Administrative Reports - 1880

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1880

Table of Contents

1 Governor's Report on Blue Book

2 Revenue and Expenditure, With Comparative Statement for 1879 & 1880

3 Harbour Master's Annual Report

4 Post Office Annual Report

5 Report of Result of Examination on Grant-In-Aid Schools

6 Report of Superintendent, Botanical Gardens and Plantations

7 Police Annual Report and Returns

8 Annual Return of the Number of Cases Tried and Actions Commenced in the Supreme and Vice-Admiralty Courts

9 Annual Report on Government Education

10 Registrar General's Census Returns

11 Registrar General's Returns of Births and Deaths

12 Gaol Annual Report and Returns

13 Reports of Colonial Surgeon and Other Sanitary Papers

 




police,

courts

THE GOVERNOR'S REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK.

1. The Returns in the Blue Book are arranged under thirty three headings, of which the first seven relate to Finance. The others are concerned with Public Works, Legislation, Census, Education, Commerce, Shipping, and Industrial resources, Gaol and Criminal statistics, Benevolent and Religious institutions.

Finance.

2. A few weeks after I had assumed the Government of Hongkong, the finance returns of the preceding year (1876) were put before me by the Auditor General. The revenue was certified to be £184,405, and the expenditure, £187,569. The fact that the expenditure showed a disposition to run ahead of the revenue, was not owing to any want of care on the part of my predecessor, but to the circumstance that some of the monthly requisitions in the Survey Department, which the Governor had sanctioned, had been subsequently exceeded without previous authority. The attention of Heads of Departments having been called to the necessity of adhering to the Treasury Instructions, and the ordinary checks on the monthly expenditure having been applied, the annual expenses of Government have since then been kept well within the annual income. For the last three years, the revenue and expenditure have been as follows:-

Revenue.

Expenditure.

1878

£197,424

£189,692

1879

£200,853

£193,097

1880

£222,905

£197,502

The chief items of this revenue consist of the House taxes, the Government Opium monopoly, the Crown rents, Stamps, Postage, taxes on shipping, licences for the manufacture and sale of spirits, and various fees under the Emigration, Shipping and Registration Ordinances.

3. Sir Hercules Robinsou, in a despatch which was laid before the House of Commons in 1865, expressed the opinion that nearly ninety-eight per cent of this revenue was paid by the Chinese in- habitants of Hongkong. I am disposed to think Sir Hercules Robinson rather overrated the amount contributed by the Chinese. It is difficult to determine it with accuracy, but, as far as I can ascertain, the Chinese pay more than ninety per cent of the revenue: and the amount they give to the State is certainly increasing, in proportion, every year. It will, doubtless, before very long, reach the figure estimated by Sir Hercules Robinson.

4. The incidence of this taxation seems at first to be rather unfair, but in an Oriental community it would be difficult, if not impossible, to have it otherwise than it is. Whilst the largest item of revenue,--the house rates (£47,916), falls on householders alike, the second largest item,-that from the Opium farm (£42,708), falls on the Chinese only. The foreign built shipping, a considerable amount of which is now getting into the hands of Her Majesty's Chinese subjects in this Colony, pays the small tax of one cent per ton, whereas the Junks that assist in the commercial movement of Hong- kong pay fees for licences, anchorage passes and clearances which amount to nearly two cents a ton. As the emigration with which the Ordinances of the Colony deal is Chinese emigration, the fees in connexion with it fall ultimately on the Chinese.

5. On the other hand, the spirit licences, and some items under the Stamp Ordinance, probably fall, in proportion, more on the small European population than on the native community. But whatever may be the actual incidence of the taxation, it is, on the whole, lighter than the taxation in any other British Colony with which I am acquainted.

6. Hongkong is a free port. We have no income tax. We have no public debt. A moderate surplus (less than one year's income) is now invested in sound Colonial securities. In short, the foreign merchants of Hongkong have the advantage of carrying on their operations with greater freedom, financially and otherwise, as far as the action of the State is concerned, than merchants have, perhaps, in any other part of the world.

7. The increase of the Colonial revenue from £184,405 in 1876 to £222,905 in 1880, is not due to any increase in taxation, but to the general progress and prosperity of the Colony. The house taxes were twelve per cent on the annual valuation in 1876, when they contributed £38,439 to the revenue: they were still at twelve per cent in 1880, when they brought in £48,032 to the revenue. The Opium farm, which was worth to the State £27,500 a year in 1876, was subsequently sold for £42,708 a year.

8. Some returns recently compiled by the Government Valuators, account for this satisfactory increase of revenue without the imposition of additional taxation. The valuation of tenements in the Town of Victoria for the last ten years has been :—

1871

1872

1873

1874

1875

1876

1877

1878

$

1,784,435

1,770,207

1,798,349

1,805,644

1,781,946

1,773,848

1,820,478

1,847,817

1,982,048

1879

1880

2,156,109

From 1871 to 1876, the valuation appears not to have fluctuated much. Towards the end of 1877, the Chinese began to flock to the Colony in larger numbers, and since then they have been building more houses, and houses of a somewhat more expensive class, and buying houses from. Europeans. The consequent change in the value of house property in the last ten years in the whole Colony, the of by

revenue from house taxes, in 1871 and 1880, the rate haluators in the following return of the

twelve per cent in both years on the

valuation of houses in Victoria, and five per cent in the rural districts.

Comparative Return of Police, Lighting, Water, and Fire Brigade Rates collected from Europeans,

&c. and Chinese respectively, during the years 1871 and 1880.

Europeans, including natives of the United Kingdom and other European States; also Americans, Portuguese of the East, Parsees, Indians, and, in short, all non-Chinese, Chinese,

1871.

1880.

$

$ 89,054.69

119,772.71

65,549.41 141,502.62

185,322.12 230,557.31

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Pulife Works. inflict

9. In 1877, I found that the injury inflicted by the typhoon of 1874 on the Praya wall, or principal quay of Victoria Harbour, had not been repaired, owing to some necessary delays in getting the local plans revised by Sir John Coode. Under the advice of that eminent consulting engineer, the plans were modified so as to give the requisite strength to the Harbour frontage. This important work was begun in January 1878 and completed in November 1880, at a total cost of £52,160. The Piers will be finished, I hope, this year.

10. Exclusive of the foregoing expenditure, I authorized an outlay on Public Works:-

In 1878, of

£

In 1879, of

21,364. 23,380

11. The principal public works, in addition to the repairs of the Praya wall, on which this money was expended for the three years 1877, 1878, 1879, were:-

The repairs to public buildings, which amounted to

The improvement and maintenance of the water works

£

12,523.

14,656

The submarine cables across the harbour, and maintenance of telegraphs,

1,406

The drainage and sewage of the Town of Victoria.

12,873

The building of a new Hospital,

1,685

The building of two houses at the Peak as a sanitarium for the Government officers, The conversion of some of the large association wards in the Gaol into cells on the

separate system,

1,240

1,242

The making and maintenance of roads, streets and bridges,

15,273

and tree planting,

3,571

12. Of the new roads begun and completed within the last three years, one runs from the old Peak road at an elevation of 1,500 feet above the sea, and, passing along the northern face of the hills, winds through a part of the Peak region, where, of late, several villas have been built by European residents. This road and the branches to it cost £1,336. The much needed improvements made for the last two or three years in the streets in the Chinese quarter of the Town, cost £1,938.

Telegraphs.

13. The system of telegraphs in the Island of Hongkong was extended to British Kau-lung last year, by a submarine cable. Two years ago, another cable was run across from the main island to Green Island. All the Police stations in the Colony have thus been put in direct communication with the Central station in the town of Victoria.

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Typhoon Breakwater.

14. Sir Arthur Kennedy's despatch of the 14th October, 1874, showed that the typhoon of that year destroyed, in a few hours, a considerable number of the Junk population of this Colony. One of the reports he enclosed said :-

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"The losses sustained by Chinese Junks, as far as they could be ascertained, are,-sunk, and total "loss, 185 Junks; repairable, 455; but this does not by any means show the terrible havoc which the typhoon has made with this description of vessel. I have only been enabled to count vessels "stranded, and those sunk having their masts above water. Hundreds of smaller Junks and boats 'must have been driven out to sea, or gone down in the Harbour, of which nothing can ever be known."

15. Of the bodies of Chinese found drowned, and duly registered, there were 419 adult males, 152 adult females, and 141 children. The fact that many families reside permanently in these Junks, accounts for the deaths of the women and children. In forwarding those figures to the Colonial Secretary, the Registrar General reported that the Returns did not show the actual loss of life, which, he thought, might be roughly estimated at thrice that recorded. Two other members of the Executive Council estimated the loss of life amongst the Junk population of the Colony, as between four and five thousand. The probability is that all these people were drowned in about fifty minutes, when the force of the typhoon was at its maximum.

16. Soon after my arrival in Hongkong, my attention was drawn to the subject by some of the Chinese merchants who had presented Memorials in 1874 and 1875 to the Government, praying that steps might be taken to protect the boat population from similar calamities in future. I read Lord Carnarvon's despatch of the 18th November, 1874, describing the deep personal interest the Queen had manifested in the calamity of 1874; and, on enquiry, I ascertained that competent authorities were of opinion that it was possible to prevent this lamentable loss of life in future.

17. Seeing that the construction of breakwaters at certain points in the Harbour might save the lives of the floating population during a typhoon, I instructed the Public Works Department to prepare an estimate of the probable cost of such places of refuge.

18. From Admiral Watson, then the Commodore on this station, and Captain Bonham Bax of Her Majesty's Ship Sylvia, I received valuable suggestions as to the best sites for the breakwaters. Admiral Ryder also approved of the scheme, and gave me his best assistance in maturing it.

19. Some of the leading Chinese merchants, who were good enough to thank the Government for moving in the matter, assured me that they regarded the protection of the Junk population as being of such vital importance to the Colony, that they had contemplated raising a subscription amongst themselves to defray the cost of the necessary works.

20. Remembering, however, on the one hand, what a considerable sum the Treasury obtains from the Opium farm and other taxes, to which the Chinese contribute so largely, and, on the other hand, how essential this laborious Junk population is to the transit of goods and the ordinary commercial operations upon which the prosperity of Hongkong depends, I was of opinion that the breakwater should be built at the cost of the public. I submitted the plans and estimates to Her Majesty's Government in November 1877. Sir Michael Hicks-Beach authorized me to begin the work in 1878, but the Survey Department having avowed its inability to undertake any special work of this kind until the repairs of the Praya wall were finished, it was only this year that the work was taken in hand by the Acting Surveyor General.

21. The breakwater is now being constructed in Cause-way Bay, a part of the Harbour selected for the purpose by a joint Committee of Naval and Colonial Officers. It will cost about £16,000.

Education.

22. The reports for the last two years of the Acting Head Master of the Central School and of the Inspector of Schools, show some progress of late in education. The state of public instruction. in this Colony is not, however, what it should be..

23. No doubt, the important changes made in the Grant-in-aid scheme by Sir Michael Hicks-Beach have given very general satisfaction, and removed a grievance under which more than three-fourths of the Christian community suffered, and which, I found, had prevented the Roman Catholic Bishop,

the Church of England Colonial Chaplain, and the Lutheran Pastor of the German community, from accepting any share of the public money voted for education. The examinations under the Grant- in-aid scheme are held by independent Government examiners in specified subjects (not including religious subjects), but the word "secular" has now been struck out of the scheme, and, for the first time, every school in the Colony, whether religious or secular, can obtain a grant. At the same time, schools other than "elementary" were also admitted under the scheme.

24. The Grant-in-aid scheme is, however, only /schools, and by one or two small European schools. done much for the greater number of the community,

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availed of by the missionary bodies for their The Government scheme of education has not the Chinese.

25. In the early years of this Colony, successive Secretaries of State impressed on Sir Henry Pottinger, Sir John Davis, and other Governors, the primary duty of encouraging schools where the ✓ Chinese boys could learn English. Some of my predecessors recognized the national importance of this, and directed English to be taught in every school supported by the Government. For a short time this was done. But on my first inspection of the Government schools, I found that the teaching of English had been given up in all of them, with one exception. In the principal Government School, the Central School, which had been established for the special purpose of teaching English to the natives, I inspected two class rooms, containing one hundred and fifty boys, under three Chinese teachers, and I found that neither the teachers nor the pupils could speak a word of English. Soon after this, I requested the European Head Master of the school to examine all the pupils on the roll, and to report to the Government as to their capacity for speaking English. He reported that out of the 412 Chinese boys in attendance, 18 were able to speak English with considerable fluency, 58 spoke English with diffidence, and 336 could not be said to speak English at all.

26. Within the last few months, the first examination of this school by independent examiners was held, when they obtained results almost as unsatisfactory as those reported by the Head Master, Mr. Stewart, in 1878. They reported that "scarcely any of the Chinese boys produced in translation into English a single grammatical sentence."

27. The result of such an educational system is seen in many ways. During the four years of my administration, many trials have taken place in the Supreme Court, criminal trials and civil cases, both tried by juries, but though the majority of the prisoners tried are Chinese, and a considerable quantity of the property disposed of by the verdicts of juries is Chinese property,-nevertheless, I do not remember in the whole course of those four years to have seen a Chinaman on a jury. The Ordinance under which juries are summoned, provides that no man can sit on a jury who has not a knowledge of English. In the year 1877, an appointment was vacant in the Magistracy,-a clerkship, worth £200 per annum. For this clerkship a knowledge of English and Chinese was necessary, that is, translation from English into Chinese, and from Chinese into English. I gave that appointment by open competition. I secured the services of the Bishop of Victoria, of Mr. Charles May, who was at the head of the Magistracy, and of Mr. Ng Choy, as three independent examiners to conduct the examination for that appointment. Eleven boys presented themselves as candidates for the examination,-all Chinese youths, but the examiners reported that not one could pass the examination, and the reason they gave in their report was the want of power or experience in translating Chinese into English. Nearly all the candidates had been educated at the Central School, and three of them were Monitors. in the school.

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28. In a letter written by the Inspector of schools to the Colonial Secretary in April 1880, a passage occurs which, perhaps, accounts for the defective state of English teaching in the Colony. The fuspector writes:-"I heard it once stated by the Head Master of the Central School, in the. "of His Excellency the Governor, that there are foreign merchants in the Colony who, in the interest presence "of local foreign trade, desire that their Chinese clerks should not be taught any more English than is "required to enable them to copy an English letter readily and neatly, and who discourage, therefore,

any attempt to give Chinese youths a thorough command of the English language."

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29. Her Majesty's Government are, however, aware that within the last two or three years the practice of teaching English has been restored in the smaller Government schools; and, in course of time, I hope to render the Central School more useful in this respect.

Trade and Commerce.

30. For several years past, the trade of Hongkong has been steadily increasing. The Harbour Master states that the total number of all vessels entered and cleared in the year 1880 was 62,495, with a tonnage of 8,634,376.

31. A large fleet of Chinese owned steamers, and, since last year, the steamers of a Japanese Company, are now competing with the foreign ship-owners.

32. The German and American merchants, who at one time were displacing British traders, are now being displaced in turn, by the Anglo-Chinese merchants of Hongkong. The latter have become the chief means of sending British goods into China; and thus the native dealers and consu-

·

mers in China find themselves brought closer every day to the British manufacturers. Under the old system in Hongkong, there stood between the manufacturer in England and the consumer in China a number of more or less costly intermediaries. Whilst the area for the consumption of foreign goods in China has been extending, owing to the tranquillity of the country and the quiet development of its internal resources, the cost to the consumer of such goods has been declining, for many reasons, of which the increased number of Chinese merchants in this Colony is one, and hence the great increase in the general trade.

33. Even in the short time that I have been here, the business premises of some well-known European and American firms have been purchased by Chinese.

1881

Opium.

34. Last year, the number of chests of Opium brought to Hongkong from India was 87,747, the estimated value of which was $58,248,235. The greater part of this is taken to the Treaty ports in foreign steamers, some of it is carried coastwise in Junks, and a small quantity is prepared in the Colony for the Opium smokers.

35. The Hongkong Government gets, at present, $205,000 per annum from the Opium farm, which is practically levying an ad valorem tax on it of more than a hundred per cent to the consumer. 36. By the Opium smuggling from Hongkong into China, the Government of China loses, at least £250,000 of revenue per annum.

37. Three years ago, I reported to Her Majesty's Government that the Opium smugglers, who make this Colony the base of their operations, are a desperate class. I transmitted Police reports showing that they fit out here with the necessary armaments and proceed to do battle to the Chinese revenue cruisers within sight of the Colony. In these battles, sometimes revenue officers are killed and sometimes the smugglers. The latter will refit here or at Macao after a skirmish, purchase cannon and ammunition, and again attack the Chinese cruisers. A few months ago, wounded men of both sides were brought to our hospital.

38. In this way, Hongkong and Macao maintain a sort of Chronic Opium War with China, on a small scale.

39. I hope that some just scheme by which the Chinese Government may get their lawful revenue, will be soon carried into effect, for the existing system is injurious to legitimate trade, and endangers the friendly relations it is the true interest of this Colony to maintain with China.

Crime, Prison Discipline and Flogging.

40. In acknowledging the receipt of a despatch from my predecessor on certain matters of prison discipline, Lord Carnarvon instructed me, in June 1877, "to review the whole question of prison discipline in Hongkong, and to make such proposals as would place the system upon a sound "basis for the future." In doing this, I found that, in 1875, Sir Arthur Kennedy had appointed a Commission on the subject, in consequence of the large number of old offenders brought before the Magistrates; and in September 1876, he had reported to the Secretary of State that the returns for 1876 would show a "serious increase of crime in Hongkong." On visiting the gaol, I ascertained that the Chinese prisoners were kept in associated cells, that there was no attempt at a reformatory discipline, that the turnkeys and guards were not well suited for such posts, and that, for some years, an experiment had been tried in dealing with crime and criminals according to a systent unknown in any other part of the Empire. The history of this experiment is not without some general interest, and it explains, to some extent, the proposals I made, and which Her Majesty's Government have sanctioned.

41. The treatment of criminals in Hongkong had been carefully considered by one of the ablest of my predecessors,-Sir Hercules Robinson. He pointed out the defects, as to size and locality, of the old prison in the centre of the Town of Victoria. He recommended the building of a new prison on an island in the Harbour, on a site that admitted of extension and of large yards suitable for reformatory labour. He also recommended a definite system of remission of sentences according to a scale to be communicated to the prisoners. Lord Cardwell approved of the Governor's proposals.

42. In three years, a gaol was built on Stone Cutters' Island, and the conditions on which prisoners could earn the remission of a small part of the sentences were also sanctioned by Her Majesty's Government and duly notified to the prisoners. The new gaol was barely finished, when Sir Hercules Robinson was transferred to Ceylon, but the definite scale of remissions of sentences had been worked successfully from 1864 to the end of 1866.

43. In the Governor's Blue Book Report for 1866 (presented to Parliament in 1868), Sir Hercules Robinson's successor mentions that he took on himself, in October 1866, the responsibility of abandoning the new and extensive gaol just completed on Stone Cutters' Island. About the

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same time, he also modified the authorized scale of remissions of sentences, by directing that there should be no remissions unless the prisoners consented to be marked permanently on the lobe of the left ear and deported, and to this, in a few months, he added the further condition that they should be flogged if found again in the Colony.

4. Under this new system, five hundred and twenty-nine prisoners were branded, and one hundred and ten flogged, when Mr. May, the Police Magistrate, expressed the opinion that "there was "not any legal power by which branding could be inflicted, or for flogging branded men simply for "being within the Colony after deportation," and he requested that the opinion of the Attorney General might be taken on the subject. Sir Julian Pauncefote thereupon wrote:-"Since my return "to Hongkong in December 1868, I have heard of criminals being liberated upon certain conditions as "to Branding, Deportation and Flogging, but I never was consulted until now as to the legality of "these proceedings," and he concludes a clear and well-drawn opinion by stating that the proceedings in question were illegal.

45. This unauthorized branding and flogging was at once stopped by an Executive order, and a disposition was shown to return to Sir Hercules Robinson's system. Thereupon, some highly respectable and very influential European residents held an indignation meeting and memorialized the Government in favour of branding and flogging Chinese criminals instead of returning to Sir Hercules Robinson's system, which, they pointed out, would involve the cost of a new gaol, and was, in their opinion, unsuited to the Chinese race, a race that they conceived to be incorrigibly bad. They pointed out the economy in prison expenditure of branding and deporting the Chinese, and, if they returned, flogging and deporting them, and again flogging and deporting them if they came back, and so on ad infinitum, instead of feeding them in gaol and only liberating them on certain authorized conditions.

46. This led to the passing of Ordinance 4 of 1872, which is described in the statute book of Hongkong as "The Branding and Flogging Ordinance.

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47. der this Ordinance, a printed form was used," Return of Prisoners in Victoria Gaol, "Hong, who are eligible for remission of sentences in accordance with Ordinance 4 of 1872," the heading of one column being "Date of completion of half sentence and willing to be marked.” Sometimes this form was altered so as to provide for the branding and deportation of prisoners who had only served one-third of their sentences. Occasionally, prisoners have been deported who had served from one-fifth to one-tenth only of their sentences. Thus, legislative sanction was formally given to a system of remission of sentences entirely different from that established by Sir Hercules Robinson.

48. As the new system admitted of reducing the number of prisoners in the gaol at any moment, it also appeared to render his idea of a new gaol unnecessary.

49. I soon found that this experiment in the treatment of criminals had not been entirely successful, and that I could not comply with Lord Carnarvon's instructions, to submit proposals for placing the system of prison discipline on a sound basis in future,-if the experiment were to be continued.

50. I called for returns showing the real effect of the experiment on the criminal population.. I found that those returns justified a statement made in October 1872 by Mr. Douglas, the late Superintendent of the Hongkong Gaol, in a report on branding, to the effect that when a prisoner is deported with a gaol mark on his neck, which cannot be concealed, and not removed without mutilation, it prevents him from getting an honest livelihood in his own country, or being taken as an emigrant, so that such a man is tempted to become a pirate or a robber near the shores of this. Colony, upon which he is thus driven back. I sent to Lord Carnarvon a list of thirty-nine prisoners branded and deported on one day, a short time before my arrival, which showed that long-sentenced prisoners, short-sentenced prisoners, prisoners whose character in gaol was described as "very bad,' and those whose character was described as very good," had all been treated in the same way, and sent in a batch to the mainland of China when one-third of their sentences had been worked out.

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51. Sir Brooke Robertson, Her Majesty's Consul at Canton, told me that he thought the system was not quite fair to the Chinese Authorities nor to the Chinese villagers near Hongkong. The Chief Justice of Hongkong, in giving judgment in a case in which a Chinaman had been deported on an illegal warrant, publicly expressed the opinion that the system was hardly consistent with our Treaty with China, and that the Government of China might justly complain of it. On this latter point, the Governor who had started the experiment had officially recorded his opinion that "it suits "this Government very well, in a selfish point of view, to get all its criminals exported to other "countries."

52. But even taking, as the guardian of the peace and good order of the Colony, a purely selfish view of it, I felt unable to sanction the continuance of the system. A police report, from the frontier of British Kau-lung, that was. submitted to me in the ordinary course of official business, said:

"Numbers of deported criminals frequent this neighbourhood; on the 8th instant, fifteen men who "had been branded and banished from Hongkong, were counted in the streets of Chinese Kau-lung "and Sham-shui-pò."

53. On further enquiry, I ascertained that the places where these old offenders were seen were not a hundred yards from the boundary of the Colony, and on sending for the gentleman who was acting as the head of our Police Force, he assured me that the night robberies and the serious crimes that were causing alarm, had been committed by branded men, some of whom had been flogged and deported more than once. Some of them had committed felonies half a dozen times. Others were well known burglars. Others had been simply branded and deported as rogues and vagabonds, and thus rendered permanent outcasts.

54. Knowing the strong feeling that existed in certain quarters in favour of treating the Chinese with exceptional severity, I submitted the facts to the Legislative Council, so as to elicit a full expression of their opinions on the subject before I made any suggestions to Her Majesty's Govern- ment. In September 1877, in laying certain returns and papers before the Council, I quoted the opinion of the late Lord Derby, who, when Secretary of State for the Colonies, in refusing to sanction an application from Hongkong, in 1845, for the branding of the Chinese, had said :---

"An indelible mark impressed on the cheek of a criminal, even if unattended by pain, is yet "evidently objectionable as fastening on the delinquent a stigma from which he could never be rescued by any future course of good conduct. It would consign him to permanent infamy, and "would finally obstruct his return to virtue and his, admission into reputable society."

55. The returns and papers I printed for the information of the Council, showed but too clearly the soundness of Lord Derby's judgment, and the inconvenient consequences of turning out batches of criminals with indelible marks that tended to consign them to a life of permanent shame, and, by an act of the State, to render their reformation difficult, and sometimes impossible.

56. As to the alleged economy of the system, I found that some of these branded, flogged and repeatedly deported criminals had, by their night raids in the Colony, destroyed property, in a few months, to a greater amount than the whole cost of their maintenance in gaol would have been in ten years, had they been kept in prison under the rational system established by Sir Hercules Robinson and Lord Cardwell.

57. Furthermore, I ascertained, beyond all doubt, that the negation of prison discipline. the excessive use of the lush, and the illegal punishments that had become mixed up with this system, had created and fostered a criminal class in the Colony and the neighbourhood, instead of diminishing the number of criminals. In short, a system devised for the suppression of crime had increased crime.

58. Before, however, venturing to deal with what seemed to be blemishes in the penal legislation of Hongkong, I was able to make some changes in the Hongkong prison. As a temporary measure, until a new prison on a new site could be built, I ordered some of the large associated wards to be converted into separate cells. I was able to appoint a trained warder and a trained head turnkey, selected from the Convict Service in England, and to employ a few trusty Chinese Assistant Turnkeys instead of some unsatisfactory Europeans of a low class, who had been repeatedly fined for drunkenness and for beating prisoners.

59. With respect to this latter reform, which has undoubtedly tended to establish a better system of prison discipline, I take this opportunity of correcting a misconception into which the Daily News and some other London newspapers fell in referring to the despatches on Flogging in Hongkong, laid by Sir Michael Hicks-Beach before Parliament in 1879. Those journals dwelt on the selection of some trained warders from the English Convict Service, and the appointment of Chinese Turnkeys, who would know something of the language and habits of the prisoners, as reforms in Hongkong for which I deserved credit. But, in point of fact, the entire credit of those appointments is due to Lord Carnarvon. Having received a despatch from my predecessor describing the misconduct and incom- petence of the gaol subordinates, His Lordship, in writing to me, a few weeks after my arrival, said :—

"I would suggest, for your consideration, whether it would not be expedient to select two "trained warders from the Home Service at £150 each, to be on an equality with the Officer as present "styled Head Turnkey; to weed out from the present class of turnkeys the most unsatisfactory "members of the class, as occasion may justify their removal, to reduce the total number of the class, say "to six or eight, and to employ some trusty Chinese as Assistant Turnkeys, under strict European "supervision."

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I was, therefore, only the medium of carrying into effect the Secretary of State's suggestions.

60. The two warders selected in England, came from the staff of the convict prison at Chatham. One of them is now the Warden, with a salary of £255 a year; and he is competent to act as Deputy Superintendent. He has done good service in reforming the gaol discipline. But Lord Carnarvon's idea of having some Chinese turnkeys, has been one of the most interesting and useful reforms effected in the Hongkong prison.

61. That those reforms, and a few minor ones, have worked well, is mainly due, however, t

the fact that Mr. Tonnochy, the Superintendent of the gaol, is a thoroughly good Officer.

62. Four years ago, I drew Lord Carnarvon's attention to the excessive number of floggings in Hongkong, and to the undue severity, in some cases leading, in the opinion of the Colonial Surgeon, to loss of life, with which the lash had been applied. In a report dated July 1877, the Colonial Surgeon said:"I have noticed that in all floggings of Chinese with the cat that they "suffer, besides the external injury of the skin, more or less from congestion of the lungs afterwards, and in old cases where the floggings have been severe, irreparable injury has been done." In referring to some cases in a subsequent report, he said:"Mok-a-Kwai, released from gaol in a "dying condition, and Leung-a-Hoi, still in gaol suffering from Phthisis, were both when they entered "healthy, powerful, muscular men, presenting no indications whatever of hereditary disease. To what "then can the disease they were attacked with be attributed? I cannot myself regard it otherwise "than as caused by the punishment they had received; both of them were horribly marked, their backs "having sloughed from extensive bruising." Lord Carnarvon felt some difficulty in accepting the Colonial Surgeon's statements as to the injurious effect of flogging prisoners on the back, inasmuch as he was the medical officer who had, for years, certified that such floggings might be safely administered.

63. The Secretary of State, therefore, directed an inquiry by a Medical Board, of which the Colonial Surgeon should not be a member, to examine and report as to the truth or otherwise of a theory which, His Lordship thought, was one "of extreme importance, whether regarded from the

point of view of ordinary humanity, of medical science, or of penal discipline."

64. The Medical Board, which consisted of the Principal Naval Medical Officer on the station, and a local physician, reported that, unfortunately, no record had been kept, based on careful medical examination, of the condition of the prisoners prior to punishment, and that they could get no reliable statistics to guide them. In reply to this, the Colonial Surgeon remarked that had "he known or "foreseen what the effects of flogging would be, he would have taken more careful notes." The Board had, therefore, to rely mainly on what they saw themselves in the gaol in 1878.

Referring to the rattan that they saw used in the Hongkong Gaol, they said: "We consider the rattan too heavy a weapon (it is forty-seven inches in length and two inches in circumference), Hand its effects are very likely to go deep into the cellular and muscular tissues, probably producing "loss of substance by sloughing, and thus for a long time delaying the healing of the wounds." In describing the effects of some floggings they themselves witnessed in the gaol, they refer to a casa. where a secondary abscess formed over the hip joint," and to another in which they saw a prisoner receive 36 lashes on the 1st of March, with respect to whom they say they found, on the 14th of May, "the wounds not healed; sloughing from the evident loss of substance"; and on the last examination they made of this case, early in September, "the wounds then were not completely healed."

65. Whilst, therefore, unable to throw much light on the specific question of the physiological effect of flogging on the back, the Medical Board exposed the fact that the instrument, or, as they call it, the "weapon," generally used in the Hongkong Gaol had been too heavy and severe.

One piece of evidence, however, elicited by Lord Carnarvon's enquiry was interesting, and it explained a passage to be found in an Address to the Queen from the Chinese inhabitants of the Colony, in which they refer to the bal effect of flogging on the back. This was an extract from a Chinese work known as the Imperial Revision of T'ai-ping."

66. In this ancient work, which was personally revised by the Emperor T'ai-tsung, in A.D. 983, it is stated that an Emperor of the Tang dynasty, reading a medical book on the relation between "the five viscera and the back," said:"Our modern law books on the flogging with the bamboo say if the flogging is distributed over the hip and upper part of the back, death may unexpectedly "result therefrom, and naturally it must be so if people are flogged on the upper part of the back; "now, flogging with the bamboo is the lightest of the five punishments, whilst a question of life "and death is the most serious thing for man; how then can it be permitted in the case of the lightest "punishment, to incur the risk of causing death by flogging? From of old, the Emperors and Kings "have never thought of this; is this not deplorable?" "Thereupon he (T'ai-tsung of the Tang dynasty) "immediately issued an Ordinance forbidding to flog criminals on the upper part of the back.

67. Though the "modern" law books to which the Emperor alluded had been compiled more than a thousand years ago, yet I was not disposed to despise them on that account, more especially as the danger to life of flogging criminals on the back has been recognized by the practice of the Chinese Government for many centuries.

68. The papers relating to Flogging in Hongkong that were laid before Parliament in 1879,* give such full statistics and information, that I need only add, on the subject of flogging, that I stopped all public flogging and branding in 1877, and put a stop to flogging on the back, pending the decision of Her Majesty's Government. Year by year I was able to reduce the number of floggings, and it is now more than twelve months since any sentence of flogging has been carried out in Hongkong.

Papers relating to the Flogging of Prisoners in Hongkong. Presented to both Houses of Parliament, by command of Her Majesty, August 1879. London: Printed by Eyre & Spottiswoode, Printers to the Queen.

69. But, whilst the powers conferred on me by Her Majesty's Commission enabled me to do this, I did not feel justified in recommending at once a revision of the statute book of Hongkong.

70. A few years' experience however of the provisional measures I had adopted having shown that crime could be controlled and diminished without barbarous and unnecessary punishinents, by simply adhering to the well understood principles of prison discipline and of police administration, I recently submited my final recommendations on these questions to Her Majesty's Government. In doing so, I transmitted various returns and reports showing the diminution of crime for the last three or four years.

71. Amongst the reports was one from the experienced head of the Supreme Court, Chief Justice Sir John Smale, in which he said

"His Excellency the Governor has restored the rule according to which Sir Hercules Robinson "dealt with convicts.

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"In 1866, the Executive, in order to avoid the expenses of a second gaol, gave conditional "pardons, without reference to myself as Chief Justice, to hundreds of prisoners after having served "very short portions of their sentences, the condition being that they should leave the Colony, and "this practice was followed subsequently. Most of these men returned to the Colony, and to that "I attribute the formation of an enlarged criminal community, from which the Colony has never since "been freed. His Excellency the Governor, since about the end of a year after his arrival, re-established "the rule of Sir Hercules Robinson, and referred the cases to the Judges, as Sir Hercules Robinson "had done. Thus, mercy to those deserving of it has always been shown, whilst really dangerous "characters have been kept in prison. Thus, also, the Judges act on the assurance that the precise "sentence will be carried out, subject only to remission according to settled rules.

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Although by law the Supreme Court has long been enabled, by special provisions, adequately "to punish old offenders twice previously convicted, a practice prevailed at the Magistracy to deal with such offenders by repeated sentences of short terms of imprisonment. His Excellency the "Governor, however, being impressed with the entire uselessness of these proceedings, induced the Magistrates to send all such old offenders for trial in the Supreme Court. At first this raised the "number of prisoners for trial there greatly. The first monthly Calendar after the change raised the "number of prisoners for trial to, I believe, forty, but when the adequate punishment of old offenders became known, subsequent Calendars soon returned to the usual rate, and some of the worst "characters in the Colony were subject to long terms of imprisonment without any sensible increase "in the inmates of the gaol.

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"Flogging, as an additional punishment for crimes accompanied with violence, was introduced "by Ordinance immediately after Chief Justice Adams and I had gone home on sick leave. He and I had always opposed its introduction. I am bound to say that on my return, after trial for a year, "the universal satisfaction expressed at the result induced my reluctant acceptance of the system.

"I, however, was prepared to consider with very great earnestness the objections of His Excellency "the Governor to flogging in public, supported as he was by the highest authority at home. Flogging "being brutal and brutalizing, it appeared to me that flogging in private had both these characteristics, "whilst it was largely wanting in the deterrent element addressed to the eyes of the lowest brutes "in society, which, to me, had been its chief, if not its only recommendation. I rarely sentenced maen to be privately flogged, but I soon became convinced, as I now am, that although the Ordinance "might well remain unrepealed, it should be had recourse to only in very exceptional cases, and that, "with rare exceptions, flogging may be avoided altogether.

72. Some general interest may, perhaps, be felt in the experiment begun in 1866 and continued for ten years in this Colony in the treatment of criminals by branding, flogging and deportation: and the consequences of stopping it and of pursuing a different system for the last four years, may possibly throw some light on the special question now agitating Australia and the United States as to the alleged criminal character of the Chinese race.

73. What has occurred here shows that, though a criminal population may be manufactured, the Chinese are not naturally a criminal population. On the contrary, I regard the Chinese as the least criminally disposed race I have seen in any part of Her Majesty's Dominions. Perhaps this might be explained by the fact that no other race in the world combines so many of the qualities that are the rational antidotes to crime: industry, temperance, frugality, and filial affection.

74. Reviewing the whole question, I, therefore, felt justified in suggesting last year to Her Majesty's Government that the Branding Ordinances be repealed, that Public Flogging be abolished by law, that all laws in Hongkong which impose flogging on persons of the Chinese race exclusively be repealed, that all flogging be abolished except for such offences as entail flogging in England, and that flogging on the back be abolished by law.

75. The Earl of Kimberley has approved of those recommendations. The draft Ordinance for carrying them into effect has been sanctioned by Her Majesty's Government, and in a few weeks the objectionable part of the penal legislation of Hongkong will be expunged from the statute book.

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76. So far, therefore, the ground is cleared for placing the prison system of Hongkong on a sound basis. To do this, however, it will be necessary to build a new gaol on the separate system. The existing gaol is in the town of Victoria, surrounded by houses. It was built in 1863. It is unsuited to the wants of the Colony, and its structure is defective. Plans for re-building the gaol on Stone Cutters' Island, on the site selected, sixteen years ago, by Sir Hercules Robinson, have been prepared.

Piracy.

77. Piracy in the waters of South China has steadily declined, and may, indeed, be said to have almost ceased, as compared with the early days of the Colony. Her Majesty's Navy have done much to bring about this result, but the numerous Chinese gunboats in the neighbourhood, and the revenue cruisers of the Chinese Government, have contributed also to its suppression.

78. What Mr. Gutzlaff states in his life of Tao Kwang should not be forgotten,-that piracy was hardly known in South China when this Emperor was able to exercise full authority. The weakening of the native Government, consequent on the Opium War and other foreign wars, enabled piracy to spring up again. As the Chinese Government has regained strength, the traders have been protected and piracy has declined.

Police.

79. When Sir Arthur Kennedy assumed the Government of Hongkong in 1872, the Earl of Kimberley instructed him to take in hand at once, and endeavour to reform the Police Force, which had become utterly demoralized from various causes, such as the temporary establishment of the Gambling licence system. He lost no time in dealing with it vigorously and thoroughly. He found it necessary in one year to strike over one hundred men off the roll. He set his face against recruiting any of the European members of the force in Hongkong, having seen that discharged sailors, and men of that class, made very indifferent constables. He entered fully into the question of constituting a large contingent of the force of well-conducted Chinese.

80. Owing to the good offices of the Crown Agents for the Colonies, he was able to obtain from the United Kingdom a trusty and respectable body of men, and to establish a system by which the Crown Agents, from time to time, select recruits to fill the vacancies that occur. The local Govern- ment is much indebted to the Crown Agents for the care they have shown in selecting these men. His Chinese branch of the force was also chosen carefully, and it has turned out to be a valuable instrument in the detection and prevention of crime. The Sikh contingent lie likewise improved. The consequence was, that on succeeding Sir Arthur Kennedy, I found a Police Force of Europeans, Chinese and Sikhs in Hongkong superior in its personnel to any Police Force I had ever seen in Her Majesty's Colonies.

81. At present, the Police Force has a strength of 610 Officers and men, not counting 52 coolies. The 610 consist of-125 Europeans, 314 Chinese and 171 Sikhs.

82. The good condition in which I found this Force has been maintained by keeping in view the admirable lines laid down by Sir Arthur Kennedy. In 1878, I found it necessary to establish a two- thirds uight duty system, and in the following year, on the recommendation of a Committee of the Legislative Council, alterations were made in some details of administration. In 1878 and 1879, I substituted steam-launches for the comparatively slow row-boats of the water police, from which the quick native sampans so often escaped. These changes have all worked well.

Supreme Court.

83. Having observed in the records of the Supreme Court a few cases where Chinese had been sentenced to death who were subsequently pardoned on the ground that they were innocent, and that other miscarriages of justice had occurred, apparently from defective interpretation, I invited, in 1877, the Judges and members of the Bar to favour me with their views as to the interpretation in the Supreme Court. They agreed in describing it as deplorably bad. The Chief Interpreter was a Portuguese gentleman, who, in the words of the Chief Justice, "cannot interpret the written The others were language of China," and who "is unable to express himself in correct English."

Chinese, who received small salaries and did not know English very well. None of the Judges knew Chinese. Neither the Attorney General nor the Crown Solicitor nor any of the Bar, except Mr. Ng Choy (who was called in 1877), knew Chinese. The Registrar and Deputy Registrar and. the Sheriff were equally ignorant of the native language. The Juries were composed of foreigners who, in nineteen cases out of twenty, did not understand a word of Chinese. And yet, in the majority of the criminal cases, the prisoners and witnesses were Chinese who knew no English, and the bulk of the property disposed of by the Court in civil cases was Chinese.

84. To remedy this defective condition of affairs, I appointed a European gentleman, who had been born in Canton

England, as oral Interpreter to the Supreme Court. I also and educated in

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placed the Interpreters of the Police Court at the disposal of the Supreme Court, filled up all vacancies in the staff of Interpreters by strict competitive examinations, and applied to all other Officials the principle laid down by the Secretary of state (despatch No. 8 of 28 April, 1855), who considered a knowledge of the Chinese language as "essential generally for the "Civil Service at Hongkong," and who, accordingly, established the rule "that no application for increase of salary in the service is to be made for any person who has not learnt Chinese."

85. The proper translation of documentary evidence, and a general supervision of the staff of interpreters, has also been secured.

86. The present Acting Chief Justice informs me that these changes have put the interpretation of the Court on a sound basis.

87. Some changes in the department of the Supreme Court that deals with public money were also rendered necessary. The year after my arrival, it was discovered that the Deputy Registrar had given no security as Official Assignee (to which he had been appointed in 1867), and, being called upon to give security, and to produce the accounts in the long unsettled bankruptcy case of Lyall, Still & Co., he fled to Macao, when it was found that he had misappropriated about £12,700. Having been given up by the Portuguese Government, he was convicted in Hongkong and sentenced to seven years' penal servitude.

88. As the defalcations had gone on for twelve or fourteen years, and affected many local interests, as well as the reputation of the Public Service, I felt it necessary to constitute a Commission of Enquiry into all the Offices of the Supreme Court that were concerned in the receipt of money and the manage- ment of trust property. The Commission I appointed consisted of the Colonial Secretary and Auditor, the Attorney General, the Manager of one of our principal banks, and a solicitor.

