainage and, wherever rebuilding is taking place, the floors of the new buildings are arranged at a suit- able height to admit of raising the streets to the required levels.

1

0 31

The houses on the lots mentioned having been mostly rebuilt, the raising of Reclamation Street in front of them was undertaken. It is only the beginning of a work which will probably extend over many years.

Item (xi). This calls for no comment.

Item (xii). Consequent upon the completion of their new godowns and offices, Messrs. Butterfield & Swire requested that reasonable access should be afforded to their property. A strip of Salisbury Road was accordingly put in order.

Item (xiii). This work consisted merely of filling in Dundas Street to the required levels.

Item (xiv). As it is believed that considerable developments will occur in the Tai Po district as the result of constructing the railway and providing a station there, provision has been made for them by laying out some new streets.

Item (xv). The work consisted of surfacing with cement concrete, 3" thick, the old granite slabs which form the platform of the bridge and erecting a railing along one side of it.

81. Raising level of Des Voeux Road (re-named Chatham Road), Kowloon, consequent on reclamation for Railway Terminus.-The work executed under this vote consisted of two parts:

(i.) The raising of the old roadway, 50 feet in width, which has been carried out by the Public Works Department.

(ii) The widening of the roadway from 50 to 100 feet in width, which has been carried out by the Kowloon-Canton Railway Department.

That portion of the work coming under (i) was completed at a cost of $12,605.76, of which $6,500 was paid in 1908. The raising extended from Kowloon Inland Lot 882 to Austin Road and included kerbing, channelling and surfacing.

A sum of $9,935.69 was paid to Railway Funds on account of the work executed under (ii).

$20,000.00.

1909. Estimates,... $17,000.00 | Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, $16,041.45 | Expenditure to 31/12/09, $22,541.45.

The estimate of $20,000 was for item (i) only but it was sub- sequently decided to charge the work executed by the Railway Department to the same vote. The amount has accordingly been increased to $51,000 in the Estimates for 1910, there being con- siderable liabilities still outstanding.

82. Road along Northern slopes of Victoria Peak.-This work was not proceeded with and no expenditure under the vote was in- curred.

83. Gullies Reconstruction.-This work was practically com- pleted. During the year 20 gullies with single gratings and 11 gullies with double gratings were constructed, or a total of 42

i

O 32

gratings, bringing the total number dealt with up to the close of the year to 696 gullies with single gratings and 721 gullies with double gratings.

.$98,000.00

1909. Estimates, ...$2,000.00 Total Estimates,........ 1909. Expenditure, $1,252.75 Expenditure to 31/12/09, $92,936.13.

84. Training Nullahs.-The following is a statement of the works carried out under this heading

(i.) Nullah in Waterloo Road, Kowloon, from Railway Bridge No. 4 to- wards Disinfecting Station (not completed),..

(ii.) Channel for stream near Wanchai Gap and below Coombe Road (completed),

(iii.) Nullah between Inland Lots 1,617 and 1,618, Shaukiwan Road (com- pleted),

Length Trained. Expenditure.

Lin. Ft.

340

1,698

390

999

182

585

(iv.) Nullah between Inland Lots 1,523 &

1,570, Bowen Road (completed)...

70

262

1909. Estimates,.

$20,000.00.

1909. Expenditure.....

.$ 3,993.07.

85. Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers and Substitution of Iron for Earthenware Pipes.-No new flushing tank was under- taken but iron pipes were substituted for earthenware pipes in the case of a portion of the Bonham Road sewer, East of Eastern Street.

The portion dealt with comprised 440 yards of 10" diameter pipes.

Cast Iron pipes, 10" diameter, to be laid in substitution for earthenware ones in Garden Road were deposited on the site, but the work was not commenced. The length to be undertaken was about 140 yards.

1909. Estimates, ...$5,000.00 Total Estimates,

| |

1909. Expenditure, 4,770.25 Expenditure to 31/12/09, $19,252.58.

86. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.-Extensive works were carried out under this heading. The following is a statement of the principal items, the amounts stated representing in some cases only a portion of the cost owing to the work extending into more than one year :-

HONGKONG.

(i.) Raising sunken sewer, Connaught Road West, and works in connection therewith (not completed),

(ii) Training nullah South of No. 8 Bridge, Shau-

kiwan (264 lineal feet),

$10,416

3,745

>

33

(iii.) Completion of nullah near Paper Mills at Aber-

deen (completed),

(iv.) Extension of stormwater outfall, Stone Nullah

Lane (completed),

(v.) Construction of stormwater drain, Shaukiwan Road, from nullah at Bay View Police Station to Inland Lot 1,462 (practically completed),

(vi.) May Road Sewer:-

Sewer from Peak Road to Inland Lot

1,772 (work completed in 1908), ...$556 Extension from Inland Lot 1,772 to near

Tramway Bridge (completed),

$3,155

2,841

2,084

794

1,350

(vii.) Extension of sewer for Marine Lot 29, Praya

East (completed),

411

(viii.) Extension of sewer to new latrine, Wongneichong

Village (completed),

310

(ix.) Extension of stormwater outfall opposite Tai Wo Street on account of reclamation (com- pleted),

150

(x.) Drain Connections (completed),

787

KOWLOON.

(xi.) Construction of stormwater drain, Shangtung Street, from sea-front to Portland Street (practically completed),

(xii.) Redrainage of portion of Yaumati in consequence

of reclamation in front of Police Station. (completed),

(xiii.) Construction of sewer for Kowloon Mortuary

(not completed),

(xiv.) Construction of sewers between Dundas Street and Nelson Street, Mongkoktsui (work completed in 1908),..

(xv.) Redrainage of portion of Yaumati in consequence of reclamation of Kowloon Marine Lot 89 (extension of K.M.L. 49), (work completed in 1908),

(xvi.) Extension of sewer, Argyle Street, for K.I.L.'s 951 and 952, $800-$300 contributed by lessee of lots (practically completed),

3,115

3,115

2,000

1.450

1,116

500

(xvii.) Extension of sewer, Salisbury Road, to K.M.L.

88 (completed),

424

(xviii.) Extension of sewer outfall at Boundary Street,

Fuk Tsun Heung (completed),

168

(xix.) Drain Connections (completed),

80

NEW TERRITORIES.

(xx.) Drainage works at Tai Wo Shi, Tai Po

(completed),

1909. Estimates,

1909. Expenditure,

$45,000.00. 38.773.51.

y

752

O 34

Item (i). The necessity for this work arose from the settlement of the Praya Reclamation which caused the sewers in the locality of the Wing Lok Street outfall to get out of their proper levels. The maximum settlement found amounted to 2' 9". The work comprised the reconstruction of pipe sewers varying in diameter from 9" to 24", principally on piled and concrete foundations, in Connaught Road West, Des Voeux Road Central and West, Morrison Street, Queen Street, Wing Lok Street and Bonham Strand West.

Item (ii). This work was partially described in last year's report. The work done this year consisted of an extension of the nullah to the South of No. 8 Bridge.

Item (iii). Under an arrangement made with the owners of the paper mills at Aberdeen with regard to certain reclamation work, the Government undertook to complete the nullah adjacent to their property before the end of June, 1909. The work, which comprised the construction of the North-east wall of the nullah and a portion of the invert, was carried out accordingly. The wall is of rubble masonry and the invert of cement concrete with rubble pitching. The work previously carried out was described in the report for 1907.

Item (iv). This work was rendered necessary by the gradual extension of the reclamation on which the Public Works Department Stores at Wanchai are situated. It comprised the construction of a short length of open nullah, the walls being built partly of cement concrete and partly of lime concrete, faced with rubble masonry and supported on piles, and the invert of cement concrete.

Item (v). This work was rendered necessary by the reclamation carried out in conjunction with the deepening of Causeway Bay. It consisted of the construction of a concrete culvert 2' 0" to 2′ 6′′ in diameter, extending from the nullah near Bay View Police Station to Inland Lot 1,462.

Item (vi). This work was described in last year's report. It was considered advisable to extend the sewer with a view to provid- ing for future building operations in the locality mentioned. The extension consisted of the laying of a 6" sewer between Inland Lot 1,772 and the line of the Peak Tramway.

Items (vii), (viii), (ix), (xvi), (xvii) and (xviii). These items refer to extensions of sewers or stormwater drains necessitated by the erection of new buildings or by the silting up of the outfalls.

Items (x) and (xix). These items need no comment.

Item (xi). Owing to developments in Mongkoktsui district and alterations in the drainage of the locality caused by the construction of the Kowloon-Canton Railway, the large open nullah in Shangtung Street became obsolete and was superseded by a pipe drain, varying in diameter from 15" to 25", which was laid generally in the bed of the old nullah.

Items (xii) and (xiv). These items were described in last year's report.

1

O 35

Item (xiii). It was considered advisable to provide a special sewer, altogether separate from the Yaumati sewerage system, for carrying off the drainage from the Kowloon Mortuary. The work comprised the laying of a 6" sewer, on a concrete foundation (partly piled) in Waterloo Road, from the sea wall to the Mortuary.

Item (xv). This work was described in the Reports for 1907 and 1908. In last year's report, the expenditure from Government funds was erroneously stated as $15,187. This was the total expenditure for the year and the contribution of $4,000 by the Land Reclamation Co. should have been deducted from it, making the net expenditure from Government funds $11,187.

Item (xx). This work was rendered necessary by the filling in of the fish pond into which the sewerage from the village of Tai Wo Shi formerly found its way. It comprised the construction of an intercepting channel to convey the sullage water to the sea.

87. Extensions of Lighting. The following lamps were erected or fitted with lanterns and burners :-

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT.

Blake Pier-4 lamps were removed in 1908 in connection with the erection of the roof

Wah Lane (taken over from owner),

over the pier,

A Chung Lane (

do.

May Road (lanterns and burners), Mount Kellett Road,

7*

1

1

11

2

22

No new lamps were erected in Kowloon.

1909. Estimates,

1909. Expenditure,

.$2,500.00. $505.00.

88. Permanent Marks for Traverse Survey Points in New Territories. Owing to the lack of a proper survey of the Colony and the absence of uniformity in the scales of such piecemeal plans as had been produced in past years, it was decided that an Ordnance Survey should be undertaken.

Bases were measured at Ngau Shi Wan and Tai Po with a 100- foot steel tape and the Tai Po base was remeasured with a certified standard "Konstat" wire, but as the wire was not received until December, it was not possible to check the Ngau Shi Wan base before the end of the year.

From the Ngau Shi Wan base, the triangulation was carried through to Tai Po, 24 stations in the main triangulation being observed to and from and the positions of 18 determined. Similar- ly, in the minor triangulation, 14 stations were observed to and from and the positions of 8 were determined.

* Paid out of the vote "Blake Pier Shelter ".

O 36

More detailed information has been given in a special report on survey work for the 12 months ending 31st March, 1910, prepared at the instance of the Secretary of State and appended to this report (Annexe L). The period dealt with differs however from that covered by this report.

|

1909. Estimates, ......$4,000.00 Total Estimates,.. $11,000.00 1909. Expenditure, ..$ 785.13 | Expenditure to

31/12/09,

$1,099.78.

89. Reinforced Concrete Piers. All the piles for Kowloon City pier extension were driven, the old timber extension being diverted where necessary to admit of this being done. Some dredg- ing was also done in the vicinity of the pier to improve the depth of water. The amount expended during the year was $15,282.94 but this included a sum of $12,306.18 for plant, which will be in great measure recovered when the work is completed and the plant return- ed into Store.

|

1909. Estimates, ...$20,000.00 Total Estimates,... $54,300.00 1909. Expenditure, $15,282.94 Expenditure to

31/12/09...

26,857.54.

90. Blake Pier Shelter.-The fixing of the lamps was com- pleted in January and the painting of the ironwork of the shelter was finished during the month of March, thus completing the work.

The total cost was $28,545.70. 1909. Estimates,.....$3,555.00 Total Estimates,. 1909. Expenditure,.. 3,554.80 | Expenditure to

|

31/12/09,.

A supplementary vote for the excess was obtained.

$28,100.00

28,545.70.

91 Miscellaneous Works.-The following are the principal items of expenditure under this heading, representing in some cases only a part of the cost of the works in consequence of their execution extending over more than one year :-

Queen's College :-

$

$3

Additional store-room for Technical Insti-

tute,

290

Enclosing verandah for clerk's room,

494

Fitting up clerk's room and providing

desks for class rooms,..

861

Furniture and desks for class rooms,

865

Telephone from clerk's room to Head-

master's room,..

112

Overhead fans in class rooms,

404

Installation of electric light in rooms 7, 13

and 24,..

275

Lavatory fittings,.

211

Sundry small items,

50

-3,562

LA

O 37

Central Police Station :-

Building in compound to afford additional office accommodation (2 rooms, lavatory and verandah),..

Improvement of Fire Service,

Converting large room into Mess Rooms

$

$

2,867

357

(completed),.

129

lustallation of electric lights and desk fans, &c., in Asst. Superintendent's quarters,

136

-3,489

Government

Offices

Extension of Corre-

spondence and Accounts Offices, P.W.D.,

(completed).:--

Structural work,

Gas fittings, &c., ..

Furniture,......

$1,064

649

695

2,408

Extension of Buildings Ordinance Office

(completed),.

458

Trough closet in Annexe for messengers

(completed),

476

-3,342

Lighthouse Pier--Green

Island-Extension

(completed),

2,229

No. 5 Police Station-Laying wood-paving in Queen's Road to obviate damage to road surface by washing of fire apparatus (completed),

1,594

Water Police Station:

Wooden shed for undesirables (completed), Repairing capstan and laying new rails for

slipway (completed),

953

633

-1,586

Dust-Boat Stations--Reconstructing and repair- ing Refuse Enclosures, concreting surfaces, &e. (completed):-

City of Victoria,

625

Kowloon,

628

Shaukiwan

231

−1,484

Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School-Extension

of latrines and urinals (completed),

Yaumati School-Turfing playground in King's

Park (completed),.

1,400

1,327

Victoria Hospital:-

Drying room in P.C.M.O.'s quarters,.... Plastering internal walls of passages and

lavatories,...

