Sessional Papers - 1885

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG DEC 1884 TO JUNE 1885

Table of Contents

1. Armaments of the forts at Hongkong

Further Correspondence as to the armaments of the forts at Hongkong

2. Armaments of the forts at Hongkong

Telegrams and Correspondence Respecting the armaments of the forts at Hongkong

3. Bills of Health

Correspondence Respecting Fees Charged for Issuing Bills of Health

4. Botanical and afforestation Department

Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and afforestation Department for 1884

5. Colonial and indian Exhibition of 1886

Papers Respecting the Colonial and indian Exhibition of 1886

6. Conveyancing Ordinance

Petition By the Solicitors and Certain Landowners for the introduction of a Conveyancing Ordinance

7. Defences of Hongkong

Despatch Respecting the Defences of Hongkong

8. Destitutes

Report on the Subject of Destitutes

9. Eastern Mail Service

Correspondence Respecting the Eastern Mail Service

10. Eastern Mail Service

Despatch Respecting Contribution towards the Eastern Mail Service

11. Educational Department

Report of the inspector of Schools for 1884

12. Finance of the Colony

Report on the Finances of the Colony By the Colonial Secretary and auditor General

13. Finances of the Colony

Report on the Finances of the Colony By the Colonial Secretary and auditor General

14. Harbour Department

Report of the Harbour Master for 1884

15. Hongkong Observatory

Report of the Government astronomer for 1884

16. Incorporation of the Vicar apostolic of the Roman Catholic Church in Hongkong

Despatches Respecting the Proposed incorporation of the Vicar apostolic of the Roman Catholic Church in Hongkong

17. Kau Ng Chek (Foot Measure)

Petition By Certain Chinese Merchants for Permission to Use the Kau Ng Chek (Foot Measure)

18. Legislative Council

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the Opening of the Session of the Legislative Council

19. Legislative Council

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the Prorogation of the Session of the Legislative Council

20. Legislative Council

Proceedings of the Legislative Council

21. Legislative Council

Address of the Legislative Council in Reply to the Speech to His Excellency the Governor

22. Medical Department

Report of the Colonial Surgeon for 1884

23. Post office

Report of the Postmaster General for 1884

24. Quarantine

Despatch Respecting the Question of Quarantine

25. Receipts and Expenditure

Report on the Receipts and Expenditure for the Year 1884 By the Colonial Secretary and auditor General

26. Receipts and Payments, 1884

Statement Showing the total Receipts and Payments, 1884

27. Rifle Practice of the Civil Police and the Supply of ammunition

Corrspondence Respecting the Rifle Practice of the Civil Police and the Supply of ammunitiion

28. Roman Catholic Chaplain

Despatch Respecting the Payment of a Roman Catholic Chaplain for the Gaol and Civil Hospital

 

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No. 1.

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the opening of the Session

of the Legislative Council of Hongkong,

3rd December, 1884.

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I have much pleasure in opening this Session, and in inviting your co-operation in its labours and duties.

ty

2. Full information with regard to the Financial position of the Colony at the present time will be laid before you in the Report of the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General. The political and other complications which have now for a considerable period affected generally this quarter of the globe and especially the neighbouring Empire of China, have exercised an injurious influence on trade and commerce, and consequently on the resources of this community. It is, however, believed that this depression will prove to be only temporary, and that the restor- ation of peace will restore the elasticity of the public revenue. Meanwhile, it will be necessary to practise a prudent economy. A list of the Public Works proposed and commenced will be submitted for your consideration; and I request, that you will report which of those works should, in your opinion, be pushed on and which postponed. Your local knowledge and experience will prove of practical advantage in enabling my Government to arrive at a sound decision on this point. It may become expedient, moreover, to revise the Estimates for 1885.

3. In opening the last Session, I informed you that the necessity of strength- ening the Military Defences of this important Naval and Military Station and great mart of commerce had been urgently represented to the Imperial Government. Without referring to the value of the other and manifold interests, both Imperial and Colonial, which are at stake here, I reminded you that Official Statistics show that the tonnage of the shipping entered at the Port of Hongkong in the year 1883, exceeded five millions of tons; that is, it exceeded the tonnage of the shipping entered at the Port of London in 1843, the year in which Hongkong was annexed to the British Crown. At the present day, the shipping of Hongkong exceeds that of all Ports in the United Kingdom with the exception of London and Liverpool. The value of the property of every kind in this community is estimated at not less than twenty millions sterling; and this is without taking into account the Naval and Military Arsenals, Stores, and Barracks. The Imperial Government has determined to proceed with the completion of the four principal Forts which are deemed by the Military Authorities to be necessary for the protection from hostile attack of this City, with its harbour and shipping"

77

78

Towards the cost of these works, this Colony is expected to contribute the sum of £56,000. The payment of this contribution will be spread over two years; and you will probably agree that it should be ultimately charged against the moderate loan, not exceeding one year's revenue, which you have already sanctioned in principle for the construction of urgently required public works. I recommend this question to your early and favourable consideration.

4. You are already aware, from papers presented during the last Session, that I have strongly pressed the expediency, on sanitary and other grounds, of the junction of the Eastern and Western divisions of this City by means of a continuous Marine Embankment along the sea-frontage of the Military canton- ments and of the Royal Naval Yard. The Colonial Office in England supports my recommendation; but I regret to announce that its negotiations with the War Office and Admiralty have not as yet been brought to a successful issue.

5. During the course of the Session, reports and other papers will be laid before

you showing the condition of the several Departments of the Public Service; which is generally satisfactory.

6. With regard to Legislation, there will be submitted to you, among other measures, Bills to make certain amendments in the Bankruptcy Law; to regulate Weights and Measures; to codify the law of Bills of Exchange; to amend certain Provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act; to appropriate certain unclaimed balances of Bankrupt and Intestate Estates; and to amend the Building Ordinance.

7. It is hoped, moreover, that the progress in its important work of the Commission appointed to consolidate the laws now in force in this Colony will enable several revised Ordinances to be proposed during the present Session.

8. You will further be requested to consider the propriety of enacting in a permanent form certain provisions of the temporary Peace Preservation Ordinance. On a recent occasion, the precautionary measures promptly adopted by the Civil Government with the support of the Military, speedily repressed the tendency to disorder which for a short period seemed to be threatening among the lower section of the Chinese population. Perfect tranquillity was at once restored. It must always be remembered that the position of the Chinese in Hongkong is essentially different from that of the natives in India, and in other possessions of the Crown acquired by conquest, where British rule has been imposed on peoples with long established insti- tutions of their own. Hongkong, on the other hand, when ceded to the British Crown in 1843, was little more than a barren rock, inhabited only by a few fishermen and pirates. Since the first establishment of our rule here, a Chinese immigration, now amounting to above 150,000, has settled in this British territory of its own free will, and for the sake of its own convenience and profit. It is obvious that this new population, while entitled to the full protection of the English laws, is bound to obey those laws. Moreover, the Government of Hongkong, while expecting the loyal support of all the nationalities dwelling here together under the British flag, has ample strength of itself to enforce obedience, and to brook no interference

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from the Chinese Secret Societies, or from other illegal or unauthorized associations. It is satisfactory to know that the principal Chinese Merchants, and all other Chinese residents of worth and substance, appreciate the advantages which they enjoy in this community, and are favourable to the adoption of measures required for the maintenance of law and order, and for the protection of industry and property.

9. In conclusion, Honourable Gentlemen, I would express my confident hope that a steady and prudent development of the resources of this Colony, coupled with constant firmness and justice,-not dry but sympathetic justice,--on the part of the Government and Legislature will, by the favour of Divine Providence, secure the general welfare and contentment of all races and classes of our population.

G. F. BOWEN.

79

:

81

No. 2.

Address of the Legislative Council of Hongkong in reply to the Speech

of His Excellency the Governor at the opening of the

Session on the 3rd of December, 1884.

!

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

1. We the members of the Legislative Council of Hongkong, in Council assembled, desire to thank Your Excellency for your speech, and to assure you of our cordial co-operation in the labours and duties of the Session which has now been opened.

2. We regret that the trade and commerce of the Colony have been injuriously affected by the political complications which prevail in this region; but we trust with Your Excellency that the present depression will prove to be only temporary, and that the return of peace at no distant date will restore the elasticity of the public revenue. Meanwhile we acknowledge the necessity for a prudent economy; and in that view we shall carefully consider the list of proposed public works to be submitted to us, so as to report as to which of them should be pushed on and which may be conveniently postponed.

3. We are glad to hear that the Imperial Government has determined to proceed with the measures required for the protection of this City with its harbour and shipping. We doubt not that the Colony will be prepared to contribute its share towards the cost of the Defence works to be undertaken, and we shall carefully consider such propositions for that purpose as may be laid before us.

We trust, however, that as soon as the plans of the defences are completed, the valuable lands now reserved, which may not be required for military purposes, will be restored to

the Colonial Government, free of all restriction.

·

4. While thanking Your Excellency for the steps that you have taken to impress upon the Imperial Government the expediency of providing for the junction of the Eastern and Western divisions of this City by means of a continuous marine embankment, we regret that the necessary negociations with the War Office and the Admiralty have not yet been brought to a successful issue.

5. We are glad to understand that the condition of the several departments of the public service is satisfactory.

6. We shall carefully consider the Legislative measures which are to be intro-

duced in the course of the Session.

7. We look with hope to the results to be obtained by the Commission appointed to revise and consolidate the laws now in force in this Colony.

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82

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8. We shall be glad to consider the propriety of enacting in a permanent form some of the provisions of the temporary Peace Preservation Ordinance. It is a cause for thankfulness and satisfaction that on the occasion of the recent disturbances

the precautionary measures promptly adopted by the Government, supported by the military, sufficed for the speedy repression of all tendency to disorder and the perfect restoration of tranquillity. While we recognize with pleasure that the. Government has ample strength to enforce obedience to law, and will not brook the interference of Chinese Secret Societies, or of other unauthorized associations, we believe with Your Excellency that it will always receive the loyal support of all nationalities dwelling in this Colony under the protection of the British flag.

9. In conclusion, we join with Your Excellency in the sincere hope that, under the favour of Divine Providence, the prudence, firmness and justice of the Govern- ment and Legislature will conduce to the general welfare and contentment of all classes and races in the population.

יי

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83

No. 3.

DESPATCH RESPECTING

THE DEFENCES OF HONGKONG.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

The Secretary of State for the Colonies to Governor

Sir George F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

17th September, .1884.

J

With reference to previous correspondence on the subject of the defences of Hongkong, I had the honour to telegraph to you on the 12th instant in the following words: “Arrangements concluded for Colonial defences; full details by post as to Colonial Expenditure under new scheme; in the meantime advance to General Officer Commanding amount required; instructions will be sent by telegraph

to him.'

The Report of the Royal Commission on the defence of British possessions and commerce abroad has been carefully considered by Her Majesty's Government, and the recommendations of the Inspector General of Fortifications on that report have been generally approved and accepted as a basis of action. In accordance with these recommendations the works, which it is proposed to erect at Hongkong, are estimated to cost fifty-five thousand six hundred and twenty-five pounds, and the corresponding armament to cost thirty-seven thousand five hundred pounds.

It was at first proposed to charge the whole of this expenditure on Colonial funds, but as was mentioned in the House of Commons on the 7th of July by the Marquis of HARTINGTON, Her Majesty's Government have now arrived at the decision that the Colony of Hongkong should defray only the cost of the necessary works, the Imperial Government contributing the armament.

I have gathered from your despatches that your Legislative Council will cheerfully vote the amount required for this purpose.

Such sums as may be immediately required for the works about to be commenced should be met from the existing balances. As you were informed in my despatch No. 178 of 28th August, 1883, when these balances are exhausted, a loan can be raised; the only difference now being that the loan will have to be of sufficient amount to meet, such portion of the cost of the military works, as well as of the other public works as may then remain to be defrayed.

I am unable to hold out any hope of Her Majesty's Government consenting to guarantee any loan to be raised for defence works, as you suggested in your despatch No. 51 of the 19th of February last, especially in view of the large amount which will be contributed from Imperial Funds.

You will of course consider with your Council when the proper time has arisen for raising the required loan.

Governor Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

DERBY.

է

(Copy.) HONGKONG,

No. 180.

SIR.

No. 4.

Despatch respecting contribution towards the Eastern Mail Service.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

The Earl of Derby to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen.

DOWNING STREET,

1st August, 1884.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch No. 218 of the

13th ultimo, and to express my satisfaction that your Government approves of the

arrangements made, and has voted the money necessary to cover the increase in the

contribution of the Colony on account of the Eastern Mail Service, from the 1st of

February, 1883.

You will learn from my Despatch No. 174 of the 25th instant, that the Postal

contribution is open to revision at the end of the present contract.

I have, &c.,

Governor Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&.c.

(Signed)

DERBY.

85

;

REPORT ON THE FINANCES OF THE COLONY

BY THE

Colonial Secretary and Auditor General.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 5.

87

The balance of the assets of the Colony on the 1st January, 1884, was $1,067,200. The Revenue of the year according to a revised Estimate made in September last will probably not exceed $1,151,000.

2. On ascertaining that the Revenue would fall short of the original Estimate every reduction that was possible was at once effected in the Expenditure, but works commenced, or for which the Government was pledged by its acceptance of contracts, could of course not be abandoned. The ordinary Expenditure of the present year is now estimated at $1,183,600.

3. In the Estimates of the present year a further sum of $272,000 was provided to be defrayed out of balances of which $100,000 were on account of the Tytam Water Works, and $172,000 for extraordinary Sanitary Works recommended in Mr. CHADWICK'S report.

4. The Expenditure on the Tytam Water Works during the year will probably be $150,000, the increase being attributable to the large consignments of cement, requisitioned from the Crown Agents; to the purchase of heavier boring machinery for expediting the construction of the tunnel, which machinery has arrived and is now being transported to the spot; and to the great excess of unforeseen work in carrying down the foundations of the Reservoir dam to a solid bottom on the rock.

5. The extraordinary works will, it is estimated, cost this year $177,180, or $5,180 in excess of the Estimate. The Surveyor General has effected reductions on the original Estimate to the extent of $20,000. But the damages caused by the Typhoon last September entailed an unforeseen and unavoidable expenditure of $19,180. This, together with some other works, the execution of which has been sanctioned by the Council, accounts for the excess over Estimates.

6. The Secretary of State for the Colonies has moreover recently authorized the immediate construction of certain Military defence works, the urgent necessity of which has been repeatedly represented, and is generally recognized. The cost of these works and of their armaments is estimated at £93,125, but the Colony will be asked to contribute only the cost of construction of the works estimated at about £56,000 say at 3/8d., $305,454, of which about $50,000 will probably be expended before the end of this year.

88

7. The position of the Colony at the commencement of next year, as far as can be foreseen, will

therefore be as follows:-

Balance of assets 1st January, 1884,

$1,067,200

Probable Revenue of 1884,

1,151,000

$2,218,200

Probable ordinary Expenditure,

$1,183,600

Extraordinary Tytam Water Works,

150,000

Sanitary and others,..

177,180

Fortifications,

50,000

$1,560,780

$ 657,420

The

year

1885 will therefore probably be commenced with a balance of assets of $657,420.

8. The Revenue of 1885 has been estimated at $1,212,188, but as the Estimates were framed

early in the present year before the expiration of the first six months, the collections of that period could not be taken, as is usually done, as a basis for the calculations. It will now in my opinion be necessary to reduce these Estimates to $1,135,000, and a corresponding reduction must necessarily be made in the Estimates of Expenditure.

9. It becomes necessary therefore to review carefully the undertakings to which the Colony is already pledged before any further extraordinary expenditure is sanctioned, as the Revenue of the Colony cannot be said to be elastic, and in my opinion is more likely to decrease than to increase. Money can, it is true, be brought into the Treasury by the occasional sale of land, but this source cannot be looked upon as inexhaustible and is, properly speaking, not Revenue. The extent of land that is

of

any value is limited, and it is inexpedient to put too much in the market at one time. I see no item of Taxation that can be increased so as to produce results of any importance, although the amount of taxation in this Colony is far from high. Taking the whole of the Revenue of 1884 it would be at the rate of $7.00 per head of the population, but this includes duty on Opium boiled for exportation, as well as interest, reimbursements, &c., which can hardly be properly looked on as local taxation. A scheme was proposed by Sir JOHN POPE HENNESSY of establishing a Spirit Farm, and an Ordinance was laid before the Council in 1879 for this purpose. The Revenue anticipated from this source was $70,000, but the scheme was abandoned by the Governor.

10. The works on which the Colony is actually engaged and which therefore must be completed, and the amounts which will have to be expended on their completion, are as follows:

Tytam Water Works,

New Central School or Victoria College,

Military Defences,

New Central Market, the land for which has been partly resumed, Drainage and Sanitary works in the Chinese part of the City and Villages,

$ 500,000

90,000

255,000

150,000

550,000

$1,545,000

!

The construction of the following works has also been approved by the Secretary of State:—

Five New Schools,

Repairs and Extensions of Police Barracks, for some years past reported

to be necessary on Sanitary Grounds,........

Other Sanitary works recommended by Mr. CHADWICK in connection

A

$ 25,000

135,000

⚫ with main drainage and the proper sewering of all private tenements, 1,000,000

And it has also been decided that a new gaol is necessary, the cost of

which is estimated at about,

400,000

11. Now to meet these important works we have a probable balance of assets of $657,420 and it is proposed to raise a loan of say $1,000,000. I do not think that in the present state of the Finances ✦ of the Colony a loan for a larger amount can be undertaken, as this will necessitate an annual provision of a sum of at least $70,000 reckoning the interest on the loan at 4 per cent. and a sinking fund of 3 per cent. If the Government of the Colony pledges itself to a larger loan, it may find difficulty in meeting its engagements, and be only able to do so by the sacrifice of all ordinary expendi- ture on Public Works and Roads for several

years.

12. It is clear therefore that this Government ought not at present to undertake any new works, the execution of which could be conveniently deferred to some future date. The Government should reserve its sanction strictly to new works, the immediate completion of which is an absolute necessity, such, for instance, as the Quarantine Station on Stone Cutters' Island estimated to cost $10,000.

By undertaking at the same time too many works on a large scale, it may find itself compelled to have to determine, in the course of a year or two, which of such works shall be proceeded with, and which shall be postponed, until a more flourishing state of finances permits of their being completed.

Audit Office, Hongkong, 10th November, 1884.

(Signed)

W. H. MARSH.

89

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ΟΙ

No. 6.

Νο. 297.

Despatch respecting the payment of a Roman Catholic Chaplain for the Gaol and Civil Hospital.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

Governor Sir George F. Bowen, G.C.M.G., to Earl of Derby, K.G.

MY LORD,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 25th August, 1884.

have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Lordship's despatch No. 150 of the 4th July ultimo, respecting the application of Bishop RAIMONDI for payment for the Roman Catholic Chaplain attending the Gaol and Civil Hospital.

2. The contents of this despatch have been communicated to Bishop RAIMONDI. 3. Your Lordship approves of my proposal that the Roman Catholic Clergy in common with the Anglican Clergy, should receive some remuneration for their ministrations in the Gaol and Civil Hospital, the amount to be determined on the principle suggested by me in paragraph 12 of my despatch No. 138 of the 26th of April ultimo, that is, upon the principle adopted by the Military Authorities in the payment of the Roman Catholic Chaplains to the Troops. That principle is a capitation rate, which gives at present a salary of about sixty dollars ($60) a month for an average of two hundred (200) Roman Catholic Soldiers now in Garrison at Hongkong. I find that the same member is about the average of the Roman Catholics in the Gaol and Civil Hospital. Accordingly, with the advice of the Executive Council, I proposed to Bishop RAIMONDI a salary of sixty dollars ($60) a month-to be readjusted every two years, for the services of the Roman Catholic Civil Chaplain; and the Bishop has officially signified his acceptance. So, unless I should hear from Your Lordship to the contrary before the next Session of the Colonial Legislature, I will then propose an annual vote of seven hundred and twenty dollars ($720), (equivalent at the present rate of exchange to about £130), for the remuneration of the Roman Catholic Civil Chaplain.

4. It is understood that, on the occurrence of a vacancy in the present Colonial Chaplaincy, a similar principle of payment will be adopted in the case of the Anglican Church, and of any other Christian communion, which may have a just

claim to similar remuneration.

*

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF DERBY, K.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

G. F. BOWEN.

92

Extract from Minutes of Executive Council held on the 20th August, 1884.

*

**

Read a Despatch from the Secretary of State, No. 150 of 1884, acknowledging the receipt of the Governor's despatch, No. 138 of the 26th April, in which was forwarded a letter addressed to the EARL OF DERBY by Bishop RAIMONDI, preferring on behalf of the Roman Catholic Church a claim for aid from the Colonial Revenue together with a memorandum by the Colonial Treasurer. In this Despatch the Secretary of State approves of the Roman Catholic Chaplain receiving pay for attendance on the Roman Catholics in the Prison and in the Civil Hospital on a scale similar to that adopted for the Military Roman Catholic Chaplain, and directs that a proposal may be made on this principle.

Read also a memorandum by the Assistant Military Secretary (Col. BARTon), showing the principle adopted by the Military Authorities for the payment of the Salary of the Roman Catholic Chaplain to the troops in Hongkong. It appears that there is now an average of two hundred (200) Roman Catholics in the Garrison, and a similar average in the Gaol and Civil Hospital, and that the capitation rate gives the Roman Catholic Military Chaplain about $60 a month.

Bishop RAIMONDI having been communicated with, and having expressed officially his willingness to accept an arrangement based on a principle resembling that adopted for the payment of the salary of the Roman Catholic Chaplain, viz., a rate calculated on a capitation basis, the Council advise that a vote of $60 a month, subject to readjustment at the end of two years, should be proposed to the Legislative Council as payment for the services of a Roman Catholic Chaplain in the Gaol and Civil Hospital. It is understood in accordance with the directions of the Secretary of State in Despatch No. 150 of 1884 that on the occurrence of a vacancy in the Colonial Chaplaincy a similar principle of payment will be adopted in the case of the Church of England, or of any other Christian Communion, which

may

hereafter have a just claim to similar remuneration.

Hongkong.

The Right Honourable The Earl of Derby, K.G., to Governor Sir George F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

DOWNING STREET,

23rd October, 1884.

No. 244.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 297 of the 25th of August, and to approve the arrangement which you propose for the pay- ment of a Roman Catholic Chaplain for attending the Gaol and Civil Hospital.

I have, &c.,

(Signed) DERBY.

Governor

Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

93

No. 7.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES OF THE COLONY

BY THE

Colonial Secretary and Auditor General.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

A careful revision recently made by the Honourable the Treasurer of the Estimates of Revenue for next year, which were laid before the Council on the 12th of June last, shows that the amount then estimated which was

is not likely to exceed

Decrease,

$1,212,188 1,135,000

$ 77,188

2. The Expenditure for 1885 shewn in the Estimates originally prepared was set down at $1,150,801. It is therefore now necessary to reduce this amount to about $1,085,000 in order to leave a margin of at least $50,000 of Revenue, for unforeseen expenditure during the

year.

3. Having carefully gone over the Estimates of Expenditure with the Treasurer and the Surveyor General, I submit for His Excellency's consideration the following recommendations.

That the Estimates of Expenditure laid before Council in June last be in the first place increased by the following items, some of which have been already sanctioned by the Council, whilst the rest appear to be necessary

(a.) Increases to Police Salaries already voted, (b.) Other increases shown in Schedule annexed,

.$ 5,500

780

(c.) Civil Hospital Extension, re-vote,..............

3,300

C.S.O. 2995.

(d.) Further vote recommended for additional story and extension of separate build- ing, on account of necessity for increased accommodation in the Hospital,...

8,000

(e.) Repairs to public buildings, increase strongly recommended,

(f.) Police Station Hunghom, new,.........................

2,000. 3,200

Total increase, Original Estimate,

$ 22,780.

1,150,801

$1,173,581

That the following alterations be made in the Estimates of Expenditure for 1885 in order to bring this sum down to about $1,085,000:--

(a.) Opium Revenue Department to be abolished if the boiling is farmed next

year: 10 months salaries to be struck out,....

.$

6,900

(b.) Tree planting, to be reduced by

4,000

(c.) New Central School (to be paid for out of balances), to be struck out

50,000

(d.) Draining of Wongneichong, to be struck out...

25,000

(e.) Widening Kennedy Road, to be struck out

2,000

$ 87,900

94

4. I see no other reduction that can be conveniently effected now, but both the Treasurer and the Surveyor General agree with me in thinking it only fair that the Imperial Government should be asked to bear half the annual cost of the Observatory, say $3,000 per annum. This institution is quite as useful to Imperial as to Local interests, and its construction has already cost the Colony $34,500. It would be only reasonable we think that the cost of making observations should be borne partly by the Imperial Government and partly by the Colony.

5. If my recommendations are approved, the Estimates of Expenditure will be reduced

from

to.....

.$1,173,581 1,085,681

leaving an estimated margin of Revenue of about $50,000 for unforeseen Expenditure. It would not be safe in my opinion to provide a smaller margin than this.

*

6. As regards the extraordinary works to be executed next year and charged against balances, which it is estimated will not exceed $657,500 on 1st January next, I beg to recommend that the following items be placed on the Estimates.

C.S.O. 2991,

(a.) Tytam Water Works.-The sooner this work is completed the better; a large

sum is therefore set down,

(b.) Military Defences,

(c.) Central School, transferred from Estimates of ordinary expenditure, (d.) Drains and Sea-wall at Lápsápwán which Government is bound to make in

fulfilment of agreement with purchasers of land in that District,. (e.) Completion of Steam Dredger and cost of dredging operations,... (f.) Unspent balance of vote for repairs of Typhoon damages of 1884, re-vote, ....... (9.) Sanitary Works, the details of which will be laid before the Public Works

Committee before their execution is sanctioned,.

C.S.O. 3022. (e.)

...

$ 200,000

200,000

50,000

75,000

10,000

9,700

50,000

$594,700

It is possible

The Colony is in my opinion pledged to the whole of the works above referred to. however that the whole of the money set down opposite the different items will not be spent next year in which case the balances will have to be carried on to 1886.

The Surveyor General suggests that the construction of a permanent Quarantine Station, which was referred to in paragraph 12 of my report of 10th November last as a work of pressing necessity, might be deferred for the present, as the temporary buildings which were erected last year

may

be put in good order at a cost of $500, and may prove sufficient for all requirements during next year. It has not therefore been included in the works proposed to be executed next year.

7. Should my recommendation be approved the accumulated balances will be reduced by the end of the year 1885 to about $50,000. As far as it is possible to foresee at the present moment, the financial position of the Colony at the beginning of 1886 will therefore be as follows. The accumulated balances of previous years will be nearly all spent, and the Colony will have $1,000,000 raised on loan to expend on public works, in addition to what can be spared for that purpose out of current revenue. There will also be the sums produced by sales of land, which have not been taken into account at all in the preceding estimates as it is impossible to estimate beforehand what they will yield.

8. The public works which have been commenced and must be continued during 1886 are the following:-

Tytam Water Works,

Military Defences,

Central School,

$300,000

52,000

40,000

$392,000

{

Other works which should be commenced in 1886 if it be possible and convenient, are:-

New Central Market,

.$150,000

5 New Schools,

25,000

Extension and repairs of Police Barracks,.......

135,000

$310,000

+

Besides the above there will be Sanitary Works in accordance with the recommendations of Mr. CHADWICK to the extent of say $1,500,000, all of which cannot possibly be undertaken at the same time, and which may have to be spread over some 5 to 10 years. The construction of a new Gaol has also been approved by the Secretary of State although he has consented to defer its erection to some future period. This is estimated at $400,000.

It must not be forgotten that interest on the proposed loan say $75,000 will also have to be paid towards the end of 1886.

16th December, 1884.

W. H. MARSH.

Schedule showing Increases and Decreases on the various items of Establishments for the year 1885.

95

Increases.

Decreases.

Registrar General, Establishment,

Ecclesiastical, Ex. of Establishment,

Medical, Establishment,

.$1,680

Colonial Secretary, Establishment, .......$1,800

720

120

Gaol, Establishment,

60

$2,580

Deduct....

1,800

Nett increase,..........

$ 780

HONGKONG.

The Postmaster General's Report for 1884.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 8.

97

1884.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, January 1st, 1885.

SIR,—I have the honour to report on the British Postal service in Hongkong and China during

2. An important extension of Money Order facilities has taken place, in the introduction of Postal Notes. For many years past Money Orders have been obtainable only at Hongkong or Shanghai. Residents at the other ports had to obtain them from one or other of these offices, which could not be arranged without a good deal of delay and trouble. Postal Notes on the United Kingdom for fixed amounts, varying from one shilling to twenty shillings, are now to be had at Canton, Swatow, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo and Hankow, besides Hongkong and Shanghai. At present both Money Orders and Postal Notes on the United Kingdom are on sale in these two latter offices, but the Postal Notes effect such a simplification of accounts as compared with the Money Order system, that, during the ' present year, the question will be taken into consideration whether it is not possible to abolish Money Orders (on the United Kingdom) and use Postal Notes only.

3. Either means of remittance has its own advantages. The Postal Note is more quickly and easily obtained, it is payable anywhere in the United Kingdom and with less formality than the Money Order, whilst the saving of work it effects in the Post Office is immense. On the other hand the price of the Postal Note is fixed, so that the purchaser does not get the benefit of a rise in Exchange; the commission charged on each note makes the remittance of a broken sum comparatively rather expensive, whilst the sender's having to put seven or eight pieces of paper into his letter instead of one still further adds to this expense. A Postal Note lost is beyond remedy,, whereas a Money Order may be lost and the money remain safe. It would however have been impossible to introduce the sale of Money Orders at our smaller offices, but Postal Notes can easily be sold at them all. If Postal Notes are made the only means of remittance it will be possible to continue their sale to an hour much nearer the time of closing the mail than is at present the case with Money Orders.

4. Other additions to our Money Order system are in progress. Arrangements are under con- sideration for the exchange of Money Orders with Portugal, with the United States, and with Hawaii. It is hoped that before another annual Report is presented these exchanges may be in operation. The Money Order office now pays its own expenses, if indeed it does not secure a small profit. Instructions received as to the presentation of Administrative Reports within the first seven days of the new year effectually prevent, however, any satisfactory or complete statement of accounts.

5. The subject of a Savings Bank had long been under the consideration of this Department, but the fact that every officer of it is overworked, and that no increase to the staff would have been sanctioned was a serious obstacle. At length a plan was submitted for conducting a Savings Bank two days a week in the Stamp Office, which, under the same roof as the Post Office, is happily exempt from the rushes of work inevitable in the Postal service of a Colony well described as "a sort of Clapham Junction for steamers." Whilst this plan was under consideration, however, the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank offered to carry on a Savings Bank on terms in many respects more favourable to depositors than those contemplated by the Government scheme. This offer was accepted. Its main advantage is that the Bank is open every day, instead of two days a week only, and that depositors who have $100 to credit can at once open a Banking account and increase their deposits indefinitely.

1.

98

Against this may be set the fact that the deposits are not secured by the Government, but this would seem to have been no obstacle to the success of a Savings Bank at Shanghai, and need not be here. The Hongkong Savings Bank was opened on May 1st, and already more than $50,000 has been deposited.*

6. An attempt was made, in connection with this Savings Bank, to introduce the system, so popular at home, of encouraging children and others to save small sums by means of Postage Stamps. In the United Kingdom every child who can from time to time purchase twelve penny stamps, and who affixes them to a form supplied free at any Post Office, is entitled to be credited with a shilling in the Post Office Savings Bank, which receives more than £200 a week in these little sums alone. It can hardly be said that it was hoped to introduce more thrifty habits amongst a certain class of our younger fellow citizens, but it was felt that at least the attempt should be made. Whether, however, pocket money is not a Hongkong institution, or whether other attractions are too strong, certain it is that the ten-cent system of saving does not seem to take hold of the young here as the penny system does in England. Only $65 has been thus collected since the Bank was opened.

7. It was hoped that another year would not come to an end without the establishment of an effective Parcels Post between China and the United Kingdom. The subject has not been lost sight of and is under consideration. It is to be feared however that one of the points always advocated by this Office-freedom from Customs interference-will not be secured.

8. On the 1st March the Post Office of Macao assumed its proper position as a Portuguese Post Office under the Postal Union, the previous irregular arrangement by which it was worked as a kind of honorary Agency of this Office (but an Agency under no control) being discontinued. The necessity for this change had been more than once urged on the Post Office of Macao, but until the arrival of the present Governor of that Settlement nothing was done in the matter.

9. Corea is also moving in the direction of admission into the Postal Union, and it is quite possible that that ignis fatuus which has long flitted before the eager eyes of philatelists-a Corean Postage stamp may ere long become a tangible reality. For years past this Office has been accustomed to receive almost touching appeals for Corean Stamps, when there was about as much possibility of obtaining them as there is of getting the postage stamps (if any) of the moon. Similar applications are sometimes received begging for the stamps of Kashgar, of Thibet, &c. .

·

10. A considerable increase in the sale of stamps is due to the action of the San Francisco Customs in seizing all the letters which Chinese passengers attempt to smuggle in their baggage or about their persons. The return of 25,000 of these smuggled letters from San Francisco by one steamer created something like a panic in the Chinese Community.

11. Through the co-operation of the Police department arrangements have been completed for signal- ling the arrival of the English mail from the new Kowloon Police Station at night, and when the wea- ther is cloudy and the Peak signal station obscured. These arrangements have already been most successful, and effectually prevent the serious inconveniences connected with the arrival of an unsignal- led mail.

12. Enquiries were set on foot as to whether it would not be possible to have the French mail sorted at Singapore during the stay of the steamer there, but the practical difficulties were, as before, found to be too many for any hope of success.

13. On September 9th the P. & O. packet Brindisi arrived here with both the English and French mails on board, owing to the Djemnah's having been quarantined in Egypt. The mail officer on board had sorted all the letters by both mails, which were ready for delivery five minutes after the bags reached the Post Office. The papers took an hour and a quarter to sort, the operations being much retarded by the filthy tarred bags in which the continental mails were enclosed as a kind of fetish against cholera. Quarantine as applied to mails is generally imagined by scientific authorities to be useless, but it is not so. It induces a salutary exercise of patience on the part of Postal Officers.

14. The English mail once arrived unsorted, from a cause which could not have been foreseen. The sorting was completed on shore in less than an hour and a half, in spite of hindrances from tarred bags.

15. The warlike operations between France and China have of course had their effect on the work of this Department as on everything else. The Messageries line between Hongkong and Shanghai has been temporarily discontinued, and the mails are conveyed by private steamers. There has been some difficulty in getting mails to Foochow, and it was latterly found impossible to get correspondence for the French fleet delivered there at all. On October 3rd, when the Saghalien arrived with the French mail, some excitement prevailed amongst the labouring classes of Chinese here, and it was not easy to get the mails on shore, nor to get them brought up to the Post Office. During the last two months the Island of Formosa has been blockaded, and the opportunities of exchanging correspondence have of course been very fitful.

*The above figures have been kindly supplied by the Chief Manager of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank.

i

99

:

:

16. Considerable numbers of dye and sugar samples have been intercepted during the year in their transit through the post, and destroyed, the attention of the despatching Office being in all cases called to the fact, and the name and address of the sender being forwarded to it. Samples of aniline dye are most mischievous. No matter how they are packed, the contents generally leak out, and one of them will spoil a whole bag of other correspondence.

17. The Assistant Postmaster General (Mr. TRAVERS) went to Europe on leave in February last and has been temporarily replaced by Mr. W. D. HUTCHISON, whose energy and suggestive mind have made him a most valuable addition to a Department otherwise much undermanned. Whilst the habit, far too common in the Colonial Service, of thinking anybody good enough for the Post Office, can only be deeply deplored, it does not follow that because an Officer has no previous acquaintance with Postal work he will be useless when transferred to it. On the contrary, the "old hand," who has been habituated to the Post Office for years, is apt to get into a groove, and into that state of mind which is known as not being able to see the wood for the trees. Much progress in the Postal service has resulted from the suggestions of outsiders. Sir ROWLAND HILL (then Mr. HILL) had no knowledge of Postal work when he pressed his reforms upon an unwilling Department. A striking improvement in sorting, which has been copied here, was urged upon the Singapore Post Office by a member of the community; and, similarly, both Mr. TRAVERS and Mr. HUTCHISON, within a few weeks of their appointments, had made valuable suggestions on points which for years had escaped the notice of the trained staff of this office.

18. Otherwise, the Department has been very short-handed. No summer is recollected with so much sickness. The senior clerk was thrown from a vehicle and so severely injured as to keep him from office for six months. Another and equally valuable officer caught a chill from working in wet. clothes (during one of our heavy rushes of night work) and this resulted in a kind of paralytic seizure which kept him absent for a long time. Sometimes there would be as many as five absent (out of thirteen) whilst even those who were here were working under difficulties from inflamed feet, swollen faces, toothache, &c. If it is remembered that in the Post Office it is impossible to get in an extra hand (for a beginner is worse than useless in the manual work of the office for at least three months) it will be seen that the officers of this Department have not had, during the past summer, exactly the easy time of it which some persons are pleased to believe they enjoy. Notwithstanding these drawbacks, there has never been a period when so few complaints have been received as to alleged missing letters as during the year under review. One firm indeed reported the loss of several entire mails for Europe, containing most valuable enclosures, but there is no doubt these letters were stolen on their way to the Post Office, whither they were sent without the precaution even of a chit-book. The usual number of complaints has of course been made as to the non-arrival or late arrival of papers from home, and in some instances they have been urged with a good deal of temper. It is hard to see why this Depart- ment is to be made responsible for the laches of London errand-boys. The papers do not arrive, and there is an end of it. There are two almost invariable causes for these delays, Late Posting, and Insuffi- cient Payment. News-agents find it easy to throw all the blame on the Post Office, and their customers seem to prefer to believe them.

19. The London Post Office raised the question whether the present subsidised mail service cannot be discontinued on the expiration of the existing contract, and the mails carried by private steamers as is the rule across the Atlantic. The Report of this Department is printed as an Appendix.

20. Allusion is made in that report to the complaints which, since the discontinuance in 1881 of the subsidised P. & O. service to Japan, have been received from all the foreign settlements there. This matter is gone into so fully in a correspondence with the London Post Office, also printed as an Appendix, that it is not necessary to add more than one observation, which is this. If the Editors of Japanese newspapers really imagine that the violent language they are fond of using towards this Office is likely to do any good, it may surely be supposed they would take the trouble to forward copies of their remarks to the Department believed to be in fault. So far from this being the case, there has been considerable difficulty in getting to know the dates on which the mails reach Japan, or any other details. Yet obviously the first step towards rectifying a grievance is to find out what it is.

21. One word may perhaps be permitted as to the local delivery of correspondence in Hongkong. This is what the late MR. FAWCETT said of recent improvements in delivery in English Provincial

towns;-

"As bearing upon the increase of deliveries, the great importance of affording every practicable facility which would encourage local correspondence has continued to be kept steadily in view. This object can be in many cases much promoted by increasing the number of collections from pillar boxes in provincial towns. It is often found possible in this way to secure the delivery of a letter in the town within two or three hours after it has been posted.”

That is in England, where everything is arranged for the arrival of mails by Railway at fixed hours. Now let us see what is demanded in this "Clapham Junction for steamers," where nothing is certain to happen but the unexpected. A resident in Canton sends on board the morning steamer a letter for Hongkong. He does not post it, that would be too much to ask, he tosses it on board without postage stamp or prepayment of any kind. It reaches this Office, unpaid of course, during

100

the afternoon. The American mail, we will say, is leaving at three, the English mail at four, and an Australian mail at five. In a word, within three hours mails have to be despatched to every part of the world. Meanwhile the Coast steamer has arrived, with half a dozen others, from Saigon, Hoihow, Manila, the Straits, &c., &c. The Canton resident's correspondent considers it very hard if his unpaid letter is not brought to him and the postage collected in time for him to answer it by the return boat which leaves at half past five. That is, he must receive it within half an hour at most from the time of its reaching the Post Office. The above is not at all an extreme or exceptional case, but fairly embodies the general view here as to local delivery, and the problem the Post Office has to solve. When an occasional failure occurs in solving it, it may be permissible to repeat as some grain of encouragement, "It is often found possible to secure the delivery of a letter in the town within two or three hours after it has been posted."

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. LISTER,

Postmaster General.

APPENDIX.

(4.)—APPROXIMATE STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1884. Supplied to the International Bureau of the Postal Union, Berne.

INTERNATIONAL.

LOCAL.

COMPARISON WITH 1883.

DESCRIPTION OF CORRESPONDENCE.

TOTAL.

De- spatched.

Received.

De- spatched.

Received.

Total in 1883.

Increase. Decrease.

Ordinary paid letters,

Unpaid and short paid Articles...........

562,000

437,000 43,000

53,000

1,095,000

903.600

91,400

13,500

21,000

2,000

9,000

45,500

37,600

7,900

Letters on Postal Business,

1,400

1,000

1,000

700

4,100

5,300

1,200

Post Cards,

10,000

6,100

1,000

1,100

18,200.

14,400

6,800

Do. with prepaid reply,.

Newspapers and Periodicals,

177,000 350,000

30,000

11,000

268,000

Books, Circulars, Prices Current, &c.,

155,000

106,000

8,000

9,000

278,000

471,000 97,000 310,000

22,000

Patterns,

1,000

14,000

260

100

15.460 16,360

940

Commercial Papers,

3,800

4,000

780

400

5,980

4,940

1,040

Registered Articles,

22,100

27,000

2,700

3,000

54,800

47,200

7,600

Letters with value declared,

Registered Articles with Return Receipt, Parcels,

..

200 170

1,200

130

750

2,280

130

260

130

890

2,477 894

197

4

(B.)-REPORT ON THE PROPOSED ABOLITION OF SUBSIDIES.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, September 1st, 1884.

SIR,-With reference to Lord DERBY'S Despatch No. 174 of July 25th, on the subject of the arrangements to be made on the termination of the present mail contract, I have the honour to report as follows.

2. Lord DERBY's Despatch, which was referred to me by order of the Governor, raises three questions:--

(a.) Would it be possible to do away with subsidies, and to entrust the mails to the most suitable vessels starting on the voyage for China, paying by weight only, as is about to be done in the case of mails for the United States.

(b.) Could the mails be transported by way of Bombay and Calcutta.

(c) As to revision of the existing distribution of expense.

3. A memorandum from Mr. FAWCETT, the Postmaster General of the United Kingdom, which is quoted by Lord DERBY, expresses the opinion that carriage of the mails by all or any of the companies running steamers between England and China would afford the communities here more frequent and less expensive means of communication than at present. It would be a very important point to this Colony if such a result could be brought about, because the existing mail service is costing us £6,000 a year. But I am of opinion that whatever economy may result from the suppression of subsidies, frequency of communication will be lessened; and regularity of communication, which is at least as important as either frequency or quickness, will have a tendency to disappear.

4. In forecasting what would happen on the withdrawal of the P. & O. subsidy, an important element in the question is, what would be the movements of the P. & O. steamers themselves? It seems reasonable to suppose that what has taken place between Hongkong and Japan would be reproduced all along the line. That is to say the boats would start with fair regularity perhaps, but their movements and their ports of call would be entirely governed by considerations relating to cargo, so that it would be quite possible that a P. & O. steamer which had left Europe before the French mail might arrive here after it.

5. There are enough steamers, take them all together, to allow of a mail from Europe arriving in Hongkong every two or three days. Such a state of things would be indeed desirable if it could be counted on. The mails would be small, would be quickly dealt with, and there would be much less rush and impatience about their distribution than at present. But it is as useless to hope for this as it would be to believe that meteorologists will ever be able to arrange that rain shall fall only when it is convenient. The steamers would come in, as they do at present, three and four within a day or two, and then no more perhaps for nearly a fortnight.

$

101

6. I submit that there is little analogy between the lines of steamers plying to China and those which cross the Atlantic. There are no ports of call in the Atlantic, the voyage occupies little over a week, and first-class steamers leave regularly enough to ensure the regular arrival of the mails at either end of the route. But the voyage to China occupies from 44 weeks to 8 or even 9 weeks, according to the class of vessel; there are several Ports of call; and the chances of steamers passing one another would introduce endless confusion into the service. Letters which left London earlier would be continually arriving after those which left later. I do not see how the London Post Office is to form any reasonable guess which of three steamers leaving London or Liverpool for China within the same week will arrive first. We cannot even do it between here and Shanghai, a voyage of 4 days! The experience of this Office in transmitting mails for Japan since the P. & O. subsidy was withdrawn shews how impossible it is to secure any thing like regularity of arrival by means of cargo steamers alone. The most anxious care has been exercised to select the best opportunities, but the result has been that the three communities of Japan have been continually complaining ever since the change was made. With regard to the homeward mails, few persons except merchants would ever have much idea when they would leave, and, as often as not, the notice would be very short.

7. If therefore the French packets continued running, the whole situation would resolve itself into heavy fortnightly mails forwarded by their means. The outward mails would take at least four hours to sort, and we should have all the old evils back again (now almost forgotten) of firms having their correspondence addressed to Singapore and sent up by private hand so as to get it quickly, &c. This might be economical, but it would not be pleasant, nor could it be called progress.

8. It is useless to suppose that any inducement would prevail on the public to correspond by private steamers if the French mails were available. When the postage to and from England was 1/4d. by the mail, every body here knew that letters could be forwarded with fair regularity by private steamers for 6d. I believe there was only one person in the entire community who took advantage of the lower rate, and that person was a lady.

9. The abolition of a subsidised service could be effected to some extent by not extending the contract beyond Singa- pore. There are quite sufficient steamers between Singapore and Hongkong, and between Hongkong and Shanghai, to carry on the mails without any very serious delay, and probably the English mail would always reach Hongkong and generally Shanghai before the next French mail overtook it. Between Ceylon or India and Singapore there are not enough steamers. Many of the Canal boats as they are called come direct from Suez to Penang or Singapore without calling anywhere.

10. I do not wish to be understood as recommending the curtailing of the subsidised line, but the Home Government is asking for information and I merely say that this could be done. The results would be disagreeable in many ways. Regularity would disappear from the service. Marine sorting would have to be discontinued.

Marine sorting would have to be discontinued. Persons would get their letters through irregular channels to obtain them quicker. A responsible and very thankless task would be thrown on the Singapore and Hongkong Offices of selecting the steamers to carry on the mails. Whatever steamer was selected, the community concerned would but too often be apt to consider it was the wrong one, for that community would criticise, after the event, a choice which would have to be made before it. Continual complaints, like those which have arisen in Japan since the P. & O. service was discontinued, would become common in Shanghai and in Hongkong also.

11. With regard to the suggestion of forwarding mails via Bombay, no doubt it might be done if there were any regular means of communication between either Calcutta or Madras and Hongkong. But except the monthly Indian steamers from Calcutta, and a monthly French steamer from Calcutta and Madras, there are none. The following figures were arrived at in consultation with Mr. F. R. HoGG of the Indian Post Office.

Average passage from Suez to Hongkong via Colombo

(both monsoons),

30 days.

30 days.

Suez to Bombay, Bombay to Madras, Transhipping, &c., Madras to Penang, Penang to Hongkong,

11 days.

11

11

2 ""

1 "> 5 ""

""

30 days.

But unless some regular weekly or at least fortnightly means existed of bringing the mails on from Madras, this route would be useless for all practical purposes.

12. On the question of the Distribution of expenses it is of course the opinion in this Colony that Hongkong should not contribute 2 per cent of its Revenue towards subsiding a mail service which costs the United Kingdom, without allowing for reimbursements, only 3 per cent of its Revenue. But so much has been said on this subject that there can be no need further to dwell on it.

13. I venture to recommend that these papers be submitted to the Chamber of Commerce, and to the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

A. LISTER,

Postmaster General.

(C.)-CORRESPONDENCE ON THE MAIL SERVICE TO JAPAN.

The London Post Office to the Hongkong Post Office.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, LONDON, 19th September, 1884.

SIR-I beg leave to forward to you herewith a copy of a letter addressed to this Department by Messrs. BISSET & Co. of Yokohama, in which they complain of delay in the transmission from Hongkong of mails sent from this Country to Japan by way of that Colony.

Messrs. BISSET & Co. have been informed that the Hongkong Post Office is not under the control of Her Majesty's Postmaster General, and that their communication has been referred to you, for such enquiry as you may think the circum- stances of the case demand.

The Postmaster General,

HONGKONG.

I

am, Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

EDW. H. REA.

102

Messrs. Bisset & Co., Yokohama, to the London Post Office.

YOKOHAMA, 12th August, 1884.

SIR, We beg to bring to your notice the great inconvenience we have been put to by the action of the Postmaster in Hongkong.

The mails from London of 27th June arrived in Hongkong 31st July, and the connecting Steamer of the P. & 0. Com- pany, viz. the Thibet, which, unfortunately for us, is not under contract with H. B. M. Government, left that port on 2nd instant for this via Nagasaki and Kobe, arriving here only yesterday morning. The Steamer Gordon Castle left Hongkong 3rd instant, and arrived here this morning, but, for some inscrutable reason, our mails were detained until 4th instant, and then put on board a slow vessel called the Altnacraig, which as yet (11 A.M.) has not made her appearance.

Since the subsidy for the Japan line was withdrawn we have been frequently subjected to inconvenience of this kind, and we trust H. B. M. Government may yet see fit to renew it.

Meantime we, in common with our fellow residents here, will feel greatly obliged if any representations or instructions from you to the Hongkong Post Office will tend to prevent such mismanagement as the case we have now described.

We remain, &c.,

The Hongkong Post Office to the London Post Office.

(Signed)

BISSET & Co.

No. 846.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, 23rd October, 1884.

SIR,-I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter No. 235,918 of September 19th on the subject of a complaint from Messrs. BISSET & Co. of Yokohama relating to the delay which took place in transmitting to Yokohama the mail despatched from your Office on June 27th.

2. It is characteristic of the treatment which this Department receives from the Yokohama community that Messrs. BISSET & Co. should endeavour to get behind the Hongkong Post Office with a complaint of which no copy was forwarded

to me.

This is the second attempt of the kind that has been made. It is equally characteristic that Messrs. BISSET & Co. should not even wait till the steamer as to which they complained had come in, nor for the full explanation which, as they very well know, has always been afforded whenever any difficulty has arisen, but should, as is customary at Yokohama, fly at this Office with all manner of charges before they were in possession of the facts of the case.