$9. The Commissioners having taken evidence, reported to the Government that estates that should have been wound up ten years before were found by them unsettled; that the cash accounts in thirty-one estates in bankruptcy had never been balanced; that in many instances, the balances to the credit of the different estates had disappeared; that there had been illegal commissions, fees and interest charged or misappropriated by former Registrars. Finally, they said: "It is very clear "that there has been no check whatever upon any Officer, but a most lax practice has existed for years past in the Supreme Court with regard to the accounts and the general conduct of business."

90. Having consulted the Judges with respect to this report and the various recommendations of the Commissioners, I appointed a Court Accountant, requested the Auditor General to make an audit of the accounts every month, directed the Court fees to be paid in future by stamps, and made some minor changes in the subordinate Offices of the Court.

91. It is due to the Judges of the Court to record the fact that, for many years, the Registrar's department of the Court had not been efficiently filled, and that they had more than once requested the Auditor General to examine the accounts of the Court. The changes I was thus able to make on the advice of the Judges, will tend to prevent delays and defalcations in future, but the want of a competent Registrar is still felt.

Sanitation and Public Health.

92. The experiments at sanitation in this Colony are not without interest. The Town of Victoria (containing 100,000 inhabitants) is built on the lower slope of a hill, the top of which is about eighteen hundred feet above the Harbour. Dr. Hance, the eminent botanist, tells me that when the Colony was established forty years ago, the ravines behind the site of the present town were well filled with indigenous trees. As the ground was being opened up to make streets, a good deal of fever prevailed. Some of the doctors attributed the difficulty in curing the fever to the existence of the trees. The trees were accordingly cut down. But with the removal of the trees, the fever appeared to increase.

93. A sanitarium was built on the Peak, seventeen hundred feet above the sea. But when the doctor who recommended it went away, his successors condemned it, and the sanitarium was for some years abandoned.

94. Governor Sir Richard MacDonnell, who had some experience of the difference of residing at a high and low level on the Coast of Africa, tried the sanitarium on the Peak again, and with complete success. The Governor's example has since been followed by European merchants, and Officials who can afford to build villas amongst the hills. On the European children, especially, the good effect of the change from the hot, stagnant atmosphere of Victoria Harbour to the fresh breezes of the Peak in the summer, is very marked.

95. Of late years, the medical dictum about the fever-producing quality of trees has also been reversed, and the sanitary advantages of tree planting established.

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96. The Ordinance No. 8 of 1856, "An Ordinance for Buildings and Nuisances," gives the local Government complete control over the construction of all buildings in the Colony. This law contains a series of minute and stringent rules, with adequate penalties, framed to prevent the construction of any houses that are not built on what was then supposed to be the best sanitary principles. The Ordinance was evidently copied almost entirely from certain Sanitary and Building Acts in force, at that time, in England. I cannot find that the Chinese householders were in any way consulted on the subject when it was being framed and passed; and the result is, that some of its provisions are entirely unsuited to this Colony, and would do more harm than good if enforced. Amongst other things, Clause VIII provides that it shall not be lawful to construct or re-construct any house without a sufficient water-closet or privy. (This is copied from an English Act, but the system of water-closets and house privies is a system quite out of place in a tropical Colony, and not in accordance with the customs of the Chinese people.).

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97. The Chinese house-bucket system, especially when combined with the dry earth system (which, in various ways more or less perfect, they have practized for centuries), is far better than a system of water-closets and house privies. The Chinese inhabitants maintain that the attempts now and then made by successive Surveyor Generals and Colonial Surgeons to force what is called "Western Sanitary Science" upon them, are not based on sound principles. As I stated in the Legislative Council in November 1878, in a discussion in which I referred to Ordinance 8 of 1856, the leading Chinese residents had said to me:"Nothing alarms us more than the Government "projects of drainage and water supply for flushing house sewage. They are not consistent with "our mode of living.'

98. On that occasion, I quoted the views of one of the most experienced medical men in China, Dr. Dudgeon of Pekin, in support of the Chinese house-bucket system as opposed to the underground drainage system, whether connected with water-closets or house privies. In his work on "The Diseases of China contrasted with those of Europe," he says:-

Much that is recommended at home in the way of ventilation, water supply, and disinfection of privies is rendered in China unnecessary. All the advantages claimed for the dry earth system ard gained here free of expense to the individual or public. The industrious and frugal habits of the Chiliese, and even their very poverty, thus work to their advantage (all sanitary measures inore than repay their cost), for it compels them to utilise all excrementitious matter. Every particle of every kind of manure, besides rags, paper, etc., are collected and preserved with the greatest car The private privies, which are all out of doors, are visited daily by these manure collectors, and so great is the demand for it, that no payment is made to these scavengers. Foreigners pay a trifle monthly to guarantee respectability, cleanliness, and regularity on the part of the collector. The "healthiness of our foreign settlements in China is, in a great measure, owing to the absence of water-closets in the dwelling-houses, which, in Europe, are a fruitful source of disease. Guses, such: as sulphuretted and carburetted hydrogen, are not so injurious to health when given off in the open "air, as when escaping from sewers. China is, par excellence, the country of bad smells, and yet, as

we have seen, the people do not seem to suffer from them.

"The removal of excreta and the disposal of sewer water is the sanitary problem of the day in "Great Britain. There the sewers allow transference of gases and organic molecules from house to house and place to place; occasionally, by bursting, leakage, or absorption, the ground is contaminated, "and the water supply is constantly in danger of being poisoned and contaminated; and all these dangers are greater from being concealed and being beyond individual control. Fevers and cholera "are thus possibly propagated from house to house. In China we are entirely free from this danger.'

99. With the best possible intentions, some of my medical and sanitary Officers have, from time to time, been arguing against Dr. Dudgeon's views and the long established practice of the Chinese cominunity. Those Officials advocate au underground net work of drains and sewers in Hongkong, and of compelling the Chinese to build their houses and to modify their domestic arrangements in accordance with "the methods of Western Sanitary Science." I have pointed out to them that the methods of Western Sanitary Science of a few years ago, which they are so fond of quoting, are no longer considered infallible; and that some Public Health Officers in England seem even disposed to take a lesson now from the experience of China and to adopt views similar to those of Dr. Dudgeon. I have reminded them that the only fatal cases of typhoid fever that occurred in Hongkong since my arrival, have been in European built houses with water-closets; and that the Chinese residents do not appear to suffer from typhoid fever or diptheria.

100. In the tabular statements appended to the Colonial Surgeon's reports for 1877, 1878 and 1879, the total number of cases of typhoid fever amounts to 8, all being Europeans. Other forms of sickness arising from sewer gas, defective water-closets, or privies in the European style, appear also to be confined mainly to the Europeans.

101. Instructions were given by the Secretary of State, in 1867, to have the dry earth system of conservancy carried out in the gaol and other Government establishments. The local medical authorities did not, however, approve of the system. Nine years after the instructions from Downing

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Street had been duly recorded, a Committee appointed by my predecessor called his attention to the vitiated state of the air and the stench in the Hongkong Gaol, and on further enquiry, I ascertained that the dry earth system was not in use, that every morning night-soil was emptied down a drain in the middle of the gaol yard.

102. As the gaol stands on the slope of a hill in the middle of the Town, I was not surprised to learn that the residents in some of the streets between the gaol and the Harbour had the same com- plaint to make as the Gaol Committee of 1876.

103. An enquiry ordered in July 1877, also exposed the fact that the majority of the European houses built on the drainage valley of the reservoir that supplied the town with drinking water, had no proper sanitary system, and that the upper sources of the water supply were constantly polluted.

104. No real difficulty was, however, experienced in getting the instructions of the Secretary of State enforced, and in 1878 a Medical Committee, consisting of the Principal Naval Officer on the station and a leading civil practitioner sent me a report, in which they said: "The sanitary arrange- "ments of the gaol are good; the dry earth system recently introduced works well."

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105. Whatever the cause may be, the public health of the Colony has undoubtedly improved of late years. Whilst some of the provisions of Ordinance 8 of 1856 may not have done much good, other parts of that Ordinance have been enforced with advantage to the public.

106. As an illustration of this, I may mention that an application came before me in January 1879 from a firm of European Architects, suggesting that I should allow certain houses which were to be built for a Chinese Bank and a Goldsmith's Shop to be constructed without kitchens or cooking places. As I usually do in such matters, I desired to see the opinions of the leading Chinese on the question before I finally decided it; and I venture to draw Your Lordship's attention to the sensible views these gentlemen expressed:

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They are of opinion that in Section VIII of Ordinance 8 of 1856 we have a very good and "useful rule, viz., that in all buildings which are used or liable to be used, either partly or entirely, as "dwelling houses, there should be safe cooking places. With reference to the arguments adduced "in Messrs. Wilson and Salway's letter, they are of opinion that, although the owner of the premises may wish his tenants or employés to obtain their food from cook-shops, there is no certainty that they would always do so. On the contrary, they are of opinion that the employés on the premises "would be certain to boil, at any rate, their tea on the premises, and boil water every evening for bathing, "the consequence of which would be that the smoke would become a nuisance to the other tenants, "and that the lighting of fires in unsafe places would endanger the whole house and the surrounding "houses too."

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107. The statement of the native merchants that the Chinese tenants and employés would have to boil water every evening for bathing purposes, would not surprise any one really acquainted with the habits of even the poorest Chinese. No doubt, certain Europeans in Hongkong, as well as in California and Australia, denounce the Chinese as a dirty race, who never bathe; but the fact is that, in this important sanitary practice, they are a clean people, and, even in the lower classes, set a good example, which our soldiers and sailors here would do well to follow.

108. Dr. Stout, of the State Board of Health of San Francisco, and one of the oldest physicians in California, refers to this in his evidence laid three years ago before Congress. he lived in the midst of the Chinese quarter, to which, no doubt, many of the residents had come from Having stated that Hongkong, he was asked:-

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'Question. During your residence there have you known of any disease, any pestilence, origi- nating and spreading in there, or spreading from there?-Answer. No, sir; none.

Q. The Chinese live in that quarter very closely, do they not?-A. Quite closely, sometimes. "Q. How is it that you account for the fact, that under these circumstances they are apparently so healthy?—A. Their frugal life gives them more immunity from disease. They eat only what is necessary to live upon. They eat to live and do not live to eat. They are clean in their habits, and they drink no whisky. I have never seen a drunken Chinaman in my life. They consequently "obtain a better resisting power to the attack of disease.

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"Q. What is their habit in regard to ablutions?-A. They constantly wash themselves.

"Q. The whole person, or only the face and hands?A. My observation of the men is that they keep themselves clean.. Their clothes are clean. As mechanics or workmen they keep themselves very clean.

"Q. What is the comparative mortality among the Chinese and the whites of this city-the death- "rate?-A: The death-rate is greater among the whites than among the Chinese.

"Q. What is the comparative mortality among adult Chinamen and adult white people?→A. "The amount is greater with adult white people.

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Q. Have they had epidemics in the Chinese quarter?-A. No, sir. The small-pox has been among "them, as it has been among others, but I think there has been less small-pox among them-I mean the "ratio of population allowed-than with the whites."

Vaccination.

109. On recently calling the attention of the Health Officer of Hongkong, Dr. Adams, to this evidence, he remarked that it agreed with his own experience, and that he was often surprised to see how very generally the Chinese passengers who came under his notice as Medical Emigration Officer, had been vaccinated or inoculated. He said he had rarely seen a Chinese child on whose arın could not be detected three or four of the characteristic marks of vaccination.

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110. It is quite possible that the comparative freedom of the Chinese in San Francisco from small- pox, to which Dr. Stout refers, may, to some extent, be due to the enlightened action of the Directors of the largest hospital in Hongkong,-the Tung-wá Hospital. The Medical Staff of the Government does not do very much in the way of vaccination, so far as the great mass of the community is concerned. But certain Chinese doctors, who are paid by the Directors of the Tung-wá Hospital, are indefatigable vaccinators. They do not confine their labours to the town of Victoria, but travel through the villages of the Island, vaccinating all newly born children. Since 1878, they have gone beyond the Colony and vaccinated in the neighbouring towns and villages of the Kwangtung Province.

111. When it is remembered that Hongkong is constantly being visited by steamers and ships from places where small-pox exists, and that the rapid commercial movement in the Harbour renders the Colony peculiarly liable to the introduction of the disease, there can be little doubt that the inmunity we have enjoyed for some years past has been largely due to the efficient vaccination conducted under the auspices of the Tung-wá Hospital.

112. The Directors are now building a special small-pox hospital to the south of the Tung-wá Hospital. All the expenses of this new building, as well as the salaries of the travelling vaccinators, are defrayed by the voluntary subscriptions of the Chinese community of Hongkong. This is ex- clusive of the annual subscriptions, amounting to about $7,000, they provide amongst themselves in aid of the endowment funds of the Tung-wá Hospital.

113. Dr. Stout's statements as to the healthiness of the Chinese in San Francisco, though living so closely packed, may tend to explain a discrepancy between the contradictory assertions made occas sionally by some leading Europeans in this Colony, including even one or two Officials, and the annual reports made at the same time, for the information of Parliament, by my predecessor.

114. In Sir Arthur Kennedy's Blue Book report dated 10th September, 1874, he said :-" The "general health of the Colony has been satisfactory." Mr. Administrator Austin, in the Blue Book report of June the 14th, 1875, said:"The health of the Colony is very satisfactory." Sir Arthur Kennedy, in his last annual report (24th August, 1876), said:" The general health of the Colony has been good.... The health of the whole community has improved." Since those authentic reports were made, the annual death rate of the Colony has declined year by year, the general health of the whole community has continued to improve, and the Registrar General's returns for the current year show the lowest death rate hitherto recorded in Hongkong.

115. Nevertheless, during those very years, 1874, 1875 and 1876, complaints were made of the alarming consequences to the public health from the influx of Chinese into the Colony, and the way they were living so closely packed. One of the principal European merchants, who had obtained some reports (of the years 1874 and 1875) of two Government Officials in support of his views, gravely urged me to pull down a considerable number of Chinese houses and put a stop to any more Chinese coming here, on the ground that their overcrowding and mode of life endangered the health of the Europeans. I was able to point out that, whilst the reports in question foretold immediate outbreaks of typhoid fever, cholera and small-pox amongst this increasing Chinese community, Sir Arthur Kennedy and Mr. Austin had carefully tested those assertions and found them entirely inconsistent with the annual statistics of sickness and mortality.

Chinese Graves.

116. 116. On sanitary grounds, also, I was asked, in 1877, to take a step, which would have done more, perhaps, than anything else to stop the influx of the Chinese.

117. I was told that three days before my arrival in the Colony, and in the interregnum after Sir Arthur Kennedy had left, one of the Government Officials had submitted certain rules respecting Chinese burials and graves, which were about to be carried into effect, and as it was thought prudent to have a sufficient force ready in case of resistance, it was suggested that the Police might be sup- ported, if necessary, by some troops.

118. On calling for the rules, I found that they had been devised apparently for sanitary purposes only; but, with some little knowledge I had gained of the Chinese in Labuan, I could not avoid seeing that the rules did not show much respect for the customs or prejudices of the natives on the

subject of graves. The Head of the Department that desired to enforce the rules had submitted an official minute to the local Government on the 21st of February, 1876, in which he said:" With due “deference I am of opinion that the sensibility of the Natives in regard to the graves of their dead has "been immensely exaggerated by historians.' The same officer had recorded his opinion that rever- ence for the dead was not a national trait of the Chinese.

119. The rules had been drawn up by this gentleman and two other European officials, but the Chinese community had not been consulted, and knew nothing of the sweeping reform that was impending./

120. Having requested the Colonial Secretary to invite ten or a dozen of the Chinese residents that he considered to be the most intelligent and respectable to a conference on the subject, I found that the proposed sanitary rules would be far from agreeable to them.

121. Mr. Chun-A-yin, who spoke on behalf of the others, assured me that if the rules were enforced, many well-to-do Chinese would leave the Colony and settle elsewhere. He said, that though some of the rules were inconsistent with the practices of their religion, there would be no outbreak or outrage, as had occurred some years before at Macao when Governor Amaral did something of a similar kind,- and that there would be no necessity for appealing to force, as they would simply go away. Amongst other objectionable rules, he pointed to rule 3: Single graves shall not be more than six feet long "by two feet wide or less than five feet deep."

((

122. That a grave should be at least five feet deep, Mr. Chun-A-yin and the other Chinese thought a very good provision, and one of them pointed out that it was already the law of the Colony; but that a special rule should be made to compel the Chinese inhabitants only to have graves not more than six feet long and two feet wide, they said, would render it impossible to bury Chinese in single graves in the Colony, as those graves are, according to Chinese customi, much larger and broader Than such a rule would allow. They said there were Chinamen in Hongkong more than six feet high; and that Chinese coffins, which are constructed according to certain prescribed regulations, for which the people have great veneration, are much longer and broader than the coffins in use in Western nations, and that their coffins could not fit into a grave only six feet long and two feet wide. 123. An ordinary Chinese coffin measures six feet six inches in length, and at the head, it is two feet seven inches wide. The coffin of a Chinese gentleman who has received a button or decoration (such as some of the Chinese merchants in this Colong have), is enclosed in a case measuring seven feet nine inches in length, and at the head, three feet three inches in width. Even. the coffin of a pauper measures over six feet in length.

124. In further conferences with these native gentlemen, they clearly explained how all the sanitary arrangements the Government might require could be secured without offending their religious customs or turning them out of the Colony.

125. In putting my veto upon the proposed rules, I requested that no Government regulations for dealing with the Chinese should be framed in furare without giving the leading Chinese residents an opportunity of knowing what was proposed to be done.

Tree planting.

126. Sir Michael Hicks-Beach pressed upon my consideration the subject of the preservation and re-establishment of forests as one of great and increasing importance, in which the health and prosperity. of the Colony were deeply concerned.

127. Small as my experience of Her Majesty's Colonies had been, I had long felt that there was a general tendency to under-estimate the necessity of tree planting, and that even in Colonies with apparently the most limited scope in this respect, something ought to be done.

128. Accordingly, in the summer of 1877, I advised the Officer then in temporary charge of the plantations that, on sanitary and other grounds, the operation of the so-called Forest Department should be extended. In reply to my enquiries on the subject, he had informed me that the waste lands of the Colony capable of being wooded, comprised about ten thousand acres, and the average number of seedling trees planted per annum was about 15,000. In his report of August 1877, he said:"If our planting operations were continued at their present tortoise speed, viz., at the rate of "15,000 trees a year, it would take us eleven hundred years to complete the job."

129. In laying this report before the Legislative Council in November 1877, I expressed the opinion that the time had come when the Colony should deal in a more comprehensive manner with the question of tree planting; that with an adequate annual vote for forming nurseries for seedlings and paying a regularly organized staff of tree planters, we should be able in a few years to transform the appearance of the Colony and permanently improve its sanitary condition. The Legislative Council not only sanctioned an immediate vote of $2,000, but, having watched its beneficial effect, they have allowed me to increase it from year to year, and they have now agreed to an expenditure of $10,000 a year on tree planting, instead of an annual expenditure of about $700, which had been, allowed up to 1877.

130. That afforestation has been taken thoroughly in hand, is seen from Mr. Ford's recent reports. Instead of planting out 15,000 trees per annum, he has planted 781,986 this year.

131. With the co-operation of the Chinese farmers in Hongkong, to which the Superintendent refers in his report, it will, I trust, be possible to plant for the future a million of trees per annum. If we can proceed at that rate, it will only take ten years to fairly plant the Island..

::

132. I have not confined the planting to the native pine tree, the Pinus sinensis, only. Bamboos are planted in ravines, as well as on the steepest hills and hill tops, and the Banyan tree along the road sides. Some of the latter that have been transplanted this year to the roads leading from each end of the town, have been successfully moved considerable distances, though with trunks from 4 to 7 feet in girth.

133. The success with which this fine shade-giving tree can be transplanted, even when thirty feet high, makes it possible to transform glaring roads into green avenues with a rapidity that would surprise arboriculturists in Europe. The nurseries contain seedlings of indigenous oaks, casuarinas, and other hardy and valuable timber trees.

134. Three years ago, about a thousand cocoa-nut palms were planted on Stone Cutters' Island, at Bowrington, and close to the village of Aberdeen, and some are now being planted along the sea- beach to the east of the town of Victoria. These trees will be ornamental, though, at this latitude, they do not bear ripe nuts.

.

135. On the important sanitary question of cultivating the Eucalyptus in Hongkong, it that only four hundred seedlings of the Eucalyptus Globulosa had been planted in the Colony, and appears that of these but one hundred survived up to 1879. The necessary steps were then taken for getting four thousand seedlings of another species of Eucalyptus which grows in a climate resembling that of Hongkong, and this number will be increased year by year.

Chinese and Irish Famine Funds.

136. Within the last few years, I had to make two appeals to the community to relieve national dis- tress. In both cases, the well-known munificence of the European merchants of Hongkong was and in each case the benevolence of Her Majesty's Chinese subjects was also manifested. The sub- shown, scriptions in this small Colony for the Chinese Famine Fund amounted to $120,000. Of this sum, the Europeans contributed $12,000, and the Chinese $108,000. For the Irish Famine Fund, the Chinese also contributed more than half the sun collected, and the largest individual subscribers were Chinese. One Chinese gentleman gave $2,000, another $1,500, and several gave from $100 to $500.

137. The Relief Committee was able to send Her Grace the Duchess of Marlborough £4,359, Mr. Gray, M.P., Lord Mayor of Dublin, £2,000, and Mr. Kennedy, Mayor of Cork, £1,000. the population of the Colony and the annual revenue with the population and revenue of other Colonies, Comparing the proportion contributed by Hongkong is relatively greater than the contributions sent to Ireland from any other Colony. Applying the same test,-population and public revenue, the seven thousand pounds sent from this small island constituted a larger contribution, comparatively speaking, than the sum raised by the Lord Mayor of London, or all the generous contributions from the United States.

Ecclesiastical and Religious.

4

138. The number of ecclesiastics and of religious institutions in Hongkong seems to be out of all proportion to the size and population of the Colony. At one time last year there were five bishops here, and the number of priests and ministers of the various Christian denominations is extraordinary. At the Te Deum on the Queen's Birthday, I have seen an altar crowded with Italian, French, Spanish. and Chinese priests. This large religious element has done good to the Colony in various ways. St. Paul's College, which is under the control of the Bishop of Victoria, has been of great benefit to the Church of England community, and it was also distinguished at one time for the thoroughly sound education in English it gave to some Chinese youths. At present, it is very useful in providing a good school for the children of the upper and middle classes of European Protestants.

139. The German Foundling Hospital and the fralian and French Convents are benevolent institutions deserving of the highest praise. But the religious life of Hongkong is essentially missionary. 140. In fact, Hongkong is one of the most important centres of missionary work in the world. One ecclesiastic here acts as the business agent of eighteen missionary bishops in China and Japan. Putting aside the undoubted benefits conferred on local education, on local Christian charities, and on the tone of society, by the presence here of those missions, I cannot confirm what has been more than once recorded in the Blue Book reports that have been printed for the information of Parliament, namely, that this: Colony is producing a beneficial effect on the Heathen population of the great Empire of China, and "leavening the surrounding mass of ignorance and superstition." On the contrary, for many years past, Christianity has been declining in China; and, at this moment, the total number of Christians is considerably less than the number that existed in the last century.

141. Writing from a spot where I have exceptional opportunities of knowing the facts, I must not conceal from Her Majesty's Government that this decline of Christianity is due, not to a want of zeal on the part of the Christian missionaries themselves, but rather to the conditions under which they are willing to work.

142. They proceed from this Colony into China supported by treaties, Consuls and, if need be, gunboats. The Chinese associate them with a system to which, whether rightly or wrongly, they object very much, the system of foreign intervention. A Chinese statesman who was visiting me, said:"The missionary enterprises that have their head-quarters under your Government, would "be treated by us with the same friendly toleration that we accord to the Tauists and the Buddhists, "but for their constant appeals to what they call treaty rights. But those treaty rights, though "framed by the late Emperor of the French and by the illustrious Lord Palmerston in the interests "of true Christianity only, and not for any political object whatever, do not appear to us Chinese to แ be as elevated above worldly considerations as their religiously minded authors doubtless intended, "and the consequence is that Christianity is making no way; is, indeed, declining visibly."

143. There are other causes also in operation in the social and commercial life of Hongkong that cannot have a very beneficial effect on the Heathen population near us. In explaining why he did not send a son to be trained in Hongkong, one of the Canton merchants of the old Hongs said to me,-- "Your Western progress, which makes children so independent of their parents, and substitutes suit you, but "individual and youthful energy for family ties and the influence of grey hairs, may

we do not like it. Your commercial laws, by which a trader can get rid of his debts without paying "them, are strange to us. We prefer the antiquated system by which debts must be paid in full; if "not by the debtor himself, by his children or grand-children, or other descendants."

CX

:

144. My opinion was recently asked by Her Majesty's Government as to the expediency of discontinuing the ecclesiastical grants which are paid to the Colonial Chaplain and Sexton of the Church of England. I have reported in favour of maintaining them.

145. A certain number of the Government Officials are members of the Church of England, and, no doubt, they accepted office expecting to receive gratuitous religious ministrations.

146. Though the wealthiest and most numerous class of ratepayers-the Chinese-get no benefit from the Colonial Chaplain, they have not the slightest objection to see his salary on the Estimates. The few Chinese who trouble themselves about such matters, say that this is a Crown Colony, that Her Majesty is the Head of the Church of England, and that they, therefore, have no desire to see any discontinuance of the ecclesiastical grants.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th of April, 1881.

J. POPE HENNESSY.

{

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 134.

The following Return of the Revenue and Expenditure for 1880, including Receipts and Disburse- ments on account of the Colony by the Crown Agents in England, is published for general information. with the Comparative Statement for the years 1879 and 1880.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 16th April, 1881.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Land Revenue,

Rents, exclusive of Lands,

LICENCES:

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1830.

REVENUE.

AMOUNT.

$

c.

EXPENDITURE.

AMOUNT.

c.

146,761.10 |(CIVIL DEPARTMENTS:— 59,068,81

The Governor,

Colonial Secretary,

Spirit Retailers,.

Pawnbrokers,..

$25,446.52

10,500.00

Treasurer,

Auditor,

Auctioneers,

2,700.00

Tenements for Emigrants,.

131.10

Emigration Brokers,.

2,200.00

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys,.

875.00

Opium Monopoly,

205,000.00

Boarding Houses,

192.00

347.00

Marriage,

Chinese Undertakers,..

100.00

Money Changers,.

755.00

Marine Store Dealers,

1,185,00

Spirit Distillers,

2,061.75

Clerk of Councils,

Surveyor General,

Government Gardens and Plantations,.

Postmaster General,..

Registrar General,

Harbour Master,

Lighthouses,

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

Judicial Departments,

Registrar of Companies Department,

Ecclesiastical Department,..

251,190,37 | Educational

do.,

TAXES :-

است

Medical

Stamps,

120,678.96

ao,

Police, Lighting, Water, and Fire Brigade Rates,

230,557.31

Police Magistrates' do,,

Police

351,236.27

do.,

Gaol

Postage,

92,015.67

do.,

Fire Brigade

do.,

Fines, Forfeitures, and Fees of Court :-

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fees,

7,119.08

905.98

4,594.76

Pensione, Retired Allowances, and Gratuities,

Charitable Allowances,

Transport,

12,949.82

Works and Buildings,.

FEES OF OFFICE —

On Cemetery Burials,.

364.00

Licences for Junks, &c.,

18,807.50

Registry of Boats,...

3,066.70

Do.

Do..

of Cargo Boats and Crew, of Hawkers,

2,473.75

Rouds, Streets, and Bridges,

Lighthouses (Maintenance),

Government Gardens and Plantations (Maintenance),

Miscellaneous Services,

Military Contribution,

2,837.25

Cargo Boat Certificates,.

Registration of Householders, Do. of Servants, &¤.,.

Official Signatures,.

Registration of Deeds, Shipping Seamen,

Examination of Masters, &c.,

385.00

1,748.25

89.00

80.00

3,759.50

6,392.00

1,890.00

Survey of Steam-ships, &c.,

4,151.00-

Colonial Registers,

70.00

Merchant Shipping Act,

242.75

Registry of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,.

1,972.40

Registration of Company,

890,00

Medical Fees on Examination of Emigrants,

13,965,00

Registration of Births, &c.,............................

42.30

Light Dues, ........

18,095.07

Licenets, &c., for Steain Launches,..

245.00

Official Administrator and Assignee,

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

1,530.36

440.00

Reimbursements, ....................

Sale of Government Property,

Interest,

Miscellaneous Receipts,

TOTAL,.

83,536.83

1,302.21

84,534.22

21,287.80.

14,558.78.

1,069,947.£1

Colonial Treasury, Victoria, Hongkong, 11th April, 1881.

32,796.43

21,813,45

9,994,68

19,058.55

1,051.69

37,893.25

4,364.70

92,042.30

15,968.86

37,407,53

5,138.50

4,672,57

48,933.89

55.47

4,679.71

31,696.8+

37,308.38

18,631.70

་་་་

176,312.30

45,729.19

11,662.90

25,519.21

3,994.00

3,004,63

51,395,61

44,192.58

2,481.39

9,620.71

45,235.08

105,355.14

TOTAL,...

R>E

Examined,

FREDERICK STEWART, Acting Auditor General.

* $120 of Fines and $1,592.20 of Fucs are paid by Stamps.

A. F. ALVES,

Accountant.

M. S. TONNOCHY,

Acting Colonial Treasurer.

948,014.33

REVENUE.

DECREASE.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1879 AND 1880.

1879.

1880.

INCREASE,

EXPENDITURE.

1879.

1880.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

C.

0.

$ (.

$

0.

U.

$

C.

$ C.

Land Reverne,

144,282.27

Rents exclusive of Lands,

59,491,83

146,761.10

59,668.81

2,178.83

173.98

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS :—---

The Governor,

31,302.24

82,796.43

1,494.19

LICIGNQUHE

Colonial Secretary,

20,967.08

21,818.45

856,37

Epirit Retailers,

21,770.40

24,440,52

607.1%

Treqsirer,

9,613.00

9,994.68

381.68

Pawnbrokers, .

- 9,100.00

10,500.00

1,400.00

Auditor,

22,076.11

19,058.55

3,017.89

Auctioneers,

2,400.00

2,700.00

300.00

Clerk of Councils,

994.50

1,054.69

60.19

Tenements for Emigrants, ...........

93.60

131.10

37.50

Surveyor General,.

37,599.05

37,893,25

291.20

Emigration Brokers,

2,817.00

2,200.00

117.00.

Government Gardens and Plantations,

4,022.80

4,364.70

341.90

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys,.

1,075.00

875.00

200.00

Postmaster General,

56,898.91

92,042.30

35,143.39

Opium Monopoly,

209,916.63

203,000.00

4,918.63

Registrar General,

13,286.93

15,968.80

2,681.88

Boarding Houses,

.192.00

192.00

Harbour Master,..

34,137.62

37,107.53

3,269.91

Marriage,

281.00

347.00

116.00

Lighthouses.

5,021.83

5,138.56

116.73

Chinese Undertakers,...

80.00

100.00

20.00

Collector of Stamp Revenue,.

4,064.78

4,672,57

007,79

Money Changers,

8865.00

755.00

80.00

Judicial Departments,.

50,492.89

4$,933.89

Marine Store Dealers,

· 930.00

1,185.00

256.00

Registrar of Companies Department,

192.00

55.47

1,559,00

136.53

Spirit Distillers,

110.00

2,064.75

1,954,75

Ecclesiastical

do.,

4,358.00

4,679.71

321.71

Educational

do.,

30,077.13

TAXES:-

31,696.84

1,619.71

Medical

Stamps,

114,765.35

120,678.96

5,913.61

do.,

33,552.13-

37,808.38

1,243.75

Police, Lighting, Water and Fire Brigade Rates,

171,342.05

230,557.31

59,215,26

Police Magistrates'

do.,

17,186.22

18,631.70

1,145.48

Police

Postage,.

55,397.07

92,615,57

37,218.50

3.;

170,655,27 176,312.30

5,657.03

Gaol

Fines of Courts,.

11.385.21

7,149.08

6,936.13

do.

41,973.08 45,729.19

3,756.11

Forfeitures of Courts,

825.43

· 905.98

$0.50

Fire Brigade

do.,

16,383.47 11,662.90

4,720.57

Fees of Courts,.

4,785.81

4,504.70

141,05

Pensions, Retired Allowances, and Gratuities,

25,727.13

25,519.21

207.92

Charitable Allowances,

3,825.00

3,994.00

169.00

FEES OF OFFICE :-

Transport,.

4,684,35

3,004,63

1,679.72

Ou Cemetery Burials,

727.50

364.00

363,50 | Works and Buildings,

02,571,22

51,395,61

11,175.61

Licences for Junks, &c.,

19,363.50

18.807.50

566.00

Roads, Streets, and Bridges,.

57.504.08

44,192.58

13,311.50

Registry of Boats,.

3,334.10

3,066.70

267.40 Lighthouses (Maintenance),.

2,999.0

2,481.39

518.25

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crew,.

2,495.95

2,173.75

22.20

Government Gardens and Plantations (Maintenance),

9,620.74

9,020,74

Do.

of Hawkers,• •

2,933.50

2.837.25

96.25

Miscellaneous Services,

49,576.07

15,235.08

4,310.99

Cargo Boat Certificates,"

100.00

385.00

15.00

Land and Houses Purchased,

80.00

80.00

Registration of Householders,..

1,590,50

1,748.25

157.75

Military Contribution,..

109,754.95

105,855.14

4,399.81

Do.

Official Signatures,

Registration of Deeds,

Shipping Seamen, ..

of Servants, &c.,..

101.75

96.00

89.00

12.75

80.00

16.00

3,622.50

3,759,50

137.00

0,438,00

6,392.00

46.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,.

720:00

1,890.00 1,170.00

Survey of Steam-ships, &c.,.

60.00

4,151.00

4,101.00

Colonial Registers,

85.00

70.00

18.00

Merchant Shipping Act,.

245.00

242.75

2.25

Registry of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

1,715.80

1,972.40

256.60

Registration of Company,

96.00

890.00

79-4.00

Medical Fees on Examination of Emigrants,.

10,119.25

Registration of Births, &C...................................

55.10

13,965.00

42.30

3,815.75

12.80

Light Dues,...

15,438.31

15,095.07

2,656.76

Licences, &c., for Steam Launches,..

150.00

245.00

95.00

Official Administrator and Assignee,

1,475.01

1,530.36

55.35

Registration of Trade Marks,

107.73

107.73

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,.

340.00

440.00

100.00

Sale of Government Property,

257.49

1,302.21

1,041.72

Reimbursements,..........

33,868,55

34,634.22

€65,67

Interest,.

19,083,57

21,287.66

2,204,09

Miscellaneous Receipts,......

21,897.18

14,558.78

7,338.40.

964,094,99 | 1,009,947,61

127,114.74

21,262.09

Deduct Decrease,

Nett Increase,

21,262.09 |

105,832.65

Colonial Treasury, Victoria, Hongkong, 11th April, 1881,

A. F. ALVES,

Examined,

Accountant:

Deduct Decrense,

Nett Increase,..

FREDERICK STEWART, Acting Auditor General.

M. S. TONNOCHY, Acting Colonial Treasurer.

926,867.86

948,014,33

07,538,01

46,391.51

:$

46,391.54.

21,146.47

;

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 127.

The following Annual Report from the Harbour Master, with the Returns accompanying it, is published for general information.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 2nd April, 1881.

[No. 71.]

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 5th March, 1881.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns of this Department for the year ending the 31st December, 1880.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port.. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port.. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa..

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port..

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers.. XVI. Return of Vessel's registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Ordinance No. 10 of 1860 and Section III of Ordinance-

No. 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of China.. XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

SHIPPING

2. The total tonnage entered in this Department for the year under review, amounts to 4,185,845 tons, being an increase of 63,177 tons over the tonnage entered in 1879.

3. In my last annual statement reporting on the year 1879, I had to call attention to a falling off in the trade as compared with 1878, but that year was the most prosperous of any that the Colony has experienced. The trade is again now nearly what it was in 1877, and there seems good reason for the increase steadily continuing..

4. It is advisable to separate the trade in foreign bottoms from that in native junks.

5. The former shews an increase of 64,942 tons on 1879, the total for 1880 being 2,535,587 tous as against 2,470,615 tons in the previous year. Of the tonnage entered in 1880, the following is the percentage due to each nationality of vessels arriving in this Colony: American, 4.97; British, 74.08; Chinese (foreign bottom), 4.98; Dutch, 0.53; French, 6.52; Gerinan, 5.79; Japanese, 1.03; Siamese, 0.59; Spanish, 0.75; others in small proportions, 0.76.

6. The trade in vessels propelled by steam amounts to 2,316,121 tons as against 2,204,901 tons. in 1879, or an increase of 111,220 tons, the percentage for each nation of the steam tonnage arrived during the year being as follows: American, 2:31; British, 78.67; Chinese, 5.43; Dutch, 0.53; French, 6.62; German, 3.91; Japanese, 1.11; Spanish, 0.80; Danish, Austrian, Belgian, Norwegian and Rus- sian, 0.62.

7. As regards the countries having tradal communication with this Colony, the trade inwards and outwards with the coast of China and Formosa naturally absorbs the greatest proportion, as ships constantly arrive with goods from various parts of the world for ports in China, and ships as fre- quently arrive from China and its neighbourhood with cargo for countries other than Chinese.

Toxs.

+,500,000

+,400,000

4,300,000

4.200,000

+,100,000

+.000,000

3.500.000

3.300,000

3.700,000

3,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

3,300,000

1,200,000

3,100,000

*3,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

2,700,000

1,600,000

$1,500,000

(8,400,000

www

2,300,000

1,200,000

£2,100,000

1,000,000

1,900,000

1,500,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,100,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,109,500

1,000,000

Marbour Department, Hongkong, 5th March, 1881.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

XATL--DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered ai Hongkong. From 1867 la 1880 inwi

BLUE LINE represents Fund: Topruge only.

MED LINE represents Poreign slapping Tonnage only,

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire trade in Foreign Ships and Junks,

·Turbour

1871.

1871.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

+

4.300,000

4.100.000

+.100,000

+.000,000

3.900,000

3,900,000

3.700.000

3,600,000

3.500.000

3,400,000

3.300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,500,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

1,500,000

2,400,000

1,300,000

1,100,000

2,100,000

1,000,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

Toys.

S. Of the whole tonnage arrived from various countries, the following is the proportion due to cach: Australia, 2.06 per cent; China and Formosa, 56.34 per cent; Cochin-China, 3.71 per cent; Continent of Europe, 3.82 per cent; Great Britain, 8.38 per cent; India and Singapore, 4.88

per cent; Japan, 5.04 per cent; Macao, 7.19 per cent; Philippine Islands, 1.62 per cent; ports in Hainan and Galf of Tonquin, 2.35 per cent; Siam, 2.09 per cent; United States of America, 2.22 per cent; the remainder in too small proportions for calculation.

9. There is an increase of tonnage in 1880 on 1879 of 126,879 tons from coast of China and Formosa, of 17,881 tons from the continent of Europe, of 47,586 tons from Great Britain, 19,175 tons from Japan, and of 25,484 tons from the Island of Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin. There is a decrease of 40,486 tons from Cochin-China, of 7,527 tons from the Philippine Islands, and of 15,425 rons from Siam.

10. Two steam lines in addition to those already frequenting the Colony, made their first appear- ance in these waters in 1880,--the Austro-Hungarian Lloyd's Steam Navigation Company, and the Nederlandsche-Indische Stoomvart Maatschappy. The former is a monthly line, the steainers of which leave Trieste via Bombay, calling at intermediate ports. The latter is at present a three- monthly line running between the Island of Java and Amoy, calling at intermediate ports, having connecting lines with Europe and the Australian Colonies.

}

JUNK TRADE.

11. This trade with Macao shews an increase on 1879 of 10,568 tons. With the coast of China, there is a decrease of 12,133 tons, the result principally of the increase of trade with that country in Boreign bottoms.

12. The local trade-that between the several villages of the Island and with the city of Victoria ---shews a decrease of 26.8419 tons, the licensed steum-launches causing the falling off of this portion of the junk trade.

EMIGRATION.

13. There is an increase on 1879 of 16,796 Chinese leaving this year for various parts of the world. Of this increase, 47.2 per cent more have gone to the Straits Settlements than left for that Colony in 1879.

1t. Of the 50,325 persons leaving, the following percentage will shew the countries to which they have proceeded: Australian Colonies, 9.67; Bangkok, 12.53; Manila, 0.43; Portland, Oregon, 2.03; San Francisco, 12.39; Straits Settlements, 61.89; Vancouver's Island, 0.56. Port Darwin con" rinues to draw a good number of emigrants.

15. On the 18th August, 1880, Manila-so far as steam-ships are concerned-was withdrawn from the provisions of the Chinese Passengers' Act, 1855, the voyage, with the fast steamers of the present day, being now performed in considerably less than seven days.

16. The difference between the total numbers of Chinese passengers leaving and those returning, is inconsiderable, 686 more having returned than left.

17. 51,011 Chinese returned to their native country during the year. Of this number, the follow- ing is the percentage due to each country whence the Chinese have returned:-Bangkok, 6.27, Hono- Jul, 0.85. Manila, 6.41, Port Darwin, 1.35, Queensland, 1.61, other Australian Colonies, 2.05, Portland, Oregon, 1.01, San Francisco, 13.99, Straits Settlements, 66.46.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

18. Seven vessels have been registered during the year, and six struck off, leaving fifty-eight vessels and 21,545 tons on the Ships' Registry of Hongkong.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

19. The Cases tried in this Court have been fewer than in any previous year, and those of but slight importance.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS, UNDER SECTION XV.

OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

20. There were 56 candidates for Masters and Mates, of whom 53 obtained Certificates.

21. There were 64 candidates for Engineers' Certificates; 62 obtained Certificates at once, one was re-examined after a period of one month, and one applied, but left the Colony before being examined.