755

475

1,230

0 38

Tai Wo Shi, Tai Po--Filling in part of fish pond

to a higher level (completed),

Yaumati Police Station-Extension for Indian Constables by adding a storey over the Interpreter's rcon,

New Chinese Cemetery, Kowloon Tong.-Form-

ing approach path,

Victoria British School-Filling in and fencing

area for playground (completed in 1908),.

Government House :--

Arrangements in connection with the cele- bration of His Majesty's birthday (completed),

Miscellaneous small works (completed),

Kowloon Waterworks-Telephone line to bungalow

1,059

1,052

1,041

1,025

757

212

969

908

Signal Hill, Kowloon,-Tower on signalling station for light to mark Kowloon Point (com- pleted),

862

at Storage Reservoir (completed),

Government Civil Hospital:---

"B" Block-Sliding collapsible shutters to confine delirious patients (completed), Medical Staff Quarters-Fixing 2 water closets and tiling pantries (completed),

Green Island Gunpowder Depôt-Store for detona-

tors (completed in 1908),

Botanical and Forestry Department-Enclosing verandah of Herbarium and Superintend- ent's Office,

Alexandra and H.R.H. the Princess of Wales (completed)...

317

453

770

645

500

Arrangements for unveiling Statues of H.M. Queen

198

Tai Po Bungalow for Assistant District Officer

-Furniture,..

389

369

Waglan Lighthouse and Quarters-General repairs

(completed),

Harbour Office-Enclosing verandah of Boarding

Officer's Quarters and alterations to provide for Imports and Exports Office,

Land Office-Enclosing passage at North end of Building for extension of office (completed), Tai Po-Native houses for clerks-Partitions, &c., Victoria Gaol-Enlarging windows (completed),

Valves, &c., (water supply),

310

312

287

179

83

262

O 39'

$

Lin Ma Hang-Contribution towards construction

of bridge,....

Sheung Shui Police Station-Sinking well (com-

pleted),

Douglas Rock-Beacon to mark position (com-

250

234

pleted in 1908),

218

King's Park-Matshed shelter for children (com-

pleted),.

216

1909. Estimates...

1909. Expenditure,

$35,000.00. 35,117.07.

92. Mongkoktsui Breakwater - Typhoon Refuge for Small Craft. --Dredging for the foundation trench of the breakwater was continued and was nearly completed. The quantity dredged during the year was 256,000 cubic yards, of which 207,000 had been done by the end of July when the dredger was placed in the hands of the Government Marine Surveyor with a view to the execution of any necessary repairs.

The vessel was docked at Taikoo Shipyard on the 9th of September for a complete overhaul to her hull and, after coming out of dock but whilst still in the hands of the Shipyard Co., was driven ashore during the typhoon of the 19th October close to the Taikoo Sugar Refinery. She was refloated on the 30th October and was found to be but little damaged, the extent of her injuries being a few bent plates which were taken off, straightened and replaced. She resumed work on the 19th November, after an interval of fully 3 months.

An Ordinance authorizing the construction of the breakwater and other works was passed by the Legislative Council in November under the title of "The Harbour of Refuge Ordinance 1909”.

Negotiations were in progress with the lessees of Kowloon Marine Lot 32 with regard to the arrangement of a reclamation adjoining their lot, which it was considered advisable to make on account of a dangerous rocky shoal near the Northern entrance to the refuge, but these had not reached a conclusion by the close of the year.

|

1909. Estimates, ...$200,000.00 Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 69,529.21 Expenditure to 31/12/09,$278,222.53 93. Causeway Bay Typhoon Refuge-Deepening shallow area to one foot below Ordnance Datum.-Reference was made in last year's report to the commencement of this work, which was undertaken in accordance with the recommendation of the Public Works Committee (vide minutes of meeting held on 4th January, 1908). The work was nearly completed, 90.000 cubic yards of material being removed during the year. A portion of this material, amounting to 34,000 cubic yards, was utilized in reclaiming an area of foreshore between Marine Lots 285 and Inland Lot 1,588, extending to 99,570 square feet in area. The reclamation is protected by a rubble mound faced with a pitched slope.

$74,000.00

1909. Estimates, ...$63,000.00 Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 63,000.00 | Expenditure to 31/12/09, 63,000.00.

t

O 40

94. Compensation under the Buildings Ordinance of 1903.--- This vote provides for the resumption of areas to form scavenging lanes and for the payment of compensation in connection with the removal of houses over the ends of private lanes or streets.

In some cases, instead of the area devoted to scavenging lanes being resumed, an agreement has been entered into with the owner to the effect that the lane will be preserved so long as the buildings abutting on it exist and in a few cases the owners have surrendered the areas required, in whole or in part, in consideration of being permitted to count them as part of their open space.

1909. Estimates,

1909. Expenditure......

.$20,000.00. 9,829.75.

The following is a statement of the resumptions effected during the year :-

Scavenging Lanes resumed on payment of compensation.

Area in Compensa-

Sq. Ft.

tion paid.

$

In rear of 2 houses on Inland Lot 1,609,

Nos. 5 & 7, Bridges Street,..

921

369.00

In rear of 2 houses on M.L. 77, Nos. 270, Des Voeux Road Central, and 62, Wing Lok Street,

85

2,147.00

In rear of 6 houses on K.I.L. 609, Nos.

18-28, Nathan Road,

1,170

2,397.50

In rear of 4 houses on I.L.'s 341 and 342,

Shelley Street,

5791

1,159.00

1841

461.25

In rear of 2 houses on I.L. 94 Sec. G.. Nos. 39 & 41, Aberdeen Street, ...

In rear of 21 houses on K.I.L.'s 550, 551, 1,204, 1,205 and 1,208. These lanes were referred to in the report for 1906 as in rear of houses on K.I.L. 412, the amount of com- pensation being stated as $3,465. Compensation was not paid until 1909 and, as the result of a re- adjustment of the area, the amount paid was reduced to $3,196. The lot (K.I.L. 412) and adjoining lots. (K.I.L.'s 550 and 551) have been re-arranged and re-numbered,

3,196.00.

A sum of $100 was paid from this vote for valuation fees in connection with lanes in the rear of houses on K.I.L.'s 522 and 548.

J

}

0 41

The following lanes were also formed but delay in the comple- tion of the necessary legal formalities prevented payment of the sums due as compensation being made before the end of the year :-

In rear of 2 houses on M. L. 76, Nos. 268, Des Voeux Road Central, and 60, Wing Lok Street,

In rear of 16 houses on P.R.M.L. 57, Nos. 78-92, Des Voeux Road West, and

Area in Sq. Ft.

Compen- sation paid. $

841

2.106.25

Nos. 27-41, Ko Shing Street, ..... 1,055

8,442.66.

Scavenging lanes were also arranged for in the rear of 33 houses on Inland Lots 1,797-1,800 and Marine Lot 295 (formerly Marine Lot 29), situated between Praya East and Queen's Road East, but the amount due by way of compensation was in this case paid out of a special vote provided for the resumption of the areas required for a public road and the lanes referred to. The amount paid in respect of the lanes was $1,639, the total area being 2,3194 square feet.

Scavenging Lanes surrendered to the Government without

payment of compensation.

In rear of 5 houses at Tai Hang Village on

I.L.'s 1,735-1,737 and 1,537-1,541,...

In rear of one house on I.L. 568, No. 263,

Hollywood Road,

Area in Sq. Ft.

400

86.27

Seavenging Lanes provided by owners but not surrendered

to the Government.

In rear of 4 houses on I.L. 1,628, Kennedy

Road,

Area in Sq. Ft.

762

of 4 houses on Q.B.I.L. 4, Quarry Bay,.

630

of 15 houses on A.I.L. 76, Main Street, Aberdeen,

1,112

of 2 houses on L.L. 1,743 (old M.L. 184), 397 A & B, Queen's Road West,.. of 6 houses on I.L. 1,780, Shauki- wan Road,

1,648

544

of 3 houses on P.R.M.L. 14, Con- naught Road Central,

246

of 4 houses on Q.B.I.L. 7, Quarry Bay.....

1.728

of 3 houses on M.L.'s 222 & 223, Nos. 310, 312, and 314, Des Voeux Road

Central,..

405

"

of 1 house on K.I.L. 1,122, No. 289. Canton Road, Mongkok,

1001

O 42

95. Resumption for Public Road through Marine Lot 29 from Queen's Road East to Praya East. This matter was referred to in para. 28 of last year's report. The compensation agreed upon was paid during the year and the road was formed with the exception of a short length adjoining Praya East. It was named Gresson Street. In addition to compensation for the area required for the road, the amount due in respect of scavenging lanes was defrayed from this

The respective amounts were as follows:-

rote.

Public road, 30 feet wide,. Scavenging lanes, ..

Sq. Ft. $3

7,906

2,319

15,812.50

4,639.00.

A sum of $388.74 for certain lots to the South-east of Fan Ling Station, which had been resumed in connection with the Railway but were found not to be required for it, was erroneously charged to this vote and, as the Treasury Books for 1909 had been closed before it was discovered, the error could not be rectified.

1909. Estimates, $21,400.00 Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 20,840.24

$21,100.00

Expenditure to 31 12:09, 20,840.24.

96. Albany Filter Beds, Reconstruction and Extension.—The contract for the reconstruction and extension of the Albany Filter Beds was completed by Messrs. Sang Lee & Co., the Contractors, in August.

The work comprised the demolition of the old watchman's quarters and the erection of new and enlarged quarters in a different position to accommodate the watchman and coolies employed in sand-washing, &c.; the construction of one entirely new bed next the Peak Tramway and the deepening and enlarging of the old beds, six in number, but now converted into seven, making a total of eight beds and increasing the filtering area from 3,246 to 4,945 superficial yards or by fully 52%. During constant supply, the quantity of water passing through these filter beds amounts to about 2,950,000 gallons per day or at the rate of about 700 gallons per square yard, assuming one bed to be always out of operation for cleaning purposes.

The new filter beds and gauge basin were constructed at a lower level than the old and the 6' 0" rectangular gauge was fixed 1.2 feet below the level of the old gauge. In addition to enabling an accurate measurement of the water passing it to be obtained, which was generally impossible hitherto on account of the flooding of the gange, this arrangement admits of the necessary quantity of water for the supply of the City being passed through the conduit without a certain proportion of it overflowing and running to waste as has frequently occurred during recent years.

Eight 10" Venturi meters were fixed, one to each bed, for re- cording the quantity of water passing from the filter beds to the Service Reservoir. The records obtained show at a glance whether the rate of filtration is being properly regulated.

$150,000.00

1909. Estimates,...$31,000.00 Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 44,987.66 Expenditure to 31 12/09, 166,004.32.

O 43

A supplementary vote was obtained for the excess expenditure. The total cost of the work, which involved the excavation of a large mass of earth and rock in order to level the area for the construction of the new and the extension of the old filter beds, has been $181,792.41, of which $15,788.09 remained to be paid in 1910.

97. Kowloon Waterworks, Gravitation Scheme.-With the exception of a few trifling matters connected with the meters and meter-houses, the only work in hand during the year was the Main Dam of the Storage Reservoir. Owing to his becoming involved in financial difficulties, the Contractor for this portion of the works. suspended operations until March, when work was resumed and continued until the 16th September. Operations once more came to a standstill at that date and formal notice was served on the Contractor taking the contract out of his hands.

After some delay caused by the preparation of the necessary documents, fresh tenders were invited in December for the completion of the work. The tender of Mr. Kang On was accepted, but the new contract was not signed until after the close of the year.

Work done during the year was, as already stated, confined to the Main Dam and comprised :-

Cement concrete,

1,400 cubic yards.

Ashlar masonry,

Rubble masonry,

.8,000

feet.

250

་་

yards.

At the end of the year, no part of the dam was lower than 440 feet above Ordnance Datum or 8 feet below the finished overflow level. The Byewash Dam remained however at about 435 feet above Ordnance Datum, affording a storage capacity of 230,700,000 gallons.

1909. Estimates... $44,000.00 Total Estimates.. $1,194,600.00 1909. Expenditure, 42,106.34 | Expenditure to 31/12/09, 1,155,187.20.

93/Miscellaneous Waterworks.--The following are the princi- pal items of expenditure under this heading, representing in some cases only a part of the cost of the works in consequence of their extending over more than one year :-

(1.) New Service Reservoir at 750′ level, West Point, construction of reservoir (com- pleted in 1908),....

(ii) Conduit.Road Extension-Extension of

6" main in May Road,

(iii.) Additional main, 12" diameter, along Caine and Bonham Roads, for supply of Tytam water to Western District of City,

$ 5,056

2,142

15,366

(iv.) Extension of main at Shektongtsui, (v.) Substitution of 7", 6" and 5" mains for 3"

mains in Shaukiwan West,

650

3,357

Item (i). The amount stated was merely the balance due on the work, which was completed in 1908, less a small credit for stores returned.

0 44

Item (ii). As there is a good deal of rock in May Road, it was considered advisable to extend the 6" main before surfacing and lighting the road.

Item (iii) As stated in last year's report, under "Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks", difficulty has been experienced in supplying the Western District of the City when the contents of Pokfulam Reservoir have had to be conserved for the supply of the High Level and Hill Districts. To overcome this. it was decided to lay a supplementary main, 12" in diameter, along Caine and Bonham Roads from Glenealy to Bonham Road Pumping Station. The pipes for this purpose arrived from England in the early part of December, and the work of laying them was immediately begun. It was still in progress at the end of the year.

Item (iv). An extension of the water mains was rendered neces- sary on account of the erection of a row of houses on Inland Lot 1,300, which had hitherto been unbuilt on.

Item (v). Owing to the rapid growth of the population of Shau- kiwan West, consequent on the construction and opening of the Taikoo Shipyard, the existing 3" main was found to be inadequate. It was therefore replaced with pipes of the sizes stated between the Water- works Road and Sai Wan Ho Market.

1909. Estimates,

1909. Expenditure,

4

.$25,000.00. .$24,984.39.

A sum of $1,651.38 was credited to this vote on account of the return into store of the pipes and fittings from the mains connecting with the service reservoir above Inland Lot 1,568 which has now been abandoned.