3. It has been explained to the public of Yokohama again and again that it is absolutely impossible for this Office to predict what steamer will reach that port first, if only for the reason that the departures of vessels from Hongkong are frequently postponed at the last moment, or, what makes the matter still more difficult, delayed from hour to hour, the Agent meanwhile assuring this Office that he expects to get the vessel away any minute. Meanwhile other steamers may have left, and if they arrive at Yokohama first the outcry against the Post Office begins all over again as if it were the first time the subject had been heard of.

4. In the case in question this Office was no doubt to some extent misled by incorrect information. The real cause of the delay however was not the slowness of the Altnacraig, but the fact that at the last moment a fight broke out amongst the crew, which detained the steamer here from Saturday evening till Tuesday morning. When intelligence of her detention reached the Post Office the other steamers were gone. The same cause of delay might have happened to either of them. Every possible enquiry had been made by this Department, and, under the same circumstances, the same decision would again be come to. No reasonable person would have thought of putting the mail on board the Thibet, yet, as it happened, the Thibet was the first to arrive. The commander of the Gordon Castle, the only other steamer, was himself one of the persons who advised this Office to send the mail by the Altnacraig, although he would have preferred to draw the allowance made by the Japanese Post Office for carrying it.

5. Two routes are open for the conveyance of the English mails for Yokohama, viz., by direct steamers, or by the P. & O. steamers which call at Nagasaki and Kobe. The direct route should of course be the quickest, but then the Whenever this P. & O. steamers are faster than many of the private ships by which the mails would otherwise be sent.

Office selects the unsuccessful route, the Yokohama papers immediately proclaim the other as that which should invariably be adopted. Thus, if a direct steamer arrives first, it is asked why the Hongkong Post Office cannot always. send the mail by direct steamer. The next time, the reverse happens, and then it is demanded why the mails are not regularly sent by the P. & O. steamer (“the connecting steamer as Messrs. BISSET & Co. call it, because it happened to be a success on that occasion.)

""

6. The Yokohama community forget also that whilst merchants and Bankers here prepare their correspondence for Japan in duplicate, so that it is comparatively easy for them to secure the earliest arrival of documents, this Office has only one mail to send.

7. This Office has not failed to secure the arrival of the mail in Yokohama by the first steamer more than three or four times in four years. Once, and once only, we were distinctly to blame, as was amply acknowledged. If this sort of correspondence is to continue, I shall have to consider whether it will not be better to put the mails for Japan on whichever steamer is leaving first, no matter what vessel it is or by what route it is going. The Yokohama Chamber of Commerce has been asked to appoint an Agent here who would direct this Office in the matter, but this suggestion has been ignored, in fact none of the Japanese communities will take the smallest trouble to secure the carrying out of their wishes.

I have, &c.,

A. LISTER,

S. A. BLACKWOOD, Esq., C.B.,

Secretary to the Post Office,

LONDON.

Postmaster General, Hongkong.

CIRCULAR.

The Colonial and Indian Exhibition of 1886.

(Papers respecting.)

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 9.

DOWNING STREET,

102

27th November, 1884.

SIR,-I have the honour to transmit to you the accompanying copies of a Memorandum, which I have received from His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and which was prepared after previous full interchange of views between His Royal Highness and myself, notifying the appointment by the Queen of a Royal Commission, and describing the proposed arrangements for the purpose of organizing and carrying out an Exhibition in London, during the year 1886, of the Products, Manufactures, and Resources of Her Majesty's Colonial and Indian Empire.

It only remains for me to recommend this undertaking to the most favourable consideration of your Government, and I rely with confidence on your own personal efforts to secure a worthy repre- sentation of the Colony under your Government.

I cannot doubt that the Government and people of Hongkong will share my satisfaction at learn-. ing that this important undertaking will have the advantage of the personal superintendence of the Prince of Wales, whose administrative capacity is as well known to you as the warm interest with which His Royal Highness regards all matters connected with the Colonial Empire.

Governor Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

I have, &c.,

DERBY.

MEMORANDUM relative to the COLONIAL AND INDIAN EXHIBITION, to be held in London in the year 1886, for the consideration of the Government of Hongkong.

MARLBOROUGH HOUSE, LONDON, S.W., 24th November, 1884.

The Official Gazette of the 18th of November, 1884, a copy of which is enclosed, notifies that Her Majesty the Queen has been pleased to nominate a Royal Commission for the purpose of organizing and carrying out in London, during the year 1886, an Exhibition of the Products, Manufactures and Resources of the Colonial and Indian Empire.

In assuming the active Presidency of this Commission, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales is desirous of having the opportunity of bringing prominently under notice the development and progress which have been made in the various parts of the British Empire, and His Royal Highness trusts that a more intimate knowledge may thus be obtained of the vast fields for enterprise which exist throughout the British Dominions.

It has been already stated that His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales intends to take the same Executive part as in the case of the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1878, and His Royal Highness has, with the consent of Her Majesty's Government, selected Sir Philip Cunliffe-Owen, K.C.M.G., C.B., C.I.E., Director of the South Kensington Museum, to act as Secretary to the Royal Commission. His Royal Highness intends, in any matters of special importance, to address himself personally to the Executive Commissioners of the respective Colonies; but he would be obliged by all general correspond- ence being carried on with the Secretary to the Royal Commission.

As regards the method of representation to be adopted by each Colony or group of Colonies at the Exhibition, His Royal Highness specially wishes that, if possible, a single Executive Commissioner should be appointed, with whom might be associated, if necessary, not more than two or three Assistant- Commissioners.

པར། |:ཀྱི ;

Į

104

No. 1.

The Secretary to the Royal Commission will be prepared to act on behalf of any Colony which may not find it convenient to appoint an independent Commissioner.

An exact date cannot be fixed at this early period, but the Exhibition will probably be opened during the first fortnight in May, 1886. With the ample time which is being given to all those con- cerned, it is sincerely to be hoped that the work of installation may be complete at least a fortnight previous to the date of opening.

As the object of this Exhibition is to represent the progress and the development of each Colony, it has been considered impracticable to call upon the Colonial Governments to comply with any form of Classification, as has been the custom at previous Exhibitions. Each Colony is, therefore, at liberty to make a Classification most suitable to its own requirements.

In furtherance of this idea, His Royal Highness trusts that each Government will take an early opportunity of preparing a Catalogue of the objects intended for exhibition, which it is requested, may, closure for the sake of uniformity, be modelled somewhat on the principle of the enclosed specimen, more especially as regards size of page and style of type. It would considerably facilitate this object if each Government were to have its Catalogue printed in London, by Messrs. William Clowes & Sons, Limited, the Official Printers and Publishers to the Exhibition. Each Government will be at liberty to sell its own Catalogue, through the Official Publishers to the Exhibition; but it is necessary that the Royal Commission should receive, as soon as practicable, a digest of the Catalogue of each Colony in order that it may be embodied in a General Catalogue of the whole Exhibition, which will be published by the Commission.

Enclosure

No. 2.

Many points of interest will doubtless present themselves to the various Colonies; but His Royal Highness especially desires that careful statistics of each Colony, carrying the information to 1885, should be prepared in a clear and readable form so as to render this valuable information easily understood by the working classes of this country. Maps specially prepared for the information of the public, should also, as far as possible, be prominently shown in the various Courts. It is hoped that these statistics, as well as the maps on a reduced scale, will be largely made use of in the Catalogues.

Much interest is taken in this country in the Woods of the various Colonies, and His Royal Highness would be glad to find that, where Cases are required for the display of goods, these Cases should be made from the native Woods of the Colony, in order that a complete representation of the Woods of the British Empire may be practically/shown.

With reference to the building Stones and Marbles of the Colonies, it is suggested that they should be sent over in the form of Pedestals, executed in accordance with the appended sketch to scale; and thereby adding uniformity, and rendering the specimens of commercial value.

As it is possible that the various Colonial Gevernments participating in the Exhibition may desire, as its outcome, that a permanent Colonial Museum should be founded in London, it has been suggested that strong reasons exist for showing the adaptability of its products, generally, in as practical a manner as possible; hence it is desirable that the Raw Product should be displayed in connection with the Manufactured Article.

It has been decided that Commemorative Medals should be given to all those taking part in the Exhibition; and it is hoped to have the assistance of specialists of known repute who will commence to make, at the opening of the Exhibition, exhaustive Reports on the Resources of the various Colonies as represented in the Exhibition. These Reports, issued at an early stage, will take the place of the Jury systems of previous Exhibitions.

Before closing this Memorandum, reference may briefly be made to special features which His Royal Highness has in view for the general advantage of the Exhibiting Governments.

It is intended to form a Library and Reading Room, where all Literature relating to the Colonies and India, that it may be possible to collect, may be at hand for reference. Not only will contributions be asked for from the Colonial Governments, but also from Home publishers.

Special arrangements will be provided for the practical illustration, in one special kitchen, of all the Colonial Frozen Meat Industries, and of the Colonial Preserved Meats, Fish and Vegetables. This department will be carried out by the Royal Commission itself, in order that the due participation of the various interests concerned may be maintained.

There will also be a Colonial Fruit and Vegetable Market, which it is hoped that each Government will make arrangements to supply by monthly shipments. This department will also be under the control of the Royal Commission.

An exhibition of Colonial Wines will be organized by the Royal Commission.

A limited space will also be set apart for the exhibition of Living Animals from the Colonies. In assuming the control of these various departments, the Royal Commission wishes to afford to the actual Producers the advantages of a fair display in the Exhibition. The Importers will, no doubt, hereafter benefit, but the interests of the Producers, as Exhibitors, are of the first consideration; and it may be here mentioned that in these departments, as well as generally throughout the Exhibition, only bonâ fide Colonists can, through their respective Governments, participate in the Exhibition. It will not, therefore, be possible for the Royal Commission to entertain any applications, upon any pretence whatever, from Colonial Importers or Agents in this Country.

BY ORDER.

Enclosure No. 1 to the above Memorandum.]

SPECIMEN

OF THE

OFFICIAL CATALOGUE

TO THE

COLONIAL AND INDIAN EXHIBITION,

1886.

LONDON:

WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED,

Offcial Printers and Publishers to the Royal Commission,

13, CHARING CROSS, S.W.

1884.

[P.T.O.

105

106

2

38

Class XX, (South Central Gallery).

380. HINDLEY & SONS, 290- 294 Oxford Street, W.-A Completely Furnished Apartment. Wood-panelled dado, framework and ceiling, oak parquet floor. The walls hung with washable Japanese leather paper.

A painted wood mantelpiece, and mahogany furniture.

381. HOVELL, W. B., St. Andrew's Basket Works, Bedford Street, Nor- wich-Wicker Furniture, comprising Draw- ing-room and Library Chairs, Wicker Lounges, Wicker Tea Tables, Ladies' Work Tables, Nursery Stands, Linen Baskets, &c.

382. STONES, JOHN, Patent Re- volving Shutter and Movable Division, and Lift and Hoist Manufacturer, Uré Mills, Ulverston.-(1) Movable Sound- proof Partitions for dwelling-houses, schools, &c., which swivel and fold into pilasters or recesses in walls. (2) Sound-proof Revolving Shutter. (3) Full size Model of Balance Weight Revolving Shutters, with the ascending, descending and vertical motions. (4) Draught Excluder.

383. ALLEN, EDWARD? E., Cheyne Walk, Chelsea.-Models Cottages.

111

the insides of rooms and other places; admits light and air, and is a sure protection against burglars. Made of wrought iron, and bronzed in any desired colour to match the wall-paper.

388. BLYTH, A. W., Medical Officer of Health, The Court House, Maryle- bone; & GREENE, DR. RÍCHARD, Medical Superintendent of the County Asylum, Berry Wood, Northampton.- Model and accompanying plans of a House to be let out in tenements.

389. LUCAS, JAMES MOORE, Ennerdale Road, Selwyn Court Estate, Kew Gardens.-Model Design of a perfect sanitary private residence, constructed specially for the International Health Exhibition, upon the latest sanitary principles. The house will be completed and ready for inspection on May 8th, and open to the public upon presenta-

tion of card. Kew Gardens station is 21 minutes by District Railway from South Ken- sington.

T.,

MATHIAS 390. O'KEEFFE, M.I.C.E.L., 40 Holbeck Road, North, Brixton, S.W.-Models of Sanitary Houses, to be constructed at the corners of important of thoroughfares so as to afford. secure means of escape from fire in any of the adjoining pre- mises, and specially adapted as approaches to light-foot bridges, over dangerous street cross- ings, and at the same time providing ladies' resting-rooms, lavatories, &c.

384. CHUBB & SONS' LOCK &

SAFE CO., Limited, 128 Queen Victoria Street, E.C.,-(1) Chubb's Patent Detector Lock, Latches, and Keys, used in fitting up dwelling-houses of all kinds, from a palace to a cottage, and for all other purposes that a lock can be adapted to. (2) Ornamental Locks and Keys. (3) Model of Chubb's Patent Fire and Thief Resisting Bankers' Strong Room made to Scale. (4) Model of a Lockmaker's Work-bench and Tools.

385. KAYE,

JOSEPH, & SONS, 93 High Holborn; and Bank Works, Kirkstall, Leeds.-Kaye's Patent Inde- structible Locks and Fastenings.

386. ADAMS, ROBERT, 17 Black man Street, Borough, S.E.~(1) Locks and Furniture. (2) Sash Fasteners. (3) Sash Bolts and Ventilators. (4) Weather Bars. (5) Casement Stays. (6) Norton's Door Springs. (7) Casement Bolts. (8) Patent Reversible and Sliding Window. (9) Case- ment Fasteners and three-throw Bolts. (10) Rack Fanlight Openers. (11) Spring Hinges. (12) Sash Centres. (13) The New Ventilating Bar for window-sashes. (14) The Panic Door, for theatres, schools, and other public buildings, which ascends into a prepared recess by slightly turning a handle, which, being covered with a glass door, can be easily smashed in case of need to give the audience instant egress.

387. BORN, PHILIP, 29 Tavistock Road, Westbourne Park. · Improved Patent Folding Lattice Shutter, for fixing in

-

391. TURNBULL, J. R., LIEUT.- COL., The Priory, Torquay.—(1) Model (Skeleton) of a London House, showing how the drains should be ventilated and carried under the house from the back to the street

sewer, according to the “. open system"; also ventilating pipes, &c. (2) Model, showing a length and section of a drain laid according (3) Model of ditto in brick channel, showing to the "open system," with pitch-sealed joints.

step for necessary work at the drain at any considerable depth: pitch-sealed joints, &c. (4) Model, gas or water-pipe laid in the usual way, but with pitch-sealed joints.

393. ALLEN, A. H., 111 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, S.W.-Model of a Labour- er's Cottage, intended to illustrate a special improvement in that class of dwellings, viz., by substituting for the ordinary combustible partitions between the rooms the use of non- combustible partitions constructed of wood quartering, coated with silicate paint, and filled in with slate panels.

394. ALLEN, C. B., 111 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, S.W.-Plan and Model of a Miner's Cottage. The noteworthy im- provement here is that of keeping the Fire- places or sources of heat in the centre of the building and away from the outer wall, thus to avoid all loss of heat. The model also exem- plifies the possibility of adapting architectural forms to such structures.

[Enclosure No. 2 to the above Memorandum.]

Upper Block

12" x 12" x 24"

Lower Block

13′′ × 13′′ × 13′′

Both Stones to be finished on all faces.

No lewis holes.

Samples of Marbles to form Pedestals.

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108

Whitehall, November 10, 1884.

THE Queen has been pleased to issue a Commission under Her Majesty's Royal Sign Manual to the effect following:-

VICTORIA, R. & I.

VICTORIA, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith, Empress of India, &c., To

Our Most Dear Son and Councillor His Royal Highness Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of Our Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Knight of Our Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Field Marshal of Our Forces;

Our Most Dear Son and Councillor His Royal Highness Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of Our Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Knight of Our Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Vice-Admiral in Our Fleet;

Our Most Dear Son and Councillor His Royal Highness Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of Our Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Knight of Our Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Major-General of Our Forces;

Our Dear Cousin and Councillor His Royal Highness George William Frederick Charles, Duke of Cambridge, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of Our Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Knight of Our Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Grand Master and Principal Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Field Marshal Commanding in Chief Our Forces ;

Our right trusty and right entirely beloved Cousin William Drogo, Duke of Manchester, Knight of Our Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick ;

Our right trusty and right entirely beloved Cousin and Councillor Richard Plantagenet Campbell, Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India

a;

Our right trusty and entirely beloved Cousin Henry Charles Keith, Marquess of Lansdowne, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor- General of Our Dominion of Canada;

Our right trusty and entirely beloved Cousin and Councillor Robert Arthur Talbot, Marquess of Salisbury, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter;

Our right trusty and entirely beloved Cousin and Councillor George Augustus Constantine Marquess of Normanby, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Our right trusty and entirely beloved Cousin and Councillor George Frederick Samuel, Marquess of Ripon, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Grand Master and First and Principal Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Our Viceroy and Governor-General of India;

Our right trusty and well beloved Councillor Spencer Compton Cavendish, Esquire, commonly called Marquess of Hartington, Our Principal Secretary of State for War;

Our right trusty and well beloved Councillor Sir John George Edward Henry Douglas Sutherland Campbell, commonly called Marquess of Lorne, Knight of Our Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George; Our trusty and well beloved James Hamilton, Esquire, commonly called Marquess of Hamilton; Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor Edward Henry, Earl of Derby, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Our Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin John William, Earl of Dalhousie, Knight of Our Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle

;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor Archibald Philip, Earl of Rosebery;

1

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor Henry Howard Molyneux, Earl of Carnarvon ;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin George Henry, Earl Cadogan ;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor Granville George, Earl Granville, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Our Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor John, Earl of Kimberley, Our Principal Secretary of State for India;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor Frederick Temple, Earl of Dufferin, Knight of Our Most Illustrious Order of St. Patrick, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor Thomas George, Earl of Northbrook, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, one of the Commissioners for executing the office of High Admiral of Our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.;

Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin Edward Robert Lytton, Earl of Lytton, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India;

Our right trusty and well beloved Cousin and Councillor Gathorne, Viscount Cranbrook, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India;

Our right trusty and well beloved Councillor William Coutts, Baron Ashford, commonly called Viscount Bury, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Our Right trusty and well beloved Donald James, Baron Reay;

Our right trusty and well beloved Councillor Hugh Henry, Baron Strathnairn, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Field Marshal of Our Forces ;

Our right trusty and well beloved Robert Cornelis, Baron Napier of Magdala, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Field Marshal of Our Forces ;

Our right trusty and well beloved Councillor Henry Austin, Baron Aberdare;

Our trusty and well beloved Anthony Evelyn Melbourne Ashley, Esquire, commonly called the Honourable Anthony Evelyn Melbourne Ashley, one of the Under Secretaries of State to Our Princi- pal Secretary of State for the Colonies;

Our trusty and well beloved Edward Stanhope, Esquire, commonly called the Honourable Edward Stanhope;

Our right trusty and well beloved Councillors :---

Sir Stafford Henry Northcote, Baronet, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath;

Sir James Fergusson, Baronet, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, Governor of the Presidency of Bombay;

'Hugh Culling Eardley Childers, Chancellor of Our Exchequer ;

William Edward Forster;

Sir William Henry Gregory, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Sir Lyon Playfair, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath;

Sir Michael Edward Hicks Beach, Baronet;

Anthony John Mundella, Vice-President of the Committee of Our Most Honourable Privy Council on Education.

Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant-Duff, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, Governor of the Presidency of Fort Saint George, at Madras;

Sir Louis Mallet, Knight Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath;

Our right trusty and well beloved the Lord Mayor of Our City of London for the time being;

The Lord Provost of Our City of Edinburgh for the time being;

The Lord Mayor of Our City of Dublin for the time being;

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Our trusty and well beloved Sir Henry Thurstan Holland, Baronet, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Sir Daniel Cooper, Baronet, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Sir John Rose, Baronet, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Sir Patrick Grant, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Field Marshal of Our Forces;

Sir Frederick Paul Haines, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, General of Our Forces;

Sir Henry Creswicke Rawlinson, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Major-General (Local), late of the Honourable the East India Company's Service, Member of the Council of India;

Sir Charles Henry Brownlow, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Lieutenant-General of Our Forces;

Sir Edwin Beaumont Johnson, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, General of Our Forces;

Sir Henry Dominick Daly, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Lieutenant-General of Our Forces;

Sir Samuel James Browne, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, upon whom We have conferred the decoration of the Victoria Cross, Lieutenant-General of Our Forces;

Sir Peter Stark Lumsden, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Major-General of Our Forces, Member of the Council of India;

Sir Thomas Brassey, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, one of the Commissioners to Execute the Office of High Admiral of Our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, &c.;

Sir Robert George Wyndham Herbert, Knight Commander of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, one of the Under Secretaries of State to Our Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies;

Sir Frederick Richard Pollock, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Major-General of Our Forces;

Sir Harry Burnett Lumsden, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Lieutenant-General of Our Forces;

Sir Barrow Helbert Ellis, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India,. Member of the Council of India;

Sir Dighton Macnaghten Probyn, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, upon whom We have conferred the Decoration of the Victoria Cross, Lieutenant-General of Our Forces;

Sir Joseph Fayrer, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Doctor of Medicine, one of Our Honorary Physicians, Surgeon-General, late of the Indian Medical Service; Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Doctor of Medicine;

Sir Owen Tudor Burne, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, Colonel of Our Forces;

Sir Robert Groves Sandeman, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Lieutenant-Colonel of Our Forces, Agent to Our Viceroy and Governor-General of India in Beloochistan;

Sir Lepel Henry Griffin, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Agent to Our Viceroy and Governor-General of India in Central India;

Sir Oliver Beauchamp Coventry St. John, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Colonel of Our Forces, Officer on Special Duty in Cashmere ;

Sir Andrew Clarke, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, Major-General of Our Forces, Inspector-General of Fortifications, and Director of Works;

Sir Edward Selby Smyth, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, General of Our Forces ;

Sir Arthur Blyth, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Agent-General in London for the Colony of South Australia ;

Sir Charles Tupper, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, High Commissioner in London for the Dominion of Canada;

Sir Francis Dillon Bell, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Agent-General in London for the Colony of New Zealand;

Sir Saul Samuel, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Agent-General in London for the Colony of New South Wales;

Sir William Charles Sargeaunt, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Crown Agent for the Colonies;

Sir Charles Hutton Gregory, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Sir John Coode, Knight;

Sir George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood, Knight, Companion of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Doctor of Medicine;

John Watson, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, upon whom We have conferred the Decoration of the Victoria Cross, Major-General of Our Forces, Agent to Our Viceroy and Governor-General of India at Baroda;

Henry Yule, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Colonel of Our Forces, Member of the Council of India;

Martin Dillon, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, 'Companion of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Major-General of Our Forces ;

Charles John Foster, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Lieutenant- General of Our Forces, Member of the Council of India;

John Arthur Godley, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, one of the Under Secretaries of State to Our Principal Secretary of State for India;

Horace George Walpole, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Assistant Under-Secretary of State to Our Principal Secretary of State for India;

}

Richard Strachey, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Lieu- tenant-General of Our Forces, Member of the Council of India;

James Michael, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Colonel of Our Forces;

Arthur Edward Augustus Ellis, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Colonel of Our Forces;

Edward Ridley Colbourne Bradford, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Lieutenant-Colonel of Our Forces, Agent to Our Viceroy and Governor-General of India in Rajputana;

Robert Anstruther Dalyell, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Member of the Council of India;

Charles Mills, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Agent-General in London for the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope;

Arthur Hodgson, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

Montagu Frederick Ommanney, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, late Captain of Our Corps of Royal Engineers, Crown Agent for the Colonies;

Robert Murray Smith, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Agent-General in London for the Colony of Victoria;

Augustus John Adderley, Esquire, Companion of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George;

James Francis Garrick, Esquire, Agent-General in London for the Colony of Queensland;

The President of the Royal Academy of Arts for the time being;

The President of the Royal Geographical Society for the time being;

The President of the Royal Agricultural Society for the time being;

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The President of the Institution of Civil Engineers for the time being;

1

1

The President of the Association of Chambers of Commerce for Our United Kingdom for the time-being;

Henry Coppinger Beeton, Esquire ;

Edward Birkbeck, Esquire;

Ernest Edward Blake, Esquire, Crown Agent for the Colonies;

Bertram Wodehouse Currie, Esquire, Member of the Council of India;

Julius de Reuter, Esquire;

Samuel Morley, Esquire;

William George Pedder, Esquire; and

John Pender, Esquire; greeting!

Whereas it has been notified to Us through Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor, Edward Henry, Earl of Derby, Knight of Our Most Noble Order of the Garter, Our Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies, and Our right trusty and right well beloved Cousin and Councillor, John, Earl of Kimberley, Our Principal Secretary of State for India, that it is desirable that an Exhibition of the Products, Manufactures, and Arts of Our Colonial and Indian dominions shall be held in London during the year of Our Lord One thousand Eight hundred and Eighty-six.

And whereas it is Our wish that such Exhibition shall afford full and suitable représentation of the Agriculture, Commerce, Arts, and Industries of Our said dominions beyond the seas, and that Our Colonial and Indian subjects shall take part in such Exhibition.

Now know ye, that We, considering the premises and earnestly desiring to promote the success of the said Exhibition, and reposing great trust and confidence in your fidelity, discretion, and integrity, do authorize and appoint you, Our said most dear son, Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, President, together with you, the said Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh; Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn; George William Frederick Charles, Duke of Cambridge; William Drogo, Duke of Manchester; Richard Plantagenet Campbell, Duke of Bucking- ham and Chandos; Henry Charles Keith, Marquess of Lansdowne; Robert Arthur Talbot, Marquess of Salisbury; George Augustus Constantine, Marquess of Normanby; George Frederick Samuel, Marquess of Ripon; Spencer Compton Cavendish, commonly called Marquess of Hartington; Sir John George Edward Henry Douglas Sutherland Campbell, commonly called the Marquess of Lorne; James Hamilton, commonly called Marquess of Hamilton; Edward Henry, Earl of Derby; John William, Earl of Dalhousie; Archibald Philip, Earl of Rosebery; Henry Howard Molyneux, Earl of Carnarvon; George Henry, Earl Cadogan; Granville George, Earl Granville; John, Earl of Kimberley; Frederick Temple, Earl of Dufferin; Thomas George, Earl of Northbrook; Edward Robert Lytton, Earl of Lytton; Gathorne, Viscount Cranbrook; William Coutts, Baron Ashford, commonly called Viscount Bury; Donald James, Baron Reay; Hugh Henry,, Baron Strathnairn; Robert Cornelis, Baron Napier of Magdala Henry Austin, Baron Aberdare; Anthony Evelyn Melbourne Ashley, commonly called the Honourable Anthony Evelyn Melbourne Ashley; Edward Stanhope, commonly called the Honourable Edward Stanhope; Sir Stafford Henry Northcote; Sir James Fergusson; Hugh Culling Eardley Childers; William Edward Forster; Sir William Henry Gregory; Sir Lyon Playfair; Sir Michael Edward Hicks Beach; Anthony John Mundella; Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant-Duff; Sir Louis Mallet; The Lord Mayor of Our City of London for the time being; The Lord Provost of Our City of Edinburgh for the time being; The Lord Mayor of Our City of Dublin for the time being; Sir Henry Thurstan Holland; Sir Daniel Cooper; Sir John Rose; Sir Patrick Grant; Sir Frederick Paul Haines; Sir Henry Creswicke Rawlinson; Sir Charles Henry Brownlow; Sir Edwin Beaumont Johnson; Sir Henry Dominick Daly; Sir Samuel James Browne; Sir Peter Stark Lumsden; Sir Thomas Brassey; Sir Robert George Wyndham Herbert; Sir Frederick Richard Pollock; Sir Harry Burnett Lumsden; Sir Barrow Helbert Ellis; Sir Dighton Macnaghten Probyn; Sir Joseph Fayrer; Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker; Sir Owen Tudor Burne; Sir Robert Groves Sandeman; Sir Lepel Henry Griffin; Sir Oliver Beauchamp Coventry St. John; Sir Andrew Clarke; Sir Edward Selby Smyth; Sir Arthur Blyth; Sir Charles Tupper; Sir Francis Dillon Bell; Sir Saul Samuel; Sir William Charles Sergeaunt; Sir Charles Hutton Gregory; Sir John Coode; Sir George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood; John Watson; Henry Yule; Martin Dillon; Charles John Foster; John Arthur Godley; Horace George Walpole; Richard Strachey; James Michael; Arthur Edward Augustus Ellis Edward Ridley Colbourne Bradford; Robert Anstruther Dalyell; Charles Mills; Arthur Hodgson ; Montagu Frederick Ommanney; Robert Murray Smith; Augustus John Adderley; James Francis Garrick; the President of the Royal Academy of Arts for the time being; the President of the Royal Geographical Society for the time being; the President of the Royal Agricultural Society for the time being; the President of the Institution of Civil Engineers for the time being; the President of the Association of Chambers of Commerce for Our United Kingdom for the time being; Henry Coppinger Beeton;

Edward Birkbeck; Ernest Edward Blake; Bertram Woodhouse Currie; Julius de Reuter Samuel Morley; William George Pedder; and John Pender, to be Our Commissioners to advise Us upon the best mode by which the Products of Industry, Agriculture, and the Fine Arts of Our said Colonial and Indian Dominions may be procured and sent to the said Exhibition.

;

;

ì

113

:

And Our will and pleasure is that you, or any three or more of you, when and so often as need or occasion shall require, so long as this Our Commission shall continue in force, do report to Us in writing, under your hands and seals respectively, all and every the several proceedings of yourselves had by virtue of these presents.

And whereas We think it expedient for the special purposes of this Commission to obtain the advice and assistance of certain native Princes and Chiefs, We do further appoint :-

His Highness the Nizam of Hyderabad ;

His Highness the Maharajah (Gaekwar) of Baroda;

His Highness the Maharajah of Mysore, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India;

Her Highness the Begum of Bhopal, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Member of Our Imperial Order of the Crown of India ;

His Highness the Maharajah of Cashmere and Jummoo, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, Honorary General of Our Forces ;

His Highness the Maharajah Scindia of Gwalior, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, Honorary General of Our Forces;

His Highness the Maharajah Holkar of Indore, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire;

His Highness the Maharajah of Oudipore;

His Highness the Maharajah of Travancore, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India;

His Highness the Nawab of Bahawulpore, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India;

His Highness the Maharajah of Jeypore;

His Highness the Maharajah of Jodhpore, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India;

His Highness the Maharajah of Patiala ;

His Highness the Maharajah of Benares, Knight Grand Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India.

His Highness the Thakur Saheb of Bhownuggur, Knight Commander of Our Most Exalted Order of the Star of India; and

The Maharajah of Vizianagram-

to be Our Commissioners for the purposes aforesaid, in addition to and together with the several Commissioners herein already appointed.

And, lastly, We do by these presents ordain, that this Our Commission shall continue in full force and effect until the close of the said Exhibition, and that you, Our said Commissioners, or any three or more of you, shall and may from time to time, and at any place or places, proceed in the execution thereof, and of every matter and thing contained therein, although the same be not continued from time to time by adjournment.

And for the purpose of aiding you in such matters, We hereby appoint Our trusty and well beloved Sir Francis Philip Cunliffe-Owen, Knight Commander of Our Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Companion of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Companion of Our Order of the Indian Empire, to be Secretary to this Our Commission.

Given at Our Court at Saint James's, the eighth day of November, one thousand eight hundred

and eighty-four, in the forty-eighth year of Our reign.

By Her Majesty's Command,

L

W. V. Harcourt.

115

No. 10.

HONGKONG.

Correspondence respecting the Eastern Mail Service.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

DOWNING STREET,

25th July, 1884.

SIR,

The Lords Commissioners of the Treasury have drawn my attention to the question of the Eastern Mail Service, with a view to the arrangements to be made upon the expiration of the present contract with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam-ship Company.

2. That contract, I would observe, will terminate on the 31st of January, 1888, if two years notice be given, and although this date is comparatively remote, the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, in concurrence with the Postmaster General, are of opinion that the variety of the interests involved, as well as the inherent difficulties of the question, make its consideration desirable thus far in advance of the date when practical steps will have to be taken, and they have suggested that notice of the termination of the existing contract should be given, and that the subject in the meantime should be thoroughly investigated in all its bearings, paying due regard to all the different interests concerned.

3. The enclosed Extract from a Report by the Postmaster General indicatęs the most important of the questions which would have to be considered, but before taking any steps in the matter, I should be glad to be favoured with an expression of the views of your Government generally on the subject.

Governor Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

1

I have, &c.,

DERBY.

Extract from Postmaster General's Report to the Treasury, dated 30th May, 1884.

1. In view of the marked development in the Steam shipping trade to India and the Australian Colonies within the last few years, would it be possible to avoid giving a subsidy to any particular Company, by placing the Mail service to the East on a footing similar to that on which the Mail service to the United States will be placed under the new plan about to be brought into operation in Septem- ber next, i.e., of taking up the most efficient vessels available from time to time, and paying only for the weight of the correspondence actually carried?

116

If such an arrangement were practicable, it might be found that a great saving would result, and also that the countries interested would have a more frequent Mail service. Moreover, if subsidies could be dispensed with, the great advantage would be secured of abolishing the evil inseparably associated with all subsidies, i.e., that by favouring one company, they curtail the benefit of free competition.

2. Would time be saved in carrying Mails to China if they were landed at Bombay, and taken by Railway from Bombay to Calcutta, whence it is presumed frequent opportunities offer for conveying them to their destination by lines of Steamers already existing?

3. The arrangements now made for the apportionment of the cost of the Packet Service between England, India, Ceylon, the Straits Settlements, and Hongkong seem to require revision, and this is especially the case with regard to the apportionment of the postage on the correspondence exchanged between England and the Australian Colonies.

*

Report by the Postmaster General of Hongkong.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, September 1st, 1884.

SIR,-With reference to Lord DERBY'S Despatch No. 174 of July 25th, on the subject of the arrangements to be made on the termination of the present mail contract, I have the honour to report as follows.

2. Lord DERBY'S Despatch, which was referred to me by order of the Governor, raises three questions:-

(a.) Would it be possible to do away with subsidies, and to entrust the

mails to the most suitable vessels starting on the voyage for China, paying by weight only, as is about to be done in the case of mails for the United States ?

(b.) Could the mails be transported by way of Bombay and Calcutta ? (c.) As to revision of the existing distribution of expense.

3. A memorandum from Mr. FAWCETT, the Postmaster General of the United Kingdom, which is quoted by Lord DERBY, expresses the opinion that carriage of the mails by all or any of the companies running steamers between England and China would afford the communities here more frequent and less expensive means of communication than at present. It would be a very important point to this Colony if such a result could be brought about, because the existing mail service is costing us £6,000 a year. But I am of opinion that whatever economy may result from the suppression of subsidies, frequency of communication will be lessened; and regularity of communication, which is at least as important as either frequency or quickness, will have a tendency to disappear.

4. In forecasting what would happen on the withdrawal of the P. & O. subsidy, an important element in the question is, what would be the movements of the P. & O. steamers themselves? It seems reasonable to suppose that what has taken place between Hongkong and Japan would be reproduced all along the line.

1

!

117

That is to say the boats would start with fair regularity perhaps, but their move- ments and their ports of call would be entirely governed by considerations relating to cargo, so that it would be quite possible that a P. & O. steamer which had left Europe before the French mail might arrive here after it.

5. There are enough steamers, take them all together, to allow of a mail from Europe arriving in Hongkong every two or three days. Such a state of things would be indeed desirable if it could be counted on. The mails would be small, would be quickly dealt with, and there would be much less rush and impatience about their distribution than at present. But it is as useless to hope for this as it would be to believe that meteorologists will ever be able to arrange that rain shall fall only when it is convenient. The steamers would come in, as they do at present, three and four within a day or two, and then no more perhaps for nearly a fortnight.

6. I submit that there is little analogy between the lines of steamers plying to China and those which cross the Atlantic. There are no ports of call in the Atlantic, the voyage occupies little over a week, and first-class steamers leave regularly enough to ensure the regular arrival of the mails at either end of the route. But the voyage to China occupies from 4 weeks to 8 or even 9 weeks, according to the class of vessel; there are several ports of call; and the chances of steamers passing one another would introduce endless confusion into the service. Letters which left London earlier would be continually arriving after those which left later. I do not see how the London Post Office is to form any reasonable guess which of three steamers leaving London or Liverpool for China within the same week will arrive first. We cannot even do it between here and Shanghai, a voyage of 4 days! The experience of this Office in transmitting mails for Japan since the P. & O. subsidy was withdrawn shews how impossible it is to secure any thing like regularity of arrival by means of cargo steamers alone. The most anxious care has been exercised to select the best opportunities, but the result has been that the three communities of Japan have been continually complaining ever since the change was made.

With regard to the homeward mails, few persons 'except merchants would ever have much idea when they would leave, and, as often as not, the notice would be very short.

The

7. If therefore the French packets continued running, the whole situation. would resolve itself into heavy fortnightly mails forwarded by their means. outward mails would take at least four hours to sort, and we should have all the old evils back again (now almost forgotten) of firms having their correspondence addressed to Singapore and sent up by private hand so as to get it quickly, &c. This might be economical, but it would not be pleasant, nor could it be called

progress.

8. It is useless to suppose that any inducement would prevail on the public to correspond by private steamers if the French mails were available. When the postage to and from England was 1/4d. by the mail, every body here knew that letters could be forwarded with fair regularity by private steamers for 6d. I believe there was only one person in the entire community who took advantage of the lower rate, and that person was a lady.

9. The abolition of a subsidised service could be effected to some extent by not extending the contract beyond Singapore. There are quite sufficient steamers between Singapore and Hongkong, and between Hongkong and Shanghai, to

118

carry on the mails without any very serious delay, and probably the English mail would always reach Hongkong and generally Shanghai before the next French mail overtook it. Between Ceylon or India and Singapore there are not enough steamers. Many of the Canal boats, as they are called, come direct from Suez to Penang or Singapore without calling anywhere.

10. I do not wish to be understood as recommending the curtailing of the subsidised line, but the Home Government is asking for information and I merely say that this could be done. The results would be disagreeable in many ways. Regularity would disappear from the service. Marine sorting would have to be discontinued. Persons would get their letters through irregular channels to obtain them quicker. A responsible and very thankless task would be thrown on the Singapore and Hongkong Offices of selecting the steamers to carry on the mails. Whatever steamer was selected, the community concerned would but too often be apt to consider it was the wrong one, for that community would criticise, after the event, a choice which would have to be made before it. Continual complaints, like those which have arisen in Japan since the P. & O. service was discontinued, would become common in Shanghai and in Hongkong also.

11. With regard to the suggestion of forwarding mails via Bombay, no doubt it might be done if there were any regular means of communication between either Calcutta or Madras and Hongkong. But, except the monthly Indian steamers from Calcutta, and a monthly French steamer from Calcutta and Madras, there are The following figures were arrived at in consultation with Mr. F. R. HOGG

none.

of the Indian Post Office.

Average passage from Suez to Hong-

kong via Colombo (both mon-

soons),

Suez to Bombay,

11 days.

Bombay to Madras,

1/1/20

1호,

...30 days.

Transhipping, &c., Madras to Penang, Penang to Hongkong,.............. 11

1

""

5

CR

""

30 days.

30 days.

But unless some regular weekly or at least fortnightly means existed of bringing the mails on from Madras, this route would be useless for all practical purposes.

12. On the question of the Distribution of expenses it is of course the opinion in this Colony that Hongkong should not contribute 2 per cent of its Revenue towards subsiding a mail service which costs the United Kingdom, without allowing for reimbursements, only per cent of its Revenue. But so much has been said on this subject that there can be no need further to dwell on it.

13. I venture to recommend that these papers be submitted to the Chamber of Commerce, and to the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

A. LISTER, Postmaster General.

Letter from the Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce.

15th January, 1885.

119

SIR,

+

In reply to your letter of the 9th September last, transmitting to this Chamber copy of a Despatch and its enclosure, together with a Report thereon by the Postmaster General on the subject of the existing Postal Contract, and also to your letter of 12th September last, transmitting copy of a further Report * by the Postmaster General on the same subject, and requesting the opinion of this Cham- ber thereon for the information of His Excellency the Governor, I have the honour to inform you that the Committee have carefully considered the Despatch and Reports submitted to them.

The Committee are of opinion that the general advantages derived by the public from the present system of subsidising a mail service have been very great, and have fully justified the cost at which the mails have been carried with such singular regularity and freedom from casualty.

To bankers and merchants certainly, and in no small degree to almost every resident in the East, whatever be his calling, the importance of a rapid, regular and trustworthy service cannot be overrated, but the Committee recognise that the boon of possessing such a perfect conveyance of correspondence, including Imperial and Official despatches of national importance, and financial and commer- cial documents of great value, has begun to be regarded by many as so much a matter of course, that they have not realised what the change would imply were the views to prevail of those who advocate, for the sake of greater economy, a subdivision of the service, and sectional subsidies. The conveyance of the mails under contract with the P. & O. Co. has been satisfactory in all respects, and the Committee would not without regret see a change in the system that has worked so well, but they are of opinion that the subsidy will bear reduction, and that in a new Contract an increased speed of one knot per hour should be obtained. The Committee would suggest too that the contract period should be limited to seven

years.

In conclusion the Committee would remark that they endorse the views so fully stated by the Postmaster General of Hongkong in his reports on the subject, bearing date 1st and 11th * September last.

I have the honour to be

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

W. KESWICK, Chairman.

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

*

Colonial Secretary.

Incorporated in the Postmaster General's Report of September 1st, in which (as printed) it forms paragraphs 9 & 10.

120

Letter from E. Mackintosh, Esq., dissenting from the resolution of the Chamber of Commerce.

HONGKONG, 22nd January, 1885.

DEAR SIR,

As the sole dissentient Member of the Committee of the Hongkong Chamber of Commerce from the views expressed by that Committee in their recommenda- tions to His Excellency Sir G. F. BOWEN, Governor of this Colony, on the question of the renewal of the postal service between Great Britain and China, the opinions of the Chamber having been courteously solicited by His Excellency, I beg to place on record the reasons for my not agreeing with the conclusions of the Committee.

Though strongly of opinion that the time is not far distant when the need for subsidising Mail steamers will become unnecessary, I am inclined to think that perhaps at present we are not sufficiently advanced for so radical a change. Still I conceive that the very onerous subsidies now paid can be considerably reduced by throwing open to public tender the various sections of the route between this and Europe; instead of, as in the past, making the service en bloc the subject of one contract. By this means greater competition will be induced, and the cost to the public most sensibly curtailed. In urging the system of sectional contracts,

I wish it to be understood that I have nothing to say against the whole service being performed as one contract. Tenders could be invited both for the entire service and for sections thereof, the option of selection resting with the Imperial authorities.

A line between an Italian or Austrian Port and Alexandria would at once, by means of the railway from Alexandria, place the mails on board a steamer at Suez bound to Bombay. Between Suez and Bombay there is an enormous traffic carried on by the finest steamers afloat. These vessels would gladly compete for a very moderate subsidy, to carry the mails between Bombay and Suez on fixed dates for departures and arrivals. From Bombay the mail could either be transmitted by rail to Madras, where it would be picked up by the Calcutta steamers trading to China, or it might be sent from Bombay by steamer to Hongkong. The large and growing trade between the two chief Indian Ports and this Colony warrants me in stating that no difficulty would be experienced in obtaining for a moderate payment from those now in the trade, or, if they were unwilling, from others, a guaranteed date for sailings and arrivals coupled with superior speed. Thus it appears to me the whole question of continuing subsidies to the Mail service between Hongkong and Europe, if it must be subsidised, can be most efficiently and economically solved as I now suggest. Aden and Ceylon would be served by the Suez-Bombay steamer touching at the former place, while the latter could be reached either from Madras or Bombay as facilities by coasting vessels offered, or special steamers could be detailed for the service. The constant communication between Hongkong and Shanghai presents the certainty of fixed departures with accelerated speed between those ports being obtained for a very trifling payment.

Japan could remain as it now is, unserved by any British subsidised line. The American route, being the more expeditious, to a great extent does away with the paramount necessity for the slower journey viâ Suez.

Great stress has been laid by the Committee upon the regularity of arrivals, and punctuality in despatch of the mails.

121

necessity for the

Under the system

I propose these features can be observed. For penalty clauses, similar to those which are part of the present contract, would be a condition in any engagement entered into with those running these sectional routes, and these penalties would be none the less operative than they are now. But to say, as the Committee do, that because the present contractors have performed the service well in the past, as they undoubtedly have, it would therefore be well to continue the service with them for the future, regardless of the facilities now offering for quick and economical intercommunication, is too ultra conservative to meet the wants of these days of progress. Advantage should be taken of the gradual, but surely extending development of communication that is the feature of the age. The whole system of subsidies, or the advantaging of one body over the rest, which is repugnant to the feeling of the majority of the trading classes, be they free or fair, should be limited as far as possible, till the practice of subsidising is extinguished, as I believe it will be at no distant date. For this reason I would suggest that under no circumstances should the duration of the contracts exceed five years, and if a shorter term could be arranged at a moderate increase, the lesser period should be accepted.

Tenders could be invited for terms of three and five years, optional with the Government to accept either period. For it can be safely assumed that the present means of communication will not stand still, on the contrary, it will progress with great strides in the future. The public interest therefore demands that the best system shall be availed of in the future, and at the very earliest possible date. To make the contract for any extended period appears to me most unwise.

.

The benefits which the various Colonies contributing to the Imperial subsidy will derive from a moderate payment for the entire service require only to be mentioned to meet acceptance. In this Colony, in particular, the amount contri- buted to the Imperial postal revenue has become a burning question, and it behoves us, if possible, to. suggest some means whereby the payment can be minimised.

Very generally I have sketched my objections to the letter of the Committee approved by my colleagues, and I have suggested a system which I believe, if elaborated, will fully answer all requirements. I will be glad if you will send a copy of this letter to His Excellency the Governor, and for that purpose I hand you a duplicate. You will also confer a favor upon me by noting my objections in the Minutes of the Chamber, and if you will permit this letter to be printed along with the Committee's recommendation, in the usual annual publication of the Chamber's résumé.

I have the honour to be

Dear Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

To the Honourable W. KESWICK,

Chairman, HONGKONG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

E. MACKINTOSH.

122

Extract from the Minutes of the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

February 10th, 1885.

The Committee consider the question of the mail subsidy.

Read a letter on this subject from the Chairman of the Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce, dated the 15th January, 1885, and one forwarding a communication from Mr. MACKINTOSH of the firm of Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE, expressing his view on the subject.

·

Read also a report by the Postmaster General (Mr. LISTER), containing a résumé of the correspondence relative to the Eastern Mail Service and its relation to Hongkong, with some additional observations and suggestions.

Resolved that as the sections of the Community which are most interested in the question of the conveyance of mails are represented by the Chamber of Commerce, the recommendations of that Chamber, which have been made with only one dissentient vote, should, in the opinion of the Committee, be recom- mended for adoption.

The Committee trust that, in any new arrangements, the distribution of the amount of contribution towards the paying of the subsidy will be favourably considered as far as this Colony is concerned, and recommend that the papers on this subject which have not already been printed should be printed forthwith.

W. H. MARSH, Chairman.

Report for 1884 from the Government Astronomer.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

123

No. 11.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY,

1st January, 1885.

SIR, For the information of His Excellency the Governor I have the honour to forward my annual report for 1884.

2. The necessity for an Observatory in Hongkong was recognised years ago. In 1879 the Royal Society suggested its establishment, and in 1881 a report was drawn up by Colonel PALMER, R.E., but his suggestions were not carried out, as the scheme submitted by him was considered to be too extensive for a beginning.

3. In May 1882 the Surveyor General submitted a report with reference to the Astronomical and Meteorological Observatory to the Secretary of State for the Colonies. The Astronomer Royal, to whom a copy of this report was forwarded, was of opinion, that the smaller and simpler scheme therein suggested, would suffice for present requirements, and that the most pressing needs of the Colony were a time-ball and a meteorological service. The Surveyor General's report received then His Lordship's approval, and early in 1883 I was appointed Director of the Observatory.-Meantime the Kew Com- mittee, the Meteorological Council, the Meteorological Reporter to the Government of India and other authorities had opportunities of giving expression to their views on the subject.

4. I spent the following

the following spring in inspecting the apparatus, that had been previously ordered or that I was instructed to order, and arranging details with the makers, as well as in studying the methods of observation adopted at the Royal Observatory, and the verification of meteorological and magnetic instruments at Kew.

5. The meteorological and magnetic instruments were ready before my departure from England. The Crown Agents for the Colonies arranged to have them carried without transhipment to Hongkong, and I started in June as passenger on the same steamer, accompanied by Mr. F. G. FIGG, who in the mean time had been appointed to be my first assistant.-The horological apparatus and the time-ball were not ready till long after my arrival in the Colony.

6. On my arrival here, I found the foundations of the Observatory already laid. In fact some progress had been made with the brickwork. The Surveyor General had selected the site some years ago, and it proved to be by far the best spot in the Colony for making scientific observations. The neighbourhood of the City of Victoria would not be suitable, as the mountains shut off from view a great portion of the southern sky, extending up to 25° of altitude, and for the same reason it is not possible to determine the true velocity and direction of the wind near the city. It is also likely, that the ferruginous rocks would deviate the plumb line, not to mention the magnetic needles.

7. I spent the following months partly in arranging details connected with the building and the foundations for the instruments, partly on a tour to the Treaty Ports of China, undertaken by order of His Excellency the Governor, to arrange to have meteorological observations made and regularly forwarded to the Observatory. The Inspector General of the Imperial Maritime Customs of China, who has contributed so much to forward the cause of science in that country, subsequently ordered a copy of all meteorological observations henceforth made in the harbours and lighthouses along the coast to be forwarded to me, and instruments of approved pattern are now being distributed

among the stations.—It is certain, that not only the meteorology of China will benefit by Sir ROBERT HART'S enlightened action, but the meteorology of the northern hemisphere will be forwarded, when reliable observations are made on a uniform plan in that extensive country.

8. The Observatory is built on the peninsula of Kaulung facing the harbour. It stands on the top of Mount Elgin, a small hill built up of decomposed granite, rising abruptly on all sides from the surrounding level ground and culminating in two prominences distant about 400 feet from each other. The top of the eastern prominence is flat, and forms, roughly speaking, a circle of about 200 feet diameter. Here the main building is situated. The magnetic hut is erected on the western prominence, the top of which was levelled and forms a rectangle 36 feet by 30 feet.