22. The following remarks made on the 20th January last on the subject of Examination will find a fitting place in this report :--

:1

Her Majesty's Orders in Council provide that Colonial Certificates of Competency (to be valid in the United Kingdom) shall be granted only to any person who for a period of three years immediately preceding his application for such Colonial Certificate, or for several periods amounting together to three years, the earliest of which shall have commenced within five years prior to such application, has been domiciled in, or has served in a ship or ships registered in the Colony where the Certificate is to be issued.

Hongkong is exceptionally situated in this matter. There are but few ships registered here, and only Officers serving in those vessels could, under the terms of the existing Orders in Council, qualify for Certificates.

Under Ordinance No. 8 of 1879, no steam-ship, British or foreign, carrying more than twelve passengers can clear out or proceed to sea unless the Officers possess Certificates of Competency or Service. The consequence is, that a large number of Masters, Mates and Engineers have presented themselves before the local Examination Board. The great majority of these candidates could not have been examined had Hongkong come within the Orders in Council, as the candidates could not produce Certificates of three years' cumulative domicile or service. The consequence would have been that many ships could not have cleared with over twelve passengers from Hongkong for want of certi- ficated Officers.

With the exception of the domicile or service of three years, the qualification of service in Hong- kong is the same as in England. The Examination via voce and by papers is taken from the Board of Trade instructions on the subject, and I have no hesitation in stating that candidates here go through as strict an examination as they do in any part of the world.

It seems, therefore, hard on Hongkong Certificate holders, that, although they have prove them- selves from a professional point of view equally competent as Masters, Mates and Engineers who pass in the United Kingdom, and in those Colonies to which the Orders in Council can apply, they should have to pay further fees and have to be re-examined before they can be put on the Register or articles of a ship at a honic port.

The reasons which have led to the cumulative domicile or service rules are doubtless good ones, but I am unable to see why certified good service in any ship should not be equivalent to service in a Hong- kong registered vessel. What is required is competency for the post for which the candidate presents himself; and if a candidate has satisfied a competent Board of Examiners that he has the requisite experience and knowledge, it seems not unreasonable that it should be sufficient to render his Certificate valid anywhere.

MARINE COURTS, UNDER ORDINANCE No. 11 or 1869 (NoW REPEALED AND RE-ENACTED IN ORDINANCE No. 8 or 1879).

23. The following Courts have been held during the year:-

1. On the 6th February, 1880,-inquiry as to the loss of the British barque Hopewell, Official Number 60,883 of London, in a Typhoon near Cebu, Philippine Islands. The Master's (PmLie C. LANGLOIS) Certificate of Competency was returned.

2. On the 2nd June, 1880,-inquiry as to the stranding of the British steam-ship Meeth, Official Number 81,457 of Sunderland, on or near the East Lamock Island. The Master's (Joux Joussox) Certificate of Competency was returned.

SEAMEN.

24. 6,392 seamen were shipped during the year, being 46 less than were shipped in 1879. 7,139 seamen were legally discharged, being 747 in excess of the number shipped. Of the latter excess, many have worked their passage without regularly shipping, others pay their own passage, and many were sent to England.

last.

25. The Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance No. 8 of 1879, became law on the 17th July This Ordinance is the consolidation of many Ordinances which had been passed since 1845, and the opportunity was taken in framing the new Ordinance to introduce measures for insuring the effi- ciency of British, Colonial and foreign steam-ships employed in the conveyance of passengers hence.

26. Ordinance No. 4 of 1855 was introduced to enable Chinese land owners in Hongkong to use the British Flag, and at the time the Ordinance was passed Chinese owned none but junks or lorchas. In course of time, Chinese became owners of steam vessels and obtained Colonial Registers. These vessels were old, indifferently officered, and generally badly found. Section V of Ordinance No. 8 of 1879 has now put this class of steamers on the same footing as other steamers.

27. The steam-launch Ordinance has, in my opinion, effected much good; the six-monthly surveys of them have doubtless prevented many accidents, which must have been attended with great loss of life.

28. Between the 17th July and the 31st December last, 63 vessels have been surveyed. Great difficulty has been experienced in procuring the regulation life buoys, and other small requirements. The instructions of the Board of Trade are followed as nearly as the circumstances of the Colouy will admit, and by a strict adherence to the provisions of the Ordinance, such another accident as that of the unfortunate Yesso in November, 1877, cannot well be repeated.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.:

Acting Colonial Secretary,

C...

H. G. THOMSETT, P.N., Harbour Master, &c.

7

I-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREws of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country, in the Year 1880.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED,

WITH CARGOES.

Vesgels.

Tous. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews.

TOTAL.

With CanOES,

Vessels.

Tons.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vossels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews Vessels.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Tons. Crews Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST,

Tons. Crew

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,.

65

41,091 1,963

03)

Coast of China and Formosa,

1,0101,112,729) 44,561)

22,076

Cochin China,

79;

66,800) 2,503)

Continent of Europe,

6

4,980

117

Gr

Great Britain,

122 165,985 4,828

India and Singapore,

86 117,878 6,800

1,25-1

41,091| 1,967 751|| 4,0881,181,805 45,012119,89011,358,235 205,915 70 66,800 2,500) 33 27,807 855

4,980 117 58 91,977 4,034 122 165,985 4,828) 891 10,575) 88 119,132 6,941

17

11,193;

272

171

11,193

27,807

581

39

1,010

انات

Japan,

58,301 2,817

1,823)

60,121) 2,813

03

192

61,797) 4,725

10

4,015

3,098!

65!

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi- |

3

1,070

32

1,076

4,038

31

4,038)

272 801 52,281 2,237 417,720 88,000 23,1201,775,962 288,971 16,909|2,470,962 250,000 351 114 94,107 3,418

8551 0.11 96,957 4,151

91,977|| 4,024}{ 161 212,500 5,031 90 121,898 7,018) 119 128,098 7,589)

11

313 5,714 318

80

52,284 2,237

252 439,805 83,757 24,161 2,910,767) 334,563

114

64

94,107) 8,418

46,575 8031

96,957) 4,151 161 212,560 5,631

124

67,895 4,707

1,25

4,921

45

71

98 123.147) 7,063 122 128,019 7,610

111

pelago,

Macao,

453)

180,780| 15,|S||

1,881

182,161| 15,ku!

1,005

139,748

8,621

64

1,175 108,300 29,000 1,510|| 340,525) 43,147)

10,002 1,322

1,629]

5,714

350,527 44,469

318

61

7

51)

7

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,.

43]

19.881 1,759

-13

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquia,,

20,825 1,500!

384

20,825| 1,000

1,827,

BATUL

21,224 1,892

951

37,598 3,577

8,510

65

96)

41,108|| 3,642

38.

2,510

4551

38,808 2,621

186

1,083

1,372 37

59,228 4,016!

289

* 155

11

137

£9,683) 4,027

1,088

28

1,872) 87

Sandwich Islands,

Siam,...

54

37,402 1,507

511

37,102 1,507

15,399)

30

15,399

809

3:

195

168

South Sea Islands,

United States of America,

24,000 1,196

24,000 1,196

17

32,824 1,099)

17

8011 73) 32,824 1,090

81

85 52,861 2,816 193 46 56,824 2,295

85

52,861 2,316

108

3611 78

31

56,324 2,295

TOTA

2,043/1,851,791 85,42

26,584

2,0781,878,820¦ 66,27:

72,602|261,169

7,800|| 434,718 84,487 24,728 2,307,520 385,0119,421 8,724,598 $30,0

7,880 461,252 85,833 20,8014,185,845 421,887

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, §c.

II-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Ilongkong for each Country, in the Year 1880.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

:

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tens. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crows Vessels.

Tous, Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crew Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels.

WITH CARGOES.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews.Vessela.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

201

22,894 1,200,

British North America,

Cape of Good Hope,

890

Coast of China and Formosa,

201

1,101

201

1,027|1,180,261 47,0283

1,352 31

261

21

22,804 1,200]

2,453)

1,974 99

ان

4,413) 65

1,974

4,413)

92

Su0 201

66,365 2,318 1,1191,196,626 49,31616,811|1,416,827 221,415 5,927 342,05459,027 22,788 1,758,881 250,442 17,838 2,547,088 208,443

99 281

08

2

24,366 1,299)

20

1,1011

28

24,808) 1,299

5,705 99

انا

3901 20

2

6,866

390

119

20

Cochin China,

80,937 1,185

27

878

68

58,185) - 2,088)

18,718 501

11! 9,926 284

39 28,644 875) 69

49,055 1,748)

6,019

381

408,419 61,815 28,857 2,055,507 329,788 37,174) 1,162

107

86,829 2,908

Continent of Europe,

801

22

8511

05,099) 3,361

35

Great Britain,

35

56,270 2,294

35

56,270 2,291

8,025) 2913

India and Singapore,

107 151,200 0,788

Japan,

50

58,703 2,791

2,473 57

11,8-10}

110 153,788 0,345)

14

10,458 2647

314

70,513 8,185

55

56,218 4,624

837

2,928

05

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

2,855

97

:

1 2,855

97

905!

141801 31

65,093|| 3,361} 861 291 98,025 10 11,298 307 591 59,146 4,689]

2,885] 62)

65,944 3,383

381

65,944| 8,383.

44

64,295| 2,5851

41

C35] 2,585

121|

101,716). 7,072)

105

114,921) 7,415]

3,310!

14,768 409

SO

126 - 165,026 ,152 120 129,689 7,824

8,700 128

1,480

311

81

Apelago,

Alacao,

452 180,253 15,313

1,881

19

453 181,084 15,30

1,110

161,189 28,207|

5,101)

891 1,171) 169,655) 29,185] 1,562

844,442| 43,640|

02

0,845

910 1,624

North Pacific,

∙1

1,883 33

1,383) 33

55

12

2,047)

31 13

2,102) 40

55]

12

3

3,430

07

5,240

351,287 44,550

3,485]

159

..79

Philippine Islands,

24,809 1,994}

18

11,806)

308 C51

35,675 2,302

35

14,444 1,263|

38

33,3031 CA

78

47,747 1,009]

82

38,753 3,257

56

44,609

934

185

83,422 4,211

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,

15,505 1,8221

3,984 1541

51

19,549 1,1761

35,100 2,110

3,185)

1937

821

38,835 2,589) 125!

50,965| 3,768|

11

7,419

297

136

58,284 1,065

Russia in Asia,

648

201

1

6481

1,462) 128

4,162| 128

5,105 151

5,105 151

Sandwich Islands,.

347

22

8471

297

491

51

&

1,351 717

Siam

53

South America,

86,507 1,400)

1,007

1,607

38,114 1,018

875

1901

4,085

188

12,930

6811

27

South Sea Islands,

9638

1,007

27

219

2101

181

..958! 181

270

401

1,518

1,793

United States of America,

21

35,495) 1,401

7801

201

36,225 1,421|

CS,550 1,788

6,812]

1001

75,308 1,883)

TOTAL,.

1,9191,749,118 83,010

107 130,687 4,285 2,0801,879,835 87,243 18,

1,008) 79 51,044 2,196 1.226

2,751*106

36

78 111,5083,304

6,072 418,326 61,545 24,332 2,294,314 326,772 20,1793,625,130 348,237 6,289 549,013 65,780 26,418 4,174,149 414,017

6,289

H. G. THOмSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

1,644! 71

64

45,382 1,958

5,602

238

1,226

801

276 461

2,476)

C8 104,051 3,181)

7,542

1200

V. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1830..

TOTAL.

· BRITISH.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

OF PORTS.

Vis. Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vis.

Aberdeen, Chau-ki-wán,

Stauley,

Victoria,

Yau-má-ti,

Total,...

2,048, 1,851,791)| 85,432|

2,043 1,851,790|85,422||

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Tons. Crews Vis.

38,218|10,052 1,001 53,705 8,128|| 1,287|| 0,082 1,126 2301

Tous. Crews.. Vis. Tous. Crews. 52,052|12,647}

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews, Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Tons. Crews. Yls. Vis.

327 14,734 2,595| 6741 52714,734 2,595 674

447 19,708 4,478) 840 79,473 12,000 -4471 10,708 4,478| 840

144 19,048 2,118) hiy 25,128 8,244| 144 19,040 2,118 801 301 20,534 850 2,073 1,878,825 80,27% 15,071 1,750,582 284,901 3,608 216,417 36,00119,582 1,066,949 271,462 18,017 8,002,328 320,323 3,038 480 08,782 7,040| 2,142|| 120,230 22,016|| 2,628) 180,018,35,650 480 68,782 7,040 2,142 3020,534|||| 850|| 2,073 1,878,825 86,27217,378 -1,872,802351,152 7,350 434,71881,48324,728 2,307,5203835,615 19,421 3,724,598 $86,554 7,380|

38,218 10,052 1,001 53,705 8,128 1,287 6,082 1,120). 230

52,05212,647 78,473 12,606 25,123] 3,244 242,951 37,411 21,055 3,846,274 857,784 120,236 28,616||| 2,028 189,018 35,650 401,252 85,333 26,801 4,135,815121,887

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, §c.

VI.—TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1830.

BRITISH.

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vis.

Tons. ¡Crews. Vis. Tons.

ews. Vis. Tons. Crews. VIs.

Aberdeen, Shu-hi-wal, Stanley,.....

Victoria,

2011

754

113

Tong. Crews. Vis.

12,271| 2,020 787 48,518 0,041 18,287 ,828 117)

Yau-iná-ti.

1,010 1,749,148) 83,010

Total, 1,919 1,749,11883,010

...

167 130,087 4,236 2,0801,879,835 87,245 10,198 1,718,718 242,228 3,162 78,249|12,574| 1,685| 107 130,087 4,235|| 2,080|1,879,835|87,245,18,200 1,875,088 265,227| 6,072

974

Tons. Crews, Vis. Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews. Vis. 30,802 7,478 978 52,163 - 0,534 12,271 2,050) 757 20,833 5,844 -1,255) 72,351|12,385) 75-1 48,618 0,541] 501 6,801 1,412:230 25,128 3,240- 113 · 18,237) 1,628 244,657 28,12419,300 1,963,870 268,852 18,117 3,467,861 325,288 103,058 20,087 2,509 181,30238,201 974 78,249 12,574 418,326 01,545 24,332 2,294,811826,772 20,179 3,025,180348,237

Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews.

221

39,892 7,478| 978 23,833 5,844 1,255

62,163] 0,534

72,351| 12,385

117

6,891 1,412 230|

25,128) 3,240

3,320

1,535

375,344 30,359| 21,440 38,813,205 355,597 103,053 20,687 2,500 181,302) 33,261

0,239

549,013 65,780 26,418 4,174,149 414,017

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, §e.

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1880.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Passen

Vessels.

Tons.

Passen-

Passen-

Crows.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

gers.

gers.

gers.

Victoria,

1,062

· 159,464

27,746

4,110'

112

8,621

1,294

203

1,174

168,085 20,040

4,703

Total,...

1,062

159,464

27,746

/ 4,410

112

8,521

1,294

293

1,174

168,035

29,040

4,703

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, fc.

VIII.--Total Number, Tonnage, Crems and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1880.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons,

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Crews.

Tons.

Passen- gets.

Victoria,

1,108

162,977

28,114

4,528

59

845.

447

1,167

167,734 28,959 4,970

Total,... 1.108

162,977

28,114

4,529

59

33

4,757

-845

447

1,167

167,734

28,959

4,970

H. G. THOMSETT, K.N., Harbour Master, go.

IN-Total Number, Tonnage, Crims and Passengers of Junis ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Const of China and Formasu, during the Year ending 31st December, 1880.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tous.

Passen-

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Aberdeen,

327

14.784

,595

28

anh-Will

447

19,708

4,478

122

674 840

38.218

10.052.

gers. 106

¦ Passen-.

Crews. gurs.

1,001

52,952

12.647

134

58,745

8,128

218

1,287

78,473

12,606

340.

Stealey,

144

19,046

2,118

15

86

6,082

1.126

2

230

25,128

3,244

17

Victoria,

14,144

959,254175,784 | 117,938

3.456

182.848

34.409

22,307

17.800

Yau-má-ti,

486

- 68,782

7,040.

124

2.142

120,238

23,616

211

2,628

Total,.....

15,548.

1,081,524 | 192,015. | 118,227

7,108

400.649

82,831

22,814

1,141,602 |210,193 | 140,245.

189,018

22,746||1,482,173|274,346|141,071

35,656

335

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, fo.

X.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crers and Pussengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

for Ports on the Coast of Chinu and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1880.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Crews.

Tous.

Passen- gers.

Passeu-

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

221

12,271

2,056

32

757

Shau-ki-win.

704

48,518

6.541

244

501

39.802 25,583

Stanley,

113

18,237

1,828

10

117

6.891

,478 5,844 1.412

178

978

52,163

9,584

210

175

72,351

Victoria,

14,465

1,013,961 | 185,116 |126.769

Tau-má-ti,

974

78,249 12,574

57

2,920 1,535

118,229

21,968

10,724

103,053 20.687

70

Total,

16.527

1,171,236 | 208,115 | 127,112

5,830

201,828 57,889

11,149

1,255

230

17,385 2,509

1,182,190 | 207,084 | 137,493 -

181,302

33,261

22,857 1,463,134 | 265,504 | 133,261

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, ĝo

12,385

419

25,128 8,240

12

127

недо

III-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at the Port of Victoria, in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1880.

ENTERED.

· NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tous.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American, Annamnese,

130

117,368

3,713

8,765

156

139

78

17

120,133 78

3,869

17

Austrian,

2

3,179

90

8,179

90.

Belgian,

1

1,125

34

1

1,125

34

Bolivian,

1

740

15

740

15,

British,..

2,043

1,851,791

85,422

30.

26,584

850

2,073

1,878,325

86,272

Chinese,

150.

124,197

7,376

5

2,090.

171

155

120,287

7,547

Chinese Junks,

16,610 | 1,240,988 | 219,761

7,310

409,270

89,625

23,920

1,650,258 303,386

Danish,

8

5,390

222

1

783

24

9

6,173

246

Dutch,

16

12,206

807

3

1,354.

58

10

13,560

865

French,

113

165,152

9,422

1

300

11

114

165,452

9,433

German,

225

134,685

4,449

21

12,156-

438

246

146,841

4,887

Honduras,

1

510

13

Ι

510

13

Japanese,

28

26,076

2,077

28

26,076

2,077

Norwegian,

4

3,681

87

4.

3,681

87

Portuguese,

632

18

632

18

Russian,

2,274

145

2,274

147

Siamese,

14,905

862

14,905

862

Spanish,

19,038

2,005

19,038

2,005

Swedish,

2

578

19

578

19

TOTAL,..

19,421 | 8,724,503 | 336,554 7,380

461,252

85,333

20,801 | 4,185,845 | 421,887

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Harbour Master, c.

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Parts in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1880.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. | Vessels.

Tous. ·Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American, Austrian,

110

98,493 * 3,423

37

36,312

659

147

134,805

4,082

1

1,817

1.

1,817

55

Belgian,

1

1,125

34

1

1,125

34

Bolivian,

1

740

15

1

740

16

British,

1,919 | 1,749,148

83,010 167

130,687

1,235

Chinese,

149

123,970

7,485

6

3,008.

174

Chinese Junks,

17,635

1,334,213236,229

5,889

206,655

58,234

Danish,.

10

6,589

272

1

570

14

11

2,086 | 1,879,835

100

126,078

23,524 | 1,630,808 204,463

7,109

87,245

7,659

286

Dutch,

9

6,408

569.

4,991

210

17

11,489

779

French,.

95

160,532

9,247

12

3,792

127

107

164,254

9,374

German,

142

82,406

2,991

105

64,996

1,811

217

146,702

4,802

J

Japanese,

27

25,635

2,038

1

20

28

26,076

2,058

Norwegian,

Portuguese, Russian, Siamese,

1,810

51

1,889

3,699-

84.

632

20

632

20

2,274

145.

10,247

615

со да

1,166 4,247

21

3,440

166

217

14,494

832

Spanish,

53

19,219-

Swedish,

2.

578

2,019 34

19,219

2,019

1

289

10

867

·44

TOTAL,

20,179 3,625,136 348,237

6,239

540,013

65,780 26,418 4,174,119 414,017

65,780

H. G. THOMSETT, R.Ñ., Harbour Muster, §e.

XI.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1880.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen

gers.

Aberdeen, Shau-ki-wán,.

327

447

14,734 2,595 19,708

4,478

29

674

38,218 10,052

106 1,001

52,952 12,647

134

122

8.10

53,765

8,128

218

1,237

73,473 12,606

340

Stanley,

144 3.19,046 2,118

15

86

6,082

1,126

2

230

25,128 3,244

17

Victoria,

Yau-má-ti,

15,206 | 1,118,718 | 203,530 | 122,348

Total,... 16,610 | 1,240,988 219,761 |122,637

3,568

190,969

35,703

22,600

18,774

1,309,687 | 239,233.

144,948

486 68,782 7,040

124

2,142

120,236 28,616

211

2,628

189,018 35,656

335

7,310 409,270 83,625 23,137

23,920 1,650,258 | 303,386 145,774

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, fc.

XII-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1880.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen, Shau-ki-wáng. 754

221

12,271 2,056

32

757

89,892

7,478

173

48,518

6,541

244

301

23,833

5,844

175

Stauley,

113

18,237

1,828

10

117

6,891

1,412

2

978 1,255 230

Victoria,

15,578 | 1,176,938 218,280 | 131,292

2,979

122,986

22,813

52,163 9,534 72,351 12,385 25,128 3,240 11,171 | 18,552 | 1,299,924 |236,043

210

419

12

142,463

Yau-má-ti,

974

78,249

12,574

57

1,535

103,053

20,687

70

2,509

181,302 33,261

127

Total.... 17,635 | 1,934,213 |236,229 | 131,635 5,889

296,655 58,204

11,596

23,524 | 1,630,868. | 294,463 143,231

H. G. THомSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, go.

XIII.—Return of Junks (Local Trade ) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kau-lung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1880.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Pasten- gers..

Victoria,

3,368 113,489 35,985 $,506 1,216 19,873

6,777 8,891 4,584 133,862 42,662 17,397

Total,... 3,368 113,489 35,885

8,506 1,216 19,873

6,777

8,899 4,584

133,362 42,662 17,397

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, fv.

XIV.—Return of Junks ( Local Trade ) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kau-lung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1880...

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.. Tous. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers,

Victoria,..... 2,013 51,678 16,937 10,740 2,679

89,342 26,537 6,706 4,692

141,020 43,474 17,446

Total,... 2,013 51,678 16,937 10,740 2,670

89,342

26,537

6,706

4,692

141,020 | 43,474

17,446.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, go.

XV.-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE..

NO. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,

2,043

1,851,791

85,422

Do.

do. in Ballast,

30

26,534

850

Total,.

2,073

1,878,325

86,272

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,-

1,919.

1,749,148

83,010

Do.

do. in Ballast,

167

130,687

4,235

Total,.

2,086

1,879,335

87,245

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

4,150

3,758,160

173,517

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

17,378

1,872,802

251,132

Do.

do. in Ballast,.

7,350

434,718

84,483

Total,.

21,728

2,307,520

335,615

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

$18,260**

1,875,938

265,227

Do.

do. in Ballast,

6,072

418,326-

61,545

Total,.

24,332

2,294,314

326,772

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,

49,060

4,601,834

662,587

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

19,421

3,724,593

· 336.554

Do.

do. in Ballast,....

7,380

461,252

85,033

Total of all Vessels entered,..

26,801

4,185,845

421,587

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

20,179

3,625,136

348,287

do.

in Ballast,

6,239

549,013

65,730

Total of all Vessels cleared,

26,418

4,174,149

414,017

Do.

do.

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,.

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trude only, entered and cleared,...

39,600 7,349,729

684,791

in Ballast,.

13,619

1,010,265

151,113

53,219

8,359,994

835,904

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of Vessels entered,

Do.

4,584

133,362

42,662

cleared,

4,692

141,020

43,474

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,.

9,276

274,382

$6,1

Do..

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,. do. in Local Trade only,

53,219

8,359,994

$35,004

do.

9,276

274,382

86,136

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,..

62,495

8,634,376

922,040

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

47,774

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

463,020 47,488

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

in China and Japan,

17,397

Total Arrivals,

575,679 50,325

Do.

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,.

423,924

48,541 17,446

Total Departures,

Excess of Arrivals of Chinese over Departures,

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,

545,236

30,443

1,120,915

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, yc..

XVI. RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1880.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis Horse

tered

Power. Tonnage.

Built

Rig.

Where Built and When.

of.

Remarks, &c.

Fame, str.,.

19,493 117.08 100 Sloop

Constance,

21,200 350.82

Barque

Iron Wood

Fatchoy, str.,

73,438

139.44 3:10

Schooner

South Shields, 1857. Bristol, 1858. Wood Hongkong, 1877.

Sold to Foreigner, 1880.

Ribston,..

58,053

396.88

Otto,

€73,443

274.44

Barque Brig

Wood Sunderland, 1867. Wood Apenrade, 1863.

Loiterer,

73.444

37.76

Lady Aberdour,

58,126 237.09

Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1869). Brig

Wood North Hylton, Durham, 1868.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Registrar of Shipping, &c.

XVII-RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS CANCELLED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1880.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage. Registry.

Date of

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where Built and When.

Reason of Cancellation.

Washi, str..

Fei Loong, str.,..

Fatchoy, str.,

65,574 265.26 1875 73,436 46.78 1877 73,438

113.14 1878

60

20

38

Schooner Iron Schooner

Iron & Wood

Dublin, 1871. Hongkong, 1876.

10

Onward,

Leonore,

Constance,

69,099 208.59 1878 71,839 251.17 1879 21,200 350.82 1380

Schooner Wood

Brig Wood Barque Wood

Sold to Foreigner, 1830. Sold to Foreigner, 1880. Registered anew at Hong-

kong, 1880.

Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1877. Cherryfield, State

of Maine, U.S.A.Sold Emden, 1866.

Sold to Foreigner, 1880.

Sold to Foreigner, 1880. Bristol, 1858. Sold to Foreigner, 1880.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Registrar of Shipping, &c.

XVIII.—AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, Ordinance No. 10 of 1860, and Section III of Ordinance No. 8 of 1879, in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1880.

MATTER OR DUTY IN RESPECT OF WHICH FEE TAKEN.

NUMBER.

FEE.

AMOUNT.

REMARKS, &c.

Alteration in Agreement with Seamen,

1

$1.00

$ 1.00

Certifying Desertions,

56

1.00

56.00

1.00

Declaration of Ownership,

8.00

2.00

Endorsement of Change of Master,

20

1.00

20,00

Endorsement of Change of Ownership,

1

2.00

2.00

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,.

Inspection of Registry,

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

Recording Transfer of Mortgage,

Recording Sale of Ship,..

Registering Certificate of Sale,

19 19 09 10 10 QUANTI

10.00

69.75

1.00

4.00

5.00

25.00

5.00.

10.00

5.00

10,00

5.00

15.00

5.00

14.00

2.00

TOTAL,..

..$

234.75

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Registrar of Shipping, &c.

XIX-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared

by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the year

ending the 31st day of December, 1880.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY

OF SHIP.

NAME.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F.

January 5 Consolation, str.

9 Diamante, str. ................

764 British 514

R. Young

R. F. Cullen

Bangkok Manila

184

Jand

185

13

13

>>

12 | Anchises, str.

1,304

C. Jackson

Straits Settlements

54

54

"

29

14 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

2,560

R. Methven

255

255

>

17 | Gaelic, str.

1,712

W.

او

H. Kidley

San Francisco

160

105

"

17 Venice, str.

1,271

P. L. Rhode

Straits Settlements

717

68

794

""

17 Suez, str.

1,390

J. D. Eaton

435

185

620

"

8.

20 Teucer, str.

1,324

R. T.

Power

"} "}

351

11

362

22 Menmuir, str.

Sydney

32

1,247

W. Ellis

49

Dunedin, N.Z. Melbourne

}

10

24 Menelaus, str.

1,559

"

E. Billinge

11

28

"1

Bokhara, str.

1,775

""

12

J

31 | Kajanatrianuhar, str.

933

23

G. T. Hopkins

W. D. Anderson

Straits Settlements

Bangkok

50

81

50

"1

:

212

214

13

February 2| Hector, str.

1,590

رو

11

22

7 | City of Tokio, str.

3,448

American

H. Jones

J. Maury

15

>

17 | Ulysses, str.

1,562 | British

J. A. Guard /

Straits Settlements San Francisco Straits Settlements

15-1

180

61

69

76!

76

1

16

19 | Normanby, str.

664

S. G. Green

33

"}

1 Sydney

32

17

19

20

21

2.5

27

28

Pesaa & 83885*

21 | Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

401 781

113

,1

18

21 Moray, str.

1,427

M. J. Butcher

53

10

63

"

"

25 ¦ Nizam, str.

1,727

A. E. Barlow

42

42

"}

March 1 Belgic, str.

1,716

دو

L. Meyer

San Francisco

107

100

39

22

1 | Danube, str.

Brisbane, str.

561

891

A. Clanchy

J. A. Reddell

Cooktown

Sydney

Bangkok

90

93

232

278

Melbourne

39

23

"}

6 Priam, str.

1,572

S. H. Butler

Straits Settlements

359

""

24

11

Consolation, str.

764

R. Young

Bangkok

425

97

10

Thibet, str.

1,671

E.

Ashdown

Straits Settlements

366

G1

}}

Sh

13 | Rajanattiaauhar, str.

933

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

Si

13 Suez, str.

1,390

J. D. Eatou

Straits Settlements

341

15 | Diamante, str.

514

R. F. Cullen

Manila

23

359

428

164

23

402

24

Straits Settlements

861

Cooktown

20

"

16 Bowen, str.

844

J. Miller

Cleveland Bay

270-

Keppel Bay

}

Sydney

161

Melbourne

26

""

17 | Sarpedon, str.

1,592

J. Rea

Straits Settlements

2231

31

20

Hindostan, str.

991

R. J. McConnell

521

10:

531

""

32

"

22 | City of Peking, str..

3,448

American

H. G. Morse

San Francisco

19

496

515

83

24 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

2,560

British

R. Methven

Straits Settlements.

252

©

258

3.4

25 Dale, str.

645

""

J. Thompson

Bangkok

927!

237

C

35

27

Nestor, str.

1,435

7. W. Freeman Strails Settlements

277

277

:

36

"

30 Diamaute, str.

37

April

2 Danube, str.

514 661

"1

R, F. Cullen

Manila

23

33

J1

7 | Gaelic, str.

1,712

""

39

""

7 ¦ Gwalior, str..

1,720

"

*}

10

Consolation, str.

764

41

"

12 Deucalion, str..

1,630

">

42

14 Coloma,..

43

14 Somerset, str.

654 | British

853 | American

A. Clanely W. H. Kidley J. C. Babot R. Young R. J. Brown C. M. Noyes

J. W. B. Darke

Bangkok

369

37+

San Francisco

459

450

Straits Settlements

171

10

173

Baugkok

3631

Straits Settlements

420

Portland, Oregon

3-46

BHA

420

3446

Cooktown

Cleveland Bay

Keppel Bay.

13A

Sydney

92

Melbourne;

56

44

46

48

49975

"

15 Japan, str.

1,865

"

15 | Moray, str.

$1,427

19 Alden Bess,

842 | American

T. S. Gardner M. J. Butcher- A. Noyes.

Straits Settlements.

7941

131

78.7

199

925

27

.814

17.

Portland, Oregor

336

342

มม

17 | Rajattianuhar, str.

933 | British

17 Lombardy, str.

1,726

37

A

19 Crusader, str.

6.47

"

50

51

52

53

56

37

66

67

6633389 5 388588386 6

20 | Agamemnon, str.

1,523

1)

20 Glenroy, str...

1,411

"

22 Orestes, str.

1,323

"

23 Esmeralda, str.

295

26 Dale, str.

645

26 Laertes, str.

1,391

30 Diamante, str.

514

}}

90 Normanby, str.

58 May 59 "}

60.

73

1

"

923

"

5 Stentor, str.

1,304

"

6 Cleveland, str.

760

64.

10 | Oceanic, str.

2,440.

"}

1 City of Tokio, str.

Ajax, str.

1 | Kashgar, str.

Atholl, str.

664

""

3,448 | American 1,525 | British

1,515

""

G. T. Hopkins

W. B. Hall T. Rowin

J. Wilding

R. A. Donaldson.

J. K. Webster

R. Talbot

J. Thompson R. F. Seale R. F. Cullen

S. G. Green

J. Maury

A. Kidd

E. J. Baker

W. S. Thomson

J. Kirkpatrick

N. Harvey

J. Metcalfe

Manila

Sydney

Melbourne

San Francisco

Straits Settlements

Bangkok

104

104

Straits Settlements

171

172

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

1

237

Sydney

226

Straits Settlements

589

530

855 122

801

935

10

Bangkok

133

Straits Settlements

330

::

:

192 10

Manila

57

19 *

145

Cooktown

2

146

107

4881

ત્ય

509

330

59

255

13

503

509

140

"

653

60

*

Bangkok

>>

234

112

San Francisco

690

152

723

234 114

690

,,

10 Consolation, str.

764

"

R. Young

Bangkok

82

82

15

>>

A

11 Geelong, str.

Java,

str.

* Carried forward,.

1,139

"}

A. C. Loggin

Straits Settlements

416

18

1,037 Dutch

J. de Ridder

Cooktown

8

434

200

Sydney

201

88,277

Carried forward,..

17,797

812

061

20 18,704

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-( Continued.)

No.

DATE CLEAKED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...

88,277

Brought forward, 17,797 812 CO

29

18,704

Cooktown

4

68

May

15 Brisbane, str.

891

British

J. A. Reddell

Cleveland Bay

339

Sydney

233

Melbourne

151

SREBR

69

""

15

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

A. B. Mfactavish

Straits Settlements

282

138

420

>>

70

""

15

Suez, str.

1,390

J. D. Eaton

422

45

467

71

15

21

Nizam, str.

1,727

L. W. Brady

171

178

72

18 Strathearn,

1,101

W. Anderson

Victoria, Van's Isld.

419

16

435

73

وو

18 Rajanattianubar, str.

933

"

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

69

70

74

"

19 Diome, str.

1,241

M. H. F. Jackson

Straits Settlements

314

314

75

"

25 Belgic, str.

1,716

J

L. Meyer

San Francisco

596

596

76

"

25 | Hindostan, str.

991

"

R. J. McConnell

Straits Settlements

357

50

407

77

26

""

Patroclus, str.

1,650

M. R. White ·

229

229

78

79

80 81

27

"

Dale, str.

645

">

J. Thompson

Bangkok

901

90

31

21

Thibet, str.

1,671

"

E. Ashdown

Straits Settlements

167

167

June

1

Diamante, str.

514

R. F. Cullen

Manila

28

28

1 Antenor, str..

1,645

J. T. Bragg

Straits Settlements

294

29

223

7

Orestes, str.

"

1,323

""

J. K. Webster

132

132

83

7 | City of Peking, str.

3,448

American

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

364

པ་

330

84

7 Cleveland, str.

85

10

China, str.

769

1,037

British

N. Harvey

Bangkok

46

46

""

G.W. Atkinson

Straits Settlements

354

22

376

86

11

Consolation, str.

784

71

R. Young

Bangkok

276

277

87

11

""

Esmeralda, str.....

395

"

R. Taibot

Manila

13

17

88

12

17

Claverhouse, str.

Cooktown

0

763

"

J. Brown

Sydney

102

}

111

Cooktown

Cleveland Bay

89

14 | Bowen, str.

844

"

J. Miller

Brisbane

1

144

Sydney

79

Melbourne

54

90

རུ མ 2 གྲ ལ

"J

15 Tencer, str.

1,324

R. T. Power

Straits Settlements.

132

91

"

15 | Japan, str.

1,865

>

T. S. Gardner

122

115

>"

15 Moray, str.

1,427

"}

M. J. Butcher

169

501

17

Rajanattianubar, str.

983

94

20 Anchises, str.

1,304

"

95

23

Josefa,

06

25

Dale, str.

Menelaus, str. ...

1,559

23

93

20

"

Gaelic, str.

""

99 July 100

2

Decima, str.

815 Germau 645 British

1,712 1,135 German

G. T. Hopkins C. Jackson D. Horstmann J. Thompson J. Nied

Bangkok

66

Straits Settlements

130

Portland, Oregon

327

༣ ༩

Bangkok

128

કર

Straits Settlements

337

W. H. Kidley

San Francisco

481

A. Luthjens

Straits Settlemeats.

388

TA

"

3

Hector, sEN.

1,500

British

101

"}

Diamante, str.

514

E. Billinge R. F. Cullen

159

>>

Manila

41

132

237

219

67

130

353

130

337

485

429

159

+1

Straits Settlements Cooktown

17

102

10

Normauby, str.

664

S. G. Green ·

Cleveland Bay

50

Keppel Bay

Sydney

Melbourne

17

103 104

10

Avoca, str.

>>

005

R. G. Murray

Straits Settlements.

510

20

549

12

Antenor, str.

"

1,645

"}

J. T. Bragg

144

17

161

""

105

12

Tunis, str....

73

$87

J. W. Irvine

Bangkok

162

163

106

14 | Consolation, str.

7644

""

R. Young

561

61

107

14

**

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

125

151

276

108

14 Suez, str.

32

1,390

"

J. D. Eaton

256

59

315

109

17

Glaucus, str........

1,648

T. Jackson

164

164

>

110

20 Rajamatrianular, str.

9:3

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

101

107

111

22

Venice, str.

1,271

21

W. M. Dod

Straits Settlements

142

144

:

112

27

22 | Serapis, str.

1,271

S. F. North

157

9

172

رو

113

74

24 Oceanic, str.............

2,440

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

"}

325!

121

10

356

114

Ulysses, str...

1,561

27

A. Thompson

Straits Settlements:

319

319

115

29

Dale, str.

6:45

1

J. Thompson

Bangkok

115

115

116

August 5

Thatės, str.

820

""

S. Vincent

Port Darwin

113

113

117

6

Danube, str....

561

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

B2

133

118

6 Geelong, stľ..........

1,139

A. C. Loggin

Straits Settlements.

199

200

119

7 Cyclops, str.

1,403

C. Butler

216

921

Cooktown

120

A

9 | Brisbane, sir.

891

121

11

City of Tokio, str.

122

13 | Consolation, str.

3,448 Americân 764 British

J. A. Reddell

Sydney

Brisbane

57

Melbourne

J. Maury

San Francisco

158

167

R. Young

Bangkok

83

83

193

14 | Morny, str.

1,427

**

M. J. Butcher

Straits Settlements

174

124

14 Japan, str.

1,805

21.

T. S. Gardner

181

27

71

125

20 Rajanattianuħar, str.

933

21

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

170

126

21

Priam, str.

1,572

S. H. Butler

""

Straits Settlements

252

127

24

1)

Belgic, str.

1,716

II. Darison

}

San Francisca

85

128

30 | Sarpedon, str.

1,592

>>

J. Rea

Straits Settlements

114

129

30

Dale, str.

645

J. Thompson

Bangkok

124

130

30 | Penedo, str.

652

J. Czin

"}

Port Darwin

300

::

:

::

:

:

:

190

221

170

252

3

93

114

130

300

131

Sept.

4 Riga, str.

132

"

6 Danube, str....

921 561

"1

C. W. Raison

Straits Settlements

360

20

398

193

"

9City of Peking, str.

3,448 | American

134

11

وو

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

British

135

11 Suez, str.

"

1,390

21

A. Clanchy G. G. Berry A. B. Mactavish

J. D. Eaton

Bangkok

190

194

San Francisco

199

220

Straits Settlements

333

63

12

413

406]

20

436

136

} 1

"}

Deucalion, str.

1,639

>>

T. Punly

2351

235

"

137

"3

14 Consolation, str.

764

R. Young

Bangkok

192

195

138

18 Cassandra, sır.

937 German

139

140

21

Adria, str..

141

25 | Gaelic, str.

20 Rajanattianuhar, str.

Carried forward,.............. 181,272

933 British

781 1,712

HI. Langer

G. T. Hopkins

J. B. Chapman

Port Darwin

501

501

Bangkok

1951

8

209

Straits Settlements

261

261

:

27

W. H. Kidley

San Francisco.

230

18

249

Carried forward,..

33,641 1,762

224.

93j 35,720

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGERS SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—(Continued.)

143

October 2|

Meath, str.

144

2 | Dale, str.

145

"}

4 Menmuir, str.

146

4

Telemachus, str.

""

1,421

117

"}

7 | Danube, str.

561

148

11

""

Oceanie, str..

2,440

119

13 | Avoca, str.

905

150

15

14 Brisbane, str.

891

"}

A

NATION-

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

ALITY

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

OP SHIP.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,. 181,272

142 Sept. 30 | Quinta, str.

874 German

1,337 British

645

1,247

H. Jones

H. N. Thomsen J. Johnson J. Thompson

Brought forward, [33,641 1,762 221 Straits Settlements

93, 35,720

423j

7

434

Port Darwin

-282

345

Sydney

62

Bangkok

129

131

Port Darwin

428!

Cooktown

W. Ellis

528

Sydney

65

Melbourne

27

Straits Settlements

306

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

300

:

J. Metcalfe

R. G. Murray

J. A. Reddell

San Francisco

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Rockhampton Sydney Melbourne

3

10

Straits Settlements

399

239

MOGH

306

312

205

199

401

312

25

151

"

16 | Consolation, str.

76-4

R.

Young

Bangkok

152

16 | Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

696

571

153

"

16 Moray, str. ......

1,427

M. J. Butcher:

664

13!

ོཔ་

4

16

10

+99

سرجر

232

773

687

"

154

19 Bellerophon, str.

1,397

TW. Freeman

2941

204

""

155

"

20

Indus, str. ·........

2,200

S. D. Shallard

213

81

221

21

156

""

23 | Rajanattianuhar, str.

933

197

"

26 Diomed, str.

1,241

158

27 Thales, str.

820

Dale, str.....

1 | Stentor, str.