99. Resuming and Filling-in Fish Pond at Tai Po-This work was completed at a cost of $10,443.60 (including cost of resumption $1,600) of which $1,443.60 was spent during the year. It consisted of filling in an old fish-pond, which was in an insanitary condition, to the Eastward of the village of Tai Wo Shi, by which means an area of 52 acres has been rendered available for the extension of the village. A portion of the reclaimed land was subsequently raised to provide an area on which buildings could be erected at a suitable level for drainage. The cost of the raising was defrayed from the vote "Miscellaneous Works".

1909. Estimates, $1,548.40 Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure,. 1,443.60

$10,473.20 Expenditure to 31/12/09, $10,443.60.

100. Compensation for Resumption of Lot No. 3,212, Survey District IV.-This lot was resumed in connection with a contemplated improvement scheme at Cheung Sha Wan. The item appeared in last year's report but, owing to the owners being absent from the Colony, the compensation could not be paid to them until 1909, when they returned.

1909. Estimates,

1909. Expenditure,

$302.00 Total Estimates,

301.95 Expenditure to 31/12/09, ...$301.95.

O 45

101. Resumptions of Land at Kowloon Point.-Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 443, 1,140 and 1,141 were resumed with a view to the construction of the Passenger Terminus for the Kowloon-Canton Railway. Their total area was 159,527 square feet, the amount paid for them being $438,699.25.

Negotiations were in progress for the resumption of Kowloon Inland Lots 442 and 618 but had not reached a conclusion at the close of the year.

1909.Estimates,

Total Estimates,

1909.Expenditure.$438,699.25 | Expenditure to 31/12/09,$438,699.25.

Staff, &c.

102. The following Officers left the Service of the Department:-

Mr. A. C. Little, Assistant Engineer.

Mr. A. R. A. Bone, Overseer.

1

Mr. W. G. Jury,

do.

Mr. James Kirby,

do.

Mr. F. E. Beach,

do.

Mr. A. Naudin, Master, Dredger St. Enoch.

Mr. David Fotheringham, Chief Engineer, Dredger St. Enoch.

and several other Subordinate Officers.

103. The following appointments were made:---

Mr. F. H. Kales, Assistant Engineer.

Mr. E. M. Wood,

do.

Mr. J. Grant, Assistant Land Surveyor.

Mr. J. E. Piercy, II Grade Surveyor.

Mr. R. J. Howard, Overseer.

Mr. J. C. Clark,

do.

Mr. R. J. Everest,

do.

Mr. F. J. Ling,

do.

Mr. A. W. Taylor,

do.

Mr. A. Gillan, Master, Dredger St. Enoch.

Mr. David Fotheringham, Chief Engineer, Dredger St. Enoch. Mr. Allan Hutchison, Chief Engineer, Dredger St. Enoch.

Mr. F. X. Garcia, Clerk.

Mr. Chan Tin Fook, do.

Mr. Wong Tsz Leung, do.

Mr. Y. Abbas,

do.

Mr. Hui Kam U, Foreman.

Mr. Ng Wong,

do.

Mr. Hi Him,

do.

Mr. Ng Kam Shing, do.

and 24 Watchmen, Survey Coolies, &c.

L

J

0 46

104. The following Officers returned from leave and resumed duty on the dates mentioned :-

Mr. H. T. Jackman, Executive Engineer,... 5th August.

I. M. Xavier, Assistant Engineer,

H. E. Goldsmith, do.,

J. J. Bryan, Drainage Surveyor,

7th October.

18th August.

8th July.

"

*1

H. C. Sayer, Surveyor,.

W. Dobbs, Overseer,

9th September.

1st April.

8th July.

H. W. Wolfe, do..

""

A. M. Souza, Clerk,

17th November.

105. No change of any moment occurred in the Staff during

the year.

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 17th June, 1910.

W. CHATHAM, C.M.G., M.I.C.E..

Director of Public Works.

0 +17

Annexe A.

ANNUALLY RECURRENT EXPENDITURE, 1909.

PROVISION-

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED.

ACTUAL.

INCREASE. DICREASE.

ALLY VOTED.

ESTABLISHMENT.

Personal Emoluments including Exchange

Compensation,

Other Charges,

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

ff

2

C.

e

ਹਰ

C.

291,492 22,418

$313,910

267,441.26 24,577.10

292,018.36

2,050.74

2,159.10

10.558

2,159.10 24050.74

10,558

Buildings.

1. Maintenance of Buildings,

57,000

56,971.71

28.23

2.

in New

""

Territories,

8,000

5,523.04

,476.96

3. Maintenance of Lighthouses,

4,500

4,166.93

33.07

1

Communications.

5. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

outside City,

4. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

in City,

55,000

54,983.22

16.78

26,000

25,941.98

58.02

6. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

in Kowloon,..................

22,000

21,545.16

454.81

7. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

in New Territories........

10,000

9,947.24

52.76

8. Maintenance of Telegraphs,

8,500

7,747.31

752.69

9.

in New

""

>>

Territories,

4,000

3,439.18

560.82

Drainage.

10. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,...

21,000

19,216.56

,783.44

Lighting.

11. Gas Lighting, City of Victoria and

the Peak,....

12. Electric Lighting, City of Victoria, 13. Gas Lighting, Kowloon,...............

14. Electric

""

"

45,000

44,475.83

524.17

22,500

22.297.15

202.85

10,000

9,389.36

610.64

1,000

883.20

116.80

1

Miscellaneous.

16.

"

15. Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers,.

Public Cemetery,

7,000

6,170.97

4,000

1.114.72

829.03 $885.23

17.

Public Recreation

99

Grounds,

3,500

2,732.96

767.04

18. Dredging Foreshores,

10,000

5,744.65

4255.35

19. Miscellaneous Services,

11,000

7,721.76

$278.24

20. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,.

12,500

34,200.25

21,700.25

37,210

Waterworks.

21. Maintenance of City and Hill District,.

60,000

46,024.66

1:975.34

22.

Kowloon,

7,000

8,585.34

1,585.34

1,600

>>

23.

*:

Shau-Ki-Wan,

1,000

864.60

24.

Aberdeen,...

500

213.97

135.40 286.03

...

...

25.

Lai-Chi-Kok,..

2,000

1,033.02

966.98

"

26. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

20,000

8,668.08

1,331.92

Total,......

........

...$ 433,000 409,902.85 23,295.59

44382.74

38,810

:

$

C.

O 48

Annexe B.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE, 1909.

HEADS AND SCB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

PROVISION-

ALLY VOTED.

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

Buildings.

1. Law Courts,.........

$

$ c.

C.

3

*

180,000

81,150.21

2. Post Office,

180,000

153,454.63

3. Public Latrines and Urinals,

12,000

9,093.00

48.849.79 26,545.57 2,907.00

4. Extension of Oll Stables to provide

Additional Office Accommodation

required for Public Works De-

partment..

2,000

6,871.30

4,871.30

5,450.00

5. Market at Kowlom Point, First Portion, 6. Staff Quarters, Ti Po,

50,000

17,662.32

16,700

16,599.27

32,337.68 100.73

180.00

7. Quarantine Statio at Lai Chi Kok-

Hospital, Approach Paths, &c.,

7,500

10,776.48

3,276.48

3,277.00

8. Additions to No.2 Police Station, 9. Extension of Ta Po Land Office to provide accomodation for Dis- trict Officer,..

12,000

12,000.00

10,000

2,212.44

7,787.56

10. Permanent Stairway to Ballroom,

Government House,

4,500

4,486.45

13.55

11. Additional Room at Queen's College

for Pupil Teachers,

8,000

3,275.68

12. Market at Aberden,

2,200

4,724.32 2,200.00

Communiations.

:

13. New Roads in Korloon,

30,000

15,778.52

14.221.48

14. New Roads in New Territories,

25,000

24,518.08

481,92

15. Forming and Kerling Streets,

35,000

31,821.54

3,178.46

16. Raising level of Les Voeux Road (re- named Chatham Road) Kowloon,

consequent ›n, reclamation for Railway Terminus.....

17,000

16,041.45

958.55

17. Road along northen slopes of Victoria

Peak,

4,300

4,300,00

Drainage.

18. Gullies Reconstrution,

2,000

19. Training Nullahs,.

20,000

1,252.75 3,993.07

747.25

16,006.93

20. Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers and abstitution of Iron

for Earthenware Pipes,

5,000

21. Miscellaneous Drinage Works,

45,000

4,770.23 38,773.51.

229.75 6,226.49

Lighing.

22. Extensions of Linting,

2,500

505.00

1,995.00

Miscelaneous.

23. Permanent Marksfor Traverse Survey

Points in Nw Territories,

4,000

785.13

3,214.87

24. Reinforced Concete Piers at Green

Island Gunpowder Depôt, New Harbour Ofte & Kowloon City,

20,000

15,282.94

4,717.06

25. Blake Pier Shelte,

1,400

3,554.80

26. Miscellaneous Wrks,.

35,000

35,117.07

2,154.80 117.07

2,155.00

27. Mong-kok-tsui Brak water-Typhoon

Refuge for Small Craft...............................

200,000

69,529.21

130,470.79

28. Causeway Bay Typhoon Refuge-

Deepening allow area to one foot below Odnance Datum,

- 29. Store Account,.

20,000 100

63,000.00

43,000.00 ·

43,000.00

Carries forward, ..........$ 901,200

630,305.10

53,419.65 324,214.55 51,062.00

Pow!

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

O 49

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

PROVISION- ALLY VOTED.

Brought forward,

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance,

1903.

C.

$

C.

$ C.

$

324,214.55

54,062.00

901,200

630,305.10 53,419.65

30. Compensation,.

20,000

9,829.75

10,170.25

31. Resumption for Publie Road through Marine Lot 29 from Queen's Road East to Praya East,

21,400

20,840.24*

559.76

Waterworks.

32. Albany Filter Beds, Reconstruction

and Extension,

31,000

44,987.66 13,987.66

19,917.00

33. Kowloon Water Works, Gravitation

Scheme,

44,000

42,106.34

34. Miscellaneous Water Works,

25,000

24,984.39

1,893.66 15.61

14

Works not appearing in Estimates.

35. Resuming and Filling in Fish Pond

at Taipo,

36. Compensation for Resumption of Lot No. 3,212 in Survey District IV in New Territories,

37. Resumptions of Land at Kowloon

Point,

:

1,443.60

1,443.60

1,548.40

301.95

301.95

302.00

438,699.25

438,699.25

Total,

$1,042,600 1,213,498.28 507,852.11 336,853.83 75,829.40

Plus Honorarium to the Crown

Plus Store Account Debit,

Solicitor in respect of action re K.M.L. 30,..

39,958.65 39,858.65

1,000.00

1,000.00

1,254,456,93

548,710.76

* Includes a sum of $388.74 for land resumed in the New Territories which was erroneously charged to this Vote.

TAITAM.

Annexe C.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORKS, 1909. Monthly Consumption and Contents of Reservoirs (gallons).

WONG-NEI-CHONG.

POKFULAM.

MINT DAM,

TOTAL CON-]

BLUE POOL

MONTH.

COLLECTED

TOTAL CON-

RAIN-

FALL

AND

TENTS OF

GRAND

AT

MAIN.

BY-WASH.

INTERMEDIATE.

FROM

SUMPTION

In Reser-

Delivered

Delivered

voir 1st of

month.

over

over

gauge.

In Reservoir | In Reservoir 1st of month. 1st of month.

In Reservoir 1st of month.

gauge.

In Reser-

voir ist of

month.

Delivered

IMPOUNDING

STREAMS.

.over

gauge.

(Filtered).

RESERVOIRS.

SUPPLIES,

POKFULAM

CONDUIT, (Unfiltered).

TOTAL.

OBSER-

REMARKS.

VATORY

(Inches).

Constant

Jan., . 51,550,000 21,286,000 287,550,000 1,235,000 209,633,000 Feb.,.42,680,000 14,607,000 200,420,000 1,841,000 208,651,000

March, 33,840,000 16,267,000 149,640,000 April,. 25,700,000 18,082,000 102,620,000 May, 11,620,000 15,048,000 55,718,000 June, 21,375,000 18,134,000 73,920,000

266,000 180,021,000

644,000 148,500,000

781,000 112,499,000 |

966,000 99,027,000

July, 28,200,000 25,587,000 87,080,000 2,346,000 119,163,000 Aug., . 65,160,000| 27,605,000|221,640,000|

107,890,000 nil.

83,443,000 2,034,000

90,561,000 2,620,000

93,789,000 3,290,000

92,061,000 2,704,000

81,794,000 6,979,000

73,220,000| 7,953,000

nil.

>>

898,000 188,456,000

Sept.,.63,160,000 31,327,000 252,740,000

18,000 198,768,000

79,599,000 24,873,000

52,639,000 27,605,000

Oct., 69,950,000 30,080,000 287,255,000 2,564,000 208,406,000 Nov.,. 70,040,000 31,029,000 407,000,000 26,301,000 205,732,000 Dec., . 61,060,000 20,485,000|398,970,000

9,000 205,732,000

136,894,000 1.46 455,626,000 4,095,000 102,145,000 400,000 102,545,000 1.66 366,387,000

1,164,000 280,754,000

3,121,000 183,322,000

8,614,000 202,267,000

5,941,000) 244,742,000

1,524,000 501,327,000

32,359,000 542,291,000

548,000 65,643,000) 7,354,000 16,756,000 575,529,000 88,969,000 33,138,000 497,000 742,211,000 77,432,000 30,702,000 21,742,000 696,473,000

20,000 519,968,000 | 7,092,000 136,288,000 606,000

supply

January 1st to

31st.

Intermittent supply

4,030,000 110,858,000 2,343,000 2,605,000 115,640,000 2,593,000 8,640,000 118,870,000 2,465,000 9,777,000 118,319,000 1,508,000] 119,827,000) 7:38 123,698,000 1,315,000) 18,950,000

127,693,000 2,529,000| 18,965,000 15,266,000 131,591,000 2,716,000 134,307,000] 8.50 28,344,000 140,823,000 1,845,000 142,668,000 23.98. 25,019,000 145,514,000 2,988,000 148,502,000 *06 18,448,000 141,107,000 2,947,000 144,054,000] ·00

113,201,000

2.34

118,233,000

2 45

in Rider Main Districts from February 1st to October 24th.