124

2

9. By the 1st January the main building was so far finished, that I could take up my residence there and start tri-diurnal meteorological observations. It is a rectangular block, 83 feet long and 45 feet wide (not including the transit room). The upper floor is devoted to my quarters. The ground floor comprises 4 rooms, each 20 feet long, 16 feet wide and 14 feet high, and 2 small rooms behind these. In the entrance hall are placed the telegraphic apparatus, through which the Observatory is connected with the Police Stations in Kaulung, and through them with the Central Police Station in Hongkong. To the right is my office, where the library is placed, contained in glazed teak-wood cases. The clock room, behind which is the galvanic battery room, is to the right of this. From the clock-room a door leads into the transit room. To the left of the entrance hall is the computing room, next to which is the instrument room, where the barometers, the barograph and the thermograph are placed, behind which is the photographic laboratory.-Every part of the two last rooms, including ceilings, floor and furniture, is painted dark red, and there are only a few panes of double red glass in

the windows.

10. A one-storied block of outbuildings, containing servants' quarters, store-rooms, &c., commu- nicates with the back-verandah by a covered passage.

11. The magnetic hut is 17 feet long, 13 feet broad, and the roof rises 11 feet high. It is made of wood, painted white outside and inside. Bamboo chips instead of nails were used in its construction as well as in the furniture. It has double doors, respectively louvered and glazed, to the north and south, and two windows on each side as well as two frosted glass windows in the roof, which throw light on the verniers. On top of massive teak-wood blocks sunk 3 feet in the ground and rising 4 feet above the floor are placed the unifilar magnetometer and the dip-circle. The former is placed north of the latter, and it is therefore convenient to observe the pole-star reflected from the speculum by opening the door. The sun and stars near the prime vertical can be observed through the windows on either side. The hut is very comfortable but is placed at an inconvenient distance from the main building. A broad road connects the two buildings and includes a bridge across the gap between the hills. The magnetic observations are printed in my report of the 15th December (Appendix I to the forthcoming "Observations and Researches in 1884") and it is therefore unnecessary to make further reference to these observations.

12. As the time-service has not yet been started and as no astronomical observations have been published, it would appear most proper to defer the description of the astronomical instruments, some of which have not yet been erected.

13. The tri-diurnal meteorological observations, that were started at 10 a. on the 1st January, were continued up to the end of the year. In January and February observations were made at 10 a. 4 p. and 10 p. as printed in the Weather Reports for those months. In March and April they were made at 10 a. 1 p. 4 p. 7.45 p. and 10 p. From the 1st May till the end of the year they were made at 10 a. 1 p. 4p. and 10 p. From the 1st April till the 1st October the standard barometer was generally read also at 1 a. Phenomena occurring at other hours including clouds of the cirrus type were also carefully noted.

14. The observations made at 7" 45". p. (7" 0 a. Washington Mean Time) the epoch adopted for the International Simultaneous Meteorological Observations were transmitted to the Chief Signal Officer, U. S. A., Washington, D. C. They embrace the height of the barometer reduced to 32° Fahrenheit and to sea level, dry and damp bulb thermometers, relative humidity, direction and velo- city of the wind, and also observations on rain, clouds and state of the weather. Since the 1st May only the latter observations were actually made at the time, it being preferred to read off the other elements from the curves described by the self recording instruments below described.

15. From the 1st January a new series of meteorological observations made according to my "Instructions for making Meteorological Observations" were commenced at different points in the Colony: At Victoria Peak observations of the barometer, dry and damp bulb thermometers, direction and force of the wind, clouds, sea and state of the weather are made at 7 a. 10 a. 1 p. 4 p. 7 p. and 10 p. The results for 10 a. 4 p. and 10 p. are published in the monthly reports. At the latter hour the self- registering thermometers including black bulb and grass minimum are read. The rainfall is collected in two gauges. One of them is an old roof-gauge. The other is placed one foot above the ground. Only the results from the latter are published.

16. Those observations being made at so high a level are of considerable importance, and it is to be regretted, that the authorities have not yet made arrangements for having observations made also at 4 a. In the absence of self-recording instruments the observations are not complete without the 4 a. observation. It would moreover be desirable at some future time to erect a self-recording anemometer on the look-out similar to the one on top of the Observatory. The comparison of the two records would clearly reveal certain most important features connected with the wind prevalent at different altitudes above sea level, which would deepen our insight into the law of storms in the China Sea.

17. At Cape d'Aguilar observations of thermometers, wind, clouds, sea-surface and weather are made at 4 a. 10 a. 4 p. and 10 p. as published in the monthly reports, but as these observations are wanting in accuracy, their publication with the exception of the state of the sea-surface, will be dis- continued next year.

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18. At Green Island the wind, clouds, sea-surface and weather are observed at 4 a. 10 a. 4 p. and 10 p. As the island is within 4 miles of the Observatory the station is not supplied with instruments, but the observer appears to be doing his best. At Stone Cutters' Island, which is within 2 miles of the Observatory but at a much lower level, the rain is measured at 10 a. as published.

19. All the observations made at these four stations are revised, corrected and reduced at the Observatory, and the instruments &c. are occasionally inspected..

20. The barograph was erected in March and worked without interruption since the 1st April. The slab is placed on a teak-wood table, which is firmly screwed to the floor.

21. The image of the flame of a Kerosine lamp, enlarged by a condenser, is thrown upon the void space, narrowed by a slit, above the mercury of a barometer of about three quarter inches internal diameter. By means of a photographic lens an image of this illuminated slit is thrown upon a cylinder covered with a sheet of sensitised paper, 23 inches long and 5 inches wide, which is revolved by a clock work, so that the portion covered by the image moves 0.364 inch an hour, the clock work moves also a shutter, that cuts off the light of the lamp from two minutes before, till two minutes after every even hour. The upper edge of the inverted image of the slit rises or falls as the mercury falls or rises in the barometer, but the lower edge is not permanently fixed, but rises or falls as the temperature of two zinc rods, fixed beside the barometer, falls or rises, and by aid of an adjustable glass lever the amount of displacement of the edge is made exactly equal to the temperature correction, that otherwise would have to be applied to the hourly readings.

22. The paper may be kept on the cylinder for two days, after which it has to be changed, this being invariably effected between 10 a. and 11 a.,-developed, fixed, washed and dried. The photograph is ready to be measured three days after being removed from the cylinder. It is then placed between two glass plates in the tabulator, and the distances between the upper and lower edges of the blackened portion of the paper, which is interrupted by the two-hourly white lines, are read off at every hour or oftener, if required, by aid of a vernier capable of being read to 0.001 inch, two fine wires fixed in empty sight-tubes being made to cover the respective edges.

23. The standards of reference are obtained from 10 a. 1 p. 4 p. and 10 p. readings of the standard barometer, corrected and reduced to 32° Fahrenheit. From the 1st April till the 1st September the 1 a. readings were also made use of, but experience proved this to be superfluous. The nominal inches ⚫on the tabulator should be greater than true inches in the same proportion as the magnified image of the slit is greater than the true image, which is about 14. Experience shows, that this has not been strictly attained. The nominal inches are 1.594, whereas they should be 1.534 inches long. But as the pressure here nearly always changes very slowly and regularly within 24 hours, it is not necessary to know this proportion with great accuracy, and it is for the same reason difficult to determine it. The above number was derived from observations made during the Typhoon in September and agrees with other observations.

24. The room in which the barograph and the standard barometer are placed is carefully shut up, so that the daily range of temperature is reduced below half a degree. Three large Kerosine lamps, always burning in the room, raise its temperature in winter a couple of degrees above the temperature of the air outside, while in summer the room is colder than the air. The temperature is observed by reading a carefully verified thermometer immersed in mercury in a tést-glass of the same diameter as the barograph barometer. The constancy of the temperature favours the accurate co-operation of the different parts of the apparatus, which are at a uniform temperature, just as a clock goes better in a room, where the temperature does not change much, because the different parts of the pendulum have the same temperature.

25. The barogram readings are entered in a journal kept in the computing room.

The figures are corrected for the scale-error of the tabulator, and when reduced to standard by comparison with the readings of the standard barometer (corrected and reduced to 32° Fahrenheit), they are entered in the tables printed in the monthly reports.

26. The thermograph was erected in March and worked without interruption since the 1st April. The slab is placed on massive teak-wood blocks, firmly screwed to a slab of granite, which rests on solid masonry.

The bulbs of the recording thermometers (dry and damp bulb) are placed in a zinc screen outside the northern window of the instrument room, which is substantially boarded, and in which are also placed two thermometers with bulbs,-dry and damp,-of similar dimensions. These have been care- fully verified at different temperatures by comparison with our standard thermometers. The tubes of the recording thermometers are bent and enter the instrument room through two slots (5.6 inches long, 1.2 inches broad and 9.2 inches asunder) bored in the boards. They then rise vertically and are held by pieces of brass, which may be raised or lowered to some extent. The slots are filled with non- conductive material, so that no air can pass out from the room. An airspeck is introduced into the mercury of each thermometer. These airspecks are photographed on the cylinder. A lamp is placed on each side of the thermograph, whose lights are condensed by lenses and reflected towards the cylinder from mirrors, placed on the slab behind the thermometer tubes. The light penetrating through

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the airspecks is narrowed by slits, and the same arrangement is made to obtain the photographic record as in case of the barograph, but the photograph exhibits in this case two curves, which represent the heights of the dry and damp bulb thermometers interrupted by the two-hour lines. The record of the damp bulb is placed vertically under that of the dry, so that there is only one time-scale. One or two zero lines, from, which to measure are obtained by allowing the light of either lamp to shine through. a small hole in either of the frames, in which the slits are cut.

27. The photographic sheets obtained from the thermograph are treated exactly as those obtained from the barograph. When they are dry the distances of the points on the curves from the zero line are read off by aid of glass scales graduated to degrees. The temperature in either case corresponding to the zero line is obtained daily by comparison with the simultaneous readings of the thermometers in the screen, which are corrected before being entered in the thermograph journal. The degrees on the reading scales should be larger than the degrees on the thermometers in the proportion, in which the images are magnified by the photographic lens. This has been attained in case of the damp bulb, but the degrees on the dry bulb scale must be multiplied by 0.980 in order to represent the readings of the thermometer. A correction is applied for this before the readings are entered on the tables printed in the monthly reports.

28. In order to prevent by any possibility a mistake in the date of the photographic sheets, the weekday, month and date are written on the back of every sheet, as it is removed from the cylinder.- Before my appointment the Crown Agents for the Colonies had ordered the barograph and the thermo- graph as well as the anemograph through the Meteorological Office. The tabulator, reading scales &c., were subsequently ordered at my suggestion as well as the pluviograph. Unfortunately a large stock of waxed paper had also been supplied by the Secretary to the Meteorological Office, who was not aware, that argento-bromide paper had for years been successfully adopted in India. Now the necessity for iodising and sensitising every photographic sheet has caused a deal of trouble during the damp and hot season.

The sensitised sheets were found not to keep for two days on the barrel. The sheets had then to be changed every day. Even the iodised sheets did not keep for any length of time. Only freshly iodised sheets could be sensitised with any certainty of success, and this added enormously to the labour a great part of the time of the second assistant being taken up by this work. Even when every precaution was taken, the result was not nearly as good as during the winter. Tannin, as recommended by Chambers, was tried, but made no improvement here. A supply of MORGAN & KIDD's argento-bromide paper has now been ordered, and thus the trouble of iodising and sensitising the sheets will be saved. Another cause of occasional failure rests with the Kerosine lamps, but the new paper being so much more sensitive, the lamps are not likely to give any trouble, when the new process is introduced. It may also be found possible to secure Kerosine oil of superior quality. No great difficulty was encountered in keeping the damp bulbs constantly wetted, but occasionally the bulbs were found to be dry.

29. The clocks of the barograph and the thermograph were rated by shortening the pendulums, but it was found inconvenient to shorten them sufficiently. The outstanding error was corrected by laying suitable pieces of iron and a few small leaden weights on the flat upper surfaces of the bobs, the rates being subsequently kept constant by adding or removing one or more of the small weights. This arrangement proved so satisfactory, that the clocks when accurately started one morning were in by far the greatest number of cases found as accurate next morning, and the error seldom exceeded · half a minute, and never 45 seconds.

30. The anemograph was erected in the course of January and worked without interruption since the 1st March. It is erected on a turret, built of strong teak-wood timber, fastened to the roof of the house by massive iron bolts. The turret rises 8 feet above the flat roof of the main building.

31. This instrument registers the number of miles traversed by the wind and also its direction. It consists of a ROBINSON'S anemometer of large size, the cups of which are 45 feet above the ground and 155 feet above mean sea level. The shaft carrying the cups is supported by friction balls running in a groove on top of the direction shaft and terminates in an endless screw, which working through toothed gearing drives a cylinder in the turret, round which a thin strip of brass forming a screw is wrapped. Round another larger cylinder, which is driven by a clockwork, is wrapped the metallic paper, on which the space traversed by the wind is recorded by the screw-shaped pencil, which rests on it with part of the weight of the cylinder round which it is wrapped. The pencil has only one turn on this cylinder and its pitch is 23 inches long, equal to a scale of 50 miles printed on the paper. ROBINSON'S Original factor-3 is adopted in our anemometric records. Whenever from further investiga- tion a new and reliable factor, dependent on the velocity of the wind shall have been determined for an instrument of exactly similar construction, it will be easy to alter the figures in our tables, but the action of the instrument is so perfect that no allowance need be made for friction.-In order to obtain a sufficiently distinct trace of the direction of the wind, the vane consists of two wind mill wheels, which keep their axis at right angles to the wind. With any change they move and carry with them a hollow brass tube, which contains, but is not connected with, the velocity shaft and acting through toothed gearing moves another thin screw-shaped pencil, which registers the direction on another part of the metallic paper. The pitch is equal to that of the velocity pencil and equal to a scale of the cardinal points of the compass printed on the paper. The clock moves the cylinder on which the paper is fastened 0.366 inch per hour.

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32. The paper must be changed every morning about 10 a. The direction and velocity are then read off by aid of divided glass scales and immediately entered in the table printed in the monthly reports. The working of the instrument has been satisfactory. It is made extra strong and worked as well in the typhoon as in a gentle breeze.

33. The pluviograph was erected in the course of January and worked without interruption since the 1st March. It is made of cast iron and stands on masonry in the ground about 75 feet S.W. of the nearest part of the main building. The rain collected by the funnel passes through a tube into a copper cup floating in mercury protected from oxidation by glycerine. As the cup is filled it sinks in the mercury and registers the amount of descent by aid of a fine lead pencil on a ruled card fastened on a cylinder revolved by clockwork. When 0.2 inch have been collected, the cup is emptied sponta- neously by a siphon arrangement, 0.1 inch of rain is represented by a length of 0.344 inch on the card, which was found correct. The hour lines are printed 0.365 inch apart, but it was not found practicable to lengthen the pendulum sufficiently for this and new hour times 0.372 inch apart have to be drawn on the cards. Care was taken by the maker to arrange, that the siphon should empty the cup as quickly as possible, and it was only during unusually heavy squalls, when the rain poured down in torrents, that it failed somewhat in its action, the amount entering the cup. while it was emptying itself being lost. It was feared that the heavy rain might mechanically push down the cup, but this has scarcely been noticed in practice. For further security an ordinary rain-gauge, the rain collected in which is measured at 10 a., is kept beside the pluviograph, and it has occasionally been found advisable to correct the pluviograms by the readings of that gauge.

34. Early in the summer the place had not yet been turfed and the dust of decomposed granite raised by the wind was most destructive to the acting parts of the instruments and particularly so to the action of the rain-gauge. When the Governor last summer honoured the Observatory with his presence, His Excellency remarked this disadvantage, and the place was soon after turfed, since which time the rain-gauge has acted smoothly.

35. The pluviograms are read off by aid of a simple scale and immediately entered in the tables printed in the monthly reports.

36. The sunshine-recorder is placed in a groove in the coping stone on the parapet 34 feet above the ground. In construction and adjustment it is similar to an ordinary sun-dial, but the style throwing the shadow is replaced by a solid glass ball, which acts as a burning glass, and the hour circle consists of a blue card, on which the hours are printed, and which is changed every evening. Whenever the sun shines brightly, it burns a hole in the paper, and by comparing the burned trace with the half-hour lines it is easy to estimate, how many minutes the sun was shining every hour. The figures are immediately entered in the table printed in the monthly reports. Care is taken to keep the glass ball clean.

37. The barograph, the thermograph and the anemograph were made by Mr. MUNRO of King's Cross, London, and are as excellent specimens of workmanship as might be expected from this well- known maker. The principal part of Mr. FIGG's time has been occupied in attending to the selfrecord- ing instruments and tabulating the records, a task in which he has exhibited much patience and perseverance as well as that conscientious care, for which he was recommended to me by Mr. WHIPPLE, Superintendent of the Kew Observatory, and to which the great accuracy of our results is to a great extent due.

.

نے

38. As stated in the "Instructions for making meteorological observations &c." meteorological instruments forwarded by observers, who regularly send their registers to the Observatory, are verified here free of cost. During the past year the following number of instruments has been verified and certificates issued:

Barometers: 13

Thermometers: 126

Anemometers: 1

39. The monthly weather reports up to July inclusive have been published. The tables are ready for the August and September reports. The typhoons in August are being investigated. The principal tables for the October and November reports are ready and some progress has been made in tabulating the records for December. I expect to be able to publish these reports in the course of next spring.

40. Some progress has also been made with the annual weather report for 1884 and with the five-day means of the principal meteorological elements. The volume of "Observations and Researches made in 1884" will be published as soon as these reports are ready.

41. The China Coast Meteorological Register was issued daily from here. Through the courtesy of the Great Northern and of the Eastern Extension Australasia and China Telegraph Companies I received daily telegrams from Wladiwostock, Nagasaki, Shanghai and Amoy, and from Manila respect- ively. Subsequently the Superintendent of the latter Company was kind enough to supply telegrams

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from Foochow and Haiphong in addition, but an even more important addition was made, when he in autumn arranged to have meteorological observations started at the telegraph station in Bolinao (Luzon). The telegraphic reports embrace generally readings of the barometer and the attached thermometer, dry and damp bulb thermometers, direction and force of the wind, state of the weather and amount of rain.

42. The Great Northern Telegraph Company receives the telegrams for 10 a. and 4 p. (previous day) during the forenoon. The E. E. A. & C. Telegraph Company receives the 10 a. and 4 p. observa- tions separately. The Superintendent of the Station in Bolinao in the course of October commenced to forward observations also at other hours, whenever he apprehended atmospheric disturbance in the neighbourhood of Luzon. He then also observed the direction, whence the clouds were coming. The importance of similar telegraphic information from a gentleman of scientific training during the coming: typhoon season cannot be overestimated.

43. As soon as possible after 10 a. and 4 p. observations made here similar to those received are forwarded to the two Companies.-The telegrams are exchanged between the Telegraph Offices in Victoria and the Observatory by means of either of our two chair-coolies. Of course it would be better to exchange the information through telegraph. There is a cable across the harbour through which the Police Stations are connected, but it has not been used for transmission of such messages. If it were possible to place the Observatory in direct communication with the Telegraph Companies Offices, the information would be supplied much sooner than is possible under existing circumstances.

44. As soon as the telegrams are received they are revised, corrected and reduced and the most prominent features and changes of the weather are pointed out, as well as the wind over the open sea between Shanghai, Hongkong and Luzon indicated by the gradients, the constants being statistically determined. Early information about typhoons is also issued, the existence of which is generally anticipated from observations here taken in connection with the general distribution of pressure &c., before it is indicated by observations contained in the telegraphic reports from any individual station, that may be situated nearer to the respective disturbance.

45. Every day the general whereabout of the centre and its progress since previous day are explained, and when, as frequently occurs during the progress of typhoons, the telegrams are not received, the information is based exclusively upon observations made here. In this part of my work I derived great help from Ferrel's theoretical papers and particularly from Meldrum's illustrious

researches.

46. The Clerk of the Department has charge of the calculations connected with the register and as soon as copies of same are ready-generally about 1 h. 30 p.-they are forwarded by one of the chair-coolies to the following addresses:

H. E. the Admiral of the Fleet.

The Harbour Office.

The Great Northern Telegraph Company.

The Hongkong Telegraph.

The China Mail.

The Daily Press.

47. Occasionally complaints have been received, that the register was not received at a sufficiently early hour.

48. A meteorological register containing the 4 p. observations made here, is sent in the evening to the Daily Press, which is a morning paper.

49. Whenever, as does not often occur, bad weather prevents the launch from running between Hongkong and Kaulung, or when information concerning typhoons, which should be published imme- diately, is at hand, a telegram is sent through the Police Stations to the Central Police Station in Hongkong, from which it is telegraphed to:

Government House,

The Government Offices,

Harbour Office,

and copies of the telegram are despatched by the Central Station to:

The Great Northern Telegraph Company.

The E. E. A. & C. Telegraph Company.

The Daily Press.

The China Mail.

The Hongkong Telegraph.

The Hongkong Club.

The Chamber of Commerce.

The Naval Yard.

The Commissariat.

The Surveyor General (when the Government Offices are closed).

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50. It was in the course of the year arranged, that I am not to control the distribution of these telegrams, for which my responsibility ceases, as soon as they have been properly forwarded from the Observatory.

51. In fact now that meteorological signals can be exhibited from this side of the harbour, the distribution among so many addresses is perhaps unnecessary, and with reference to the Telegraph Companies I have formed the opinion, that telegrams concerning typhoons should be forwarded only to those Treaty Ports, to the ships in which their contents would be of importance in each individual

case.

52. In the latter part of August a mast for hoisting police and storm-signals erected at Tsim- sha-tsui was furnished with the system of signals explained in my notice of the 11th August (Appendix F), and a gun was placed at the foot of the mast for giving warnings to the Colony.

53. The signals, although they were rather light, being made of perforated canvas framed in leaden pipes, blew down and were damaged, because the cord, that supported them, was far too weak. At the time the water-police had not yet taken possession of the new barracks and there were only a couple of English constables living in the old station, but it would be impossible to refer in too high terms to the conduct of the police, who are charged with hoisting the signals, both under those difficult circumstances and also afterwards.

54. A new set of signals made of rattan have since been made at the suggestion of the Surveyor General, but they are only 4, while the original signals were 6 feet in diameter. Whether they will be sufficient, remains to be seen. At any rate it is to be hoped, that arrangements will be made to have them hoisted to the top of the mast, which was reserved for these signals.

55. The notice referred to was extensively circulated and it was clearly stated, that the signals are hoisted solely with the object of informing masters of vessels leaving the port concerning the where- about of the centre of typhoons, and that local storm-signals would be given by firing the gun,-so that it is surprising, that a portion of the public should be under the impression, that the signals indi- cate strong wind in the Colony, but no doubt more correct notions will get abroad next season.

56. Through these signals supplemented by the information given in the daily registers, masters of vessels are enabled to form an opinion of the winds and weather,-fine in some places foul in others, -likely to be encountered on the voyage, and to select the best time for starting all according to their destination. But after all I have learned, that cases still occur, where a captain, who is less familiar with typhoons, delays his ship in port, although the information issued to a practical meteorologist implies, that he is likely to encounter fine weather on a voyage to the port, for which he is about to start,—while another ship starting at the same time for some other port may run great risk.

57. To a port frequented by so vast a shipping as Hongkong it would be an advantage to have trustworthy information concerning bad weather likely to be encountered by each individual ship leaving the port placed within reach of every captain about to leave the port, and this can only be effected by allowing them to telegraph to me for information, adding the name and destination of the ship in question. Similar enquiries may in England, on payment of one shilling for the message be addressed to the meteorological office, but the answer contains only a guess at the weather expected next day, while in the China Sea it would be possible to give information concerning the weather likely to prevail on the voyage.

58. But in order to effect this it would be necessary to appoint a telegraph clerk in the Observatory. Occasionally during the past season masters of vessels have sent one of their mates over to make enquiries, and I have done my best to give them the required information, but at serious inconvenience owing to the smallness of the staff attached to this Department.

59. I devoted part of my time in the autumn of 1883 in studying past records of the weather kept by officers of the Harbour Department and Mr. FIGG assisted me in taking monthly means of observations. The results were published in the Gazette (Appendices A-C to "Observations and Researches in 1884"). He also took monthly means of the height of the barometer registered for over twenty years in the Harbour Office, but as some difficulty was encountered in ascertaining the corrections, which the barometers required, the results have not yet been published and will not be of much importance when published.

60. Beside the reports to appear in the "Observations and Researches in 1884," which will include a complete barometric determination of the height of Victoria Peak, I have published the following papers:

a. "On the Rainfall and Temperature of Markree, Sligo." (In "Quarterly Journal of the

Royal Meteorological Society" April, 1884).

b. "Markree Observatory." (In "The Observatory. A monthly review of astronomy."

October and November, 1884).

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61. During the past year my time was to such an extent occupied in erecting and adjusting the instruments, in making the necessary arrangements of the methods of using them and in official correspondence, that I am not able to add a catalogue of the scientific instruments and books to this year's report. I also regret having been at times behind-hand in acknowledging the receipt of publi- cations from other scientific centres and from individuals and having been forced by want of time to neglect my scientific correspondence in general, but although during the first portion of the new year several new instruments will have to be started, I expect to be able to attend more regularly to my duties in this respect.

62. Officers of the Royal Navy and Officers of the French squadron in China as well as numerous captains of merchant vessels have forwarded to me meteorological observations made during typhoons, by aid of which I have been enabled to investigate those atmospheric disturbances, from which investi- gations results useful to the navigation of the China Sea will follow.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. DOBERCK, Government Astronomer.

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c., &c.,

&e.

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No. 12.

Report for 1884 of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

BOTANIC GARDEN, 7th January, 1885.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on this Department for 1884.

2. With the completion of the laying out and arrangement of the last remaining portion of land available for garden extension (paragraph No. 4 of my Report for 1883), the Gardens have developed in area as far as seems possible in the locality in which they are situated. Any further extension which may be desirable will have to be in the nature of branches at some distance from the central garden. Therefore the available resources and energy have been chiefly directed during the year to the improvement and completion of works which needed closer attention and more support. The exceptionally sterile nature of the soil of this "barren rock," the exposed aspect of the Gardens and absence of water for artificial watering in the dry season, necessitate the expenditure of a great deal more thought, time, and means than is usually experienced in establishments of this kind. Whenever opportunities can be got for a few important alterations I hope to be able to undertake them. Amongst these should be the re-arrangement of the Fountain Terrace and adjacent grounds. The trees on the terrace have quite outgrown themselves for the positions which they occupy; most of them should be removed and a more suitable arrangement of planting substituted, but time and means prevent this being carried out at present. If these means had been available I should have much wished to carry out the work at once.

3. The Typhoon of September worked a good deal of mischief in the Gardens both by the force of the wind and the deluge of rain with which it was accompanied. Limbs and branches from the larger trees and shrubs were much broken, while smaller things were extensively up-rooted; amongst the latter a large number of roses and Poinsettias were destroyed. Many of the remaining Poinsettias were denuded of their leaves and in consequence they have been unable to produce the large floral crimson bracts which they otherwise would have had. A large number of Poinsettias were planted during the year, and had it not been for the typhoon they would have made a brilliant display.

4. Quite as much damage is done to plants and shrubs, both to those growing in pots and the open ground, by the saturated state of the soil which results from the enormous fall of rain during the storm. The plants which suffer the most from this cause are naturally those which come from countries having dry climates, many of which plants in consequence of these excessive downpours it is impossible to cultivate here. Poinsettias, Roses and Euphorbias specially suffered, a large number having been quite killed. Young plants, both seedlings and from cuttings, of ordinary things, even those natives of this place, were lost in large numbers. To be able to successfully cope with the elements at such times, as well as in ordinary heavy rains, many pot plants ought to be provided with substantial sheds in which they could be housed. Mat-sheds are usually blown away at the commencement of

a storm.

5. Much more attention was given to Labelling the plants than it had been possible to bestow on this work for some time past. A large number of labels have been lettered and put down, so that at least one specimen of each kind of tree or shrub has now its name affixed to it. The specimen pot plants are also being ticketed. With the completion of these, visitors will be able to ascertain the names of all plants under cultivation. The destruction of the labels by weather, and the constant removals of them by the workmen who take them up to facilitate operations, and who on finding when they wish to replace them that they have forgotten where the labels were taken from, put them back hap-hazard, renders it an arduous thing to keep labels well supplied and in due order. The Chinese workmen, unlike native Indians, are quite unable to learn foreign names of plants, therefore they are unable to render any assistance in plant labelling. The labels used for open ground work are made of teak, painted, lettered, and varnished. This I have found the most suitable of any kind yet tried where a large label is required.

6. The additional piece of palm ground has been planted up with as many species of Palms as

it will contain.

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132

7. New ground has been broken up, prepared and planted with New introductions as well as with older kinds which were required for ornamental purposes especially to meet, when they are sufficiently grown, the increasing demand for cut flowers. For this service we shall have yet, to make very considerable provision. It is to be regretted that no suitable piece of ground is available, without the expenditure of much money on it, for the special purpose of growing a supply of flowers for cutting instead of having to make so great a drain on those in the Gardens. A piece of land which might be obtained, with the consent of the Government, just over the nullah to the east of the Garden might be converted from its present exceedingly rough condition into a passable reserve garden, if it can be saved from being further deprived of the surface soil in the meantime. I would strongly urge the advisability of placing this ground at once in the charge of this department, so that it might be duly conserved for possible future requirements.

8. The Herbaceous plant borders on each side of the Owl-house walk, in consequence of their having become unsuitable for the class of plants which they contained have been turfed down and lines of Camellias and Azaleas planted in the turf.

9. A plot of ground near the north-east entrance was prepared and planted with representative species of Scitamineous and Amaryllidaceous plants which were removed chiefly from the borders in the New Garden that were turfed down.

10. Near the Caine Road entrance the bank which had been denuded of grass by the shade cast from large trees has been converted into a Rockery and planted with ferns and miscellaneous plants. Other objectionable parts in the same locality I purpose dealing with this year so that they may be brought more into harmony with the rest of the Gardens.

11. The New Nursery described in paragraph 4 of last year's report has proved of great advantage for the work for which it was intended. Because of lack of funds its arrangements, however, are not so complete as they should be, but I hope to secure these bit by bit.

12. The new Plant House has well met the requirements for the better cultivation of some plants grown in pots. A similar structure, but with some improvements on the old one, has just been completed. It is 51 feet long by 22 feet wide. A new glass-house between the two is still wanted for the cultivation of plants susceptible to ill effects from cold in winter and from excessive rains in the wet season. It would be most desirable that these structures should have a more ornamental appearance, but so far the funds which were available for building them only barely sufficed to provide what was absolutely necessary for cultivable purposes only. In due course I hope that the present structures will be replaced with ornamental and more durable ones, at least equal to those with which most gardens of any standing are provided.

13. The system of Plant sales which I first officially suggested in 1882 and which were inaugurated four months ago have been more appreciated by the public than I anticipated they would be at the commencement. About 1,500 plants have been sold up to the end of the year. It will take some little time to learn what the public really require and more time to provide for those requirements, but I hope that we shall be able to meet them fully, and probably to develop new ones, as time goes Of course we have not been able to do more than propagate and grow on in small pots plants for sale. There would however be a considerable demand for specimen plants ready to at once furnish verandah parapets, but we have not yet facilities for carrying out the cultivation of such plants. If I can possibly see my way to make this successful it shall have consideration.

on.

14. A slight increase has been made in the number of Birds and quadrupeds, but we cannot go much further without additional accommodation. The fine Siamese honey-bear which we had for many years was lost a few months ago. Mr. E. M. SATOW, C.M.G., H. B. M. Consul at Bangkok, however, most kindly sent another one from Bangkok to replace it. The young one has grown rapidly and is now in fine condition. Two fine storks were also kindly given by Captain STEWART ; they are thriving well. Miss. WALKDEN also generously presented a nice deer, a fine specimen of the argus pheasant was sent by Mr. W. H. FORBES, but this, I much regret to say, fell a victim to cold, apparently.

15. The devastation committed by Ants in gardens is so great, and effectual remedies are so little known that it will be useful, no doubt, to many people to make known the success of a plan which has been here adopted this year to protect seeds and plants in the open ground. The remedy is carbolic acid diluted in water. With one part of acid in 50 of water a line is watered all round seed beds or patches of ground when the seeds are sown, afterwards a daily application of half the strength is made until the seedlings are beyond the power of their enemies. This has been found a great success when ants were not already in the ground operated on, as they seem to have great objections to crossing the saturated line.

16. The plants of Star anise which Mr. H. KOPSCH, Commissioner of Customs at Pakhoi, kindly procured for us in 1882 from the district where it is cultivated by the Chinese have made very satisfac- tory progress, and I think it is probable that they will flower this year, when, if they do so, it will be possible to settle the question which has been long in doubt as to what the species of Illicium is which Star anise of commerce is obtained from.

17. Exchanges of plants and seeds have been conducted with the various establishments with which relations are in existence. The number of plants received was 800, and of bags, boxes and packets of seeds 201, of animals 10, and Wardian cases 9, from 42 contributors.

རྩྭ

:

133

:

ནོ

18. The plants sent out numbered 1,740, and of bags, boxes and packets of seeds there were 201, and of Wardian cases 12, to 46 recipients.

19. The names of the principal contributors to the Gardens are as follow:-

Adams & Sons, New Zealand; seeds. Boehmer, Louis, Yokohama; plants.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide, Dr. Schomburgh, Director; seeds.

Brisbane, J. Pink, Director; seeds.

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23

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>>

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Jamaica, D. Morris, M.A., Director; seeds. Mauritius, J. Horne, F.L.S., Director; plants and seeds, three Wardian cases. Melbourne, W. Guilfoyle, Director; seeds. Natal, J. M. Wood, Curator; seeds. Sydney, C. More, F.L.S., Director; one

Wardian case plants.

Royal, Calcutta, Dr. G. King, LL.D., Superintendent; plants and seeds, two Wardian cases.

Royal, Kew, Sir J. D. Hooker, K.C.S.I., &c., Director; plants, seeds and herbarium specimens, two Wardian cases. Singapore, N. Cantley, superintendent;

Wardian case of plants.

Townsville, W. M. Anderson, Superin-

tendent; seeds.

Coates, J.; plants.

Cope, A. E., Saigon; plants.

20. The following were the chief recipients :—

Acclimatization Society, Queensland; plants and seeds, one

Wardian case.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide; seeds.

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Brisbane; seeds.

Jamaica; seeds.

Mauritius; plants and seeds, two Wardian

cases.

Melbourne; seeds.

Natal; plants and seeds, two Wardian

cases.

Royal, Calcutta; seeds.

Royal, Ceylon; plants and seeds, two

Wardian cases.

Royal, Kew; seeds.

Singapore; plants and seeds.

Sydney; plants and seeds, one Wardian

case.

Townsville; plants and seeds, two War-

dian cases. Trinidad; seeds.

Bell-Irving, Mrs.; plants.

Boehmer, Louis, Yokohama; plants, two Wardian cases.

Bunting, J., Yokohama; seeds..

Coxon, Mrs.; plants.

Crow, W. E.; plants.

De Segonzac, G. D., Hankow; seeds. Dickie, Mrs.; a badger.

Forbes, W. H.; an argus pheasant.

Ford, C.; plants and seeds collected in Formosa. Howell, F.; a monkey.

Hughes, S.; a Fokien deer. Hutchison, J. D.; plants. Johnson, Mrs. A. B.; seeds. O'Malley, Mrs.; rare fern. Pitman, John; plants. Richards, C. W.; an owl. Romano, A. G.; plants.

Satow, E. M., Bangkok; a Siamese bear.

Schlich, Dr. W., Inspector General of Forests, Indià; seedș

of forest trees.

Stewart, Captain; 2 storks.

Swaelmen, Vander, J., Ghent, Belgium; seeds.

Verona, Captain, S.S. Berenice; seeds. Veitch, J. V. & Sons, London; plants. Walkden, Miss; a deer.

Burdon, Mrs.; plants. Coxon, Mrs.; plants. Creagh, C. V., Perak; seeds. Curtis, C., Penang; seeds. Forest, R. J., Amoy; plants. Ho Kai, Dr.; plants.

Hutchison, J. D.; plants.

Ladies' Recreation Club; plants.

Lewis, Captain; plants. Linstead, Mrs.; plants.

O'Malley, Mrs.; plants.

Patterson, J. W., Shanghai; seeds.

Pearce, Rev. T. W., Canton; plants.

Romano, A. G.; plants.

Ribeiro, F. V.; plants.

Satow, E. M., Bangkok; one Wardian case plants. Sargent, Mrs.; plants.

Swaelmen, J. V., Ghent, Belgium; seeds.

Vyvyan, Lieut. C. B.; seeds.

Vincent, Captain; plants.

Woodin, E. L.; plants and seeds.

Walker, Col. E. L.; plants and seeds.

Williams, J. P., Ceylon; seeds.

21. The Library has been increased by the following additions :--

Botanical Magazine for 1883.

Decandolle's Prodromus, 21 vols.

Flora British India, parts 10 and 11, presented by Sir

Gardeners' Chronicle for 1883.

Joseph D. Hooker, K.C.S.I., &c.

Genera Plantarum, part II of Vol. III.

Guide to the Natal Botanic Gardens.

Journal of Botany for 1883.

Report on the Botanic Gardens and Plantations, Adelaide,

""

Report of the Forest Administration in Bengal for 1882-83.

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for 1883.

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Ganesh Khind, for 1883-84. and Plantations, Jamaica,

for 1883.

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Saharumpore and Mussorie,

for 1883.

of the Queensland Acclimatization Society for 1883. on the Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta, for 1883.

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27

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39

22

31

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Ceylon, for 1883. Kew, for 1882.

Cawnpore Experimental Farm for 1883. Horticultural Gardens, Lucknow for 1883. Public Gardens and Plantations, Jamaica,

for 1883.

of the Forest Administration in Assam for 1882-83.

""

23

29

in Ajmere - Merwara

for 1882-83.

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29

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in British Burma for

1882-83.

in the Central Provin-

ces for 1882–83. Corrg for 1883–84. in the Hyderabad As- signed Districts for 1882-83.

in the Punjab for 1883-

84.

in the Madras Presi-

dency for 1882-83.

in the North Western Provinces and Dudh for 1882-83.

Forest Survey Branch, India, for 1882–83. on the Measurements and Rates of Growth of Ca-

suarina in the Mellore District, India. Review of the Forest Administration in British India for

1882-83.

List of Publications and Maps relating to Forest Adminis- tration in India sent to the Edinburgh International Forestry Exhibition of 1884.

Suggestions regarding Forest Administration in the Hyde-

rabad Assigned Districts, India.

134

22. As an appendix, I attach a list of Additions to the Hongkong flora which have been discovered since Dr. HANCE's valuable supplement was published in 1871. The localities and dates, and names of individuals refer to the places where the plants were found, the time of the discoveries, and the names of the discoverers. In those cases where descriptions or notices of the plants have been published the Journals or Magazines which contain them are referred to. No list has been made public for 13 years, and a number of additions have not been recorded at all, although many entirely new species have been described and published, chiefly in the journal of Botany. This list will not only be inter- esting but it should be of much use to workers at the Hongkong flora. It will serve a good purpose until a descriptive list of additions is published, a work which is much needed. I have to thank Dr. H. F. HANCE, H. B. M., Acting Consul at Canton, for valuable information and assistance in the preparation of the list.

23. As new discoveries of plants are continually being made in Hongkong we may yet expect many interesting additions to the number already known when the Island is more completely searched.

24. The Re-arrangement of the herbarium has been completed and a good foundation now exists on which to build up what should become in the future the chief herbarium in China.

AFFORESTATION.

25. The work of the year has been chiefly devoted to the rearing and planting of the China pine as before. The Total number of trees planted is 330,019, and of sites sown 384,140. This kind of tree we must look to chiefly for the furnishing of the hills with forest vegetation, as it is the only one which experience would lead me to plant in large quantities in most of the localities where afforestation can be successfully carried on.

26. Other kinds have been experimented with, several new ones having been added to the list during the year, but most of the exotic trees must be provided with much more favourable conditions for tree growth than those which the China pine requires; these favourable conditions exist in small areas only, and they are often widely separated, which makes the management of them a great deal more difficult than if extensive areas could be obtained in localities convenient of access. The conditions most favourable are good soil, an adequate amount of moisture in the soil, and especially shelter from winds. All of these conditions usually decrease in proportion as we ascend the hills, therefore I have chiefly limited the areas selected for planting to the lower portions of the hills first where the expendi- ture of labour and money is likely to give quicker and more certain results than planting in the upper regions where the results are less satisfactory and slower of accomplishment. These higher portions of the hills it will be time enough to take in hand when planting is complete in those places where better effects are produced. At the same time plantings on a limited scale, but sufficient for the purpose, have been made for experiment in localities where the conditions are as varied as possible, so that when the time arrives for advancing the work into exposed and higher regions a certain amount of experience will have been acquired for guidance in conducting the work, so that unnecessary waste of Government money may be saved in extensive works.

27. No operations on a large scale should be instituted until perfectly reliable practical data have been procured. It is so easy to build up a pleasing theory of apparently possible achievements that many people often fall into the temptation and only find their mistake when a touch of practice upsets all their calculations.

28. Tree planting began in the second week of December 1883, and it was finished in the third week of June of the year under report. The season, in consequence of the rain having been more evenly distributed than usual, was extremely favourable for planting.

29. Upwards of 9,000 Gum trees, consisting of fourteen species of Eucalyptus were planted on the lands bordering the northern side of Kennedy Road. As stated in par. No. 65 of my report for 1883, species which are indigenous to Queensland were selected as being the most likely to succeed in this climate. They were planted during February and March when they were between six inches and a foot high. Great care was taken in the preparation of the ground for their reception. Scarcely any deaths occurred after planting, and the trees have made very satisfactory progress up to the present, the different species ranging from three to ten feet in height. The places where these trees are planted are fairly well sheltered and the soil is tolerably good. So good results are, however, not to be generally expected here from gum trees. Twenty thousand more gum trees have this year been raised for next year's planting. Most of these will be planted, at the request of the Military Authorities, in the vicinity of the Military Sanitarium at 900 feet above sea level for the expected benefit of the inhabitants of the Sanitarium.

30. The Planting operations are tabulated as follow:-

TREES PLANTED

Pinus sinensis,

Bamboos,....

Bischoffia javanica,

.318,859

148

209

Cæsalpinia ferrea,

Cinnamomum Cassia,

Eucalypti, 14 species, Hura crepitans, Hymenæa courbaril, Persea namuh, Podocarpus latifolius, Podocarpus elongata, Prosopis juliflora,

41

268

9,293

22

12

49

32

39

....

242

Thespesia populnea,

4

Tristanea conferta,

801

Sown in situ

Pinus sinensis,

.384,140

714,159

135

31. A good number of Camphor and Cork-Oak trees have also been reared in the nurseries for planting out during the coming season.

The acorns from which the cork-oak trees were raised were procured from Spain. They were not in good condition when they arrived but about a quarter germi- nated and the seedlings made rapid, but rather weak, growth.

32. Many of the Cassia (Cinnamomum Cassia) trees, although they had been planted in the most sheltered position that could be found for them, suffered greatly from the October typhoon, otherwise they have continued to make satisfactory progress.

33. Plantations of the Varnish tree (Aleurites vernicia) received a liberal supply of manure and the trees had the soil well dug about their roots. The effects of these operations are very marked, the trees having immediately greatly strengthened and developed. There are about 40,000 of these trees.

34. A plantation of the Chinese Tea-oil plant was also treated in a similar manner as the above. Of these plants there are about 2,000 so far doing well. It is rather early yet to judge of their ultimate

success.

35. The political troubles in China have prevented our obtaining a supply this year of seeds of the varnish tree in consequence of missionaries not being resident in the interior. Efforts which have been made to get seeds through Chinese agents have not yet been successful, but I hope yet to get some. It is always extremely difficult to procure seeds or plants from any distance through Chinese.

36. Upwards of 1,000 trees-all that it was practicable to transplant-were removed from the line on which the cutting for the new conduit was made. In the Happy Valley woods 200 indigenous oaks and other trees and 300 pine trees were felled to provide for the progress of the conduit. At the request of the Surveyor General this work, which had been done at his request, was suspended in con- sequence of some alteration which he stated it would be necessary to make in the line of the conduit. Portions of many of the trees which were felled have been retained for wood specimens. When the work of clearing off trees is continued there will be opportunity to secure a further stock of specimens without sacrificing trees which should not be cut merely for the sake of getting specimens.

37. The Forest Guards had twenty-one cases for prosecution before the Magistrates, out of which nineteen convictions were obtained. The sentences of the prisoners were from two to fourteen days imprisonment.

38. The grass-cutters continue to do much mischief both directly and indirectly to the plantations. Until some such steps as those I recommended a year ago are taken, I fear that mischief will continue The loss of natural aids to reproduction is always to be regretted as these can be obtained so much more effectively, extensively, and economically than artificial ones.

to ensue.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent Botanical and Afforestation Department.

136

Appendix

LIST OF ADDITIONS TO THE HONGKONG FLORA.

MAGNOLIACEÆ.

Michelia sp., Below Victoria Gap, 27th May, 1883.

ANONACEÆ.

Melodorum glaucescens, Hance. Victoria Peak, Au-

gust, 1879, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIV., p. 112. Uvaria calamistrata, Hance, Little Hongkong, Au- gust, 1861, Dr. Hance, and May, 1876, Rev. J. Lamont and C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XV., p. 77.

CRUCIFERÆ.

Cardamine Lamontii, Hance. September, 1874, Rev.

J. Lamont. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIV., p. 363.

POLYGALEÆ.

Polygala telephioides, Willd. Little Hongkong, 19th

September, 1882, C. Ford.

Polygala Wattersii, Hance? Little Hongkong, 6th

July, 1881, C. Ford.

TERNSTRŒMIACEÆ.

Adinandra Millettii, Benth and Hook. Repulse Bay,

26th July, 1879, C. Ford.

LINEÆ.

Ixonanthes chinensis, Champ. Re-discovered by C.

Ford, 9th March, 1881.

Zanthoxylæ sp.

BUTACEA

ILICINEÆ.

Ilex buxifolia, Hance. Wongneichung, May, 1874, Rev.

J. Lamont. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIV., p. 364.

CELASTRINEÆ.

Evonymus gibber, Hance. Hongkong Botanic Garden, June, 1881. Jour. of Bot., vol. XV., p. 77. Most 'probably introduced to the Garden from the hills, but it has not yet been discovered wild.

SABIACEÆ.

Meliosma squamulata, Hance. Wongneichung, April, 1874, Rev. J. Lamont. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIV., p. 364. Meliosmatis sp., March, 1883, C. Ford.

LEGUMINOSÆ.

Acacia pennata, Willd. May, 1858, Dr. H. F. Hance. Crotalaria striata, DC., Roadsides, 1879, C. Ford. Geissaspis cristata, W. et Arn., Deep Water Bay,

24th November, 1879, C. Ford.

Mimosa pudica, Linn. Happy Valley, C. Ford. Mucunæ sp., 11th November, 1883, C. Ford. Ormosia semicastrata, Hance. Wongneichung, April,

1879, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XV., p. 78.

CRASSULACEÆ.

Kalanchoe spathulata, DC., Cape D'Aguilar penin-

sular, 8th May, 1884.

COMBRETACEÆ.

Lumnitzera racemosa, Willd. Little Hongkong, 17th

June, 1879, C. Ford.

MYRTACEÆ.

Eugenia acuminatissima, Kurz., 1879, C. Ford.

MELASTOMACEÆ.

i

Otanthera Fordii, Hance. Black Mountain, July, 1880,

C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIV., p. 47. Sonerila tenera, Royle? Mt. Gough, August, 1880, G.

S. Northcote.

CUCURBITACEÆ.

Trichosanthes acmenioides? Near Buddhist Tem-

ple, 13th August, 1879, C. Ford.

Trichosanthes multiloba, Miq.? Aberdeen New

Road, June, 1880, C. Ford.

FICOIDEÆ.

Tetragonia expansa, Forst. Causeway Bay, 8th May,

1879, C. Ford.

ARALIACEÆ.

Pentapanax decandrum, Hance. Hoktsuewan, No-

vember, 1884, C. Ford.

RUBIACEE.

Geophila reniformis, Don., North Point, 14th Sep-

tember, 1881, C. Ford.

Hedyotis hispida, Retz. Little Hongkong, 4th Sep-

tember, 1882, C. Ford.

Lasianthus Wallichii, Wight., Happy Valley, April, 1874, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIII., p. 196. Weberæ sp., Wongneichung, 27th October, 1881, C.

Ford.

COMPOSITÆ.

Ainsliæa Walkerii, Hook. Capt. A. L. Walker, Bot.

Maq., Tab. 625.

Cnicus japonicus, Maxim. Cape D'Aguilar, 1873? C.

Ford.

CAMPANULACEÆ.

Lobelia radicans, Thunb. Happy Valley.

SAPOTACEÆ.

Chrysophyllum pentagonum, Hance. Wongnei- chung, January, 1881, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XV., p. 78.

STYRACEÆ.

Symplocos decora, Hance. Victoria Peak, 4th March, 1876, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XXII., p. 369. OLEACEA.

Ligustrum japonicum, Thbg., Victoria Peak, 4th

June, 1879, C. Ford.

SCROPHULARINEÆ. Vandellia pedunculata, Benth. 17th November, 1880,

C. Ford.

Vandellia angustifolia, Benth. Hinds.

ACANTHACEÆ.

Justicia ventricosa, Wall. Wongneichung, 21st March,

1883, C. Ford.

VERBENACEÆ.

Avicennia officinalis, Linn. Little Hongkong, 26th

July, 1879, T. Sampson and C. Ford.

Lantana trifolia, Wántsai, August, 1879, C. Ford.

LABIATE.

Elsholtziæ sp., Little Hongkong, 16th September, 1882,

C. Ford.

Hyptis suaveolens, Poir., Stanley, &c.

POLYGONACEÆ.

Polygonum flaccidum, Roxb., Mt. Gough, Novem-

ber, 1874, C. Ford.

Polygonum sagittatum, Thbg., Shaukiwán, 7th July,

1879, C. Ford.

Polygonum tinctorius, Lour. Saiwán, 16th July,

1876, C. Ford.

ARISTOLOCHIACEÆ. Aristolochia Thwaitesii, Hook. Happy Valley,

14th April, 1882, C. Ford.

PIPERACEÆ.

Saururus Loureirii, Dene., Happy Valley, 1883, C.

Ford.

LAURINEÆ.