3 | Nizam, str.

4 | Suez, str.

30 | City of Tokio, str.

160

Nov.

1

161

182

1,727

"

163

1,390

194

11

Danube, str.

561

13

Belgic str..

1,716

13

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

13 | Olaf, str.

9786 | Danish

Zangbesi, str.

1,540 | British

A. Symons

17

Parroclus, ste.

1,650

170

1,473

"}

1,520

>>

647

11

2

Jee.

2 j Geelong, str.

2 | Ocean, str.

1,089

20 | Naples, str.

Achilles, str..

24 | Crusader, str. City of Peking, sur.

Teheran, str..

Vorwarts, str.

3,444 | American

1,671 | British 1,817 | Aust. Hung. 1,199 | British

G. G. Berry

A. C. Loggin G. Marnesig

G. W. Atkinson

H. Webber

Bangkok

>>

San Francisco

Straits Settlements

3,448 | American 645 | British

1,304

G. T. Hopkins M. H. F. Jackson

S. Vincent

J. Maury J. Thompson J. Kirkpatrick L. W. Brady

J. D. Eaton

A. Clanchy H.

Davison

A. B. Mactavish

J. A. Andresen

M. R. White

C. White

C. Anderson

Port Darwin Cooktown

Sydney

San Francisco

San Francisco Straits Settlements

Bangkok

84

Straits Settlements

450

197

1

50

161

Bangkok

194

Straits Settlements

4321

co co or

Go

91

450

248

166

202

435

172

172

"}

4241

67

16

515

Bangkok

1293

1

130

120

1

JO

131

517 141

10

678

100

166

1581

155

2471

247

282

331

307

168

153

T. Rowin

125

26!

1:4

167

:

13

*260*

336

""

Port Darwin

196

Sydney

50

173

4 Rajanattiaunhar, str.

933

>>

G. T. Hopkins

Bangkok

801

93

179

11 | Menelaus, stæ.

1,559

J. Nicol

Straits Settlements

230

39

13 Gaelic, str.

1,713

W. H. Kidley

San Francisco

236

249

13 | Danube, str.

581

A. Clanchy

Bangkok

228

230

132

15 | Ancona, sir,

1,974

E.

G.

"

183

16| Moray, str.

1,427

Stead M. J. Butcher

Straits Settlements 196

198

61

24

646

>>

134

16 | Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

5061

155

683

"

> }

20 | Auchises, str.

1,904

C. Jackson

260

260

Port Darwin

24

Cooktown

186

20 Menmuir, str:

1,247

W. Ellis

Rockhampton Sydney

173

DRI

Melbourne

16

187

IZN

189

190

29 | Dale, str.

645

J. Thompson

" " "

>>

Bangkok

Gol

26 | Hector, sir.

1,590

""

F. Billinge

Struits Settlements

159|

28

Glaucus. str.

1,643

T. S. Jackson

288

100

Port Darwin

971

دو

28 Meath, str.

1,337

J. Johnson

Cooktown

64

159

292

213

1

Sydney

771

101

"

29 | Kashgar, str.

1,515

W. A. Seaton

Straits Settlements

149

༠༣

151

192

30 | Ocranic, str.

2,440

>> ""

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

270

1

14

204

Total Tons,

253,110

Total Passengers,.

47,438 2,313

424

150

50,325

To Bangkok,

")

Brisbane,

Cleveland Bay,

Cooktown,

Dunedin, New Zealand,

Keppel Bay,

"

"

Mauila,

"

21

"

Melbourne,

Port Darwin,

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

Rockhampton,

San Francisco, U.S.A.,.

Straits Settlements,

Sydney,

Victoria, Vancouver's Island,

SUMMARY.

6,161 7

57

212

526

74

5+

16 6,305

7

12

58

7

5

216

526

2,267

2,268

1,009

12

1,021

3:

3

6,006!

52 153

24

28,672 2,183

180

110

6,235 31,145

2,075

419

7

2,082

16

435

Total Passengers,

47,438 2,313

424

150!

50,925

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Emigration Officer, &c.

XX.-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1880.

No.

DATE ARRIVED,

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

V.

F

M.

I

January 2 Diamante, str.

514 British

2 Menelaus, str.

1,559

Thebaud Billinge

Manila

121

121

Straits Settlements

445

15

460

>>

3

Suez, str.

1,390

"

Eaton

98

93

3 Venice, str.

1,271

Rhode

160

10

170

"

9 Hector, str.

1,590

Jones

246

6

252

103

2

"

Cooktown

39

Townsville

91 Menmuir, str.

1,247

Ellis

Rockhampton

Brisbane

252

14

Sydney

19

Dunedin, N.Z.

16

Melbourne

431

10

7893

10 | Gaelic, str.

1,713

Kidley

San Francisco

741

741

"

13 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

959

Webb

2:

Straits Settlements

3041

3

315

"

13 Esmeralda, str.

395

Talbot

"

Manila

103

103

14 Geelong, str.

1,139

Stewart

11

Straits Settlements

58

58

11

15 Glengyle, str.

1,263

12

13

"

19 Diamante, str.

14

15

"1

19

21

Coloma.....

16

39

17

18

24 Ulysses, str...

19 Glaucus, str.

Emuy, str.

22 Escambia, str..

23 Rajanattianuhar, str..

853 American

1,401 British

Noyes

1,647

Quartly Jackson

36

37

319

323

514

222 Spanish

Cullen Blanco

Manila

130

130

30

11

30

Portland, Oregon

161

164

Wildgoose

Straits Settlements

27

27

933

Hopkins

Bangkok

255

1,560

Guard

Straits Settlements

245

→ LO

259

250

19

26 | City of Tokio, str.

3,148 American

Maury

San Francisco

590

590

20

27 Nizam, str.

1,727 British

Barlow

Straits Settlements

108

122

21

28 Jeddah, str.

993

Clarke

253

">

260

30 | Consolation, str...

764

Young

Bangkok"

61

62

31 | Esineralda, str.

395

Talbot

Manila

174

174

24

31 Benarty, str.

1,119

Potter

Straits Settlements

135

140

February 2 Sarpedon, str..

1,592

Rea

"

296]

77

300

26

Diamante, str.

614

Cullen

Manila

70

:

70

4 Kenmure Castle, str.

1,260

Luck

"

Straits Settlements

ՏՈ

82

23

6 | Glenlyon, str.

1,374

"

Wallace

274

278

7 Moray, str.

1,427

Butcher

130

J1

15

149

30

7 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

Mactavish

145

10

137

9Priam, str.

1,572

Butler

147

150

9 Thibet, str.

1,671

"

Ashdown

31

35

""

13 Normanby, str.

664

Port Darwin

94

Green

Sydney

28

122

34

**

16 | Esmeralda, str.

305

Talbot

Manila

271

28

35

16 | Cheang Hock Kian, str.

959

Webl

Straits Settlements

124

36

17 | Belgic, str.

1.715

Meyer

San Francisco

:

200

37

21 Lombardy, str.

1.726

Hall

Straits Settlements

28

38

21 Brisbane, str.

891

Reddell

32

39

24 Diamante, str..

514

Cullen.

Manila

100

100

Straits Settlements

92

Cooktown

13

Townsville

40

25 Bowen, str.

844

Miller

Rockhampton

Brisbane

798

175

Sydney

22

Melbourne

25

41

28 Nestor, str.

1,435

Freeman

Straits Settlements

267

267

42 March 1 | Rajanattianuhar, str.

933

Hopkins

Bangkok

61

61

43

2 Laertes, str..

1,391

19

Scale

Straits Settlements

250

10

260

44

3 Glamis Castle, str.

1,559

1)

45

Suez, str.

1,590

Greig Eaton

55

>

Į

56

314

28

342

"

J▼

...

46

8 Venice, str.

1,271

77

Rhode

195

200

17

8 Jeddah, str..

993

Clark

300

27

5

8

315

18

8 Kaisar-i-Hind, str..

2,560

79

Methven

80

2

82

49

9 Diamante, str....

514

"}

Cullen

Manila

80

80

50

11 Glenroy, str.

1,411

:

Donaldson

Straits Settlements

169

1

170

51

Y

11 City of Peking, str.

52

12 Deucalion, str.

3,448 American 1,639 British

Morse

San Francisco

103

Brown

Straits Settlements

310

15

125

105

325

53

وو

15 Esmeralda, str.

395

22

Talbot

Manila

52

52

54

17

17

Orestes, str....

1,323

"}

Webster

Straits Settlements

2441

12

256

55

"

20

Dale, str.

645

"}

Thompson

Bangkok

33

H

1.

34

56

20 Gleneagles, str.

1,837

McBain

Straits Settlements

217

217

57

22 Agamemnon, str.

1,522

):

Wilding

300

20

320

58

"

22

Emuy, str.

222 Spanish

Blanco

Manila

77

77

59

37

23

Diamante, str.

514 British

Cullen

-100

100

60

25

27 Danube, str.

561

"

Clanchy

Bangkok

31

32

61

62

30 ¦ Ajax, str.

1,525

Kidd

Straits Settlements

437

15

10

462

30 Gaelic, str.

1,713

Kidley

San Francisco

253

257

Straits Settlements

119

Townsville.

63

11

30 Somerset, str.

654

>>

Darke

Keppel Bay

Brisbane

155-

Sydney

Melbourne

12

64

争量

30 Esmeralda, str.

395

Talbot.

Manila

37

37

65 April

1

Moray, str.

1,427

66

""

1 Consolation, str....

764

21

67

"

2 Glenfalloch, str..

1,419

Butcher Young Park

Straits Settlements:

941

101

Bangkok

821

88

""

Straits Settlements

117

3

F

150

68

"

3 Japan, str.

69

6 Kashgar, str.

1,865 1,515

"

Gardner Baker

329 21

""

350

62

62

70

"

6 | Emuy, str.

222 Spanish

Blanco

Manila

32

32

Carried forward..

84,198

Carried forward.

11,875 304

31

5

12,218

RETURN OF VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,→( Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

I

M.

M

71 April

Brought forward........

84,198

7 Glencoe, str.

1,901 British

Gulland

Brought forward... 11,875 301

34

5

12,218

72

Straits Settlements

""

7 Rajanattianuhar, str..

119

119

933

""

73

27

7 Cassandra, str.

Hopkins

Bangkok

81

4

937 German

85

74

Langer

Straits Settlements

8 Diamante, str.

9 | Ocean, str.

10 Stentor, str..

69

1

514 British

7.t

Cullen

Manila

100

1,039

100

Webber

Port Darwin

120

1,304

78

$2

83

84

12 Diomed, str.

15 Nizam, str.

79

""

15 Esmeralda, str.

80

3

>>

16| Fohkien, str.

"

19

City of Tokio, str.

"1

19

Dale, str.

19

Sunbeam, str.

1,241

77

Kirkpatrick Jackson

120

Straits Settlements

290

10

300

:)

141

145

1,727

Brady

"

55

395

19

Talbot

Manila

80

16 Loudoun Castle, str.

3,448 American

645 | British

1,612

>Y

Marshall

Straits Settlements

215

509

Ashton

"1

66

Maury

San Francisco

286

286

Thomson

Bangkok

56

1,154

Dobson

22

Straits Settlements

77

66

427

8 2 2 2 2 8 2

55 80 219

66

60

79

<

Cooktown

36

85

21 Menmuir, str.

1,247

Townsville

14

Ellis

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

5

211

18

87

Melbourne

5

86

23 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Metcalfe

Straits Settlements

177

87

24 Emuy, str.

180.

96

97

98

99

8 a 28888888

222 Spanish

Blanco

Manila

83

24 Diamante, str.

34

514 British

Cullen

150

89

26 | Glenartuey, str.

150

1,400

21

Auld,

Straits Settlements

167

167

90

26 | Normanby, str.

664

Green

Port Darwin

68

""

91

26| Danube, str.

Sydney

14

82

561

""

02

30 Kashgar, str.

1,515

>>

Clanchy Baker

Bangkok

501

ㄓˋ

5+

Straits Settlements

27

2*

93

Strathleven, str.

1,588

:

Pearson

Esmeralda, str..

"

30

395

Talbot

Manila

67

95

3

Consolation, str.

764

})

4

Guy Mannering, sir.

2,114

Young Mann

Bangkok

76

79

Straits Settlements

121

123

}}

5

Geelong, str.

1,139

Loggin

91

92

5

,་

Snez, str.

1,390

Eaton

110

60

"

8) Arratoon Apcar, str.

"

200

1,392

Mactavish

390

30

100

10 | Carisbrooke, str..................

"7

420

960

Wharton

144

150

101

"

10 | Antenor, str.

1,644

102

10 Diamante, str.

514

103

10 Rajagattiamuhar, str.

938

13

Bragg Cullen Hopkins

170

6

180

Manila

100

Bangkok

104

115

104

+

11 | Belgic, str.

1,716

17

105

>>

12 Glenroy, str.

Meyer

San Francisco

186

156

Donaldson

Straits Settlements

273

108

JJ

12

Jeddah, str..

N

286

993

107

Iz

Tunis. str.

21

886

Clark irvine

150

??

Bangkok

73)

150 78

Straits Settlements

9

Cooktown

49

108

12 Brisbane, str.

894

Reddell

Townsville

Bowen

162

Brisbane

109

Sydney

89

13 Orestes, str......

1.823

Webster

Straits Settlements

120

120

110

13 Peshawur, str.

2,103

Rennoldson

66

111

18 Tencer, str.

1,324

Power

, រ

77

279)

20

62 305

112

"

18 Esmeralda, str.

395

Talbot

113

"

20: Dale, str.

645

Thomson

Manila Bangkok

102)

102

78

8:

114

"

21

Electra, str...

1,161 German

Bochme

Straits Settlements

123

128

115

25

Anchises, str.

1,304 | British

Jackson

296

"

304

116

D

25 Emuy, str.

222) Spanish

Blanco

Manila

48

48

117

})

25 Diamante, str.

514 British

Cullen

150

150

118

25 | (Eolus, str.

302

Waugh

Bangkok

63

63

119

28 Gwalior, str.

120

*

28 Glenorchy, str.

1,718 1,778

Babot

"

Straits Settlements

901

121

77

122

31 Cleveland, str.

123 124

June

2 | City of Tokio, str.

"1

2 Moray, str.

125

""

2 Oxfordshire, str.

31 | Cheang Hock Kian, str.

3,448 American 1,427 British

Jones

956

Quartly Webb

400

20

420

374

15

"

380

769

Harvey

Bangkok

71

71

Berry

San Francisco

229

229

Butcher

Straits Settlements

225

234

998

30

""

30

126

127

י

3 Consolation, str..

128

2 Lord of the Isles, str.

Japan, str.

1,536

Felgate

122

128

+7

+

764

23

1.29

"

5 China, str.

1,865 1,037

Young Gardner

Bangkok

132

8

110

Straits Settlements

262

63

325

2

Atkinson

165

"

169

130

"

5 Esmeralda, str.

27

395

"

131

7

Emny, str.

222 Spanish

Talbot Blanco

Manila..

93

93

27

27

132

}:

9 Rajanattiannbar, str..

933 British

Hopkins

Bangkok

207

213

133

9 Menelaus, str..

1,559

Nicol

Straits Settlements

402

402

12

""

Port Darwin

130

Cooktown

Townsville

134

"

10 Bowen, str.

881

Miller

Rockhampton

349

Brisbane

Dunedin, N.Z.

25

Sydney

400

Melbourne

40

135

11 Diamante, str.

136

11 Mirzapore, str.

137

14 Hector, str.

138

"

14 Fleurs Castle, str.

139

14 Hermine

140

514

Cullen

Manila

200

2,090

Parish

Straits Settlements.

145

1.

1,589

""

Bellinge

350

35

J?

1,622

"

16 Yoritomo Maru, str.,

·Carried forward..

289 Swedish

612 Japanese

Kidder

601

Loungrin Cotter

Honolulu

140

فرخ

A

200

145

385

60

150

Straits Settlements

35

165,198

Carried forward....

22,261 679

10

23,008

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continned).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

CHILDREN.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M. F. J

141

June

21

Brought forward..... Antenor, str.

165,198

1,644 British

142

21 Atalanta, str.

787 German

Bragg Platf

Brought forward... 22,261|| Straits Settlements

679

Si

58

10

23,008

310

13

323

28

N

143

21 Date, str.

""

30

645 British

Thomson

144

>>

21 | Esmeralda, str.

395

Talbot

Bangkok Manila

93

93

85

85

115

"

22 Emuy, str.

222 Spanish.

Blanco

60

146

"

22 Gaelic, str.

"

60

1,712 British

Kidley

San Francisco

159

147

"

22 Ancona, str.

159

1,974

Stead

Straits Settlements

79

79

148

""

23 Glaucus, str.

1,648

Jackson

189

149

1

23 Glenfinlas, str.

"

200

1,408

Wilcox

200

>>

150

17

26 Gleniffer, str.

""

200

1,412

Graham

139

D

"

140

151

་་

28

Diamante, str.

511

Cullen

Manila

140

""

140

152 July

1

Suez, str.

1,390

Eaton

"}

Straits Settlements

240

10

250

158

3 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

Mactavish

246

20

11

*

266

154

3 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

376

19

4

11

382

155

3 Thornhill, str...

967

Walker

30

>>

**

30

156

5 Avoca, str.

905

Murray

103

108

157

5 Consolation, str.

768

Young

Bangkok

92

10

102

158

27

5 Cleveland, str.

769

Harvey

$5

86

159

160

!་

7 Emuy, str.

7 Ulysses, str.

222 Spanish

Blanco

Manila

80

80

1,561 British

Thomson

Straits Settlements

426

11

437

161

"

8 Ravenna, str.

2,118

Lee

140

21

140

Thursday Island

Cooktown

24

Townsville

162

10 Normanby, str.

664

Green

Brisbane

102

Syduey 1

Dunedin, N.Z.

22

Melbourne

163

12 Diamante, str.

514

Cullen

Manila

200

12| Rajanattianuhar, str.

933

Hopkins

Bangkok

147

153

165

12 Gordon Castle, str.

1,519

186

B3 | Cyclops, str.

1,403

Waring Butler

Straits Settlements

196

200

391

1125

411

167

17 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

269

269

168

17 Crusader, str.

647

Rowin

Port Darwin

731

Cooktown

124

169

19 | Dale, str.

645

Thomson

Bangkok

28

170

20 | Pekin, str.

2,232

Rabbie

Straits Settlements

167

167

171

21 Emuy, str.

227

Spanish

Blanco

Manila

78

78

172

21! Norseman

711 Siamese

Ecclestone

Bangkok

30

30

22 Atholl, str.

174

23 | Esmeralda, str.

395

923 British

Talbot

Thomson

60

60

Manila

42

42

27 | Carisbrooke, str..

960

Landweer

Straits Settlements

2201

233

176

Feronia, str.

1,115 German

Peterson

15

145

::

177

31 | Priam, str.

31

Diamante, str.

August | City of Tokio, str.

1,572 British

Butler

419

20

""

439

514

Culien

Manila

200

;

200

+

3,448 American

Maury

San Francisco

113

122

180

2 Japan, str.

1,665 British

Gardner

Straits Settlements

2321

265

181

2 | Moray, str.

1,427

Butcher

160!

19

!!

180

182

5 Robiila, str..

2,227

Barratt

170

"J

123

5

Consolation, str..

763

.་

6 Tunis, str.

886

Young Irvine

Bangkok

47

42)

42

Straits Settlements

Port Darwin

37

Cooktown

22

185

6

Brisbane, str.

891

Reddell

Townsville

11

128

Rockhampton

Brisbane

Sydney

186

7 Agamemnon, str.

1,522

187

7 | Sarpedon, str..

1,591

Wilding Rea

Straits Settlements

12

208

111

"

115

153

7 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

222

226

189

9 Esmeralda, str.

395

Talbot

Manila

102

102

190

12 Olaf, str.

976 Danish

13 Rajanattianuhar, str.

933 British

192

16 | Belgic, str.

1,716

103

17 | Octava, str.

852 German

Anderson Hopkins Davison Hansen

Straits Settlements

421

42

Bangkok

7+

75

San Francisco

136

136

Straits Settlements

29

29

17 Escambia, str..

1,401 British

Wildguose

91

91

""

195

18 Deucalion, str.

1.639

196

18 China, str.

1.039

197

19 Khiya, str.

1.506

193

>>

24 | Ajax, str.

1,525

Purdy Atkinson

Alderton

Kidd

4496

};

25

10 01

455

30

7

71

:

71

211

"

199

21 Glencoe, str.

1,901

Gurland

10 00

225

100

>

Port Darwin

16

200

27 Claverhouse, str.

763

Brown

Cooktown

20

39

Sydney

201

27 Bombay, str.

740

202

371

30 Laertes, str.......

1,891

Goggin Scale

Straits Settlements

125

130

146

146

"

203

30 | Danube, str.

561

205

>>

204 Sept.

1 | City of Peking, str.

Arratoon Apear, str.

3,448 American

1,392 British

Berry

11

Clanchy

Bangkok

70

70

San Francisco

2561

256

206

1 Suez, str.

207

3 Lombardy, str.

208

209

3 | Loudoun Castle, str.

Ceylon

1,390 1,726) 1.615

Mactavish Eaton

Straits Settlements

180

12

192

100

125

11

"

Adamson

83

83

681 American

Marshall Hadyn

30

30

Honolulu Straits Settlements

13

1

It

15

A

Cooktown

42

210

4 Somerset, str.

654 British

Darke

Townsville

9

114

Brisbane

10

211

Consolation, str..

764

Young

Sydney Bangkok

36

52

52

Carried forward.

250,605

Carried forward..

32,326 966

77

15

33,384

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—( Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

'SHIP'S NAME.

Toss.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

CHILDREN.

TOTAL.

M

F

M.

Brought forward....

250,805

212 Sept.

Telemachus. str....

213

11

Glenearn, str.

1,121 British 1410

Jones Gasson

Brought forward...32,326|| 966 Straits Settlements

77

15

33.384

442;

8.

450

2

170

4

174

21

11

Stentor, str...

1,304

11

Cheng Hock Kian, str.

956

Kirkpatrick Webb

91

91

J

3231

9

341

216

11 Rajanattianular, str....

933

Hopkins

Bangkok

61

61

217

15 | Gaelic, str.

1,713

Kidley

San Francisco

207

207

218

15 Meath, str.

1,587

Johnson

Newcastle, N.S.W.

19

Port Darwin

26

t5

Port Darwin

219

17 Menmuir, str.

1,247;

Ellis

Cooktown

43

Sydney

40

220 221

17

Nizam, str.

1,727

Bradley

Straits Settlements

136

136

20

21 | Bellerophon, str.

27 Glenartney, str.

27 Hakon Adelsten, str..

Indus, str.

29 Fiva, str.

30 Oceanic. str.

30 Danube, str. 30 | Japan, atr.

1,897

Freeman

17

399;

399

1,400

Auld

2500

250

905 Norwegian

Bergh

90

90

2,200 British :

Shallard

61

61

1,037 Dutch

Ridder

Port Darwin

32

32

2,410 British

Metcalle

San Francisco

251

251

561

Clanchy

Bangkok

90

90

1,865

Gardner

Straits Settlements

480

18

10

511

224

ber 2| Momy, str.

1,428

Butcher

331

386

230

Patrocius, ste.

1.650

White

316

320

Diomed, str.

1.241

Jackson

130

Glamis Castle, str..

1.559

Greig

76

#1

77

Gleneagles, str.

1,837

Taylor

102

105

Avoca, str.

905

Murray

30

.:

Lorne, str.

1.035

McKechnie

116

30 119

Port Darwin

15

Brisbane, str.

891

Cooktown

221

Reddell

Sydney

$1

Melbourne

Orestes, sir...

1323

Webster

Straits Settlements

300

Lazabosi, sir.

1,59

Synous

113

tari devonden, str..

960

Wharton

2

GO

atikanukan, EN

Hopkins

Bangkok

67

847 Chinese

Peterson

Honolulu

278

of Dakle, str.

3.448 American

Maury

-uez, str.

1,30) British

Baton

San Francisco

Straits Settlements

500

40

Ascona A »mir, str.

1.992

Mautavish

158

Lises, stb.

1.304

Jackson

371

les, str.

1.5528

Anderson

334

ría, stc.

1,135 Germán

...!, str.

1039 British

Webber

Moleje, str.

1.76

1.671

Cumorchy, str.

1,779

Davison

Leven Quartly

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

Johanssen

: Cooktown

San Francisco

Straits Settlements

:

125

3.82

Vorwaeris, str.

Kashgar, str.

1,514 British

Pee.

Odenlyon,str.

1,373

Carisbrooke, str..

960

Meamnir, str.

232

Bowen, str.

891

Miller

Rockhampton

207

Brisbane

Dunedin, N.Z.

Sydney

Melbourne

Darabe, sir.

561

Clanehs

Bangkok

89

muri, str.

705

Grenfell

Straits Settlements

3961

"

400

Itor, str.

1,5891

Billinge

531

581

20| Geelong, str.

Tower, str.

Ancona, sir.

18 Breconshire, str..

18 | Glemánias, str.'

18 | City of Peking, str.

90| Rajanatsiaquhar, str.

Menelans, str........

1,824

1,974

Power Stead

2071

221

109

1.240

Thomas

1,409

Wilcox

30 3201

30

320

3,448 American

Berry

San Francisco

906!

900

983 British

Hopkins

Bangkok

128

1.739

Atkinson

Straits Settlements

134

1,659

Nichols

400

1,817 | Austro-Hung. Marnesig

418

Cole Donaldson Wharton

111

360

198

02 16

4 2

BL

139

400

418

111

371

200

Port Darwin

Cooktown

2018

1,247

Ellis

Townsville

173

Sydney

Dunedin, N.Z.

260

Ulysses. str.

1.560

Thomson

Straits Settlements

350

"

270

6 | Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

28

273

19

37.

271

6 | Mommy, str.

1.427

Butcher

331]

331

"

273

6 | Danube, str.

561

Gaelic, str.

1.712

Gluuens, str.

1,647

Clauchy Kidley

Jackson

Baugkok

119

120

San Francisco

575

Straits Settlements

100

100

Mirzapore, str.

9.270

Parish

101

101

"}

276

13 Radnorshire, str.

1,201

Davis

30

30

Port Darwin

277

Cooktown

26

13|| Meath, str.

1,337

Johnson

80

Brisbane

18

Melbourne

30.

273

15 | Glenfalloch, str.

1.418

Park

Straits Settlements

356

279

17 | Oceanic, sir,

2,440

;;

280

23 | Nestor, sir.

1,458

Metcalfe Jago

San Francisco

766

356 766

Straits Settlements

538

588

Carried forward,

349,582

Carried forward........... | 48,137|1,147 121

26

49,434

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, Continued).

DATE

No.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

ARRIVED.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL

OF SHIP.

M.

F.

M. I

281

Dec.

262

283

"

Brought forward.

23 | Avoca, 24 Kenmure Castle, str... 28 | Lombardy, str.

3-19,582

str.

904 | British

1,268

1,716

""

284

28

Cyclops,

str.

1,403

Murray Luck Chapman Butler

Brought forward....... 48,137 1,147

Straits Settlements

124

26

19,134

27

27

60

122

:::

60

122

150

150

285

286

28 | Cheang Hock Kian, str. 28 Mars, str.

956

1

Webb 1,362 (Austro-Hung.] Colombo.

319

10

co

341

115

115

Port Darwin

Cooktown

237

21

28 Brisbane, str.

$91 British

Reddell

Townsville Sydney

152

Melbourne

Dunedin, N.Z.

288 289

29 | Rajanattianuhar, str. 30 Coloma...

933

200

2.

31 Thales, str.

853 American $20 British.

Hopkins Noyes Vincent

Bangkok

Portland, Oregon Cooktown

227

1

3

231

318

2

350

Newcastle, N.S.W.

29

20

TOTAL TONS...

360,688

TOTAL PASSENGERS.

49,686 1,160 132

51,011

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

VALUE OF

TOTAL. TREASURE

SUMMARY.

BROUGHT.

M.

I.

M.

1.

From Bangkok,

3,110

84

3,197

Bowen,

Brisbane,

>>

Cooktown,

2

119

119

546

546

$319,543

Manila,

Melbourne,

Port Darwin,

Sydney,

Dunedin, N.Z.,

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

Keppel Bay,

Newcastle, N.S.W.,

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

Rockhampton,

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

Straits Settlements,

Thursday Island,

Townsville.

182

182

405

18

10

4

437

1

3,268

3

I

220

220

**

30

509!

514

690

690

$17,835

99

20

2.116

32,723 1,931

19

7,185 $4,596,959

122

25 35,901

595

595

$416,125

320

1201

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

49,686| 1,160

132

33

342

51,011 $5,350,762

H. G. THOMSETT, B.N., Emigration Officer, je.

XXI-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the Year 1880.

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF.

NO. OF

NATURE OF CHARGE.

No. of CASES.

DE- FEND-

ANTS.

Impri- Impri-

soned with Hard

soned in

Fined.

default

Forfei- ture of Pay.

Repri-

manded.

Sent back to Duty.

To be dis- charged from

Dis- missed.

Labour. of Fine.

Ship.

Absent from Ship without Leave,. Arrival without Report (Junk), Assault,

Broaching Cargo, &c.,.

Desertion,

.......

G

18

19

10

3

Discharging Fire Arm in Harbour,

Disorderly Conduct,

Drunkenness,

False particulars, Giving (Junk),

10

3

1

2

Found stowed away,

10

Harbour Regulations, Breach of,

Insubordination,

Leaving withont Clearance (Junk),

232

L

Merchant Shipping Act, 1854,

1

Neglect of Duty,

Refusal of Duty

14

48

21

Wilfully remaining behind,

3

3

3

TOTAL,

85

140

56

21

25

01

AMOUNT OF

FINES,

$ 3.50

57.89

1.00

5.00

3

3.00

5.00 0.70

16

9

12.00

6.00

11

19

S96.09

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N.,

Marine Magistrate, &c.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 156.

The following Annual Report from the Postmaster General is published for general information.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 30th April, 1881.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

1880.

GENERAL POST Office, HONGKONG, April 12th, 1881.

Sis.—I have the honour to report on the British Postal service in Hongkong and China during

2. The main feature of interest has been the steady extension of the Postal Union, until it may now be said that only two groups of countries of considerable importance are not included in it. These are the Australasian and South African Colonies. With regard to the former, a Postal con- ference was to assemble at Melbourne in November last to discuss the Union and other questions. of these important Colonies into the Postal

world. circumstances

It is much

to

be hoped

the

system

which

now

embraces

3.

In

the

case

of

the

result may be

almost all Australasian

the

entrance

the

rest

of

the

group,

local

this Colony to

reduce

have

enabled

Government of

the our outward postage, by the principal route, to the Union tariff, thus effecting one more considerable step towards uniformity. It is curious to observe, however, that the more simplicity is attained, and the easier Postal arrangements become, by far more mistakes are made, not only by the public, but also by the Departmental Staff. When each country in Europe was treated on a special and different Postal tariff, some with a half ounce unit, some with a quarter ounce, people. were forced to acquaint themselves with the various rates of Postage, and knew inore about them than they do now. When newspaper postage from England was twopence by one mail and a penny by the other, newspapers were prepaid with fair correctness and regularity. Now that the postage is three- halfpence by either route, the very simplicity of the arrangement seems to carry it beyond the compre- hension of the average poster of newspapers, for the sacksful of short paid papers which arrive (and the new Tariff is now a year old) attest that it is as far from being generally understood as ever. Even when the three-halfpenny postage has been mastered, the senders appear to have no idea that three-halipence will only pay for four ounces, but post papers weighing twelve and fourteen with apparently

confidence

as

to

every their free delivery. ese short paid papers have proved a serious impediment to the rapid sorting and delivery of mails. About this time last year the English public was just beginning to discover the French mail to be the cheaper opportunity of the two, and though this is no longer the case, the consequent augmentation of the mail will probably continue for years. The time required to sort the French mail, which had once been (under exceptionally favourable circumstances) as little as half an hour, crept up to an hour and a half. Then the short paid papers began to arrive, and the hour and a half threatened to become two hours. Even when the mail was sorted, its delivery was much retarded. Everybody had to pay two cents at least, and nobody had two cents ready. The difficulty has mat by leaving the short paid papers to stand over till is time to deal with them, and consequent delay in their delivery induces more care in prepayment, the object of this Office

been attained.

there

been

if the will have

5.(The sale of Post cards has exceeded all expectations. They were introduced because it was obligatory to issue them, but it was not expected that more than a few dozen would be sold. Some difficulty was experienced in keeping pace with the demand. At least two-thirds of those purchased.. however, have gone to gratify the mania for Stamp-collecting, which seems to increase with the obsta/les surrounding it. It is difficult to make votaries of the great science of Philately understand that Post Offices exist for any other purposes than to supply them with every conceivable variety and shade of Postage stamp. The object of a Postal Administration, on the other hand, naturally is to get rid of all odds and ends, temporary or obsolete issues, and such like, as quickly as possible.

2

6. After twenty years of existence as a Colonial Post Office, this Department has at last succeeded (in eliminating pence from its dealings with the public. As late as last year the charges on all unpaid correspondence were made in pence, the accounts were kept in Sterling, and the Postage Stamps in use represented sixpences, shillings, &c. We have now got something like a decimal series, adapted to the Colonial currency. It may be possible to improve it as years go on.

7. The general Statistics taken in November 1879 may be said to have been fairly successful. There has not been one-tenth as much correspondence and misunderstanding arising from them as was the case with the Statistics of 1877. Those to be taken in May of the present year will, it is to be hoped, pass off with all the smoothness of routine.

(8. The general principle of the Statistics is, to observe carefully during one calendar month the actual weights of correspondence forwarded, which are multiplied by 12 to give an approximate total for the year.), This Colony was very unfortunate in the fact that during the Statistical month of November 1879 there were three departures of the French Contract packets (November 1, 15, and 29), so that Hongkong had to pay during 1879 and 1880 as if there were 36 French mails in each year, whereas there are only 26. The appropriate multiplier would have been, but though this Depart- ment received the sympathy and support of the London Post Office in its endeavours to establish that multiplier, the French Adininistration (supported, it must be admitted, by the letter of the documents authoritative in the matter) declined to accede to this reduction. Such a case indicates a defective principle, which would be remedied by extending the Statistics over 28 days only, and multiplying the results by 13. It is to be hoped this proposition will be brought forward at the next Postal Con- gress; it has already been suggested by this Office.

1 Since the above was written. this conference has been postponed. 2 Sic in a letter from a distinguished Philatelist.

9. Local statistics, for the purpose of framing the tabular information required by the International Bureau, were taken during 28 days of last November.). A table is appended comparing their results with those obtained in the same way in 1879. The statistician must indeed have the courage of his convictions who attempts to depend on figures obtained in this way. It is like estimating what a man will eat in a year from what he consumes at one chance meal. The result might do very well to print in a Blue Book, but nobody would use it as a basis on which to victual a ship. A glance at Table C appended to this Report, under the head of Books, &c., will shew that the increase in 1880 purports to be more than the whole number forwarded in 1879! Such a result is not in the least consonant with reality, the fact being that, as far as can be judged from ordinary observation, there has been very little increase, if any at all.

10. The Money Order system with some of the Australasian Colonies, commenced last year, has been availed of by Chinese resident in Queensland and New South Wales to an extent which was hardly expected at first. Indeed, as far as this Office is concerned, the system may almost be said to have been too successful, for it nearly monopolises the time of a clerk and a shroff, who have had to be detached from other duties. Chinese cannot be dealt with so quickly in Money Order matters as Europeans. An Englishman who has an Order to cash takes the money given to him and goes away. With a Chinese, the vexed question, What is a pound? assumes a knotty and complicated aspect. To his mind a sovereign represents the highest price he could get for it after a morning spent in haggling at the gold-shops. This Office has generally to offer him a few cents less. Even when the rate of exchange is settled, the difficulties are not ended. At 3/72d., for instance, a sovereign may be represented by either $5.49 or $5.48. To pay the former sum involves a trifling loss; to pay the latter secures a trifling profit. Nobody but a Chinese would go into the fractions of a cent, but the China- man not only does so, but even considers himself defrauded of them. It should be said, however, that the Chinese here are learning, as they learn everything, that the Post Office will not chaffer with them, and this does not appear to affect the popularity of the Money Order system.

11. The Money Order system of the London Post Office is naturally looked upon as a model for British Colonies. It is an excellent system, but somewhat complicated and elaborate; not more so, perhaps, than is necessary where the orders are numerous, and the amounts forwarded in either direction very far from being equal. It is certain, however, that a small Money Order system can be effectively carried on between two Colonies, and be a great convenience to either, without the lists, duplicate lists, percentage on commission, and other formalities required under the London rules. Such is the sim- plified system of this Office with Yokohama, with Shanghai, and with the Straits Settlements. An advice is forwarded for each order issued, and accounts are periodically compared, the balance due being forwarded to whichever office is entitled to it. Each office keeps the commission it collects, and all the forms used are simplified as far as possible. There would be but few obstacles to a general Inter-Colonial Money Order system on this easy plan, but if the London details be insisted on (and some Colonies insist on them) the amount of writing and of labour involved becomes prohibitive.

12. Communications were addressed to all the Australasian Colonies requesting their co-operation in the establishment of an Inter-colonial Parcel Post, such as is worked between this Colony and the Straits Settlements without any resultant inconvenience. They have all declined, and all, or nearly all, on the same ground-Customs difficulties. As the subject is still, however, to be discussed at the Australasian conference mentioned above, and has also been under consideration in Europe, it may, per- haps, be permissible to devote a few words to it. The subject of parcel post is interesting to most resi- dents in China, because there are so many little objects of Chinese or Japanese manufacture which such persons naturally wish to send to their friends elsewhere. A preliminary objection as to the supposed invasion of the carrying business of Steamer Companies may be first disposed of. If the public were to be allowed to send carpets, overcoats, &c., through the post (as was once the case when the sample post to England was somewhat abused), whether under the title of Parcels, or of Samples, the carrying companies might fairly object, as, in the instance in question, they did. But if the parcel post be strictly confined to small things (menus objets) as is proposed, then the parcels to be carried become precisely those of which Steamer Companies had rather be rid than otherwise.

13. To be at once effective, popular, and successful, a Parcel Post scheme requires three conditions::

(1.) Freedom from any further formalities as to declaration of contents than may be neces-

sary to prevent the transmission of liquids, explosives, &c.

2.) One moderate prepayment to ensure free delivery at the door of the addressee. (3.) Absolute freedom from Customs duties or interference.

carsels.

14. In the case of the existing Indian Parcel Post, the sender has to fill up a declaration of con- tents, sometimes required in triplicate, sometimes also in French. He has to enclose his parcel in an. outer cover to the nearest chief Post Office. If sending to the United Kingdom, he cannot prepay. further than London, and it is matter of frequent remark that it costs more to get a parcel from London to the country than it has cost to get it from Calcutta to London. Moreover, the Addressee will have to pay the Customs duty, if any.

15. If the Postal Union system has proved anything, it has proved that to effect Postal Reforms on a large and liberal scale, Governments must be prepared to give up haggling about small sums,

(9. Local statistics, for the purpose of framing the tabular information required by the International Bureau, were taken during 28 days of last November.). A table is appended comparing their results with those obtained in the same way in 1879. The statistician must indeed have the courage of his convictions who attempts to depend on figures obtained in this way. It is like estimating what a man will eat in a year from what he consumes at one chance meal. The result might do very well to print in a Blue Book, but nobody would use it as a basis on which to victual a ship. A glance at Table C appended to this Report, under the head of Books, &c., will shew that the increase in 1880 purports to be more than the whole number forwarded in 1879! Such a result is not in the least consonant with reality, the fact being that, as far as can be judged from ordinary observation, there has been very little increase, if any at all.

10. The Money Order system with some of the Australasian Colonies, commenced last year, has been availed of by Chinese resident in Queensland and New South Wales to an extent which was hardly expected at first. Indeed, as far as this Office is concerned, the system may almost be said to have been too successful, for it nearly monopolises the time of a clerk and a shroff, who have had to be detached from other duties. Chinese cannot be dealt with so quickly in Money Order matters as Europeans. An Englishman who has an Order to cash takes the money given to him and goes away. With a Chinese, the vexed question, What is a pound? assumes a knotty and complicated aspect. To his mind a sovereign represents the highest price he could get for it after a morning spent in haggling at the gold-shops. This Office has generally to offer him a few cents less. Even when the rate of exchange is settled, the difficulties are not ended. At 3/73d., for instance, a sovereign may represented by either $5.49 or $5.48. To pay the former sum involves a trifling loss; to pay the latter secures a trifling profit. Nobody but a Chinese would go into the fractions of a cent, but the China- man not only does so, but even considers himself defrauded of them. It should be said, however, that the Chinese here are learning, as they learn everything, that the Post Office will not chaffer with them, and this does not appear to affect the popularity of the Money Order system.

be

(11. The Money Order system of the London Post Office is naturally looked upon as a model for British Colonies. It is an excellent system, but somewhat complicated and elaborate; not more so, perhaps, than is necessary where the orders are numerous, and the amounts forwarded in either direction very far from being equal. It is certain, however, that a small Money Order system can be effectively carried on between two Colonics, and be a great convenience to either, without the lists, duplicate lists, percentage on commission, and other formalities required under the London rules. Such is the sim- plified system of this Office with Yokohama, with Shanghai, and with the Straits Settlements. An advice is forwarded for each order issued, and accounts are periodically compared, the balance due being forwarded to whichever office is entitled to it. Each office keeps the commission it collects, and all the forms used are simplified as far as possible. There would be but few obstacles to a general Inter-Colonial Money Order system on this easy plan, but if the London details be insisted on (and some Colonies insist on them) the amount of writing and of labour involved becomes prohibitive.