Taitam

Tuk

121,335,000

6.70

Pumping Engines

125,013,000 12.82

130,222,000 8.34

running from 1st February to 28th May, 21st 28th June, 30th August to

13th

September, 4th to 21st October, number of days running: 158.

Constant supply from October 25th to December 31st.

to

Total,.

1909.

Total,.

1908.

Increase

or

Decrease.

:

269,537,000

272,016,000

987,040,000

94,738,000

161,231,000 1,512,546,000 24,255,000 1,536,801,000| 75.69

1,146,300,000

49,262,000

198,065,000 1,665,643,000 17,752,000 1,683,395,000 | 91.84

-2,479,000

-159,260,000

+45,476,000

~36,834,000—153,097,000 +6,503,000 153,097,000+6,503,000-146,594,000-16:15

Estimated average population for whole year, 208,560. Consumption of filtered water per head per day, 20 gallons,

7

Annexe D.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORKS, 1909. Particulars of Metered and Unmetered Supplies (gullons).

FILTERED SUPPLY.

51

UNMETERED.

METERED.

UNFILTERED

MONTII.

CITY.

TOTAL.

CITY.

HILL

DISTRICT.

SUPPLY GRAND TOTAL. (Metered).

Trade.

Domestic.

January,

February,

March,

113,003,000 13,066,000 77,163,000 16,121,000 84,360,000 15,878,000

7,847,000 ·

2,372,000 | 136.288,000

610,000

136,898,000

6,962,000

1,899,000 102 145,000

405,000

102,550,000

8,232,000

2,388,000 119,858,000

2,346,000

113,204,000

April,

90,196,000 14,937,000

8,409.000

2,098,000 | 115,640,000

2,597,000

118,237,000

May,

June,

92,290,000 15,028,000 92,344,000 14,626,000

9,126 000

2,426,000 118,870,000

2,467,000

121,337,000

8,939,000

2.410,000 118,319,000

1,511,000

119,830,000

July,

93,305,000 17,903,000

9,680,000

2,810,000 | 123,698,000

1,319,000

125,017,000

August,

September,

October....

96,111,000 19,317,000 9,548,000

2,687,000 127,693,000

2,533,000

130,226,000

November,...

December,

Total, 1909,

Total, 1908,

97,832.000 20,673,000 10,299,000 112,930,000 15,564,000 9,605,000 117,873,000 15,675,000 9,298,000 114,150,000 15,454,000 8,698,000 1,181,557,000) 194,272,000 106,643,000 1,362,667,000 172,787,000 102,556,000

2,787,000 131 591,000 2,724,000

2,719,000

134,310,000

140,828,000

1,847.000

142,670,000

2,668,000 145,514,000 2,805,000 | 141,107,000

2,991,000

148,505,000

2,949,000

144,056,000

30,074,000 | 1,512,546,000 24,294,000

1,536,840,000

27,633,000 1,665,643,000 21,854,000

1,687,497,000

Increase or Decrcase,..

181,110,000+21,485,000

+ 4,087,000 +2,441,000 -153,097,000 +2,440,000

-150,657,000

MONTH.

January,

February,

March,

April, -

May,

June, -

July,

August,

September, -

October,

November,

December,

Total, 1909,

Total, 1908,

Annexe E.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORKS, 1909.

Water Pumped to Hill District and High Levels of the City (gallons). (Theoretical Displacement of Pumps.)

HILL DISTRICT.

HIGH LEVELS OF CITY.

GRAND

700′ and 750′ TANKS. (Conduit & Peak Roads District.)

600′ and 650' TANKS. (Robinson Road District.)

COMBINED

TOTALS.

TOTAL

PUMPED.

Engine. Total.

Motors.

Engine.

Total.

O 52

Motors.

Engine. Total.

Motors.

2,372,000 2,372,000

1,899,000 1,899,000

2,388,000 2,388,000

2,098,000 2,098,000 2,426,000 2,426,000 2,410,000 2,410,000 2,810,000 2,810,000 2,687,000 2,687,000 2,787,000 2,787,000 2,724,000 2,724,000 2,668,000 2,668,000 2,805,000 2,805,000

30,074,000 | 30,074,000

1,663,000 1,663,000 4,202,000 1,291,000 1,291,000| 3,334,000 1,603,000 1,603,000| 3,487.000 2,065,000 2,065,000 3,305,000 2,358,000 2,358,000 3,551,000 2,882,000 2,882,000 3,287,000 2185,000, 2,238,000 3,485,000 19,000 | 2,205,000| 2,224,000| 3,781,000 2,200,000 2,200,000 3,621,000 1,386,000 1,386,000 3,617,000 1,415,000 1,415,000 3,431,000 1,425,000 1,425,000 3,800,000

53,000

72,000 | 22,678,000 22,750,000 | 42,901,000

4,202,000| 5,865,000 8,237,000 6,524,000 3,334,000 4,625,000 3,487,000 5,090,000 7,478,000 3,305,000 5,370,000 7,468,000 3,551,000 5,909,000 8,335,000 3,287,000 6,169,000 3,485,000 5,723,000 3,781,000 6,005,000

8,579,000

8,533,000

8,692,000

3,621,000 5,821,000

8,608,000

3,617,000 5,003,000

7,727,000

3,431,000 4,846,000 7,514,000 3,800,000 5,225,000 42,901,000 65,651,000 95,725,000

8,030,000

75,000 | 27,558,000 27,633,000| 7,872,000 5,928,000 13,800,000 35,422,000 | 14,785,000 | 50,207,000|64,007,000 | 91,640,000

--75,000 +2,516,00 +2,441,000-7,800,000+ 16,750,000 +8,950,000, +7,479,000—14,785,000-7,306,000+1,644,000+4,085,000

Increase or Decrease,

1

t

UNMETERED

SUPPLY,

GRAND

TOTAL.

REMARKS.

Trade.

Domestic.

Total.

Annexes F & G.

KOWLOON WATERWORKS, 1909.

Contents of Reserv ir and Details of Muthly Consumption (gallons).

METERED SUPPLY.

Month.

IN RESER-

VOIR 1S1

OF MONTH.

53

from 1st June onwards.

Water measured by Venturi meter Constant supply during whole year.

January,

162,341,000

4,399,000

1,778,000

February,

156,200 000

3,758,000

1,575,000

March,

147,433,000

3,848,000

1,795,000

6,177,000 21,861,000 23,038,000 5,383,000 15,565,000 20.898,000 5.643,000 18,258,000 23,901,000

April,

129,367,000

3,863,000

2,019,000

5.882,000 | 17,906,000

28,788.000

May,

99,225,000

4,741,000

1,746,000

6,490,000

17,336,000

23,826,00

June,

95,100,000

4,297,000

2,262,000

6,559,000

17,961,000

24,520,000

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

....

December,

Total 1909,.

26,825,000 4,926,000 2,642,000 155,100,000 4,967,000 2,725,000 7,692,000 194,667,000 4,768.000 2,813,000 240,417,000 4,422,000 2,478,000 237,617,000 4,960,000 2,421,000 246,792,000 4,323,000 2,237,000 53,275,000

7,568,000

17,362,000

24,930,000

17,638,000

25,330,000

7,581,000

17,309 000

24,890,000

6,900,000

17,940,000

24,840,000

7,381,000

16,789,000

24,170,000

6,560,000 17,480,000

24,040,000

Total 1908,.

58,862,000

26,491,000

25,028,000

79,766,000 213,405,000 293,171,000

83,890,000 212,907,000 296,797,000

|

Increase or Decrease,

......

-5,587,000 + 1,463,000

- 4,124,000

+498,000 -3,626,000

Annexes H, J & K.

VILLAGE AND WATER BOAT SUPPLIES, 1909,

Details of Consumption (gallons).

054

H.

J.

ABERDEEN WATERWORKS.

SHAUKIWAN WATERWORKS.

MONTH.

Metered

Supply.

Unmetered

Supply.

Total.

Metered

Supply.

Unmetered

Supply

Total.

Sai Wan

Supply.

Grand

K.

LA-CHI-

KOK WATER

BOAT

SUPPLY

Tot..l.

(METERED).

January,

33,000

228.000

261.000

96,000

826.000

922,000

261,000

1,183,000

5.969.000

February,

36,000

302.000

338,000

110,000

1,038.000

1,148,000

61,000

1.209.000

5,851,000

March,

25.000

367,000

392,000

79,000

1.039,000

1,118,000

95,000

1.213.00)

6.913,000

April,.

49.0' 0

389,000

438.000

138. 00

1,335,000

1,473,000

123.000

1,596 000

7,072,0 0

May,

June,.

July,

August,

September,

84,000

408,000

442,000

126,000

1.473 000

1,599,000

64.000

1.663.000

7,092,000

37,000

463,000

500,000

106,000

1.575,000

1.681.000

6,000

1.6-7 0 0

5,706,000

43,000

497,000

540,000

138,000

1,48 ,000

1.6:3.00)

532,0 0

2.155, 00

3,848,000

46,00

529,000 |

575,000

96,000

1.494,000

1.590,000

188 000

1,778.000

3,133.0°0

27,000

465,000

492.000

102,000

1,38 3 00

1,483,000

561,000

2,044,000

5.009.000

October,

25.000

420,000

445,000

107,000

1,714,000

1,821,000

1 288,000

3,109.000

3,552 000

November,

29,000

365.000

394,000

126,000

1,260,000

1,286,000

December,.

32,000

358,000

385.000

148,000

1,481,000

1,632.000

282.000

3,000

1.668,400

2,633,000

1,635,000

4,636,000

Total, 1909,

416,000

4,786,000 5,202,000 1,372,000

16,101,000

17.476,000

3,464 000

20,940,000

61,414,000

1908.

.,

630,000

Increase or Decrease,..

- 214,000

3,950,000 4,580,000 +-836,060 +622,000

1,079,000

19,299,000

20.378.600

1.699,000

22,077,000

66 690,000

+293,000

−3,195,000

- 2,902.000

+1,765,000

- 1,137,000

-5,276,000

O 55

Annexe L.

REPORT ON LAND SURVEY WORK

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31ST MARCH, 1910.

1. Organization.The Land Survey Office, which includes a staff of surveyors under the direction of an officer designated the Principal Land Surveryor, forms a branch of the Public Works Department. Its principal function in the past has been the survey of leased areas, which were generally of small extent, but the acquisition of some 350 square miles of new territory in 1898 and extensive developments in the Colony generally have necessitated an extension of its operations.

The Principal Land Surveyor, in addition to supervising the usual survey work necessary in a rapidly developing Colony, is the executive officer for dealing with all matters relating to Crown Lands, the whole of which are under the charge of the Director of Public Works. He submits reports on all applications for land, conducts all sales of areas to be let on long leases, prepares permits for temporary occupation of land and licences for temporary piers, and attends to the preparation of lease plans for lots of land, quarries, permanent piers, &c., and to the keeping of the numerous records.

The work performed by the surveyors is of very varied character as will be gathered from the particulars given later in this report. Each surveyor is responsible for co-ordinating his own traverses and plotting them.

Two Land Bailiffs, whose time is wholly occupied in preventing illegal squatting and encroachments upon Crown Land, which are very common offences among the Chinese population, are attached to the office.

Two Chinese clerks and 4 tracers are employed in carrying on the purely clerical work.

Temporary Officers.

O 56

www

2.-List of Officers.

Date of

Designation.

Name.

Appoint-

Present Salary.

Scale of

Salary.

ment.

Principal

£

Land

Convey- ance Al- lowance.

Surveyor, L. C. Recs. 6.11.01. 480 p.a. £450-£540|360 p.a.

Land Sur-

by £30 tri-

ennially.

veyor,

B. W.

Grey.

1.5.99. 420

£330-£420

Do.

|

by £30 tri-

ennially.

Do.

A. J. Dar- 22.5.03. | 390

by.

Do.

Do.

""

Do.

E. B. Reed. 28.10.05. | 360

Do.

Do.

""

Land Bail-

iff,

F. II. Dil-

6.6.04. | 230

£210-£250

Do.

lon.

by £20 tri-

Land Sur-

jennially.

veyor,

... F. Sutton. 20.6.08. | 330

£330-£120

Do.

by £30 tii-

ennially.

Do.,

G. C. Mc- 24.5.07. | 300

£300-£360

Do.

Intosh.

by £30 tri-

(1) T

enuially.

Do.,

J. Graut.

26.10.08. 330

""

No progres-

Do.

(2)

sive scale.

Do.,

A.B. West. 14.1.10. 330

Do.

Do.

Do.,

C. F. For-

7.3.10. 300

Do.

Do.

hes.

Land Bail-

iff.

J. Mackay. 1.10.07. 210

£210-£250

Do.

by £20 tri-

5th Grade

Clerk,

ennially.

Do.,

5th Grade

E. A. Chin. 23.1.03. 660 p.a. | $480-$660

Ko Siu Fan. 3.6.08. | 540

by $60 annually.

Do.

Tracer,... Tang Ngok 28.10.05. 660

Do.

""

Wan.

Do.,

Lo Ka

1.11.06. 600

Do.

99

Tsok.

Tracer,

Wong Sun 24.9.08. 360 Kuen.

""

No progres-

Do.,

Wong

10.10.08. 420

sive scale. Do.

Wing Iu. (3)

E

:

(1.) As this officer was not so fully qualified as the others, he was not allowed to participate in the general advance of saiaries granted in October, 1908.

(2.) Dismissed on 29th March, 1910.

(3.) Services dispensed with on 31st December, 19 09.

O 57

There were also 29 survey coolies receiving wages at rates vary- ing from $8 to $11 per month according to service. Total wages for year $2,928.

3. Cost of Department.-As the survey office forms part of the Public Works Department and is accommodated in the same build- ing, which is known as the Government Offices, there are numerous charges, such as those for lighting, heating, electric fans, &c., which cannot be stated. Omitting charges of such a nature, the following is a statement of the cost :-

Salaries,

Conveyance Allowances,..

Wages of Coolies,

Drawing Materials and mounting plans, Surveying Instruments,

Land Survey Contingencies (largely cost

of advertising land sales, &c.),

Miscellaneous Expenses,..

Triangulation of Colony,

Total.