Beilschmiedia chinensis, Hance, Black Mountain,

May, 1881, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XX., p. 79. Cinnamomum validinerve, Hance. Wongneichung,

June, 1879, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XX., p. 80. Cryptocarya concinna, Hance. Wongneichung, 23rd August, 1880, C. Ford, Jour. of Bot., vol. XX., p. 79. Perseæ sp., Victoria Peak, 9th November, 1881, C. Ford.

Sp., Victoria Peak, 9th November, 1881, C. Ford.

:

EUPHORBIACEÆ.

APPENDIX,-Continued.

Buxus sempervirens, Linn, var. Wallchiana.

Causeway Bay, 6th February, 1882, C. Ford. Euphorbia atoto, Forst., Deep Water Bay, 30th Dec-

ember, 1878, T. Sampson and C. Ford. Excæcariæ sp., Repulse Bay, 24th November, 1879,

T. Sampson and C. Ford.

Trewia nudifiora, Willd., Little Hongkong and Táitám-

tuk, Dr. Hance.

URTICACEÆ.

Cudrania rectispina, Hance. Wongneichung, April, 1874, Rev. J. Lamont. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIV., p. 365.

CUPULIFERÆ.

Castanopsis Lamontii, Hance. Wongneichung, No-

vember, 1874, Rev. J. Lamont. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIII.,. p. 368. Quercus glauca, Thunb. T. Sampson and C. Ford. Quercus synbalanos, Hance. Wongneichung, July, 1880, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XXII., p. 228. Quercus iteaphylla, Hance. Wongneichung, April, 1881, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XXII., p. 229.

CONIFERÆ.

Podocarpus macrophylla, Don., Victoria Peak, C.

Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XXI., p. 357. Podocarpus chinensis, Wall., Hoktsuiwan, Novem-

ber, 1884, C. Ford.

ASELEPIADEÆ.

Tylophora macrantha, Hance. Little Hongkong,

May, 1881, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XX., p. 79.

ORCHIDEÆ. Bolbophyllum delitescens, Hance. Victoria Peak,

July, 1873, C. Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XIV., p.:44. Cleisostoma virginale, Hance. Wongneichung, Aug., 1861, Dr. H. F. Hance. Sup. to Flora Hong., p. 40, Jour. of Bot., vol. XV., p. 38.

Cleisostoma Fordii, Hance. Victoria Peak, 1873, C.

Ford. Jour, of Bot., vol. XIV., p. 45.

Eria ambrosia, Hance. Victoria Peak, March, 1875, C.

Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. XXI., p. 231.

Liparis choroxantha, Hance. Mt. Parker, March,

1881, C. Ford, Jour. of Bot., vol. XXI., p. 231.

Habenaria rhodocheila, Hance. Little Hongkong,

August, 1882, C. Ford.

Pogoniæ sp., Little Hongkong, 1879?

Nephelaphylli sp., Victoria Peak, C. Ford.

SCITAMINEÆ.

Zingiber integrilabrum, Hance. Mt. Gough, April,

1881, C. Ford.

Zingiber Zerumbet, Cape D'Aguilar, 19th September,

1879, C. Ford.

IRIDEÆ.

Iris speculatrix, Hance. Pokfúlam, April, 1874, C.

Ford. Jour. of Bot., vol. VIII., p. 196.

AMARYLLIDEÆ.

Lycoris aurea, Herb., Hoktsuiwan, November, 1884,

C. Ford.

Hypoxis aurea, Lour.

DIOSCOREÆ.

T Dioscore spicata, Roth.? Happy Valley, 28th June,

1880, C. Ford.

LILIACEE.

Aspidistra lurida, Ker., Happy Valley, 1878, C. Ford.

Hemerocallis disticha, Don., Hoktsuiwan, C. Ford. Smilacis sp., Happy Valley, 17th October, 1881, C.

Ford.

PALMÆ..

Calamus Margaritæ, Hance. Wongneichung, April, 1874, Mrs. Dods. Jour. of Bot., vol. VII., p. 267. Calamus tetradactylus, Hance. Wongneichung, March, 1875, Dr. Dods, Jour. of Bot., vol. VIIÏ., p. 290. Calamus thysanolepis, Hance. Táitámtuk, Novem-

ber, 1873, Dr. Dods. Jour. of Bot., vol. XII., p. 265. Calamus Walkeri, Hance. August, 1873, Colonel A.

L. Walker. Jour. of Bot., vol. XII., p. 266. Licualæ, sp., Mt. Parker, 1879, C. Ford.

ARISÆMEÆ.

Arisæma penicillatum, N. E. Br., Victoria Gap, C.

Ford.

CYPERACEÆ.

Cyperus tegetiformis, Roxb., Little Hongkong, 1882,

C. Ford.

Scleria caricina, Benth., 1881, C. Ford. Cladium, (Bauméa) ensigerum, Hance, mss., Pok-

fúlam, 17th January, 1883, C. Ford.

GRAMINEÆ.

Arundinaria Hindsii, Munro., "Sterile specimen

gathered in 1842, by Hinds."

Arundinaria, "Summer, 1879, C. Ford. “White bamboo

of the natives."

Panicum cinicinum, R. Br., Above Happy Valley. Panicum radicans, Retz., Causeway Bay, 29th Octo-

ber, 1882, C. Ford.

Chrysopogon parviflorus, Benth., C. Ford. Chrysopogon pictus, Hance, C. Ford..

FILICES.

Acrostichum quercifolium, Retz., Wongneichung,

September, 1874, C. Ford.

Asplenium germanicum, Weiss., 1874, Jour. of Bot.,

vol. XXI., p. 209.

Asplenium normale, Don., Black Mountain, C. Ford,

Mt. Gough, G. S. Northcote.

Asplenium Pullingeri, Baker. Bull. de la Soc. bot.

de France.

Nephrolepis, Mt. Parker, 1884, C. Ford.

Onychium japonicum, Kunze, Mt. Gough, C. Ford. Polypodium Phymatodes, Linn., Mt. Davis, Dr. H.

F. Hance.

Polypodium irioides, Lam.

Pteris discolor, Langed. and Fisch., North Point, 1879,

C. Ford.

Trichomanes Filicula, Borg., Happy Valley, 1874,

C. Ford.

EQUISETACEÆ.

Equisetum debile, Near Victoria Gap, Theo. Samp-

son.

LYCOPODIACEÆ.

Selaginella concinna, Spring.

Selaginella tenera, Spring? 1874, Rev. J. Lamont,

and Happy Valley, 1876.

Selaginella sp., Mt. Kellet, and Victoria Peak, C. Ford. Lycopodium carolinianum, Linn., Black Mountain,

16th September, 1882, C. Ford..

137

139

No. 13.

PETITION

Presented to the Legislative Council at the meeting held on the.

21st January, 1885.

To the Honourable

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

OF HONGKONG.

THE HUMBLE PETITION OF THE UNDERSIGNED PETITIONERS.

SHEWETH:-

I. That your petitioners the undersigned solicitors constitute the whole body of solicitors in the Colony of Hongkong.

II. That a very large number (it is believed a majority) of the titles to land in the Colony have, for various reasons, during the existence of the Colony, fallen into a most complicated and entangled condition, so much so that there are, as your said petitioners have experienced, a very great number of titles which, though possibly so far good in the sense that no one could dispossess their owners thereof, are, from a technical point of view, practically bad in the sense of their not being, as they should be, titles which a Court of Equity would force on an unwilling purchaser.

III. Owing to these facts the transfers of land in the Colony have become to a large extent difficult, if not, indeed, on open contracts, impracticable undertakings, demanding strong guarding conditions of limitation on sales, which, however, valuable as a protection to Vendors, are apt to startle intending purchasers and prejudice the biddings, or where the contract is an open one, such as by letter, as so many are, the result, as the experience of the last three years conclusively proves, is frequently a law- suit.

IV. In consequence of the legal difficulties above referred to attaching to trans- missions of land, your said petitioners, at a meeting lately held by them, considered the whole question, and the mode that would be best in the public interest to effect a remedy.

V. At the same meeting your said petitioners unanimously passed the following resolutions:-

1.)—That in order to assimilate the law of property in this Colony to that now in force in England, and to facilitate the transfer of land in the Colony, it is very desirable that the Imperial Acts known as the Real Property Limitation Act 1874 and the Vendor and Purchaser Act 1874 should be extended to this Colony so far as the provisions of the same are applicable and with such variations and additions as may be necessary.

140

2.) That having regard to the manner in which the Crown Lots in this Colony have been and are still being divided into Sections and such Sections into Sub-sections, and the difficulty, and in some cases the impossibility, thus occasioned in tracing and obtaining production of such of the Title Deeds as relate to the whole of the Crown Lot or' Section before such division, it would greatly facilitate and cheapen the trans- mission of land if a system for filing official copies of all Deeds which have now to be registered in the Land Office were legalized, either by duplicate copies of such deeds being left with the originals, or by such originals being copied by clerks to be appointed for the purpose, such official copies to be taken and received as evidence of the originals, and if certified copies of the memorials of all such deeds as have already been registered were (unless and except so far as they should be proved to be inaccurate) to be taken to be sufficient evidence of the deed and of the due execution thereof so far as the same were exemplified in the memorial.

VI. Your said petitioners also discussed several other points of practice and procedure, and came unanimously to the conclusion that without the aid of state legislation nothing effectual could be accomplished towards rescuing the land question of the Colony from its present hopeless and entangled position.

VII. The accompanying draft form of Ordinance has been prepared by your said petitioners after careful consideration and regard to the special nature of the require- ments of the practice of conveyancing in the Colony.

VIII. If an Ordinance to the proposed effect were passed, your said petitioners have no hesitation in saying that it would be a great relief to a large majority of land- owners and would materially facilitate dealings with lands in this Colony.

Your said petitioners therefore humbly pray Your Excellency and the Legislative Council to introduce an Ordinance to the above effect and your petitioners will ever pray, &c.

A. B. JOHNSON,

Crown Solicitor.

WILLIAM WOTTON.

VICTOR H. DEACON.

ALFRED PARKER STOKES.

H. L. DENNYS.

F. H. O. WILSON.

C. ERNEST BOWLES.

ERNEST R. WOOD.

W. H. R. MOSSOP.

MATHEW J. D. STEPHENS.

HENRY J. HOLMES.

CREASY EWENS.

H. T. ARKCOLL.

DANIEL E. CALDWELL.

GODFREY C. C. MASTER.

i

#

7

WE, the undersigned residents and landowners of the Colony of Hongkong, having read the foregoing Petition, are advised and firmly believe that if its prayer be granted the effects will be of a highly beneficial nature to the large body of residents who have interests in, and will greatly facilitate dealings with, lands in this Colony.

W. KESWICK.

T. JACKSON.

F. D. SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

C. P. CHATER.

WM. H. FORBES.

A. P. McEwEN.

J. S. LAPRAIK

by his Attorney,

C. D. BOTTOMLEY.

C. D. BOTTOMLEY.

E. R. BELILIOS.

E. MACKINTOSH.

J. BELL-IRVING.

H. HOPPIUS.

. A. GÜLTZOW.

M. GROTE.

M. E. SASSOON..

C. STIEBEL.

W. KERFOOT HUGHES.

L. POESNECKER.

C. ERDMANN.

A. McIVER.

. H. W. DAVIS

by his Attorney, FRED. T. P. FOSTER.

EDMUND SHARP

by his Attorney, FRED. T. P. FOSTER.

GRANVILLE SHARP

by his Attorney,

FRED. T. P. FOSTER.

FRED. T. P. FOSTER.

J. GODFREY BIRD.

CLEMENT PALMER.

DORABJEE NOWROJEE,

F. DODWELL.

W. H. RAY.`

E. L. WOODIN.

A. MCCONACHIE

Attorney for the Executors of R. J. GILMAN, Deceased.

R. J. ASHTON

by his Attorney,

A. MCCONACHIE.

A. R. HUDSON

by his Attorney,

A. MCCONACHIE.

W. S. YOUNG

by his Attorney,

A. MCCONACHIE.

H. G. THOMSETT,

J. P. MCEUEN

by his Attorney,

H. G. THOMSETT,

R. K. LEIGH,

CHEONG KAI.

LI SING.

YU SUIWAN.

HO LAI SHI

by her Attorney,

HO KAI.

WEI A YUK.

LEE TUCK Cheong.

CHOA CHEE BEE.

CHAN TAI

by his Attorney,

PUN PONG.

CHING KWAI

by his Attorney,

PUN PONG.

Q

141

I

}

!

!

A BILL

ENTITLED

An Ordinance for the further limitation of actions and suits relating to the recovery of land and rent and for altering and amending the law of conveyancing within the Colony of Hongkong, 1885.

W

HEREAS it is desirable further to limit the times within which actions or suits may be brought within the Colony of Hongkong for the recovery of land or rent and of charges thereon, and to facilitate the transfer of land within the Colony by means of certain amendments in the law of conveyancing: Be it therefore enacted by the Governor of Hongkong, with the advice of the Legislative Council thereof as follows:-

1. This Ordinance may be cited as The Conveyancing Ordinance, 1885.

2. The terms hereinafter mentioned shall have the mean- ings assigned to them unless there be something either in the subject or context repugnant to such construction that is to say:-

The expression "the Land Office" shall mean the

Land Office of the Colony.

"

The expression "the Land Officer shall mean the person (other than the Governor) who shall for the time being have the lawful control and super- intendence of the Land Office.

The word "Land" shall extend to messuages, land, tenements and hereditaments of any tenure situate in the Colony.

The expression "the Court" shall mean the Supreme

Court of the Colony.

3. After the commencement of this Ordinance no person shall make an entry or distress, or bring any action or suit, to recover any land or rent, but within twelve years next after the time at which the right to make such entry or distress, or to bring such action or suit, shall have first accrued to some person through whom he claims, or, if such right shall not have accrued to any person through whom he claims then within twelve years next after the time at which the right to make such entry or distress, or to bring such action or suit, shall have first accrued to the person making or bringing the same.

4. A right to make an entry or distress, or to bring an action or suit to recover any land or rent shall be deemed to have first accrued, in respect of an estate or interest in reversion or remainder, or other future estate or interest, at the time at which the same shall have become an estate or interest in possession by the determination of any estate in respect of which such land shall have been held, or the profits thereof or such rent shall have been received, not- withstanding that the person claiming such land or rent, or some person through whom he claims, shall, at any time previously to the creation of the estate which shall have determined, have been in the possession or receipt of the profits of such land, or in receipt of such rent; but, if the person last entitled to any particular estate on which any future estate or interest was expectant shall not have been in the possession or receipt of the profits of such land, or in receipt of such rent, at the time when his interest determin- ed, no such entry or distress shall be made, and no such action or suit shall be brought by any person becoming entitled in possesion to a future estate or interest but within twelve years next after the time when the right to make an entry or distress, or to bring an action or suit for the recovery of such land or rent, shall have first accrued to the person whose interest shall have so determined, or within 'six years next after the time when the estate of the person becoming entitled in possession shall have become vested in possession, (whichever of those two periods shall be the longer) and, if the right of any such person to make such entry or distress, or to bring any such action or suit, shall have been barred under this Ordinance, no person, after- wards claiming to be entitled to the same land or rent in respect of any subsequent estate or interest under any deed, will, or settlement executed or taking effect after the time when a right to make an entry or distress, or to bring an action or suit for the recovery of such land or rent, shall have first accrued to the owner of the particular estate whose interest shall have so determined as aforesaid shall make any such entry or distress, or bring any such action or suit, to recover any such land or rent.

Short title.

Interpreta- tions.

The Land Office.

The Land Officer.

Land.

The Court.

No land or rent to be recovered but within twelve years after the right of action accrued. [37 & 38 Vict.,

c. 57, 8. 1.]

Provision for case of future estates. [37 & 38 Vict. c. 57, s. 2.]

Time limited to six years when person entitled to the particular estate out of possession, &c.

P

}

143

144

**

:

In cases of infancy,

coverture or lunacy when right of action accrues, six years to be allowed from terraination of disability or previous death. 37 & 38 Vict., c. 57, 8. 3.]

No time allowed for absence from Colony.

[37 & 38 Vict., c. 57, s. 4.]

J

Thirty years utmost allow- ance for disabilities. [37 & 38 Vict., c. 57, s. 5.]

Mortgagor to be barred at end of twelve years from the time when mortgagee took posses- sion or from last written acknowledg

1

ment.

[37

38 Vict., c. 37, s. 7.]

5. If, at the time at which the right of any person to make an entry or distress or to bring an action or suit to recover any land or rent, shall have first accrued as aforesaid, such person shall have been under any of the following disabilities, that is to say, infancy, coverture, idiotcy, lunacy, or unsoundness of mind, then such person, or the person claiming through him, may, notwithstanding that the period of twelve years or six years (as the case may be) herein- before limited shall have expired, make an entry or distress, or bring an action or suit to recover such land, or rent, at any time within six years next after the time at which the person to whom such right shall first have accrued shall have ceased to be under any such disability, or shall have died (whichever of those two events shall have first hap- pened).

6. The time within which any such entry may be made, or any such action or suit may be brought as aforesaid, shall not in any case after the commencement of this Ordinance be extended or enlarged by reason of the absence from the Colony, during all or any part of that time, of the person having the right to make such entry, or to bring such action or suit, or of any person through whom he claims.

7. No entry, distress, action, or suit shall be made or brought by any person who, at the time at which his right to make any entry or distress or to bring an action or suit to recover any land or rent shall have first accrued, shall be under any of the disabilities hereinbefore mentioned or by any person claiming through him but within thirty years next after the time at which such right shall have first accrued, although the person under disability at such time may have remained under one or more of such disabili- ties during the whole of such thirty years, or although the term of six years from the time at which he shall have ceased to be under any such disability, or have died shall not have expired.

8. When a mortgagee shall have obtained the possession or receipt of the profits of any land, or of any rent com- prised in his mortgage the mortgagor, or any person claiming through him, shall not bring any action or suit to redeem the mortgage but within twelve years next after the time at which the mortgagee obtained such possession or receipt, unless in the meantime an acknowledgment in writing of the title of the mortgagor, or of his right to redemption, shall have been given to the mortgagor or some person claiming his estate, or to the agent of such mortgagor or person, signed by the mortgagee or the person claiming through him; and in such case no such action or suit shall be brought but within twelve years next after the time at which such acknowledgment, or (if more than one) the last of such acknowledgments was given, and when there shall be more than one mortgagor, or more than one person claiming through the mortgagor or mortgagors, such acknowledgment, if given to any of such mortgagors or persons, or his or their agent, shall be as effectual as if the same had been given to all such mortgagors or persous, but where there shall be more than one mortgagee, or more than one person claiming the estate or interest of the mortgagee or mortgagees, such acknowledgment, signed by one or more of such mortgagees or persons shall be effec- tual only as against the party or parties signing as aforesaid, and the person or persons claiming any part of the mortgage money or land or rent by from or under him or them, and any person or persons entitled to any estate or interest, to take effect after or in defeasance of his or their estate or interest, and shall not operate to give to the mortgagor or mortgagors a right to redeem the mortgage as against the person or persons entitled to any other undivided or divided part of the money or land or rent; and where such of the mortgagees or persons aforesaid as shall have given such acknowledgment shall be entitled to a divided part of the land or rent comprised in the mortgage, or some estate or interest therein, and not to any ascertained part of the mortgage money, the mortgagor or mortgagors shall be entitled to redeem the same divided part of the land or rent on payment, with interest, of the part of the mortgage money which shall bear the same proportion to the whole of the mortgage money as the value of such divided part of the land or rent shall bear to the value of the whole of the land or rent comprised in the mortgage.

X

0

145

9. No action or suit or other proceeding shall be brought to recover any sum of money secured by any mortgage, judgment, or lien, or otherwise charged upon or payable out of any land or rent at law or in equity, or any legacy, but within twelve years next after a present right to receive the same shall have accrued to some person capable of giving a discharge for or release of the same, unless in the meantime some part of the principal money or some interest thereon, shall have been paid, or some acknowledgment of the right thereto shall have been given in writing signed by the person by whom the same shall be payable, or his agent, to the person entitled thereto, or his agent, and in such case no such action or suit or proceeding shall be brought but within twelve years after such payment or acknowledgment, or (if more than one) the last of such payments or acknowledgments was given.

10. After the commencement of this Ordinance no action, suit, or other proceeding shall be brought to recover any sum of money or legacy charged upon, or payable out of, any land or rent, at law or in equity, and secured by an express trust, or to recover any arrears of rent or of interest in respect of any sum of money or legacy so charged or payable, and so secured, or any damages in respect of such arrears, except within the time within which the same would be recoverable if there were not any such trust.

11. In the completion of any contract for sale of land made prior to or after the commencement of this Ordinance, and subject to any stipulation to the contrary in the contract, twelve years shall be the period of commencement of title which a purchaser may require.

12. In the completion of any such contract as aforesaid, and subject to any stipulation to the contrary therein, the obligations and rights of vendor and purchaser shall be regulated by the following rules, that is to say:—

First. Under contract to grant or assign a term of years, whether derived or to be derived out of a freehold or leasehold estate, the intended lessee or assignee shall not be entitled to call for nor enquire into nor make any objection to the title to the freehold ;

Second. Recitals statements, and descriptions of facts, matters, and parties contained in deeds, instru- ments, ordinances, or statutory declarations twelve years old at the date of the contract, shall, unless and except so far as they shall be proved to be inaccurate, be taken to be sufficient evidence of the truth of such facts, matters, and descriptions;

Third. The inability of the vendor to furnish the purchaser with a legal covenant to produce and furnish copies of documents of title shall not be an objection to title in case the purchaser will, on the completion of the contract, have an equitable right to the production of such documents;

Fourth. Such covenants for production as the pur- chaser can and shall require, shall be furnished at his expense and the vendor shall bear the expense of perusal and execution on behalf of and by himself and on behalf of and by all necessary parties other than the purchaser ;

Fifth. Where the vendor retains any part of or any interest in any estate to which any documents of title relate, he shall be entitled to retain such do- cuments but shall, at his own expense if required, give to the purchaser notarially certified copies of such documents as he shall retain ;

Sixth. The inability of the vendor to get in the legal estate of and in any land contracted to be sold which shall have been outstanding for a period of at least twelve years immediately preceding the date of the contract shall not be an objection to title.

13. Trustees who are either vendors or purchasers may sell or buy without excluding the application of the 10th section of this Ordiuance.

Money charged on land and legacies to be deemed satis- fied at the end of twelve years if no interest paid nor written acknowledg- ment given meantime.

[37 & 38 Vict., c. 57, 8. 8.]

Time for reco- vering charges and arrears of interest not to be enlarged by trusts for raising same. [37 & 38 Vict., c. 57, s. 10.]

Twelve years the root of title.

[37 & 38 Vict., c. 78, 8. 1.]

Rules for regulating obligations and rights of vendor and purchaser. [37 38 Vict

c. 78, 8. 2.]

[37 & 38, Vict. č. 78, s. 2.]

[37 & 38 Vict. c. 78, 6. 2.j

[37 & 38 Vict c. 78, B. 2.].

Trustees may sell, &c., notwithstand-

ing rules. [37 & 38 Vict.,

c. 78, 8. 3.]

1

146

Vendor or purchaser may obtain decision of Judge in chambers as to requisitions or objections, &c [37 38 Vict., c. 78, s. 9.]

Copies of

deeds, &c., to. be made by band officer.

Notarially certified copies of powers of attorney, &c., to be regis- tered.

True Icopies of memorials of deeds. &c., registered prior to the

commence- ment of

rdinance to be evidence.

Commence- ment of Ordinance.

14. A vendor or purchaser of land, or their representa- tives respectively, may at any time and from time to time apply in a summary manner to a Judge of the Court in Chambers in respect of any requisitions or objections, or any claim for compensation, or any other question arising out of, or connected with the contract not being a question affecting the existence or validity of the contract, and thereupon the judge shall make such order as to him shall appear just, and shall order how and by whom all or any of the costs of and incident to the application shall be borne and paid.

15. The land officer shall make and retain in the Land Office a copy (certified by him to be a true copy) of every deed, probate, letters of administration, judgment, or other instrument, or writing, whether under seal or not, which shall be registered in the Land Office under Ordinance No. 3 of 1884, or Ordinance No. 10 of 1856, and such certified copy shall be taken to be sufficient evidence of the original deed, probate, letters of administration or other instrument or writing of which it is a certified copy.

16. Where any person shall desire to register in the Land Office any deed, or other instrument, or writing, whether under seal, or not, which shall have been or shall purport to have been executed or signed by the attorney of any party thereto under a power of attorney or other authority in writing such person shall simultaneously with such registration deposit in the Land Office a notarially certified copy of such power

of

attorney or other authority, and such notarially certified copy shall be taken to be sufficient evidence of the original power of attorney or authority of which it is a notarially certified copy, and any deed or other instrument, or writing, whether under seal or not, which prior to the commencement of this Ordinance shall have been or shall purport to have been executed or signed under or by virtue of any power of attorney or other authority in writing whether such power of attorney or other authority can be produced or not shall, unless and except so far as the contrary be proved, be deemed to have been duly and lawful executed in pursuance of such power of attorney or other authority, and such power of attorney or other authority shall, unless and except so far as the contrary be proved, be deemed to have contained full and sufficient power and authority for the execution or signature of such deed or other instrument or writing.

17. A copy certified by the land officer to be a true copy of the registered memorials of any deed or other instrument or writing which shall have been registered in the Land Office prior to the commencement of this Ordi- nance shall, unless and except so far as the same shall be proved to be inaccurate, be taken to be sufficient evidence of the contents, and due execution of the deed, or other instrument or writing of the memorial of which it is a certified copy.

18. This Ordinance shall commence and take effect on the

1885. day of

K

?

147

No. 14.

Telegrams and Correspondence respecting the Armaments of the Forts at Hongkong.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

TELEGRAM.

Governor Sir G. F. Bowen to the Secretary of State.

2nd January, 1885.

Legislative Council unanimous in voting the amount estimated for expenditure on works of Military Defences, on the understanding that Imperial Government provides armament of latest pattern breech-loading heavy Ordnance, capable of resisting heaviest modern Ironclads. Despatch by Mail.

MY LORD,

(2.)

Governor Sir G. F. Bowen to the Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE. HONGKONG, 2nd January, 1885.

Referring to much previous correspondence on the subject, I have the honour to report that on the 31st ultimo, the Legislative Council unanimously voted the special contribution of fifty-five thousand six hundred and twenty-five pounds sterling (£55,625), required by Her Majesty's Government from this Colony to meet the cost of the new Defence Works.

2. I have this day telegraphed to your Lordship to the above effect.

3. The terms of the vote, which were arranged by the Finance Committee of the Council, are as follows:---

"This Council now vote the sum of fifty-five thousand six hundred and twenty-five pounds sterling (£55,625), required as the contribution of this Colony to the effective defence of Hongkong; it being understood that the armament to be provided by the Imperial Government, will be of the best and latest pattern of breech-loading Ordnance, and capable of resisting attacks by the heaviest modern Ironclads.'

4. It is my duty to report that there is a very strong feeling in this corn- munity-a feeling fully shared by the principal Naval and Military Officers on this Station that it would be worse than useless (as leading to a false sense of security), to erect fresh Defence Works here, unless they are armed with Ordnance of the

148

*

latest and most approved pattern, capable of resisting the attack of the heaviest modern artillery. It was perceived from the Parliamentary Papers that it was originally proposed that the very insufficient sum of only £37,500 should be provided for the armament of the new Forts at Hongkong; and the un-official members of the Colonial Legislature gave energetic expression to the dissatisfac- tion generally felt on this point. However, I drew attention to the fact that, from the latest Parliamentary Papers, it appears that this question had been reconsidered by the Military Authorities in England; that the sum proposed for the new armament at Hongkong had been doubled; and that the letter from the War Office to the Treasury of the 1st November ultimo, contains the following paragraph: "At the time the earlier Parliamentary Estimate was framed, it was intended to provide wrought iron guns as possessing sufficient power for the work they would be likely to be called upon to perform. The armaments of the Forts, however, are required to resist the present power of foreign ships which may attack them, and consequently must be of a more formidable nature than was at first contemplated; therefore, some of the guns have been chosen from the latest pattern of breech- loading Ordnance, which has greatly increased the cost."

5. After some discussion the special contribution of £55,625, required by Her Majesty's Government, was voted by the Legislative Council unanimously ;—an important point, for obvious reasons, in a matter of this nature.

6. I earnestly recommend, on grounds alike of Imperial and of Colonial Policy, that, in the terms of the Vote cited above, "the armament to be provided by the Imperial Government should be of the best and latest pattern of breech- loading Ordnance and capable of resisting attacks by the heaviest modern Ironclads."

7. It will be recollected that, in addition to this special vote for Defence Works, Hongkong pays an annual Military contribution of £20,000, which has already amounted to an aggregate sum of above £400,000. Moreover in my despatch No. 380 of the 17th November ultimo I wrote as follows:-

"It is generally urged here by the few Civil British residents (who do not exceed 800 in number, including men, women, and children) that the position of Hongkong is analogous to that of Gibraltar, and that this important naval and military station and great emporium of British trade is maintained chiefly for Imperial rather than for local objects. It is further pointed out that the heads of the Commercial houses, and other principal owners of the vast amount of shipping and other property which it is proposed to protect, are, for the most part, persons resident in England, and not at Hongkong. In fact there is no permanent British population here; and it is felt that there is no analogy between this Imperial Station, with its local revenue of little more than £200,000 on the one hand, and on the other hand, the great self-governing Colonies in Australia and Canada with their large, permanent, and fast growing British population, and their rapidly increasing revenues of many millions sterling, which already far exceed the revenues of several European Monarchies."

The Right Honourable

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

G. F. BOWEN.

THE EARL OF DERBY, K.G.,

&c.,

Sc.,

&c.

149

(3.)

TELEGRAM.

From the Secretary of State to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen.

:

21st January, 1885.

Referring to your telegram of 2nd January, new Guns being provided cost more than eighty thousand pounds sterling.

(4.)

Secretary of State to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

DOWNING STREET,

14th February, 1885.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch No. 3 of the 2nd of January respecting the character of the guns to be provided for the new Defence Works of the Colony; and to inform you that that despatch has been communicated to the Secretary of State for War.

You will have learned from my telegram of the 21st ultimo that Her Majesty's Government have decided to provide new Guns at a cost of more than £80,000.

Governor Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

MY LORD,

I have, &c.,

(Signed) DERBY.

(5.)

Governor Sir G. F. Bowen to the Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 31st January, 1885.

In continuation of my despatch of the 2nd instant respecting the new Defence Works of Hongkong, I have the honour to forward herewith a copy of a question on the subject asked in the Legislative Council by the Honourable THOMAS JACKSON, one of the Un-official Members :-

"The Honourable THOMAS JACKSON, pursuant to notice, asked if it is true that the funds of this Colony are at present being spent upon the construction of a fort in the Liümun Pass, covering the proposed minefield, upon which it is intended to mount old 40-pounder guns which have been obsolete for nearly twenty years, and which would prove utterly useless against modern Ordnance.”

150

2. I annex also a report of the speech Mr. JACKSON made on this occasion :-

-

·

"Your Excellency, recently when we were called upon in this Council to pass a vote towards the cost of the fortifications of this island, I had grave misgivings about the sufficiency of the measures then proposed, and my fears were realised when it came to my knowledge within the past ten days that a fort is at present being constructed at the Liümun Pass, which is to be armed with 40-pounders mounted on old naval slides. I would require to be possessed of a good deal of that sort of faith which would enable me to believe to be true what I knew to be false if I believed that such a fort would be efficient or was a fit and proper. expenditure of our funds. I have heard it stated there is some doubt whether the funds to be ex- pended on that fort are imperial or colonial funds, but considering that many of us, I think I may say all of us,

and not only those who are here but many others in the colony, contribute not only to the colonial but also the imperial funds, I equally protest against imperial funds being wasted. An eminent Royal Engineer has stated that insufficient fortifications are worse than no fortifications at all; they are suffi- ciently strong to invite attack, and not strong enough to resist it. Such, sir, I hold the fortifications now in progress to be, and it appears to me the whole scheme of defence for this most important port will have to be reconsidered. Nothing less than making Hongkong impregnable will be sufficient. It has been said the coaling stations are to be protected in such a manner as that they may be able to resist surprises. I think there can be nothing more foolish. I hold that Hongkong ought to be entirely independent of the Navy. If unhappily we are involved in war with any of the great powers I have no doubt the Navy will find ample work elsewhere than in Hongkong, and I hope we will all be spared the sight of a British Admiral loitering in Hongkong when our commerce on the seas stands in need of protection. I hope the Admiral will be out seeking the enemy, finding him, and hammering him as in days of yore. Providence and the strong right arms of our ancestors have handed down to us in the British empire as it at present exists a noble inheritance, at once the pride and glory of British subjects of every race, and either the admiration or envy of the rest of the world. I hold it is a sacred duty to maintain, defend, and if need be extend this empire, and in insisting upon the proper fortification of Hongkong, and making this gem of the eastern seas a place to which ships may resort for safety, we are doing our part towards this desirable end. Recent events in the Southern Pacific conclusively prove that nobler and more statesmanlike views of imperial policy can be taken by the colonies themselves than by the mother country, where the energies and abilities of states- men are so much occupied in domestic legislation and party strife, and where so inany of our foremost men appear to be devoted to paddling their own canoes in the troubled waters of English party politics."

3. After consultation with Lieut.-General SARGENT, I replied in the following

terms :-

"With reference to the question of the Honourable Gentleman, I desire, in the first place, to take this opportunity of informing the Council that, on the 2nd instant, I forwarded by telegraph to the Secretary of State for the Colonies, the vote passed unanimously, on the 31st ultimo, viz.:—

'This Council now vote unanimously the sum of fifty-five thousand six hundred and twenty-five pounds sterling (£55,625), required as the contribution of this Colony to the effective defence of Hongkong; it being understood that the

}

:

armament to be provided by the Imperial Government will be of the best and latest pattern of breech-loading Ordnance, capable of resisting attacks by the heaviest modern Ironclads.' To this I have received the following reply:

'Referring to your telegram of the 2nd January, new guns are being provided at the cost of more than eighty thousand pounds sterling (£80,000).' It will be remembered that this is more than double the cost (viz. £37,500) of the guns originally proposed for the new Forts at Hongkong.

"With regard to the terms of the Honourable Gentleman's question, I am unable to say, if 'the Funds of the Colony are at present being spent upon the construction of a Fort in the Liümun Pass.' I have ascertained that the military works here are being carried out under the immediate direction of the War Office in England, and that it is not known as yet whether the cost of the battery at the Liümun Pass, which will not exceed one thousand pounds sterling, (£1,000), will be set down to Imperial Funds, or to the Colonial contribution. Of course, if it is so desired, I will forward the question of my Honourable Friend to the Secretary of State.

151

"With respect to the other points of the Honourable Gentleman's question, I am informed that heavy Ordnance will probably be mounted at the Liümun Pass. so soon as it can be procured; but that the primary object of the new work there is to protect the Submarine minefield against the attack of armed boats and steam- launches; and that for this purpose lighter and rapidly-firing guns are indispensable; such as breech-loading 40-pounder guns, which the Military Authorities declare are not obsolete, or ineffective."

4. In my despatch of the 2nd instant referred to above, I drew attention to the strong feeling prevalent in this community on the subject of the armament to be provided for the new Defence Works.

X

The Right Honourable

I have, &c.,

(Signed)

G. F. BOWEN.

&c.,

&c.

THE EARL OF DERBY, K.G.,

&C.,

C

153

No. 14 B.

Correspondence respecting the Armament of the Forts at Hongkong, (in continuation of No. 14.)

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

Secretary of State to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

DOWNING STREET,

SIR,

20th March, 1885.

With reference to my despatch, No. 31, of the 14th ultimo, I have the honour to forward, for your information, copy of a letter from the War Office on the subject of the new Defence Works at Hongkong.

Governor

Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

I have, &c..

(Signed).

DERBY.

Enclosure.

SIR,

War Office to Colonial Office.

WAR OFFICE, 13th March, 1885.

I am directed by the Secretary of State for War to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 14th ultimo, forwarding a further despatch from the Governor of Hongkong, concerning the new Defence Works of the Colony; and in reply to acquaint you, for the information of the Earl of DERBY, that when the subject of the Defence of Hongkong was first considered, the guns with which it was proposed to arm the batteries were 10-inch. M.L.R. guns, which at 3,000 yards can only penetrate 9 inches of iron.

As the project developed, it was thought desirable to employ some more modern guns, and the 9.2-inch B. L. Gun was proposed;-a gun which was thought to be sufficiently powerful to beat off any ironclads likely to be met with in those seas.

151

More recent events in China have, however, demonstrated the possibility of the attack of Hongkong by Vessels of War carrying guns and armour with which even the 9.2-inch gun would be hardly able to cope, and it has now been determined to employ a certain number of 10-inch B.L. guns of 27 tons.

This gun is capable of penetrating nearly 18 inches of iron at 3,000 yards; and, although still more powerful guns are now being constructed, it is considered that guns of this nature, which are the heaviest that can be worked by hand, are amply sufficient for the Defence of Hongkong, aided as that defence would be by mines and also by Torpedo-boats.

Were heavier guns than the 10-inch of 27 tons employed, it must be borne in mind that hand power would no longer suffice for working them, and the difficulty of maintaining in working order at all times, at a foreign station, the machinery needed for the heaviest guns, which, if out of order, would render the guns useless and thus completely cripple the defence, has decided the Home Government not to attempt to mount heavier guns than these at Hongkong.

It will be seen from the above sketch of the history of the designs for the Defence of Hongkong that circumstances have compelled changes in the original proposals, and that each successive advance in the power of the Artillery, while throwing on the Imperial Government an increased charge for Armaments, has also in- creased the amount which will be necessary for constructing the works.

The exact increase in cost cannot at this moment be estimated precisely, but it will undoubtedly be considerably in excess of the amount which the Colony was asked to contribute at the time when the original scheme was under consideration. The enclosures which accompanied your letter are returned herewith as requested.

THE UNDER-SECRETARY OF STATE,

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

HENRY BRAND.

Colonial Office.

No. 15.

155

MY LORD,

Despatches respecting the question of Quarantine.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G. to the Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 19th December, 1884.

With reference to my despatch of the 9th August ultimo, and to previous correspondence respecting the question of quarantine, I have the honour to report that, Her Majesty's Minister at Peking (Sir HARRY PARKES), in a despatch dated on the 5th instant, has written to me as follows:-

"I should take this opportunity of stating to your Excellency that the instruc- tions I received last year from the Foreign Office on the subject of quarantine, and which I have been directed to communicate to the Chinese Government, show that Her Majesty's Government are not in favour of the adoption of that measure. I take from these instructions the following passage:--

"Much as scientific men may have differed upon the 'Contagion' of Cholera, there is a complete agreement among all who have a practical acquaintance with the subject either in India, or in the United Kingdom, that the generally received theory and practice of quarantine is not only useless, but also hurtful."

"The custom of imprisoning the healthy with the sick is calculated, for moral and physical reasons which are easily understood, to increase the number of the persons attacked, to intensify the virulence of the disease, and to convert the prison into a nidus of infection; while the unfounded belief by the security given by quarantine discourages the adoption of those sanitary measures which alone are proved to check the spread of the epidemic."

"If the above reasoning be applicable to epidemic cholera, it would appear to have greater force in regard to any endemic form of the disease, such as that which occasionally appears in China during the summer months."

2. Personally, I am disposed to agree with the spirit of the instructions from the Foreign Office quoted above. But, it will be remembered that very conflicting opinions have been held, and very different courses of action have been followed, respecting quarantine, by various Colonial Governments and Communities. I would request your Lordship to inform me, for my future guidance, if you desire that the principle laid down by the Foreign Office should be followed, in questions relating to Quarantine, by the Government of Hongkong.

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF DERBY, K.G.,

&c.,

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

G. F. BOWEN.

&c.,

Sc.

156

(2.)

Secretary of State to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

DOWNING STREET, 13th February, 1885.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch of the 19th December last, on the subject of Quarantine regulations.

2. The views expressed in the Foreign Office instructions to Her Majesty's Minister at Peking, quoted in your Despatch, are those entertained by Her Majesty's Government on the subject of Quarantine against Cholera, and these views have been put in practice in the United Kingdom, where Quarantine is no longer enforced except against plague and yellow fever.

3. Her Majesty's Government have not, however, throught it necessary to press for the adoption of a similar course in Colonies where public opinion is strongly in favour of the enforcement of strict Quarantine regulations; but, if it is probable that the Legislature of Hongkong would be willing to adopt the English practice, I should approve of your introducing the necessary legislation.

4. If Quarantine were abolished, it would be necessary to give the Governor in Council power of making regulations similar to that possessed by the Local Government Board under Section 130 of the Public Health Act, 1875; and it would be necessary for the Governor in Council to make regulations for the detention and examination of ships suspected of being infected with Cholera, or coming, from places infected with Cholera; for the medical examination of the passengers and crew, and for the removal from the ship and the detention and treatment in proper isolated places of the sick persons on board; for the disinfec- tion of the ship, and for the disinfection or destruction of all infected articles on board similar to those made by the Local Government Board in their Order of 12th July, 1883. A copy of that Order is enclosed for your information, with copies of the accompanying letter to the Sanitary Authorities, and of a Memorandum by the Medical Officer of the Board on Precautions against Infection of Cholera.

Governor

Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

DERBY.

&c.,

&c.

I

Q

157

No. 16.

Petition by certain Chinese Merchants for Permission to use the Kau Ng Chek (foot measure).

Presented to the Legislative Council by the Honourable Wong Shing

on

April 8th, 1885.

To

THE HONOURABLE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG.

THE HUMBLE PETITION OF THE UNDERSIGNED MERCHANTS.

HUMBLY SHEWETH :-

1. That your Petitioners are merchants who have for many years been engaged in trade in and with this Colony.

2.-That your Petitioners have in the course of their business always used and adopted a certain Standard of measurement commonly known in English as a Chinese foot or Chek and called in Chinese "Kau Ng Chek."

3. That this Chinese foot or chek is the common foot of commerce in this Colony and is not a class measure of length.

4. That this Chinese foot or chek is subdivided into Ten Chinese inches and is equivalent to 9 inches of the Chek or foot commonly called in Chinese as "Pai Chin Chek" which is used by the Treasurer of Kwong Tung Province principally for the measure of land.

5. That this Chinese foot is only .13 of a Chinese inch shorter than the Standard Chek used in all the Custom Houses in China in accordance with Article No. XXXIV of the Tientsin Treaty between Great Britain and China.

6. That the Kau Ng Chek is about 13 English inches; the Custom House Standard chek is about 14.1 English inches; and the Canton Treasurer's chek is about 14ğ English inches.

7.-That there is no universal Standard chek used in China.

8. That when English goods are imported into China it is usual in the cases where the duty is levied on the length to convert the English measures into measurements according to the Custom House Standard chek which is equal to 14.1 English inches and is only .13 of one Chinese inch longer than the Kau Ng Chek as aforesaid.

9. That the chek exclusively used in Pekin is a chek of the same length as the Kau Ng chek; and that the Kau Ng chek is well known to all Chinese and has been commonly in use in this Colony for at least thirty years.

7.

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.

10. That in Ordinance No. 8 of 1885 which has already come into force, the Kwong Tung Treasurer's chek is adopted as the Standard chek in Hongkong and it is made compulsory for all Chinese merchants to use this chek.

11. That the adoption of this chek will cause your Petitioners very great inconvenience and trouble in business as shewn hereunder :-

a. In all trade transactions where the price is according to length, the price will have to be increased.

b. That large quantities of goods have already been ordered with refer- ence to the customary measure of the Kau Ng chek, and that the due fulfil- ment of these contracts will be rendered very difficult except by incurring heavy loss.

C. That the Kau Ng chek is so commonly used as to cause constant mistake and dispute if the Treasurer's chek is to be the Standard Chek.

d. That the Custom House will only levy duty according to the Custom House Standard chek, and if goods are sent up to Canton or to any Chinese port measured, invoiced, and marked according to the Kwong Tung Treasurer's chek, the goods will be liable to seizure owing to the excess of length.

e. That general inconvenience will be caused by the substitution of a measure little known or used in commercial transactions as the Treasurer's chek for the commonly used and well-known Kau Ng Chek or the Custom House Standard chek without any corresponding benefit.

f. That your Petitioners are for the present obliged to sell exclusively by English measures for the reason that the Customs Officers will of their own accord alter them into Chinese measurements according to their Standard Chek, and to avoid dispute and seizure.

g.

That the exclusive use of the English measures will however cause much inconvenience and trouble to your Petitioners and to the Public.

12.-That the adoption of the Canton Treasurer's chek will afford the general community of this Colony no substantial benefit as a proportionately higher price will have to be charged for each chek of stuffs sold, while it may cause much annoyance and trouble to and misunderstanding between the buyers and sellers.

YOUR PETITIONERS therefore pray

1. That either the Kau Ng chek or the Custom House Standard chek be made the Chinese Standard chek in this Colony instead of the "Pai chin chek.'

27

2. That this Honourable Council, pending decision in this matter, will suspend the operation of such portion of the said Ordinance No. 8 of 1885 as relates to the subject matter of this petition.

AND YOUR PETITIONERS will ever pray, &c., &c.

DATED this 8th day of April, 1885.

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· No. 17.

Despatches respecting the proposed Incorporation of the Vicar Apostolic

of the Roman Catholic Church in Hongkong.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

Extract from Secretary of State's despatch No. 98 of the 6th November, 1875.

*

*

*

*

5. I notice that Bishop RAIMONDI subscribes himself "Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong." This is a title which as you are aware cannot be conceded to him by Her Majesty's Government, and which you will no doubt avoid using in your official communications with him.

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

CARNARVON.

:

(2.)

Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G. to the Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 6th June, 1884.

159

Enclosure 1.

Enclosures 2 & 3.

Enclosure 4.

MY LORD,

I have the honour to transmit herewith a letter addressed to your Lordship by Monsignor RAIMONDI, the Roman Catholic Bishop at Hongkong, together with other documents relating to it, and the opinion of the Attorney General on the whole case.

2. From this correspondence it appears that the piece of land, known as "Inland Lot No. 50," in this City, is held on lease for a term of seventy-five (75) years, from 1848, granted to "The Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith," and for a further term of nine hundred and twenty-four (924) years to Bishop RAIMONDI by name. This Leasehold is the property of the Roman Catholic Mission at Hongkong. Circumstances have arisen which make it desirable for the Mission to sell their interest in this land; but, owing to a statement made from the Bench of the Supreme Court by the Chief Justice (Sir GEORGE PHILLIPPO) in a recent case, to the effect that Missionary Societies, not being Incorporated Bodies, are incapable of selling or mortgaging land, the Roman Catholic Mission has not been able to give a marketable title to this property.

160

3. To meet this difficulty, a short Private Bill, a copy of which is annexed, was, at the instance of Bishop RAIMONDI, brought into the Legislative Council by the Senior Un-official Member (Mr. RYRIE). This Bill purported to authorize the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith to sell or mortgage the specific lot in question; but, on consideration by the Law Committee of the Legislative Council, it was considered that this Bill would not have the desired effect; and it was accordingly withdrawn.

4. It will be seen that Bishop RAIMONDI now wishes for an Incorporation Act to enable him to deal with this and similar cases; but as the Attorney General remarks, "he does not state to whom or to what body it is that he desires "that incorporation should be granted, whether to the Bishop of Acantho (Bishop "RAIMONDI'S title), or to the Sacred Congregation, or to the Vicar Apostolic, or "otherwise; nor does he say who or what the Sacred Congregation is, or with "what authority he applies on behalf of the Sacred Congregation."

·

5. However, at the urgent request of Bishop RAIMONDI, I forward the case in its present incomplete form; with the hope that your Lordship will furnish me with detailed instructions as to the course to be pursued in the present instance, and with full information as to the guiding precedents which have doubtless been made in other Colonies. In particular, it is desired to have a draft of a Bill which has been sanctioned, in similar instances, elsewhere.

6. I may add that this case is one which, owing to the needs of the Roman Catholic Mission, requires an early decision; that there is no objection (of which I am aware) to the sale of the land in question; and that it is obviously desirable, on many grounds, to facilitate the transfer of landed property in a Colony situated as is Hongkong.

Enclosure 5.

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

G. F. BOWEN.

P.S.-June 12th, 1884. Since the above despatch was written, I have received from Bishop RAIMONDI, (in answer to a letter to him from the Acting- Colonial Secretary embodying the opinion of the Attorney General), the annexed reply in explanation of those points which apparently required elucidation. whole case is now before your Lordship; and, as I have already said, an early decision and full instructions for my guidance respecting it are very desirable.

The

Enclosure 6.

Enclosure 7.

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF DERBY, K.G.,

&c.,

&e.

&c.,

G. F. B.

}

161

Enclosure 1.

Bishop Raimondi to Secretary of State for the Colonies.

RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR,

ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSION HOUSE, HONGKONG, 28th May, 1884.

I have been recommended by His Excellency the Governor, Sir GEORGE BOWEN, to address your Lordship in a very important urgent matter which affects very considerably the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith in Rome, to whom pertains the Roman Catholic Mission of Hongkong.