12. Communications were addressed to all the Australasian Colonies requesting their co-operation in the establishment of an Inter-colonial Parcel Post, such as is worked between this Colony and the Straits Settlements without any resultant inconvenience. They have all declined, and all, or nearly all, on the same ground-Customs difficulties. As the subject is still, however, to be discussed at the Australasian conference mentioned above, and has also been under consideration in Europe, it may, per- haps, be permissible to devote a few words to it. The subject of parcel post is interesting to most resi-. dents in China, because there are so many little objects of Chinese or Japanese manufacture which such persons naturally wish to send to their friends elsewhere. A preliminary objection as to the supposed invasion of the carrying business of Steamer Companies may be first disposed of. If the public were to be allowed to send carpets, overcoats, &c., through the post (as was once the case when the sample post to England was somewhat abused), whether under the title of Parcels, or of Samples, the carrying companies might fairly object, as, in the instance in question, they did. But if the parcel post be strictly confined to small things (menus objete) as is proposed, then the parcels to be carried become precisely those of which Steamer Companies had rather be rid than otherwise.

13. To be at once effective, popular, and successful, a Parcel Post scheme requires three conditions:

(1.) Freedom from any further formalities as to declaration of contents than may be neces-

sary to prevent the transmission of liquids, explosives, &c.

(2.) One moderate prepayment to ensure free delivery at the door of the addressee. (3.) Absolute freedom from Customs duties or interference.

-Frels

14. In the case of the existing Indian Parcel Post, the sender has to fill up a declaration of con- tents, sometimes required in triplicate, sometimes also in French. He has to enclose his parcel in an. outer cover to the nearest chief Post Office. If sending to the United Kingdom, he cannot prepay. further than London, and it is matter of frequent remark that it costs more to get a parcel from London to the country than it has cost to get it from Calcutta to London. Moreover, the Addressee will have to pay the Customs duty, if any.

15. If the Postal Union system has proved anything, it has proved that to effect Postal Reforms on a large and liberal scale, Governments must be prepared to give up haggling about small sums,

21. Mr. JEFFERY also explained to the Committee that stolen letters in which nothing remunera- tive is found (handfuls of 20 or so being taken on speculation as stated above) are generally destroyed, and that, in 1876, 7,000 letters containing Money Orders were stolen. Although the thieves only realised 120 of these, and were traced and convicted in 40 cases, the payees of the remaining 6,880 Orders must have been subjected to an amount of inconvenience, delay, and correspondence, from which Registration would have effectively saved them. Had the 7,000 sums of money been in Stamps or Bank notes, every one would have been lost; in the forty cases which were detected the forged signature to the Order would probably form the sole clue.

22. Table 4 gives a return of the Revenue, &c. of this Department for the year. It had been hoped that the gross sum collected would still have been a little above $100,000, but such is not the case. It must be remembered that we have closed one of our main offices, that, namely, in Yokohama. -- The balance accruing to the Colony is, however, more than double what it was last

I have the honour to be,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant.

year.

The Honourable F. STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

$c.,

ALFRED LISTER,

Postmaster General,

&.c.

3 Report of the Committee of Inquiry into the Money Order System of the Post Office, &c., 1877. Minutes of Evidence.

APPENDIX.

(A.)—COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE, 1880 & 1879.

1880.

Imperial and Foreign Share, ....... $33,430.74 Conveyance of Mails and Contribu-

tion towards P. & O. Subsidy,

Expenditure,

Balance,

Gross Revenue,...

1879.

$40,293.96

Decrease,...

$6,863.22

20,501.87

20,235.13

Increase,

266.74-

33,084.87

36.663.78

Decrease,.

3,578.91

9,486.09

4,594.16

Increase,.

4,891.99

$96,503.57

3101,787.03

Decrease......

$5,293.46

(B.)-SALE OF POSTAGE STAMPS.

1880.

1879.

INCREASE.

DENOMINA-

DECREASE.

A

TION.

Number.

Amount.

Number. Amount.

Number. Amount.

Number.

Amonat,

1 Cent (Cards).

2 Cents.

19,562 419,718

$ C.

195.62 8,394.36

C.

27

(Cards).

6,429 51,380

192.87 2,055.20

278,908 3,584 213,883

5,578.16

19,562 140,810

$ C.

195.62

$

C.

2,816.20

107 52 8,555.32

2,845

85.35

162,503

6,500.12

213,293

10,664.65

1,721

6,430

57,600

385.80 4,808.00

17,333

219,796

$6.05 211,572 1,040.28 17,583.68

10,578.60

10,908 162,196

654.48 12,975.68

10 12

333,498

33,349.80

333,498

33,349.80

24,697

2,963.64 123,613

14,933.56

>>

98,916

11,869.92

16

7,340

1,254.40

18

1,000

342.00

24

9,310

2,234.40

37,728 4,717 35,413

6,076.48 $29.06 8,199.12

29,888

4,732.08

2,817

507.06

26,103

6,264.72

28

120

33.60

98

27.44

>>

80

17,963

5,388.90

3,751

23

1,125.30

22 14,212

6.16 4,263.60

43

8,505

4,082.40

12.313

5,910.24

>>

3,808

1,827.84

96

5,192

4,984.32

6,353

6.103.68

1,166

1,119.36

2 Dollars.

1,020

2,040.00

1,037

2.074.00

17

34.00

3

500

1,500.00

406

1,213.00

94

27

282.00

10

47

470.00

26

200.00

21

210.00

"

Total,......

$85,139.96

$79,887.89

$51,787.33

$46,535.26

Deduct Decrease,...

Total Increase,

46,535.26 $ 5,252.07

De- spatched.

Received.

De- spatched.

DESCRIPTION

OF

CORRESPONDENCE,

(C.)-APPROXIMATE STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1880.

Supplied to the International Bureau of the Postal Union, Berne.

INTERNATIONAL.

COMPARISON WITH 1879.

LOCAL.

TOTAL.

Received.

Total in 1879.

Increase. Decrease.

Ordinary paid Letters..

327,000

829,000

58,000

71,000

785,000.

642,000

Unpaid and short paid Letters,

5,000

14,000

1,500

7,000

27,500

14,400

143,000 13,100

Letters on Postal business.

900

800

1,200

900

€3,800

3,146

654

Post Cards,..

1,000

1,200

1,200

1,000

4,400

Do. with prepaid reply,

6,110

1,710

Newspapers and Periòdicals,

156,000

291,000

40,000

8,000

495,000

227,000

268,000

Books, Circulars, Prices Current, &c.,

192,000

187,000

24,000

12,000

415,000

370,000

45,000

Patterns.

8,000

10,000

1,000

600

19,600

6.450

13,150

Commercial Papers,

500

800

1,300

570

730

Registered Letters,

14,000

15,000

2,200.

1,400

32,600

19,019

13,581

Letters with value declared,

...

Registered Letters with Retura Receipt,

70

550

80

80

780

1,139

359

Parcels,

200

480

50

40

770

210

560

Do. with value declared,

Number of Money Orders,

Amount of Do.,

2,462

353

152

277

3,244

3,749

fr. 254,278 fr. 45,381

fr. 14,347

fr. 23,685 fr. 337,691 fr. 398,895

505

fr. 61,204

(D.)—MONEY ORDER BUSINESS.

No. of Orders.

Amount.

Colonial Com-

Total

Com-

mission.

missiou.

In Sterling.

s. d.

C.

C.

Hongkong on London,

1,597

6,787.17.1

253.71

Shanghai

825

3,152.12.0

122.00

Hongkong or Shanghai on Queensland,

31.12.9

2.25

J

on New South Wales,

20

194.10.5*

11.00

on South Australia,

4.10.4*

0.75

on Western Australia,

Total Outward Orders in Sterling,...

2,462

10,171. 2.7

390.61

390.61

London on Hongkong,

122

512. 5. 7

27.20

on Shanghai,

51

140.15. 0

7.70.

Queensland on Hongkong or Shanghai,

44

264.13.11

New South Wales on

127

849.10. Of

47.55

31

South Australia on

47. 0. Ot

2.51

Western Australia on

1. 0.0

"

Total Inward Orders in Sterling,

358

1,815. 4. 6

84.96

84.96

In Dollars.

C.

$ c.

Hongkong on Shanghai,

51

981.76

13:25

on Japan,

45

744.79

12.20

or Shanghai on Straits Settlements,

56

1,142.93

18.00

Total Outward Orders in Dollars,

152

2,869.43

43.45

43.45

120

2,164.56

35.75

71

1,124.54

86

1,447.99

277

4,737.09

35.75

35.75

554.77

Shanghai on Hongkong,

Japan on

"}

Straits Settlements on Hongkong,.

Total Inward Orders in Dollars,

TOTAL COMMISSION,....

Hongkong gives the paying Colony 1 per cent commission on these amounts.

+ Hongkong received 1 per cent commission on these amounts.

No. 41.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following letter, with enclosure, from the Inspector of Schools, reporting the result of

the examination of the Grant-in-Aid Schools, is

published for general information..

By Command,

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office,

1

十四第報

暮百

監督學院歐·

曉諭事照得現

暑輔政使史 攝

督憲札諭將以下公

文抄印俾衆週知

一千八百八十一年

右中陳

二月 初四日示

右就

者賞七此

規十

七備

仙支給列獎

輔政使司史

就年記錄一幷陳明須至申陳者 學現年增益至於去歲頒行助賞規條若何仍由卑職將來 圓是以溢支四百一十九大圓七十七仙原實因領助賞之義 暮元旦伊邇爲此卑職懇請即將該項給發以便支給查一千 八百八十一年分度支數目爲此款備支者僅得六千九百大 百一十九大圓七十七仙茲將各數詳列繕呈按現在華人歲 爲申陳事 運助賞規條各義學應領獎賞合計該銀七千三 一千八百八十一年 正月二十七日

仍實

繕義大千

Hongkong, 4th February, 1881.

+

[No. 3.]

INSPECTORATE OF SCHOOLS,

HONGKONG, 27th January, 1881.

SIR, I have the honour to forward under this enclosure a tabulated summary of the grants earned by the various Grant-in-aid Schools, amounting to $7,319.77, and, owing to the. approach of the Chinese New Year, I beg to recommend that the money be paid at once.

I.

The Estimates for 1881 provide only the sum of $6,900 for the purpose; so that there is an. excess_ of $419.77, which is caused by the in- creased number of the Schools now under the Grant-in-aid System.

I reserve all remarks as regards details of the working of the Grant-in-aid Scheme during the

past year for my Annual Report, and have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

E. J. EITEL,

Inspector of Schools.

The Honourable F. STEWART,

Acting Calonial: Secretary.

Inspectorate of Schools, Hongkong, 26th January, 1881.

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Exam-

iped.

Standard I.

Standard 11.

Standard HI

Standard IV,

Standard V.

Standard VL.

Number of Scliolars who Passed.

Watatu, bet vt lcholars who Failed.

Standard II.

Standará UL

|Standard IV.

RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS IN 1880.

Standard V.

Standard VI,

{ Total Pussed. -

Total Falled.

mice | Average Daily Attent

Yraş

daring School

Standard I.

Sundard II.

*

$

1-Baxter Vernacular Sai-ying-|

: pán School (Girls),

21 24

6

Co

4

1

27.94

30

21

25

Baxter Vernacular D'Aguilar

17 17

2

10

1

25.10

10

3

60

28

****

$

$

40

06

ジョ

$

40

6.60

27.91

ها مركزه

57.98 173.96

21

7.50

25.40

38.72 116.18

231.94

154.90

Street School (Girls);............

>$772.08

Baxter Vernacular Hollywood

I

28

27

0-

13

27

29,30

78

28

8

12

0.60

29.50

20.25 189.76

241.00

#Road School (Qirls),

Baxter Vernacular High Street

21

[School (Girls),

P-C. M. S. St. Stephen's School

I

28

No. 1 (Boys),

C. M. S. St. Stephen's School

I

No. 2 (Boys),

7.-C. M. S. Baxter Memorial Schoolį

I

30

· (Girls),;;

-C. M. S. Sal-ying-p'ún School

I

37

* 8 18 5

19

3

1

25.21

27

10

7

27

$7 33 21

2

#

20

26

12

8

20

37

12 10

8

5

1

(Boys),

ེཆ་

49.71

1:0

33.50

C. M. S. Sheung-wan School

(Boys),

10. L. M. S. Hollywood Road School

(Boys),

12-L. M. 3. Tá-ping-shan School (Mixed),

SISE, M. S. Wan-tsai, School (Boys),.|

13.-L. M. S. Wán-tsai School (Girls),. 14.-L. M. S. Staunton Street School'

No, 1 (Girls), i

I

I

23

23

12

7

23

:

· I

52

50

12

13

18

ลง

47.80

86.70 60 42

2 €7.86

2 3 3 3 3

18

21

10

20

12.00

22.21

88.31 105.53 1415.24

42

21

37.74

17.13

142.21 189.71

11

16

49.71

51.42 184.29

205.71

a38.34

48 36

8

AC

10.50

$3.55

721.91

180.50 241.05 1.006.50

GO 56

23

3

GO

108

54

13 20

7

2

51

ca

60.13 65

156 49

I

20

20

→]

20

21.20

27 27

9

9

1 21

30.12

26

20

10

7

20

30.80

15-L. M. S. Staunton Street School No. (Girls),

21

21

7

เร

8

21

27.30

18.-L. M. S. Yau-má-ti School (Boys),.|

47

89

18

Q 10

2

95

47.70

17.-St. Paul's College Mission School, | D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

45

40

17

9 12

15

00337

18-St. Paul's College Mission School, į Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),..

41

#1

21

5

45

48,00

105

19.-Basel Mission Boarding School'

III

45

1:2

44

10

#

38

46.21

(Girls),

20.Basel Mission Day School (Boys),. III 21-Berlin Foundling House School (Girls);

20

20 11.

''

G

23.81

22.-Diocesan Home School (Mixed),.

III

IV

30 30 10

11

30

29.78

8 3 3 3 3 2 3 3

3

30

42

21

45

64

14

2 7 8 9 7 2

40

17.30

€5.82 397.48

263.80

:

$6.70

41.67

125.08 180.70

32

91

9.

07.36

91.84 275.62 367.36

32

00.48

92 87

279.61 371.48

32

22

9.00

24.26

45.00 135.20 180.26

32

26

21.00

30.12

55.53 166.59

222.12

1,841.27

50

J2

28

:

36

10

32 13.50

80.50

.60.50

1$1.50

242.00

35

20

21

43

26 9.00

27.35

51.55 154.77

206.85

61

85

51

72

63

7

CO

72

29

28

7

7

26

15

34.51

12

28. St. Joseph's College Chinese ) School (Boys),

IV 31 31

7

6

8

2

24

81.73 42

49

24.-St. Joseph's College Portuguese) School (Boys),

IV

139

107 13

17

33

25

2

1

78 100 330

25,-St. Paul's College, Hongkong

IV

13

11

3

5

11

18.81 16

40

30

Public School (Boys),

26. Victoria School (Boys),....

21

10

+

D

M

22.78

32

27.-Victoria School (Girls),.

14

1-4

3

16.65

8

2 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 9 2 3 3

70

:

47.70

62.02

158.78

251.70

25

56.37

81.59 253.78

338.37

#011.37

35

16

48.00

69.00 207.00

276.00

36

20

24

C6

13.00

2.00

46.21

101,05 303.18

401.21

517.02

16

23.81

:

28.20 84.61 112.81

18 · 21,00

5.00

20.78

71.43

:

800

39 38 %

24

11

4.

6.00

34.81

72.20

21-4.80

216.61

235.73

288.81

285.79.

* 288.51

48

58

34.78

77.18 231.55 308.78

1,422.45

$4

18

169.72

278.43

16.81

26.20

:

78 61

30

14

32

22.78

18.19

149.59

885.29 1,113.72

104.81

192.75

* 104.31

405.78

38

23

18.

20 6.00

10.95

53.23

159.72 212.95

a. Teacher.

b. Assistant Teacher.

Under one Manager, The Right Revd. Bishop BURDON,

TOTAL,

7,819.77

E. J. EITEL, Inspector of Schools.

Standard III.

Standard IV,

Swas to which the School is entitled.

Standard V.

of

Standard VI.

Gend.

Very

Good.

Fair.

Needle Work.

Capitation Grant.

Assistant Examiner's

Fec.

To Teacher.

Grant-in-All.

To Manager.

Total Grant.

KEMARKS.

1

該將一千八百八十年遵照賞規條甄別各學術列於左

一白思他西營盤義學 第一級書館 嗔册女童二十四名赴考女二十四名取二十三名十一名 第一考取六名賞銀三十 第二考取四名 賞銀二十四圓 第三考取四名賞錢二十八 第四考 石賞銀四十 第五考取四名賞銀三十六園 甄別針黹上班賞銀四十中班賞 銀六圓 週年均計每日得學童二十七名雾百之九十四 十七九十四仙 合共賞銀二百三十一九十四仙 在內攤派總理值銀一 七十三圓九十六仙掌教值五十七圓九十八仙

二白思他德記拉街女義學 第一級書館 填册女童十七名赴考女童十七名取十六名黜一名 第一考取二名賞錢十圓 第二考取十名賞銀六 十元 第三考取四名賞銀二十八元 甄別針黹上班賞銀二十四中班賞銀七元半週年均計每日得學童二十五名霁十之四賞錢二十五元 四十仙 合共掌賞錢一百五十四元九十仙 在内攤派總值銀一百一十六元一十八仙掌教值銀三十八員七十二仙

三白思他荷李活道義学 第一級書館 填册女童 名赴考女童二十七名全取無黜 第一考取九名賞銀四十五第二考取十三名賞 銀七十八元 第三考取四名賞銀二十八元 第四孝取一名賞銀八元 甄別針黹上班賞銀四十二元中班賞銀一十元半 週年均計人數每日 得學童二十九名半價錢二十九元半 合共賞銀二百四十一元 在内瀟派總理值銀一百八十元七十五仙掌教值銀六十元十五仙 四白思他高街女義學 第一級書館 填册女童二十一名 赴考女童十九名取十四名五名 第一考取七名賞銀三十五元,第二考取三名賞 银十八元 第三考取三名賞二十一元 第六彩塭一名賞銀十元 甄別針黹上班賞銀二十六圓中班賞銀十二元 週年均計每日得學童二 十三名界百之二十四賞銀二十三元十四仙 合共賞銀一百四十五罽计四仙在內攤派總理債銀一百八元九十三仙掌教值銀三十六元三十 一仙

五國家聖會聖士提反第一間男學 第一級書館 填册學童二十八名 赴考學童二十七名全取無黜 第一考取十六名賞銀八十元 第二考取 七名賞銀四十二元 第三考取三名賞銀二十一元 第五考取一名賞銀九元 週年均計每日得學童三十七名雾百之七十四賞銀三十七元七 十四仙 合共賞銀一百八十九元七十四仙在內攤派總理值銀一百四十二元三十一仙掌教值銀四十七元四十三仙

六國家聖會聖士提反第二間男義學 第一級書館填册學童三十七名赴考學童三十三名取二十九名四名 第一考取二十四名賞銀一百二十 圓.第二考取一名賞銀六 第三考取二名賞銀十四 第四考取二名賞銀十六圓 週年均計每日得學童四十九名答百之七十一賞四 十九圓七十一仙 合共賞銀二百零五圓七十一仙在內攤派總理值錢一百五十四圓二十九仙掌教值錢五十一圓四十二仙

七國家聖會白思他女義學 第一級書館 嗔册女童三十名赴考女童二十六名全取無 第一考取十二名賞銀六十圓 第二考取八名賞銀四 十八圓 第三考取五名賞銀三十五 第四考取一名賞銀八 甄別針黹上班賞銀四十六園中班賞銀一十圓半 週年均計每日得學童 三名界百之五十五賞銀三圓五十五仙 合共賞銀二百四十一圓五仙在內攤派總理值一百八十圓八十仙掌教佰銀六十圓十五仙 八國家聖會西營盤男義學 第一級書館 册學童三十七名赴考學童三十七名單卅五名鸝二名 第一考取十二名賞銀六十圓 第二考取十名 賞銀六十圓 第三考取八名賞銀五十六 第四考取五名賞銀四子圓 週年均計每日得學童西十七名界十之三賞銀四十七元三十仙合共 賞銀二百六十三園三十仙在內攤派總理值銀一百九十七圓川十八仙掌教值銀六十五八十二仙

九國家聖會上環男義學 第一級書館

毌學童二十三名 赴考學童二十三名全取無黜 第一考取十二名賞銀六十圓 第二考取七名賞銀 四十二圓 第三考取四名賞銀二十八名 週年均計每日得學童三十六名雾十之七賞銀三十六圓七十仙 合共賞銀一百六十六國七十仙在 內攤派總理値銀一百二十五圓零三仙掌教值銀四十一圓六十七仙

十倫敦傳教會荷李活道男義學 第一級書館 填卌學童五十二名 赴考學童五十名 取四十八名二名 第一考取十二名賞銀六十圓 二考取十八名賞銀一百零八圓 第三考取十三名賞銀九十一

第四考取四名賞銀三十二 第五考取一賞銀圓 週年均計每日得

學童六十七名界百之三十六賞銀六十七圓三十六仙 合共賞銀三百六十七國三十六仙在內攤派總理値銀二百七十五圓五十二仙掌教值 銀九十一圓八十四仙

十一倫敦傳教會灣仔男義學 第一級書館 壝册學童五十四名 赴考學童五十四名 取五十一名三名 第一考取十三名賞銀六十五圓 第二考取二十六名賞銀一百五十六圓 第三考取七名賞銀四十九 第四考取四名賞銀三十二圓 第五考取一名賞銀九圓 週年均計每 日得學童六十名零百之四十八賞銀六十圓四十八仙 合共賞銀三百七十一圓四十八仙在内均派總理值銀二百七十八圓六十一仙掌教值 九十二圓八十七仙

十二倫敦傳教會太平山男女義學 第一級書館 旗卌學童二十名 赴考學童二十名 全取無黜 第一考取六名賞銀三十圓, 第二考取七名 每 賞銀四十二 第三考取三名賞錢二十一 第四考取四名賞銀三十二圓 甄別針黹 上班賞銀二十二圓 中班賞錢九圓 週年均計 日得學童二十四名客百之二十六賞銀二十四圓二十六仙 合共賞銀一百八十圓券二十六仙在內攤派總理值銀一百三十五二十仙掌教 銀四十五圓峇六仙

十三倫敦 博教會灣仔女義學 填册女學童二十七名 赴考古學堂二十七名 取二十四名黜三名 第一考取九名賞銀四十五圍 第二考取九 名賞銀五十四圓 第三考取二名賞銀十四 第四考取四名賞銀三十二 甄別針黹 上班賞銀二十六圓 中班賞銀二十一圓 週年 計每日得學童三十名寄百之一十二賞銀三十一十二仙 合共賞銀二百二十二圓-十二仙在內攤派總理値銀一百六十六圓五十九仙掌教 値銀五十五圓五十三仙

十四倫敦傳教會士丹頓街第一間女義學 第一級書館 嗔册女潼二十六名 赴考女童二十六名 全無淛 第一考取十名賞銀五拾圓 第 二考取七名賞銀四十二 第三考取四名賞銀二十八圓 第五考取四名賞銀三十六圓 第六考取一名賞銀十圓 甄別針黹 上班賞三 十二圓 中班賞銀十三圓半 週年均計每日得學童三十名半賞銀三十圓半 合共賞銀二百四十二圓在內難派總理値銀一百八十一圓半 掌教值銀六十半

十五倫敦傳教會士丹頓街第二間女義學 第一級書館 與肼女童二十四名 她考女童二十四名 取二十一名黜三名 第一考取七名賞銀三 十五圓 第二考取五名賞銀三十 第三考取三名賞銀二十一圓 第閂考取六名賞銀四十八 甄別針黹 上班賞銀三十六圓 中班賞 銀九圓 週年均 得學童二十七名寄百之三十五賞銀二十七回三十五仙 合共賞銀二百零六園三十五仙在西攤派總理值銀一百五十 四圓七十七仙掌 但銀五十一屆五十八仙

十六倫敦傳教會油蔴地男義學 第一級書館 填肼學童四十二名 赴考學童三十九名 取三十五名黜四名 第一考取十六名賞銀八十 第二考取九名賞銀五十四 第三考取 賞銀七十圓 週年凶計每日得學童四十七名譽十之七賞銀四十七國七十仙 合共賞銀二百五 十一圓七十仙在內攤派總理值銀一百八十八闖七十八仙掌教值銀六十二圓九十二仙 十七聖保羅書院德記拉街傳教男義學 第一級書館

舺學童四十五名 赴考學道四十五名 全取無黜 第一考取十七名賞銀八十五元 第二考取九名賞銀五十四元 第三考取十二名賞銀八十四元 第四考取四名賞銀三十二元 第五考取三名賞銀二十七元 週年均計每 得學童五十六名客百之三十七賞銀五十六元三十七仙 合共賞銀三百三十八元三十七仙在內攤派總理信銀二百五十三元七十八仙掌教 銀八十四元五十九仙

十八聖保羅書院麟激士街傳教男義學 第一級書館 云册臺六四十一名 赴考章董四十一名 取四十名黜一名 第一考取二十一名賞銀一 百零五元 第二考取十二名賞銀七十二元 第三考淑百,銀三十五元 第八考淑二名賞銀十六元 週年均計每日得意四十八名賞銀 四十八元 合共賞銀二百七十六元在內攤派總瀏笸餵二百界七元掌教菑佛六十九元

七鳳園

七十二

★ 仙年

十九巴色傳教曾女館 第三級書館 旗卌女童四十五名 赴考古意四十四名 取三十六名黜八名 第一考取十名賞銀六十元 第二考取九 名賞銀六十三元 第三考取九名賞銀七十二云 第四考取四名饃三十六元 第五考取二名賞限二十元 第六考取二名賞銀二十四元 甄別針黹 上班賞銀六十六元 中班賞銀十五元 下班賞銀二元 週年均計每日得學童四十六名雾百之二十一賞銀四十六元二十一 合共賞銀四百零四元二十一仙在內攤派總理值銀三百零三元一十六仙掌教值銀壹百零壹元零五仙

二十巴色傳教會男義學 第三級書館 堠册學童二十名 赴考學童二十名 取十四名黜六名 第一考取十一名賞銀六十六元 第二考取一 名賞銀七元 第三考取二名賞銀十六元 週年均計每!得學童二十三名得百之八十一賞櫻二十三元八十一仙 合共賞銀賞百一十二元八 十一仙在內攤派總理值銀八十四元六十一仙掌教值銀二十八元二十仙

二十一巴陵育嬰堂女館 第三級書館 填册女童三十名 赴考女童三十名 全取無糰 第一考取十名賞銀六十元 第二考取十一名賞銀七 十七元 第三考取九名賞銀七十二元 甄別針黹 上班賞到十八元 中班賞銀二十四元 下班賞五元 週年均每日得學童二十九名寄 百之七十三賞銀十九元七十三仙 合共賞銀二百八十五圓七十三仙在內攤派總理值銀二百一十四圓三十仙掌教值銀七十一圓四十三仙 二十二日字樓男女館 第四級書館 鎭册學童二十八名 赴考學童二十八名 取二十六名黜二名 第一考取七名賞銀四十二圓 第二考取 七名賞銀五十六圓 第三考取六名賞銀六十圓 第四考取二名賞銀二十四 第五考取一名賞銀十四 第六考取三名賞銀四十八元 甄別針黹 上班賞銀四元 中班賞銀六元 週年均計每日得學童三十四名零百之八十一賞銀三十四元八十一仙 合共賞銀二百八十八圓 八十一仙在內攤派總理值銀二百一十六元六十一仙掌教值銀七十二元二十

二十三聖約瑟書院華人男義學 第四級書館 填册學童三十一名 赴考學童三十一名取二十九名黜二名 第一考取七名賞銀四十二圓 第二考取六名賞銀四十八圓、第三考取八名賞銀八十 第四考取四名賞銀四十八圓 第五考取四名賞銀五十六 週年均計每日得學 童三十四名寄百七十三賞銀三十四圓七十三仙 合共賞銀三百霁八圓七十三仙在内攤派總理值銀二百三十一圓五十五仙掌教值銀七十 七圓一十八仙

二十四聖約瑟書院西洋人男義學 第四級書館 填册學童一百三十九名 赴考學童一百零七名 取九十五名黜十二名 第一考取十三名賞 銀七十八圓 第二考取十七名賞銀一百三十六圓 第三考取三十三名賞銀三百三十圓 第四考取二十五名賞銀三百圓 第五考取六名賞 銀八十四圓 第六考取一名賞銀拾六圓 週年均計每日得學童 拾六圓 週年均計每日得學童壹百六十九名界百之七十二賞銀壹百六十九圓七十二仙 合共賞銀壹千壹 百壹十三圓七十二仙在內攤派總理值銀八百三十五圓二十九仙掌教值銀二百七十八圓四十三仙

二十五聖保羅書院港衆男義學 第四級書館 嗔册學童十三名 赴考學童十一名 全取無黜 第一考取三名賞銀十八

銀四十 第三考取三名賞銀三十圓 週年均計每日得學童十六名答百之八十一賞銀十六圓八十一仙 合共賞銀一百零八十一仙在 內灘派總理値銀七十八圓六十一仙掌教值銀二十六圓二十仙

二十六威克多理阿男義學 第四級書館 填册學童计一名赴考學童十六名全取無黜 第一考取一名賞銀六圓 第二考取四名賞三十二 第三考取五名賞五十圓 第四考取三名賞三十六圓 第五考取一名賞十四圓 第六考取二名賞三十二圓 週年均計每日得學童十二名香 言之七十八賞銀十二圓七十八仙 合共賞銀一百九十二圓七十八仙在內攤派總理值銀一百四十四圓五十九仙掌教值銀四十八圓十九仙 二十七威克多鐘阿女義學 第四級書館 嗔册女童十四名 赴考女童十四名 全取無黜 第二考取一名賞銀八圓 第三考取五名賞銀五十 第四考取三名賞銀三十六圓 第五考取二名賞銀二十八圓 第六考取三名賞銀四十八圓 甄別針黹 上班賞銀二十圓 中 班賞 週年均計每日得學童一十六名雾百之九十五賞銀十六圓九十五仙 合共賞銀二百一十二圓九十五仙在內攤派總理值銀一百五十九圓 -教值銀五十三二十三仙

第二考取五名賞

在寛

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

No. 105.

The following Report from the Superintendent, Botanic and Afforestation Department, is published for general information.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 11th March, 1882.

W. M. DEANE, Acting Colonial Secretary.

SUPERINTENDENT, BOTANIC AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT, TO ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

BOTANIC GARDEN, 18th April, 1881.

No. 16.

SIR.--I have the honour to submit my Report on the Progress and Condition of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for the year 1880.

2. The removal from the gardens of plants and shrubs of which the individuals of some kinds were too numerous has been carried on for the benefit and better appearance of those remaining, as well as to make room for newer introductions. Considerable work has also been done in transplanting shrubs and trees which were too crowded or ill placed.

3: Persea Nanmu. Oliv. From the small tree of this valuable timber tree of Yun-nan, which Mr. Watters kindly sent from Ichang, we have procured about half a dozen young plants, by layering. The little tree has succeeded very well in our garden, and if a large stock of it could be obtained it night be a valuable addition to our plantations. I have tried to get seeds or plants from Yun-nan, and correspondents have kindly promised their assistance, but as yet nothing has come to hand.

4. Cytisus proliferous vár. ("Tagusaste"). The seedlings (about 50) which were planted on the hills about a year ago grew remarkably well until the hot weather and rains commenced, when, I regret to say, they all perished, proving the unsuitability of the climate for this fodder plant.

5. Rhagodia hastata (Australian "Salt Bush"). The same may be said of this fodder plant as of the above "Tagasaste," it having grown vigorously until the hot weather and rains set in, when it perished.

6. Pithecolobium Saman (The "Rain Tree"). Small trees which were carefully planted in prepared ground in 1879 continue to thrive, many of them are six to seven feet high. But those which were planted in unprepared ground, although nursed by the trees of a young plantation in which they were planted, are only about two feet high.

7. Manihot Glaziorii (Ceara Scrap Rubber). In good soil a small plant, which I brought from Kew Gardens in 1878, and which was then only about three inches high, has grown to a tree about 15 feet high and is now seading freely. It seeded last year also and from the seeds which were produced we raised several small plants which were planted on the hills, at about 400 feet altitude, last autumn, but the cold of the past few months killed them down to the ground-the lowest temperature recorded at the gardens, alt. 300 feet, was 462-but all are now making new shoots from the surface of the ground. The old plants were not affected by the cold.

8. Liberian Coffee. A few plants of this, which have been in the gardens for four years, do not thrive at all well, although the Arabian coffee grows luxuriantly and fruits abundantly.:

9. Pai-cha wood. The wood used at Ningpo for carving is called by this name. The tree from which the wood is obtained has not yet been identified, but as I have succeeded in obtaining a small plant of what is reputed to be the true one, there is some hope that when it flowers the doubt may be set at rest; judging from the appearance of the plant without flowers or fruit, it is a species of Evonymus.

10. Macadamia ternifolia (the “Queensland Nut"). In my last report I mentioned that this had flowered for the first time here. Now I am able to state that the flowers were succeeded by a very fair

crop of nuts which tasted quite equal in flavour to those produced in Queensland.

11. Sheds with screens of canvas on rollers have been put up for the better cultivation of Ferns and some other plants which cannot be well grown unless they are protected from the powerful sun- rays and heavy rains. The plants grown in these structures have shown a marked improvement for the extra care bestowed upon them. These sheds and the orchid-house are, I hope, the fore-rur of more ornamental and accessible structures which might, with advantage, be added to our ack ledged beautiful, but small gardens.

12. The Aviaries and Orchid-house which were in a very dilapidated state have been repaired and put in a fairly effective condition. The Monkey-house has not been repaired, although it is very much decayed. The house is, I believe, badly placed for the health of the animals; scarcely any sun can ever enter the house, and it is exposed to all the cold weather which we get from the northerly winds. I would strongly recommend the abandonment of the place altogether and the keeping of monkeys, unless a proper house could be provided for them. The structure is of wood, and ever since it was erected it has been constant trouble and expense to keep the animals in the house, as they are continually eating away and pulling down the boards of which the house is constructed.

13. The following plants flowered for the first time in these gardens:-

Aristolochia longifolia. Brassaia actinophylla. Cypripedium Stonei. Dendrobium Paxtonii.

Echeveria metallica.

Frencia pendula.

Lettsomia Chalmersii.

Mezoncurum brachycarpum.

Monstera deliciosa. Peperomia arifolia.

72

marmorata.

Rhododendrom Champions.

Seaforthia elegans.

Tecoma australis.

14. During the year under notice the following plants, hitherto unrecorded as being indigenous to Hongkong, have been discovered in the Island:---

Asplenium lunulatum, Sonerila tenera, and Otanthera Fordi, Hance, novum species.

15. Dr. KING, Superintendent of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta, kindly presented for the library a copy of Griffith's Palms of India.

16. As the gardens are becoming crowded, the interchange of plants and seeds has not been conducted with quite so much vigour as in former years when there was more necessity for the importation of plants to stock the newly formed portions of the garden. The number of contributors was 32, from whom 677 plants and 145 packets and parcels of seeds, and 8 birds and animals were received. 1,834 plants anil 190 packets and parcels of seeds were supplied from the garden to 41 recipients.

17. The following is the list of Contributors:

Alderton. Captain; Japanese plants.. Brand, E; Geraniums..

Botanic Garden, Brisbane; six Wardian cases of ornamental and useful plants and seeds of Eucalypti, &c. Bowen; case of Araucarias, &c. Jamaica; seeds.

::

"

>1

"2

17

1)

77

Melbourne; seeds of Australian

trees and shrubs. Singapore; plants Ataccia cristata. Buittenzorg, Java; Wards case

of Cinchonas.

Beazely, Mrs., Swatow; Chinese plants. Bush. L. L.; Pheasants.

Crawford, D. R.; Geraniums and seeds. Crocker, W. M., Sarawak; valuable orchids. Creswell, C. T., Sydney; seeds of Australian tim-

ber trees.

Coote, H. E., Vice Admiral; Ferns from Perak. Tennant, H. P., Foochow; Bamboos.

Gerlach, Dr.; Chinese plants and Herbarium

specimens. Godsil, Captain; Civet cat.

Hance, Dr. H. F., Whampoa; seeds. Hange and Schmidt, Erfurt; Cacti. Hungerford, Dr.; orchids.

Hyde, H. B., New York; American plants. Lowcock, H.; Wallabie and Peacock.

Mesny, Colonel, Herbarium specimens from

Sze-chuen.

Pasedag, C. J., Amoy; ornamental plants. Price, Hon. J. M.; seeds from Cochin China. Queensland Acctn. Society; seeds of Australian

trees.

Rozario, M. C. do.; Peacock.

Romano, A. G.; plants.

Royal Gardens, Kew; seeds of palms, &c. Smith, R.; Lizard.

Silva, J. M.; plants.

Sampson, T., Cauton; Acer Formosana. Taylor, C. S.; Ferns and ornamental plants. Thomsett, Captain; Pelargoniums. Tsan Chun; Water Hen.

Watters, T., Ichang; Persea Nanmu. Wheathy, Mrs., Ningpo; Pai-cha tree.

!

*s sinensis two-year old plants

AFFORESTATION.

18. The following trees were planted during the

year:-

Ficus retusa (Banian)

Brought forward

210,542

144,948

61

وو

"}

size from 4 ft. to 10 ft. high sown in situ

862

60,555

17

""

Aleurites triloba (Candleberry-tree)

) sown in situ... Eucalyptus spp. (Gum-trees)

Cupressus torulosa (Bhotan Cypress).

Bamboos

24

""

1,900

1,537

(,, ) large trees transplanted Pinus canariensis (Canary Island Pine)... Cupressus funebris (Funereal Cypress).. Syncarpia laurifolia (Turpertine-tree). Grevillea robusta (Slky Oak).

16

23

26

14

22

452

Dammara robusta

21

164

Stillingia sebifera (Tallow-tree).

25

Quercus salicina

Harlandi

Carried forward

50

Albizzia Lebbek

31

50

Miscellaneous

234

210,542

211,015

19. Nine years experience has shown that two-year old seedings of Pinus sinensis cannot be successfully and economically planted in consequence of the roots penetrating the soil to such a distance that balls of soil cannot be kept adhering so perfectly as desirable to the roots. No seeds of any kind were sown in the nurseries during 1879 for a supply of trees which should have been provided for. planting during the year under notice, therefore when the Afforestation Department was returned to my charge in the end of the year 1879 I found that there was nothing available for planting excepti the refuse in the nurseries after the planting of 1879 had been finished, and these remaining trees were, through having been too much crowded, attenuated and very unpromising subjects for planting on the exposed hills, for which sturdy well grown plants should always be prepared. It was, however, advisable to do something with the available trees, therefore the worst weak and sickly trees were pulled up and sacrificed, to afford what benefit could be obtained during three or four months, which intervened between that time and the tree-planting season, to the trees which were selected for planting. In the face of these drawbacks it was anticipated that, however careful we might be in! transplanting, a large percentage of deaths would inevitably ensue, a result which occurred, but not to the extent anticipated; about 20 per cent. only succumbed.

20. About seven years ago an experiment was made of sowing seeds of Pinus sinensis în situ, that is, small places, each about a foot square, were dug and levelled on the hillside where it was intended trees should grow, and on these sites a few seeds were sown. The trees on the plots of ground thus treated succeeded so well, and finding also that the trees reared by the villagers on Chinese territory and on this island had been thus reared, I was induced to prepare and sow 60,000 sites in the same manner. The seedlings on these sites having given sufficient promise of succeeding, a much larger area-viz., nearly 600 acres, containing about 650,000 sites-was selected for this mode of afforestation during 1881. Although the trees reared in situ do not grow so vigorously for the first few years as those reared in and transplanted from nurseries, still the method has much to recommend it. Taking it for granted that the same amount voted for afforestation during this year will be granted annually until the wooding of the island is completed, we shall be able to accomplish this desirable object in a quarter of the time, by sowing in situ, of that necessary under the nursery system. When. the trees are large enough to fell for firewood. &c. a financial return for the outlay expended upon them can, it is hoped, be obtained by judicious periodical thinning and felling of portions of the plantations.

21. It is still desirable that nurseries, although on a smaller scale, should be maintained for raising a supply of trees for planting in situations where sowing in situ may be impracticable, and also for rearing other than pine trees which demand nursery treatment preparatory to planting, as it will be an object kept steadily in view to experiment with, and introduce, where successful, such foreign trees as are suitable for our soil, climate, and exposure, as will relieve the monotonous aspect of too much of any one kind of tree, besides, if possible, introducing others which may be valuable for timber or other economic uses.

22. As will be seen by the foregoing list several other than pine trees have been planted. I may mention first the Eucalypti of which over 1,500, comprising about a dozen kinds, were planted. Where these were planted amongst three-year planted pines they succeeded fairly well; Eucalyptus citriodora, the lemon-scented gum, having grown to, in some instances, 9 feet high in ten months, the largest having a circumference of 3 inches at one foot from the ground. Those planted away from the shelter of other trees have not done so well. The pine trees on the large area planted during 1880 will be about the right size in 1883 to be good nurses for other trees which I would advise being planted amongst them. It would be necessary to begin the preparation of such trees next year. More trees of the lemon-scented gum would have been planted last year, but it was impossible, in.. consequence of the limited supply in its native country, Queensland, to obtain sufficient seeds.

23. On the spur of Mount Gough jutting out towards Head Quarter House, above Kennedy Road, the sky-line of the ridge, at the instigation of His Excellency the Governor, was planted. Large bam- boos, oaks (Quercus salicina, and Q. Harlandi), pines, and banians were used. The effect is very good, and the plantation a marked improvement to the scenery on the upper side of the above named road,

There was much trouble in getting the large and weighty trees up the steep hill, but the result obtained is well worth the trouble which was taken..

24. The nurseries were taken in hand and a large number of pines reared for planting in 1881 besides several other trees such as Albizzins, candleberry tree, tallow tree, oaks, &c., some of whirl will be planted this year, and some next, when they will have become a good size.