$ 36,651.50

2,578.79

2,928.00

660.26

489.82

1,265.70

429.43

1,095.97

$ 46,099.47

4. Trigonometrical Work.-As no survey of the Colony had been made since that carried out by Lieut. Collinson in 1845 (his plan contains many inaccuracies), it was decided in 1908 that a proper Ordnance Map should be built up on correct triangulation and this work was commenced early in 1909. The staff then con- sisted of six surveyors, exclusive of the Principal Land Surveyor, three of whom had been appointed during the two previous years. The necessity for this considerable increase and further additions subsequently made was partly due to difficulties and delays which had occurred in procuring qualified men and to sickness among the staff which caused the survey work to fall so seriously into arrear that it has not yet been found possible to overtake it.

In addition to Collinson's map, which was on a scale of 4 inches to the mile, there were in existence plans of various portions of the Colony, such as the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Kowloon, the principal villages, &c., but in most cases these had been produced in a piecemeal fashion and were far from accurate. As will be seen from the following statement no uniformity of scale had been observed in the preparation of these plans:-

City of Victoria,

Hill District, -

Kowloon,

Aberdeen Village,

Shaukiwan Village,

- 1"-160 feet.

1"

250 feet.

1/2,500 or 1"-208.33 feet. 1" 40 feet.

1"-50 feet.

In the case of

The above remarks refer to the Colony proper. the New Territories, ceded in 1898, a map had been prepared by a Survey Party from India during the years 1898-1904, but so many of the traverse points have since been destroyed by the native population, who were unfriendly at first to British rule, that it was

0 58

found impracticable to utilize it in the preparation of the new maps and as all filling in had been done by plane table it was not possible to replot the survey.

Here again the mistake of variety of scales was repeated, those employed being different from any of the plans previously produced. A considerable area was plotted on a scale of 16′′- -1 mile (1′′—330 feet), but, as this was found to be too small to be applicable to many parts, a scale of 32′′-1 mile (1′′-165 feet) was adopted for the remainder.

After full consideration of the matter, it was decided that the new Ordnance Maps should be plotted on scales of 200 feet and 50 feet 1 inch, the latter being only used for populous areas or where early development of the country might be expected.

The Indian Survey meridian was accepted temporarily and, when the triangulation was carried through from a base at Tai Po which had already been co-ordinated, its bearing was found to dis- agree by only 3". It has therefore been decided to accept the original meridian.

In the new triangulation, as already mentioned, a base was laid out at Tai Po measuring 2,168 780 feet and this was extended by a series of well-conditioned triangles, 15 in number, to Ngau Shi Wan where another base 2,271-525 feet in length had been measured. The misclose was 175 foot representing an error of 1/12,980. Both bases are about 15 feet above sea level and were measured with a 100-foot Konstat wire. All the angles were observed with a Troughton and Simms 5" theodolite fitted with micrometer eye pieces reading to 10" and estimating to 1", and each angle was read 6 times on each vernier, making a total of 12 readings. The largest error in any triangle is 13" and this occurs in one only. The largest error in any of the other triangles hitherto observed is 9". Any triangle with an error in excess of this will not be accepted and the 13" error has not yet been corrected. 52 stations have been fixed and 33 of these have been valued; most of the others have been observed to and in some cases some observations have been taken from them. All observations have been taken on to flashes by a mirror in sun- light: no night work has been attempted.

The work would have been much more forward but for the heavy cloudy weather in May and June and the rains during the whole of the Summer.

The area covered by the triangulation already completed is about 15 miles North and South by 42 miles East and West.

5. Topographical Work.-As it becomes necessary for the issue of lease plans or other purposes to make a survey of any neighbour- hood so the filling in of the Ordnance Maps is taken in hand. Traverses, the error in which must not exceed 1/2,500 in the case of the 200 feet 1 inch maps and 1/3,000 in the case of the 50 feet maps, are run between triangulated points and any subsequent filling in will be done on these closed traverses. The work hitherto carried out is too disconnected to admit of any useful particulars of it being given.

A

O 59

6. Cadastral Work. All questions relating to land in the New Territories were settled in 1900-05 by a Land Court on the basis of the cadastral maps prepared by the Survey Party from India and it has not been found necessary to again deal with the matter. In Hongkong and Kowloon, the cultivated areas are of small extent and any surveys required in connection with them were completed prior to the 31st March, 1909. Consequently, no cadastral work has been done during the period under review.

7. Special Work.---A Board for dealing with squatters' claims had been constituted by Ordinance in 1890 but had not concluded its labours. As the work had proceeded in a very desultory manner for many years, the Government decided that an effort should be made to bring it to a close and, with that view, the Principal Land Surveyor was appointed Secretary. In addition to the Principal Land Surveyor, fully half of the survey staff were engaged for 6 months in preparing particulars of claims to some 505 holdings comprising roughly about 930 plots of land and small houses or matsheds. These were all dealt with by the Board and the work is now practically completed.

The delimitation of lands in occupation or required by the Military Authorities, the preparation of accurate plans of the same and the settlement of areas to be surrendered by the Military Authorities to the Colonial Government under the Lewis Agreement of 1905 were all in progress during the year.

The setting out in the New Territories of areas granted to certain parties known as Taxlords, who were recognised by Government as having some claim to compensation in the form of land for the abolition of certain fees they had enjoyed prior to the British occupation, took up about a fortnight of a Surveyor's time and a month of a tracer's time.

Much clerical work is involved in carrying on the dual duties of land survey and superintendence of Crown Lands conducted by the Land Survey Branch.

8. Maps published.-No maps were published during the year.

9. Miscellaneous Matters.-The multifarious nature of the work performed by this branch in the preparation of sale particulars and lease plans; of permits and licences for cultivation, boat breaming, slipways, piers, &c.; of schemes for the laying out of new areas and the improvement of many insanitary areas and villages; of setting out reclamations, new roads, &c., &c., precludes the possibility of any considerable amount of systematic survey work. The total length of traverses run during the year between the triangulated points already valued and accepted, exclusive of detail lines, amounts to about 60 miles.

The following is a brief summary of the other work accom- plished :-

261 lease plans (in triplicate) with particulars were prepared. 27 sale plans (in duplicate) and sale conditions were prepared.

60

1,917 plans and sunprints in connection with proposed sales, permits, piers, squatters' holdings, &c., were prepared or traced.

1 plan measuring 6 ft. × 7 ft. was reduced from a scale of

50 ft.1 inch to one of 200 feet-1 inch.

4 plans measuring about 3′ × 2′ 6′′ (varying scales) were

reduced.

1 plan measuring about 6 ft. × 3 ft. was reduced from 32′′

1 mile to 1/2,500.

1 plan measuring about 2' x 3' was enlarged from a scale

of 1/2,500 to one of 100'--1 inch.

6 maps of Kowloon (scale 1/2,500) were extensively altered and added to in order to bring them up to date.

747 permits for temporary tenure of Crown Land were

issued.

104 temporary Pier Licences were issued.

The following officers were absent during the year either on leave or in hospital:-

Mr. L. C. Rees-4 days in October in hospital.

Mr. B. W. Grey-23 days in July in hospital. Went on 12

months' leave on 1st August.

Mr. A. J. Darby-on leave from 1st April to 12th March. Mr. E. B. Reed-3 days in November in hospital.

Mr. F. Sutton-12 days at various dates in hospital.

Mr. J. Grant-16 days in January in hospital.

16th April, 1910.

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.

APPENDIX P.

REPORT OF THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.

STAFF.

1. Mr. W. J. Solly, Postmaster at Shanghai, returned from leave and resumed duty on 22nd November. Mr. G. G. Burnett, Senior Clerk in the Hongkong Office, was granted leave from 11th May. Mr. R. J. Savage, Superintendent of Mails, returned from leave and resumed duty on 29th June.

2. Among the remainder of the staff there were twelve resigna- tions and appointments at Hongkong; and one resignation and appointment at the Shanghai Office.

MAILS.

3. The number of mail bags and packets dealt with in the General Post Office, Hongkong, amounted to 209,109 an increase of 4,820 compared with the previous year. Further details are given in Table I.

REGISTRATION AND PARCEL BRANCH.

4. Registered articles and parcels handled in Hongkong amount- ed to 951,101 an increase of 145,688, compared with the previous year. Further details are given in Table II.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

5. A statement of Revenue and Expenditure is given in Table III. Revenue amounted to $444,046.58 showing an increase of $31,614.98, being due to increase of business. The Expenditure amounted to $510,729.99 being an increase of $139,243.82 on the expenditure of the previous year. This proportionately large in- crease in expenditure was due to the following reasons:-In the year 1908 only three of the quarterly payments of the contribution towards the subsidy to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Com- pany for the carriage of mails were paid, while during the year under review the quarterly payment in arrear together with the full yearly payment were made. Of the payments under this head of expenditure $32,596.63 was in respect of the year 1908. (Other Mail Transit payments also show an increase of $71,975.10, due largely to the payments made to China, Japan and Russia for the carriage of mails despatched by the trans-Siberian Railway. Since the last statistics were taken for transit payments on account of mails despatched by this route, the weight of mails despatched, especially from Hongkong, has greatly increased, owing to a better service, and in consequence after the next statistics have been taken in the year 1911 these payments will be still more increased.

6. Table IV shows a comparative statement of the sale of post- age stamps at the various British Postal Agencies in China for the years 1908 and 1909. Table V shows the number of stamps of

P 2.

different denominations issued for sale during the years 1908 and 1909. Table VI shows a statement of Revenue and Expenditure for the last ten years. Table VII shows the amounts payable yearly by and to Hongkong for the years 1908 to 1913, inclusive, for the tran- sit of mails, based on the statistics taken during the first twenty- eight days of November, 1907, in accordance with the provisions of the Universal Postal Union Convention of Rome. Table VIII shows the amounts payable yearly by Hongkong, for the period from the first of October, 1907, to the 31st December, 1909, for transit of mails sent from the British Post Offices in North China by the trans-Siberian Railway, based on the statistics taken during the first twenty-eight days of May, 1908.

MONEY ORDERS.

7. The slump in money order transactions during 1908, aggre- gating about £16,000 less than during 1907, was arrested in 1909 in which year business began to recover its vitality resulting in an increase of £6,000 over that of 1908. The sale of British and Local Postal Orders also increased by £4,000 and $5,000 respectively, but the payment of British Postal Orders showed a small diminuition of £500.

Further details are given in Tables IX, X and XI.

DEAD LETTERS.

8. The total number of articles dealt with in the Dead Letter Office at Hongkong was 102,950, made up as follows:-Returned to Hongkong from other offices 48,649 and returned by Hongkong to offices from which they originated 54,301. This is an increase of 3,709 on the total of last year. Of the letters returned to, and originating from Hongkong, it was possible to return to the senders 12,991. There were undeliverable by the General Post Office and the two Branch Post Offices:-Foreign letters, etc., 26,338, Lottery Letters, etc., 13,189 and Local Letters, etc., 4,155. The first and second of these are included in the total of those returned by Hongkong to offices of origin, and of the last mentioned it was possible to return to the senders 3,107.

9. There were 59 unregistered letters in which were found articles of value :-(riz., silver spoons, leather pocket books, brooch, silver hat-pins, silver chains, purses, &c., &c.) and money (consisting of drafts, hank notes, money orders, postal notes, postage stamps, and coin) to the value of £28.16.3. These, when possible, were subjected to registration and returned to the senders. Two hundred and eighteen Chinese letters were found to contain coin (mostly Cash), but with the exception of 63 which contained the senders' names and ad- dresses, and which were compulsorily registered for return to the senders, the remainder were destroyed and the contents converted into Hongkong money and paid into Revenue. Two hundred and for- ty-five post cards bearing imitation of postage stamps and addressed. to the United Kingdom were withdrawn from the mails, the regula- tions of that country prohibiting their being forwarded. There were 27 post cards posted either with no address whatever or so vague and incomplete that they could not be forwarded. Further details are given in Table XII.

P 3

PILLAR BOXES.

10. The total number of articles collected during the year from all pillar boxes was 183,152 against 161,933 in 1908, showing an increase of 21,219 on the total of the previous year. New pillar boxes have been erected at the Star Ferry Company's wharves and at the Lower Peak Tramway Terminus.

CHINESE BRANCH.

11. The total number of Chinese registered articles delivered by this Branch was 183,805 of which 119,436 were from America and Canada and 64,369 from China and other countries. This shows a decrease as compared with the year 1908 of 3,185 and an increase of 20,885 as compared with the year 1907. The amount of ordinary correspondence dealt with has largely increased; the increase being mainly due to the letter carrier licences being no longer issued. The number of Postal Hong licences issued during the year was 37, 36 renewals and one new licence. This number shows a decrease of one license compared with the previous year. The letter carrier licences were abolished as the necessity for such no longer exists.

WESTERN BRANCH POST OFFICE.

12. The amount of correspondence sent between this Branch Office and Canton was :-Despatched 662,713 letters. 7,635 other articles, and 10,351 registered articles. Received 811,776 letters, 11,401 other articles, and 4,836 registered articles. These figures show a total increase of 164,298 compared with the figures of the year 1908. In addition to the above 11,189 Hong Packets were despatched to Canton and 18,192 received. The number of Hong Packets are diminishing while the number of ordinary letters are increasing, which shows that the Chinese are sending their cor- respondence more through the ordinary post than was formerly the case. The value of stamps sold at this Branch amounted to $105,592.50 compared with $72,174.10 in the previous year.

MISCELLANEOUS.

13. The Cash on Delivery system, as applied to parcels, was started between Hongkong and the United Kingdom, and the Straits Settlements. By this system a person is enabled to pay for goods sent by parcel post at the time of receipt, the Post Office collecting a small fee in addition to the sum paid over to the sender.

14. A parcel post agreement was entered into with the Chinese Imperial Post Office which came into force on October 1st.

15. One hundred and eighty-five articles intended to be registered or sent by parcel post, were found in the drop box of the General Post Office during the year. They were forwarded in the manner intended. Thirteen hundred enquiries were received for registered articles and parcels, of the above number all but four were proved to have been duly delivered to their rightful owners. Three were found to have been lost when in the custody of Foreign Postal Adminstrations, and one, a parcel, in the Shanghai British Post Office. Compensation has been paid in each case.

10th March, 1910.

C. McI. MESSER,

Postmaster General.

Table I.

Mails Despatched and Received during 1909.