Since the year 1845, the Roman Catholic Mission of the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda is in possession of Lot No. 50 in Hongkong. By an Indenture of Crown Lease dated the 14th day of August, 1845, and made between our Sovereign Lady the Queen of the one part and the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith of the other part, Her said Majesty did demise, lease, and to farm let unto the Sacred Congregation all that piece or parcel of ground, and premises known and registered in the Land Office Hongkong as Inland Lot No. 50, to hold the same unto the Sacred Congregation for the term of 75 years subject to the pay- ment of a certain sum to be paid on or before the sealing and delivery of the Inden- ture to the Governor at the time being of Hongkong for the use of the said Majesty, and also subject to an annual rent, &c., and by a further Indenture dated the 30th day of April, 1879, the said term was extended for a further period of 924 years. The sum requested for the price of the ground was paid, the receipt whereof is ack- nowledged in the Crown Lease. The Crown Rent was annually paid consisting of £58 per year for 39 years till now, and a receipt given by the Government. When His Excellency Sir RICHARD MACDONNELL thought to have power to remit a part of the heavy Crown Rent on Lot 50 on behalf of the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith, the Right Honourable the Secretary of State at the time strongly objected and refused to approve of it. All this was certainly to be taken as recognizing the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda as owner of the Lot 50, with all the power to hold and to dispose of the said Lot, and it was in that persuasion only that the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda has on the said piece or parcel of ground at its own expense erected a Cathedral Church, Presbytery and Schools. The said Cathedral Church, Presbytery and School buildings having lately become too small for the needs of the Roman Catholic Mission of Hongkong, and being very inconveniently situated, the neighbourhood having changed to the worse, the Roman Catholic Mission of the said Sacred Congre- gation of the Propaganda have, out of their own moneys, purchased more than three years ago, other lands more favourably situated and have erected new and spacious schools thereon, and have laid the foundation of and are now in course of erecting on another portion of the said land a Cathedral Church more suited to the needs of the Mission. The contracts for carrying on the works have been made and signed, and we calculated to have the necessary funds to do it from the result of the sale which we intended to have of the said Lot 50. In fact, the Lot 50 was sold once at the end of 1881; the sale was carried on and no question about the title was raised. The conditions of sale, however, not having been complied with, the property returned to us. In the beginning of this year we were about to sell it again, or to have a loan by mortgaging the said Lot 50, when on

102

the occasion of a case at the Supreme Court in which the London Missionary Society were concerned, the Chief Justice, Sir GEORGE PHILLIPPO, declared, that the Missionary Societies in Hongkong could not suit, as they were not recognized as Incorporated, and that it was necessary that they should apply to the Legislature which could by an Ordinance give the Trustees the power to sell. Doubts arose therefore for the first time in Hongkong as to whether the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith are entitled to mortgage and sell the said land and premises. The doubts which have arisen caused great damages to the Sacred Con- gregation of Propaganda, and put them in a very great financial embarrassment, the works of the new Cathedral being urgent and it being impossible to stop them. We applied therefore to the Local Legislature for a Bill to empower the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda to mortgage and to sell the said Lot 50; but the Attorney General declared that the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith was a mere aggregate of persons having no legal standing, and before the law not existent, that nothing therefore short of an Incorporating Act could be of any value, and that it was necessary to refer this matter for the instructions of your Lordship before legislating in the Colony. His Excellency Sir GEORGE BOWEN, the present Governor, is very much interested on our behalf, but the Government is obliged to follow the advice of the Attorney General. We have the assurance that His Excellency the Governor is well disposed to recommend the matter to the immediate and favorable consideration of your Lordship.

Therefore we earnestly apply to you, Right Honourable Sir, praying that your Lordship would kindly authorize the Legislature of Hongkong to pass a measure of the kind desired.

Besides Lot 50 we have several other properties in Hongkong, some in the name of the Catholic Authorities of the time being as Trustees of the Sacred Con- gregation of the Propagation of the Faith, and some in the name of the Prefects and Vicars Apostolic and their successors. If we could have a Bill comprehending all the different properties it would do better; but, at any rate, the most urgent is the present case of Lot 50. The longer the present state of things lasts, the greater will be the damages inflicted on the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda.

We have already informed the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda in Rome of the case and we have sent to them a certified copy of the Crown Lease, Lot 50. We need not mention that we have made Hongkong the Head Quarter of the Catholic Missions in China; large capitals have been invested in the Colony by the Roman Catholic Mission, and it would be quite disadvantageous both to the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda and to the English Government, were we to place our funds elsewhere. Therefore, we strongly urge the matter, and we have no doubt your Lordship will cause at your earliest convenience the Sacred Congrega- tion of Propaganda to be placed in Hongkong in a legal position, and to put an end to the very disagreeable position we have been reduced to.

The Right Honourable

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

JOHN T. RAIMONDI,

Bishop of Acantho and Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong.

PRINCIPAL SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COLONIES,

&c.,

&c.,

fc.

I

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Enclosure 2.

Bishop Raimondi to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSION HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 27th February, 1884.

163

.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

I trust your Excellency will excuse me for the liberty I take in laying the following statements before your Excellency's kind consideration.

That the Roman Catholic Mission in the name of the Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide in Rome, has possessed the Lot No. 50 in this Colony for nearly 40 years. The Lease does not mention any particular object for which the ground should be used, but it is constructed in the same terms used in common leases, and for nearly forty years we paid the Crown rent of $280.20 yearly, making a total of nearly $12,000. With our own money, added to that which has been given from our friends out of Hongkong, the residents of Hongkong having only contributed to less than $10,000, we improved the lot by building a College, a residence, and a Church for the benefit of our Catholic Community, the Colonial Government having contributed nothing towards the erection of the above mentioned buildings.

From the beginning of our coming into the possession of the Lot till a few days ago we have always been in the persuasion that we could mortgage or dispose of the property at our own pleasure. Several transactions of other properties than this which were in the same conditions as the present one have taken place and no obstacle of any kind has been

kind has been put in the way, therefore three years ago, on conside- ration of the Church becoming too small for the ever increasing Catholic population in Hongkong, which was not more than 1,000 when the Church was built and now reaches 5,000, likewise of the roof of the Church being in bad condition, the repairs of which will entail very large expenses, and of the neighbourhood having changed for the worst and of the danger of fire to which our present Church is exposed at present on account of the former surrounding European houses having been con- verted into Chinese ones, we determined to buy another property in Glenealy, which we did and where we have already built a fine College, and levelled the ground and laid down the foundation of the new Cathedral at our own cost. When

we made those transactions, we naturally contemplated the sale of the Lot No. 50 and to transfer its profit to Glenealy to finish our constructions. But a few days ago we have been informed by our legal adviser that, according to what Sir GEORGE PHILLIPPO said lately from the Bench, we cannot dispose of Lot 50 without the authority of the Legislature. Seeing that we could not sell, we managed to have a loan, and a Company in Hongkong was ready to favour us with, on a mortgage to be placed on Lot 50, but Mr. JOHNSON, the Crown Solicitor, having been consulted said that he could not advise them to do it on account of what the Chief Justice said lately from the Bench. Our position at present is a most awkward one. We must proceed with building the new Cathedral, a contract having been signed, and we are rendered unable to have any means either by selling or by mortgaging. The more we regret it, as we are working not for our own benefit but for the benefit of the Colony, and our whole community is compromised as it is really an urgent matter to transfer the Church and our residence in a better position than it is at present.

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164

I have therefore to request that your Excellency will be pleased to take our case into your consideration and either to grant us such incorporation as was granted in Trinidad to the Archbishop of Port Louis by Ordinance No. 16 of 1870, or, as this will take considerable time, to introduce and pass a special Ordinance reciting the circumstances especially authorizing the sale of Lot No. 50.

I have the honour to be,

Your Excellency's

(Signed),

Most obedient Servant,

JOHN T. RAIMONDI, Bishop of Acantho and Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong.

SIR,

Enclosure 3.

Bishop Raimondi to Colonial Secretary.

ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSION HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 15th April, 1884.

With reference to my letter of the 28th February last to His Excellency the Governor, and to the letter which I wrote to you on the 21st March last in answer to your letter of the 7th March, I beg to inform you that by the direction of the Attorney General a Draft Bill was drawn up which was published in the Govern- ment Gazette of the 12th April according to the Standing Orders.

I have the honour to send you herewith 16 Copies Draft Bill.

We trust, the Government will not shrink from favouring us and have the Bill passed in the Council at the earliest convenience, in consideration of the very awkward position, in which we have been placed without any fault of ours by some doubts raised for the first time after 39 years of our being in possession of the Inland Lot 50, as to whether we are entitled to mortgage and sell the said land and premises, of which embarrassment we gave notice to the Government by our letter of the 28th February last.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your very obedient Servant,

(Signed),

The Honourable THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

JOHN T. RAIMONDI, Bishop, Vicar Apostolic.

Enclosure 4.

Report by the Attorney-General.

The application of Bishop RAIMONDI contained in his first letter of February 27th 1884, was "to grant us such incorporation as was granted in Trinidad to the "Archbishop of Port Louis by Ordinance No. 16 of 1870, or, as this will take "considerable time, to introduce and pass a special Ordinance reciting the circum- "stances especially authorizing the sale of Lot No. 50.”

Upon this the Bishop was requested to furnish a copy of the Trinidad Ordi- nance to which he referred and also the Crown Lease of Lot 50. No Copy of the Ordinance could be obtained. The Crown Lease was furnished and proved to be for 75 years from 1845 "to the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith," and for an extended term of 924 years more to Bishop RAIMONDI by name.

In making his application in his letter of February 27th, 1884, the Bishop. says:-"We have been informed by our legal adviser that according to what Sir "GEORGE PHILLIPPO said lately from the Bench we cannot dispose of Lot 50 "without the authority of the legislature."

And in his letter of April 15th, 1884, he adds that by direction of the Attorney General a Draft Bill was drawn up. This is inaccurate, as the Attorney General gave no direction in the matter.

A Bill was drawn by Mr. J. J. FRANCIS who is the Bishop's legal adviser and was introduced into the Legislative Council, and was intended, as I understood, to provide what Mr. FRANCIS conceived to be necessary to meet the difficulties of the Bishop's position and to do, for the Bishop and those on whose behalf he was acting, what Sir G. PHILLIPPO was supposed to have pointed out as being necessary.

The Bill was subsequently withdrawn as not being sufficient for the purpose desired, and what the Bishop now appears to wish for is "an Incorporation Act."

The observations of the Chief Justice would appear to refer to the difficulties in which Trustees of Charities might find themselves if they wanted to deal with their lands by way of sale or mortgage. But the difficulty of the Bishop appears to be that the Crown Lease of the land with which he wants to deal is to "The Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith," which is not a body corporate, and that he cannot therefore give a purchaser a good marketable title.

The Bishop does not state to whom or to what body it is that he desires that incorporation should be granted, whether to the Bishop of Acantho or to the Sacred Congregation, or to the Vicar Apostolic or otherwise, nor does he say who or what the Sacred Congregation is, or with what authority he applies on behalf of the Sacred Congregation.

It would be necessary before anything could be done that he should furnish full information upon these points.

If an Ordinance incorporating any body representing the Roman Catholic interest here were passed, it should contain a Section defining the powers of the Corporation with regard to future dealings with its lands.

165

June 4th, 1884.

(Signed),

EDWARD L. O'MALLEY.

Enclosure 5.

Draft Bill.

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

This is to give notice that the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith intends at an early date to apply to the Honourable Legislative Council of Hongkong for a Bill to enable the said Sacred Congregation to sell and dispose of

166

and in the meantime to mortgage all that piece or parcel of ground known and registered as Inland Lot No. 50, with its appurtenances on which the Roman Catholic Cathedral, Seminary and other Ecclesiastical Buildings, the property of the said Sacred Congregation, now stand, the said Cathedral and Buildings being now too small for the needs of the Mission and inconveniently situate, and the said Sacred Congregation having acquired other and more suitable premises.

Hongkong, 12th April, 1884.

Title.

Preamble.

Copy Draft Bill.

A Bill to enable the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith to mortgage and sell certain Property in Hongkong.

WE

HEREAS by an Indenture of Crown Lease dated the 14th day of August 1845 and made between Our Sovereign Lady the Queen of the one part and the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith of the other part Her said Majesty did demise lease and to farm let unto the said Sacred Congregation all that piece or parcel of ground and premises known and registered in the Land Office Hongkong as Inland Lot No. 50 to hold the same unto the said Sacred Congregation for the term of 75 years subject to the payment of the rent and to the observance and fulfilment of the covenants conditions and stipulations in the said Indenture of Crown Lease contained. And whereas by a further Indenture dated the 30th day of April 1879 the said term was extended for a further period of 924 years.

And whereas the said Sacred Congregation has on the said piece or parcel of ground at its own expense erected a Cathedral Church, Presbytery and Schools.

AND WHEREAS the said Cathedral Church, Presbytery and School Buildings have become too small for the needs of the Roman Catholic Mission in Hongkong and are very in- conveniently situate.

And whereas the said Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith have out of their own monies purchased other lands more favourably situate and have erected new and spacious Schools thereon and have laid the foundations of and are now in course of erecting on another portion of the said lands a Cathedral Church more suited to the needs of the Mission.

And whereas the said Sacred Congregation are desirous of selling the said Inland Lot No. 50 with the erections and buildings thereon at the first convenient opportunity and in the meanwhile of raising money thereon by mortgaging the

same.

And whereas doubts have arisen as to whether the said Sacred Congregation are entitled, in view of the Law affect- ing Charities and Charitable Trusts, to mortgage and sell the said land and premises.

And whereas it hath been shown by the said Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith, that it is desirable and to the advantage of the Roman Catholic Mission in Hongkong that the said Sacred Congregation should be authorised and empowered to sell the said land and premises at the first convenient opportunity and in the meantime to raise money by the mortgage thereof.

Be it enacted by the Governor and Legislative Council of Hongkong:-

1. The said Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith is authorised and empowered to sell and dispose of the said Inland Lot No. 50 with the erections and build- ings thereon and the rights, easements, and appurtenancés thereto or commonly held or enjoyed therewith and all their right title claim and demand therein or thereto under the said Indentures of Crown Lease and of Extention thereof at such time and manner and for such price or prices as to the said Sacred Congregation shall think fit and in the meantime to mortgage the same or any part thereof.

2. Nothing herein contained shall affect or be deemed to affect the right of Her Majesty the Queen her heirs or suc- cessors or of any bodies politic or corporate or other person or persons except such as are mentioned in this law and those claiming by from or under them.

167

.

No. 633.

MONSIGNOR,

Enclosure 6.

Acting Colonial Secretary to Bishop Raimondi.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 5th June, 1884.

With reference to your letter of the 20th ultimo, and to previous correspon- dence respecting the same subject, I am directed by the Governor to inform you that His Excellency is advised that the observation of the Chief Justice to which you allude would appear to refer to the difficulties in which Trustees of Charities might find themselves placed, if they wanted to deal with their lands by way of sale or mortgage. But your difficulty in connexion with this Lot appears to be that the Crown Lease of the land is to The Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith, which is not a Body Corporate in English law, and you cannot therefore give a purchaser a good marketable title.

I am to point out that you do not state to whom or to what body it is that you desire that incorporation should be granted, whether to the Bishop of Acantho or to the Sacred Congregation or to the Vicar Apostolic, or otherwise: nor do you say who or what the Sacred Congregation is, or with what authority you apply on its behalf.

I am to add that it would be necessary, before anything could be done in the way of Legislation, that you should furnish full information upon the points men- tioned above.

Meanwhile the Governor will transmit by the next mail to the Secretary of State your letter of the 28th May ultimo; and will ask for the instructions of Her Majesty's Government as to how questions of this kind ought to be treated, and enquire what precedents there may be in other Colonies.

>

The Right Reverend

C

BISHOP J. T. RAIMONDI.

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Enclosure 7.

Bishop Raimondi to Acting Colonial Secretary.

ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSION HOUSE, HONGKONG, 9th June, 1884.

SIR,

I have duly received your letter of the 5th instant, and in reply I beg to state:

1. We were induced to believe that the observations of the Chief Justice were. referring to our case from the words attributed by the Press to the Chief Justice— "His Lordship said there were some difficulties in the way of appointing trustees by the Court. In the first place the application was made by the London City Mission, and he did not know that he could take special notice of what the Society

168

was, not being a corporation." Moreover the doubt thrown on our power of mortgaging Lot 50 by the Crown Solicitor were based on the words of the Chief Justice. The Crown Solicitor said to our friends who wanted to make a new loan to us on mortgaging Lot 50-" After what has been said by the Chief Justice I cannot advise you to do it." On that we moved the Bill, and it appeared at least to us when we proposed it first, that neither the Chief Justice, nor the Attorney General had any objection to it. We regret only to have lost time.

2. As to whom or to what body the incorporation should be granted, the matter ought to be settled first with the Attorney General. I think it should be to the Vicar Apostolic; but it must be such as to comprehend all the titles of our several Crown Leases. I fear, if I have to move the matter by myself, my work might be useless as it has been with the precedent Bill. We must have an Act to prevent all future doubts or difficulties; and I hope the Government will help us

in the matter.

3. I did not say who and what the Sacred Congregation is, because I thought the Government knew it before hand. To avoid all misunderstandings, I will give the definition from Professor CAMILLI's lectures on Canon Law delivered in the Roman Pontifical Seminary and therefore very accurate. In the first volume, p. 259, he defines the Roman Congregations as follows:-Roma Congregationes dicuntur Collegia particularia ex aliquod Cardinalibus aliisque viris prestantissimis in Urbe (Roma) constituta pro nonnullis negotiis curandis discutiendis et definiendis.

At page 267 he defines the nature of the Congregations of the Propagation of the Faith:-Congregatio Propaganda Fidei præest omnibus Missionibus in partes Infidelium et intuitu Missionum predita est amplissimis facultatibus siquidem in se una Congregationum plurium aliarum officia complectitur, et constituit organum generale per quod Romanus Pontifex necessitatibus Missionum providet. Constat, prout cæteræ, Prefecto Secretario etc.

The present prefect of the Congregation is Cardinal SIMEONI. To give you an idea in my way of viewing the matter, I would in lato sensu compare the Sacred Congregation of Propaganda to the Colonial Office, and I would say, with some- thing of the Foreign Office, as the Propaganda likewise presides to the interest of the Catholic Church in England, Ireland and the English Colonies always under the control of the Pope. It is the Propaganda which published lately a series of letters concerning Ireland showing its consistent policy in recommending to the Catholics of Ireland loyalty to the Queen and respect to the authorities.

4. You ask me, on what authority I apply on behalf of the Propaganda-I answer: In force of the organisation of the Catholic Church by having been myself entrusted by the Sovereign Pontiff the Pope through the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith with the charge of the Catholic Mission of Hongkong.

5. By the last mails I have referred the case to the Sacred Congregation to whom I have likewise sent a certified copy of the Crown Lease of Lot 50. As soon as I shall receive instructions it will be my duty to communicate them to you.

6. The only thing I regret after all is that no arrangements could be found in such case of emergency. The doubts which have arisen for the first time on our power of mortgaging and selling Lot 50 will, we fear, if not removed soon, con- tribute to lessen the value of our property. Such a ground as Lot 50 which was called by the Surveyor General a very precious property, located in the centre of the

¿

town, could not in future be sold as before at a very high price, as people will always be afraid of buying it, and both the Catholic Community and the Colony of Hongkong will suffer, the former by not being able to have the new Cathedral finished in time to supply its imperious wants caused by its daily increasing, and the latter by our not being able now to get sufficient funds, by the sale of the Lot, to ornament the exterior of the Church, as much as we had desired to render the Cathedral a worthy monument of the Colony.

Thanking His Excellency the Governor for his kindness of transmitting my letter to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

169

Honourable F. STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

HONGKONG.

I have, &c.,

JOHN T. RAIMONDI, Titular Bishop of Acantho, and Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong.

(3.)

Secretary of State to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

DOWNING STREET,

SIR,

2nd August, 1884.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 210 of the 6th of June, transmitting a letter addressed to me by Bishop RAIMONDI, together with annexed correspondence, on the subject of the difficulties which have arisen in regard to the disposal of certain property in the Colony leased to the "Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith," and requesting instructions.

I enclose copies of two Ordinances of the Legislature of Trinidad which may be of use to you in dealing with this question. I shall have no objection to the enactment of an Ordinance containing the following provisions

a. It should incorporate either the person for the time being holding some office in the Church of Rome in Hongkong, e. g. the Bishop or the Vicar Apostolic as in the case of the Roman Catholic Arch- bishop of Port of Spain under the Trinidad Ordinance No. 16 of 1870 (copy enclosed), or a body of trustees to be appointed from time to time, in some manner to be prescribed by the Ordinance, as in the case of the Church of England in Trinidad under the Ordi- nance No. 8 of 1873.

b. It should vest in such Corporation Lot 50 and the other property of

the Church of Rome in Hongkong.

c. It should empower such Corporation to acquire and hold property for

the use of the Church of Rome.

170

d. It should empower such Corporation to sell, mortgage, and otherwise dispose of any property for the time being vested in it with such consent (if any) as it may be thought desirable to make necessary; the provisions however for vesting in the new Corporation Lot 50 or any other property which may have been leased to the Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith should not be enacted without the consent of the Sacred Congregation, for which I under- stand the Bishop has applied, and care should be taken to impose on the Corporation all the obligations imposed or expressed to be imposed on the lessee by the leases of any property the leasehold interest of which is transferred by the Ordinance.

I have, &c.,

Governor Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.;

&c.

&c.,

Q

(Signed),

Enclosure in the above.

TRINIDAD.

DERBY.

No. 16, 1870.

An Ordinance enacted by His Excellency the Governor of Trinidad, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council, for the Incorporation of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Port of Spain.

SEAL

(Signed),

J. R. LONGDEN.

August 4th, 1870.

BB

E it enacted by His Excellency the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Legislative

Council, as follows:-

1. The Most Reverend HYACINTH JOACHIM LOUIS GOUIN, the Roman Catholic Archbishop in this Island, and his Successors in Office, or the Roman Catholic Dignitary for the time being having the Supreme Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction in this Island, in the Roman Catholic Church, shall be a Body Corporate, and have the name of "The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Port of Spain," and by that name shall have Perpetual Succession, and shall have full Power to purchase, take, hold and enjoy all Lands, Messuages and Hereditaments of what nature or kind soever in Perpetuity or for a Term of Life or Years, and also all manner of Goods and Chattels whatsoever, and may sue and be sued in all Courts of Justice, and before all Magistrates in this Island, and shall and may have and use a Common Seal, and the said Seal may, from time to time break, change, alter or make anew, as to the said Corporate Body may seem fit.

Passed in Council, this First day of August, in the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy.

(Signed),

A. C. ROSS, Clerk of the Council.

(4.)*

Bishop Raimondi to the Colonial Secretary.

ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSION HOUSE, HONGKONG, 10th April, 1885.

Y

171

SIR,

Referring to certain remarks made in Council on Wednesday last, on the subject of the Bill for the Incorporation of the Roman Catholic Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong, I beg to inform you that the Head of the Roman Catholic Church in Hongkong will always be a Vicar Apostolic. On the death or in the absence of the Vicar Apostolic, the Senior Priest on the Mission succeeds him as Pro-Vicar, either by special or general appointment; the Vicar Apostolic will generally be a Bishop of some Titular See, but need not necessarily be so.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

JOHN T. RAIMONDI,

Bishop, Vicar Apostolic.

t

Honourable W. H. MARSH,

Colonial Secretary.

+

C

173

No. 18.

HONGKONG.

Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1884.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 30th March, 1885.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for 1884, together with the Tables showing the work done in the different Establishments of the Medical Department. I also forward reports from the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, the Superintendent of the Lock Hospital, and the Government Analyst.

POLICE.

2.-The admissions from the Police Force to Hospital, in 1884, show a decrease of over one hundred as compared with 1883. For the last four years the numbers have been as follows:-1881, 498; 1882, 549; 1883, 599; and 1884, 486, shewing a considerable improvement, especially when the strength of the Force in the different years is taken into consideration. The average strength of the Force in the last four years has been:-1881, 624; 1882, 588; 1883, 658; and 1884, 666.

3. There were seven deaths in the Force: one European, one Indian, and five Chinese; of these deaths only two occurred in Hospital; one European and one Chinese. The Indian died in India while away on leave. One Chinese died in China while on leave, and three others in their own houses.

4.-Table I shews the admissions to Hospital of each class of the Force during each month of the year 1884. The number of admissions of every class is, as usual, largest in the summer months.

5.-Table II gives the average strength of the different sections of the Force, the death rate of sickness and mortality to strength.

6.-Table III shews the number of admissions to Hospital of the different sections of the Force from the different stations and districts.

7.-The Water Police Hulk being burnt, destroyed one great source of sickness amongst the Force, but the new Water Police Station not being ready, the men were located at Crosby's Store which, during their stay there, proved no improvement on the Hulk. Towards the end of the year they were removed into the New Water Police Station on the Kowloon side and this, so far, has been a great improvement. It has yet to be seen how it works in the summer months.

8.-Stanley Station, which in 1883 sent in twenty-eight cases, this year only sent in thirteen; the number is still high as, in 1882 only, seven cases were received. This year, while the old Station is being partially rebuilt and repaired, the men have been stationed in the old military quarters there.

9.-No. 2 and No. 3 Stations sent in 18 cases this year, as compared with 39 in 1883. Most of the cases come from No. 3 Station which should be pulled down and entirely rebuilt; there is plenty of room for an excellent Station there.

10.-No. 7 Station sent in 29 cases, as compared with 58 in 1883. This Station should also be entirely rebuilt, as there is plenty of room for an excellent Station and no reason for its being so insa- lubrious.

11.--The Central Station furnishes many more cases than it should do. This Station and No. 9 admit of much improvement. The latter, an old Station of the Bungalow description, only used for married quarters, should be rebuilt with two stories. Whitfield Station is now the worst of the out-stations and sends in a very bad class of fever cases, though, as regards the building itself, there is nothing to quarrel with; but a great amount of earth cutting, &c., has being going on of late years in the neighbourhood. However, I think, time will work improvement in this Station.

12. The admissions to Hospital from the various sections of the Force for the last four years are as follows:

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Admissions to Hospital, 1881,

.88

212

198

Do.,

1882,

92

230

227

Do.,

Do.,

1883,.. 1884,.

..113

246

239

87

224

175

174

13. This shews that the improvement has taken place chiefly among the Europeans and Chinese, 14.-The admissions to Hospital and deaths of members of the Police Force during the past ten years are given below.

Admissions.

..436

1875, 1876,

Deaths.

14

...410

7

1877,

..418

6

1878,

..566

6

1879,

..566

8

1880,

...588

13

1881,

....498

10

1882,

..549

8

1883,

...599

10

1884,

..486

7

TROOPS.

15.-There is a very slight decrease in the number admitted to the Military Hospital this year, but an increase in the number of deaths.

16.--Table IV gives the average strength of the Force, the cases of sickness and deaths, with the percentage to strength for 1884. I give below, for the sake of comparison, the number of admissions and deaths for the past ten years.

1875,.

Admissions.

Deaths.

716

9

1876,

563

2

1877

973

9

1878,

944

· 10

1879,....

.1,035

8

1880,

1,075

13

1881,.

.1,116

4.

1882,

.1,019

9

.1,105

10

1,097

12

?

1883,.

1884,.

17. The sickness, therefore, is nearly equal to any of the previous five years and is only exceeded twice in the previous nine years, while the number of deaths is only exceeded once in the previous

nine years.

18. The Indian Troops, like the Indian Police, seem to suffer more from sickness in proportion to their strength than the white Troops or Police. The Indian Troops have, as a rule, better quarters lighter duties, and less exposure than the Police, yet their sickness in proportion to their strength is not much less, so that the sickness among them cannot be accounted for in this way. Their own climate is as cold in winter, as most of them come from northern India, and very much hotter in summer, and it is not less variable in its changes. The same diseases are common to both climates. They can in both cases procure the diet they are accustomed to in their own country and they are both better paid and clothed. So that it is difficult to account for so much sickness amongst them in both

cases.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

19.-This Establishment is now conducted in the Old Lock Hospital which has been altered and improved according to the plans approved by the Secretary of State and now provides handsome airy wards for the patients.

20.-The New Lock Hospital is still occupied as part of this Establishment and will remain so until the Fever Wards, Venereal Wards, Coolies Quarters, &c., &c., are finished, which, I hope, will take place before the end of the year.

21.-Besides these buildings, a new Hospital, a Mortuary and a Laboratory have to be constructed and the ground for these buildings is now in course. of preparation.

22.-The house for the Superintendent is also in the course of construction. The foundations have been laid and I hope a few months more will see it completed.

23.-The New Public Mortuary is now in working order and there will be no longer any offensive long deceased bodies brought to the neighbourhood of the Hospital.

ww

i

24. The admissions during the past year have not been quite so numerous as in the two former years, 1881 and 1882. The following table shews the number and position of the patients brought to Hospital for the past four years.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

Police,

498

549

599

486

Board of Trade,

117

116

110

60

Private paying Patients,.............

193

268

260

259

Government Servants,

67

88

105

96

Police Cases,

139

207

227

231

.....

Destitutes,

222

230

201

222

1,236-

1,458

1,502

1,354

175

25.-The decrease in the admissions to Hospital are, it will be seen above, chiefly due to the Police, Board of Trade and Government Servants, all of which it is very satisfactory to note. Private paying patients remain about the same. Police cases shew a steady increase in every year which is unsatisfactory. Destitutes are about the same.

26.-Table V shews the character of the diseases admitted to Hospital.

27.-Table VI shews the rate of mortality of the different classes admitted to Hospital.

28. Table VII shews the admissions and deaths in each month of the year, both sickness and mortality being greatest in the last seven months of the year. This is not usual; the summer months June, July, August, and September have generally brought in the largest number, but this year the numbers in all classes kept up pretty steadily to the end of the year.

29.-Table VIII shews the number of dead bodies brought to the Mortuary and shews a great decrease in the number of children, only 25; the number of adults has also been considerably decreased, being 56, but for the last three months of the year the bodies were taken to the new Public Mortuary of which the record is not set down here.

30. The number of admissions and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital for the past ten years are as follows:- *

1875,... 1876,

Admissions. ..1,010

Deaths.

59

1,000

36

1877

950

49

1878,

1,289

50

1879,

.1,071

55

1880,

1,055

44

1881

.1,236

49

1882

.1,458

68

1883,

.1,502

70

1884,

...1,354

50

31.-The percentage of deaths to admissions, 3.69, is the smallest percentage in the past ten years, showing that the cases admitted have been less severe in character than in former years.

32.-Many of the complaints in the Superintendent's Report will, I hope, be rectified in the course of the year. They have all been reported on in previous reports.

SMALL POX HOSPITAL.

33.-Seven cases of Small Pox were admitted during the year, of whom two died; the rest were of a very mild type.

34.-Table VIII, a shews the number of admissions and deaths, the nationality and the number of days of detention. They were principally seamen from vessels in the Harbour. One was a Chinese Constable.

VICTORIA GAOL.

35.-The number of prisoners admitted to Gaol this year is greater than for the past two years. The daily average number in the Gaol, however, has been but slightly increased, as compared with last year. The following figures show the number of admissions and the daily average for the past ten years.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

....

4,023

Daily average No. of Prisoners.

1875, 1876,

1877,

1878,

1879,

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883, 1884,

374.06

..4,062

432.60

.3,964

395.22

.3,803

519.22

..3,665

576.13

..3,530

575.25

..4,150

666.00

..3,498

622.00

.3,486

542.15

..4,023

552.00

So that, although there is an increase of over 500 in the admissions, there is only an increase of 10 in the daily average number of prisoners in Gaol. This shews a slight improvement in the daily average

for the past two years.

36.-The number of sick admitted to this Hospital is still large and is owing, as before reported, to the number of vagabonds and beggars sent in of late years.

37.-Table IX shews the admissions to Hospital, the nationality and disease and the number of deaths, which was only three.

176

38.-Table X shews the number of cases treated in the cells. Besides these there are numbers of petty complaints not registered who, together with malingerers and others, come up for examination every morning or to be passed for punishment.

Table XI shews the rate of sickness and deaths in the Gaol for the year 1884.

Table XI, a shews the character of the cases admitted to the Gaol Hospital immediately on their reception from the Courts. In the case of Europeans it is principally from the effects of alcohol; in that of Chinese, debility or venereal disease. Many of them come in looking so seedy that they are put under observation for a time to make sure of their condition.

Table XI, b shews the number of opium smokers of one mace and upwards, admitted to Gaol this year, the quantity smoked by each daily, the number of years they have been addicted to the habit, their weight when admitted and their weight for every week of the first month of their detention or as long as they remained if less than a month; with the nature of the complaints of those under treatment in Hospital. Thus, out of 87 recorded smokers, there were only 12 under treatment and none of these exceeded two mace in their consumption of opium. One opium smoker died this year, a case of general debility, and this is the first opium smoker that has died in the Gaol in the eleven years I have been in medical charge. This was very sensationally made use of in some Public Papers, under the head of DEATH OF AN OPIUM SMOKER IN VICTORIA GAOL. The largest consumer of opium admitted this year was No. 14, five mace; he had been eight years an opium smoker and weighed 80lbs. on admission, increased 34lbs. Three had been opium smokers for thirty years, one daily consuming one mace, one daily consuming two mace, and one daily consuming three mace. The lightest weight admitted was 75lbs., his daily consumption 3 mace and he increased in weight 8lbs. in the first month; had smoked 20 years.

The heaviest weight admitted is 139 lbs., his daily consumption 2 mace, increase in weight 7 lbs., had smoked 20 years; none of these last received any special treatment.

I can find no special symptoms common to all opium smokers when deprived of the use of the drug; they are all ready enough to complain if there is anything the matter with them, and are all watched with the greatest care, and I find nothing to recall in anything I have stated in previous reports.

Nothing has been done in the way of chemical analysis of the opium smoke, as the very limited accommodation for laboratory work is hardly equal to the ordinary requirements of the Government Analyst, who has had much difficulty and discomfort to contend with, in even his ordinary duties.

There still remains as an established fact that the sudden deprivation of the drug produces no evil effect and causes no appreciable discomfort, certainly nothing more than a tobacco smoker would suffer.

TEMPORARY LUNATIC ASYLUM.

39.-This wretched building is no longer in existence. The patients were removed from it at the end of the year, and we now have a fine airy building not far from the Government Civil Hospital.

40. There were only six admissions this year, four males and two females. Four were discharged and sent to their native places relieved, and two remain.

41.-Table XI, d shews the number, nature, and nationality of the cases and the length of their

detention.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

42.-The total number of patients admitted to this Hospital during the year was 1,474; the total treated 1,558; of these 755 died.

The number of out-patients treated was 102,811.

The number of moribund cases brought to Hospital is 291.

The number of Small Pox cases treated in the Small Pox Wards of this Hospital was 15; of these

7 died.

The number of vaccinations successfully performed by the travelling vaccinators of the Tung Wa Hospital during the year was 1,694.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

43.-The new Lock Hospital being still used as a portion of the Civil Hospital, two Small private houses, near the latter, are still in use as a Temporary Lock Hospital, with no ground attached for exercise, but I hope by the end of the year this state of things may be altered and the women received in their proper quarters.

44.-Table XV, a shews the number of women admitted to Hospital for the last 27 years with the average number of days they were under treatment, with the exception of last year; compared with which there is one day increase; this is the lowest average in the 27 years, showing that the disease treated is for the most part of a mild character.

45.-Table XV, b shews the number of beds provided in the Lock Hospital, the number of women detained in Hospital, the number coming to be examined and the number of examinations made.

?

46.-Table XV, c shews the number of men treated for venereal disease in the different Hospitals, Military, Naval, Police and Civil Hospitals, with the average number of men in Garrison and Port of different classes per month.

177

47.-Table XV, d shews the number of women treated in the Lock Hospital and the nature of their complaints, only two of them have been found to suffer from constitutional disease.

48.-Table XV, d 2 shews the number of unregistered women proceeded against, of whom 193 were convicted and 39 found to be diseased.

Table XV, e shews the nature of the complaints among the men treated in the different Hospitals, with a comparison of the numbers of the last three years.

Tables XV, e 1 and XV, e 2 show the amount of constitutional disease contracted amongst the Naval and Military men.

Table XV, e 2 shews that none of the Naval Seamen contracted constitutional disease in Hongkong and only four contracted it elsewhere, as compared with 8 having contracted it in Hongkong and 24 elsewhere in 1883.

Table XV, e 1 shews that 28 of the military contracted constitutional disease in Hongkong against 13 in 1883. . Of the Police, 8 contracted constitutional disease, the same number also in 1883.

49.—The rise in the number of men attacked among the Military with constitutional symptoms is not easily accounted for, as the number of men diseased from all venereal complaints is 159 as compared with 153 in 1883, shewing but a slight increase in the total number of complaints.

50.-The Police have had 41 men sent to Hospital suffering from venereal disease, as compared with 42 in 1883; 8 of those suffered from constitutional disease and the same number in 1883.

51.-The seamen, not knowing their way about, rarely come in contact with any but the regis- tered women, but both Military and Police are well aquainted with the town and with the whereabouts of unregistered women; but the Police have not suffered more than last year from constitutional disease, whereas the Military have more than doubled this number and the reason why I am unable to understand.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

52.-Table XVI shews the rate of mortality among European and American Residents in Hong- kong. The percentage to the number of residents for 1884, 3.09, is the highest in the past ten years. I give below the tables of the death rates for the past twelve years among Europeans and Chinese, as registered in Hongkong, from diseases which may be caused by filth poison.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS.

YEAR.

1878. | 1874. | 1875. | 1876. | 1877. | 1878. | 1879. | 1880. | 1881. | 1882. | 1883. | 1884.

Enteric,........

1

1

1

5

3

3

1

2

10

1

7

Fevers Simple Continued,

6

4

5

9

8

15

21

12

17

13

9

Typhus,

2

4

4

1

1

Diarrhoea,

17

17

18

14

10

9

14 10

10

13

9

12.

Totals,

25

26

24

24

27

29

38. 24

29

37

19

23

YEAR.

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

1873. | 1874. | 1875. | 1876, | 1877. | 1878. | 1879. | 1880. | 1881. | 1882. | 1883. | 1884.

Enteric,.........

12

Fevers Simple Continued,

96

125 31

46 291 343 370

94 145

89

116 309 438 679 262 132

481 733 373 168

71

571 600

Typhus,

16

2

8

33

21

...

38

3

Diarrhoea,

195. 231

288 259

311

701 608 348 435 465 660

301

Totals,

319 402 612

696

834

1,304 1,478 1,080 1,079 1,215 1,496 | 1,035

178

A

53. The figures in the European Table vary but slightly in the different years and classes of disease and the totals still less. The figures in the Chinese Table vary very cansiderably in the different years, both as regards the different classes of disease and the totals. Why Enteric Fever should vary from 12 to 679, simple continued Fever from 46 to 733 and Diarrhoea from 195 to 701, is very hard to say. I have here given the lowest and the highest numbers in any of the twelve years given in the tables. I can only ascribe it to a confusion in the diagnosis of the different diseases. The totals show that the mortality from these different diseases went up by pretty large jumps from 1873, when the total was 319, to 1879, when the total reached 1,478 in 1880; the total made then a large drop to 1,030 and then went on rising again till 1883, when the total reached 1,496; this year it has again made a large drop to 1,035. Typhus I have laid no stress upon, as it has not, so far as I can ascertain, been diagnosed by European Physicians as occuring in the tropics and is not a disease, unless carefully isolated, likely to stop at one or two cases.

54.-The only cases, as far as I can ascertain, of true Typhus ever seen by European Physicians in Hongkong, were some cases received many years ago in the Seamen's Hospital, now the Naval Hospital, and they all came in vessels from Japan. Still it is very clear that these classes of diseases have very largely increased of late years among the Chinese, as is shown by the totals, and have not shown any great inclination to go back to their former small numbers, which does not speak well for the Chinese portion of the City of Victoria or the Villages of Hongkong, as regards sanitation.

55.—The Sanitary Board can do little to help this state of things, as long as the Building Ordi- nance and other Ordinances affecting the General Health of the Population remain as at present, for they are powerless to interfere in many cases. For instance, in the majority of Chinese Houses and many of those occupied by Europeans who can get no other quarters, the latrine is situated in the kitchen, not a very pleasant thing to think of. Not that the Chinese themselves like this arrangement, but they, like some Europeans, are compelled by circumstances to put up with it. It will at any rate take many years to remedy this state of things. Then all wells should be done away with especially in the Chinese quarters of the Town, (the state of the drainage as shown in Mr. CHADWICK's reports rendering the subsoil of the town yearly more unwholesome), and this cannot be done so long as the water supply is so limited. Many wells, that cannot be chemically proved to be unwholesome, are far from coming under the head of what are called potable waters. And many of them are by the Chinese themselves condemned as unfit for drinking, but are used for washing purposes only. Many have been closed as being unfit for any purpose, and this inflicts great hardship and expense on the poorer class of Chinese in the neighbourhood, who obtained their water from this source, for they have to go to much farther a field for their supplies.

56.-The progress of reorganising the drainage is necessarily slow and this also greatly depends on the water supply.

57.-The markets, which are sadly in need of improvement, will also have to wait and many other things that I have brought to notice years ago in my reports remain in statu quo or have improved for the worse.

Mr. CROW's analytical report is very interesting. Besides the reports on some poisoning cases, on poisons in use by the Chinese, there are other things well worthy of circulation.

The analysis of bread supplied from various sources in Hongkong was very satisfactory. Nothing of an unwholesome nature was to be detected in any case.

The analysis of the water supply is not satisfactory. The water supplied from the Pokfulám Reservoir is good, but of 42 wells examined only one, situated in Caine Road, was found to be equally good, the others only varied more or less in impurity, in most cases greatly so, and some wells were utterly condemned as unfit for any purpose.

The analytical work has been greatly hampered by want of a proper Laboratory, which want, I hope, will soon be rectified.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&e.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

POLICE.

I. TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1884.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

Remaining on the 1stJan.,

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

1884,

January,

February,

March,

April,

May, June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

13

Total,..

87

MZQNOZOONOOOR 15

3

1

10

6

19

1

10

22

15

1

22

1

7

14

6

27

5

17

13

35

7

...

30

18

55

9

23

15

47

6

25

15

46

...

18

...

32

57

...

6

15

9

30

...

6

9

23

77

36

15

28

52

9

16

38

1

224

175

1

:

486

૧૭

C. J. WHARRY, M.Ď., Superintendent.

II.—TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1884.

AVERAGE STrength.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

European. Indian. Chinese.

Total. European. Indian.

Chinese. European. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

111 178 *377 666

87

224 175

1 1t 15

per cent.

*Includes 52 Coolies,

† Died in India on leave.

79.0 125.84 46.41 per cent. per cent.

+ 1 Chinese Constable died in China on leave, and 3 Chinese Constables died in their own houses.

0.90

0.56

1.32

per cent.

per cent.

per cent.

III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1884.

GOVERNMENT

CENTRAL

No. 1

No. 5

HOUSE

8

No. 2

39

9

""

3

STONE CUTTERS'

ISLAND.

No. 6

WATER POLICE STATIONS, TSIMSHATSUI,

WHITFIELD.

SHAUKIWAN. POKFULAM.

ABERDEEN.

STANLEY.

No. 7

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Remaining on 1st Jan., 1884,

5

1

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,...

3 9 3

1 11 10 4 24

2

July,...

August,

4 16

3 21

3 16

7

1 13 9

September, 2

October,

November, 1

December, 11 7

::::::

Chinese.

4

I

Total,. 41 (153 46 3 11 4 1

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

::

:::::

YAUMATI,

HUNG HOM.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

: : : : : : : : : : :

11

10

13

15

7

6

20

Sout :

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

TOTAL

1

2

9

:::::

::::::::::

1

1

2

2

I

:::

2

2

HAIR:::::::

19

2

1

1

aaaa H ::~HH

2

1 22

2 1 22

2

27

2

1

35

55

1

47

46

2 57

2

30

1

36 2 52

1

38

6 1 19 4 99

1

5

2

2

1 2 4 7 4 7

2

6 18 5 7 14

7 486

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

IV.—TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1884.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS.

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTA- LITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

White. Black. *Total. White. Black. Total.

White.

Black.

Total.

White. Black. White. Black.

1,062 165

1,227 913

184

1,097

8.

4

12

47.62

7.35 8.05 24.21

R. HUNGERFord, Deputy Surgeon General,

P.M.O.

.179

DISEASES.

180

V.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1884.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Measles,

2

Enteric Fever,

3

3

:~

2

Febricula,

12

20

24 56

J

Remittent Fever,.

45

37

43 125

1

2

Intermittent Fever,

6

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

1

1

Rheumatism, Acute,.

7

Do., Chronic,

3

Do.,

Muscular,

5

Lumba go,

1

Stiff Neck,

1

Sciatica,

4

1 5

Syphilis, Primary,—

Hard Chancre,..

18

Soft Sores,

17

54

23

1

22

Sloughing Phagedona,

*2

:

***

Secondary,-

Roseola,

1

1

2

:::

:

:

:

Local Affections,-

Pharyngitis,

1

:

Laryngitis,

1

Lupus Exedeus,

2

Iritis,

Psoriasis,

:

Rupia,

Acue,

Periostitis,

Myelitis,

Ulcers of Face,

Do. of Breast and Arms,.

Do. of Arm,

Do. of Leg,

Condylomata, Rheumatism,

Eucephaloid Cancer of Testis,

Fibrous Tumour of Upper Jaw,

Do.

do. of Neck,

Cystic do. of do.,

Leprosy,

Scurvy,

Tuberculosis,

Phthisis,

11

2

9

5

Ni mi

1

co:

11

1

2

2

Homoptysis,

Ancemia,

Anasarca,

Ascites,

16

1

+

9

3

6

18

2

2

2

2

Gangrene of Finger,

Congestion of Brain,

1

Softening of Brain,.

2

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis,

Muscular Paralysis of Extremities 1

8

Paraplegia,

Hemiphlegia,

Hydrophobia,

1

Epilepsy,

2

Headache,.

1

7

Neuralgia,.

2

Delirium Tremens,

6

Alcoholism,

16

17

2

Hypochondriasis,

Dementia,

3

Conjunctivitis,

14 21

Pterygium,

Keratitis,

Ulcers of Cornea,

Foreign Bodies on Conjunctiva,

Iritis,.

Hordeolum,

Laceration of Eye-ball,

Valve Disease,-

Aortic, Mitral,

Hypertrophy of the Heart,

Dilatation of the Heart,

Aneurism, Subclavian,

Do., Aortic,

Traumatic Gluteal,

Do.,

Tussis,

Bronchial Catarrh,

1

...

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Diarrhoea,

Brought forward,..

2 Gum-boil,

Parotitis,

3 Tonsillitis,

1

...

Pharyngeal Abscess, Gastric Catarrb,..

Dyspepsia,

Tape-worm,

Lumbrici,

Dysentery,

Do., Chronic, Hernia, Inguinal,

231 153 155 539 10

2

61209:00

2

6

ai: -wi wi

6 2

24

*

51

18

10

48

Do.,

Chronic,

...

1

2 4

Colic,

...

Constipation,

12

...

Rectal Abscess,

Fistula in Ano,

Hæmorrhoids,.

2

Hepatitis,

Abscess of Liver,

2

2

Congestion of Liver,

10

2

12

Cirrhosis,

4

6

1

2

Enlarged Liver,

Jaundice,

2

31

Enlarged Spleen,

Bright's Disease,

2

2

Renal Calculus,

1

Vesical do.,

Urethral do.,

Cystitis,

Irritable Bladder,

Retention of Urine,

Gonorrhoea,

42

8

53

Gleet,

3

Warts,

2 4 16

2

...

...

...

3

...

3

3

Phimosis,

Elongated Prepuce,

Rupture of Urethra,

Stricture of do.,

.

Do. of do., after Rup-

ture,

Excoriation of Penis.

2

1

-

1

Do.

of Anus,..

Do.

of Perinæum,

Herpes Preputialis,

Sloughing of Perniceum & Nates,

Chronic Ulceration of Perniceum, Suinses of Groin,

Hydrocele Testis, Orchitis,

Oopheritis, Amenorrhoea,

1

Dysmenorrhoea,

Ovarian Cyst,

Parturition,

3

2

Angular Curvature of Spine,

Necrosis of Lower Jaw,

Do. of Upper Jaw,.

Do. of Temporal Bone,.

Synovitis, Knee,..

Do., Ankle,

Chronic Abscess of Thigh,

Obstruction of Femoral Lym-

phatics,

Sinus of Thigh,

Diffuse Cellulitis of Hand,

1

2

:

2

33 22

*

2

Do. Abscess, Carbuncle,

do. of Arm,

6

2

Elephantiasis of Foot,

1

Herpes Circinatus,..

2

3

Molluscum,

Scabies,

2

Eczema,

Bronchitis, Acute,

Do.. Chronic,

Pneumonia, Acute,

Do., Chronic,

1

Ulcer,

10

Bubo,

7

2

Boils,

14

3

26

34

Burns and Scalds,

3

5

1 10

11

Debility,

13

17

38

*

2

Opium Smoking (Debility)..

1 Poisoning, Opium,.

1

Do., Alcohol,

Asthma,.....

Emphysema,

Empyema,

1

Olitis,

Abscess of Ear,

1

Ozona,

1

Toothache,

1

1

Carried forward,

231 153 155 539 10

2 4

16

Do., Datura,

Immersion in Water, Suicidal,

Privation,

Fxposure to Cold, &c.,

13

9

481

Gangrene of Feet, &c.,

Inebrietas, Moribund,

Carried forward,.............. 484 255 264 1003 17 4

23

20

NW

SHARE & G

4

3

27

2

25

2:

2

N

16 37

:

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY, &c.,-(Continued).

ADMISSIONS,

DEATHS.

181

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Chinese.

Brought forward,.

26

Observation,

2

Cut throat,

Inflammation of Face & Hand

(Lacquer Poisoning),

Dog-bite,

Monkey-bite,

Man-bite,

21

Contusions,

Sprain of Ankle,

Do. of Knee,

Do. of Loin,

Do. of Wrist,

Wounds, Contused,.

9

21

Do., do.,

of Scalp...

7

36

Do.,

do., of Eye-ball,

Do.,

Incised,

4

32

12

Do.,

Lacerated,

Do.,

Gun-shot of Forehead,.

1

Do.,

do.

do.

1

-39

1

1

2

1'

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Coloured.

3 22

484 255 264 1003 17

Total.

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Europeans.

+

Coloured.

DISEASES.

...

...

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Brought forward,..

Do.,

16 37

Wounds, Punctured of Lung,

Do.,

do. of Abdomen, do. Overscafula,

559 316 431 1306 17

1

3

I 1

Concussion of Brain,

1

1

*~

4 18 39

Do. of Spine,

1

Fracture Simple,—

1

34

Do.

of Clavicle,

1

Do.

of Radius,

...

Do.

of Radius and Ulna,

Do.

of Humerus,

1

Do.

of Fibula,

40

Do.

of Femur,

47

1

Do.

of Neck of Femur,

Do.

of Ribs,

2

2

40...

Do.

of Skull,

:

12

1

Fracture Compound,-

3

3

Do.

of Skull,

1

Do.

of Radius and Ulna,

and Leg.......

Do.,

do.

of Face,

1

1

Do.

of Nectacarpal Bones..

Do.

of Finger,

3

Do.,

do.

of Lung,

Do.

of Toes,

Do.,

do.

of Chest-wall, 1

1

Do.,

do.

of Hand,

Do.,

do.

of Leg,.....

Do.,

do.

of Sacrum,

Do.,

do.

of Thigh,...

:-212

Do.

of Tibia,

1

2

Do. of Tibia and Fibula,

Dislocation of Nasal Bone, Old Fracture of Tibia, Fibula

and Humerus,

...

1

:

:.

:

Do., Punctured of Upper Arm,

Carried forward...........

1

...

559 316 431 1306] 17

Reduction of Dislocation,----

Nasal Bones.....