25. Although so much work is being done in tree-planting, the nature of the ground operated on, and its distance from the roads, renders the work hardly appreciable to casual observers. After they have been planted on the hills, the small trees remain hidden by the long grass until about two years after- wards when, just as they overtop the grass, they become plainly visible from a distance, and at the end of the third year they make a very fair show. Those sown in situ are about one year longer than the others before they alter the appearance of the landscape. In a year hence the trees which were planted twelve months ago will be visible from the roads; of the trees then visible there will be about 120,000, that is, nearly twice as many as are contained in all the other plantations put together.

The

26. Afforestation consists not merely of planting trees but of conservation and preservation from wanton and accidental destruction of trees, shrubs, and seeds at present on the ground. recent authorization of the appointment of Forest Guards, to check the destruction of, and damage to, trees and shrubs by persons and goats will have a most salutary effect. Still, although the damages will be greatly diminished, some offences must necessarily occur; as there will always be some persons in this, as well as other things, to break the law when they can have a chance to do so with impunity. I believe that the cutting of trees is frequently done at night in the vicinity of villages and near the sea-coast, at the latter, probably, by boat people.

27. The Little-Hongkong woods-the most beautiful bits of natural forest vegetation on the island-suffer considerably from the depredations of wood cutters. The vegetation is in most parts so thick and impenetrable that it is difficult to patrol the woods efficiently. It would be a great aid to their preservation if some walks or narrow tracks could be cut through them, not only for the benefit of the Forest Guards in their work, but also to render the woods accessible to pedestrians and picnic parties, to whom this portion of the island might become a favourite resort if it were made a little more attractive by artificial means. Perhaps something in the way of a Japanese or Chinese

FEE

dea might be established there. A new mountain road from the top of the Little-Hongkong wo Wántsai Gap, where it would form a junction with the Wántsai and Aberdeen road, would

:) nuke the woods accessible and form a pleasant walk from this side of the island and from the Peak houses.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanic and Afforestation Department.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

(C.S.O. No. 641.) No. 4.

TREE-PLANTING BY THE CHINESE NEAR HONGKONG.

BOTANIC GARDENS,

27th February, 1882.

SIR,-In reference to His Excellency the Governor's Minute on C.S.O. No. 592, inquiring if I had been able to get sufficient data to form an approximate idea of the total number of Pinus sinensis planted by the natives for the last ten or fifteen years from the mouth of Mirs Bay to Lantao and the neighbouring islands," I have the honour to report, that taking into consideration the lands tinted red on attached rough sketch I estimate roughly, that about one tenth part may be planted, and that there may be about 25,000,000 trees thereon.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable M. S. TONNOCHY,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

CHARLES FORD. Superintendent,

Botanic and Afforestation Department.

$

?

No. 57.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

The following Report and Returns from the Police Department are published for general in-

By His Excellency's Command,

formation.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 19th February, 1881.

[No. 44.]

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

POLICE OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 10th February, 1881.

SIR,I have the honour, in accordance with the instructions contained in your Circular of the 7th January, 1881, to forward, for the information of Ilis Excellency the Governor, details of the Police Establishment, the list of Pensioners, and the Criminal Statistics for 1880.

2. The Criminal Statistics show that 6,415 cases were reported to the Police during 1880, being an increase of 286 cases or 4.66 per cent on the Returns for 1879. In the sub-division of these cases into Serious Crimes (so called) and Minor Offences, a decrease of 346 cases or 14.43 per cent is found in Serious Crimes, and an increase of 632 cases or 16.93 per cent in Minor Offences.

I have the honour, to be,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant,

W. M. DEANE, Captain Superintendent of Policz.

The Honourable F. STEWART, L.L.D..."

Acting Colonial Secretary-

1880.

Robberies with Violenci

from

the Person.

TABLE A.

RETURN of SERIOUS and MINOR OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1880, with the Results of such Reports.

Burglaries.

Larcenies in

Dwelling

Houses

at Night.

Assaults

with Intent

to rob.

Felonies

nut

alrendy

Assaults

and

Disorderly

Kidnapping. Gambling,

Conduct.

Larcenies.

given.

Possuiskund

Piracy.

Euro-

Miscellaneous

peans

and Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Offences.

Ameri-

cans.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. ·

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Perseus discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged..

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

No Pass or Light.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted,

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

January,

1

1

February,

Mar

3

4

April,

3

May,

June,

2

July,

2

August,

September,

October,

November,

Բ

4

4

December,

3

2 I 3

*

2

2

153

$7 24

1)

a

145

69

31

!!!

$6

31

15

5

20

17

01 20 371 37 27

7

G

12

TOTAL

OF

ALL

CASES.

25

12

30

105

157

32

12

6

3

1

344

110

389

117

506

4

12

IS 27

89

78

24

35 5

6.

1

307

123 341

129

142

1.

3+

11 19

128

131

15

3

55

4

T

3

361

108

417 113:

481

21 15

19 100

FI...

96

211

2 2

309

Giri 35

SO

235

$2

385

9

17

14 16 30

108

130

13 .17

404

16

4$2

93

409

T

20

18 20

53

102

89

2-1

20

197

3

2 354

91 583

95

399

17.

25 45 113 110

30

162

2

465

118 505

120

611

1

31

301113

16.

75

11434

38

23

3

**

10

F

458

124 483

131

504

4312] 20

78

96

35

B

22

352

71 6382

73

371

10 19 C5

185

205

لان

438

3.

G00

107 705

111

616

I

1

40

*19109

310

063

71 61 5

980

123 1,042

128

1,034

26

59.

15

328 332

རི་

42)

2

4

089

107 781

109

737

163

81 30

661

69

41

32

24

22

122

54 22.

48

TO

1

10

20

201 301

9

127

69

12

نار

30

22

201 - 94

16

$

CO

113

69

103

16

65

14:

201

47 19

9

6

110 70

22

77

107

$7

00

90 29

3

6

5

221

2.

14 14.

11

1 13 13)

7

121 12

10 1 21

2

1

110

66

20.

701

83

40

IG

23

2

127

93

15

631

70

21

21

28 2.11

152

100

19

71 101

24

48 1331 29

19 14

6

127

82

174 1

&

79 111

20

411 301

201

14

2

122

58 15

I

COL

1353

93

SI

211

31)

¿

7

7

1 33 29! 5

TOTAL,

25 16 3 34

27

18

2

a. Prisoner escaped in one case.

1,662

868

239

15

746;

965

310

358) 811) 191

65

b. One Felon committed suicide (murder).

Police Department, Hongkong, 10th February, 1881.

43

226) ISH 70 11

12

50 276 329 $401,815 1,709

371 | 431 40

2812 5,742

2526,201

1,305

0,415

c. One Prisoner absconded from baft.

d. One Case doubtful,

e. One Case doubtful.

W. M. Dr

Captain Superintent

Police.

!

1880.

1

C:

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cuses reported,

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persous discharged.

Gases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cakes reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persous discharged. Cases reportĜ.

No. of Persous convicted.

No. of Persons discharnet.

Casey report.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Fersons convicten. Yo, of Persmas discharge

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons disebarged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons dischargét. Cases reported.

} No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

Duty.

Characters.

Mendicants.

Hawking,

Unlicensed

Street Cries.

Rogues,

Desertion,

Neglect of Refusal and

Suspicious Vagabonds

Ordinance.

Vehicles

4

Puldic

Breach of

Breach ofMer-

chant Shipping

Consolidation Ordinance.

Ereach of Spirits]

and Opium Ordinances.

Brunch of Registration Ordinance.

Gael

and

TABLE B.

RETURN of MISCELLANEOUS OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1880, with Results of such Reports.

Podce,

Breach of

Conspiracy,

Bribery and

Extortion,

Intimidation,

Earth,

Pretences.

by False

Money Goods and

Obtaining

Trespass.

Orilinaneys.

Derontation

Oniriances.

Mensures

Pawił kokers,

Breach of

Spurious Coins.

or

Trees.

Cutting

Damage Property,

to

&c.

Attempt

to commit

Suicide.

January, ...

26 23

*

February,..

198

3

20

March, .............

April,

June,

July,

August.......

18 10 6

4.1

30

20

24

2

:

September,

10 13 2

11

11 5

1

2

October,....

10

29

91 87 4

12

12

G

16 15 4

1

November,

45 15 37

102) 101| 15

84 31}

6

13 14 1

13

11 2

3

December,..

42)

26] 19 [115] 113]

00

B

22 19 3

12 11

1

28 29

12

00

12

1

3 10

1

211

Total,.. 193 142 61

603) 686) 47 | 130] 122 16 } 106] 119; 20.

143) 124| 46 | 23 | 30 | 16 (79) 145|28|| 175 103,24 6 6

21

Police Department, Hongkong, 10th February, 1881.

10

21

11 12.

#2!

प्रभ

98; 3) 2

ના

Co

شن

3-

2

N

2

I

11

110 198

>

2

3 | 101] 103′13) 30 | 30

10 [1919] sisi

2

8192

2

19

32

N

9

*

12

*

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged..

Cruelty to Animals.

Contempt of Court, Perjury or False Charge.

Breach of Dangerous goods

Ordinance.

Total

999

165

89

120

137

32

78

21

131 †

15

100

96

141

609

108

130

330

12

15

102

89

24

3 [13

118

110

30

2

~

91

75

38

78

98

22

205

185

31

310

71

228

57

#1 201..1,815 |1,769

374

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

DESCRIPTION.

TABLE C.

COMPARATIVE RETURN of OFFENCES coming under the notice of the Police during the Years 1878, 1879, and 1880.

SERIOUS.

Number of Cases,

Number of Persons,

Convicted.

Discharged.

1879.

1879. | 1880. | 1878. | 1879. | 1880. 1878. | 1879. | 1880.

Murder,

7

4

*1

1

*

Robbery with Violence from the Person,

35

39

25

12

10

16

Assault,

Gambling,

Burglary or Larceny from House at night, Assault with intent to rob,

131

101

53

49

44

31

10

Aliscell duuuis,

Drankeness,

Kidnapping.

53

51

31

38

68

69

40

13

Nuisances,

Viracy,

7

12

6

00

No Pass or Light.

Unlawful Possession,

470 URB 226 410

302

181

166 105

70

Larcenies,

Felonies not already given,.

11

1,888 | 1,850 |1,662 | 1,037 19

972

898 304

302

239

&

10

1

13

7

15

TOTAL,

2,611 |2,397 |2,051 |1,554 |1,381

DTSCRIPTION,

MINOR.

Number of Persons,

Number of Cases,

Convicted.

Discharged,

1878. 1879. 1880. 1878.1879. 1880. 1878, 1879.1880.

875 838 7461,289 1,134 965 353 157 358 585 499 814 125 185 332 337

1,794 |1,442 |1,815 |1,965 | 1,717 |1,769

318

376

310

191

374

512

301 276

355

232

329

No analysis of Convictions & Discharges.

335

762

840

1,208

671

185

430

TOTAL,.............

4,2243,732 1,364 |3,839 |3,350 | 3,548

775 898

875

* The supposed murderer committed suicide,

1880-Total Number of Cases, 6,115, being an Increase of 286 Cases or 4.066 per cent from 1879, Decrease of Serious Crimes, 316 Cases or 11.43 per cent. Increase of Minor Offences, 632 Cases or 16.93 per cent,

Police Department, Hongkong, 10th February, 1881,

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.—No. 104.

The following Return is published for general information.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 25th March, 1881.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

RETURN of the NUMBER of CASES tried and ACTIONS commenced in the Supreme and Vice-Admiralty Courts of Hongkong, during the Year ended 31st December, 1880.

Cases tried in 1880.

Judgment.

Total

Amount of

Number

Court.

of

Cases.

Debt or Damages claimed.

Plaintiff. Defendant.

Nonsuit.

Struck out. Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Supreme Court:-

Summary Jurisdiction,

Original Jurisdiction, -;

Bankruptcy, } Discharge) 11 | 1,463,844.44

granted,

Probate,

Petitious granted,

662

Appeals,

Vice-Admiralty Court,.......

0758 16

$75,700.05

601

62,144.81

14

45

1

12

100

11

>850

$2,479,524.66

855,335.86

62

Appellant 1

23,000.00

Actions commenced in 1880,

Court.

Yum- ber of

Amount of Debt of

Cases.

Damages

Settled without Trial.

Judgment.

claimed.

Plaintiff.

X

Supreme Court:→

Defendant. Nonsuit. Struck out.

Remaining in Depend-

ence.

Total.

Cases. Debt & Damages.

Summary Jurisdiction, 1,279

Original Jurisdiction, - 65

$139,389.15

363,920.14

509

23.

586 14

43

12

1

94

Bankruptcy,

213

259,203.60

Discharge (granted,

Petitions

1896

35

26

Probate,

78

856,457.76

62

Appeals,

1

ì granted,

Appellant

1,440 $1,643,060.65

16

Vice-Admiralty Court,...

24,000.00

1

a. 23 pending in 1879; 171 were Petitions for refund of Rates.

ỏ. The amount given in these cases is the sworn value of the several Estates in which Probate or Letters of Administration were granted during the year. e. This case was from the Marine Magistrate.

d. The amount given in these cases is the amount of Liabilities set forth in the Bankrupt Schedules.

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrur.

}

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 204.

The following Census Returns of the population of the Colony on 3rd April, 1881, with covering letter of the Acting Registrar General, are published for general information.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 8th June, 1881.

No. 35.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 1st June, 1881.

SIR, I have the honour to enclose the Returns of the Census which was taken on the night of the 3rd April last, in accordance with the directions of His Excellency the Governor.

The previous Census was taken on the 4th December, 1876, when the whole population numbered 139,144, shewing an increase in four years (the period that had elapsed since the Census of 1872) of 17,159; it now numbers 160,402, shewing an increase in four years and four months of 21,258.

The greater part of this increase is, of course, in the Chinese population.

The European and American community is larger by 273, and the increase is among the British, Portuguese, Germans, and Italians, and is that of women and children. The male adult population has decreased.

All the villages, with the exception of Stanley, Aberdeen, and Little Hongkong, have added to their inhabitants.

Kau-lung has increased by 1,317, and if the Government is desirous of encouraging the settlement of population in that Dependency, the existing tenure of land leases by their extension would materially aid in that direction.

New buildings are still being erected, and 1,062 have been added since last Census, and of the 352 houses destroyed by fire in December 1878, the greater number, on being rebuilt, have been enlarged by an additional story.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable

ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

$.c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

JOHN GERRARD, Acting Registrar General.

No. 1.-CENSUS of HONGKONG, including the MILITARY and NAVAL ESTABLISHMENTS, 3rd April, 1881.

POPULATION.

TOTAL.

Men.

Women:

Boys.

Girls.

Europeans and Americans, Resident Population,

935

768

699

638

3,040

British, Military, ̈

1,107

84

62

66

21,319

British, Naval Establishment,.

2,345

78

2,437

Europeans, Police,

103

12

134

Europeans and Americans, Crews of Mercantile Shipping in

606

14

627

the Harbour,

Foreign Men of War in the Harbour,

197

197

Temporary Residents, ....

158

14

4

188

Prisoners,

48

48

Total-of Europeans and Americans,

5,499

899

857

1735

7,990

Goa, Manila, Indian, &c., and others of mixed blood, Residents, Goa, Manila, Indian, &c., Crews of Mercantile Shipping in

the Harbour,

426

174:

185

183

968

441

1

2

445

Indians, Military,

98

5.

4

109

Indians, Police,.......

194

3

198

Prisoners,

2

2

Total of Indians, &c.,

1,161

181

- 191

189

1,722

Chinese in employ of Europeans, &c., Residents,

4,184

750

195

400

5,529

Chinese in employ of Mercantile Shipping in the Harbour,. Chinese in employ of Foreign Men-of-War in the Harbour, Chinese Police,

782

1

1

2

792

236

236

351

1

2

354

Chinese employed by the Military and Naval Establishments,.. Chinese residing in Victoria,..

560

32

88

16

. 696

62,744

17,253

8,579

8,280

96,856

Chinese residing in Villages and Kau-lung,

9,323

3,573

2,050

1,660

16,606

Chinese Boat Population in Victoria Harbour,

7,635

3,440

3,061

2,551

16,687

Chinese Boat Population other than in Victoria Harbour,

5,039

2,961

2,226

2,076

12,302

Chinese Prisoners,

598

27

6

1

632

Total of Chinese,

91,452

28,041

16,209

14,988

150,690

Grand Total,

98,112 29,121

17,257

15,912

160,402

British, Portuguese,

German,

Of EUROPEANS and AMERICANS, Fixed Residents, there are :—

American,

French,

Italian,

Spanish,

Danish,

Dutch,

Swiss,

Swedish,

Russian,

Belgian,..

Austrian,

Turkish,

Grand Total,..

POPULATION.

TOTAL.

Men.

Women.

· Boys.

Girls.

336

161

144

144

785

384

521

511

-453

1,869

106

23

32

27

188

41

16

8

70

25

12

3

42

12

24

40

4

1

5

9

10

4

1

1

2

5

1

6

4

4

2

1

:

:

10

7

1

2

3

1

1

2

935

768.

699

638

3,040

}

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 18813

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

1

No. 2-

Table showing the Aes of the EUROPEAN and AMERICAN RESIDENT POPULATION, 3rd April, 1881.

Number of ̈

Persons.

20 Years 30 Years and under: and under.

40 Years

50 Years and under. and under.

60 Years 70 Years and under. and under.

80 Years and under.

Not stated..

3,040

1,337

582

599

297

122

37.

18

48

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881.

'JOHN GERRARD, “Acting Registrar General.

No. 3.-Table showing the RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS of the EUROPEAN and AMERICAN RESIDENT POPULATION.

3,040

278 2,108 361 62

9 75 11 12 18

22

~I

7

6

1 1

1 1 12

51

Number

of

Persons.

Church of

England.

Roman

Catholic.

Protestant.

Presbyterian.

Episcopalian.

Lutheran.

Independent.

Methodist.

Christian.

Jewish.

Baptist.

Congregation- alist.

Unitarian.

Calvinist.

Quaker.

Theist.

Universalist.

None.

Not stated.

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881.

Number

Persons.

JOHN GERRARD, Acting Registrar General.

No. 4.Table shewing the AGES of the GOA, MANILA, INDIAN, &C., RESIDENT POPULATION, and their RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS.

$209 Years 30 Years 40 Years 50 Years 60 Years 70 Years 80 Years 90 Years' and under and under and under. and under. and under. and under. and. under. and under.

Not stated.

968

368

178

167

108

46

19

RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS OF ABOVE.

1

77

Number of Persons.

Maho Roman medan. Catholic.

Parsee.

Je- wish.

Hindoo.

Budd- hist.

Pro- testant.

Church of England.

Arme- nian.

Inde- pendent.

Sinto..

Not stated.

968

369

266

91

40

26

13

Registrar General's Office, Victoria Hongkong, 1st June 18812

13

3.

86

JOHN GERRARD,"

Acting Registrar General,

N). 5.—RETURN of the POPULATION of HONGKONG, exclusive of the MILITARY and NAVAL DEPARTMENTS, &c.,

3rd April, 1881.

-**

CHINESE.

1....

VICTORIA DISTRICT,

Chinese Residing in Victoria,

in Employ of Europeans,

VILLAGES.

Wong-nai-chung,

WHITE.

Males. Females. Males. Females. Males.. Females. Males.

COLOURED.

TOTAL.

Females

1611 357 1611357

2,245 1,763 2,2451,763

771,323. €4,379

25,533 ** 1,150

1,634 1,406 lase

75,702

26,683

Shau-ki-wán,

Shi-wán,

Shek-ò,

Tái-tâm-tuk.

Stanley,

Aberdeen,

Heong-Kong,

Pok-fú-lam,

Kau-lung,

Boat Population,

Temporary Residents, .

Prisoners,

●.༔

&

48

:

311

218

2,201

1,073

119

94

203

190

50

36

517

3123

960

345

152

169

425

.210

6,435

2,586

17,961

11,028

604

28

2

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881.

:

11,373 17,961

$5,233 11,028

162

26

654

28

108,097

44,761

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

No. 6.- ABSTRACT of RETURNS furnished from each House occupied by CHINESE, in the COLONY of HONGKONG, stating Number of Persons resident therein, and Mortality.

TOTAL OF

MOR-

MEN.

WOMEN. Boys.

GIRLS.

EACH

TALITY.

PLACE.

City of Victoria,....

In employ of Europeans,

62,744 4,184

17.253 750

8,579

8,280

+

96,856

3,358

195

400

5,529

66,928

18,003

8,774

8,680

102,385

3,358

VILLAGES.

Wong-nai-chung,

Shau-ki-wáu,.

Shái-wán,

Shek-ò,

Tái-tám-tuk,

Stanley,

Aberdeen,

Heong-Kong,

Pok-fú-lam,.

Kau-lung,

Total,.

Grand Total,.

239

152.

72

66

529

1,777

740

424

333

3,274-

80

65

39

29

213

150

139

120

64

70

393

39

23

11

13

86

30

398

216

119

96

829.

818

236

142

109

1,305

83

96

69

73

321

89

355

142

70

68

635

5,395

1,793.

1,040

803

9,021

219

9,323

3,573 **2,050

1,660

16,606 488

76,251

21.576

10,824

10,340 118,991

3,846

1. Shau-ki-wan includes San T'sün, Hung-Heung-lò, Tung Lo Wán, Pak Shui Wán, Ts'at-tsze-múi, Shin Tsing Wán, Wong Kok Tsui, and A' Kung Ngam.

2. Shek-ò includes Hok Tsui and To-ti Wán.

3. Stanley includes Tái-t'ám and Wong Ma Kok.

4. Aberdeen includes Ap-lí-chau.

5. Pok-fú-lam includes Lap Sap Wan.

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881

Adults.

Children.

No. 7. ABSTRACT of PARTICULARS in regard to CHINESE POPULATION of HONGKONG and KAU-LUNG.

Male. Female. Male Female.

Number

Total.

of Number

Persong

of Visitors.

Vicennial Periods of Ages,

in Occu-Families pations:*

Religions.

Countries.

ན;

Victoria Villages.

Total.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Under 20,

villa

9,393

744° 17,253 8,579

'3,573 2,050

8,280

96,856 | 59,538,

9,724

786

17,413

4,672

22,115

Protestant,

1,081

20 & upwards,

38,714 6,716

15,430

16,606 9,682 $2,195

103

Roman Catholic

418

Kau

40 & upwards, .| 19,889

3,565

23,451

Confucian (U-Kaú),.| 42,546

84 1,168 Kwong 32 450 Hongkong, 3,985 46,531 Fo-Kien,

76,713

713 13,192 30,200

286 2,382

280

3,868

291

60 & upwards,

2,190

895

3,085

Grand Total,..

118,462 | 69,220

11,859

* 889

Laity (Tsuk-Ka),

32,197

11,644 43,841

43,841 Singapore,

16

80 & upwards, .

123

40

163

Taouist,

106

77

183 Pechili,

22

Not stated....

18,197

718 19,215

Mohammedan,....

Grand Total,

113,462

Buddhist,

Jewish,

6

17 Quan See

15 Sai

kiang,

Kan-Soo,

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881

Malay,

Not stated,

20,479

772

21,251

Shan Tung,

3

· Grand Total,..

Hoo-pee,

113,462 Hoo-Nan,

Kiang-Nan,

Austria,

India,

Sydney,

Persia,

Wan Nam,,

Kwei Chau,...

Not stated,

18,497

718

19,215

Grand Total,... 113,462

JOHN GERRARD, "Apting Registrar Genovai.

Architects..

A

No.

CUPATIONS in VICTORIA and VILLAGES.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Brought forward,.

22,830

Awning Makers,:

Gardeners,

39

23

62

B

Ginseng Dealers, *...........

Geomancer,

Bakers,

54-

54

Glass Manufacturers,

Bamboo-wares Dealers,

37.

$10.

47

Glaziers,.

Workers.

102*

19-

121

Grass Cutters,"

19

Bankers,.

-55

55

Gold Beaters,

Barbers,

1,039

+159

1,198

Rakers,

16

11

11

140

140

60

60

8

Barrister-at-Law,

Bean Curd Sellers,.

Betel-nut Sellers,

Bird Sellers,

Birds' Nest Sellers,

Blacksmiths,

* 1

87

.20

107

H

10

10

7

7

Hat Makers,

$53

53

35

35

Hawkers,

1,770%

348

2,118

394

314

708

Herbalists,

12

19

Boat Builders,.

52

58

110

House Owners,

30

36

Bookbinders,

51

51

Braziers,

856

8

864

Brick and Tile Dealers, .........

18

18

Brokers,

453

~

:

455

Image Makers,

15

15.

Brothel Keepers and Inmates, ....

1,273

42

1,315

Insurance Co.s' Managers,

Building Contractors,

42

42

Iron and Copper Dealers,

56

26

2

56

Bullion Dealers,

34

34

Pans Makers,

Butchers,

27

J

C

Cake Sellers,...

Makers,

Carpenters,

Jade Stone Dealers,

18

18

95

24

119

Jinricksha Letters,

15

15

151

151

Joss-house Keepers,

20

2,284

639

2,923

Joss-paper Sellers,

25

.22

2223

21

41

47

Carriage Makers,

Carvers,

Caulkers,

Chair Coolies,

39

39

Joss-stick

65

65

69

70

102

32

134

L

980.

950

29

Letters,

5 Labourers,

682

682

Makers,

48

Chandlers,

360

162

522

Cigar Makers,

31

48 Lamp Sellers,

Lantern Makers,

31 Lacquered-ware Dealers,

:

Cinnamon Dealers,

7

7

Lard Dealers,

Clerks.

2.751

98

2,849

Leather Dealers,.

Coal Dealers...

15

5

20

Box Dealers,.

Coke Dealer,.

1

Makers,.

"}

Coffin Makers,

Cobblers,

Coffee Shop Keepers,

Collectors of Old Wares,..

41

47

Lemonade and Sodawater Manufacturers,

7

7

Lime Burners,

3

25

53

30

30:

7

སྒྱུ “ ཤྩ ཿ །ཥྛཱ ཿ

8

13

Linguists,

66

27

93

"

"1

Opium Dross,.

179

3

182

M

11

Oyster Shells,.

16

16

Compositors,

30

30

Masons,

516

26

Compradores,

94

1

95

Marine Store Dealers,

17

Confectioners,

30

30

22

Delicacies Dealers,.

11

542 17 11

Coolies.

5,955

518

6,473

Mat Makers,

49

49

Coopers,

27

27

27

Bag Makers,

560

560

Cotton and Yarn Dealers,

58

58

Shop Keepers,..

75

75

Quilt Makers,

29

29

Shed Builders,

86

2

88

77

Cow Dealers,..

19

19

Match Makers,

13

13

Curio Dealers,

9

Meat Vendors,...

207

36

243

D

Divers,

Dentists,

Doctors,

Drapers,

Druggists,

Dyers,...

Milk Sellers,

Midwives,

8

8

Money Changers,

3

3

Musicians,

299

34

333

148

8 ܂

156

N

216

27

243

37

40

Nail Cutter,

51

63

54

55

Mirror Sellers,......

28

28

109

111

29

30

F

E

Earthen-ware and Porcelain Dealers,

23.

32

Eating House Keepers,.

144

13

157

Egg Dealers,.

17

Engineers,

36

85

121

Oil Dealers,

17 Oar Makers,.

Old Clothes Dealers,

Dealers, prepared,

Newspaper Editors,. Nightmen,

49

23

20

43

17

19

36

4574

1

75

Opium Boilers,

103

103

71

77

Firearms Dealers,

18

20

unprepared.

40

42

Firewood and Charcoal Dealers,

112

112

Flower Hawkers,.

41

41

P

Florists,

20

20

Flour Dealers,

20

20

Paint Dealers,

10

Fish Mongers,

242

83

325

Fishermen,

464

464

Painters,

Foreign Goods Dealers,

191

Fortune Tellers,

84

Pawnbrokers,.

Frame Makers,

Fruit Dealers,.............

*94

Furnace, &c. Makers,”

Furnace Menders,

Gamboge Dealers, :::..

Paper Box Makers,.

10 Peppermint Oil Dealers,.

109 Pewtersmiths,

3 Photographers,

5 Portrait Painters,

Furniture Dealers,

3

454

64

518

10

10

37

41

2

73

173

45

45

200

SEX 200

18

Piece Goods Dealers,

88

$109

$22,8304

Carried forward,

£29,929

OCCUPATIONS in VICTORIA and VILLages. Continued.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Victoria. Villages, Total.

Brought forward,.

29,929

Brought forward,.

Pig Dealers,

127

80

207

Spectacle Maker,

58,327

**

Pilots,

Play Actors,

9 Spirits Merchants, .................

124

124 Stationers,

-132

14

146

Plumbers,

17

17

Porcelain Menders,

Stone Quarry Farmers,

3

10-

10

ཟློས་ Cutters,

252

Post Office Keepers, ......

67

57

Dealers,

+1,187 66

1,439

73

Poulterers,

53.

53

Steam-ship Co.'s Agent,

1

Preachers,

1.

4

Story Teller,.....

Printers,.

25

Students,

1,874

688

Privy Keepers, m

2,562

16

16

Sugar Dealers,.....

14

14

Pulley Makers,

12

**

Refiners,

15

15

Sweetmeat Dealers,

18

18

R

Sesamum Oil Dealers,

5

5

Rattan Dealers,

Workers,

Rent Collectors,

Rice Dealers,

30

N-31

T

448

448

46

46

Tailors,

1,795

62

1,857

121

128

Taouists,.

86

50

136

19

Pounders,

1,044

39

1,083

Tanners,

1

1

Rifle Makers,...................

Roast and Dried Meat Vendors,

5

5

Teachers of Shroffing,

14

14

80

83

Tea Dealers,.................

51

51

Rosin Vendors,

.15

15

Timber Dealers,

97'

10

107

Tinsmiths,

171

I

172

S

Tobacconists,

26

1

27

Theatre Lessees,

10

10

Sail and Rope Makers,

96

45

141

Tobacco Manufacturers,

96

96

Salt Bean Curd Sellers,

60

60

Tooth Powder Dealers,

13

13

Dealers,

8

Fish Dealers,

132

+2

7

15

Makers.....

57

57

42

171

Trading Hong Merchants,

393

393

Sandal-wood Dealers,

15

15

Traders,

2,298

79

2,377

Workers..

61

61

Sapan-wood Dealers,.

3

3

U

Workers,

20

20

Sauce Manufacturers,

33

8

41

Umbrella Makers,

169

169

Scale Makers,

11

Ι

12

Undertakers,.

26.

18

44

School Masters,

127

44

171

Seamen,

1,760

322

2,082

V

Servants,

15,023

1,405

16,428

Sharks' Fins Dealers,

15

15

Vegetable Sellers,..

68

10

78

Sheep Keepers,..

10

10

Vermilion Dealers,

*

19

19

Ship Compradores,

113

113

"

Manufacturers,

104

104

Charterers,

11

་་

41

"

Shoe Sellers,

Makers,....

Shopmen,

47

48

W

500

500

Slippers Sellers,

23

23 Washermen,

425

14

439

4,483

886

5,369 Watchmakers,

96

1

97

Shroffs.

193

15

208

Watchmen,

121

34

155

Silversmiths,.

420

48

468

Water Sellers,

186

186

Soap Manufacturers,

5

2

7

Weavers,.

3

3

6

Carried forward,..

58,327

TOTAL,.

69,220

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong 1st June, 1881.

John Gerrard,

Acting Registrar General,

1

DETAILED RETURN of the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of VESSELS anchored and plying in the Harbour and Bays of Hongkong, and their Population, 3rd April, 1881.

VICTORIA

SHAU-KI-WÁN.

ABERDEEN.

STANLEY.

KAU-LUNG.

DESCRIPTION

ESSE

No. of

Vessels.

Adults.

Children.'

No. of

Vessels,

Adults.

Children.

No. of

Vessels.

u.

11.

B.

G.

V.

IV.

B.

G.

Trading Junks, Passage Boats,

Cargo Boats,

72 1,138

25 160

630 2,537

. 84

41

26

D

12

Adults.

Children.

M.

IV.

B.

G.

24

No. of

Vessels.

Adults.

Children.

V.

11.

B.

Q.

ན་

'No. of

Vessels.

Adults.

Children.

M.

IV.

B. G.

<3 Nosoft

Vessels.

31

266

15

9

G

7

22

939

832

794

4

27

::ཀྟྭཱ

Fishing Boats,

234 845

316 368

240

140

836

313

270 235

Stone Boats,......

31

277

8

11

6

56

Hakow Boats,¿.

17

71

40

39

35

::དྡྷེ ::

8

23

:

:

22 93

81

36

25

95

558

184

172

109 382

216

183

178

197

789 322

286

224

98

25

16

6

2

2

7

17

67

23*

Sampans,

986

1,469 |1,526 | 1,151 | 1,021

469

190

679

390

399

356

647

562

346

393

303

556

548

438

20 16 110 1,440 33 211 656 2,657 971 871 820 775 | 3,4101,378 |1,291 |1,049 473426 33

93 45

3992,088 3,164 3,317 | 2,325 |2.212

ΤΟΓΑΙ..

Adults.

Children,

M.. W.

B.

Q.

49

42

9

29

53

11

40

Bumboats,

£12

75 97

14

6

2

3

14

16

Pullaway Boats,...

352

!.809

488 536

850

18

39

29

23

Water Boats,

136

73 63

61

12.

Steam Launches,..

07

Yachts,

18

91 11 6

370 818 517 570 379 61: 136 73 63 61 37. 180 2 19 18

:

2,423 |7,635 |3,440 |3,061 | 2,551

6251,438

993

665

635

458 | 1,237

775

537 569

116

102

218

183

178

604

975

811

694 4,226 12,674 | 6,401

,287 1,627

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881,

JOHN GERRARD, Registrar General.

1

Victoria,

Shau-ki-wáng

Aberdeen,

Stanley,

Kau-lung,

LOCALITY.

No. 10.-SUMMARY OF No. 9 RETURN.

POPULATION.

NUMBER

OF VESSELS.

TOTAL NUMBER

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

OF PERSONS.

Males.

Females.

Males.

Females.

2,423

7,635

3,440

3,061

2,551

16,687

625

1,438-

993

665

635

3,731

458

1,237

775

537

569

3,118

116

402

218

183

178

981

604

1,962

1975

841

694

4,472

4,226

12,674

6,401

5,287

4,627

28,989

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1381.

No. 11.-EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.

John GerraRD,

Acting Registrar General,

NUMBER OF BRITISH

NUMBER OF

AND FOREIGN

NUMBER

TOTAL NUMBER OF

SCHOLARS

CHINESE SCHOLARS.

CLASS OF SCHOOL.

OF

BRITISH AND

SCHOOLS.

FOREIGN

TOTAL NUMBER OF CHINESE SCHOLARS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Boys.

Girls.

SCHOLARS.

Boys.

Girls.

Government,

36

73

73

1,867

138

2,005

2,078

Roman Catholic, including Reformatory,

20

328

357

685

171

329

500

1,185

Hongkong Public School,

I

22

22

22

St. Paul's College Mission,

165

37

202

202

Church Missionary Society,.

229

42

271

271

Diocesan Home.....

31

355

36

42

The Baxter Vernacular Schools....

169

169

169

262

155

417

417

London Mission,

Berlin Mission,.

38

33

38

Basel Mission,

Victoria School, Chinese, General,.

24

30

71

37

27

64

13

13

77

Chinese, Private,

76 19

1.728

37

1,765

1,765

::

215

247

217

TOTALS,..

174

491

389

880

4.710

997

5,707

587

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881.

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

No. 12.—CLASSIFICATION und NUMBER of PUBLIC and PRIVATE BUILDINGS in the COLONY of HONGKONG and

BRITISH KAU-LUNG, 3rd April, 1881.

VICTORIA.

VILLAGES.

TOTAL

IN HONGKONG.

KAU-LUNG.

Public Offices. Barracks, Guard Rooms, and other Government Buildings. Churches, Chapels, and Places of Worship. British and Foreign,

49

14

63.

3

14

4

18

11

22

Government Schools,

.8

14

22

Mosques and Chinese Temples

Houses and other Buildings Assessed at and above £100 per annum value occupied, Shops and Private Dwellings Assessed below £100 per annum value, occupied,. Houses Untenanted and Unfinished,

965

18

983

5,437

1,336

6,773

977

355

355

29

Total...

6.839

1,397

8,236 -

1.029

MILITARY BUILDINGS.

Barracks,

Guard Houses,

Commissariat Buildings,

Special Quarters,

Hospitals,

Total.......

19

23

NAVAL BUILDINGS.

Store-houses, Cooperage, Timber Store, Rigging Shed,

Workshops,.

Offices, Quarters, Guard Rooms, Out-houses,.

Hospital Buildings,.

Total.....

Grand Total,

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1s

June 1881-

8

6

11

I

26

26

6,884

1,401;

8,285

1,034

JOHN GERRARD,

9 Registrar General.

No. 13.-CENAUS of HONGKONG for the following Years, exclusive of MILITARY and NAVAL DEPARTMENTS, CREWS of MERCANTILE SHIPPING in the HARBOUR, and POLICE.

1870-71.

1872.

1876.

1881..

Persons.

Persons.

Persons.

Persons,

Europeans and Americans,

2,736

2,520

2,767

3,040

Goa, Manila, Indian, &c., and others of mixed blood;

1,388

635

812

968

Temporary Residents,

57

159

154

188

Chinese in employ of Europeans, &c.,

7,617

7,460

5,879

5,529

Chinese residing in Victoria,

72,984.

75,584

84,425

96,856

Chinese residing in Villages,

10,507

11,672

15,230

16,606

Chinese Boat Population in Victoria Harbour,

12,309

13,500

12,404

16,687

Chinese Boat Population other than in Victoria Harbour, Prisoners,

11,400

6,699

10,341

12,302

479

441

512

682

Registrar General's Office, Victoria, Hongkong, 1st June, 1881.

119,477

118,670

132,524

152,858

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General,

12

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION No. 205.

BIRTHS AND DEATHS. HONGKONG.

The following Returns of the Acting Registrar General, are published for general information.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 8th June, 1881.

FREDERICK Stewart,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS and DEATHS for the 1st Quarter of 1880, ending 31st March.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

CHINESE.

DEATHS. BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

DEATHS.

Victoria,

21

21

31.

11.

203

Boys. Girls. Males. Females. Boys. Girls. Males. Females.

British and Foreign, 13 Portuguese,

126

400

520

+

Kau-lung,

9

5

26

Indians, &c.,

Slau-ki-wán,

18

15

25

Non-Residents,

Aberdeen,

1

1

7

Stanley,...

7

4

2

11

6

12

42

TOTAL,..

21

21

31

11

238

151

455

580

GRAND TOTAL,

ANNUAL DEATH-RATE, PER 1,000, FOR 1ST QUARTER OF

1880.

Whole Population,.

30.96

Births, 431 431 Deaths,..1,077

British & Foreign Community,

18.71

Do.. deducting non-Residents,

15.31

کس

Chinese,

31.80

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 24th April, 1880.

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

RETURNS OF BIRT and DEATHS for the 2nd Quarter of 1880, ending 30th June.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

DEATHS. BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS..

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

Boys.

Girls. Males. Females: Boys. Girls.

Males. Females.

2:

British and Foreign, 11

Victoria, Kau-lung, Shau-ki-wán,

t

14

18

24

10

126

106

352.

435-4

Portuguese,.

.15

2

4

34

16

Indians, &c.,

4

16

9

33

11

Non-Residents, •

4

Aberdeen,

1

17

6

Stanley,..

1

4

1

34

TOTAL,..

14

18

24.

10

145

120

440

469

ANNUAL DEATH-RATE, PER

GRAND TOTAL, 1,000, FOR 2ND QUARTER OF

1880.

Whole Population,..

27.10:

Births, .297

British & Foreign Community,

15.15

Deaths,...943.

Do. deducting non-Residents,

15.31

Chinese,

27.93

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 21st July, 1880.

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS and DEATHS for the 3rd Quarter of 1880, ending 30th September.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

DEATHS. BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

Boys.

Girls. Males. Females. Boys.... Girls. Males. Females.

British and Foreign, 12

Victoria,

19

18

24

12

157

112

420

438

Portuguese,

..14

Kau-lung,

6

3

24

31

Indians, &c.,

6

Shan-ki-wán,

11

10

23

20

Non-Residents,

4

Aberdeen,...

· 5

1

20

15

Stanley,.

3

5.

2

36

TOTAL,..

19

18

24

12

··179€

129-

492

506

GRAND TOTAL,

ANNUAL DEATH-RATE, PER 1,000, FOR 3RD QUARTER OF

1880.0

Whole Population,.

29.72*

Births, 345

British & Foreign Community, 16.04

Deaths,.. 1,034

Do. deducting non-Residents, Chinese,

16.33

30.66

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong 18th October 1880.

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

DISTRICTS.

Righ

RETURNS Of PTHS and DEATHS for the 4th Quarter of 1880, ending 31st December.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

DEATHS. BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

الحصة لانة

Boys.-- Girls. Males. Females. Boys.

Girls.

Males. Females.

Victoria,

23

27

27

11

225

162

369

424

Kau-lung,.

12

5

27

23

Shau-ki-wán,.

19

13

16,

14

Indians, &c., .............. 7 Non-Residents,

British and Foreign, 14 Portuguese,

.12

5

Aberdeen,

2

6

14

6

Stanley,...

5

7

38

TOTAL,.. 23

27

27

11

264

191

433

471

ANNUAL DEATH-Rate, per

GRAND TOTAL, 1,000, FOR 4TH QUARTER OF

1880.

Whole Population,.

27.07

Births, ...505 British & Foreign Community, 16.93 Deaths,...942 Do. deducting non-Residents,

Chinese,

=

16.84 27.77

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 24th January, 1881.

JOHN GERRARD, Acting Registrar General.

RETURNS of BIRTHS and DEATHS for the Year 1880, ending 31st December.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

DEATHS. BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

Boys. Girls. Males. Females.