For H. M. S.

For

To and from Hongkong.

in China

Foreign

Station.

Ships.

Sent in transit through Hongkong.

Steamers

Carry ng Mails.

Loose

Bags. Packets. Letter

Bags.

Bags.

Bags and

Boxes.

Arrivals Depar-

Packets.

tures.

Boxes.

- P 4-

Received, 1909,

113,805

2,347 2,932

538

3,764

Received, 1908,

110,797

1,179

2,828

283

114

10,302

13,650

Increase,

3,008

1,169

101

255

3,650

Decrease,.

...

...

3,348

Despatched, 1903,

86,379

6,578

2,327

1,117

2,736

40,326

432

...

Despatched, 1908,

84,382

7,931

2,645

1,372

1,765

40,812

335

13,532

14,760

Increase,

1,997

971

97

Decrease,

1,353

318

255

:

486

1,228

Table II.

Statistics of International, Local and Agencies Registered Correspondence and Parcels for the Year ending 1909.

-P 5-

INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL.

COMPARISON WITH 1908.

Description of Correspondence.

TOTAL

1909.

TOTAL

1908.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

Insured Letters,

672

877

1,549

1,068

481

Registered Articles,........

379,233

130,193

809,426

693,621

115,805

Registered Articles viâ Siberia,.

14,972

9,051

24,021

24,024

Insured Parcels viâ Gibraltar,

2,065

1,981

4,046

3,729

317

Insured Parcels vâ Brindisi,

72

181

253

236

17

Insured Parcels viâ Marseilles,.

333

333

327

6

Ordinary Parcels viâ Gibraltar,

11,536

14,071

25,607

24,799

808

Ordinary Parcels via Brindisi,

137

483

620

588

32

Ordinary Parcels via Marseilles,

1,015

1,015

1,105

90

Cash on Delivery Parcels,

1

107

108

108

America, Manila and Honolulu Parcels,.

2,257

3,067

5,324

1,596

728

German Parcels by German Ships,

458

2,183

2,641

2,168

473

French Parcels by French Ships,

951

951

929

22

Indian Insured Parcels,

704

952

Indian Ordinary Parcels,..

1,522

1,724

Australian Parcels,

1,160

593

75,204

72,337

2,867

Japan Parcels,

Miscellaneous Parcels,.

2,017

2,399

34,675

29,458

451,482

499,619

951,101

805,503

145,688

90

Table II,-Continued.

INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL.

COMPARISON WITH 1908.

DESCRIPTION OF CORRESPONDENCE.

TOTAL

1909.

TOTAL

1908.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

P6

Parcels received for China Fleet,..

1,887

1,887

2,266

379

Parcels, Shanghai and Agencies,

25,248

35,811

61,059

42,223

18,836

Registered Articles, Shanghai,

53,844

32,552

86,396

85,589

807

Registered Articles, other Agencies,

10,876

14,823

25,699

14,573

11,126

Exclusive of Articles also passing through Hongkong,......................

89,968

85,073

175,041

144,651

30,769

379

Grand Total for 1909=1,126,142 ; net increase 175,988.

Table III.

Revenue and Expenditure.

RECEIPTS.

1908.

1909.

INCREASE.

DE-

CREASE.

T

EXPENDITURE.

1908.

1909. INCREASE.

DE-

CREASE.

Sale of Stamps, Hongkong,

Do., at the Agencies, Unpaid Postage, Boxholders Fees,

260.940 23 281,499.81 110,993.23 117,922.77 4.582.41 4.868.02 7,453.00 7,529.00

20,559.61

6,929.54

Transit Payments,

285.58

76.00

Commission on Money Orders and Postal Notes,

16,393.36 | 19,743.48

2.350.12

Profit on Exchange on Money Order Transactions, Interest on Money Order Fund, Void Money Orders& Postal Notes,

10,675 25

1.001.01

393 08

12,049.12

1,381,35

53.00

1,373 87

380.34

Working Expenses,

Carriage of Mails :---

Gratuities to Shipmasters. Contribution towards P. &

0. Subsidy,

***

Commission on Money Orders,

74.117.12 146.092.22 3,852.05

71,975.10

4,990.22 1.138.17

94.124.35 161,440.05*, 67,315 70

1,562.77

1,562.77

197,829.88 198 207.50

377.62

340.08

Total Receipts,

Deficit,

Total,.

P 7

$112,131.60 144,016 58 | 31,955.06 340.08

...

Total Expenditure,...$ 371,486.17 510,729.99 140.806 59 1,562.77

Profit,.

40,945.43

66,683.41

131.60

412,131.60 510,729.99

Total,.

$412,431.60 510,729 99

* Of this amount $32,596.63 was in respect of the fourth quarterly payment for the year 1908.

P8

Table IV.

Revenue from the Sale of Postage Stamps, etc., at the British Post Offices in China during the Years 1908 and 1909.

1908.

1909.

Shanghai,

-$ 65,553.24

$70,094.30

Amoy,

5,829.00

5.707.17

Canton,

10,691.49

10.430.10

Chefoo,

1.734.22

2,527.46

Foochow,

4,801.79

4,268.25

Hankow,

3,777.73

4.312.81

Hoihow,

1,199.78

1,160.05

Lin Kung Tau,

5,440,75

5,852.60

Ningpo,

-*

470.41

552.21

Swatow,

5,848.52

5,885.53

Tientsin, -

5,646.30

7,132.29

$110,993.23

$117,922.77

L

P 9

Table V.

Postage Stamps, etc., issued for Sale in Hongkong and at the British Post Offices in China during the Years 1908 and 1909.

Deno- mination.

1908.

1909..

Increase + Decrease-

Postage Stamps,.

སྭ་

1 cent. 653,276 526,560-

126 716

2 cents. 2,639,996|2,943,349+ 303,353

4

5

6

2,646,2162,730,702 + 1,512,876 2,345,755 +

77,756

84,486

832,879

90,720 +

12,964

92,156 98,160+

6,001

10

1.100.396 1,138,058 +

37,662

12

25,676

25,440

236

་.

"

20

103,196

99,595

3,601

"

30

56,876

57,360+

484

59

"

150

64,396

57,720

6,676

"

I dollar.

40,556

35,289

5,267

""

19

2 dollars.

19,446

17,421;

2,025

3

""

4,706

4,162

544

5

2,456

2,065,

391

""

10

2,606

2,570'

36

Books of Stamps, Post Cards,.

1 dollar.

7,475

7,925+

450

1 cent.

32,796

26,042

-

6,751

2 cents.

""

دو

Newspaper Wrappers,.

Postage Envelopes,

482 +-~

316 14,736

506 +

190

14,796 +

60

116 11,166

308+

192

1,713-

9,453

1,346

700

646

546

1,075 +

529

2,622

3,275 +

653

8,742

9,350 +

608

242

215

27

喃喃

10

292

450+

138

Registration Envelopes,.

11

10,535

11,306 +

771

Year.

Total Revenue.

Total Expendi-

ture.

C.

$

P 10-

Table VI.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Post Office for the Years 1900 to 1909.

3

Percentage of Expen-

diture to Revenue.

%

Profit.

Deficit.

1900,

325,603,33235,263.08

$ C. 90,340.25

C.

72.25

1901,

355,9 2.74 | 273,685.51

82,227.23

76.99

1902,

387,066.19|316,240,12| 70,826.07

81.70

1903,

414,867.20 | 334,177.40

80,6×9.80

80.55

1904,

408,458.92 316,756.56 91,702,36

77.54

1905,

414,838.19585,449.25

170,611.06

141.12

1906, 420,454.04 359,484.08 60,969.96

85.49

1907,

445,420.92 | 366,452.47| 78,968.45

82.27

1908,

412,431.60 371,486.17 40,945.43

90.07

1909,

444,046.58510,729.99

66,683.41

115.01

P 11

A

Table VII.

Amounts payable yearly by and to Hongkong for the years 1908 to 1913 inclusive for the transit of mails based on the statistics taken during the first twenty-eight days of November, 1907, in accordance with the provisions of the Convention of Rome.

Country in correspondence with Hongkong.

Amount payable by Hongkong.

Amount payable to Hongkong.

Francs. cms.

Francs. ems.

Austria,

2,293.55

Belgium,

1,854.22

British India,

1,538.42

Canada,

9,761.05

Egypt,..

1,181.62

Federated Malay States,

4,060.88

France,

98,222.72

French Indo-China,

9,294.37

Germany,...

113,544.38

Holland,

5,960.05

Italy,

17,845.99

Japan,

23,727.60

Macao,....

1,897.42

Nether-lands India,

3,106.35

Philippine Islands,..

5,686.96

Straits Settlements,

15,069.25

Switzerland,.

2,244.76

United Kingdom,

12,771.56*

United States of America,

14,075.34

Fes. 54,728.99

Totals,..... Fes. 289,407.50

* These figures are exclusive of the sea-conveyance of mails by P. & O. packets which is included in the amount £11,273 payable by this Colony as its share of the mail subsidy.

Table VIII.

Amounts payable yearly by Hongkong, for the period 1st Octo- ber, 1907, to 31st December, 1909, inclusive, for mails sent from the British Post Offices in North China by the trans-Siberian Railway, based on the statistics taken during the first twenty-eight days of May, 1908.

Country in correspondence with Hongkong.

Amount.

Francs. cms.

1,053.67

China,

Japan,

Russia,

1,795.61 92,568.50

Total,

Fes. 95,417.78

COUNTRY.

Table IX,

Money Order Transactions during 1908 and 1909.

1

1909.

1908.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid.

P 12

£ s. d.

s. d. £ s. d.

+

s. d.

£

s. d.

'Tasmania,

United Kingdom,. Queensland,

New South Wales, Victoria,

South Australia,

New Zealand,

Transvaal,

Cape Colony,

Canada,

13,483 1 317,766 5 613,160 8 217,107 5 9

322 13 1

159 6 3 14,555 8 4

102 3 9

13,199 14 1

57 2 6

L s. d. £

658 19 9

1,355 14 3

d.

£

s. d.

941 2 2

2,287 8 0

811 7 3

2,819 12 10

129 14 11

532

4 10

463 7 7

1,605 12 7

342 15 10

1,640 17 9

120 11 9

35 5 2

Western Australia,

15 11 3

62 3 1

339 10 2

75 13 4

30 0 0

13 2 3

1,100 7 1

103 14 8

1,283 16 11

88 3 5

413 17 8

1,421 19 4 3,371 0 11

53 18 3

307 15 0

470 7 5

8 4 10

183 9 10

56 9 9

1,401 5 2

31 15 2

111 2 5

2,981 10 9

20 14 2

389 10 2

35 9 1

259 17 0

3 13 0

752 1 2

1

90 18 5

5 15 4

85 1 8

26 7 0

7 6 11

492 4 2

United States of America,

877 2 10

4,244 4 1

1,049 3 0

3,441 13 5

516 9

802 10 8

397 10 10

1,180 16 4

408 5 11

1,276 6 0

172 0 2

10 15 1

Japan,

23,092 17 8

2,253 9 1021,134 16 7 |

8,646 18 9

1,958 1 1

Straits Settlements,

685 8 4

1,291 3 0

772 15 9

1,684 4 1

87 7 5

95 9 8

6,393 8 11 393 1 1

Federated Malay States,

Carried forward,

159 12 0 1,542 9 0 40,795 9 0 53,384 17 138,422 2 4 £94,180 6s. Id. £96,606 12s. 10d.

58 17 5

1,393 14 9

100 14 7

148 14 3

58,184 10 6 2,762 11

3,378 0 0

£6,140 11s. 9d.

393 15 2 8,181 13 5

£8,575 88. 7d.

COUNTRY.

1909.

Table IX,-Continued,

1908.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid. ¡Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid.

£

s. d.

Brought forward,..

s. d. £ s. d. £ £ 8. d. 40,795 9 0 53,384 17 1 38,422 2 4 58,184 10 6 2,762 11 9 3,378 0 0

£ S. d.

£

s. d.

مع

s. d.

393 15 2

£ s. d.

8,181 13 5

British North Borneo..

5 16 8

379 17 4

315 0

322 16 11

2 1 8

57 0 5

Sarawak,

13 3 8

91 7 0

158 18 1

13 3 8

Siam,.

12 6 9

39 19 9

30 12 2

54 1 1

18 5 5

67 11 1

14 1 4

Macao,

129 11 9

296 7 3

102 2 9

226 8 6

27 9 0

69 18 9

Kiautschow & German Post Offices in China,

33 1 6

84 19 3

Shanghai,

8,670 11 0

2,845 17 0

19 18 0

7,263 12

77 4 7

13 3 6

7 14 8

22,545 7 11

1,406 18 10

300 9 1

Agencies in China,

4,368 10 6

4,044 15 5

323 15 1

Base Post Office,

115 0

5 1 10

3 6 10

India,...

Ceylon,

Germany,

19,189 11 6 | 125 0 1

1,415 4 7

10,027 6

329 18

6,620 13 11

913,785 13

6

9,461 2 7

5,403 18 0

566 4 2

4

223 17 6

1,304 16

399 0 2

98 17 5

69 110

2

6,119 14 7

110 8 5

Total,.

70,389 16 678,471 9 2 61,160 19

781,599 2 2

9,739 14 11

Nett Increase for 1909,.

.£6,101 3s. 118.

£148,861 5s. 8d.

£142,760 ls. 9d.

500 19 4

5,208 1 6

£14,947 16s. 5d.

510 18 0

8,335 14 6

£8,846 12s. 6d.

P 13-

Table X.

British Postal Orders issued and paid at Hongkong and at the Agencies in China.

ORDERS ISSUED.

VALUES.

AMOUNT

s. d,

s. d.

s. d.

d.

s. d.

s. d.

s. d.

0

6

1

0

1 6

2 6

5 0

10 0

10 6

s. d.

20 0

£

s. d.

Total in 1909,.

1,069

3,061

2,365

2,747

4,602

4,861

1,013

r1,198

16,012 17 0

Total in 1908,

914

2,765

2,058

2,222

3,313

3,527

701

8,494

12,046 16 6

ORDERS PAID.

No.

AMOUNT.

£ s.

d.

6,419

4,916 12 6

,

6,980

5,457 10 6

Total in 1909, Total in 1908,

1

P 14

Table XI.