Partial Excision for Necrosis,--

Upper Jaw,

Amputations Primary,—

Of Hand through Meta-l

carpus,

Of Fingers,

Of Thigh,

Of Toes,

*

1

Amputation Secondary,-

Of Hand through Meta-l

carpus,

1

:

:

السمع

1

#

18

69

39

TOTAL,..

572 322 460 1354 18

sch

4

28 50

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Brought forward,...... 4

2

8 14...

1

1

Removal of Bullets,—

Of Calculi,

:

4

4

1

.1

1

1

412

1

1

:

1.

:

Of Vesical Lateral Litho-}

tomy,

Of Urethral,

Of Humour of Upper Jaw, Incision for,-

Fistula in Ano,

Phimosis,

Circumcision,-

Paracentesis,

Abdominal,

Ovarian,

Vesical per Rectum, Hydrocle,

:

Carried forward,...... 4

2

8

14

1

1

CO 10

6

5

1

:

::

...

:

2

TOTAL,.

17

4 20

41

:

1

1

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

VI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admissions.

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

}

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

4.54

1875,

5.01

1875,

4.51

1875,

8.65

4.49

1876,

3.42

1876,

3.28 1876,

3.91

5.15

1877,

4.16

1877,

3.25

1877,

8.12.

3.88

1878,

3.46

1878,

3.08

1878,

5.76

5.13

1879,

3.12

1879,

8.39

1879,

4.72

4.17

1880,

3.73

1880,

2.66

1880,

5.80

3.96

1881,

3.87

1881,

3.09

1881,

4.80

4.60

1882,

4.35

1882,

4.38

1882,

5.24

4.66

1883,

4.37

1883.

3.01

1883,

6.08

3.69

1884,

3.15

1884,

1.24

1884,

6.08

1875, 1876,.. 1877.

1878, 1879,. 1880,

·

1881, 1882,. 1883, 1884.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

182

VII.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1884.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1884,

23

1

15

1

8

46

2

January,

40

14

24

78

February,

26.

20

1

23

69

6

March,

42

24

31

97

3

April,

43

19

29

91

May,

49

37

44

1

130

June,.

49

32

36

117

6

July,

65

34

43

142

9

August,

51

26

60

137

4

September,

30

24

40

94

2

October,

39

29

34

102

November,

46

1

30

50

1

126

2

December,.

69

18

38

125

Total,

572

18

322

4

460

28

1,354

50

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

January,

February,

March,

April,.

VIII-LIST of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1884.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL.

Adults.

Children. Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

4

3

77

10

12

4

6

6

4

4

10

5

9

# 6D 6D CO

4

10

8

9

13

8

12

..

·

May, June, July, August, September,

October,

November, December,

Total,.

4

:::

56

25

85

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

VIIIa.-TABLE of ADMISSIONS INTO and DEATHS in SMALL FOX HOSPITAL, 1884.

No. SEX.

NATIONALITY.

AGE.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

No. OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL.

DESCRIPTION

OF

RESULT.

PATIENT.

1

Male

Goa

40

8th March

11th March

3

Private Paying

Do.

Spanish

19

23rd

1st April

7

Do.

Died. Recovered.

""

Do.

Spanish

36

24th

26th March

2

Do.

""

Do.

Malay

Do.

Chinese

1st April 13th

5th April

4

Do.

Died. Recovered.

24th

11

P. C. 414

Do.

""

Do.

English

25th

""

8th May

13

Private Paying

Do.

Do.

German

41

16th June

3rd July

17

Do.

Do.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

IX.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL and MORTALITY, during the Year 1884.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st

Europeans.

Coloured

Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured

Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

January, 1884,

2

:

5

7

:

I.-

Febricula,

1

2

3

...

Intermittent Fever,

1

5

...

Remittent Fever,

1

II-

Rheumatism,

9

10

Scrofula,

1

1

Syphilis primary,

13

13

Syphilis secondary,

6

6

III.-

Cephalalgia,

2

...

Otorrhoea,

1

Insomnia,

I

...

Conjunctivitis,

Ophthalmia,

...

Keratitis,

1

IV.-

Aortic Aneurism,

Ancemia,

I

Morbus Cordis,

VII.

Asthma,

...

Bronchitis,

VIII Colic,

IX.-X

+

Constipation, Diarrhoea,

Dysentery, Dyspepsia,

Fistula in Ano, Gastralgia, Hæmorrhoids, Jaundice,

...

Rectal Hæmorrhage, Tænia Solium, Tonsillitis,

IX.-X.-Albuminuria,

Balanitis,

Cystitis,

2

2

7

3

...

2

1

2

1

1

8

2

1

1

1

1

....

Gonorrhoea,

3

5

Orchitis,

2

Stone in Urethra,

1

182T

8

2

XI.-

Disease of joints,

1

Ι

Periostitis,

1

...

XII-

Abscess,

I

55

56

Acne,

Boil,

Carbunele,

1

Cellulitis,

I

Erysipelas,..

Herpes Zoster,

1

.Herpes Preputialis,

1

Ulcer,

1

10

11

Unclassed:

Alcoholia,

12

Debility,.....

1

::

27

8888

12

28

Wounds and Injuries:—

Abrasions,

Burns,

Contusion,

Contused Wound; Punctured Wound, Shot Wound...............

Fracture,

Wounds,..

Sprain,

• Unknown or Unrecognized:-

Observation,

I

I

...

...

....

...

...

N

7

...

26

26

1

1

...

3

3

11

:

Total,..

65

1

...

3

5

16 27

251

317

:

...

...

...

:

...

...

...

I

REMARKS.

Ni

2

2

...

...

...

...

:

:

3

:

3

183

Sent to Tung Wa Hos-

pital.

1 with Diarrhoea.

By hanging 1.

Flogging II.

1 Clavicle, 1 Ulna, (1 Neck of Femur sent to Civil Hospital).

184

X.-TABLE shewing the CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1884.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1884,

II.-

Rheumatism,........

Secondary Syphilis,

III.-

Otorrhoea,

Ophthalmia,

IV.-

Anæmia,

VII-

Bronchitis,

VIII.-

1

Dyspepsia,.

. XII.-

Abscess,....

Unclassed.-

Debility,

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

1

:

...

...

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

.:.

6

6

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

3

8

8

Total,......

2

*26

28

XI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1884.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Daily Average

No. of Prisoners.

Total Sick in

Total

Hospital.

Serious Sick, Total Sickness Trifling Deaths.

Cases.

Rate of Sickness.

Rate of Mortality.

to Total.

To Total. To Average. To Total. | To Average.

4,023

552

317

28

3

7.879

8.575

6.250

0.074

0.545

TABLE XI, 4.---CASES ADMITTED to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL at the First Medical Examination by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1884.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

185

SENTENCE.

Number.

- DISEASES.

Years. Mos. Days.

1234 ON

:

Alcoholia,

1 Jan.

10 Jan.

On Remand.

1

Debility,

8

23

""

""

14

Alcoholia,

9

23

""

وو

Do.,

9

10

On Remand..

22

1

Do.,

9

10

6

1

Primary Syphilis,.

14

9 Feb.

7

Contusions,

26

12

On Remand.

29

8

6

Fractured Ulna,

31

10 Mar.

14

9

Debility,

2 Feb.

15 Feb.

10

14

Carbuncle,

14

وو

10

11

Gonorrhoea,

23

27

3 Mar.

99

42

12

Opthalmia,

23

17

""

25

7

13

Debility,

8 Mar.

11

A

""

14

14

Do.,

17

28

""

5

15

....

Do.,

16

Do.,

17

Do.,

29

"2

1 April.

1

3 April.

On Remand.

Do.

""

Do.

""

18

Do.,

1

Do.

"

19

7

Do.,

5

""

29

20

14

Observation,

5

12

"

""

21

Secondary Syphilis,

19

22

22

7

Observation,

29

وو

23

6

Gonorrhoea,

24

7

Observation,

1 May. 9

19 May.

1

6

"3

"

10

""

""

25

14

Debility,

12

19

""

26

14

Observation,

13

14

"

27

3

.Asthma,....

16

""

28

7

Erysipelas,

29

""

29

6

Febricula,

2 June.

18

30

6

Wound,

10.

:

31

32

3

Debility, Do.,

14

17

29

33

3

Febricula,

21

""

34

3

Debility,

17.

""

"

35

6

Primary Syphilis,.

2 July.

36

7

Debility,

5

A

37

Do.,

38

Do.,

39

Primary Syphilis,.

25

10 10 10

5

">

وو

29

40

1

Fracture Neck of Femur,...

24

41

3

Contused Wound,..

28

5

""

21

3 June.

""

12 July.

17 June.

25

26 25

""

16 July.

11

7

8

30

""

""

2 Aug. 1 ""

Sent to Tung Wa Hospital.

Throat cut.

On Remand.

Sent to Civil Hospital.

42

3

Fractured Clavicle,

28

11 Sep.

43

3

Primary Syphilis,

28

""

44

3

Debility,

13 Aug.

15

وو

45

Observation,

16

23

39

"

46

Punctured Wound,

22

23

14 Aug.

On Remand. Do.

Discharged.

""

47

Dysentery,

26

48

Gonorrhoea,

27

5 Sep. 5

""

49

4

Observation,

28

وو

""

29 Aug.

50

Contused Wound,.

51

Contusion,

5 Sep. 5

20 Sep.

On Remand.

27

Do.

52

Primary Syphilis,

9

14 Oct.

Do.

دو

53

Do.,

10

""

15 Sep.

54

Abscess,..

13

11 Oct.

""

55

Secondary Syphilis,

6 Oct.

4 Nov.

56

Debility,

10

15 Oct.

Sent to Tung Wa Hospital.

:

57

6

58

1

59

2:

Observation,

18

23

Alcoholia,

1 Nov.

4 Nov.

21

Rheumatism,.

5

26

Sent to Civil Hospital.

""

60

7

Aortic Aneurism,

19

25

""

"

61

21

Debility,

24

8 Dec.

62

CO

6

Do.,

3 Dec.

5 ""

63

Alcoholia,

3

10

""

64

65

.18 6

Chancre,

4

""

Abscess,

6

18

""

66

Shot Wound,..

6

19

39

67

4

Abscess,

9

13

68

69

14

70

14

244

Alcoholia,

10

12

""

Do.,

15

""

Do.,

20

71

Observation,

20

وو

وو

...

...

72

2

Alcoholia,

22

2 ***** *N

Sent to Civil Hospital.

29

27

On Remand.

""

Sent to Civil Hospital.

27

"

27

""

23

On Remand.

22

22

Paid fine.

""

29

186

XI, B.-TABLE shewing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS) for the First Four Weeks' Confinement in

VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1884.

No.

AGE.

NUMBER OF YEARS OPIUM SMOKER.

CONSUMPTION WEIGHT WHEN

PER DIEM.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS.

REMARKS.

ADMITTED.

IÙ O << 10 CO I 00 O

1

29

10

Years.

Mace.

108

Ibs.

108

104

104

104

30

1

107

107

""

""

""

107

107

107

3

10

115

115

112

112

112

""

4

30

10

97

97

101

103

103

99

30

10

118

120

121

121

121

""

6

45

30

118

118

118

118

118

40

96

93

93

92

95

>>

8

32

N

120

119

119

118

119

95

9

35

102

105

102

104

107

""

>>

10

44

دارد

118

29

1175

112

117

118

11

45

15

831

83

84

84

85

27

12

27

2

112

114

11

113

112

113

13

45

20

83

87

85

85

>>

""

>>

General Debility, Died.

14

30

8

5

SO

29

22

811

79

80

84

15

32

7

88

88

89

90

94

""

21

16

29

3

94

90

89

88

91

22

"}

17

35

8

93

""

933

98

96

97

18

30

5

120

120

123

123

21

""

19

28

5

114

>>

"

"

111

114

115

116

20

26

10

107

108

108

108

110

>>

""

21

28

10

100

>>

"

1043

103

106

111

22

32

5

107

""

25

27

107

1063

107

108

23

20

93

93

""

>

27

881

91

93

24

36

10

110

107

108

109

$1

""

21

1101

25

37

99

962

95

100

"

"

>"

General Debility.

26. 49

104

105

105

105

105

"7

19

27

25

104

103

103

101

101

"

28

26

10

99

96

95

94

""

>>

29

38

10

115

114

114

112

115

""

30 46

20

117

113

"3

>>

114호

110

110

31

22

6

85

89

90

88

93

"3

""

""

32

37

102

98

99

101

"

""

>>

33

28

115

109

113

111

""

>>

34

25

2

99

98

100

100

100

""

""

35

42

113

108

109

113

115

وو

""

""

General Debility.

36

28

10

87

86

87

88

92

Febricula.

37

??

37

26

86

38

20

39

23

40

25

41

49

18

42

28 10

43

21

44

29

4

TNO∞ 1 00 CT 1

90

91

90

89.

22

5

104

""

104

108

109

""

و

""

8

1022

105

94

100

Abscess.

""

""

""

107

31

""

""

106

108

108

105

107

104

104

104

>>

>>

""

108

108

105

105

105

27

""

29

109

,,

110

114

116

""

""

121

122

122

122

121

""

""

,,

45

52

10

112

112

110

112

114

27

"

""

46

41

10

103

106

107

106

107

:

""

""

47

28

4

103

99

101

101

103

""

21

27

48

30

4

116

118

116

116

116

"

"1

""

49 24

105

""

104

104

104

104

Observation.

"7

50 31

7

80

77

765

82

82

51

36

52

25

53

40

54

28

55

52

56

25

57

50

58

25

59

31

60

50

61

48

62

25

63

39

64

40

65

28

66

25

67

38

68

27

69

38

SWGNWO+UNNEL, EE-8.

""

??

20

120

116

115

115

120

Dysentery.

""

""

1

106

104

102

102

105

""

"2

""

10

98

95

97

96

""

""

10

113

111

111

112

111

22

21

30

85

83

86

90

Ancemia.

"

114

111

111

111

113

""

77

30

102

101

101

103

103

19

19

98

97

97

97

97

""

"

"

11

111

115

117

120

119

""

"2

20

75

77

80

83

83

>

"

20

139

144

143

146

146

>>

"

""

10

· 93

101

102

102

103

22

""

100

100

99

102

103

>>

""

"

105

104

107

104

104

""

"

3

99

96

98

98

98

""

**

109

107

110

114

114

Observation. Contused Wound.

""

"

15

112

109

114

114

114

39

101

101

101

101

101

C

""

22

10

107

105

109

108

108

"

22

70

32

4

119

119

119

119

119

>>

"7

71

40

20

95

91

91

95

95

"

""

32

72

24

91

92

89

91

92

>>

""

73

28.

118

118

116

118

116

17

>>

29

74

28

99

98

95

95

11

""

75

35

20

110

110

113

110

95 110

Debility.

"

""

76 40

20

90

90

90

91

95

">

19

77

28

116

111

111

113

113

22

""

78

32

93

95

93

96

>>

""

79

41

112

113

112

113

113

99

""

80 28

103

100

103

102

105

"

"

""

81

22

3

104

106

106

"J

>>

1063

104

82 35

1

93

90

94

96

95

Abscess.

""

""

83

36

3

114

111

112

112

**

>>

""

84

54

10

104

106

107

108

107

>>

""

*

85

35

7

132

130

131

15

31

1291

131

86

24

2

106

105

105

105

105

>>

"

59

87 30

10

84

83

84

83

84

"

"

وو

}

!

XI, C.-TABLE shewing OPIUM SMOKERS ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, and treated by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1884.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1884,

I.—

Febricula,

No. 36,........

IV.-

Anomia,

55,.......

"

VIII.-

Dysentery,

51,..

XII-

Abscess,

Nos. 39 and 82,....................

Unclassed.-

Debility,

Wounds and Injuries.

Unknown or Unrecognized.-

13, 25, 35 and 74,...................

Contused Wound, No. 66,

Observation, Nos. 49 and 65,

TOTAL,...

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Death.

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

:

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

:

:

4

1

1

1

2

2

12

12

1

XI, D.~TABLE shewing the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of PATIENTS treated in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUM, during the Year 1884.

No.

Native of

Sex.

Age.

Diseases.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No. of Days in Asylum.

Description of Patients.

1

Anglo-Chinese,

F.

Portuguese,

F.

Chinese,

M. 26

4 Indian,

5

Indian,

M.

Indian,

M. 30

292528

35 Dementia,

40

Dementia,

1884. 1st Jan. 1st

1884. 22nd May 27th Feb.

143

57

Police Case. Destitute,

งา

Dementia,

5th July

3rd Sep.

60

97

M. 31 Acute Mania,

19th Aug.

13th Sep.

25

17

Dementia,

12th Sep.

Still in Asylum.

Dementia,

29th Nov.

Still in Asylum.

19

Remaining în Hospital 31st Dec.,

1883.

XII.—TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1884.

Admitted during

the year 1884.

No. of Cases Treated in the Hospital, 1884.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Malcs.

Females.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

No. of Patients) Discharged during the year 1884.

Died

during 1884.

No. of Out-Patients Treated during 1884,

Moribund Cases,

1884.

Males.

*83[Budg

187

Remaining in the Hospital 31st Dec.,

1884.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

74 10 84 1,236

238 1,474 1,810 243 1,553 631 88719 605 150 755

79,110 23,701 102,811 202 89 291 74 10 84

XIII.-VACCINATIONS performed during the Year 1884 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

1,535

In Out-Districts.

159

Total.

1,694

XIV.-CASES of SMALL Pox treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1884.

Remaining in Hospital Admitted during 1884.

31st December, 1883.

Discharged.

Died.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1884.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

:

8

7

15

4

4

00

8

SH

4

3

17

2

188

XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 27 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued and the AVERAGE LENGTH of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858,

124

1858.

4,797

1858,

.43.8

1859,

162

1859,

5,389

1859,

30.8

1860,

361

1860.

9,107

1860,

23.7

1861,

442

1861,

10,778

1861,

23.4

1862,

485

1862,

12,193 1862,

22.0

1863,

420

1863,

11,707 1863,

23.7

1864,

442

1864,

11,940 1864.

27.0

1865,

390

1865,

11,303 1865.

28.0

1866,

406

1866,

13,060

1866,

28.6

1867,

484

.1867.

13,120

1867,

25.5

1868,

579

1868,

16,462

1868,

23.6

1869,

546

1869,

16,799

1869,

24.8

1870,

722

1870,

18,382

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871,

12,308

1871

18.5

1872,

656 1872,

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1873,

11,219

1873,

19.5

1874,

315

1874,.

6,814

1874,.

18.6

1875,

134 1875,

2,916

1875,.

18.7

1876,

168

1876,

2,730

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877,

3,069

1877,

16.6

1878,

105

1878,

2,242

1878,

19.0

1879,

129

1879,

2,199 1879,

13.6

1880,

57

1880,

1,300 1880.

14.7

1881,

44

1881.

1,330

1881,

21.7

1882,

99

1882.

1,831

1882,

15.5

1883,

273

1883,.

3,451

1883,

12.0

1884,

325

1884,

5,174

1884,

13.1

TABLE B.

Daily Average, 14. Longest day, 179.

KETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 10 during the Year 1884

Number admitted

Number of Beds in Lock Hospital.

into Hospital

on Certificates of Visiting Surgeon.

Number who submitted voluntarily.

24

325

264

Number against whom

it was necessary to proceed

by Information before the Registrar General.

116

Total Number brought under

the Provisions of the Ordinance.

280

Total Number of Examinations made during the Year.

13,389

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

18,00-4

Total Number Discharged from Hospital.

323

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1884.

Total No. of Females

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEX DISEASED

ADMITTED INTO

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per Month).

Average No. of

adınitted

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil

Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

Men in Mer- Garrison chant and Port Seamen. (per month).

Average Percentage

of Men Diseased (per month).

325

159 1191

39

921

439

1,227 706

666

13,300

15,899

2.77

TABLE D.

REMARKS.

+49 of the admissions into the Naval Hospital

were not contracted in Hongkong.

49 of the admissions into the Civil Hospital

were not contracted in Hongkong.

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1884.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DIS HARGED.

25

13,389

325

13,064

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do..

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined, Secondary Syphilis,

TOTAL,...

TABLE D 2

No. remaining in Hospital, 31st December, 1883.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Cured.

227

75

77

72

181

188

181

67

74

68

2

2

>>

16

325

341

323

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1881

5

6

Or : 19

18

Shewing the Number of UNLICENSED PROSTITUTES apprehended under Ordinance No. 10 of 1867, during the Year 1884.

NO. OF WOMEN.

CONVICTED.

DISCHARGED.

FOUND DISEASED.

In Boats,

In Houses,

3

3

217

190

27

1 38

Total,

220

193

27

39

2

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1884.

Military

DISEASES.

Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated,

Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

and Primary Syphilis, combined,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Do.,

Gonorrhoea and

do.,

do.,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea, Gleet,

26

36

4

11

100

101

17

35

5

3

7

15

28

2

27

2

TOTAL,.

..1884,......

159

149

41

94

TOTAL,.

.1883,......

153

225

42

93

TOTAL,.

.1882,

138

168

40

124

TABLE E. 2.

January, February,

+

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of NAVAL MEN admitted into NAVAL HOSPITAL, during the Year 1884.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

September,

October,

November, December,

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

...

Contracted elsewhere.

...

Total.

1

2

1

2

1.

Total Number,......

TABLE E. 3.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

H

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL, during the Year 1881.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS. ·

January, February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

04:23:00:00:

6

Contracted elsewhere.

Total.

...

3 4

2

3

3

1

6

189

Total Number,..........

28

XVI. TABLE Shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong, during the last.10 Years.

Percentage of Deaths to

Years.

1875,

1876,

Number of European and

Deaths.

American Residents.

Number of Residents.

2,520

59

2.34

2,520

74

2.93

1877,

2,767

84

3.03

1878,

2,767

67

2.42

1879,

2,767

55

1.98

1880,

2,767

69

2.49

1881,

3,040

64

2.10

1882,

3,040

55

1.80

1883,

3,040

81

2.06

1884,

3,040

94

3.09

Average of 10 Years...

2,826.8

70.2

2.424

190

Enclosure 1.

Report from the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 19th February, 1885.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Hospital Statistics for 1884, with a few remarks upon the working of the Hospital during the past year.

2. The beginning of the year found the Civil Hospital Establishment very much scattered and carrying on its work under great difficulties, in a variety of buildings, and with a staff mostly new to Hospital work.

3. The patients and part of the staff were lodged in a portion of the old female Lock Hospital, in the new female Lock Hospital, and in the old West Point school building; while the Apothecary had temporary quarters at some little distance up the hill, and the Superintendent temporary quarters still farther off.

4. The old female Lock Hospital is now, at the close of the year, partly rebuilt, and though not yet finished, is occupied by part of the patients and staff, the remainder of the patients and staff, with the exception of the Superintendent, occupying the new female Lock Hospital.

5. The Superintendent remains in the temporary quarters away from the Hospital.

6. The Superintendent's official residence adjoining the Hospital, the construction of which was ordered in March 1883, was commenced in June 1884, and though the Surveyor General reported that it would be ready for occupation in September 1884, the foundations are barely completed and the superstructure is not yet begun.

7. It is hardly necessary to remark that the completion of the Superintendent's residence will conduce largely to the efficiency of the Establishment, and the comfort of the patients. Moreover, the Government is paying house-rent for temporary quarters, and there will be an annual saving in money on the completion of the official residence.

8. The Apothecary, Steward, and European Ward-master were all recently appointed, and were new to Hospital work at the beginning of 1884, but twelve months' experience has familiarized them with their respective duties, and the work now goes on more smoothly.

9. The clerk who was appointed to the Hospital, December 1st 1883, fresh from school, did not work satisfactorily and he has now left the service.

10. Continual trouble is experienced with the lowest class of attendants in the Hospital. They are only paid six dollars ($6) a month and have a good deal of night watching in the wards besides regular work in the day time; so it is no wonder if they are not very zealous in performing their duties and not very anxious to remain in the service. It seems hardly reasonable to expect common coolies, at six dollars a month, to nurse the sick and to sit up at night with them.

11. There are at present 98. beds in use, and the stress of the work falls upon the medical officer and the European ward-master.

12. The need of a second medical officer is daily felt in the Establishment and there should also be a second European ward-master.

13. The strain upon the medical officer is somewhat relieved by the gratuitous assistance of Dr. MARQUES, who is good enough to attend to urgent cases, when he chances to be at hand in the Superintendent's absence.

1

14. The calls upon the ward-master are so constant and so harassing, that there is always a risk of his going the way of his predecessors.

15. These almost without exception have succumbed to the pressure, and however promising and well recommended on joining the service, have nearly all taken to drink and dissipation.

16. The Hospital register records 1,423 cases, of which 69 were not admitted.

17. These latter, comprising 11 cases of dog bite, 2 of gun-shot wounds, I attempted drowning, and a number of contused and lacerated, wounds, received the necessary attention in the surgery and were dismissed.

18. The remaining 1,354 treated in Hospital included 46 who remained at the end of 1883.

19. Of this number 486 were Police, and the remaining 868 consisted of merchant seamen, private residents, destitutes, prisoners, members of the Chinese Customs and Revenue services, and officers and seamen from foreign ships of war,

20. Two invalid soldiers were received from the French expeditionary force at Keelung.

21. The admissions from the Police were 113 fewer than in 1883.

22. Table III shows the number from each Station.

23. A number of weakly men and invalids have been discharged from the force, and the burning of the Water Police Hulk in February removed a fruitful source of disease.

191

24. The temporary quarters of the Water Police in Crosby's Store were very unwholesome, but the new barracks at Tsimshátsui were at length occupied in September, and improved health and increased efficiency may now be looked for in consequence.

25. The temporary quarters occupied by the Police at Stanley since August 1883, appear to be productive of a severe form of remittent fever complicated with paralysis of the extremities. It would be well to have the Police Station there repaired and re-occupied.

26. Whitfield Station furnishes a large number of cases of remittent fever, some of them severe. The condition of this neighbourhood is capable of improvement.

27. The Police suffered principally from malarial diseases, fever and dysentery, bronchial affections, and surgical injuries.

28. The total number of days spent in Hospital in 1884 by members of the force was 5,157; in 1883 it was 5,990. About half as many more days were spent off duty on sick leave.

29. Ten patients were admitted from foreign ships of war; one officer and two seamen from American vessels, three Russian and three Spanish seamen, and one seaman from an Italian Corvette. 30. Table V shows the varieties of disease among the patients generally, with the Mortality from each.

31. Malarial diseases, fevers and bowel complaints, are prominent in the list and though not many were fatal, in a large number of cases there ensued severe anemia and serious deterioration of health. A number of cases were complicated with paralysis of the extremities and none of these had quite recovered the use of their lower limbs when discharged.

32. Enthetic disease was slightly diminished but the numbers treated in Hospital are no criterion of the amount of the disease in the Colony..

33. Twenty-three cases of Alcoholism and Delirium Tremens were admitted; at one time no fewer than four being under treatment. This was rather trying to the resources of the Establishment, for there was no proper accommodation for them, and they not only disturbed the other patients, but some of them, being powerful men, required the whole strength of the nursing staff day and night to keep them within bounds.

34. In the course of the year a number of lunatics were sent to the Civil Hospital for observation before being admitted to the Lunatic Asylum. As there is neither accommodation for such cases in the Civil Hospital, nor a sufficient staff to detail special nurses to watch them, the Government might consent to supposed Lunatics being sent to the Asylum for observation. While insane persons are under observation, prior to being placed under restraint, there is always a risk of homicidal or suicidal impulses being developed, and if this were to happen in the Civil Hospital the consequences would be disastrous.

35. Eye diseases were about the same as last year.

36. Bronchial and pulmonary complaints were not more numerous.

37. Hepatic affections were as usual.

38. At the end of July a German seaman was admitted with choleraic symptoms, and died in 4 hours. He had recently arrived from Swatow in the steam-ship Glücksburg.

39. Three Chinese women in labour were brought to the Hospital for assistance; they had all been in labour for several days, and required instrumental aid. Two were successfully delivered, one of whom died of puerperal fever three weeks after. The third died undelivered half an hour after arrival at the Hospital.

40. If the Chinese sick poor are to depend for medical treatment upon the so-called Doctors of the Tung Wah Hospital, a room might still be set apart in that Establishment for women in labour requiring assistance, and European aid called in when necessary.

41. The Chinese know nothing whatever of midwifery, and at the Civil Hospital there is neither proper accommodation for such cases nor a sufficient staff to attend to them.

42. Only a few days ago a woman in labour sent to the Hospital by the Police was found to be dead on arrival.

43. Twenty-eight cases of debility were received in which no special symptoms were observed. 44. Twenty-seven admissions were set down to privation, this appearing to be the exciting cause of the mischief present.

45. Drunkenness sent 25 men to Hospital, most of them with broken heads, &c.

46. There were 98 cases recorded as having been under observation, and these constitute a troublesome class of patients, which includes Police constables and merchant seamen, prisoners in Police Custody, and complainants in the Police Court, with a considerable number of loafers.

Some of them were really sick but a large number were impostors. The discipline of the Police Force, and the ends of justice, as well as the economical administration of the Hospital Establishment, require that these cases should receive special attention.

47. Only three cases of opium poisoning were admitted to Hospital, but a number were taken by the Police direct to the Mortuary.

192

48. Four cases of datura poisoning were treated in Hospital; the use of this poison seems to be more common in the Colony than formerly.

49. Wounds of all kinds, and fractures figure largely in the list as usual.

50. Fifty deaths occurred in Hospital during the year.

51. Up to September 9th, 85 dead bodies were deposited by the Police in the Hospital dead- house.

52. On the 10th September the Public Mortuary at Shekt'ongtsui, being nearly finished, was made available for use, and since that date the Police have taken there all the dead bodies which came into their hands. The patients and staff of the Hospital have thus at last been relieved of what was a constant source of danger and discomfort.

53. The receipts from patients in 1884 amounted to $7,144.45: of this $1,675.75 was derived from the Board of Trade, and $837.42 from the Police. In 1883 the receipts were $8,113.22: of which $1,826.25 was from the Board of Trade, and $1,102.25 from the Police.

54. The visitation of the Hospital by Justices of the Peace, in abeyance for some time past, is to be resumed at some future period. This will be a great advantage, as it will encourage the staff by showing that an interest is taken in their work, and it will also facilitate the remedying of defects in the Establishment.

55. If I might make a suggestion to those responsible for the construction of the Civil Hospital, I would represent the propriety of a laundry forming part of the Establishment. The soiled bedding and clothing is now sent to the Gaol and washed by the convicts, and the result is unsatisfactory.

56. A Hospital report should include something in the shape of scientific observation, and might be expected to contribute something towards a knowledge of the diseases of the locality. This is out of question, however, with one medical officer in sole charge of a general Hospital of 98 beds, a small- pox Hospital of 10 beds, and medico-legal work to perform as well. With such difficulties in the way of nursing and administration as have been described, it is satisfactory that the year's work has been got through without any remarkable failure.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES.

Colonial Surgeon.

Enclosure 2.

Report on the Lock Hospital.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 8th January, 1885.

SIR, I have the honour to forward a short report on the work done during last year in this Establishment in connection with the Contagious Diseases Ordinances.

Within the above mentioned period (1884-1885) 12,638 examinations were held in this Hospital and 427 at Wántsai; and 325 women were detained for treatment.

The majority of admissions were on account of gonorrhea; the cases of leucorrhoea and soft sores coming next in frequency and, lastly, those of ulceration of the os uteri.

Of the true or constitutional syphilis, there have been but 2 cases recorded in this Hospital; a fact to be wondered at, considering the great movement of ships in the harbour, and, moreover, the circumstance that, with the exception of Shanghai and Japan, that very important measure of sanitary science--the inspection of prostitutes, is not enforced at all in the neighbouring ports and places.

The rarity of that terrible scourge amongst the registered women in this Colony, proves, I think, that they, to a certain extent, do take some precautions, as they dread a long detention in the Hospital. It has come to my knowledge that the two women, who had contracted syphilis, had infected within a few days, three men.

Of the 190 registered women against whom complaints were lodged, 57 or 30 per cent. were found to be diseased.

That in a good many cases men did not contract disease with them, will soon be apparent by a little process of reasoning.

Leaving for the present the less serious cases, such as gonorrhea, in which are included also the simple urethritis, and confining our attention only to cases reported as venereal sores' and 'primary syphilis,' you will perceive by referring to the Table H, that of the 45 women examined, only 14 were found diseased.

193

I do not know how many of the reported 'primary syphilis' turned out to be true constitutional infection. I have entered all such cases in the new forms of returns as soft sores, unless I had reason to judge or suspect otherwise.

We know from the well defined nomenclature in use in the Government Civil Hospital, that only one man was treated there, who had contracted syphilis in a registered brothel.

The woman who had infected the man, was detained in the Hospital, as often happened, long before the complaint was made.

The delicate constitution of some of the prostitutes renders them unfit for their miserable calling. They had to be frequently kept in Hospital, and many times were charged with having given gonorrhoea.

It would be advantageous to the women's as well as to men's health, if only robust ones were allowed to follow that course of life.

The enclosed Tables D. E. F. and G. show respectively, and more particularly, the number of women examined and treated at this Hospital, and those that were examined at Wántsai; the number of complaints against them, and the result of the examinations of the unregistered prostitutes.

As we cannot dispense altogether with the old nomenclature, the Tables A. and C. have been compiled in that form, by Mr. DE SOUZA, the Apothecary of this Hospital.

The following tabular statement indicates the number of times the same woman has been com- plained against:-

95

Women,

once

13

do.,

twice

11

do.,

3 times

4

do.,

4

1

do.,

5

I

do.,

6

1

do.,

11 .""

The proportion of times the same woman has been found diseased is :-

31

15

Women, do.,

twice

3 times

11 2

do.,

4 ""

do.,

5 27

366 women were ordered to be examined more than once within a week. The percentage of diseases amongst the registered women were:

Gonorrhoea,

Leucorrhoea, Soft sores,

Syphilis,

..37

.29

.24

...

Ulceration of the os uteri, 19

....07

Of the 116 women from unlicensed brothels who were examined, 39 were detained. As would be expected from that class of women, many of them had the disease in its worst forms.

One had phagedenic sores which, more than once, caused profuse hemorrhage; she was suffering also from paraplegia. . After nearly 7 months of treatment she was discharged cured.

This is the longest period a patient was detained in the Hospital last year.

Compared with the previous year, there has been an increase in the number of complaints and of women treated in this Hospital; perhaps it is due to the stricter enforcement of the Ordinance.

I have to record some changes in the staff of this Institution. The new Matron Mrs. J. ACKERS, gives entire satisfaction. She is intelligent and attentive to her duties.

Mrs. ACKERS was for 9 years nurse in one of the Hospitals in Liverpool, and has a diploma of midwifery.

By arrangement with the Honourable REGISTRAR GENERAL, Inspector EDWARDS attends every morning at this place; Inspector HORTON has been ordered to visit also the ships in the harbour; Inspector LEE continues at his old post.

No death took place in this Establishment.

There were remaining under treatment on the 31st of last month, 18 women; of whom 3 were from unlicensed brothels.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

L. P. MARQUES, M.K. & Q.C.P.I.; L.M.; L.R.C.S.I.,

Resident Surgeon.

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

Number

of

1884.

Women

Examined.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

Soft Sores.

D.

RETURN of WOMEN EXAMINED and TREATED in the LOCK HOSPITAL during the 12 Months of the Year 1884.

FOUND DISEASED.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Cutane-

Hard

ous

Chancre.

Erup-

tion.

January,

February,

1,055

12

1 6

1,075 6 4 9

:

March,.....

988

4 2

1

April,

990

6 9

10

...

May,

1,032

17 13

6

June,

986

7

3

July,

August,

1,079

10 6 9

...

1,032 11

7

September,

1,069

10 10

7

October,..

November,.

December,

1,128 10 1

7

:..

:

:.

:

994

1,210

9 4

6

:

...

6 14

4

Total,

12,638

108 78 | 75

:

Secondary.

Labial Abscess.

Ulceration of Os

Uteri.

Warts.

ཙཱ་

11

Free from Disease.

Remained.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

Soft Sores.

1,023

16 32

48 16 4 4

DISCHARGED CURED.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard

Chancre.

Cutane-

ous

Erup-

tion.

***

7

...

1,048

10 27

37 7

7

:

...

...

5

10

976 12 12 24 3

3

10

2

958

9 32 41

Co

8

17

1

989

15 43 58

7 12

7

3

966

17 20 37

6 10

4

...

1

...

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

2

:

1,052

- 9 27 *36

11 5

:

...

6

1,000

8

32

40

10 2 8

...

...

:

4

1,038

19

31

50

12 11 7

femal

1

1

...

1,109

13

19 32 9 4 6

4

1 2

:...

971

12 23

35

...

1,183

10 27 37

201

13

1

9

5 10 2

:

:

:

:

:

...

1

1

4 56

212,313150 | 325 | 475|107| 71 72

:..

...

...

1

Secondary.

Labial Abscess.

Ulceration of Os

Uteri.

Warts..

Total Discharged.

Remaining in Hospital.

REMARKS.

7

25 12

13

38 10 a Psoriasis and fis- sures of the tongue

tonsils.

and ulceration of

5

เค

15

9

:

5

LO

1

26

15

13

2

41

17

8

28 9

.28

1

:

21

22

8

19

6

:.

F:.

37

13

1

20

...

12

2

25

10

:

1 I

:.

19

18

1

1

2 66

89

3

323|152

L. P. MARQUES, Resident Surgeon.

194

2

1884.

COMPLAINTS FROM

E.

RETURN of the NUMBER of COMPLAINTS against REGISTERED WOMEN, during the 12 Months of the Year 1884.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS,

Gonorrhoea.

Soft Sores.

1 a

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard Cutane-

Chan-

cre,

ous

Erup-

tion.

Secondary.

NO. OF WOMEN

POINTED OUT,

RESULT OF EXAMINATION,

RESIDENCE.

Free from

Found

Diseased,

Detained.

Disease,

REMARKS.

1 b

2

a. Primary syphilis according to the report.

January,

H.M. Navy,

5

H.M. Army,

5

Government Civil Hospital,

2

...

"}

Miscellaneous,

2

1 c

February,

H.M. Navy,

10

H.M..Army,

3

2 a

"3

Government Civil Hospital,

2

1 d

"}

Miscellaneous,

1

...

...

"}

March,

H.M. Navy,

11

Id

12

H.M. Army,

2 a

062306+224

Ship Street,

10

Graham and East Streets,..

Graham Street,

Graham and Ladder Streets,

Ship, Cochrane, East and Ladder Streets,..

Ship, Stanley and East Streets,

Ladder and East Streets,

Graham Street,

Ship, Graham, Ladder and East Streets,

Stanley, Cochrane and Ship Streets,

وو

Government Civil Hospital,

April,

H.M. Navy,

2 a

H.M. Army,

1 a

"

Government Civil Hospital,

}}

Miscellaneous,

>>

May,

H.M. Navy,

H.M. Army,

10

>>

Government Civil Hospital,

2

3 a

1f

97229

June,

H.M. Navy,

H.M. Army,

10

la

"}

Government Civil Hospital,

1ƒf

...

}}

Foreign Man-of-war,

"

July,

H.M. Navy,

H.M. Army,

11

Government Civil Hospital,

17

11

August,

H.M. Navy,

H.M. Army,

15

Merchant Vessel,.

Merchant Vessel,.

September,... H.M. Navy,

October,

"}

"}

November,

H.M. Army,

Government Civil Hospital, H.M. Navy,

H.M. Army,

Government Civil Hospital,

H.M. Navy,

H.M. Army,

Foreign Navy,

Miscellaneous,

}}

December,

H.M, Navy,

H.M. Army,

""

Government Civil Hospital,

})

Miscellaneous, .

""

Total,.

1

127HH2H 10 10 10 10 2 :~~~

2

***

1 a

...

2 a

i a

...

2 a

1 x

1 a

}

...

Id

...

2

1 x

1

1 a

145

43

2

હું છું જે કહ્યુ કે

East Street,

Do.,

Cochrane and Ship Streets, East Street,

Do.,

Ship and Stanley Streets, East Street,

Ladder, Graham and Ship Streets,.

Graham and Ladder Streets,

Ladder and Graham Streets,

Cochrane, Ladder and East Streets,

Ship and Cochrane Streets, East Street,

Ladder, Ship and East Streets, Ship Street,

...

East and Graham Streets,

East Street,

Cochrane, Graham, Ship and East Streets,

10

Ship Street,......

3

East and Ship Streets,

1

Ladder Street,......

11

Ship, Graham and Cochrane Streets,

2

Cochrane and Graham Streets,

1

Graham Street,

2

East and Ladder Streets,

...

Ship and Cochrane Streets,

Cochrane and East Streets,

+32

Ship and East Streets,

East and Graham Strects,

Stanley and Graham Streets,

190

133

OHHHOME :24**22DDER H∞~HMDHM2022 :~~-~~~

1

5

1

~i nii -i ---ai nwaii wni i

6

INHNNNN

Hollywood Road, Stanley and Graham Streets,. Ship, Graham and East Streets,

Stanley, Ship and East Streets,

10

1

...

57

:

b. Detained since 11th December.

e. Syphilis according to the report.

d. Described as gonorrhoea and sore on the penis.

e. One of the cases described as gonorrhoea and sore of the penis.

f. Described as sore on the prepuce.

x. And bubo.

1

1

3

1

g. Syphilis according to the report.

1

1

1

h. One case returned as primary syphilis.

.L. P. MARQUES,Resident Surgeon.

195

:

190

F.

RETURN OF WOMEN EXAMINED in WANTSAI during the 12 Months of the Year 1884.

1884.

Number of Women Examined.

Found Diseased

Free from

and sent to the

Disease.

Lock Hospital.

Gonorrhoea.

Soft Sores.

Leucorrhoea.

NATURE OF DISEASE.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Cutane-

ous

Hard Chancre. Eruption.

Secondary.

1

...

January,

30

29

February,

39

38

لسم لسم

1

1

1

March,

31

31

April,

32

30

2

1

May,

43

41

1

...

June,

33

33

July,

36

36

August,

41

38

3

2

1

September,

33

33

October,.

37

36

:..

1

November,

34

33

1

1

December,

38

38

ཝོ

Total,...... 427

416

11

6

3

G.

...

.:.

::

...

Ulceration of Os

Uteri.

Warts.

2

...

L. P. MARQUES,

Visiting Surgeon.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

RETURN of the RESULT of EXAMINATIONS of WOMEN from UNREGISTERED BROTHELS during the Year 1884.

1884..

No. of Women.

Place of Residence.

January,

February, March,

April,

May,

June,

15 Queen's Road West, Cochrane, Graham

and D'Aguilar Streets,...

8 Gage & Stanley Sts. & Lyndhurst Terrace, 3 Graham and Shing Wong Streets,

7 First Street, Man Hing Lane and Boats, 24 Gough, Elgin, Cochrane, Second & Square

Streets,

6 Queen's Road, Station Street (Yaumáti),

13 Cochrane Street, Queen's Road, Upper

Lascar Row, Shaukiwán, ....

7 First Street, Hollywood Road,

NATURE OF DISEASE.

7424

4

1

+ :-

::

4

3

دن

Free from Disease.

Found Diseased and Detained.

Leucorrhoea.

Ulceration of Os Uteri.

Gonorrhoea.

Warts.

Soft Sores.

3

1

1

1

18

∞ +4

4

62

03:

1

1

1

July,

11

August, : ..............

14 Second Street, Queen's Road,..

8

September,

5

NON

1

1

1

4

1

1

1

:

October,

10 Gutzlaff and Station Streets, Queen's Road,

Wong Hing Lane, .......

9

1

1

November,

2 Shing Wong Street,..

1

1

1

December,

7 Gilman Bazaar, Tung Man Lane, Wel-

lington Street,...

4

3

1*

1

:

la

Total,

116

* and soft sores.

77

39

6 15

8

10

a and gonorrhoea.

SYPHILIS.

Primary. Secondary.

Cutane- ous' Erup-

Hard

Chan-

cre.

tion.

::

::

:

:

:

:

:

TABLE A.

L. P. MARQUES,

Resident Surgeon.

Number of Beds

in Lock Hospital.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of the above Ordinance, during the Year 1884.

Number

admitted to

Hospital

on Certificates

of Visiting Surgeon.

Number who submitted Voluntarily.

Number against whom it was necessary to proceed by Information before the

Registrar General.

Total Number

brought under the Provisions

of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examina- tions made during the Year.

Total Number of Examina- tions made when no Disease was found.

NUMBER DISCHARGED FROM HOSPITAL.

No. discharged free from Disease who still follow their former Pursuits.

Number who have returned to their Friends or Emigrated.

Total Number Dis- charged.

24

$25

264

116

280

13,389

13,004

323

REMARKS.

323

In this Table are in- cluded also the wo- men that were ex- amined at Wantsai and those that were examined by the Co- lonial Surgeon.

L. P. MARQUES.

Resident Surgeon.

EXAMINATION.

Number of days

in Month on which

Examinations were held.

Total Number of Examinations

made during the Year.

25

25

TABLE C.

LOCK HOSPITAL, CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE. RETURN of WOMEN examined, and treated in HOSPITAL, during the Year 1884.

HOSPITAL.

Number admitted to Hospital.

Total Number of Examinations made when no

Disease was found.

13,389

325

13,064

DISEASE.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated Gonorrhoea

do.

Do. and P. Syphilis combined.. P. and Secondary do. do.

TOTAL.

197

DISCHARGED.

Died and

Remaining in Hospital

31st

REMARKS.

Cause

December,

Total. of

1884.

Death.

Remained.

Admitted.

Total treated.

Cured.

To Gaol.

277

75

77

72

181

188

181

67

68 74

2

2

2

::::

72

181

68

2

::::

5

476:

16 325

341 323

323

18

In this Table are included also the women that were examined at Wan- tsai and those that were examined by the Colo- nial Surgeon.

L. P. MARQUES,

Resident Surgeon.

H.

TABLE showing the RESULT of the EXAMINATIONS of REGISTERED WOMEN stated to have infected men

with Venereal Sores.

1884.

Complaints from

Soft Sore.

Hard Chan-

cre.

Result of Examination.

Residence of the Women.

REMARKS.

Free.

De- tained.

.

Jan.,

"

39

·Feb.,

>>

H.M. Army,

>>

Do.,

""

H.M. Army,

Govt. Civil Hospital, Miscellaneous,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

French Man-of-war,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

March,... H.M. Army,

1 a

1

East Street, Graham Street,

1

1

...

16 Ladder Street,

1

1 c

Graham Street,

1

Do.,

1

1

Ladder Street,

1 e

I a Τα

Ship Street,

1

1 d

a. Primary syphilis according to

the complaint.

b. Syphilis according to the report.

c. Sore on the prepuce.

d. Detained since December 11th.

East Street,

lf

1 g

Graham Street,

e. Detained since January 14th.

1 a

Ship Street,

1

H.M. Navy,

1 a

West Street,

1

f. Detained since February 8th.

59

H.M. Army,

1 a

Stanley Street,

April,

Do.,

1 a

Do.,

H.M. Navy,

1 a

East Street,

""

Do.,

1 a

Do.,

May,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1 h

Do.,

"

H.M. Navy,

1 a

Do.,

....

Do.,

1 a

Do.,

29

Do.,

Do.,

""

June,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1 e

H.M. Army,

Τα

27

July,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1

Do.

do.,

1

...

23

Aug.,

""

""

H.M. Army,

Ια

Do.,

I a

Do.,

I a

Sept.,

H.M. Navy,

1 a

Cochrane Street,

Ship Street,

Cochrane Street, East Street,

Do., Ship Street,

Do.,

East Street,

1

1

I i

1 k

1

:

1

1

H.M. Army,

1 a

Stanley Street,

1

"

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1

East Street,

...

H.M. Army,

1 a

Ship Street,

Oct.,.

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1 n

Graham Street,

1

H.M. Army,

Ια

Ship Street,

1

وو

H.M. Navy,

1

وو

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1 n

Do.,

·

39

Nov.,

H.M. Navy,

1 a

"

Foreign Navy,

1

Miscellaneous,

1 a

Ladder Street,

Cochrane Street,

East Street,

Graham Street,

1 x

:

...

Do.,

1

Do.,

H.M. Army,

1 a

Ship Street,

g. Described as a case of phimosis.

h. Sore on the prepuce.

1ji. Detained since the 2nd instant, suf- fering from ulceration of os uteri. 1jj. The woman was admitted on the 19th of April, suffering from soft sore, and discharged on the 3rd instant.

17

1p

k. The woman was last examined

on the 24th of last April. She was free from disease aud left the Colony.

I. Detained since June 7th, suffer-

ing from leucorrhoea.

n. And bubo.

o. Detained since September 16th.

x. The woman was detained in Hospital since the 1st instant, and discharged on the 13th. p. Suffering from chronic ulcera-

tion of os uteri.

q. Syphilis according to the com-

plaint.

""

Do.,

1 a

Do.,

1

Dec.,

Do.,

Do.,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1g

Graham Street,

Miscellaneous,

Ια

"7

H.M. Navy,

Τα

Do., Ship Street,

1

H.M. Army,

1 a

Do.,

>>

Total,.........

43

2

Total,......... 31

14

L. P. MARQUES,

Resident Surgeon.

198

Enclosure 3.

Report of the Government Analyst.

ANALYTICAL DEPARTMENT,

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 10th January, 1885.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward a report of the analytical work conducted in the temporary laboratory of this Hospital from November 1st 1883, the day on which I took charge, to November

1st 1884.

2. For the sake of convenience I have arranged the report under the several headings, Toxicolo- gical, Water, General, Remarks.

TOXICOLOGICAL.

3. There have been only four cases of death from suspected poisoning in which chemical analyses were deemed necessary by Her Majesty's Coroner.

4. In two instances a most careful search failed to reveal the presence of any poison either mineral or alkaloidal in the third opium was detected; and in the fourth case a poison was brought to light which, so far as its chemical characteristics are concerned, is, I believe, entirely new in the experience of toxicologists.

5. The post-mortem examination in this case pointed to a neurotic poison as the cause of death and as one of the persons who was said to have been under its influence had complained of "dimness of sight," Dr. WHARRY suggested that the mydriatic largely used by the natives here and in India, viz.: Datura Alba' might have been the agent employed.

6. A direct search was therefore made for this poison and its absence having been established, an extended enquiry was instituted, which resulted in the detection of the poisonous alkaloid of "Gelsemium Elegans," of the natural order Loganiaceae, in the stomach contents of the male adult and female child and also in the food, of which they were said to have partaken.