Females. Boys. Girls.

Males. Females.

British and Foreign, 50

Victoria,

77

84

106

44

711

506

1,541

1,817

Portuguese,

.52

Kau-lung,

29

17

123

96

Indians, &c.,

.23

Shau-ki-wán,

64

47

80

70

Non-Residents,

25

Aberdeen,

9

55

34

Stanley,

14

12

21

9

150

TOTAL,..

77

84

106

44

826

591

1,820 2,026

GRAND TOTAL,

ANNUAL DEATH-RATE,

1877.

1878.

1879. 1880.

PER 1,000, FOR THE YEAR

Whole Population,..

26.81

29.60

32.14 28.71

Births, ..1,567 Deaths,..3,996

British & Foreign Community,

18.04

18.73

18.15

16.71

Do. deducting Non-Residents, 13.78 Chinese,

14.90

14.16

15.95.

27.41

30.35

33.11

29.54

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 24th January, 1881.

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

RETURNS IRTS and DEATHS for the 1st Quarter of 1881, ending 31st March.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN. COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

DEATHS. BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS..

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

Boys.

Girls. Males. Females. Boys..

Girls. Males Females.

British and Foreign, 14

Victoria,

28

21

39

10

156

124

319

315

Portuguese,...

..12

Kau-lung,

4

20 Y

17

Indians, &c.,

5

Shau-hi-wáng

Aberdeen,

૨૩

15

**13

14

Non-Residents,

18

1

11

14

Stanley,..

1.

4

3

49

TOTAL,..

28

21

39

10

190

145

367

363

GRAND TOTAL,

ANNUAL DEATH-RATE, PER 1,000, FOR 1ST QUARTER OF

1881.

Whole Population,..

22.39

Births, ...384

British & Foreign Community,

21.83

Deaths,...779

Do. deducting non-Residents, Chinese,

15.82

22.43

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 18th May, 1881.

JOHN GERRARD,

Acting Registrar General.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.—No. 209.

The following Annual Report from the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol, and accompanying Returns, are published for general information.

By His Excellency's Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 8th June, 1881.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

TOTAL,.

PLASS

OF

PRISONERS,

RETURN showing the CLASSIFICATION of OFFENCES for which PRISONERS were committed to Vicronia Gaon, from the respective Counts of the COLONY, during the Year 1880.

N

:

1

:

...

7

5

19

792

22

202

་ ་ ་

5

1

t

: :

1

2

6

:

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Cutting and wounding, or Assault occasioning grievous

bodily harm.

Assault with intent to rob, or Robbery with violence.

Burglary, Attempted Burglary, Breaking, entering and stealing, and having

possession of house-breaking implements.

Larceny, Larceny from a house, from Person, from Ships

or Boats in Harbour or on the High Seas.

Obtaining goods or money by false pretences.

Culawful possession, and Receiving stolen goods.

Child stealing, Kidnapping. Abduction of females, Forci- ble detention, and Buying or Selling human beings.

Untering counterfeit coin or notes.

21

10

17

1

:

1

18

5

:

:

:

:

:

57

:

:

:

...

:

:

Piracy,

Perjury, and Preferring a false charge.

Embezzlement.

Males,

Females,

Males,

Males,

Females, .......

Females, ... ...

20

1

12

7

19

809

23

213

3

4

6

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 27th May, 1881.

9

5

100

Conspiracy to defraud.

Committing or attempting to commit an unnatural offence.

Indecent Assault.

Common Assault, Assault with wounding, Fighting, Disorderly conduct. Drunkenness, Refusing to pay chair hire, Resisting Police, and Leine abusive language.

Misconduct as a Private or Public Servant. Refusing duty, Nerlgence. Deser-

tion. Absent without leave, und Remaining behind from ships.

Breach of Military and Naval Discipline.

Breach of Conditional Pardon. and Returning from De-

portation.

Extortion and attempting to Extort.

Gambling, or Haunting Gambling-Houses, Rogue and Vagabond. SuspiciouF and dangerous characters. Vagrancy and Obtaining passages surreptitiously on board ships. Aiding and abetting in a misdemeanour.

Contempt of Court.

Unlawful hawking or Selling goods without Licence. Uttering cries. Without Passes or Lights, Obstruction. Nuisance, Damaging property, Firing crackers, Making bonfire, Defiling stream, Indecent exposure, Trespassing, Breach of Ordinance for Harbour and Market Regulations.

Using Threats.

Breach of Brothel Ordinance.

Mendicancy. dangdi

Attempting to commit suicide. Bribery.

Carrying deadly weapons.

119

2

.....

11

I

3

245

11

:

13

O

6

:

:

71

:

:

:

I

2 23

OF

20

1

4

388

27

71

2

1

684

10

11 12 13 14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

045

14

24

OT

5

3 67

16

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Administering Drugs.

On Remand, For Trial, and pending orders.

:

E

Illegal pawning.

:

360

1

1

2 | 431 19 3,530

Superintendent. S. TONNOCH},

For Debt.

TOTA

+

7. I have delayed sendin in this Report in the expectation of receiving, long ere this, copies of the Annual Reports of the Commissioners of Her Majesty's Convict Prisons, so that I could have remodelled my Return of preitable labour somewhat after the Returns supplied to Her Majesty's Government at home and laid before Parliament. These Reports have, however, not yet arrived, nor have the "Regulations for the Conduct of Convict Prisons," applied for at the same time. I have been more anxious to receive the latter than the former, as I wish to see introduced, as early as possible, into this gaol some satisfactory and self-working system for the remission of sentences, and the remuneration of industrious prisoners for their work.

8. I had the honour of laying a draft of such rules before His Excellency as far back as the commencement of 1879, but, in consequence of the impossibility of carrying them out except in a gaol modelled on the separate system, they were laid on one side to await the approval of the plans of the new gaol. Since then a new Prison Act has been introduced in England, and new regulations framed under it. This Act and its regulations I have applied for, and am anxious to obtain, so as to establish a new system of remission of sentences and remuneration of prisoners.

9. The want of means of extending assistance to deserving prisoners who seem repentant of their first fall and wish to lead a better life, if assisted at the outset, has, in the absence of any "Prisoners' Aid Society," been much felt by me. I had either to assist them myself or send them away empty, soon to return again..

10. On Christmas Day 1879, however, I received a handsome donation from a resident of long standing in the Colony, who requested that the money be devoted to the aid of discharged prisoners. I have carried out his wishes, and, I may say, with the best results, as very few of those who have been assisted have returned to gaol a second time; but as the majority of those assisted have immediately left the Colony to try their fortunes elsewhere, I have been unable, according to the wish of the charitable donor, to give him any subsequent history of the recipients of his bounty. This fund is now exhausted, and I do not think we should look any longer to outside aid to reinstate it, but should establish a system of remuneration from the profits of their labour, which would serve as an incentive to the prisoners to good conduct and industry while in gaol.

I have the honour to be.

Sir.

Your most obedient servant,

M. S. TONNOCHY, Superintendent.

The Honourable Dr. F. STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

HONGKONG.

RETURN shewing the NUMBER of PRISONERS in Victoria Gaol on the last Day of each Week of the Year 1880.

WEEKLY, 1880.

EURO-

PEANS.

CHINESE

OR COLOURed.

TOTAL.

WEEKLY, 1880.

EURO-

PEANS.

CHINESE OR COLOCEED.

TOTAL.

Males. Males. Females.

Males.

Males. Females.

January

11

17

18

+=8

4

29

502

14

545

July

4

30

487

17

534

38

509

15

562

11

30

500

18

548

36

511

14

561

18

31

479

20

530

19

25

40

527

15

582

25

33

489

21

543

"

February

1

38

519

15

572

August

· 1

34

477:

20

'531

8

37

521

14

572

8

36

449

20

*505

"

""

15

35

534

17

586

15

34

428

19

481

""

""

22

34

531

16

581

22

37

469

21

530*

"

وو

29

27

500

17

544

29

38

463

524

"

March

7

29

495

17

541

September 5 43

446

17

506.

14

37

511

17

565

12

44

451

21

516

25

21

35

507

16

558

19

41

455

19

515

>

28

34

527

16

577

26

40

471

13

529

"

April

4

32

538

15

585

October 3

41

471

20

532

11

33

517

16

566

10

47

526

19

592

18

29

542

18

589

17

46

535

14

599

25

30

532

16

578

24

46

553

16

615

May

34

494

16

544

31

49

602

14

665

9

33

522

17

572

November 7

52

577

16

645

16

34

523

21

578

14

51

550-

23

37

556

22

615

21

56

552

32

"

30

35

531

20

586

-

28

65

546

""

"

June

6

34

554

19

607

December

5

62

550

13

35

563

22

620

12

52

537"

""

20

دو

27.

22

32.

534

19

585

19

52

545

29

504

20

.553

26

53.

533

NALKANK

623

629

638

637

618

629

611

"

TONNOCH rintendent

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong 27th May, 1881.

XIX.-TABLE shewing the ANNUAL MEAN STATE of the ATMOSPHERE, during the Year 1880, as recorded at the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, 86 feet above mean low level of Spring Tide.

FAIRENHEIT THERMOMETERS.

HYGROMETERS.

WINDS.

1880.

BAROMETER.

Self Registering in Shade.

Dry Bulb.

Wet Bulb.

In Shade.

Mean.

in

Max. Min.

Max, Max. Min.

Sun Sun Min. in soil Bulb Bulb G ex- Grass.inches) Vacuo. posed. deep.

Quarter (prevailing.)

on

In Shade.

In Shade.

MONTHS.

January,

February,

March....

April, ..........

May,

June,

29.87

July,

(August, ............................

September,

October,

November,

December,

Annual Mean,..

9 A.M. 3 P.M. Max. Min. 9 A.M. Noon. 3 P.M. 30.22 30.14 73.0 39.0 62.9 50.2 58.8 61.5 62.2 115. 78. 52.3 50.4 80.13 30.15 09.0 46.0 62.7 62.9 60.5 61.5 61.3 107. 70. 55.9 6.1.0 30.18 30.10 83.0 46.0 71.7 56.7 66.1 70.3 70.4 130. 90. 59.1 56 5 30.09 80.03 89.0 55.0 75.7 61.9 74.4 74.2 74.8 133. 93. 67.5 62.0 71.1 75.2 65.5 29.97 29.93 91.0 63.0 83.0 70.0 78.8 81.6 82.3 188. 96. 72.8 72.3 78.6 81.2 74.3 77.0 29.83 93.0 66.0 85.6 72.9 82.4 84.0 84.3 134. 94. 74.7 77.8 82.2 84.1 78.8 29.84 29.79 93.0 71.0 88.1 74.3 83.9 86.5 86.2 131. 95. 76.2 79.3 83.5 80.1 78.3 29.85 29.85 95.0 71.0 87.3 74.3 83.2 85.8 86.1 124. 94. 76.1 78.5 82.7 86.2 78.5 29.95 29.90 91.0 66.0 86.7 72.9 82.5 85.3 85.4 132. 95. 75.4 77.7 82.2 85.4 70.4 80.00 30.01 88.0 65.0 82.4 69.0 77.9 81.1 80.4 123. 93. 71.3 73.8 79.5 80.5 70.3 80.25 30.21 81.0 50.0 73.7 58.6 68.3 72.6 70.3 124. 86. 00.3 62.5 68.3 72.5 59.4 80.28 30.23 75.0 41.0 65.2 52.4 61.7 6.1.0 64.8 110. 71. 53.3 51.5 60.7 615 55.0 80.08

9 A.M. 3 P.M. 9 A.M. | 3 P.M.

59.8 61.3 57.3

58.1 62.1 53.2 55.9 58.5

9 A.M.

N & NE

N & E

3 P.M.

RAIN IN INCHES

DURING

THE MONTH.

No.

STATE OF WEATHER.

OF

DAYS

HAV⭑

ING

RAIN.

Average during the Month.

9 A.M.

3 P.M.

NE & NW

2.72

10 Fine, 14 days. Overcast, 17 days. Fine, 17 days. Overcast, 14 days.

NE & E

3.22

18

65.8 70.9 60.6

63,1

NE & E

NE & E

0.25

67.9

E & W

E & W

4.28

11

•ང་

11

21

29

10

2

27

"}

}

}}

}}

23

8

"

"1

"}

17

11

19

16

14

"}

12

E & W

E & W

14.78

18

11

20

10

21

"}

}}

}}

}}

17

"}

"}

80.2

E & W

E & W

28.00 24

25

6

24

11

"1

?!

!!

!!

::

79.9

E & SW

E & SW

11.45

18

15

16

18

13

"}

11

}}

"

81.0

E & W

E & W

11.61

20

14

17

17

14

"}

}}

}}

11

"}

79.5

E & W

E & W

18.04 16

19

11

19

11

J1

"}

}}

}}

11

>!

73.3

E & NE

E & NE

640

58.5

NE & NNE

N & NE

JE&E& NNE E & NE

15.83

0.06 2

1.27

12

24

7

26

11

11

30

30

"

"}

4

16

15

19

12

NOOI

5

"

0

}}

11

11

}}

11

"}

}}

30.01 85.5 56.5 77.0 63.8 73.2 75.7 75.7 125. 88. 77.2 77.6 72.7 75.8 67.3 69.9

THERMOMETER, FAHRENHEIT.

111,57 156

Total Total

RAINFALL IN INCHES.

during during

the

year.

the

year.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875. 1876. 1877. 1878. 1879. 1880.

1872. 1878.

1871.

1875. 1876. 1877.

1878.

1879. 1880.

Maximum, 89.5

91.0

90.0

91.0

90.0

95.0

95.0

94.C

95.0

Minimum, 43.5

49.0

47.0

41.0

37.0

41.0

38.0

45.0

39.0

62.92 75.47

81.98

83.43

103.55 76.72 81.40 94.70 111.57

Range,... 46.0

42.0

43.0

50.0

53.0

54.0

57.0

49.0

50.0

January, February,.

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,..

October,.

November,

December,

January, February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October.

November,

December,

TABLE E 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT.

Table shewing the Numbers of Naval Men admitted into Naval Hospital during the Year 1830.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

Contracted

at Hongkong.

Contracted

Elsewhere.

1

4

1

4

1

1

4

Total Number,....

TABLE E 3.

Total.

oi ni mwi¦ ¦ Hi

9

2

4

3

4

23

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT.

Table shewing the Numbers of Military Men admitted into Military Hospital during the Year 1880.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

· Contracted

at Hongkong.

6

0250

Total Number,......

Contracted

Elsewhere.

Total.

2

6

2

1

1

13

XVII. TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years

Years.

1871,

1872,

1873,

1874,

1875,

1876,

1877.

1878,

1879,

1880,

Average of 10 Years,......

Number of European and

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to

American Residents.

Number of Residents.

2,736

83

3.03

2,520

65

2.50

2,520

49

1.94

2,520

72

2.85

2,520

59

2.34

2,520

74

2.93

2,767

84

3.03

2,767

2,767

2,767

2391

67

2.42

55

1.98

69

2.49

2,640

67

2.55

XVIII. TABLE shewing the Work performed by the INSPECTOR of NUISANCES for the Year 1880.

No. of Summonses No. of Persons

Issued.

Arrested.

No. of Persons Discharged.

No. of Persons Fined.

No. of Notices Issued.

133

77

19

191

7,000

Total Amount of Fines in Dollars.

$266.10

XVI.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A.

SHEWING the ADmisstos into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 23 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIRTg issued and the AVERage Length of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858,

124

1858,

4,797

1858,..

43.8

1859,

162

1859,

5,389

1859.

50.8

1860,

361

1860.

9,107

1860,

23.7

1861,

442

1861,

10,778

1861,

23.4

1862,

485

1862,

12,193

1862,

22.0

1863,

420

1863,

11,707 1863,

23.7

1864,

442

1864,.

11,940

1864,

27.0

1865,

390

1865,

11,303

1865,

28.0

1866,

406

1866,

13,060

1866,

28.6

1867,

1867.

13,120

1867.

25.5

1868,

579

1863,

16,462

1868,.

1869,

045

1869.

16,799

1869,

24.8

1870,

722

1870,.

18,382

1870,.

23.1

1871,

593

1871,

12.308

1871.

18.5

1872,

656

1872,

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1873,

11,219

1873,

19.5

1874,

345

1874.

6,814

1874,

18.6

1875,

134 1375,.

2,916

1875,

18.7

}

1876,

168

1876,..

2,730 1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877,

3,069 1877,

16.6

1878,

105

1878,

2,242

1878,

19.0

1879,

1:29

1879.

2,199

1879.

13.6

1880,

57

1880,

1,300

1880.

14.7

TABLE B.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 10 during the Year 1880.

Number of

Beds

Number admitted into Hospital

in

on Certificates of

Number who submitted voluntarily.

18

57

192

Lock Hospital. Visiting Surgeon.

Number against whom

it was necessary to proceed

by Information before the Registrar General.

Total Number brought under the Provisions of the Ordidance.

192

Total Number of Examinations made during the Year.

9,683

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

9,626

Total Number Discharged

from Hospital.

62

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1880.

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No. of Females

ADMITTED INTO

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per Month).

Average No. of

into Lock Military | Naval ļ

admitted

Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

Police Civil

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

Mer- chant and Port Seamen. (per month).,

Men in Garrison

Average Percentage

of Men Diseased (per month).

57

164

181.

17

60+

452

1,045 644

632

9,814

12,135

0.305

TABLE D.

REMARKS.

*51 of the Admissions into the Naval Hospital

were not contracted in flongkong. 36 of the Admissions into the Civil Hospital

were not contracted in Hongkong.

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1880.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

Average No. of

days per month on which Exami- nations were held.

Total Number of

Examinations made during the

year.

Number admitted

into

Hospital.

Total Number of Examinations madu when no Dis-!

case was found.

13

9,683

57

9,626

DISEASES.

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do.,

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined, Secondary Syphilis,

TOTAL.....

TABLE E.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1879.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Cured.

1821

20

21

21

31

34

33

6

8

1

7

57

64

62

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1880.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

and Primary Syphilis, combined,

Frimary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Do.,

Gonorrhoea and

Primary and

Secondary Syphilis,

do.,

do.,

do.,

aud Gonorrhea,.

Gonorrhea and Tertiary Syphilis,

Tertiary Syphilis,...

Orchitis,.

Cleet,.

Huboes,

Military

Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

59

60

7

5

87

92

22

20

6

3

13

9

2

::

4

14

2

1

TOTAL,..

TOTAL,..

..1880,-.

164

181

47

60

42

.1879,...-..

183.

293

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1880.

XI.—TABLE hewing the CASES, not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, Created by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1830.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1880,

Fever, (Simple, continued),

Do. Intermittent),

Phthisis Pulmonalis,.

Syphilis (Secondary,)

Apoplexy,

Disease of the Heart, (Organic),

Anemia,

Bronchitis,

Dyspepsia,

Diarrhoea, Gastralgia, Jaundice,

Stricture,

Synovitis,.

Boils.

Abscess,

Carbuncle,

Debility,

Alcoholism.

Wounds (Contused),

Child-birth,

TOTAL,

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

1

3

+

1

1

1

1

I

1

1.

1

4

1

41

43

1

1

1

1

1

1

63

10

28

91

XII. TABLE shering the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1880.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Grol.

Daily Average No. of Prisoners. Hospital

Total

Total

Sick in

Sick, Total Trifling Deaths.

Cases.

Serious Sickness

to Total.

Rate of Sickness.

Rate of Mortality.

To Total. To Average. To Total. To Average...

3.530

574.25

316

91

2

8.952

11.530

2.778

0.057

0.348

Number Rematting in Hospital at the begin- ning of the year 1889.

Admitted during the year 1880,

Total Cases Treated in the Hospital.

Discharged.

Died.

Number of Out-Patients Treated

at the Hospital.

XIII.-TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during the Year 1880.

Death Rate per cent., including Inenrables and Moribund Cases.

Death Rate in the Total of the 82,627 Treated at and

Remaining in Hospital

at the end of

the year.

in the Hospital.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- inale.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Male.

Fe- male.

Total.

Male. Fe-

Total.

Per cent..

Male.

male.

Fe- male.

14

1,031 252 1,037 266 593

95 431 15966,256 15,018; 81,274 | 39.65 · 59.77 48.60

0.714

63

12

XIV.-VACCINATIONS performed during the Year 1880, by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

IN VILLAGES AND RURAL DISTRICTS. TOTAL NUMBER OF VACCINATIONS.

1,508

SO

1,594

XV.—CASES of SMALL POX treated at the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during the Year 1880.

REMAINING IN HOSPITAL ON 1ST

ADMITTED DURING

JANUARY, 1880.

THE YEAR.

DIED.

DISCHARGED.

REMAINING IN HOSPITAL ON 31st DECEMBER, 1880.

Male. Female Total. Male. Female. TotalMale. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

13

19-

81

155 46-

51

30

77

Nil

}

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September, October, November, December,

IX.--TABLE shewing the

OMISSIONS into and DEATHs in the GOVERNMENT SMALL POX HOSPITAL

during each MONTH of the Year 1880.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL Admissions.

TOTAL Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

3

13

4

2

1

1

0 10 00 00 01 pound

-

TOTAL,.....

20

1

8

3

1

29

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

X.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY, during the Year 1880.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1880,

Fever (Simple),

Do. (Intermittent),

Smail-pox,.....

Gout,

Phthisis Pulmonalis,

Rheumatism,

Scrofula,

Syphilis (Primary).

Do. (Secondary),

Ophthalmia,

Disease of the Heart (Organic),

Anæmia,

Bubo.

Bronchitis,.

Parotitis,

Cynanche,

Cancrum oris,

Colic and Constipation,

Diarrhea,

Dysentery,.

Dyspepsia,

Gastralgia,

Hepatitis,

Bright's Disease,

Orchitis,

Phymosis,

Dysuria,

Stricture,

Hydrocele,..

Synovitis,

Abscess,

Boils,

Carbuncle,..

Ulcer,...

Urticaria,....

Impetigo,.

General Debility,

Delirium Tremens,

Old Age,

Opium Smoking,

Do. Eating,

Burns and Scalds,.

Contusions,

Sprains,

Wounds,

TOTAL,

Chinese prisoners flogged during the year.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Euro- Coloured peaus.

Persons.

Chinese.

Total. Euro- Coloured peans. Persons.

Total.

Chinese.

2

2

10 CO

5

27

32

7

7

--

:

1

10

6

6

13

13

2

1

28

27

3

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

137642-6-01 - pred

1

4

20

24

1

I

5

1

I

40

15

15

1

7

2

1

11

11

4

...

5

6

74

238

316

...

:-::

...

DISHASES

TABLE NEC

ng the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY, SC.--( Continued).

ADCHEONS.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

1345

293

Brought forward.............

Frost-bitten Toes and Fingers....

Contusions,

Sprain of Ankle,

Do. of Foot,

Do. of Spine,

Do. of Shoulder,

Wounds. Contused,

do..

of Scalp..

Incised,

Do., Do..

Lacerated,

Gunshot, through Ilium.:

do.. of Abdomen, !

Hematuria,

Punctured, of Neck.

Cut Throat,

do.. of Lung,

Strangulation, Partial, Suicidal,

Concussion of Brain,

Disloention of Forearm. Back-

Do.

Do.

wards.......

of Humerus~.

of Femur into ob

turator Formen.

Simple, of Skull.

:

Fracture.

Du..

of Scapul.

do.,

of Humerus

do..

of Radius &

Cina.

Do..

do..

of Metacar-

pal Bone.

Du..

do..

of Femur.

I..

do..

of Nook of i

Femur............}

Carried forward..........

:-

----

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

908 13

26

:

17

36

DISZASES.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Co

19 11

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeaus.

Coloured.

Chinese,

Total,

Brought forward..

Fracture, Simple, of Tibia &}

368 299 364 1031 14

1

:

:

:

:

1

:

Fibula,...)

Do.. Do., do.,

do.,

of Patella,

of Dorsal

Do..

do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Vertebræ,

of Lumbar

Vertebre. (

Compound, of Skull,

du.. of Fingers,

Do.,

do.,

of do. I

& Tetanus,

Do.,

do.,

Do..

do.,

carpal Bone

Do..

of Meta-

carpal Bone, (

of Meta-

& Tetanus,.)

do., Commi-

muted of Lower Jaw..........

Old Fracture of Left Tibia,

Un-united Fracture of Neck)

of Femur.

Amputation Wound of Toei

after Frost-bite.

Lateral Curvature of Spine. Neuralgia of Leg after injury.. Loss of Sensation in Fingers |

and Toes,

Irritation of Scalp by Chinese

Powder......

Attempted Drowning, Suicidal... Eruption on Face,

:

299 364

1031 14

199

Parturition......

:

:

-:

:

:

:

1

TOTAL........

375 301 379 1055 14 8

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

VI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL. during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admissions.

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

Per cent,

1871.

6.61 1871.

Per cent.

4.20

Per cent.

Per cent.

1871,

1872,

6.82 1872,

4.86

1872,

3.98 2.39 1872,

1871,

13.18

12.93

1878,

6.88 1873,

883 1873,

7.93 1873,

7.14

1874..

9.12

1874,

9.06 1874,

6.22

1874,

12.50

1879,

4.55 1875,

4.35 1875,

4.08 1875,

5.76

1876, 1877

2.49

1876,

2.81 1876,

2.53

1876,

1.76

5.15 1877,

4.16

1877,

3.25

1877,

8.12

1878,

3.88

1878,

346 1878,

3.08

1878,

5.76

1879,

5.13 1879.

3.12

1879,

8.39

1879,

4.72

1880,

4.17 1880,

3.73

Isso,

2.66

1880,

5.80

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

VII.-TABLE teming the Apuissions into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1880.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

January,

28

2

13

· 1

28

4

69

7

February,

31

13

20

64

3

+

March,

21

22

32

1

75

April,.

17

17

23

1

57

May,

92

16

23

61

June,

47

27

50

124

July,

39

36

42

1

117

August,

34

34

56

124

September,

39

44

October,

33

1

November,

32

17

December,..

30

29

1912898

27

110

32

100

24

73

22

3

81

QPCOA ~ CO CO TO NION

3

7

4

3

4

Total,....

375

14

301

со

379

1,055

44

January,

February,

March, April,.

May, June,.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

VIII-LIST of DEAD BODIES brought to the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL for Examination

during each Month of the Year 1880.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL..

Adults. Children. Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

5

9

6

5

3

6

7

7

4

1

020202 00 IH OD

7

13

8

8

5

3

9

11

9

77

6

9

11

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,.

1

1

:

69

32

103

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

A

ABE

ADMI~IG

ADMISSIO S.

and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1880.

DEATHS.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES

Typhoid Fever, Febricula.

Intermittent Fever,

Remittent Fever,.

Varicella,

Rheumatism, Acute,

Do.,

Muscular,

Do.,

Chronic,

Lumbago,

Scurvy,

Leprosy,

Syphilis, Primary,-

Hard Chaucre.

Soft Chancre,

Phagedonic Sore,

Do. do.. & Sup-} purative Cystitis,...

Secondary Affections,-

Ulceration of Tongue,...

do. & Throat.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese

Total.

Europealis.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

33

2

RSS

8

10

9

10

:

Do.

Do.

of Angle of mouth,

Do.

of Face,

Do.

of Arm.

Do.

of Leg,

Roseola,

Rupia.

6

Psoriasis.

Tubercles on Scrotum,

Periostitis.

Necrosis of Frontal Bone,

Eularged Testis,

Rheumatism,

Anemia,

Anasarea,

Ascites.

Meningitis. Subacute.

Apoplexy,

Epilepsy.

Paralysis of 6th Nerve,

Do. of 3rd and 6th Nerves,.

Progressive Muscular Atrophy,..

Locomotor Ataxy,

Hemiplegia,

3

Syncope.

Neuralgia...

Cephalalgia,

3

Delirium Tremens,

B

Alcoholism..

Iritis,

Hypochondriasis..

Dementia,

Contusion of Eye-ball,

Conjunctivitis,

Ulcers of Cornea,.

Opacities of Cornea,

Deafness,.

1

Otorrhoea,

Otitis,

Abscess of Ear,

Morbus Cordis,..

Do. Functional,

Do. Aortic Insufficiency,

Do. do. Constriction,

Hypertrophy of the Heart,

Varicose Veins,...

Tussis,

1

3

1

1

Laryngitis,

Bronchial Catarrh,

Bronchitis,

Asthma...

Hemoptysis,..

Pneumonia, Acute,

Do., Chronic,

Pleuro-pneumonia,

Pleurisy,

Phthisis,

Parotitis,

Edema of Face,

Enlarged Cervical Glands,

Tumour on Neck...

Harelip,

Alveolar Abscess,...

Necrosis of Upper Jaw,

Do. of Lower do.,.

Stomatitis,

Excoriation of Tongue,r:

Submaxillary Abscess," Aphthæ,...

Tonsillitis, EAN

Ulceration of Pharynx,

Carried

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Brought forward,.

183110 175 468

Gastric Catarrh,

Gastritis,

3

Է

Dyspepsia,

Cancer of Stomach,

Abscess of Adominal Wall,

Dysentery,

Do., Chronic,.

12

18

Diarrhoea,

5

41

Do., Chronic,.

6

Perityphitis,

Colic,

11

4

18

22

Constipation,

6

6

Obstruction of Bowels, .

1

1

Hernia, Oblique Inguinal,.

1

:

1

1

1

Do. Double

do.,

1

Hæmorrhoids,..

Rectal Abscess,

Fistula in Ano,.

1

Condylomata Round Anus,

Abscess of Nates,

Congestion of the Liver,

8

3

Hepatitis,.......

Abscess of the Liver,.

1

3

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Cirrhosis of the Liver,

Jaundice,

Enlarged Spleen,

Nephritis, Acute,

Do..

Chronic,

Vesical Calculus,.

Spermatorrhea,

Urethritis and Penile Fistula,

Gonorrhoea,

Gleet,

Stricture of the Urethra,

Do.

do., Spasmodic,

3 Rupture of the Urethra,

Extravasation of Urine,

Excoriations of Prepuce, Phimosis, Congenital, Orchitis,

Abscess of Testis,

24 18

ස:

3

Scrofulous dis Testis,.

Hydrocele Testis.

2

Induration of Prepuce and

Scrotum,

1

Eczema Scroti,

Enlarged Inguinal Glands,

Enlarged Testis and Cord,

Sinuses in the Groin,..

Dysmenorrhoea,

Abscess of Thigh.

4

Diffuse Suppuration of Thigh,...

Chinese.

Total.

20

:

NNW

15

30

· 1

1

11

4

Encephaloid Tumour of Thigh,

Abscess of Leg,

Sinus of Leg,

Cystic Tumour on Upper Arm,

Periostitis,

Necrosis of Shaft of Femur,

Caries of Sacrum, Arthritis, Knee,

Do. Ankle, Thecal Abscess, Carbuncle,

Abscess of Axilla,

Do. over Sternum, Do.

of Foot,

Bunion,....

1 Eczema,

Scabies,

1 Ringworm,

3 Herpes Zoster,.

Prurigo,

1

2

2

1

Ulcer,

2

2

Boils,

4

3

5 Bubo,

4

Scald,

Burns with Gunpowder,

2

2

Excoriation of Toes,

1

Debility,

8

5

20

33

Poisoning, Opium..

3

Do., Alcoholic,

3

Privation,

4 1

13

1

Inebrietas,

3

4

Moribund,

213 31

17

69

183 110 175

20

Observation,

Bite by Man, Dog-bite,

Monkey-bite," Centipede-bite,

ཋཱ་.!

Carried forward,

345 270 293 $9087

64 17 | 36 |

POLICE.

I. --ABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1880.

J

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions.! Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

January,

12

16.

1

37

1

February,

12

9

29

1

March,

9

16

22

1

47

1

April,

10

10

25

May,

11

12

18

41

June,

9

17

42

68

July,

12

30

33

75

August,

9

27

34

1

70

September,

16

35

October,

10

27

November,

9

16

::

16

67...

19

56

1

11

1

36

1

December,

16

13

37%

Total,...

122.

1

223

2

243

4

588

7

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

II. TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1880.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICK.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS. RATE OF MORTALITY.

European Indian

Chinese.

Total.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chiness.

105

181

349 635*

126+

2241 243

1

31

911

120.00|123.75| 69.63

0.95

1.65

2.58

per cent.

!

per cent.

per cent.

Exclusive of Staff,

22

Coolies,...52 (

† 4 Cases were Small-pox ‡ 1 Case was

|| 1 Indian

5 Chinese (

European.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Jannary,

February,

March,

13

April,

+

8

May,

9

11 8

85 1-4 x

June,

6

10 19.

July,

6. 24.1

August,

5 24

11

10. 21

a

September,

October,.. November, December,

7.1 21

Died on leave.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

III. POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1830.

CENTRAL

No. 5

No. 2

8

"

3

1

No. I AND STONE CUTTERS'

3

J+L

ISLAND.

No. 6

No. 7

WATER POLICE)

HULK. TSIM-SHA-TICT

WHITFIELD.

SHAU-KI-WAN. POR-FU-LAM.

ABERDEEN.

STANLEY.

TAU-MA-TI

HONG-Hox.

1.

::::

4

3 8

78 188 108

4

*6%

1 1

:

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

:

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

2

1

1

::::

1

8

15

2

9

11:

13.

2

4

11

5

3

23

4

19 17

15

74

.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

MTD::: : ; | Indian.

Chinese.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,.

Superintendent.

IV. TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG during the Year 1880.

STRENGTHA

RATE OF MORTALITY

2

5

8

4

5

3

9

2

21

4

7

3

9 ༡

8

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS:

RATE OF SICKNESS.

TO STRENGTH.

White.

Black Total. White.

White Black..

White. Black. Total.

Black.

Total.

White. Black. White.

Black.

953

91

1044

1943

132'

1075 10

13

8.24 12.021.04

3.29.

per cent.per cent. per cent. per cent

C. J. WHARRY, M.D

ndent,

2

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL, SIR,-I have the honour to forward the following remarks on the Government Civil Hospital, and

HONGKONG, 22nd April, 1881. the work done in the Establishment during the year 1880. The tables of statistics were sent in on the 30th ultimo.

The beginning of the year 1880 found us still making shift to carry on the work in the old Lock Hospital, into which the Establishment was moved after the great fire in 1878. The defects of this building and the difficulties encountered in it have been mentioned in my two last reports, so they need not be here repeated. Matters came to a climax on the 7th July, when 15 patients presented themselves for admission, and four of them had to be sent away for want of space. The new Lock Hospital adjoining the old building, had recently been completed, and this was handed over to the Civil Hospital Establishment and opened for the reception of patients on the 9th July.

The new Lock Hospital may be described as containing on its upper floor one large ward 60 feet square, divided into three compartments by two parallel walls, with free communication between the compartments by means of windows and doors.

On the ground floor are sundry rooms used for the accommodation of the Assistant Superintendent, Apothecary and Analyst, Steward and one Wardmaster, and some of the nurses and coolies deposit their beds about the staircase and passages for want of other sleeping room.

The plan on which the ward upstairs is constructed is a most objectionable one, but the compart- ments, such as they are, have been utilized for thirty beds. Each compartment contains ten, and the average space for each bed is 105 square feet and 1,600 cubic feet.

This is a fair amount of space, but the circulation of air is very much impeded by the close proximity of the building to the larger edifice immediately above it on the south side, and in the hot summer months, when the upper Hospital is cool and breezy, the atmosphere in the lower is still and oppressive.

The ventilation is also much obstructed by the old wooden hut on the west side, in which some of the Chinese attendants are accommodated, pending the construction of a proper dormitory.

A dormitory for the Chinese actendants with cooking and washing conveniences, &c. is very much needed both for the preservation of health and of discipline. Attention has been called in previous reports to two dangerous nuisances; one of them a public latrine adjoining the Hospital is now removed, but the other, which was the practice of sending annually about 120 dead bodies to the Hospital mortuary, still remains. There is as yet no public mortuary in Hongkong, and the patients in the Civil Hospital are still exposed to danger and discomfort from the offensive state of some of the bodies deposited in their immediate vicinity.

The roadway up to the Hospital from the Queen's Road has been improved, but the lower extremity is not enclosed, and there is no gate and no porter's lodge. At present the porter is able to exercise but little control over the ingress and egress from the Hospital, and for the protection of Hospital property, as well as for the control of patients and the discipline of the Establishment, this entrance should be properly enclosed and a gate and lodge erected. Morcover there is nothing now to prevent coolies and others from defiling the road, and this is done to a great extent.

In July when the new building with its thirty beds was added to the Hospital Establishment, the staff was necessarily increased, and a second Surgeon and an European Wardmaster added,

The services of Mr. L. P. MARQUES, L. R. C. S. I., &c. were obtained to carry on the duties till permanent provision could be made, and Mr. G. R. DAVIDSON was engaged as Wardmaster. Mr. DAVIDSON left the service at the end of two months, and since then the Hospital has got along as well as it could without an European Wardmaster. It was not easy to find an efficient and trustworthy man to fill the post, and the difficulty has been avoided by leaving it vacant.

The Steward, Mr. SENNA, caused a great deal of trouble by his inefficiency and by shortcomings in his accounts, and he was interdicted from duty on the 21st December. Mr. MCCALLUM, the Apothecary and Analyst, has been good enough to undertake the charge of the Hospital monies, and the troubles of the past year in this respect will not be repeated.

The Hospital Register for 1880 records 1,103 cases: 48 of these comprising superficial injuries with one fractured wrist, five cases of dogbite, and one of opium poisoning, were treated in the surgery and then dismissed: and one was brought in moribund and died in twenty minutes. There were 37 cases at the end of 1879, so the number of patients treated in Hospital during 1880 amounted to 1091. Of these 602 were Police Constables, and the remaining 489 were made up of seamen, private residents, destitutes, prisoners, members of the Chinese Customs and Revenue Services, and seamen from foreign ships of war.

The number of Police sent to Hospital in 1880 was 588, and 14 remained over from 1879, so there were 602 constables under treatment during the year. In 1879 the numbers were respectively 570 and 5, making a total of 575 treated in 1879.

There was thus an increase of 27 Police patients in 1880: the Europeans sending 27 more to Hospital, the Indians 28 more, and the Chinese 28 less.

:

-1.

A reference to Table III shows that while the sick from Aberdeen were diminished by 44, from the Central district, including the Central, Nos. 5, 8 and 9 Stations, there was an increase of 77 There was diminution of 11 from the Water Police Hulk Tsim-sha-tsui, and Whitfield, but the number, 89, is still large.

The total number days spent in Hospital by Police constabl as 8,086, representing 12 men off duty for the whole year in 187) the number of days was 5,10. There was a real increase in 1880, but not as much as the figures would seem to imply. In 187 want of space in the Hospital necessitated the discharge of Police patients immediately they were convalescent, and men who had been in Hospital for a week were thus sometimes sent back to their stations to spend three or four weeks more off duty in completing their recovery.

This had been the practice for years past, and there were many objections to it. It was very undesirable to have idlers loafing about the stations for weeks together, and as in many instances the stations themselves were the main factors in producing the sickness, the men returning thither were not likely to be speedily restored to health and efficiency. Moreover, the constant presence of invalids would not have an inspiriting effect upon those performing their daily round of duty.

Since the Hospital space was increased in July, it has been possible to amend this practice to a certain extent, and to retain convalescents in Hospital until they are fit for duty. The accommodation however is not yet sufficient for this to be done regularly, and from time to time the Hospital has to be relieved at the expense of the Police stations. I may here call attention to the fact that since the fire of 1878, part of the ward space of the Hospital has been taken up for temporary quarters for the Superintendent, and when the projected house is built for the Superintendent, these wards will be again available for patients.

A good deal of the sickness among the Police must be attributed to the faulty construction of the stations, and to overcrowding. Among the Indians it is worthy of note, that some of the recruits sent from India from time to time are about forty years of age, although they state themselves to be not more than 27. If care were taken to provide younger recruits, I believe fewer of them would come to Hospital.

On the 12th August, the Aberdeen Police station was abandoned; only one Indian constable being left there. The Europeaus were lodged in the Harbour station, and the Chinese sent to Ap-li- chan. The Europeans did not apparently benefit much by the change, but the Chinese sick list for the year comprised only 21 cases instead of 61 as in the previous twelve months.

The Police suffered principally from malarious fevers, bowel complaints and chest affections. Three seamen were admitted from foreign ships of war, American, Brazilian and Italian respectively. The last mentioned suffered from stone in the bladder: and was admitted to Hospital in a very exhausted condition. It was a most unpromising case, but to give him a chance of life, lateral lithotomy was performed. The operation was somewhat prolonged as the calculus (phosphatic) broke down under the forceps and had to be extracted piece-ineal, and the patient did not rally bute. died the following evening.

Table V shows the varieties of disease among patients generally with the mortality from each. Fevers were not quite so prevalent as in 1879, but bowel complaints remained about the same. Bronchial and pulmonary affections were not more frequent.

Venereal cases generally were about as numerous as last year, but the proportion of primary syphilis was smaller.

Fractures and dislocations were somewhat more numerous.

Six cases of opium poisoning were brought to the Hospital alive, three of which were restored. Two fated cases of tetanus occurred, both Chinese: in one case there was compound fracture of the metacarpal bones of the right hand, all the fingers having been torn off by machinery, and in the other, the fingers of one hand had been crushed.

Two cases of parturition are recorded. They were Chinese women who were admitted on the application of the Police: one was an arm presentation requiring operative interference: the other a protracted labour delivered by forceps.

The evil consequences of exposing parturient women to septic infection are so well known that such cases are never admitted to the wards of general hospitals in England, but in the Hongkong Civil Hospital there is only one woman's ward for all cases, and women applying for assistance in labour must either be sent away unaided to die or take their chance of septicemia in the Hospital. There is considerable risk from the position of the ward or rather from the close proximity to it of the public dead-house of the Colony, which is only a few yards off, and on the windward side in summer. There were, as usual, many cases of great interest under treatment during the year, and if it were possible for them to be accurately recorded, the observations would be of great value.