Statement of Local Postal Notes issued at Hongkong and at the Agencies in China.

VALUES.

25 cents. 50 cents.

$1.00

$2.00 $3.00 $4.00

$5.00

AMOUNT.

$10.00

C.

Total in 1909,..

423

566

405

461

528

612

1,110

2,377

35,067.75

Total in 1908,.

426

518

402

489

561

536

1,113

1,906

30,197.50

- P 15

P 16

Table XII.

Dead Letters Received and Despatched in the Dead

Letter Branch.

PLACES.

RETURNED

TO HONGKONG.

RETURNED BY HONGKONG.

Cards.

Other

Articles.

United Kingdom,

3,177

759

160 3,245

India,

1,198 35

130 2,420

619

557 11,843

587

Straits Settlements,

4,767

36

277 | 2,731

61

463

Federated Malay States,.

547

3

33

316

3

2

Ceylon,

120

24

108

30

15

Batavia, N.I.,

100

792

356

18

55

Egypt,

32

5

13

91

37

83

Continent of Europe.

846

315 3,220

U. S. of America,

2,782

500

352 1,882

290 2,312

Canada,

480

54

23

239

39

400

Japan,

365

169 233 478

269

167

China,

7,009

65| 1,802|15,600

375

842

Manila,

140

33

5

362

39

176

Mexico,

393

3

65

Honolulu,

221

French Indo-China,

131

4

6

544

26

158

Foreign Offices in China,

281

35

50

Macao,

53

353

15

23

Siam,

337

ra

32

239

7

1

Victoria,

143

New South Wales,

111

2283

15! 110

17

89

20

5 209

26

148

South Australia,

9

1

3

28

17

Queensland,

6

18

48

30

Western Australia,

41

13

3

29

3

Tasmania,

17

1

i

13

1

New Zealand,

81

12

22

69

26

Natal (inclusive of South

99

12

Africa),

Transvaal,

211

30

3

:

:

Other Places,.

3,993

768 2,730

65

2

2

Shanghai B. P. O.,

3,223

554 8,236

Other B.P.O.'s in China,

501

62 328

Total in 1909,

Total in 1908,

30,122 3,188 15,339 30,761 2,815 20,725 30,065 2,834 16,025 28,818 2,558 18,941

1

Appendix Q.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

British Section.

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1909.

in

As I took over late in the year I am not in a position to describe any detail the progress which has been made during the season 1909 and 1910 and will therefore confine myself to a statement of affairs at the end of the year.

Land.

Lots 618 to 1,140 were acquired with a view to placing the terminus at Tsim Ssa Tsui.

It was proposed to exchange a portion of the reclaimed ground close to the China Light and Power Company's premises for the ground known as the Match Factory and compensation would then have had to be paid for the buildings only. It has been possible however to level off a site at the back of the Match Factory on Crown Land and make use of the spoil to make up the approaches to Gascoigne Road thus avoiding the exchange and adding a valuable piece of land practically free of charge to the Railway.

Earthwork.

A great deal of Earthwork North of Beacon Hill Tunnel has been completed.

A certain amount of damage was done by typhoons to the banks between Miles 7 and 12 and one bad slip occurred in Cutting No. 30 at Mile 10. All damage is now being repaired and the slip has been cleared away and retaining walls are being built to prevent recurrence. At Mile 15 there is a very wet and troublesome cutting. The Contractors, having practically finished the amount of work contracted for, have been relieved of further work and the cutting is being finished on piece work, and is well forward towards com- pletion. It is anticipated that it will be sloped and drained before the heavy rains. South of Beacon Hill the work is in a very unfinished state due to gaps caused by the rebuilding of bridges and the amount of work left to be done at the Reclamation.

The girders for the new bridges will not be out before April by which time the bridges and their approaches will be ready.

An alteration of Centre Line in Cutting No. 1 for which sanc- tion was obtained will enable the cutting to be completed before the time originally anticipated and will obviate the expenditure contemplated as necessary to make the cutting safe had the original Centre Line been adhered to. Some five million cubic feet of filling remain to complete the reclamation between Blackheads and the Storm Water Outfall, as well as a portion of about two hundred feet long of the sea wall, which cannot be got in until the filling is more advanced, owing to the possibility of scouring out the pierre perdu

Q 2

if too great a head of water were allowed to accumulate between the wall and the filling.

Tunnels.

All Tunnels are now completed.

At Beacon Hill the headings met satisfactorily on 17th May, 1909, and since then the work has been rapidly pushed to completion. The Tunnel is lined throughout with a varying thickness of brick- work in cement. The treacherous nature of the rock rendered lining imperative, and as it was found impracticable to line the roof only, in portions where the rock was less liable to slide, a thin skin. of brickwork built tight to the excavation has been put in. There does not seem to be any use in perpetuating the shaft on the North Face which is too near the portal to be of any service as a ventilating shaft, and as it would have cost great deal more to brick it up than the estimated cost of six thousand dollars, owing to the very wet nature of the ground, the shaft will be filled in and suitable arrange- ments made to cope with the water which comes down it.

and

At Taipo Tunnel the heading met on the 28th April, 1909, the work is now completely finished. This tunnel has been very creditably and cheaply constructed.

run:

The following are the approximate prices and lengths per foot

*

Length.

Cost per foot.

Tunnel No. 1-Double Line:

2-Single Line

Fully lined..... ..

150

$507.42

7,212

455.28

>>

Partly fully lined

3-Double Line and arched over

329

247.48

""

>>

throughout

4--

170

400.92

>

23

༥,

923 327.14

"

""

יי

Roads.

Road diversions in connection with the Kowloon-Taipo Road are well forward and the fencing and draining alone remains to be finished. The excavation and piling for the bridge in connection with the Road Diversions at Gascoigne Road at Hung Hom has been completed. It was decided to get the spoil for the road from a site at back of the Match Factory, referred to above, thus saving further land acquisition.

Bridges.

The Bridgework has been completed with the exception of the Road Bridge No. 2 at Mile 1 and the rebuilding of Bridges Nos. 4, 5, 7, 8 and 12 which have failed owing to faulty design in foundations in very treacherous ground and to bad material. Some other bridges are being strengthened. The cost due to this cause is estimated not to exceed $95,000.

Telegraph.

The telegraph line was laid throughout the Section but only some eight miles of it is in the permanent position. This is now being taken in hand.

A

!

*

Q 3

Ballast.

All ballast required for the Main Line has been broken and bottom ballast is being laid where practicable. The depth of top ballast under the sleepers has been increased to six inches but this will not involve an increase of quantity but a redistribution of material. The quality of ballast is good and it has been broken at a moderate rate. The ballasting of the last eight miles necessitates the laying of a siding at Mile 14 to take up the ballast broken at a depôt along the abandoned alignment.

Stations and Buildings.

Yaumati and Fan Ling stations were completed but no work has been done on staff quarters anywhere. It is a pity that in Railway Construction such matters are usually left to the last because it is difficult to get contractors to undertake them when there is no work of any bulk to be done close at hand. Shatin, Taipo and Lofu remain to be built as well as the terminal station at Kowloon, which remain- ed in abeyance pending a final decision regarding the site of the terminus. Station masters' and menials' quarters and gangmen's lines have to be provided throughout. No arrangements for signall- ing or interlocking yards have yet been made. The amount of work involved in all this is not large, and all should be completed before June.

Plant.

There has been no expenditure in 1909 on Construction Plant. During the year indents were sent home for two tank engines, six open bogie goods waggons, six covered bogie waggons, twenty-six covered four-wheeled waggons and ten open ditto and two goods brakevans four-wheeled. None of these have yet arrived in the Colony. The engines and bogie goods stock should have been out by the middle of January but advice of despatch is only just now to hand, and the opening of the line in May must therefore be delayed. A contract for the body work and erection of the passenger stock was placed with the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company. There is likely to be delay in carrying out this Contract due to the non-arrival of fittings before the end of March; and the underframes I fear will not be out before the middle of May, so that the con- tract time will have to be extended to the beginning of July.

Opening for Public Traffic.

Last year it was the intention to open for Public Traffic by using the Overland Route which runs parallel to the Railway at Hung Hom and to place the Railway Station in a position which though tem- porary would come into the scheme for final development. Since then ideas have undergone a change and a new proposal regarding the final location of the terminus has been submitted to the Se- cretary of State.

Until connection with Canton is established nothing much in station accommodation at Kowloon is required for the light local traffic which in the interests of the Railway it is advisable to work up. Pending the decision as to the location of the terminus there- fore we may take it that for all practical purposes a flag station in

Salisbury Road close to the Ferry proposed in the scheme lately sent forward and another at Hung Hom will meet all the Kowloon and Hongkong requirements.

There remains a good deal to be done before the Railway can be said to be completed. Stations and quarters or both have to be built at all stations. Workshops and watering arrangements have to be erected and the reclamation must be finished before the Goods Yard can be laid. As regards the shops nothing can be done in this respect because the site for the Workshops is not levelled off nor is the steel work likely to be out before April. Girders for Bridges 4 and 8 will not be out till the end of March.

Before through opening to Canton however the contract time for completion of the reclamation will have elapsed and the passenger and goods yards will be ready. As the British Section will be ready for opening before the Chinese Section it is proposed to open the line as soon as the essentials are ready, with the station arrangements as intimated above, in order to work up the local traffic and to transport material for the Chinese Section if required, all of which will help in earning Revenue. It is impossible to fix a date at pre- sent but it will take at least six weeks after the underframes are out for the Rolling Stock to be ready so that it would not be safe to reckon on anything earlier than July.

Notes on the Estimate for 1910.

II.-Land.-Seeing that the question of the terminus is still undecided no alteration has been made in the figures under this head. The expenditure up to date is $762,863.65 leaving a balance of $433,015.55.

III.-(a.)-In revising the Estimate of 1907 at the end of last year, the Earthwork appears to have been reduced by $132,228.62 as the saving anticipated by reducing the line of frontage of the Reclamation between Blackheads and the Storm Water Outfall. The increase of rate due to the rock in Hung Hom Cutting appears to have been lost sight of, for the through rate that was being paid to the Contractors at the beginning of 1909 was that estimated for in 1907, and the amount of rock that was likely to be met with as the Cutting went down to Formation was neglected. As a fact the through rate in 1909 worked up to over $17 a thousand cubic feet and will be close on $20 per thousand cubic feet before the Hung Hom Cutting is completed. In discussing the present increase of Estimate it is well to neglect the 1909 figures in order to show how the increase has arisen. In the table which follows the various figures have been lumped up in order to agree with the heads of Estimate in which the accounts have been kept.

}

Estimate Expenditure Estimate to Final

of 1907. to date.

complete.

Estimate.

$

$

$

$

Service Road,....

23,900

5,000

1,000

6,000

Excavation in Hung Hom

Cutting and Reclam-

ation,

522,500

413,606

142,000

585,606

Claims by Leigh and Or-

ange,

10,000 10,000

Alterations to Drains and

Sewers,

66,000

53,000 12,000 65,000

Sea Wall:

Dredging, etc.,

84,000 123,730

16,000 139,700

Sea wall as per Original

Design,

129,800

174,200

4,800 179.000

Retain Wall in Cutting,

47,100

abandoned for Tun- nel No. 1,

Substituted Estimate for

cutting down Signal Hill in case of terminus be- ingat Tsim Ssa Tsui,.. General Earthwork out-

side above,

Overland Route,. Depreciation of Plant,

Total,..

40,000 40,000

1,527,200 1,378,374

114,600 1,492,974

6,300

3,000 60,000

9,300

60,000

$2,400,500 2,184,180 403,400 2,587,580

From this it will be seen that the Estimate for the completion of the Earthwork now amounts to $2,587,580, an excess of $319,403 over the Estimate of 1909 and of $187,080 over the Estimate for 1907. It is impossible owing to absence of detailed figures in the Estimate for 1909 to explain how and where this excess has arisen and one can only say that notwithstanding the saving in the quantity of reclamation which amounts to some sixty lacs of cubic feet, the actual figures in Estimates for 1907 and 1910 for the work in Hung Hom vary as shown in the table on account of higher rates having to be paid than those originally estimated for. A further excess is the inclusion of the $60,000 now charged off as deprecia- tion of plant. This was not made in the previous estimates. Of the $114,600 required to complete the Earthwork outside Messrs. Leigh and Orange's contracts it will be seen from the details given below that a sum of $59,600 is set down for works not previously contemplated but which are now necessary to render the cuttings and the banks safe.

Estimate for works not included in previous Estimates.

Making up banks at Bridges 4, 8 and 12,

Repairing damage done by typhoons in September

last along the banks and clearing slips,

Raising of pitching along the banks between

Shatin and Taipo,

Concrete Drains, Cutting 47,

Rubble Toe Walls in Cutting 47,

Turfing along banks and cuttings,

Earthwork to finish,

$10,000

18.000

9,000

13,400

4,200

5,000

$59,600

55,000

$114,600

The amount of $40,000 for work round Signal Hill is still allowed for in the Estimate in case it is decided that the site of the terminus shall be at Tsim Ssa Tsui.

III.—(b.) The cost of the Tunnels has worked out as follows:-

Cost to date.

Depreciation of Plant @ 50 per

cent. off.

Total.

Per foot run.

22

Tunnel No. 1,

"

2,

$

3,

""

31

76,113.16

3,170,503.99 $113,000

76,420.87

76,113.16 $507.42

3,283,503.99

455.28

5,000

81,420.87

247.48

4,

2"

63,156.23

5,000

68,156.23

400.92

5,

..

291,950.94

10,000 301,950.94

327.14

$3,811,145.19

3,499,824.69

Less Estimate for 1909,

represents the present increase of Estimate. Deducting the cost of Tunnel No. 1 which was not inncluded in last year's figures,...

$311,320.50 which

76,113.16

this leaves an excess on Beacon Hill Tunnel of $ 235,207.34

Reverting to the Chief Resident Engineer's Report for last year the following represents the rough estimate for completion given by him and the actual amount expended :-

Estimated.

Actual.