7. It is impossible for me in the present report to give full details of this investigation, but the following observations will be perhaps of service to others in China who are engaged in forensic determinations.

8. In the course of an analysis of the contents of the stomach of the male adult, an alkaloid was extracted which gave a peculiar purplish-red colour: very much like that displayed by Gelsemia, when tested with oxidizing agents. The same re-action was also observed on applying similar re-agents to the alkaloid separated from the stomach contents of the female child, and in a still more marked manner on that derived from the tea infusion seized by the Police when the case was reported.

9. At this stage of the enquiry I could find no record of a poison having the above character being used by the Chinese, and I was not aware that anything closely allied to Gelsemia-the alkaloid of "Gelsemium Nitidum," Michaux, syn. "Gelsemium Sempervirens," Aiton, could be obtained in any form from the native herbalists.

10. An examination of two reputed poisons was therefore at once undertaken: from one of which, white Jasmin root, mentioned in your annual report for 1882 as being used in conjunction with the flowers and leaves of Datura Alba,' I failed to separate anything alkaloidal; but from the second, (one spoken of as being very deadly), an alkaloid was extracted which exhibited exactly the same colouration with similar re-agents as the substance isolated from the stomach contents, &c.

-

11. By the kindness of Dr. WHARRY I was enabled to obtain experimental evidence as to the physiological action of the drug, for a hypodermic solution of the alkaloid prepared from the root and the tea infusion caused the same poisonous symptoms when injected into some small guinea-pigs. This and the identity of the chemical reactions between the alkaloid isolated from the food and stomach contents and that from the Chinese root, left no doubt but that a decoction of the drug known by the name of

Fooh-moon-keung had been either prepared with, or mixed in the tea of which the three members of the family drank on the night of the supposed murder.

12. It was only at the last moment, when the case was dismissed by the Magistrate, that I was able with the generous assistance of Mr. FORD, the Director of the Botanical Gardens, to state with certainty, from what plant this poisonous alkaloid was derived.

13. There are only three known species of the genus Gelsemium (Jussieu), one in North America, G. Sempervirens, yielding the well known eclectic remedy; another in Sumatra; and one in China, G. Elegans, Benth., now under notice. The last named grows very sparingly in Hongkong, but more abundantly on the neighbouring mainland of China.* A six hours' journey specially undertaken in December last to find specimens in flower on Chinese territory, having as guide a collector of drugs for the shops in Hongkong, only revealed however one small plant.

* Flora Hongkongensis Bentham 1861 p. 229.

7

}

199

14. No mention is made of Gelsemium Elegans in either Hanbury's' or 'Porter Smith's' Notes on Chinese Materia Medica or in 'Gordon's Epitome of the reports of the Medical officers to the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service.' The plant is figured, however, on the last page of the first illustrated volume of the celebrated Chinese Herbal

Pun-tsaou-kang-muh and in another volume a full description of its properties is given. The Chinese have been aware of the poisonous action of this drug for centuries.

15. The writer of the Pun-tsaou states that it is never used internally as a medicine, although preparations of the plant are used with success as an application to boils and ulcers.

16. On the other hand, the Rev. E. FABER assures me, that in some parts of the Kwangtung province the root is secretly used by some native doctors for certain forms of disease.

17. In the following table I have stated what coloration is exhibited when manganic oxide and sulphuric acid are applied to :-

The alkaloid of Gelsemium Elegans.

A deep purplish-violet colouration changing to one of a rich purple hue.

Gelsemia.

A damask-red colour changing to a

rich green, which latter tint is, more marked at the edges.

Strychnia.

A deep-violet colouration changing rapidly to purple and finally as- suming a cherry-red tint.

These colours are all evanescent, but that displayed by the first mentioned alkaloid is more lasting than the others. The above re-actions have been observed several times in the Laboratory. The strychnia was taken from a London sample and the Gelsemia was extracted from an alcoholic extract of the root of Gelsemium Nitidum.

18. The alkaloid of Gelsemium Elegans, although coming very near, is, I am quite certain, distinct from Gelsemia. In addition to the different colours produced when in contact with oxidizing agents, some important chemical characters do not agree, a publication of which in detail is reserved for a future report.

19. The names by which Gelsemium Elegans is known in the Pun-tsaou-kang-muh, are as follows:-

III.

IV.

Cantonese.

Kau Màn.

Ye Kot.

Tuk Kan.

U Mung ts'ó.

I.

II. 野葛

◄.

ÊN BE G

VI. 黃籐

VII.

火把花

Fo Pa Fa.

Tin Cheung Tsò.

Wong Tang.

Mandarin.

Kou Min.

Yeh Ko.

Tu Kên.

Hu Mêng Ts'au.

Twăn Chang Tsau. Kwang Tiêng.

Huo Pa Hwa.

20. The coloured plate accompanying this report is the work of a Chinese Artist in Hongkong. The plant in flower and the ripe fruit are taken from a specimen gathered on the hills overlooking the head of Mirs Bay. The root from one obtained by Mr. W. D. HUTCHISON, whose assistance in this and like investigations where intercourse with the Chinese is of service, has been most valuable. I would also express my obligations to Mr. FORD, for many details concerning the Botanical and Geographical situation of important drugs, and to the authorities at the Tung Wa Hospital for much useful informa- tion concerning their use and misuses by the Chinese.

21. It is a matter of importance that the complete analysis of this root be undertaken as soon as possible, and it is my intention to carry out this investigation as soon as the new Laboratory is completed.

22. As far as I can judge no chemical analysis has been even attempted before, and, if such a case as the one alluded to should ever go to the higher Courts, the chemist who had charge of the case in the Laboratory would naturally be examined very closely on the properties and behaviour of an alkaloid, which, in point of toxic power, is I believe quite equal to Strychnia.

23. There have been no analyses in cases of poisoning by Datura Alba last year. Two men were under treatment in the wards of the Civil Hospital suffering from mydriasis, believed to have been caused by the use of this Solanaceous plant, but the Police were unable to discover any rem- nants of the meal in which it is assumed the poison had been incorporated.

24. Bread Analysis. In October last, when the city was disturbed and rumours of bread poison- ing were afloat, at the request of the Government, analyses of the bread supplied from the principal bakeries were undertaken for the detection of poison.

25. These examinations were conducted at an early hour daily, and, in order to avoid unneces- sary alarm the subject was kept as quiet as possible. Processes were adopted which have been found to work both well and rapidly and it is gratifying to be able to report that in no instance was anything unwholesome detected.

200

26. It is quite likely that the rumour current, had originally no reference to any actual intention on the part of the Chinese to have recourse to such diabolical means as this, in order to gain their ends, but that it alluded to the affair of the 15th January 1857, when, the city being somewhat unquiet the notorious ESING attempted to rid Hongkong of the European population by mixing arsenic' in the bread he supplied them. Fortunately for the Colony on that occasion the would be homicide made the happy blunder of adding too much of the poison, which induced violent vomiting on the part of his intended victims very soon after the poison had been admitted into.the stomach.

27. The opportunities for detection and the chances of apprehension are far greater now than in 1857, and one can hardly imagine that the "ESING case" will be repeated; nevertheless the rumour being abroad, a safeguard was provided in causing the departments concerned to be on the alert.

WATER.

28. During the past year it was considered advisable not to attempt to carry out the monthly water analyses in full.

29. In estimating the minute quantities of ammonia, such as exist in nearly all drinking waters, and especially in the case of the Pokfúlam supply, accommodation different from that provided in this Hospital is necessary.

30. It must not be supposed that the following remarks on the quality of the waters referred to are exhaustive. In a room with limited accommodation, where urinary examinations are sometimes of daily occurrence, and where there is an absence of a good water supply suitable for the purposes of condensation, it has been found impossible to make determinations with sufficient accuracy to be available for comparison with those performed on previous occasions.

31. The best authorities on water are agreed that it is most unsafe to give judgment on facts derived from an estimation of one or two constituents only. This remark applies particularly to waters coming from a district where the character of specimens of undoubted purity is not known or where details concerning the locality and strata through which the samples have passed are not forth- coming; but where the nature of water suitable for potable purposes is well known, then considerable value may be attached to a few qualitative and quantitative determinations.

32. The partial analysis, which it has been found practicable to make from time to time, have shown that the quality of the water emanating from the Pokfúlam reservoir continues satisfactory.

33. The same good account cannot, however, be given of the water coming from a source, the necessity of the freedom from contamination of which is scarcely second in point of importance to that of the Pokfúlam supply. I refer to that furnished by the various wells which are found in immense numbers, and in close proximity to each other, all over the city.

34. The Sanitary Board were fully alive to this, and when quarantine regulations were in force, I analyzed at their request some fifty samples taken from wells situated in the most populous parts of the city.

35. The appended table shows the result of the partial analysis of these waters, sent to the Hospital for examination by the Secretary of the Sanitary Board, in September last.

36. Of the 46 wells enumerated, 15 or 32 per cent. (marked †), showed the presence of large quantities of free ammonia on the direct application of the "Nessler re-agent," and 7 or 15 per cent., (marked *), contained 'Nitrites' in considerable amount.

37. The figures giving the amount of Chlorine, in all the waters, are very variable. Pokfúlam water and that drawn from a well on the South side of Caine Road, where the surroundings were such as would almost ensure its freedom from contamination, contained .5 and .9 grains per gallon respect- ively. Every other specimen contained a much larger quantity. There was some speculation as to the cause of the presence of 69.3 grains per gallon in the water of well No. 35. An inspection showed it to be due to the close proximity of the source of the supply to a salt store.

38. Considering the polluted condition of some of the wells, one cannot but be surprised that the figures in the columns showing the amount of Oxygen absorbed should have come out so low. Pokfulam water absorbed .0702 and that derived from a well in Wa On Lane, the quality of which be expressed in one word 'sewage,' a similar quantity .0756. A glance, however, at the figures. given in the other columns clearly shows that the organic matter in the case of the former specimen is harmless, while that of the latter is unquestionably of a dangerous character.

may

39. By the kindness of Mr. MCCALLUM I was afforded an opportunity for observing the surroundings of several of these wells. In almost every instance, they were not such as would conduce to the maintenance of a pure and wholesome supply.

40. The public ought not to be allowed on any consideration to use for potable purposes 'sewage' such as the so-called water drawn from the wells Nos. 6, 9, 10, 15, 16, 33, &c., undoubtedly is.

41. It is also difficult to understand why so important a matter as the analysis of the well waters of the Colony is overlooked until it is feared an infectious or contagious disease may be in our midst. The better plan would be to have complete analyses of the water of typical wells from all parts of the city made during the Winter and Spring months, when the city is not threatened with cholera and when the conditions for making chemical analyses are more favourable. If this were done, the Govern- ment would be able to state with certainty, on the advent of an epidemic, what wells could be used with safety.

201

42. I believe that steps have already been taken towards closing some of these bad wells, and if the samples herein enumerated are fairly representative of the quality of the water used for drinking purposes by the native and a large portion of the European population in the city of Victoria, a still larger number might be examined and condemned even before the hot season comes on this year.

65

"A

water which shows the presence of 'ammonia and nitrites' on the direct application of appropriate re-agents, needs no analytical process to condemn it entirely, any more than if it exhibited a distinct "odour and an unpleasant taste.'

GENERAL.

43. The murder at Kowloon, on April 16th, furnished material for investigation. A garment was sent by the Police with a request that the stains thereon might be examined in order to determine whether or not they were due to 'human' blood. Although very like, the stains were not due to blood but to some of the oxides of iron. The man under arrest was an Engineer and had possibly been using, when at work, some paint made of the iron pigments known in commerce as 'Indian and Venetian red.'

44. Leaving the term 'human' out of the question, for it is impossible to distinguish with certainty the blood of a human being from that of other mammals, the Inspector took a proper course in having the coat examined. In chemico-legal cases negative evidence is equally as valuable as that of a positive nature.

45. The analyses of milk which have been proceeded with, show, that the quality of that supplied to the patients in the wards of the Civil Hospital is of an unusually high standard at some periods

of the year.

Total Solids,

Solids non fatty,

do. fatty,

Highest.

17.2 per cent. ..11.25

"}

5.95

Lowest.

14.9 per cent.

9.8

>>

5.1

>>

The above analyses were those of milk concerning the purity of which there was no doubt.

46. The conduction of the assay of genuine specimens of this valuable article of diet from time to time, would not only furnish the necessary information for the Police Courts in Hongkong, but would be of immense value to chemists of all parts especially as since the 'Manchester case' the matter has been so prominently before the scientific world.

47. It is usually assumed that milk is very poor in the tropics, which is probably the case with samples purchased of the street vendors, but few Alderney cows, under the most favourable conditions, could furnish milk giving such good results as the specimens mentioned above. It should of course be noted that no allusion is made to the 'quantity' of milk yielded by the cows.

48. The analysis of about fifty specimens of urine and several other miscellaneous articles, some of which were specially reported on, completes the list of Laboratory work.

REMARKS.

49. It is to be hoped that during the present year a Laboratory will be provided for the services of the Government, as a large amount of important work is now remaining untouched owing to the want of suitable accommodation.

50. In certain quarters a belief is current that the detection of, say à poisonous alkaloid, in the stomach contents of a victim, is an easy matter in Eastern practice, because of the large amount of material used in cases of poisoning, whether suicidal or homicidal.

51. The following facts will tend to show that a large quantity of poison taken into the stomach does not necessarily cause death, and that if death does ensue the chances of detection (of the poison) are sometimes very remote. Last year a Chinaman had taken, with the intentions of a suicide, a quantity of opium extract considerably larger than was necessary to cause death and in a short time he vomited freely, which was not only the means of the affair being brought to the notice of the Police, but also of saving his life. Twelve hours after the dose was taken, the man was sitting up in bed and answered in an intelligent manner the questions put to him. Again, the largeness of the dose in the ESING case' above alluded to was the means of saving the lives of the whole European commu- nity in 1857. Once more, the circumstances attending the death of the adult female found dead at the peak, (one of the two cases alluded to in Paragraph 4.), pointed to the action of some poison or other, but nearly the whole of the fluid portion of the contents of the stomach was lost, the vomit having been thrown on the floor. In an instance such as the last it may be urged that, although the vomit was lost and the stomach failed to give sufficient material for investigation, yet that a trace of the poison might be found in some other organs, such as the liver, kidneys, contents of bladder, upper and lower intestines, &c. This is a favourite argument in a Coroner's Court. Of course it can, if' the nature of the poison used has been ascertained outside the Laboratory, either in the post-mortem room or elsewhere. But in the East, there is an entire absence of by-evidence in such cases as these. In the LAMSON case, one which was admitted on all hands to be shrouded with difficulties, it was known beforehand what substance of a poisonous nature, and which was ultimately proved to have caused death, the criminal had purchased. The Sale of Poisons Act was specially framed to act as a safeguard in such instances.

202-

52. In Hongkong, every thing is different. There is no series of well kept registers the Police can search through when a case involved in mystery is on hand, and in all those which I have had the honour of investigating, the Coroner's requisition has given no clue as to what probably caused death. In the Gelsemium poisoning case above referred to, a clue was certainly provided, but a wrong scent is worse than none at all; so much material is absorbed which cannot as a rule be utilized in succeeding researches.

53. All these facts tend to show that it is only right that every facility in the shape of laboratory conveniences should be provided in order to occasion a successful issue in these forensic investigations. There ought to be no half measures in cases where the life of a fellow creature is at stake.

54. It is I believe the intention of the Government to construct also a Pharmaceutical Laboratory, in order that as many preparations as possible for the Medical Department may be manufactured from crude materials on the spot. Some galenicals, although made with the greatest care at home, are so much changed by the time they reach the Colony, that it is difficult sometimes to recognize them. The advantages therefore of this step will be two-fold. First, there will be in course of time a considerable reduction effected of the amount now provided in the Estimates for medicines; and secondly, the quality of the preparations for the different Hospitals will be superior to those obtained in the usual way, through the Crown. Agents.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Your most obedient Servant,

WM. EDWARD CROW, Government Analyst and Apothecary to the Civil Medical Department.

Table showing the result of the partial analysis of 46 samples of water drawn from Wells in September last

in the City of Victoria.

All parts expressed in grains per gallon. Degree of Hardness Wanklyn's scale.

No.

Description of Sample.

Chlorine.

Hardness.

Oxygen absorbed

in 4 hrs. at 80° F.

No.

Description of Sample.

Chlorine.

Hardness.

Oxygen absorbed

in 4 hrs. at 80° F.

AB

Pokfúlam Water,

.5

Well above Caine Road,

1

General Post Office,

2

Woo On Lane A,

3

B,

""

""

Lan Kwai Fong,.

1.4 .0702 .9 2.0 .0079 7.7 8.1 .0274 5.0 9.3 .0092 5.0 8.2 .0160 4.8 8.0 .0267

23 24

Graham Street No. 44,

2.9

5.6

.0289

2)

No. 48,

4.1

10.2

.0656

25 Tsun Wing Lane, 26* Hollywood Road, 27 Gage Street A,

6.6

7.5

.0578

2.7 4.5

.0714

2.9 5.4

.0289

28

B,

1.5 2.4

.0096

*

"

Upper D'Aguilar Street,

3.2 5.5

.0142

29† Wellington Street No. 91,...

6.4 10.5

.0386

6† Chuk On Lane,

7.4 12.1

.0207

30

29

No. 98,.

6.5 8.1

.0308

7

Central Police Station,

3.9 8.0

.0060

31

Queen's Road No. 102,

7.6 10.4

.0366

8

9** Wa On Lane,

Shelley Street,

......

3.4 6.0

.0328

32

Wing Kut Street,

3.7

5.3

.0513

10t Kau U Fong,

16.9 22.5 .0756

8.8 12.1

331* Wing Woo Street No. 2,

9.0

10.3

.0372

.0228

34

Queen's Road No. 240,

2.0

3.5

.0407

11

I On Lane,

10.2 15.7 .0343

35

Hillier Street No. 42,

69.3

85.4

.0354

12

Circular Pathway A,

8.3 13.4

.0297

36

Circular Pathway C,

3.4

4.8

.0283

13

B,

""

步步

14* Yau Shau Lane,

15+* U Yak Lane E,

16†

W,

وو

17

Praya Central No. 3,

18

An Fung Lane,

19

Pottinger Street,

20

Chinese Street,

21

Cochrane Street,.

22

Stanley Street,

8.8 19.5 .1366 1.7 5.9 .0197 15.3 16.4 .0673 33.9 18.8 .0404 1.8 3.6 .0080 5.5 6.0 .0059 2.5 5.5 .0218 6.7

8.3 .0278 5.4 9.0 .0595 9.2 12.7 .0135

37

D.

5.9 10.3

.0230

38

39t 40t

Hillier Street No. 29,. Kwai Wa Lane A,

1.8 2.9 .0407

1.7 3.4

.0212

"3

45†

""

B, 41*† Cleverley Street No. 18, 42 43† East Street No. 48, 44 Tai-ping Lane No. 5,....

No. 6,.

2.5 4.0

.0265

22

4.5

6.5 .0425

No. 20,

5.7

6.5

0195

13.7

10.3

2.3

5.9 .0372

5.8 6.6 .0124

29

46*

Taipingshan Street,

10.7

10.1

† Free ammonia shown on direct application of Nessler re-agent.

* Nitrites in considerable quantity.

WM. EDWARD CROW.

203

No. 19.

HONGKONG.

Harbour Master's Report for 1884.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 27.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 21st January, 1885.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns of this Department for the year ending the 31st December, 1884.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port.

VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Section 3 of Ordinance No. 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of China. XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

SHIPPING.

2. These tables shew a falling off in the whole trade of the Colony of 894 vessels and 134,436 tons. 3. The following table of arrivals will show at a glance where the falling off lies.

Year.

1883, 1884,

Increase,

.....

Decrease....

Junks. Tons. Steamers. Tons.

Sailing Vessels.

Tons.

24,258 1,851,239 3,012 3,215,569 23,473 1,687,594 2,976 3,259,234

387

234,859

314

220,403

43,665

785 163,645

36

73

14,456

4. The European sailing trade shews a continued decrease; but the trade in steam-ships has increased by 43,665 tons, although the number of vessels is 36 less than in 1883. The most serious falling off is due to the trade in Junks. This trade in the years 1880 and 1881 was steady, it had a sudden increase in 1882 and a slight increase in 1883. The trade is now about what it was in 1880 and 1881.

5. The trade to Great Britain shews an increase both by British and Foreign ships. That with Japan shews an increase under the British flag, but a falling off in ships under Foreign flags. The most serious decrease is, as before stated, due to the depression of the Junk trade. For, although there is an increase of 52,589 tons to the Coast of China and Formosa in British bottoms, there is a falling off of 214.187 tons in vessels carrying Foreign flags. The depression in the Junk trade is probably due to the difficulties existing between France and China. There is also a decrease of trade in British and Foreign bottoms amounting to 45,940 tons with Cochin-China, but a slight increase in British vessels with the Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin.

204

6. There is an increase of vessels under the British, German, and United States' flags. The latter is due to a local American firm purchasing a number of European built vessels from a Chinese Company. There is consequently a falling off of this class of vessel under the Chinese flag, in fact, although the return shows the arrival of 33 vessels during the year, the Chinese flag before the end of the year ceased to be seen in these waters.

EMIGRATION.

7. 6,191 fewer emigrants left here in 1884 than in the previous year, the requirements of the Straits Settlements and Malay States not being so great as in 1883.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

8. Thirteen vessels were registered, and seven vessels withdrawn from the Registry of this Port during the year.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

9. Seventy-eight cases were tried during the year; refusal of duty, assault, and drunkenness on board ship being the chief offences.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS, UNDER SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE 8 OF 1879.

10. The following list will show the number of Candidates who passed, and of those who failed in obtaining Certificates of Competency.

Masters,

First Mates, Only Matės,

Second Mates,

RANK.

First Class Engineers, Second Class Engineers,

PASSED.

FAILED.

21

2

14

5

10

1N

2

I

50

19

23

42

10

5

GO N

3

2

5

11. An Order in Council issued under the provisions of 32 and 33 Vict. Chap. 63, Section 10 came into force in this Colony on the 1st January 1884, making Certificates of Competency issued here equal to those issued in Great Britain, and the Colonies coming within the provisions of the same Imperial Act.

MARINE COURTS, UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE 8 OF 1879.

12. The following Courts have been held during the year :-

1. On the 19th March, 1884,-Inquiry as to the explosion of the starboard boiler and the total destruction of the British Steam-ship Yot-Sai, Official No. 73,450 of Hongkong, while on a voyage from Hongkong to Macao, on the 24th February, 1884. The Master's (JOHN PARKINSON HOYLAND) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

2. On the 15th July, 1884,-Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Marlborough, Official No. 76,985 of Singapore, on a reef off Hainan Head (North extreme of the Island of Hainan) on the 12th June 1884. The Master's (MAX. KUNATH) Certificate of Competency was suspended for one year. Mr. KUNATH feeling dissatisfied with the result of the inquiry, the case was re-heard on the 27th August, and the Court reduced the suspension of the Certificate from twelve months to one of six months from the date of the last enquiry.

SEAMEN.

13. 9,253 Seamen of all Nationalities were shipped, and 10,153 were discharged in the

year 1884. The excess of men discharged over men shipped is caused by some of the former being sent to England and Australia as distressed seamen, and others leaving the Colony without notifying their departure.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

&c.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

i

1.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWs of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country, in the Year 1884.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

66

78,406 2,836

66

78,406| 2,836}

18

British North America,

1

884

16

..

British North Borneo,..

6

2,830

233

6

Cape of Good Hope,.

2

1,418

45

2

884

2,830 233

1,418

16

2

267 13,939

1,061 36

18

...

2

45

Coast of China and Formosa,..

1,201 1,526,689 54,995

23 15,061

Cochin China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

pelago,

Macao,

Mauritius,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

117 128,103 3,800

69,098 3,772

148 213,617] 5,894

94 120,044 6,367

97 130,891 5,148

314 203,886 12,256|

44,554 3,309

81

38,390 2,819

:

:

3,891

1,418)

45

579 1,2241,541,750 55,574 14,529 1,316,601 192,674 8,295 499,454 86,577 22,824 1,816,055 279,251 15,730 2,843,290 247,669 8,318 514,515 87,156 24,048 3,357,805 334,825 117 128,103| 3,800|| 42,445 1,166 400

50

168 170,948) 4,983

13,939 267

1,061) 36

84

92,345 3,1031

84

...

92,345 3,103

884

16

884

16

8

3,891

2

1,418

269

45

269

:

2

17 51 42,845 1,183]

37

37

69,098 3,772 63 109,853 5,848

564 26

167 170,548 4,966) 64 110,417 5,874 100 178,951 9,620|

400

17

564

26

148 213,617 5,894 42 94 120,044 6,367

52,937 1,014|

42

30,626

866

::

52,937 1,014) 190 266,554 6,908|

38

30,626 866

132 150,670 7,233

101 179,515 9,646 190 266,554. 6,908 132 150,670 7,233

97 130,891 5,148 65

76,033 3,747

51

7,143] 134

70

83,176 3,881

162 206,924 8,995

7,143

134

167 214,067 9,029

6

5,246| 155!

647

28

6 5,246 155 ,315 204,533 12,284|

17

18,083 1,002

171

:.

...

18,083 1,002}

23)

886

135,829 22,854

109

13,748 1,369

995

149,577 24,223 1,200

23,329 1,157

339,715 35,110]

23

110)

14,395 1,397 1,310

23,329 1,157

354,110 36,507

3

2,013

70

3

...

:

:

...

2,013 70

3

350

21

195

11

...

545 32

2

2,013 70

350

2,013 70

21

1

195

11

3

545 32

...

94

+ CO

3,192

1,119

125

85

47,746 3,434

58

24,994 1,889

10

6,008

321

68

31,002 2,210

139

69,548 5,198

14

9,200

4:46

153

78,748 5,644

39

97

39,509 2,858,

105)

42,495 2,189

105

42,495 2,189

199

80,885 5,008;

1,119

39

202]

82,004) 5,047

Puget Sound,

Russia in Asia,

Sandwich Islands,..

Siam,

South America,

1

1,193

20

1,193

20

1,193

201

1

1,193] 20

...

::

4,682 228

4,682

228

3

4,682

228

4,682| 228

531

17

484

14

21

1,015

31

31

1,787

39

2,916

53

4,703

92

4

2,318

56]

3,400

67

91

5,718

123

87

71,002 2,857

87

:

71,002 2,857

22

13,787

481

221

1

461

13

1

461

13

...

...

United States of America,

11

27,296 1,025

1,345

22

12

28,641 1,047||

33

62,901 2,146||

:::

13,787 481

109

84,789 3,338

109

84,789 3,338

1

461)

13

1

461

13

་་་

33

62,901 2,146

44

90,197 8,171

1

1,345

22

45

91,542 3,193

TOTAL,..

2,364 2,663,346| 105,557 |

331

21,848

807 2,397 2,685,194| 106,364 15,940|1,951,609 236,557 8,426 530,428 88,508 24,366 2,482,087 325,065 18,304 4,614,955 342,114|| 585,194

8,459 552,276 89,315 26,7635,167,231 431,429

205

II.—NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country, in the Year 1884.

TOTAL.

206

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,.

29

33,032 1,532|

29

33,032 1,532|

29

33,032 1,532

29

...

...

33,032 1,532

...

...

British Columbia,.

I

397

11

1

3971

11

2,770

51

...

British North America,

361

14

1

361

14

...

2,739

53

5,593

2,137

931

35

8,363 144

4,876

3,167

62

British North Borneo,

2,777

139

4

2,777

139

674

23

1

88

674 23

3,100

67

5,593 93

35

2,137]

8,760

155

5,237

102

3,451

162

3,451

162

...

Cape of Good Hope,......

162

9

1

162

162

9

9

162

9

Coast of China and Formosa,

1,304 1,625,486 60,057

63

Cochin China,.

44

Continent of Europe,

28

Great Britain,

44,317 1,391 55,526 3,506||

7,191

50

8883

49,965 1,713

56,308 1,471

94 100,625 2,862

45

39,673 1,570

28

186]

55,528 3,506

7,191

39

75,533 4,786

31

...

615

761

1,867 1,675,451 61,770 16,594 1,501,086 226,715 5,861

316,653 65,004 22,455 1,817,789 291,719 17,898 3,126,572 286,772 5,924 23,872

366,618 66,717 23,822 3,493,190 353,489

63,545 2,185

891

83,990 2,961

81

80,180 2,086

170 164,170 5,047

39

75,533 4,786

67 131,061 8,292

...

67 131,061 8,292

...

186

3

2,921

54

2,921

54

81

10,112 240

10,112 240

India and Singapore,

204 283,658 11,523]

LO

3,214

99 209 286,872 11,622|

39

48,462 1,458||

1

1,911

41

**

Mauritius,

Sandwich Islands,

Siam,..

Jamaica,

Japan,

Macao,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,......

Port Said,

Russia in Asia,...........

South America,

United States of America,.

85 133,760 5,418||

54

60,048 1,610

139 193,808 7,028

66

99,925 5,120

...

7

15

...

6,294

...

14,244

...

128

46

54,756 1,586

243

332,120| 12,981|

12

9,508 227

255

341,628 13,208

1

1,911

41

1

1,911 41

1

1,911 41

:

...

394

81

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,||

3,383

71

3

319 208,748 12,451|

319

3,383

208,748 12,451

71

1

468

341

11

1

341

11

907

15

907

151

3

545

12

933 143,088 23,303||

...

34

...

68

2

1,575

27

31

114,169 5,514

2,043

151

233,685 10,538|

39

1

468

12

11,106 1,163 1,001

154,194 24,466

1,252

351,836 35,754

68

8888888

691

74,292 2,004

220

307,977 12,542

5

4,958

98

6

11,106 1,163 1,320

5,426

362,942 36,917

110

1.

341

11

1

341

11

...

...

...

819 16

4

1,364 50

545

34

***

1,726

31

5

2,271

65

...

...

36

19,245 1,521

94

38,309 2,667

1,734

8,382

1.622

208

48

27,627 1,729

29

13,049 1,035||

33

78

981

39,931 2,745

102

41,219 2,103|

cro ca

28,272

2,093

62

551

41,321 1,586

65

32,294 2,556|

45

36,654

759

110

68,948 3,315

74

105.43,312 2,177|

196

79,528 4,770

3,715

152

203

83,243 4,922

31

1

...

...

1,571

40

:::

1,734

31

1

1,734 31

1

...

1,734 31

...

...

6,261

220

7 6,261 220

6,261

220

...

...

6,261

220

...

3.

...

1,571

...

40

3,264

69

3,264

69

4,835 109

4,835

109

...

...

35

23,877 1,019

6,310

176

42

30,187 1,195

17

9,584

336

2

1,231

29

2

...

1,231

29

3 1,682 36

8

12,081

318

6,564 110

13

18,645

428

36

43,264 1,084||

4,467

3,332

116

47

23

14,051 452

52

38

යස

1,682 36 46,596 1,131

44

33,461 1,355

2,913|

55,345 1,402

13

65

10,777

9,896 · 157

292

44,238 1,647

5

2,913

65

51

65,241 1,559

TOTAL,..

2,205 2,493,806 101,873||

204 196,703 5,551 2,409 2,690,509 107,124 17,980 2,088,118 268,103 6,035 420,457 68,263 23,965 2,458,575 336,366 20,185 4,531,924 369,976 6,289 617,160 73,814 26,374 5,149,084 443,780 2,409|2,690,509|

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1884.

207

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGoes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

133

177,729

5,526

13

15,074

271

146 192,803

5,797

Austrian,

12

22,251

716

12

22,251

716

Belgian,

1

1,100

17

1

1,100

17

British,

2,364

2,663,346

105,557

33

21,848

807

2,397

2,685,194 | 106,364

Chinese,

32

24,531 1,604

1

392

23

33

24,923 1,627

Chinese Junks,

15,101

1,196,128

203,531

8,372

491,466

87,315

23,473

1,687,594 | 290,846

Danish,

11

2,948

209

1

268

19

12

3,216

228

Dutch,

24

31,043

1,745

24

31,043

1,745

French,

103

155,262

10,328

1

858

18

104

156,120

10,346

German,

443.

289,454

9,781

31

19,717

617

474

309,171

10,398

Italian,

2

1,671

27

2

1,671

27

Japanese,

16

19,851

891

16

19,851

891

Norwegian,

4

1,441

41

1

281.

7

5

1,722

*48

Russian,

4

5,374

271

4

5,374

271

Siamese,

14

6,477

251

14

6,477

251

Spanish,.

40

16,349

1,619

6

2,372

238

46

18,721

1,857

T

:

TOTAL,......... 18,304 4,614,955 342,114

|

8,459

552,276 89,315

26,763 | 5,167,231 | 431,429

IV.--NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1884.

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

CLEARED.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

Austrian,

Belgian,

11

117 154,559 20,544

5,522

32

35,781

619

673

149 11

190,340

6,141

20,544

673

1

British,

Chinese,

2,205 26

2,493,806

101,873 19,382 1,352

204

1,100 196,703

17

1

1,100

17

5,551

2,409

2,690,509 |107,424

1

Chinese Junks,

17,170

1,358,587 236,238

5,893

392 308,376

23 65,516

27

19,774

1,375

23,063 | 1,666,963

301,754

Danish,

11

2,948

209

1

268

19

12

3,216

228

Dutch,

22

29,9.18 1,678

2

1,125

36

24

31,043

1,714

French,

German,

99 150,459 10,079 394 250,553 9,031

4

2,732

62

103

153,191

10,141

88

64,763

1,727

482

315,316

10,758

Italian, Japanese,

3

2,146

42

3

2,146

42

16

20,539

927

16

20,539

927

Norwegian,

Russian,

Siamese,

Spanish,

3

1,502

38

3

4,650

223

12

5,608

213

46

18,869 1,920

C = 1 ∞

3

1,068

32

6

2,570

70

702

31

4

5,352

254

1

424

15

13

6,032

228

5

1,580

124.

51

20,449

2,044

TOTAL,......... 20,135 4,531,924 369,976 6,239

617,160

73,814 26,374 5,149,084 443,790

208

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews.

29,461 7,026| 1,127| 64,428 14,175 42,915 6,609 1,032 56,298 9,824 14,699 1,924] 354 28,279 3,680 303,926 39,534 20,062 4,799,987 364,130 161,275 34,222 4,188 218,239 39,620 552,276 89,315 26,763 5,167,231 431,429

V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1884.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

OF PORTS.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwán,

600

...

...

Stanley,

Victoria,

343

163

2,364 2,663,346 105,557]

33

Yaumáti,.

...

4281

...

...

Total,..

2,364 2,663,346 105,557

33

21,818

Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Vls.

Crews. Tons. Crews. VIs. Tons. Crews. Vis. 34,967 7,149 327 29,461 7,026 1,127|| 64,428|14,175| 600 34,967 7,149 527

13,383 3,215| 42,915 6,609| 1,032|

689 343

56,298 9,824| 13,383 3,215| 689

13,580 1,756 191 14,699 1,924Į 28,279 3,680|| 163 13,580 1,756| 191 21,848 807 2,397 2,685,194 106,364 14,406 1,832,715 219,089 3,259 282,078 38,727 17,665 2,114,798 257,766 16,770 4,496,061 324,596 3,292 56,964 5,398 3,760 161,275 34,222 4,188 218,239 39,620|| 428 56,964 5,398 3,760 807 2,397 2,685,194 106,364 15,940 1,951,609 236,557 8,426 530,428 88,508 24,366 2,482,037 325,065 18,304 4,614,955 342,114 8,459

354

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1884.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.,

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews, Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vls.

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,..

271

...

...

Stanley,.

611

163

Crews.

Tons.

14,302 2,811| 835 37,718 5,196 378 13,292 1,689|

Vis.

Tons.

191

...

Victoria,

2,205 2,493,806|101,873|

Yaumáti,.

...

...

...

Total,..

2,205 2,493,806 101,873||

204 196,703 5,551 2,4092,690,509 107,424 14,862 1,888,185 234,498 2,642 2,028 84,621 23,909 1,989 204 196,703 5,551| 2,4092,690,509 107,424 17,930 2,038,118 268,103 6,035

Tons. Crews. Vls. Crews. Vls.

Vls. Tons. 49,609 11,229 1,106 63,911| 14,040 271 835

14,302 2,811|

17,412 4,152| 989 55,130 9,348 611 378

37,718 5,196 14,087 1,991| 354 28,270 3,680) 163 13,292 1,689 207,868 20,916 17,504 2,096,058 255,414 17,067 4,381,991 836,371 84,621 23,909 130,58129,075 4,012 215,20253,884 2,023

Crews.

191

2,846

1,989

Crews.

Tons.

49,609 11,229| 1,106| 17,412 4,152| 989 354

14,987 1,991 28,279 3,684 404,571 26,467 19,913 4,786,562 362,838 130,581 29,975 4,012 215,202|53,880

Vls. Tons.

Crews.

63,911 14,040

55,130 9,348

420,457 68,263 23,965 2,458,575|336,366 20,135 4,531,924|369,976| 6,239

617,160|73,814 26,374 5,149,084 448,790

Y

{

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1884.

209

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,

838 128,485 21,990 2,234

102

9,153

1,204

163

940 137,638 23,194

2,397

Total,... 838 128,485 21,990 2,234

102

9,153

1,204

163

940 137,638 23,194

2,397

VIII.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1884.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Victoria, ......

877

Passen- gers.

131,507 22,266 3,121

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

65

Passen-

gers.

9,929 1,100 444

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

942

141,436 23,366 3,565

Total,... 877 131,507 22,266 3,121

65

9,929 1,100

444

942 141,436 23,366 3,565

IX.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1884.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Passen-

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

600 Shaukiwán,... 343

S anley,

Victoria,

163 12,729

34,967 7,149 13,383 3,215 13,580 1,756

93

527

29,461

7,026

239

689

42,915

6,609

85

191

14,699

1,924

Yaumáti,...... 428

948,749 164,023 | 111,922

56,964 5,398

3,103

233,963

36,330

76

3,760

161,275

34,222

116 42 112 24,040 62

1,127

64,428 14,175

209

1,032

56,298 9,824

281.

354 15,832 | 1,182,712 | 200,353 | 135,962

4,188 218,239 39,620

28,279 3,680

197

138

Total,... 14,263 1,067,643 | 181,541 112,415 8,270

482,313 86,111 24,372

22,533 | 1,549,956 | 267,652 136,787

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1884.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,.

271 611

14,302 2,811

Passen-

gers.

149

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

37,718

5,196

92

378

835 49,609 11,229 17,412 4,152

Passen- gers.

150 1,106

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

63,911 14,040

299

107

989

55,130 9,348

199

Stanley,

163

13,292 1,689

82

191

14,987 1,991

93

354

28,279 3,680

175

Victoria,

Yaumáti,

13,225 2,023

1,077,147 | 180,367 | 124,472

2,435

85,858

17,069

7,618

15,660

1,163,005 197,436 132,090

84,621 23,909

60

1,989

130,581

29,975

150

4,012 215,202 53,884 210

Total,... 16,293 1,227,080 213,972 124,855

5,828

298,447

64,416

8,118 22,121 | 1,525,527 |278,388 | 132,973

210

XI.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1884.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

600

34,967 7,149

93

527

29,461

7,026

116

1,127 64,428 14,175

209

Shaukiwán,...

343

13,383 3,215

239

689

42,915

6,609

42

1,032

56,298 9,824

281

Stanley,

163

13,580

Victoria,

13,567

1,756 1,077,234186,013114,156

85

191

14,699

1,924

112

354

28,279 3,680

197

3,205

243,116 37,534

Yaumáti,.

428 56,964 5,398

76 3,760

161,275 | 34,222

24,203 62

16,772

1,320,350 | 223,547

138,359

4,188

Total,... 15,101 1,196,128 203,531 114,649

|

8,372

491,466

218,239 39,620

87,315 24,535 23,473 1,687,594 290,846

138

139,184

XII.—Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1884.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons.. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,...

271 14,302

2,811

149

835

49,609 11,229

150

1,106

63,911 14,040

299

611

37,718 5,196

92

378

17,412

4,152

107

989

55,130 9,348

199

Stanley,

163

13,292 1,689

82

191

14,987 1,991

93

354

28,279 3,680

175

Victoria,

14,102 | 1,208,654 202,633 | 127,593

2,500

95,787 18,169

8,062

16,602

1,304,441 |220,802

135,655

Yaumáti,..

2,023 84,621 23,909

60

1,989

130,581

29,975

150

4,012

215,202 53,884

210

Total,... 17,170 | 1,358,587|236,238 |127,976

5,893

308,376 65,516

8,562❘ 23,063

1,666,963301,754

136,538

XIII.-Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1884.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,...... 3,797 124,808 40,179 3,920

1,428

39,492 11,131

6,612 5,225

164,300 51,310 10,532

Total,...

3,797

124,808 | 40,179 3,920 1,428 39,492 11,131 6,612 5,225

164,300 51,310

10,532

XIV.—Return of Junks ( Local Trade ) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Qut-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1884.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria, ......

1,948 56,406 17,055 7,294 3,318 111,136 34,448

3,019

5,266

167,542 51,503 10,313

Total,... 1,948 56,406 17,055 7,294 3,318 111,136 34,448

3,019

5,266

167,542 51,503 10,313

XV-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,

2,364

2,663,346

105,557

Do.

do. in Ballast,

33

21,848

807

Total,........

2,397

2,685,194

106,364

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

2,205

2,493,806

101,873

Do.

do. in Ballast,

204

196,703

5,551

Total,...........

2,409

2,690,509

107,424

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

4,806

5,375,703

213,788

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

15,940

1,951,609

236,557

Do.

do.

in Ballast,.....

8,426

530,428

88,508

Total,.........

24,366

2,482,037

325,065

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

17,930

2,038,118

268,103

Do.

do. in Ballast,..

6,035

420,457

68,263

Total,.....

23,965

2,458,575

336,366

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,......

48,331

4,940,612

661,431

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

18,304

4,614,955

342,114

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

8,459

552,276

89,315

Total of all Vessels entered,

26,763

5,167,231

431,429

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

20,135

4,581,924

369,976

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

6,239

617,160

73,814

26,374

5,149,084

443,790

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

38,439

9,146,879

712,090

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

14,698

1,169,436

163,129

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,........

53,137

10,316,315

875,219

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,

5,225

164,300

51,310

Do.

cleared,

5,266

167,542

51,503

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,

10,491

331,842

102,813

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,.

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

53,137

10,316,315

875,219

do.,

10,491

331,842

102,813

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,

63,628

10,648,157

978,032

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,.

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

73,767

503,507

61,425

10,532

Total Arrivals,

649,231

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

51,247

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,.

492,851

53,656

10,313

Total Departures,

608,067

Excess of Arrivals over Departures,.

41,164

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,

1,257,298

211

212

XVI.-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1884.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis Horse

tered

Power. Tonnage.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks, &c.

Benclutha, str.,

76,360 1,338.58 150 Schooner

Iron

Glasgow, 1876, & Shanghai, 1880. Foreign name

Song Tai, str.,... 88,826 43.48 10

Schooner Wood

Hongkong, 1878.

"Mee Foo" since sold to Foreigners at this port.

Fannie, str.,

....

88,827

54.84

25

Dandy Wood

Hongkong, 1884.

Since sold to Foreigners at Manila.

Zephyr, str.,... 88,828

278.31

65

Schooner Iron

Mary Austin, str. 53,204 140.22 30

Schooner Iron

Zafiro, str.,

88,829

Carisbrooke, str. 65,463

Hailoong, str.,... 65,082

675.44 184

973.07 140

277.12 60

Schooner Steel

Schooner Iron

Hongkong, 1878.

Newcastle on Tyne, 1865.

Aberdeen, 1884.

Foreign name "Zephyr."

Foreign name "Tromp."

Sunderland, Durham, 1873.

Schooner Iron

Aberdeen, 1871.

Saltee, str., ......

Nam-Vian, str.,

Pithau, str.,...... 88,831

50,372

252.21 90

88,830

Schooner Iron

472.31 94 Schooner Iron

64.92 15 Schooner Wood

Glasgow, 1864.

La Seyne, near Marseilles, France, 1876. Hongkong, 1884.

Foreign name Saltee."

Foreign name "Nam Vian.”

CC

Koussia, str., 88,832 25.66 12

2

Schooner Wood

Hongkong, 1884.

Milton, str.,...... 88,833 149.61 37 Schooner Wood

Hongkong, 1884.

Foreign name "Milton."

XVII.—RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1884.

Name of Vessel.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

Naomi,.

50,685 28.25 1869

Kim Kin Kee,. Hanoi, str.,

64,101 415.35| 1873

73,446 96.68 1881

44

Schr.

Yot Sai, str.,..

73,450 127.50 1882

80

None

Albay, str.,..

63,841 366.00 1883 90

Schr.

Iron

Benclutha, str.,.

76,360 1338.58 1884 150

Schr.

Iron

Fannie, str.,

88,827 54.84 1884 25

Dandy Wood

Schr. Wood Canton, 1868. Barque Wood Memel, 1854.

Wood Hongkong, 1881. Wood Whampoa, 1874.

Glasgow, 1871. Glasgow, 1876 & S'hai. Hongkong, 1884. [1880.

Sold to Foreigners, 1884. Sold to Foreigners, 1884. Transferred to Singapore, 1884.. Destroyed by explosion of boiler, Lost near Swatow, 1884. [1884. Sold to Foreigners, 1884. Sold to Foreigners, 1884.

XVIII.—AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III of Ordinance No. 8

of 1879 in the Harbour Department during the Year 1884.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number.

Fee.

Amount.

Remarks, &c.

Alteration in Agreement with Seamen,

2

$1

**

2

Certifying Desertion,

164

1

164

Declaration of Ownership,

24

2

48

Endorsement of change of Master,

43

1

43

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

9

2

18

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,..

13

15

195

Inspection of Registry,

14

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

4

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

3

Recording Sale of Ship, ....

16

Registering Certificate of Sale,

3

110 10 10 2

14

5

20

5

15

5

80

TOTAL,...

6

.$ 605

x

XIX.-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1884.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

213

ADULTS,

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

183

1 January 2| Orestes, str.

1,323 British

2

"J

5 Deucalion, str....

1,639

J. K. Webster T. Purdy

Straits Settlements

226

227

32

13

3

227 264

""

25

8

Pekin, str.

2,125

">

A. Symons

212

:

212

75

J

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

7

Townsville

23

19

9 Chang Chow, str..

1,109

J. Whittle

168

Rockhampton

7

Brisbane

19

Sydney

7

+

Melbourne

12

5678 ->>

ཐ འ བ བ བ

11 Glenavon, str.

1,936

R. A. Donaldson

Straits Settlements

265

19

12 Arabic, str.

2,788

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

82

""

:

:

38

:

""

12 Zambesi, str..

1,540

L. 1. Moule

Straits Settlements

297

49

10

"

14 Ulysses, str.

1,561

"

A. Thompson

127

21

14 Rory, str.

1,262

""

R. C. Marsden

141

315

82

11

367

127

143

""

Port Darwin

5

Townsville

8

10

23

~

15 Catterthun, str.

1,106

H. Craig

Rockhampton Brisbane

99

40

Sydney

26

Melbourne

15

:

11

16 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

116

25

150

19

12

"

16 Wingsang, str...

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

131

13

1

145

"

""

13

""

18 Anchises, str.

1,304

C. Jackson

130

130

19

29

14

22 Hydaspes, str.

1,891

G. Scrivener

78

78

22

15

وو

26

Titania, str.

16

26

Oceanic, str.

2,011 Austro-Hung. G. Marussig

2,440 British

73

25

"}

17 February 5 Brindisi, str.

2,142

""

H. Davison

J. Reeves

San Francisco

43

co co

3

104

3

52

Straits Settlements

131

131

Cooktown

Brisbane

46

18

8 Euxine, str.

978

J. B. Peters

Townsville

Rockhampton

35)

109

14

Sydney

9

Adelaide

3

...

19

9

"

Chi Yuen, str.

1,211

F. Wallace

"

Straits Settlements

61

20

"

13

Hector, str.

1,590

E. Billinge

21

"

14

Japan, str.............................................

1,865

T. S. Gardner

""

""

106

91

11

22

"

14

Lennox, str.

1,327

D. Scott

113

:

Townsville

47

23

23

14 Woosung, str.

1,109

A. Hunt

11

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

42

61

106

111

123

114

13

12

Singapore

67

Port Darwin

16

Townsville

·48

24

""

16 Tannadice, str.....................................

1,408

S. G. Green

Rockhampton

9

246

""

Brisbane

72

Sydney

15

Melbourne

14

Adelaide

4

27

*** * 23

25

"

26

"

****

19 Assam, str.

19 Rory, str.

20 Glenroy, str...

1,597 1,262 1,370

S. F. Cole

Straits Settlements

116

116

""

R. C. Marsden

""

""

163

8

3

175

وو

W. J. Grake

231

231

""

28

"

ཝཱ

21 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Honolulu

R. R. Searle

592

San Francisco

71

29

"

27 Sumatra, str.

30

22

28 Pandora, str.

1,406 British 1,781 Austro-Hung. G. Sturli

T. Fairtlough

Straits Settlements

532

674

24

3162

3

672

8

4

560

Singapore

187

Port Darwin

Townsville

31

""

29 Whampoa, str.

1,109 British

21

J. E. Williams

Brisbane

Sydney Melbourne Honolulu

82

11

8 8*38 5 38

32 March

3 City of Tokio, str.

33

""

3 Glenlyon, str. .................................

3,129 American 1,373 British

J. Maury

468

San Francisco

120

31

4 Ganges, str.

2,162

"

35

6 Ocean, str.

1,039

D. O. Mackinlay W. B. Andrews R. R. Brown

Straits Settlements

307

""

86

:::

6

712

316

29

""

583

18

Q

36

""

8 Diomed, str.........

1,736

M. H. F. Jackson

""

""

232

44

37

"

11 Vorwærts, str.

612 German

F. Boysen

Mauritius

129

19

12 Nellie May,

39

33

13 Glenfalloch, str.

664 American 1,419 British

A. Austin W. J. Burch

Victoria, V. I.

200

Straits Settlements

150

599

307

86

610

236

179

200

150

Port Darwin

22

Cooktown

19

Townsville

31

40

""

15 Menmuir, str.

1,247

Rockhampton

30

P. Helms

""

Brisbane

31

A

:

162

Sydney Melbourne

13

12

Tasmania

Townsville Brisbane

49

77

41

18 Suez, str.

1,390

W. M. Dodd

"

Rockhampton Sydney

33

182

13

Melbourne

10

Honolulu

569

20

14

42

""

19 Arabic, str.

2,788

W. G. Pearne

રે

""

San Francisco

1,204

589

7

:

Carried forward....... 67,233

Carried forward,... 9,889

311

105 56 10,361

214

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-(Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...... 67,233

43 March 19

Malwa, str.