The makeshift nature of the Establishment, however, precludes the possibity of this, and makes it difficult to do more than attend to the daily needs of the Hospital.

There were 44 deaths during the year.

The number dead bodies sent to the Hospital for examination was 103, of which 32 were Chinese children.

The receipts from the Police amounted to $1,352.91, from the Board of Trade $1,402.50 and from other sources $3,441.93.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

PH. B. CAYRES, Esq., M. R. C. S., &c.

Colonial Surgeon

CJ WHARRY M.D

Superintendent

Chinese.

European.

CASES admitted to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL at the first Medical Examination by COLONIAL SURGEON during the Year 1880.

Sentence.

Name.

Disease.

Years. Months. Days.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

A. Stewart,.

F. Bullin,

4

Alcoholism,

6th Jan. 1880.

9th Jan. 1880.

42

Abcess,

J. Peterson,

F. Johnson,

D. Robinson, T. Duffield,. G. Warren, W. Stewart, Jno. Murray, Jos. Murray,

W. Price,

14

Alcoholism,

5

Do.,

8th 16th 29th April

""

"}

77

""

"7

14

Do.,

29th June

""

84

Anemia and Jaundice,

29th July

""

18th Feb. 25th Jan. 3rd May 8th July 18th Aug.

"

""

""

"7

""

Remand

Wound,

6th Oct.

13th Oct.

""

""

Alcoholism,

9th

13th

""

""

""

27

7

Do.,

9th

14

Do.,

9th

13th "" 13th 77

77

""

27

1

Do.,

11th Nov.

22nd Nov.

""

77

J. Riley,

1

Do.,

19th

25th

""

27

""

""

W. Jolinstone,.

12

Do.,

22nd

29th

"3

>>

""

""

J. Murray,

14

Do.,

27th

6th Dec.

""

""

L. Boyle,

J. Smith,

P. Johnstone,

J. Smith,

Chan A-kwai,

Chan A-fat,

Tsoi Lam Sing,

งงง

Do.,

29th

6th

17

""

77

>>

7

Do.,

4th Dec.

10th ""

"7

7

Do.,

14

Do.,

4th 29th

10th

""

>>

10th Jan.

""

A

"

6

Bubo,

6th Jan.

6th March

>>

27

12

General Debility,

7th

10th Jan.

""

""

Leong A-tak,

Bronchitis,

Do.,

12th

17th

""

""

27

12th

23rd

""

"}

"}

>>

Wong A-tai, Chan A-tak,

General Debility,

22nd

27th

22

""

27

77

Diarrhoea,

33rd

26th

>>

""

Wong A-luk,

Gastralgia,

23rd

6th Feb.

"2

"}

""

Yeong A-fuk,

6

Ancemia,

23rd

28th Jan.

"2

>>

77

Li A-shing,

Remand & 1

Do.,

23rd Feb.

23rd March

Li A-sing, Yan A-tsau, Hung A-tim, Lai A-chuck, Ho A-tak, Kwan A-sze, Wong A-mun,

Lo A-wa,

14

Chancre and Bubo,

19th May

1st June

>>

3

General Debility,

2nd June

7th

27

"">

AAA

Sprained Ankle,

7th

15th

"}

""

Opium Smoker,.

7th Oct.

18th Oct.

""

>>

1

Do.,

Contusions,

12th

26th

"}

22

"

21st

25th

>>

Opium Smoker,..

26th

9th Nov.

17

"

42

Contusions,

Chung A-cheung,

Sz A-on,

Tang A-cheong,

co co co i

Opium Smoker,.

2nd Nov. 10th Dec.

16th >>

>>

""

21st Dec.

"}

""

Anemia & General Debility,

Do. Do.,

29th

6th Jan.

1881.

""

دو

30th

6th

"}

"?

"}

A LIST of CHINESE PRISONERS (Opium Smokers) under observation by COLONIAL SURGEON during the Year 1880.

Name.

Opium

No. of years Consumption

Smoker.

per diem.

Weight when Admitted.

Pang A-low,

20 years.

Tsung A-kau,

8

""

Au Yeong I,

30

""

Ng A-shing,

3

3

""

Leong A-yeong,

14

27

Lam A-sau,

35

""

Luk Lum Kiu,

16

>>

Tang Fuk Hing,

12

27

Mak A-lok,

18

})

Ip A-lum,

15

""

Au A-pin,

10

>>

Wong Man Fai,

7

"7

Cheong A-on,

10

Tang A-sun,

101

Chung A-cheung,

20

""

Kwong A-tai,

24

""

Cheong A-chu,

10

""

Lau A-sze,

10

27

Lai A-chuk,

20

27

Ho A-tak,

18

""

Chung A-pat,

8

A

""

Luk A-pun,

10

Wong A-mun, y

11

1000 19 C T CO & CO 19 H∞ 10 - 19 09 10 09 19 COIAKO

tael.

mace.

24

""

""

""

ل الله

""

""

77

>>

27

""

""

""

""

[3-

Wong A-chun,

7

Wong Kun Chi,

384

""

""

107 lbs.

""

85

""

""

107

"}

110

27

114

85

116

80

Weights 1st four consecutive weeks.

""

102 107 111 112

82 93 96 97 110 115 116 115 110 112 114 113 115114 116 115

85 92 .92 911 [116118 119 1167

80 82 85 88

Remarks.

No weights taken.

}}

"

"}

"

>>

""

>>

""

>>

""

AAAAAA

Very thin when admitted.

C

Blank wall no apertures in it or forming Kitchen

wall of another house back to back with this.

Kitchen.

Kitelien.

Kitchen.

Floor of Loft.

Floor of Loft.

Shop.

The black lines show the original designs of the house, which is composed of a base three rooms and then kitchens. Afterwards the system is to divide the three big rooms into small partitions, a The average height of room thirty feet long by sixteen wide would divide into eight smaller rooms. each room is fourteen or fifteen feet then admits of a sort of loft being built within the room which is divided into partitions similar to the floor below, under these circumstances there would be sixteen partitions in each room each inhabited by a separate family."

Downspout,...

Chimney,

....

Kitchen.

Airhole.

Doors.

Passage.

Staircase.

Window.

Window.

This is a linear ground plan of one of the rooms and kitchens. Dotted lines show in both plans how the partitions are arranged, and how a common passage is made for the use of those The windows in inhabiting the partitions leading to the kitchen and staircase which is common to all.

front of this staircase form the means of ventilation in front, the door leading into the kitchen and the air hole in the kitchen roof leading into the next floor kitchen in the case of the first and second stories and into the open

air in the third and the narrow chimneys are the means of ventilation at the back... a house It will thus be seen that very little, very little indeed, is the amount of pure air that gets into of this cription. The front rooms vary in length from 30 to 60 feet they are rarely wider than 16 feet. The kitchens are about 6 feet by 10 feet. The average height 14 feet. In one of these rooms 30 feet by 16 feet divided as described from 24 to 50 people-men, women and children included live. ezdescription. I have seen 170 pigs kept besides the above mentioned number of

Floor of Loft.

October,

Samtary Analyses of water from Pokfoolum water supply.

Grains per gallon.

Parts per Million.

Degree of Hardness.

1830.

Total

Free Albuminoid

Solids. Chlorine.

Ammonia. Ammonia.

3.5

0.7

0.018

0.060

1.2

3.1

0.6

0.010

0.040

1.0

3.0

0.5

0.010

0.046

1.0

November,

December,..

Co

6

All had a yellowish, opalescent and turbid appearance.

Analyses of 15 samples of milk purchased in Hongkong.

Genuine.

Adulterated with 10 per cent. water.

1

11

""

"}

>>

1

14

";

"

1

20

"1

པ་

""

"}

1

22

2)

"

"

1

40

">

">

??

"

1

Deprived of Cream.

1

Colostrum.

HUGH MCCALLUM, Analyst.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 6th March, 1881.

SIR,-With reference to your request that I should estimate the morphine value of the different preparations of opium used for smoking purposes and furnish you with what information I could relative thereto, I have the honour to lay before you the following remarks.

The morphine value of the different preparations of opium depend chiefly on the amount of extract yielded by and the percentage of morphine present in the crude opium from which they were prepared. Now as opium varies considerably in this respect the preparations thereof will vary accordingly. There is also more or less loss of morphine during the preparation of smoking extract, the loss being greater the longer it is submitted to moist heat and the higher the temperature. Making due allowance for variations from these causes, the results obtained from the different kinds examined, and stated below, may be taken to fairly represent their average percentages of morphine.

59

Indian opium, average morphine value of

""

""

5 to 8 per cent. quantity of smoking extract yielded by ...70 to 80

""

1st Quality of prepared opium, from Hongkong opium farm yielded 5.86 per cent. morphine. 2nd Quality of prepared opium, from Hongkong opium farm yielded 7.30 per cent. morphine. Cake prepared opium from a coolie smoking house said to have been prepared from opium

dross yielded 6.28 per cent morphine.

Opium Dross, (scrapings from opium pipe) yielded 4.76 per cent morphine.

average quantity of extract yielded by 65 to 70 per cent.

It is generally assumed that the effect of smoking opium is similar to that of eating it and that this is principally due to the morphine it contains, this assumption appears very problematical when the following facts are taken into consideration.

1st. That Indian opium is the kind most prized by smokers and it is characterised by its

usually low percentage of morphine.

2nd. That the Chinese estimate the value of opium according to flavour and the quantity of

extract it yields.

3rd. The mode of preparing smoking extract tends to the destruction of morphine.

ith. The large quantity which can be smoked without any apparent toxic effect not only by

habitual smokers but also by beginners.

5th. There is no authentic case of acute poisoning from opium smoking.

An experiment has been made bearing on this point and although not conclusive it is confirmatory of the idea that morphine is not the active agent which gives pleasure to the opium

smoker.

The following tabulated statement explains and gives the result of experiment:-

Description of Samples of Prepared Opium Submitted for trial.

No. 1.—Prepared Opium from Opium Farin.

No. 2.-Prepared Opium, minus

morphine.

No. 3.—No. 1, with 10 per cent

morphine added.

No. 4.—No. Î, with 20 per cent

morphine added.

Opinion of a Chinese Expert, in one of the Opium Firms, Hongkong.

Opinion of a Nine Years Opium Smoker.

Is fairly good, is a mixture of Bengal Opium and something | Good.

else.

Is black and coarse, smell fairly good, is not Opium.

Not very good.

Coarse, but can be smoked, contains Opium with some other Same as No. 1.

mixture, is not so good as No. 1.

Very coarse and black burns like charcoal, contains no

Opium.

Fairly good, but not so good

The prepared opium minus morphine was made from Patna opium having as the other opium constituents removed with the morphine.

as Nos. 1 and 3.

little as possible of

The samples were submitted without any remark beyond desiring an opinion as to quality. A second trial was made with similar results:-

Description of Samples of

Prepared Opium Submitted for trial.

Opinion of a Chinese Expert, in one of the Opium Firms, Hongkong.

Opinion of a Nine Years Opium

Smoker,

1

No. 1-Opium Farm prepared Opium, contained 7 per cent morphine. No. 2.—No. 1, with 15 per cent

morphine added.

No. 3.-No. 1, with 25 per cent

morphine added.

No. 4.-Prepared Opium, minus

morphine.

Appearance coarse and when burned becomes black and hard, | Very good.

it is Bengal Drug but not pure, it is mixed with some other stuff and has no taste.

Burns very quick and has no taste or smell of Opium at all. Colour red and course when burned gives out plenty of smoke and leaves simply ash and no Opium to smoke. Just like No. 2, only a shade better.

When applied to the light burns like Opium, but in a moment it burns quite black and the dross leaves a bad smell. When burning gives out strong smoke.

Same as No. 1.

Not good.

Same as No. I.

It will be observed that the Chinese expert bases his opinion on the physical appearance of the extract, its behaviour in the flame of the lamp and its smell, not on its effect when smoked. The nine years opium smoker apparently judged of its quality in a somewhat similar manner, but as he actually smoked a considerable quantity of each, viz. :-nearly a quarter of an ounce of each of those to which morphine had been added and over two ounces of No. 4 in the second table, his opinion is considered of most value. At my request he got some of his friends to try No. 4 in the second table and they agreed with him that it was good. On one occasion in about twelve hours he smoked a quantity of opium, to which morphine had been added, equal to at least twenty grains of morphine.

If the effects of opium smoking are similar to those of opium eating and morphine the active agent, it can only be said regarding the former mode of using the drug that a more elaborate, troublesome, wasteful, and expensive method could scarcely be devised to obtain a minimum of effect from a maxi- mum of power.

In connection with the above, I may mention that I have visited a number of opium smoking houses of different classes, but have not as yet been fortunate enough to see that profund sleep with beautiful dreams, &c., which has been so graphically described. In the coolie houses, I have seen men asleep after their evening pipe, and also most probably a hard day's work, they having taken up their quarters there for the night, however, a slight shake with the sight of a ten-cent piece, and they were very soon wide awake.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES, Esq., M.R.C.S., &c.,

Colonial Surgeon and Inspector of Hospitals..

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Analyst.

stories.

Owing to the gambing going on in Chinese house property, every available space is made use of and the sanitary condition of the town sacrificed to the greed for gain; land that five years ago could have been bought for $5,000 could not be purchased now for $50,000. This is all very well so long as the present condition of things lasts, but the first sign of an epidemic would be the signal for a clearance among the Chinese, and house property would then go a begging in Victoria, as it does to this day in the town of Port Louis Mauritius, once one of the most famous health resorts of the world. Hongkong once had the notoriety that going there was thought equivalent to going to certain death. I am much mistaken if she is not building up as bad a notoriety for herself in the future.

Constructed as the houses are at present, I do not see how they could be built on worse principles as regards sanitation. I have endeavoured to give the outlined plan of a Chinese house of three stories to help out the description I intend giving here.

The house consists of three large rooms, one on each story with a kitchen attached to each room. These rooms are from 30 to 60 feet long by 16 feet wide and 14 feet high. The ventilation consists of two windows in front, 8 feet high by 3 feet wide, if there is a verandah in front, and they come down to the floor, if not, they are about 5 feet high by 3 feet wide, the entrance from the stair case and the door in the wall separating the room from the kitchen; these are all the means of ventilation, if we except in the case of the two upper floors, the interstices in the floors which open into the rooms below. The walls of these rooms are composed of bare brick, sometimes they are, when newly built, whitewashed, but rarely have any thing done to them after that. The floors are composed in the case of the ground floors of mud, tiles, or concrete, in the upper floors of thin deal boards so put together that there are considerable intervals between them. This sort of construction precludes washing or cleaning for almost all floors, in fact nothing of the sort is ever done. These rooms say 30 feet by 16 are divided by thin plain deal board partitions 6 feet high into spaces of 7 feet square; a room of the above dimentions would divide into eight such spaces, with a small passage two feet wide running down the centre. In each of these partitioned spaces a family resides. But this is not all: between the top of these partitions and the ceiling is a space eight feet high, and in the poorer class of houses this would be considered an awful waste of room, another floor is therefore constructed inside the room and other partitions built on that. Thus a house three stories high originally, becomes by this proceeding equal to one six stories high. The staircases leading to these rooms are narrow with small steps and very steep, the incline being about one foot perpendicular to one foot horizontal. A European Policeman this year was killed by falling down a single flight of such stairs. The kitchen attached to each room is about 16 feet long, (the width of the house that is) by 8 feet wide and 14 feet high, the apertures for ventilation consist of the door into the room, an air hole 4 feet square in the ceiling; (in the case of the two lower stories opening into the kitchens above, in the case of the upper story on to the roof) and the chimney. It is not uncommon thing for children and even adults to fall through the air holes and break their necks. Down through these air holes come the down-spouts as they are called which convey away the drainings of the kitchens into the house drains. The kitchen floors are tiled and are always wet and sloppy. These down spouts are also used by all the inhabitants of the rooms as urinals, which are composed of lengths of porous earthenware piping cemented to the wall, the consequence is the wall of the house is damp with whatever filth goes down the pipes. It is not always that these down-spouts lead into a drain, sometimes only into the earth through which the fluids thrown down then trickles till it finds the water level. This is the construction of the houses; with such arrangements how are pure air, pure light, freedom from damp and an equable temperature to be obtained or pure water to be kept. The kitchen chimney owing to the want of draught is useless, the smoke of the fires when cooking is going on pervades the whole house, the walls are blackened all over the house by it, wood and charcoal are generally used, and the atmosphere inside the house at the times when the fires are going is little short of suffocating. The habits of the Chinese do noc assist in the sanitation of the house. In each of the partitions referred to is a bed on which the family sleep, under the bed is a poo poo tub, which is of glazed earthenware with a cover to it, this is used for the night soil by the women and children, and is emptied according to the class inhabiting the house from once every two days to once a week. The bedding used by the Chinese is never washed, and among the lower classes they seldom wash themselves. Such are the conditions inside the houses often much worse than here described, and such the state of 96 out of every 100 houses in the Colony.

As for the roads and streets, Chinamen are to be seen pursuing their avocations on the paths and even in the roadway, throwing slops, animal and vegetable refuse out of their houses into the road at all hours, ruining the concrete roads, well laid granite side channels and foot paths by chopping wood, hammering and pounding things on them, thus cutting the roads into holes and loosening the stones of the foot paths and side channels, and costing the Government large sums annually for repairs. The drain traps are openly used by coolies as urinals, and the stench so caused is in some places abominable; mentioning places in principal thoroughfares, the traps near the gates of the Italian Convent, Caine Road, and those in Pottinger Street by the Roman Catholic Cathedral are among the most savoury. A more disgusting state of things than the Queen's Road presents between the Wellington Barracks and Morrison Hill is hardly to be described, the road always in a of wet and filth from refuse, offal and slops thrown out of the houses. If this is so in the principal. thoroughfare of Hongkong, what it must be in Tai-ping-shan where few Europeans it is not difficult to imagine

Another

In an enclosed report by Mr. MCCALLUM of analytical work done, is an interesting account of the water supplied to the town, which it is pleasant to know is a good potable water in spite of its very unpleasant appearance and when filtered is very good drinking for Europeans, for the Chinese they must put up with both the dirt in it and the limited supply they are able to get. analysis made some time ago of the water from one of the largest streams in the Colony, passing through the Military grounds to the sea showed the water to have been so defiled by the washermen and squatters on the hill sides as to render the stream below them nothing better than an open sewer. From the opening of the sewers not being carried far enough out into the tide way and the want of thorough flushing the stench along the Praya Wall is most offensive, especially so on a hot day when the tide is low. I think I have said enough, though I have not mentioned the markets and after all it is a mere reiteration of what has been said in former reports, and as far as I can see what I may still continue to complain of in future ones.

I have the honour to be

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

[

Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,.

Acting Colonial Secretary, Sc.,

&c.,

&'c.

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

LABORATORY

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL. HONGKONG, 1st February, 1881.

SIR, I have the honour to lay before you a report of the work done in the Government Labora- tory since taking up my appointment in November 1879.

On arrival I found there was no laboratory and scarcely any Apparatus, Appliances, Chemicals; &c. An indent was therefore made for such articles as was considered necessary and these arrived from England in May, in the meantime no adequate laboratory had been provided and some difficulty was experienced in even storing them safely.

On the opening in July of the New Lock Hospital as an addition to the Civil Hospital, a room was placed at my disposal in which some work could be done.

Forty-five Analyses have been made including a few researches for poisonous substances in cases of suspected poisoning.

Finding that the milk supplied for the use of the patients in the Government Civil Hospital was largely adulterated with water, it was deemed expedient to examine the milk as sold by milkmen in the ordinary way of business, samples of cows milk (in all 15) were purchased from different places and analyzed, the results are tabulated below. Water was the only adulterant detected, and although this may be considered as merely a dilution of a valuable food, yet the question arises, is the adulterant used pure, judging from its source it is not likely to be so. It was observed that all the samples rapidly entered into the lactic fermentation, when once started, no doubt, this was aided con- siderably by the comparatively high temperature, it was however a sure sign that the houses used as dairies had received scant attention as regards cleanliness. As milk has been traced to have been the source of infection in some cases of infectious disease, it is desirable that these milk shops be made subject to inspection to see they are kept clean and fit places for dairies.

Owing to the usually turbid and yellowish appearance of the water obtained from the Pok- foolum water supply, a monthly sanitary analysis has been instituted, the results for the last three months of 1880 are given below. When filtered this is a good potable water, both the mineral and nitrogenous organic matter being low. In its unfiltered state the matter in suspension is considerable at all times and after heavy rain is excessive, this could, however, be almost entirely removed by an efficient filtration before entering the aqueduct, such filtration would tend to oxidise and destroy the organic matter present in and at the same time improve the appearance of the water.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

PH. B. CAYRES Esq MR.CS

Colonial Surgeon and Inspector of Hospitals

HUGH MCCALLU

Analyst

***

192 women submitted to examination under the Contagious Diseases Ordinance, and 9,683 examinations were made.

The average detention of the cases taken into Hospital was 14.7 days for all classes of venereal

disease.

The number of men admitted into the Military Hospital was 164, as compared with 183 in 1879, of this number 13 contracted constitutional syphilis. All the cases were contracted in Hongkong.

The admissions to the Naval Hospital were 181, as compared with 293 in 1879, of these 23 contracted constitutional syphilis. Of the 181 admissions, 51 cases were not contracted in Hongkong, and of the 23 cases of constitutional syphilis, 11 were not contracted in Hongkong.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital were 107, of these 36 did not contract the disease in Hongkong, 47 of these admissions were from the Police Force. Of the Police 15 contracted constitutional syphilis, of the rest 28 contracted constitutional syphilis.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

The number of deaths this year among the European Community was 69 as compared with 55 in 1879, the percentage of deaths to the Population was 2.49 as compared with 1.98 in 1879. The average for the past nine years is 2.55.

The Rain-fall this year, 111.57 inches was the largest rainfall recorded in the past nine years. The maximum heat 95° has only once been equalled in the past nine years.

We have much to be thankful for in the heavy rains that have kept the drains of the Colony well flushed, and to that is attributable a slight decrease in a certain class of diseases which have been steadily on the increase during the past few years, as the following Tables show:--

Deaths Among Chinese.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1873.

1879.

1880.

Enteric,

12

125

31

94

145

89

116

309

Fevers.

Simple continued,........

96

46

201

2443

370

481

783

373

Typhus..

16

C2

33

21

""

>"

77

Diarrhoea.

195

231

288

259

311

701

608

848

Deaths other than Chinese.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

Enteric,

1

1

1

5

3

"7

co

Fevers.

Simple continued,.....

6

+

5

9

CC

15

21

12

Typhus.

4

2

1

">

""

Diarrhea.

17

17

18

14

10

9

14

10

These figures do not speak well for the sanitation of the Colony of late years, and the small improvement in the figures of last year I am convinced is only due to the tremendous flushing of the drains from the unusually heavy rains we had.

Table XVIII shows the work of the Sanitary Inspectors. The number of persons fined for nuisances was 191, the amount of tines collected $266.10, in 1873 the number of persons fined was 1,557, and the amount of fines collected $1,571.30. I do not see that the nuisances daily committed and filth to be seen in the roads and streets flung out from the houses has any way abated; far from it. I think things were never in so bad a condition as they are now since I have been here, and we appear in this matter to be getting worse and worse every year.

Six years ago I reported on the unhealthy and unwholesome style adopted in the construction of Chinese houses, but things have been growing steadily worse instead of better.

Whereas in many cases narrow gullys affording some amount of air separated the old houses, now enorinous blocks of houses three and four stories high are built back to back or with plain back walls with no apertures in them, and on the worst conceivable plans as regards sanitation. Since I wrote my Annual Report for 1874, in which I particularly brought to notice the construction of Chinese Houses, thousands of houses have been built or pulled down and rebuilt, and hundreds of others built on what were unoccupied places at that time. With only this difference that whereas the old houses were rarely more than two stories high, none are now built less than three and many four stories high and built on as bad if not worse plans than those they have succeeded. I have seen nearly all Queen's Road, a road. about three miles long, change in the last seven years from houses two stories high to-houses of three.

X

way that Europeans offer a glass of wine. It is not expected among the Chinese that the visitor will make a beast of himself, and become non compos mentis any more than the European visitor is expected to make himself drunk. It is quite evident from the numbers that smoke even to large amounts without harm to themselves, without any desire to increase the amount of their daily allowance, even when it is but small, that the practice bears no comparison with spirit drinking. The case with which the habit is dropped at once with immediate benefit is very well illustrated in the rapid increase of weight. From what I can see in the Goal, Tobacco smokers suffer much more annoyance when.deprived of their pipe than the opium smokers do. I am no advocate for the practice of opium smoking as the "Friend of China" suggests in an abusive article on opinions I expressed on the matter in previous reports, for I cannot discover where the pleasure or enjoyment is obtained, and except for the extravagant price paid for it a more harmless and useless amusement and a greater waste of time I cannot conceive. There has been much sickness among the Goal officials as I have previously mentioned and for similar reasons to the sickness among the Police viz. unwholesome quarters. I am glad to find the views I expressed in former reports as to evil effects of flogging on the back with the cat on the internal organs of the body have been confirmed at Home, for the Lancet of April 2nd 1881, in a short article on Flogging in the Army says "The Hounslow inquest will be fresh in the recollection of many readers, and it will not be forgotten that the enquiry, which elicited the most startling and significant facts was adjourned ten times. The lash was then shown to be a weapon capable of inflicting formidable and even fatal injuries on the deep structures while apparently doing little harm to the superficial. It was found to be a murderous, and wholly- misleading instrument of torture." Flogging as now conducted on the breech does no permanent harm. The increased number of sick among the prisoners is principally from causes not in any way connected with the Goal, and it is a matter of congratulation that notwithstanding the increased number in the daily average of prisoners, the limited accommodation has not given rise to any serious trouble, and there have been only two deaths to record.

TEMPORARY LUNATIC ASYLUM.

This still remains in the old houses in Hollywood Road, parts of which have become uninhabit- able, and the houses themselves cannot be considered safe. Twice during 1880 public notice of a storm having been given from the Harbour Master's Office, the lunatics had to be removed to the Police Cells at the Central Station, fortunately the storms were not severe. The buildings are wholly unsuited for the purpose of a Lunatic Asylum, but no better can be procured, and should any thing happen to them during the Typhoon season this year, I am unable to point out any others to take their place.

There were eight admissions this year, besides one that remained from last year. Two of the admissions, one female and one male, were from the better classes, who I venture to say had never been lodged in such a hole as this building before. The female was confined a month and dismissed relieved. The male was a partner in a large mercantile house, was detained a week, when a passage was taken for him to England with his keeper by the House he belonged to.

One case was an educated Chinaman, who could read, write and speak English well; he had long been in the employ of an English Firm in a responsible post and was a man about forty years of age. He was dismissed cured, and has been all right ever since. Another case was a China boy educated in the Central School, who also wrote, read and spoke English very well, he was dismissed relieved. One was an English sailor, who had cut his throat and stabbed himself in the abdomen. This was an interesting case, the wound in the abdomen healed, but an abscess formed under the scar which was opened, and a large piece of the liver was discharged. This man made a good recovery both physically and mentally. There was another case of attempted suicide and cerebral excitement which was discovered to be caused by constipation. The man's bowels must have been in this state for over a fortnight. This was a Chinaman and was dismissed cured. One was a Gaol Warder who was also dismissed cured. The other two were Portuguese destitutes afterwards taken charge of and removed by their Consul.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

The total number of admissions during this year was 1,353, of these 590 died. The number of outpatients treated was 81,274. The number of deaths in Hospital is chiefly owing to the insuperable objection of the Chinese to go into Hospital, except in the last extremity, many being admitted in a moribund condition.

ابه

The number of small-pox cases admitted was 155, of which 97 died, most of the cases were children.

The number of vaccinations done by the Tung Wah Hospital during the year was 1,594, of these 86 were done in the villages by travelling vaccinators belonging to the Hospital.

LOCK HOSPITAL.MP

This still remains in a building that was formerly a school, part of which cannot be used. Both the new and the old Lock Hospitals being used as the Civil Hospital.

There were 57 registered women, admitted during the year. They were nearly all cases of the milder types of venereal disease only one case of Secondary syphilis.

is powerless, which does not appear to be generally known. In the manuals for the guidance of Health Officers, it is distinctly stated in the event of disinfecting properties being required where dry earth is used, a disinfectant powder, not a liquid, must be employed. I have frequently inspected the system at the Gaol which works as well as can be expected, though the Gaol main drain requires as much flushing as ever, for all the urine which contains by far the major portion of the putrifactive matters excreted from the human body is thrown down the drain as also the washings of the dry earth buckets after they have been emptied into the tubs which coolies carry away.

Two floggings took place in the Gaol this year, one resulted in the death of the warder who administered it, who fell down and died a few seconds after of heart disease, his death being probably hastened by the exertion he had just undergone. He was a powerfully built native of Goa, and no one was aware that any thing was the matter with him.

There were only two deaths this year among the prisoners, though some have been released whose recovery was impossible. Many prisoners have to be sent in to the Hospital as soon as admitted to Gaol, among the Europeans this is generally caused by their being in an advanced stage of Alcoholic poisoning; with the Chinese the causes are various and the prisoners principally belong to the beggar class, worn out decrepit or deformed. I enclose a list of those sent at once to the Hospital on admission to Gaol. There are many old men in the Gaol whom it is impossible to punish further than depriving them of their liberty, otherwise they are better off than they would be outside.

Kidnappers appear to resemble the man-eating tiger in being old and worn out before taking to the practice, they are generally old men and women unfit for hard work. There is one old lady in the Gaol at present for unlawful detention, whose sentence is two years simple imprisonment, she is eighty years old, all but stone blind, has not a single tooth in her head, cannot walk without assistance, and appears to be quite childish.

One case of Small-pos occurred in the Gaol, it was a prisoner who had been detained over a year. How he contracted the disease I cannot say, he was removed to the Tung Wah Hospital Small-pox Wards. His case became confluent and he died. No other case occurred.

I enclose a list of the Opium Smokers, using one mace or more daily. Of those that smoked less no note was taken. In all cases the habit was entirely ignored and no sedatives or stimulants allowed. It occurred to me at the latter part of the year to have these men weighed every week for the first month to see what improvement they made. If they made any, the result was that all gained weight, some rapidly and enormously, so that ignoring the habit and breaking it off at once does no harm so long as they are fairly well fed. One old man weighing 80 pounds, looking as miserable in condition as he well could, who had been a smoker for 38 years, whose daily consumption of opium was five drams or mace which is a little less than a dram being 58.7 grains, increased his weight by 83 in the first four weeks with no other treatment than the regulation diet. The average weight of a Chinaman in these parts is about 113 lbs. All along I have been astonished at the small effect, shown by opium smokers, of the use of the drug even in large quantities.

I have not been able to trace any disease the opium smokers have been suffering from as caused by this habit. The debility which they suffer from is most assuredly caused by want of proper nourishment which I think is sufficiently proved by the rapidity with which they increase in weight, when simply given a fair quantity of good food. Surprised at what appeared to me little short of marvellous after what I have seen among opium eaters, I asked Mr. MCCALLUM to analyse the different forms of opium in use among the Chinese here, also to make other preparations of opium and submit to an old opium smoker and his friends and an opium merchant, who was connected with one of the opium firms, for their opinions. The result of these experiments is embodied in the report made by Mr. MCCALLUM which I enclose. The opium smoker in this report recognises no difference between the opium supplied by the Opium Farmer containing 7 per cent. of morphia, the same opium with 15 per cent. of morphia added to it and the same opium with all the morphia extracted. The opium expert is very much muddled in his opinions and only judges the opium by its appearance and its behaviour when burnt in the pipe. An opium pipe takes an infinity of trouble to prepare. Three long inhalations at most exhaust it, the flavour of the smoke is but small, there is nothing aromatic about it, and the effect produced seems about as much as would be obtained from smoking a piece of paper. I have watched a European smoke 32 grains of the opium supplied by the Opium Farmer containing 7 per cent. of morphia, this quantity was smoked in one hour under the superintendence of an old opium smoker. The effects were nil as far as this gentleman was concerned although he was unaccustomed to the use of opium in any form. It had no effect on his senses, on his pulse or on his temperature, and he was quite disgusted at not becoming even drowsy or having the delightful dreams he anticipated. It will be seen in Mr. MCCALLUM's report that the opium smoker got through an amount of opium in twelve hours that contained morphia to the amount of 20 grains. Yet he and his friends smoke opium from which all the morphia is extracted, and with as much gratification as that containing even an excess of morphia and pronounce it equally good. What is it then in the opium that gives the pleasure and what does the harm? If the man had but swallowed one tenth of the amount of opium containing morphia that he smoked, it would have killed him. I like Mr. McCALLUM have visited opium dens of both high and low class. I have also had many opportunities of seeing opium smokers of the better class in their own houses, but I have never seen any smoker who was not as easily roused as any ordinary sleeper and as quickly wide awake. It is customary among the Chinese to offer the opium pipe to a visitor in the same

"

1

}

That is to say that the deaths in Hospital are less than 2.50

per cent. The deaths among the whole European population of the Colony is 2.49 per cent. This would indicate that the cases in Hospital must be of a simple nature. I know of no General Hospital anywhere else showing such a small percentage of deaths to admissions, and this at any rate is no proof of the unfitness of the Buildings now in use, as a general hospital, a purpose for which they were never intended, but rather that they have been excellent makeshifts. So far from the lower wards not being airy, and being interfered with by the position of the new Lock as the Superintendent states, Dr. BLENNERIASSETT, his locum tenens, was observing the other day how cool and airy these wards were, although the day was exceptionally hot and close.

The increase in the cost of this establishment has been considerable, one item only, the staff which in 1873, when the Superintendent took charge, cost $2,920 now cost $7,824, and is still reported as being insufficient.

The paying patients exclusive of Police and seamen sent by the Harbour Master brought in 1873 $2,440.08, in 1880 $3,441.93, or just $1,001.85 more, which is a long way from paying for the increase of Staff. Certainly the Staff required much improvement, but I do not now see the necessity for the incessant grumbles concerning its insufficiency.

Only one operation is reported in Table V, amputation of the toe. The operation refered to for stone in the Superintendent's report was performed this year and will appear in the Tables for 1881.

A valuable addition was made to the Staff of the Hospital in 1879 in the appointment of Mr. H. MCCALLUM, as Apothecary and Government Analyst. I have much pleasure in expressing my satisfaction with the efficient and obliging manner in which he has performed his duties. Though he has had good grounds for complaint in his capacity as analyst in the want of a Laboratory for which there is no place suitable in the building at present used as a Hospital.

SMALL POX HOSPITAL.

The number of cases of Small-pox admitted to Hospital in 1880 was 29, an unusually large number. 27 of them were admitted in the first four months of the year, the deaths were 4. The admissions for the past eight years are as follows:-

Year.

1873,

1874,

1875,

1876,

1877,

1878, Is 9. 1880,

Small pox cases.

7

6

5

18

25

7

13

29

In the first four months of this year 1881, only 6 cases have been admitted, although small-pox is reported as raging in Canton. It will be seen that the demand for accommodation in this Hospital was much above the average last year. Though some of the cases were mild varioloid, and only detained a few days.

VICTORIA GAOL.

There have been fewer admissions to the Gaol than last year, but the daily average number remains auch the same as the following figures demonstrate.

Total number of prisoners

admitted to Guol.

Daily average number of prisoners.

Year.

1873.

1874,

1875,

1876.

1877,

1878.

1879,

1880,

#

... 4.656

388

3,645

350.04

4.028

374.06

4.063

432.60

3.964

395.22

3.803

519.22

3.669

576.13

3,530.

574.25

These figures demonstrate that although the total admissions show a decrease as compared with past years, the daily average number in Gaol has increased considerably. So also has the number of sick whereas in 1873 only 148 were admitted into the Gaol Hospital, the number in 1880 has risen to 316, and this is less by 48 than were admitted in 1879.

The dry earth system, though a great improvement, is very difficult to manage so as to get as much benefit as might be obtained even with the inferior description of dry earth used, which is composed of disintegrated granite. The short-term prisoners cannot be made to understand the arrangement, and urinate on the dry earth side of the buckets, thus rendering it powerless as a decodorizer, which in any case it only is partially.As a disinfectant dry earth of the best description

complaints concerning is part of the subject have but very small foundation, and the opinions he has given are not in accordance with facts. I see no reason to alter the opinions I have given and the statements I made on the subjects of the temporary arrangements, the proposed new buildings or the Hospital Staff in previous reports and letters, mentioning especially my Annual Report for 1879, my letter C. S. O. No. 322 dated January 30th 1879, letter dated September 4th with enclosures, letters, dated September 20th 1880, and October 2nd 1880.

Two Commissions of Enquiry on the Hospital Staff and the proposed New Buildings were appointed this year and reported on these matters. The first, composed by Surgeon General MACKINNON, A.M.D. and Dr. O'BRIEN, I was informed, agreed with my views. The second was composed by Deputy Surgeon General THOMSON, A.M.D. and Deputy Inspector General BREEN, R.N. Of their report I have heard nothing although they in a manner sat in judgment on the opinions I had expressed and recommendations I had forwarded to Government. But I am permitted to draw my own conclusions, as since that by the sanction of Government and the Military Authorities a Military Surgeon has been permitted to take charge of the duties of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital pending his absence on leave for a twelve-month, and it is not thought too much by either of these Authorities or the gentleman himself for him to perform his military duties as Surgeon as well as those of the Superintendent at the Hospital. Nor apparently did the Superintendent who complains so much of the excess and arduous nature of his work think it too much to ask of another man to do his duty for a twelve-month for considerably less than half pay. How this can be reconciled with the statements in his letters and the report which I enclose that he is overworked and has not time for doing things he thinks should be done. I am at a loss to understand.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the year 1880 were 1,055. Of these there were Police 588. Police cases 144, Destitutes 97, Government Employés, chiefly Gaol Officials 48. The remaining 168 were seamen sent by the Harbour Master and paying patients. The numbers admitted during the past eight years are as follows:-

Your.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877,

1878,

1879, 1880.

Admissions.

952

829

1,010

1.001

950

1.289

1.071

1,055

ib

It will thus be seen that if it had not been for the great increase in the number of almissions from the Police Force during the past three years, so far from an increase in the demand for accommodation, there would have been a steady decrease. The increase from the Force arises, as I believe, from preventable causes, so also do a number of the admissions of the Gaol Officials and destitutes. The latter are for the most part European sailors, deserters, or discharged from their ships, worthless drunken lot who pass their time drunk in a gutter, in Gaol and in Hospital alternately. It would be cheaper for Government to ship them off to other ports where they might find some employment which they cannot find here even if they wished. I presume the Government would prefer to have increased accommodation in their quarters for the Police in preference to increased accommodation in the Hospital. The admissions from venereal disease on which so much stress was laid as demanding increased accommodation, shew a decrease this year by the Superintendent's own showing in his report, but not by the Tables, as it appears only Europeans were put down in Table C in previous years, the Chinese being left out.

:

Table V shews the number of admissions, deaths and their causes. At least two thirds of the cases are such as would only be treated as out-patients in any General Hospital at Home, and certainly could cause very little trouble and not the least anxiety.

Table VII shews the number of admissions for each month of the year as usual the numbers are most numerous in the hot months from June to October.

The number of deaths in Hospital this year was 44 which in comparisou with previous years is low as the following figures indicate.

Year.

Deaths.

1873,

55

1874,

95

1875.

59

1876.

36

1877

49

1878

50

*1879

55

1880

A

MEDICAL.

COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1880.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 20th May, 1881.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for 1880, together with the usual Tables shewing the work done in the different Establishments under my supervision. I also enclose a report furnished by the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, concerning the working of that Establishment, and some very interesting papers concerning analyses furnished me by Mr. H. MCCALLUM, Government Analyst.

POLICE.

There is an increase of twenty one in the number of Police admitted to Hospital in comparison with the two previous years 1878 and 1879, both of these years record the admission of 566 as compared with 588 in 1880. Including those that remained in Hospital at the end of 1879, 602 have been under treatment. The Europeans and the Indians keep about the same average, but the Chinese show an enormous increase in the number of admissions which were 142 in 1878 with 1 death, in 1879, 277 with 2 deaths, in 1880, 243 with 9 deaths.

The admissions of the Force generally have been much increased in the last three years as the following figures show.

Year.

1873,

1874.

1875,

1876.

1877,

1878.

1879.

1880.

Police admissions to Hospital.

Deaths.

..477

11

.346

12

.436

1-4

410

7

418

6

566

6

..566

8

..588

13

These deaths did not all occur in Hospital, some were sudden deaths, and some took place while the members were away on leave.

The Police have been called upon to undertake much longer hours of duty while nothing has been done excepting at Aberdeen to improve their quarters, which have been over and over again reported as overcrowded and unwholesome especially in the cases of the Central Police Station, the Water Police Hulk and Nos. 3, 7 and 8 Stations. The two first mentioned furnish the greatest number of sick.

602 the number treated during the year in the Hospital does not include many treated in their own quarters and homes, such as Inspectors, Sergeants and married men.

The deaths in the Force during the year were Europeans 1, Indians 3, Chinese 9. One Indian and five Chinese died while away on leave.

TROOPS.

There has been a considerable increase of sickness amongst the troops as is shown in Table IV when compared with previous years, as the following figures show.

Year.

1873,

1874.

1875,

1876,

1877.

1878,

1879,

1880,

Troops admitted to Hospital.

.1,446

..1,067

716

563

973

944

.1,035

..1,075

Deaths.

12

10

9

2

9

10

8

13

In fact they seem getting back to the state of things so bitterly complained of in 1874. There were 164 venereal cases admitted to the Military Hospital as compared with 183 in 1879, but of these 13 were secondary syphilis as compared with 7 in 1879.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Concerning the Establishment we seem as far off getting the new building as ever with the proper accommodation for the Patients and Staff. On this matter and the necessity for further increase of

year. Staff which had already been much increased, there has been considerable disagreement this It is quite evadent that until there is a proper building instead of the make-shifts of past years, there will be much to complain of on that score but am of opinion that most of the Superintendent's