Lining Shaft,

$ 6,000 $

6,195.14

Heading driving,

105,000

128,982.12

Widening out,

500,000

634,063.77

Carried forward,... $

611,000

769,241.03

I

7

Brought forward,

$

611,000

769,241.03

Lining,

410,000

516,398.50

Depreciation of Plant,

100,000

113.000.00

Buildings, Sanitation,

Nil.

11,694.18

$1,121,000

1,410,333.71

1,121,000.00

$ 289,333.71

III. (c.) ROADS.

Amount expended to date,

$ 5,000

Anticipated expenditure:-

Gascoigne Road approach,

80,000

Metalling,

19,800

Turfing to slopes,

2,400

Removing Gas Pipes, etc.,

3,000

$110,200

Public Works Department Road to Yaumati,..

10,000

$120,200

This was

In the 1909 Estimate an increase of $2,479.84 only was shown as due to extra cost of road approach to Bridge No. 2. obviously an under-estimate as the quantities and rates given to Messrs. Leigh and Orange for the approaches and metalling of the Bridge amount to $102,200. The balance of the Estimate is for Road Diversions between Shatin and Taipo and a roadway from Hung Hom to Yaumati.

IV.—(a.) MAJOR BRIDGES.—The actual cost of abandonment due to defective foundations or the use of inferior material is $68,590.14 and the cost of additions to existing structure necessary to prevent further trouble $17,264. The sum of these figures and the actual cost of the bridges is $808,583.41 to which must be added a sum of $7,912.00 as depreciation of plant bringing the Estimate up to $816,495.41, an excess over the 1909 Estimate of $138,729.05.

IV. (b.) MINOR BRIDGES.--The cost of abandoned structures is $25,788.83, additions to existing bridges $3,300 and the total all inclusive cost $350,126.47, being an excess of $10,522.19 on last year's Estimate.

VIII.-(a.). Under Stations and Buildings a reduction has been made of $139,998.47 so as to accord with the actual requirements of the Kowloon Station Yard, a sum of $100,000 being included as probable cost of a ferry pier whatever be the site selected. The buildings will be of a temporary nature and pending the settle- ment of questions connected with the Joint Working Agreement no general offices need be built as the present construction office should meet all requirements for some time to come. It is proposed to accommodate the Stores in the old Cattle Depôt which fortunately has not been pulled down.

IX.--(a.).

Plant amounts to

The booked value of the Construction

Depreciation which has now been written off..

Anticipated sales, say of this

$506,565.61

200,912.00

$305,653.61

203,769.08

$101,884.53

Under X items 7 and 8 a sum of $913,922.87 is provided to meet Interest and Loss of Exchange and this has not been included in any of the previous Estimates.

X.-c.) A credit head showing the amount anticipated on sales for Stores now standing on books, less depreciation, has been opened and amounts to $150,000. Further credit on sales of buildings along the line to the extent of about $30,000 are anticipated but are not shown in the Estimate, as they may be required to meet cost of dismantling plant and transport and other minor matters in connection with the tunnels.

No alteration of allocations has been made, in arriving at the above Estimate, although the procedure followed hitherto, is not strictly in accordance with Railway Accounting. It is desirable however that an adjustment be made as soon after the Construct- tion Account is finally closed as possible in order that the various items of expenditure be charged off to their proper heads.

28th February, 1910.

E. S. LINDSEY, M.I.C.E.,

Chief Resident Engine r.

REPORT OF THE

RAILWAY MEDICAL OFFICER.

Staff.

Mr. Naidu has been stationed at North Face Camp, Beacon Hill Tunnel, throughout the year.

Dr. Chan Tsan Kun was Assistant Medical Officer at Taipo Kau until the 5th April, when he was transferred to the Bacteriological Institute in Hongkong and his place was taken by Mr. Lam Yun Hae who remained until the end of June when the post was abolished.

Mr. Kelly has superintended the Sanitary Work in the Camps along the line.

At each of the three Dispensaries, Kowloon Chai, Shatin and Taipo Kau, a Chinese dresser has been on duty day and night and from each Dispensary an Indian Foreman has made a daily round of coolie quarters on his section, issuing quinine, etc., to those in need and bringing in or reporting cases requiring medical attendance.

Quinine pills were issued daily to coolies whenever practicable during the months of June, July, August, September and October. As the population is such a shifting one, it was impossible to carry out the regular issuing of quinine with any degree of thorough-

ness.

9

Coolie lines and all drains were regularly cleansed with dis- infectant fluids throughout the year.

Camps are all supplied with Sanitary Dust Bins and Refuse has been burnt daily.

Pools of water which afforded harbour for mosquitoes and which for one reason or another could not be drained, have been regularly treated with kerosine oil.

The general health of the Railway employees has shown a steady improvement; there was a decrease in the number of entries from Malarial Fevers and Dysentry in spite of the fact that a much greater proportion of the sick men came forward for Western treat- ment than formerly.

There was an increase under the heading of "Injuries" but the cases were for most part, slight-very few being serious enough to necessitate hospital treatment.

Beri Beri still causes a fair amount of sickness and several deaths have occurred from this cause, some with remarkable rapidity.

In November four coolies died at Kowloon Chai on four succes- sive days, three of the deaths taking place in the same room.

The coolies had apparently been in fairly good health, at any rate they had been working as usual when they suddenly developed symptoms of acute Beri Beri and died shortly afterwards. Post mortem examination confirmed the diagnoses. The buildings in which these deaths occurred were promptly disinfected and closed, since when there have been no more deaths from Beri Beri at Kow- loon Chai.

The Camps at No. 5 Tunnel, Taipo, have shown distinct improvement since drainage and other prophylactic measures, which were made possible by the appointment of an extra Assistant Medical Officer at the end of last year, could be carried out with some degree of thoroughness.

Until the headings of Beacon Hill Tunnel met, allowing a free current of air through, there was considerable trouble caused by the irritating vapours given off from the gelatine used for blasting purposes. The vapours given off from a well and thoroughly detona- ted charge do not appear to do much damage but if for any reason part of the gelatine is lighted and burns slowly before detonation takes place, the fumes given off from the slowly burning part of the charge are exceedingly dangerous causing stupefaction very quickly and death is liable to result owing to fixed chemical compounds being formed in the blood, thus destroying its oxygen- carrying property.

On June 10th, a gang of coolies had to come through dense fumes on their way out of the Tunnel at Shatin. They all complained of feeling sick and dizzy and three of them died very shortly afterwards; the rest had completely recovered by the following morning.

The total number of cases seen at the three Dispensaries was 2,192 against 2,064 in 1908 and 3,667 in 1907. Of these the following were the principal causes :-----

7

Cases of Malaria,

Cases of

Malaria,

-Q 10

Tuunel No. 2.

Taipo.

1909.

1908. 1907.

South North

Face.

Face.

Malaria

140

113

197

450

556

1,168

Dysentery

10

11

Beri Beri

44

52

223

29

53

124

58

81

Injuries

264

260

608 354

371

The following table shows the monthly return of Malaria at all three Dispensaries and percentages to the number of coolies. employ, Leach month :

12 13 6

Co

01

January,

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Kowloon Chai,

11

3

6

19 16

Shatin,

11

12

13.30 33

Taipo,

14

13

9

18 11 16 19

232

33 18 19

9

13 10

7

تن

3

Total,..

28 21

2536 32 65 68

58 41 22 17

Percentage to cool-

ies employed,

0.9 07

1.1 0.6 0.9 0.8 2.1 1.5 1.6 1.1 0.6 0.6

The comparative percentages of Malaria at Beacon Hill Tunnel for the three years 1909, 1908 and 1907 are shown in the following table.

January,

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

1907,

1908

60

5

56 25

32 16 32

1 89

11

00

8

26 16 IN 21

59 48 59 166 185203117 85 62 65 59

2 13 2

55

51 33

31 25 11

6542

19 49 45

18 18 19

55

Percentage to total coolies,

1907.. 1.9 3.7 1.7 2.03 7.1 85

11 6.8 3.4 2.3 2.4 2.6

2.3 1.2 1.04 .6 1.2 2.8

2 11.1 1.5 1.3 .9

0.5

25 74 4 .5 .6 1.6 1.1 1.2 86 73 5

September.

October.

November.

December.

"

Q 11

During the year 54 cases were sent to hospital for treatment, a reduction of 50 per cent. in comparison with 1908.

The following table shows a list of cases for the three years 1909, 1908 and 1907 :-

1909.

1908.

1907.

Malaria

10

37

89

Dysentery

1

11

12

Beri Beri

8

16

0

Injuries

18

21

12

Cellulitis, Ulcers, etc.

3

7

12

Debility

3

3

3

Chest Diseases

2

4

6

Eye Diseases

1

2

Venereal Diseases

5

2

Alcoholisın...

Hepatitis

Snake bite

Quinsy

Leprosy

Plague

Adenitis

Lumbago

Pleurisy

Rheumatism

Total,

1

Ι

0

1

1

1

1

(

1

0

1

1

54

113

146

Thirty deaths took place on or near the Railway works, for the most part before aid could be summoned. As previously, many were old and decrepit individuals who wandered on to the Railway works in a very weak condition.

Dynamite explosions (misfiring) accounted for three deaths. The following shows the causes and number of deaths for the ast three years :-

Malaria

Beri Beri

Injuries

Dysentery

Debility

Pneumonia

Poisoning by Gelatine Fumes

Small Pox

Plague

Phthisis

Total,

1909.

1908.

1907.

14

14

13

1

3

2

1

1

0

1

1

3

SPOON NOOOO

5

7

6

2

30

44

22

One European was invalided from the Colony in December, the cause being Anæmia following successive attacks of Malaria.

J. W. HARTLEY, M.B., &C.,

Railway Medical Officer,

Kowloon, 1st February, 1910.

- Q 12

KOWLOON CAN-

(BRITISH

Main Head.

Sub-Head.

Estimate of

June, 1907.

Revised Estimate of 1909.

$ C.

c.

I.-Survey, II.-Land, III.---Formation,

Earthwork,

45,000.00 139,700.00 2,400,504.70

42,277.65- 1,195,879.20

2,268,176.05

(b) Tunnels,

2,203,415.00

3,499,824.69

IV.--Bridges,

(c) Roads,

(a) Major,

82,500.00

84,979.84

585,911.57

677,766.36

(b) Minor,

422,718.11

339,604.28

(c) Culverts,

68,882.00

65,243.86

V.-Fencing,...

(a) Boundaries,

31,813.00

39,999.45

(b) Signs,

396.00

400.00

V1.-Telegraph,

26,864.00

26,971.42

VII.-Track,.

(a) Ballast,

154,110.00

132,066.54

(b) Permanent Way.

747,032.00

732,192.71

VIII. Stations & Build- (a) Buildings,

223,396.25

449,998.47

ings.

() Machinery,

39,560.00

40,000.00

Furnitures,

3,410.00

5,000.00

(d) Workshops,..

60,000.00

IX.-Plant,

(a) Constructions,

234,067.00

234,000.10

(b) Loco., Tools & Plant,

50,000.00

(c) C. & W. Plant,.

10,000.00

(d) Engineering,

() Loco., Rolling Stock,

88,000.00

(f) C. & W. Rolling Stock,

309,540.00

X.-General Charges, (1) Salaries,

(3) Furnitures,

(5) Medical,

388,148.20

399,720.43

(a) | (2) Quarters & Offices,.

38,970.80

68,495.13

10,956.00

11,639.61

(4) Office Expenses,

13,068.00

32,710.93

20,020.00

22,319.46

(6) Home Charges,

123,200.00

74,478.29

(7) Interest,

(8) Exchange,

(b) Accounts,

42,843.53.

(e) Stores,

Anticipated Credit by Sales,

8,003,642.63 11,004,128.00-

The excess is mainly due to the inclusion of Interest and Loss of Exchange debit and credit adjustments of the other items amount to an excess of $453,444.79

Kowloon, 7th March, 1910.

TON RAILWAY.

SECTION.)

13

Further Revised, Variations be-

Estimate of

1910.

tween Estimates of 1909 & 1910.

Expenditure to 31st Dec., 1909.

Anticipated Expenditure to the end of Construction.

Grand Total.

$

?.

$ C.

$

('.

42,277.65 1,195,879.20 2,587,580.00 3,811,145.19

816,4 350,126.47 72,546.09 39.999.45

42,277.65

42,277.65

762,863.55

433,015.65

1,195,879.20

319,403.95

2,047,323.04

540,256.96

2,587,580.00

311,320.50

3,480,248.19

330,897.00

3,811,145.19

120,200.00

35,220.16

4,957.63

115,242.37

120,200.00

,495.41

138,729.05

648,816.92

167,678.49

816,495.41

10,522.19

321,793.12

28,333.35

350,126.47

7,302.23

68,721.56

3,824.53

72,516.09

996.45

39,003.00

39,999.45

400.00

100.00

400.00

30,032.17

3,060.75

19,807.47

10,224 70

30,032.17

132.066.54

40,093.10

91,973.44

132,066.54

732,192.71

524,985.83

207,206.88

732,192.71

310,000.00

139.998.47

58,647.01

251,352.99

310,000.00

40,000.00

40,000.00

40,000.00

5,000.00

5,000.00

5,000.00

60,000.00

60,000 00

60,000.00

101,884.53

132,115.57

505,048.23

403,163.70

101,881.53

50.000.00

50,000.00

50,000.00

10,000.00

10,000 00

10,000.00

88,000.00

88,000.00

88,000.00

309,540.00

2,350.00

307,190.00

309,540 00

399,720.43

337,605.63

62,114.80

399,720.43

68,495.13

67,691.76

803.37

68,495.13

11,639.61

10,981.03

658 58

11,639.61

32,710.93

27,893.26

4,817.67

32,710.93

22,319.46

20,484.70

1,834.76

22,319.46

124.478.29

50,000.00

89,633.22

34,845.07

124,478.29

713,922.67

713,922.67

251,625.09

462,297.58

713,922.67

200,000.00

200,000.00

63,229.01

136,770.99

200,000,00

42,843.53

29,128.27

13,715.26

42,843 53

190,297.50

190,297.50

150,000.00

150,000 00:

150,000.00

150,000.00

12,371,495.46

1,367,367.46

9,617.499.22

2,753,996.24 12,371,495.46

amounting to $913,922.67 which has not appeared hitherto in the Estimates. The which is explained under the various heads in the notes on the Estimate.

.