1,697 British

A. C. Loggin

Brought forward, | 9,889

Straits Settlements

311 105

56 10,361

1691

:

169

44 45

19

""

Zambesi, str..

1,540

L. H. Moule

298

14

15

329

""

""

19

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

319

59

10

397

""

""

46

""

19 Glenearn, str.

1,410

W. E. Duke

360

37

15

418

22

Singapore

300

Port Darwin

8

Cooktown

47

"}

24 Taiwan, str.

1,109

J. Smith

354

Townsville

2

Sydney

17

Melbourne

17

2

49663848588

او

28

Berenice, str.

1,707 Austro-Hung. P. Crillovich

Straits Settlements

529

46

11

593

""

28

Glencoe, str.

1,901 British

E. F. Park

117

117

33

50

51 April

31

وو

Achilles, str....

1,529

C. Anderson

175

176

22

""

1

Clyde, str.

2,244

E. M. Edmonds

114

114

多多

52

""

1

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

420

14

5

C. T. Hook, str.

902 British

W. Jarvis

Straits Settlements

507

30

12

"

""

8

Geelong, str.

1,139

P. W. Case

278

23

14

524

446

550

324

""

55

8

Ajax, str.

1,525

"2

J. Riley

141

""

15

Thames, str.

2,131

W. D. Anderson

129

::

141

129

""

57

16 Lennox, str.

1,327

D. Scott

466

B

49 201

9

544

>>

J

16

Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

401

64

10

17

492

>>

وو

18

Oceanic, str.......................

2,440

J. Metcalfe

""

San Francisco

745

11

2

762

Port Darwin

42

Cooktown

Townsville

60

"

18 Catterthun, str.

1,406

""

H. Craig

Rockhampton

Brisbane

109

17

Sydney

20

Melbourne

&

61

""

22 Khiva, str.

1,419

P. Harris

Straits Settlements

516

26

18

561

""

Singapore

115

4

Port Darwin

1

Rockampton

4

62

""

23 Timor, str.

1,421

J. B. Peters

""

Sydney

17

191

Melbourne

44

Wellington, N. Z.

1

Adelaide

5

33628

37

24 Bellerophon, str.

64

""

25 Rohilla, str.

1,396 2,252

""

""

65

28

Medusa, str..

T. W. Freeman W. Barratt

Straits Settlements

158

158

""

225

225

67

68

""

66 May

2 Bangalore, str..

3 Chi Yuen, str..

6 Chang Chow, str.

1,776 Austro-Hung. G. Ragusin

1,310 British

482 110

18]

19

1,211

J. P. Hassall F. Wallace

>>

303 19

14

374

34

15

945

629

1

337

11

434

"

Port Darwin

24

Cooktown

Townsville

7

1,109

J. Young

62

Brisbane

Sydney

11

Melbourne

11

...

82=22

69

""

6

City of Rio de Janeiro, str..

70

3

7 Prinz Alexander, str.

2,275 American 1,911 German

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

712

R. Eckert

Jamaica W. I.

509

109

28

4

727

17

59

694

71

8

F. P. Litchfield,

72

""

8 Nepaul, str.

1,042 | American 1,987 British

S. C. Spalding

Victoria, V. I.

368

H. Wyatt

Straits Settlements

198

::

::

368

198

73

13 Sumatra, str.

1,406

"

T. Fairtlough

G

647

38 12

703

Port Darwin

25

Cooktown

7

Townsville

11

74

>>

14 Tannadice, str....

1,408

S. G. Green

22

Rockhampton

1

71

Sydney

14

Melbourne

11

Adelaide

Port Darwin

1

Brisbane

4

75

""

16 Euxine, str.

978

A. W. Yule

21

Sydney

9

27

Melbourne

11

Adelaide

2

76

39

17 Arratoon Apcar, str.

77

17

22

Ascalon, str..

1,392 1,523

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

507

118

11

>>

J. Peters

560

55

"

78

21

City of Tokio, str.

3,129 American

J. Maury

San Francisco

1,055

* 12 12

17

12

15

1- 2 GI

184

653

635

1,076

Port Darwin

19

79

"

22 Woosung, str.

1,109 British

A. Hunt

Cooktown

Townsville

Brisbane

37

Sydney

11

Melbourne

11

80

19

22 Ancona, str.

ور

81

82

""

24 Zambesi, str:

28 Orion, str.

83

30

San Pablo, str..

84

31

Kashgar, str.

2,113 American

1,515 British

85 June

4 Priam, str.

1,402

1,874

R. G. Murray 1,540

L. H. Moule 1,814 Austro-Hung. G. Mahorcich

E. C. Reed W. J. Webber S. H. Butler

Straits Settlements

187

"

384

31

344

223

73

13

18

200

"

San Francisco

213

Straits Settlements

134

6

272

35

""

"

86

"J

5 Martha,

853

A. McPherson

"?

87

""

10 Khiva, str.

1,419

P. Harris

"

Victoria, V. I. Straits Settlements

141

3

284

39

13

88

10 Chi Yuen, str.

1,211

F. Wallace

202

13

""

دو

""

89

""

13 Ulysses, str.

1,561

A. Thompson

152

"

90

""

13 Vorwærts, str.

612 German

F. Boysen

Mauritius

214

18

91

27

14 Wingsang, str...

92

32

16 City of Peking, str.

93

17 Japan, str.

1,517 British 3,129 American 1,865 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix G. G. Berry I. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

556

31

San Francisco

783

Straits Settlements

302

528

8

22

4

50

10

20903

336

187

8

430

27

457

213

145

6

318

145

342

219

152

232

598

817 368

Carried forward,.............. 150,105

Carried forward.......

26,680 1,500 474

280

28,934

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, Continued).

215

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

Mr. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,......| 150,105

Brought forward,|26,680] 1,500|

474

280 28,934

Port Darwin

5

Thursday Island

3

Cooktown

10

94 June

18| Keelung, str.

919 British

J. Smith

Townsville

21

59

Brisbane

Sydney

10

Melbourne

8

Singapore

86

Port Darwin

Cooktown

11

Townsville

95

37

19 Laju, str.

1,246

C. Mann

141

>"

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

12

Melbourne

11

96

21 Jason, str....

97

24 Geelong, str...

1,412 1,139

"s

"J

98

27 | Titania, str.

99

17

27 Anchises, str.

100 July

2 Oceanic, str.

2,440

""

101

"}

3 Taiwan, str."....................

1,109

J. Smith

""

S. Milligan

Straits Settlements

141

141

P. W. Case

374

35

11

427

21

2,011 Austro-Hung. C. Doncich

1,304 | British

324

53

12

396

11

C. Jackson

130

130

"

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

405

36

15

461

Singapore

154

Cooktown

2

Townsville

Rockhampton Brisbane

...

179

...

Sydney

Melbourne

11

J. P. Hassall

Straits Settlements

379

33

W. H. Lunt

70

""

Port Darwin

Townsville

1

Sydney Melbourne Adelaide

19

102

""

5 Bangalore, str....

1,310

103

""

7 Benclutha, str...........................

1,339

104

""

9 Catterthun, str.

1,406

"

H. Craig

:

424

78

28

Singapore

139

Rockhampton

105

9 Naples, str.

1,473

J. Thom

Brisbane

4

178

33

Sydney

28

Melbourne

5

106

""

11 Cyclops, str.'.

1,403

R. Jago

Straits Settlements

140

140

107

12

Arabic, str.

2,788

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

182

11

"

108

""

12 Sumatra, str.

1,406

W. E. Clement

Straits Settlements

316

29

10

39

109

""

15 Taisang, str.

1,505

T. Davies

385

33

10

J1

110

111

"

112

"9

113

114

22

26 Kashgar, str.

19 Zambesi, str..

19 Deucalion, str.

19 | Arratoon Apcar, str.

23 City of New York, str.

1,964 American 1,515 British

T. Purdy

A. B. Mactavish W. B. Cobb W. J. Webher

1,540

S. Bason

93

3004

197

360

436

102

11

1,874 1,392

136

136

19

254 87

15

14

370

San Francisco

177

Straits Settlements

74

28

12

-

1

191

27

106

115

26 Hector, str.

1,590

""

E. Billinge

159

159

""

""

116

12

26 Glencoe, str....

1,901

E. F. Park

190

190

""

""

117

26

Guthrie, str.....

1,493

""

R. Craig

""

Sydney Melbourne

20

30

10

118

28

""

119

Pandora, str. 28 Lennox, str.

1,781 Austro-Hung. G. Me:teler 1,327 | British

Straits Settlements

141

48

12

15

216

D. Scott

66

11

80

j

Timor Island

16

Cooktown

120

29

31 Timor, str.

1,421

J. B. Peters

Townsville

51

Rockhampton

Brisbane

Sydney

24

121 August 2 Menelaus, str.

1,519

R. Nelson

Straits Settlements

91

122 123

""

2

Khiva, str.

1,419

""

>>

8

City of Tokio, str.

3,129 American

F. Speck J. Maury

185

17

San Francisco

302

10

Port Darwin

26

124

""

9 Tannadice, str......................................

1,408 British

S. G. Green

125

""

9 Patroclus, str.

1,650

R. S. Brown

126

""

14

Wingsang, str..

127

>>

14

Japan, str.

128

""

16

Adowa, str.

129

18

Meefoo, str.

""

130

"

22 | San Pablo, str..

131

"

132

"

28 Berenice, str.

26 Bangalore, str..

1,339 American 2,113

1,310 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix T. S. Gardner W. F. Caborne W. H. Lunt E. C. Reed J. P. Hassall

1,707 Austro-Hung. G. B. Verona

1,517

>"

1,865

1,112

133

"

28 Woosung, str.

1,109 British

A. Hunt

Carried forward,.. 212,810

Cooktown

Townsville

Rockhampton Brisbane

Sydney

21

در

86

91

208

319

60

Melbourne

Adelaide

Straits Settlements

156

156

178

47

235

"J

197

42

10

256

23

126

38

10

179

""

48

11

65

San Francisco

179

10

195

Straits Settlements

291

9

310

233

56

300

"

Port Darwin

:

Cooktown

Townsville

Rockampton

9

Brisbane

56

Sydney

11

Melbourne

Launceston

Adelaide

Carried forward..............

33,581 2,168

598

423

36,770

216

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—( Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL..

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...... 212,810

Brought forward,... 33,581 2,168

598 423 36,770

Port Darwin

Cooktown

5

134 Sept.

2 Menmuir, str.

1,247 British

P. Helms

Townsville

44

Sydney

201

Melbourne

135

4 Sumatra, str.

136

""

4

Glenfinlas, str.

1,406 1,409

W. E. Clement

""

Straits Settlements

393

43

10

7

453

A. J. Jacobs

10.

:

100

137

5

City of Peking, str.

138

""

12

Lorne, str.

3,129 American 1,035 British

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

344

32 11

32

419

W. Hunter

Straits Settlements

388

3

4J4

Port Darwin

Cooktown

139

""

13 Airlie, str.........

1,492

W. Ellis

"2

Rockhampton Brisbane

6

44

Sydney

25

Melbourne

4

140

141

142

39

15

Zambesi, str................

22

15

Glenroy, str..............

1,540 1,411

S. Bason

Straits Settlements

90

15

25

19

2

136

22

19

W. J. Geake

107

107

"

27

15

Chi Yuen, str.

1,211 American

F. Wallace

157

38

9

14

218

""

143

""

16

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

A. B. Mactavish

152

35

11

206

144 145

""

18

Oceanic, str.

2,440

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

160

11

3

183

""

"

20 Antenor, str......................

1,376

""

J. T. Bragg

Straits Settlements

136

136

Port Darwin

Cooktowa

146

147

34

20 Suez, str.

1,390

W. M. Dodd

Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

Cooktown

""

22 Tamsui, str.

919

A. Vardin

22

Townsville

Sydney Melbourne

51

21

15

148

""

149

150

151

Oct.

152

""

23 Laju, str.

27 Elektra, str.

27 Taisang, str..

1Arabic, str.

3 Sarpedon, str.

1,246

Singapore

Port Darwin

C. Mann

Cooktown

Sydney

12

Melbourne

2,095 Austro-Hung. G. Sturli

Straits Settlements

286

33

1,505 British

T. Davies

329

70

>

2,788

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

265

9

1,592

23

""

J. Ward

Straits Settlements

159

Port Darwin

153

39

10 Catterthun, str.

1,406

H. Craig

Sydney

14

Melbourne

11

154 155

"J

13 Bellerophon, str.

1,397

دو

14 City of Rio de Janeiro, str..

2,275 American

T. W. Freeman W. B. Cobb

Straits Settlements

139

San Francisco

105

Port Darwin

2 12

484

12

15

"t3

::

143

335

423

278

159

28

139

117

156

""

14 Whampoa, str.

1,109 British

J. E. Williams

Cooktown Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

49

4

1]

Melbourne

8

3

157

""

15 Khiva, str.

158

""

16

Japan, str.

1,419 1,865

""

F. Speck

Straits Settlements

467

72

T. S. Gardner

27

309

79

20

15

21

575

9

12

GY

409

159

23

""

16 Wingsang. str.

1,517

""

d'A. de Ste. Croix

355

821

13

11

160

""

20 Telemachus, str.

1,421

H. Jones

""

230

3

461 239

:

Port Darwin

3

Cooktown

Townsville

161

""

22 Timor, str.

1,421

A

J. B. Peters

Rockhampton

35

Brisbane Sydney

19

Melbourne

7

162 163

25 Glaucus, str..

"

28 Ancona, str.

1,382

1,874

""

T. Jackson

Straits Settlements

191

12

10

207

R. G. Murray

70

70

164

28 Medusa, str.

165

""

28

City of Tokio, str.

3,129 American

166

1,776 Austro-Hung. G. Ragusin

J. Maury

""

339

15

77

440

San Francisco

33

11

354

Nov.

3 Ulysses, str.

1,561 British

167

"

4 Sir Garnet Wolseley, str.

A. Thompson

Straits Settlements

123

124

1,477

168

29

5 Geelong, str..

1,139

""

""

D. Morgan

252

P. W. Case

251

169

29

8 San Pablo, str..

95

:

26

285

31

293

170

""

11

Verona, str. :

2,113 | American 1,862 British

E. C. Reed L. H. Moule

San Francisco Straits Settlements

71

2

73

186

186

171

29

12 Taiwan, str.

:

1,109

J. C. Arthur

233

172

30

"1

15 Glenfalloch, str.

1,419

R. Webster

"J

""

191

Port Darwin

Ir

1013

271

192

Cooktown

173

22

18 Atholl, str.

923

29

R. W. Thomson

Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

4

11

7

174 175

""

18

Kashgar, str.

1,515

""

15

19

City of New York, str.

176

""

22

Taisang, str.

177

22

22

Arratoon Apcar, str.

178

24

Chi Yuen, str.

1,964 | American 1,505 British 1,392 "" 1,211

W. A. Wheler R. R. Searle

Straits Settlements

248

29

San Francisco

1941

T. Davies

Straits Settlements

165

28

12

12

33

A. B. Mactavish

107

48

220

22

F. Wallace

"2

""

55

Carried forward,.............. 284,614

Carried forward,........... 41,686| 3,044|

39

284

222

207

171

1

67

799

63 46,167

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,―(Continued).

CHILDREN.

217

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WITHER Bound.

TOTAL

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...

284,614

179 Nov. 25

Malwa, str. .....................

1,697 British

A. W. Adamson

Brought forward,... 41,686 3,046 Straits Settlements

799 638 46,167

150

150

180

15

28

Titania, str.

2,011 Austro-Hung.] G. Doncich

280

58

17

363

181 Dec.

1

Anchises, str.

182 183

184

185

186

187

15

17

A

""

1

Glenfruin, str.

1,936

1,304 British

25

C. Jackson

169

""

:

170

E. Norman

188

12

2+3

""

"2

2

City of Feking, str..

3,129 American

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

197

206

"

5

Vortigern, str.

8

Fidelio, str.

8

Victoria, str..

876 British

852 German 1,531 British

J. Brown

Singapore

28

207

Mauritius

168

H. Brock

124

127

J. B. Shield

Straits Settlements

627

47

10

22

Khiva, str.

1,419

22

F. Speck

131

188

""

13

Oceanic, str..

2,440

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

116

""

189

"'"

15 Cyclops, str.

1,403

22

R. Jago

Straits Settlements

345

190

16 | Rory, str.

1,262

R. C. Marsden

202

+852-

13

17

7372m

704

205

179

385

218

""

"2

Port Darwin

Cooktown

191

39

17 Iolani, str.

981

E. Allason

"

192 193

Townsville

Rockhampton Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

Adelaide

18 Wingsang, str..........

"2

22 Sumatra, str.

1,517 1,406

d'A. de Ste. Croix | Straits Settlements

""

W. E. Clement

57

22

Singapore

Port Darwin

Cooktown

48

12

6

2

369

47

8

429

299

27

12

342

44

194

وو

23 Menmuir, str.

1,247

P. Helms

25

*

Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney Melbourne Adelaide

83

16

6

2

195

24 Arabic, str.

196

24 Japan, str.

197

"J

29 Pandora, str.

198

""

29

Menelaus, str.

2,788 1,865

23

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

140

15

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements.

266

71

1,300 British

Total Tons,....

317,359

1,781 Austro-Hung.] G. Mettel

R. Nelson

"

265 78 181

6479

13

18

3839

163

354

368

183

...

27

Total Passengers,.

46,061 3,536

911 189

51,247

To Adelaide, South Australia,

,, Brisbane, Queensland,

,, Cooktown,

""

Do.,

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

,, Jamaica, West Indies,

23

Launceston,

ލމ

Mauritius,

29

Melbourne,....

Port Darwin, South Australia,

,, Rockhampton, Queensland,..

San Francisco, U.S.A.,........

31 Straits Settlements,

>>

Sydney,

Tasmania,

Thursday Island, Queensland,..

SUMMARY.

25

25

486

129

:::

486

129

1,629

27

24

1,684

509

109

59

17

€94

4

...

635

321

259

2 2 2

671

329

267

148 8,005 32,286 3,084|

149

303

80 128

8,516

696

588

36,654

531

Q

538

1

3

3

16

16

364

3

367

709

1

::

713

1

Timer Island,..

""

""

Townsville, Queensland,.

""

Victoria, Vancouver's Island,

''

Wellington, New Zealand,

Total Passengers,

46,061 3,536)

911

739 51,247

:

:

218

XX.-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1884.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

123

1 January 2 Rory, str.

1,862 British

Marsden

Straits Settlements

279

11

2

39

4 Fei-Lung, str.

752

Alison

150

19

4 Picciola, str.

874 German

Nissen

101

131

9

1

300

153

102

Port Darwin

7

Cooktown

Townsville

15

4 Naples, str.

1,473 British

Thoms

Rockhampton

Sydney

2422

90

13

29

Melbourne

4

157

5 Arabic, str.

2,787

Pearne

San Francisco

431

5 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Mactavish

Straits Settlements

3081

5

"1

"

8 Moray, str.

1,427

Duncan

280

20

47

WN

431

319

310

11

Port Darwin

11

Thursday Island

6

Cooktown

27

8

"

8 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Craig

Townsville

26

167

"

Sydney

69

Adelaide

10

Dunedin, N.Z.

18

"

10

Taichiow, str.

862

Jordan

Bangkok

170

""

10

11

"

12

Pekin, str.

954

Heurmann

38

>>

"

12

Taisang, str.

1,505

Bamford

Straits Settlements

155

12

>>

14 Benledi, str.

1,000

Thompson

"

83

""

13

"

14 Cyclops, str.

14

15

"}

14 Bellona, str.

15 Geelong, str.

789 German 1,139 British

1,402

Jago

195

Schaefer

Mauritius

58

Case

Straits Settlements

290

10 N LO LO MO

:

175

38

160

85

200

70

294

Port Darwin

16

Cooktown

2

16

""

19 Euxine, str................

978

Peters

Rockhampton

19

82

Brisbane

28

Sydney

2

Melbourne

15

17

18

19

20

21

TORRER***5

""

21 Titania, str...................

"}

21 Assam, str.

21 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, 8.

2,011 Aust.-Hung. Marnssig

1,597

Cole

Straits Settlements

50

50

19

239

11

1,012 British

Lightwood

Bangkok

102

"}

22 Oceanic, str.

2,440 "1

Davison

San Francisco

791

7200

7

246

2

104

799

"

22 Benalder, str.

1,334 "

22

""

22 See Wo, str.....

1,058 11

Ross Mitchell

Straits Settlements

100

100

"1

357

2

359

23

""

24 Glenroy, str.

1.411

"

24

>>

24 Chi Yuen, str......

1,211

Geake Wallace

138 12

640 20

""

25

27

25

Kong Beng, str.

862 "2

26

26

19

Hector, str.

1,589

Jones Bellinge

Bangkok

50

Straits Settlements

99

"J

27

19

29

Miramar, str.

891

Duggua

65

22:2*

150

4

2

666

50

10

109

4

69

"J

Port Darwin

2

Cooktown

26

28 Feb.

1 Hoihow, str.

896

Varden

19

Townsville

Brisbane

4

81

Sydney

30

...

Melbourne

13

31

28-88

29

2 Japan, str.

Gardner

1,865

Straits Settlements

164

2

"

30

">

4 Antenor, str.

1,644

2)

27

4 Lennox, str.

1,327

Bragg Scott

50

"?

41

::

...

""

32

19

4 Glenfalloch, str.

Burch

1,419

66

""

27

33

"

5 Rory, str...

1,262

Marsden

103

29

34

"

8 Diomed, str.

1,736

Jackson

17

"

35

13

11 Rosslyn, str.

1,049

McKechnie

150 85

252

166

50

41

68

2

111

152

85

19

39

Port Darwin

Cooktown

36

;

19

11 Tannadice, str.

1,408

Green

Townsville

42

19

Sydney

25

Melbourne

8

37

""

12 Glenlyon, str.

1,373

19

38

14 Nestor, str.

1,459

McKinlay Nish

Straits Settlements

200

200

158

161

""

39

16 Malwa, str.

1,697

Duggan

78

78

"}

Brisbane

33

40

16 Suez, str.

1,390

Dodd

38

""

Melbourne

5

41

18 Jeddah, str.

993

Geary

Straits Settlements

158

10

2

173

>>

42

""

18 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Searle

San Francisco

294

299

43

19| Benclutha, str.

1,339 British

Lunt

Straits Settlements

580

584

44

19 Laertes, str....

1,391

Scale

136

140

19

??

45

""

20 Picciola, str.

875 German

Nissen

170

6

180

""

46

20 Pandora, str.

"

2,143 Aust.-Hung. Sturli

190

47

11

20 Ashburne, str..

1,613 British

Lambert

242

48

21 Glenearn, str.

1,410

Duke

239

""

11

49

""

26 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

Bangkok

50

"

50

,,

26 City of Tokio, str.

3,129 American

Maury

San Francisco

79

51

29

53

Patroclus, str.

52 March 3 Clyde, str.

4 Chi Yuen, str..

1,650 British

Brown

Straits Settlements

630

20

2,244

Edmond

104

"

""

54

11

4 Mongkut, str.

55

6 Achilles, str.

1,211 859 1,529

Wallace Loff

750 16

22

00

::

190

245

246

53

84 650

104

8

776

Bangkok

49

1

50

Anderson

Straits Settlements

285

15

300

"

56

"}

7 Glencoe, str.

1,901

Park

200

200

>

"

57

8 Bengloe, str.

1,198

Webster

267

گرم

277

"

58

"

8 Zambesi, str.

1,540

""

59

""

8 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Moule

Mactavish

71

3

74

"

207

2

216

19

19

60

11

8 Wingsang, str.

1,515

St. Croix

130

138

""

"

61

11

10 Donar, str.

1,041 German

Kuhn

412

~

420

Carried forward..

86,653

Carried forward...........

12,006 256

71

17

12.350

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,~( Continued).

219

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F

M. F

Brought forward........

86,653

Brought forward... 12,006 256 Port Darwin

71

17

12,350

9

Cooktown

2

Townsville

5

62 March 10 Menmuir, str.

1,247 British

Helms

Rockhampton

10

74

Sydney

23

Dunedin, N.Z.

22

Adelaide

3

63

19

13

Rory, str.

64

65

66

13

31

Yorkshire, str.

1,262 1,126

Marsden

Straits Settlements

489

""

Arnold

29

""

"

""

13

Ajax, str.......

1,525

27

Riley

196

""

14

Arabic, str.

2,787

Pearne

San Francisco

168

2142

3

522

33

200

170

"

67

"3

15 Thames, str.

2,131

Anderson

Straits Settlements

154

154

"

68

17 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Webb

331

11

69

34

18 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Stratton

Bangkok

85

:

:

345

85

:

70

11

18 Danube, str.

501

Newton

35

"

71

"

19 Glenelg, str.

1.956

72

73

""

19

Sarpedon, str..

1,592

Quartly Ward

Straits Settlements

2031

~~

37

15

230

90

90

21

وو

Nam Shan, str.

805

Blackburn

76

76

፡፡

74

22

Berenice, str.

1,787

Aust.-Hung. Crillorich

270

270

75

27

24 Jeddah, str..

993

British

Geary

377 16

411

23

76

24 Picciola, str.

875

German

Nissen

176)

*

77

24 | City of Peking, str.

3,129

American

Berry

San Francisco

193

21

78

25 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,011

British

Lightwood

Bangkok

86

79

27 Laju, str..

Mann

Straits Settlements

362

10

1I2O

180

5

2

221

88

8

384

1,246 >"

80

28 Rohilla, str.

Barratt

149

149

"

2.252 "

21

81

28 Stentor, str..

Edwards

140

5

10

5

150

1,304

"

19

Port Darwin

7

Thursday Island

2

Cooktown

7

223

82

28 Naples, str.

Thom

Townsville

70

1,473

11

Rockhampton

12

Brisbane

35

Sydney

3

83

28 Chang Chow, str.

Whittle

Australian Ports

39

1,109

Port Darwin

12

84

29 Catterthun, str.

1,406 ""

Craig

6889

39

67

Sydney

55

85

31 Mongkut, str.

86

31 Spartan

87

31 Geelong, str.

British

859 " 749 American

Loff

Case

Bangkok

88

Crossby

Honolulu

106

:

Straits Settlements

78

2

1

1

90

106

80

1,139

88 April

2 Bellerophon, str.

Freeman

410

410

1,396 ""

"

89

??

5 Telemachus, str.

Jones

150

150

1,421

"1

"

90

5 Lennox, str.

Scott

273

22

1,327

12

""

91

"

7 Japan, str.

Gardner

259 29

1,865

15

""

92

33

8 Oceanic, str.

2.440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

185

12

222

10

2

307

6

300

197

"1

93

""

12 Nepaul, str.

1.988

"

Wyatt

Straits Settlements

127

127

94

"}

12 | Glenfruin, str.

Norman

192

2

194

1,936

"

19

95

""

12 Danube, str.

Newton

561

Bangkok

57

57

19

96

19

15 Agamemnon, str.

1,523

""

Wilding

Straits Settlements

220

14

97

12

15 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

Webb

437

25

7

~~

2

236

11

480

956

**

*

98

""

15 Rosslyn, str.

1,049

McKechnie

60

60

99

"7

15 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,011

Stratton

Bangkok

118

10

140

"

100

33

17 Bengalore, str.

1,310 ""

Hassall

Straits Settlements

133

136

101

21 Glaucus, str.

12

1.647 *

102

""

21

Donar, str.

1.041 German

Jackson Kuhn

92

5

>>

315

4

103

21

Medusa, str.

"

1,776 Aust.-Hung. Ragusin

435

25

12

322

100

325

480

Port Darwin

Cooktown

12

Townsville

104

21

21 Euxine, str......................

978

British

Peters

46

Brisbane

19

Sydney

Melbourne

105

22 Kong Beng, str.

862

??

106

22 Glenogle, str.

2,000

Jones Hogg

Bangkok

53

Straits Settlements

32

23

107

"

22 Oopack, str......

Thomson

224

1.730

""

108

23 | Ancona, str..

1,874

17

109

23 Glencoe, str.

21

1,901

""

110

24 Jeddah, str..

993

Murray Park Geary

100

"

Bangkok

291

Straits Settlements

346

10

"

111

28 Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

11

Lightwood

Bangkok

100

112

11

29 Sumatra, str.

1,406 ""

Fairtlough

Straits Settlements

191

113 May

1 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

114

"1

2 | Priam, str.

2,275 American 1,402 British

Searle

San Francisco

171

Butler

Straits Settlements

224

115

2 Glenavon, str..

>>

116

""

5 Zafiro, str.

117

""

5 Flintshire, str.

1,935 ""

675 1,017

Donaldson

168

Talbot

110

""

Haine

50

11

118

""

5 Mongkut, str.

859

"

119

>>

5 Woosung, str..

1,109

Loff Hunt

11

120·

"

6 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1.392

97

121

6 Picciola, str.

122

""

7 Galley of Lorne, str.

1,380

874 German

British

Mactavish Nissen Pomroy

Bangkok Australian Ports Straits Settlements

74

20 x

:::

::

119

349

45

401

"

29

10 10 ****

5

W N

3

A

ON 10

55

33

224

100

30

10

371

107

200

173

228

169

120

50

74

119

398

414

30

"

Port Darwin

7

Cooktown

10

Townsville

7

123

""

7 Tannadice, str.

1,408

Green

82

"}

New Zealand

30

Sydney

25

Melbourne

2

124 125

8 Verona, str.

"

9 Glucksburg, str.

126

9 Taichiow, str.

"

1,862 1,093 German 862 British

>>

127

10 Orestes, str..

"

128

"

12 | Zambesi, str.

1,323 1,540

"

Clement Bertelsen Jordan Webster Moule

Straits Settlements

2301

230

255

"

Bangkok Straits Settlements

227

204

120

00 50 50 60

8

263

6

2

8

243

3

207

6

126

29

"}

!

Carried forward...............

180,194

Carried forward...

23,533 618

203

108

24,462

$220

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-( Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

129 May

130 131

Brought forward....

12 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

12 City of Tokio, str.

180,194

Brought forward... 23,533|| 618

203

108

24,462

956 British

Webb

Straits Settlements

443

28

10

486

3,129 American

Maury

San Francisco

183

192

""

15 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Stratton

Bangkok

71

81

132

""

15 Breconshire, str..

1,241

Thomas

Straits Settlements

95

95

133

19

19

Rosslyn, str.

1,049

McKechnie

409

134

135

??

39

19

Ulysses, str.

1,560

Thompson

191

19

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

Bangkok

551

10 10 N

5

2

213

W LO

418 200

60

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

41

136

19

11

Menmuir, str.

1,247

Helms

Townsville

9

63

Sydney

25

Melbourne

15

Port Darwin

9

Cooktown

2

Townsville

4

137

19 Suez, str.

1,390

Dodd

Brisbane

36

69

""

Sydney

11

Melbourne

2

138

139

12

140

**

22

141

23

20 Teheran, str.

21 Orion, str.

Hydaspes, str.. Donar, str.

1,670

Nantes

24

1,814 Aust.-Hung. Mahorcich

Greymouth, N.Z.

Straits Settlements

5

30

:::

30

4001 27

3

433

1,891 British

Serivener

1,041 German

Kuhn

11

142

"

24 Benlarig, str.

1,482 British

Clark

";

"

""

"

107

107

294

302

931

100

143

26 Jason, str.

1,412

Milligan

62

70

"1

144

26 Chi Yuen, str.

1,211

Wallace

641

30

}}

"

145

97

27 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

11

Lightwood

Bangkok

118

12

10 00

33

681

140

146

29 Arabic, str.

17

2,788

Pearne

San Francisco

238

238

147 148

31 Vorworts, str.

612 German

Boysen

Mauritius

193

193

31 Anchises, str.

1,304 British

Jackson

Straits Settlements

324

20

344

149 June

3 Glenearn, str.

1,410

Duke

35

I

36

22

150

3 Massilia, str.

2,748

Shallard

>>

>

61

61

151

3

""

Khiva, str.

1,419

Harris

35

35

152

""

3 Principia, str.

1,790

Kerrnish

33

29

29

153

>>

3 Glenartney, str.

1,400

Sommer

100

10

154

""

3

Rory, str.

1,262

Marsden

""

68

14

155

3 Lennox, str.

1,327

31

""

156

5 Taichiow, str.

862

51

157

37

6

Mongkut, str.

158

6

Japan, str.

859 1,865

""

"

"

159

10

City of Peking, str.

""

160

12

Radnorshire, str.

"}

161

13 Geelong, str.

1,139

162

14 Picciola, str.

3,129 American

1,201 British

""

875 German

Scott Jordan Loff

"

140

25

Bangkok

56

4

>

90

42421

114

84

WN

171

3

65

93

Gardner

Straits Settlements

24

26

Berry

San Francisco

2611

10

6

305

Rickards

Straits Settlements

214

220

Case

129

4

.137

Nissen

353

360

163

22

14 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Stratton

Bangkok

84

86

164

16 Cyclops, str.

"

165

16 Glenfinlas, str.

""

166

18

Rosetta, str.

1,403 1,409 2,136

Jago

Straits Settlements

226

24

""

Jacobs

187

*༠

250

3

2

200

"1

22

Brady

109

109

"

""

167

18

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

Bangkok

110

10

5

130

""

وو

Port Darwin

21

Cooktown

21

168

20 Taiwan, str...

1,109

Smith

"

Townsville

Brisbane

Sydney

15

7

159

42

Adelaide

Melbourne

51

169

170

**

21 Titania, str..

21 Deucalion, str.

2,011 Aust.-Hung. Doncich

1,374

Purdy

Straits Settlements

170

11

181

275

15

2

300

#

171

"

23 Bangalore, str.

1,309 British

172

23 Rosslyn, str.

1,049

Hassall McKechnie

281

30

279

فرم

6

300

""

173

*7

90 Euphrates, str.

1,300

174

30 Devonshire, str.

1,513

$1

"

175

30 Taichiow, str.

862

Mitchell Purvis Jordan

29

29

19

29

29

Bangkok

83

3

91

"

Port Darwin

81

Cooktown

6

176

"

30 Naples, str.

1,473

Thom

Townsville

8

61

""

Brisbane Sydney

32

7

Port Darwin

7

...

177 July

1 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Craig

Sydney

32

49

"

Dunedin, N.Z.

10

***

178

""

1 Ganges, str..

2,162

Andrews

Straits Settlements

153

153

21

179

3 Yamashiro Maru, str.

"

1,560 Japanese

James

296 10

306

"J

180

17

4 Taisang, str.

1,505 British

Davies

252

8

I

261

>>

181

182

183

184

4457

Hector, str.

Chi Yuen, str..

1,590

Billinge

510

10

23

""

1,211

Wallace

630

30

21

"

5 Glenroy, str.

1,411

Geake

52

+452

";

"

Menelaus, str..............

1,508

Nelson

59

:>

13

185

7 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Mactavish

215

10

""

186

10 Patroclus, str..

1,650

Brown

223

9

"

""

187

"

10 Atholl, str.

923

Thomson

61

144

221

525

670

63

60

227

234

11

188

10 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Stratton

Bangkok

81

188

65

83

>>

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

Townsville

189

11 Timor, str.

1,421

Peters

38

Sydney

Melbourne

[

Dunedin, N.Z.

190

19

12 City of New York, str. ...[

191

23

14 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

Carried forward.......

1,964 American 1,012 British

Cobb Lightwood

San Francisco

Bangkok

209 69

2

214

1

70

...

270,712

Carried forward....

33,936 1,051

305 181

35,473

:

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

221

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F

M.

F

Brought forward...

270,712

192 July 193 194

15

Glucksburg, str.

1,093 German

15

Khedive, str.

2,123 British

Bertelsen Horne

Brought forward... 33,936 1,051 Straits Settlements

305 181 35,473

3501 20

370

111

111

"

19

"

15

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

258

11

284

"

19

195

16

Nestor, str.

1,269

Nish

142

148

""

27

196

18 Kashgar, str.

1,515

Webber

100

102

12

""

197

18

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

19

Bangkok

96

co

103

198

19 Pandora, str.

1,781 Aust.-Hung. Mettell

Straits Settlements

272

302

199

22

Guthrie, str.

1,494 British

Craig

286

300

H

12

29

200

25

Khiva, str.

1,419

""

"

Speck

101

105

201

25

Laertes, str..

1,391

Scale

336

14

""

""

"

202 203

26

Altna Craig, str..

1,872

""

"

Buyers

24

41

350

25

""

22

26

Chang Chow, str.

1,109

Young

Australian Ports

41

41

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

204

""

28 Tannadice, str.

1,408

Green

Brisbane

20

96

Sydney

54

Adelaide

1

Melbourne

- ט

3

205 206

207

208

209

210 August

211 212

29

Taichiow, str.

859

Jordan

""

72

Bangkok

46

29

Abbie Carver

934 American

Pendleton

Honolulu

121

27

30

City of Tokio, str.

3,129

27

30

Achilles, str.

>>

1,528 British

Maury

San Francisco

313 19

529

10 00

3

22

58

128

332

Anderson

Straits Settlements

358

358

31

Clyde, str.

22

2,244

Edmond

116

116

""

31

Gordon Castle, str.

1,320

Rowell

173

173

"

"

1

""

Picciola, str.

874 German

Nissen

350

354

""

2

Benclutha, str.

""

1,338 British

Lunt

519

519

""

213

99

5

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

St. Croix

86

3

89

""

""

214

""

5

Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

168

168

"1

""

215

6

Glamis Castle, str..

22

1,559

White

252

254

""

216

7

Mongkut, str.

859

Loff

"

Bangkok

98

98

217

>>

8

Duburg, str.

921

German

Schultz

Straits Settlements

259

268

218

*

9

Adowa, str.

1,112 British

Caborne

247

Q

1

251

"

219

11

27

Yokohama Maru, str.

1,298 Japanese

Burdis

77

77

""

220

11

Diomed, str..

1.476 British

Jackson

147

147

221

27

11

Ajax, str.

222

"

11

Woosung, str.

1,525 1,109

"

Riley

170

170

19

Hunt

Australian Ports

55

55

"

223

11

San Pablo, str.

""

2,113 American

Reid

San Francisco

133

133

224

12

Thames, str.

>>

2,131 British

Seaton

Straits Settlements

132

132

225

27

13 Stentor, str...

1,304

Edwards

170

11

226

"}

14 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Lightwood

Bangkok

84

227

16 Chi Yuen, str................

27

1,211

Wallace

Straits Settlements

330

228

16

Lennox, str.

27

1,327

Scott

238

602 00 σ

176

86

200

340

262

"

وو

229

""

18

Amy Turner

962 American

Newell

Honolulu

314

314

230

19

Bangalore, str.

""

1,310 British

Hassall

Straits Settlements

120

120

231

21

Berenice, str.

>>

1,707 Aust.-Hung,

Verona

384

232

""

21

Danube, str.

561 British

Newton

Bangkok

26

co co

233

23

Vorworts, str..

612 German

27

Boysen

Mauritius

118

734

234

23

Mount Lebanon

530 British

Nelson

Honolulu

152

""

235

23 Antenor, str.

39

1,376

""

Bragg

Straits Settlements

1891

236

23 Glenogle, str.

"

2,000

15

Hogg

257

"

237

39

25 | Keelung, str.

919

Smith

Australian Ports

46

"J

238

""

25 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Berry

San Francisco

355

21

10

239

19

25 Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

115 10

~

10 2

400

37

122

155

200

264

46

391

134

240

26 Strathleven, str..

1,588

Pearson

Straits Settlements

142

151

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

12

Townsville

11

241

26 Menmuir, str.

1,247

Helms

Brisbane

89

""

Greymouth, N.Z.

Wellington

1

Sydney

38

Adelaide

242

27 Rohilla, str...

2,251

Barratt

Straits Settlements

72

72

243

28 Sumatra, str.

1,406

Clement

183)

185

"?

""

244

30 Agamemnon, str.

1,523

"

245

Sept.

1 Sarpedon, str.

1,591

Wilding Ward

326

332

127

127

*

""

:

246

5 Zambesi, str.

">

1,540

247

27

5 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

>>

248

5 Tai Sang, str.

1,506

19

249

5 Airlie, str.

1,492

Bason

Mactavish

Davies Ellis

213

213

"

330

20

Co

N

358

وو

251

20

271

>>

58

6

5

69

""

250

6 Oceanic, str.

2,440

""

251

8 Tamsui, str.

919

Metcalfe Vardin

San Francisco

342

15

6

363

Australian Ports

58

58

252

8 Bellerophon, str.

1,397

Freeman

>>

Straits Settlements Port Darwin

307

307

Cooktown

253

9 Suez, str.

"

1,390

Dodd

Brisbane

Sydney

33

50

254

"

10 Mongkut, str.

859

255

13 Mee Foo, str.

1,339 American

Loff Lunt

Melbourne

Bangkok

46

Straits Settlements

256

13 Oopack, str.

1,730 British

Thomson

257

13 Teddington, str..

1,310

Clark

258

15 Danube, str.

561

19

259

""

15 Laju, str.

1,246

Sydney

73

3

76

355

12

4

375

140

140

...

"

125

125

1

Newton

Bangkok

31

1

32

Port Darwin

11

Brisbane

6

Mann

31

7

31

Carried forward......

366,264

Melbourne

Adelaide

Carried forward.....

46,170 1,361

407 223

48.161

***

...

222

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F

M.

F.

Brought forward

366,264

260 Sept. 16

Arabic, str.

2,788 British

Pearne

Brought forward... 46,170 1,361 San Francisco

407

223

48,161

313

313

261

17 Telemachus, str.

1,421

Jones

Straits Settlements

511

550

"

ད་

""

262

""

263

264

""

265

22

""

Elektra, str.

17 Kü Maru, str.

19 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

20 Cheang Hock Kian. str.

2,095 Aust.-Hung. Sturly

884 Japanese

Brown

73

73

""

1,012 British

Lightwood

Bangkok

64

64

956

Webb

Straits Settlements

659 11

5

680

528 56

14

10

608

27

266

22

""

Benalder, str.

1,331 British

Ross

19-t

2

9

205

""

267

268

269

19

22

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

";

Bangkok

581 2

3

63

23

""

Ancona, str.....

1,874

19

Murray

Straits Settlements

123

123

24

"1

Bellona, str.

789 German

Schaefer

30

30

""

270

25

Glaucus, str.

99

271

272

""

27 Glengarry, str.

29 Glucksburg, str.

1,955

273 274

""

275 October 1

276

277

278

279

280

"J

""

29

Sagami Maru, str.

29

C. T. Hook,.

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

1,382 British

""

1,093 German

1,162 Japanese

902 British 2,275 American

Day Jarvis

Jackson

279

"

Taylor

300

""

Bertelsen

306

9

26

322

291

308

323

""

186

186

12

Bangkok

45

50

Cobb

San Francisco

479

479

2

2

Tantallon, str.

1,310 British

Partridge

Straits Settlements

122

6

130

3

Ulysses, str...

1,650

Thompson

345

1

346

"

3

Priam, str.

1,402

Butler

147

150

21

3

4

Wingsang, str.

1,516

St. Croix

2001

30

230

*

4

Khiva, str.

1,419

Speck

50

59

281

??

6

Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

356

"

"

356

282

6 Taichiow, str.

862

Jordon

Bangkok

50

54

283

8 Verona, str..

1,862

Moule

Straits Settlements

116

116

""

284

8

Chi Yuen, str..

1,211

285

10

Mongkut, str.

859

Wallace Loff

385

3

393

11

60]

11

"

64

286

11 Glenfalloch, str..

1,419

Webster

Straits Settlements

180

20

200

""

287

11

Orestes, str.

288

"

13

Ningchow, str.

1,323 1,735

""

Webster

243

12

255

""

Wallace

100

6

106

"

289

";

13

City of Tokio, str.

3,129 American

Maury

San Francisco

376

10

386

290

";

15

Satsuma Maru, str.

1,160 Japanese

Jones

Straits Settlements

180

186

291

""

17

Rory, str.....

1,262 British

Marsden

511

18

529

""

292

20 Iphigenia, str..

1,059 German

Ahrens

141

6

A

149

Port Darwin

19

Cooktown

2

Townsville

15

293

20 Guthrie, str.

1,493 British

Craig

Brisbane

Rockhampton

Sydney

6

114

12

41

Melbourne

19

294

20 Hoihow, str.

"

295

21

55

San Pablo, str.

296

"

21

Kong Beng, str.

896 2,113 American Reed

862 British

Jones

Clegg

Australian Ports

34

34

San Francisco

524

7

531

Bangkok

501

297

"

21

Medusa, str.

1,776 Aust.-Hung. Ragusin

Straits Settlements

348

298

"

21

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956 British

Webb

299

23 Malwa, str.

وو

1,697

300

25 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

>>

301

19

27 Ceylon,......

302

27 Jason, str.

"1

303

39.

30+

28 Glenfruin, str.

28 Geelong, str.

1,936 1,139

305

28 Duburg, str.

306 Nov.

3 Benledi, str.

647 American

1,412 British

""

:)

921 German

1,000 British

Case

Adamson Lightwood Barstow

485 13 112

243

8

60

352

5

5

508

112

Bangkok

Honolulu

62 4 141

66

7

4

155

Milligan

Straits Settlements

460 10

470

Norman

274 15

289

""

159

19

Schultz

3 356 7 10

162

""

Thomson

180 12

NO

2

to co

379

200

307

3 Taiwan, str....

1,109

Arthur

"

308

""

4 Catalina,

484

Williams

Australian Ports Honolulu

39

39

111

2

3

116

>>

309

"

5 Anchises, str.

1,304

""

310

6 Rosetta, str...

93

2,136

">

Jackson Brady

Straits Settlements

445

445

67

67

"

Port Darwin

13

Thursday Island

Cooktown

21

311

7 Tannadice, str.

1,408

Green

Townsville

7

98

"

Rockhampton

10

Brisbane

7

Sydney

38

312

"

7 City of New York, str.

1,964 American

313

10 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

314

1)

10 Chi Yuen, str.....

315

}:

11 Taisang, str.

1,211 1,505

>>

Searle Mactavish Wallace Davies

San Francisco

508

**

508

Straits Settlements

250

250

630

20

650

""

325 20

4

2

22

"

351

316

11 Mongkut, str.

859

Loff

""

Bangkok

113

2

115

317

12 Teucer, str.

1,324

Power

Straits Settlements

901

9

2

101

318

14 Kashgar, str.

1,515

Wheler

143

4

147

??

319

"

17 Cyclops, str.

1,403

22

Jago

376 11

387

77

320

"

17 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Berry

San Francisco

997 34

8

1,013

321

"

17 Taichiow, str.

862 British

Jordan

Bangkok

78

3

81

322

323

324

"

17 Woosung, str.

21 Titania, str...

21 Massilia, str.

1,109

Hunt

Australian Ports

35

35

"

2,011 Aust.-Hung. Doncich 2,748 British

Straits Settlements

344 8

со

352

Shallard

92

92

>>

325

21 Rory, str.

1,262

Marsden

324

15

6

345

326

21 Flintshire, str.

1,017

Doncaster

176

3

184

"

327

21 Rochampton, str.

1,391

Sanderson

303

...

307

"

328

"

22 Vortigern, str.

876

Brown

19

Bangkok

80

80

329

25 Deucalion, str.

1,374

Purdy

Straits Settlements

159

164

330

"

25 Benarty, str.

1,119

Le Boutillier

30

30

331

>>

26 Cheang Họck Kian, str....

956

Webb

340

2-

4

352

Port Darwin

26

Thursday Island

2

Cooktown

9

332

28 Menmuir, str.

1,247

Helms

"

Townsville

23

145

Brisbane

Sydney

56

Melbourne

24

Carried forward...

468,663

Carried forward......

63,510 1,828

513

282

66,133

.

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued).

223

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward..............

468,663

333 Nov.

28 Oceanic, str.

2,440 British

334 Dec.

2 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Metcalfe Stratton

Brought forward... 63,510 1,828 San Francisco

513

282

66,133

990

...

990

29

Bangkok

70

70

335 336

99

2 Glenavon, str....

1,935

Donaldson

Straits Settlements

198

""

27

.2

Khiva, str.

1,519

19

Speck

243

10 CO

5

6

TH LO

209

254

""

337

19

3 Tamsui, str......

919

Vardin

Australian Ports

150

150

""

338

3 Nanshan, str.

805

Blackburu

""

Bangkok

44

2

4

50

339.

""

6 Cardiganshire, str.

1,623

""

Courtney

Straits Settlements

226

4

230

340

19

8

Sutlej, str.

2,156

Johnson

75

75

""

41

341

27

8

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

""

Bangkok

55

2

57

342

9

Wing Sang, str.

1,515

343

9

Cambodia, str.

1,969

St. Croix Wildgoose

Straits Settlements

460

20

480

29

29

341-

>>

9

Hector, str.

1,589

345

10

Alden Besse

812 American

Batt O'Brien

320

G

326

""

Honolulu

57

57

Port Darwin

3

346

347

348

*

349

""

11 Naples, str.

11 Japan, str.

11 Menelaus, str.

13 Glucksburg, str.

1,473 British

Thom

Brisbane

40

92

Sydney

49

1.865 1,300

Gardner

"

Straits Settlements

446

21

10

480

Nelson

116

120

1,093 German

Bertelsen

276

281

350

12

13 Mongkut, str.

859. British

Loff

Bangkok

55

55

351

15 Sumatra, str.

1,406

Clement

Straits Settlements

117

117

22

352

16 Glenartney, str.

1,400

Sommer

230

230

""

>>

353

20 Peshawur, str..

33

2,130

Babot

60'

60

"

354

""

20 N. Thayer,

586 American

Crosby

Honolulu

101

355

27

22 Chi-Yuen, str..

1,211 British.

Wallace

Straits Settlements

542 15

356

>>

22 Laertes, str..

1,391

Scale

183

132

2

104

565

190

12

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

5

Townsville

15:

Brisbane

50

357

11

22 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

184

"

Sydney

31

Melbourne

18

Adelaide

21

Dunedin, N.Z.

34,

358

""

359

360

24 Taichiow, str.

24 Pandora, str.

862

Jordan

19

Bangkok

104

104

24 Iphigenia, str.

1,059 German

Ahrens

52

60

1,781 Aust.-Hung. Mettel

Straits Settlements

150

155

361

24 Kennett, str.

1,156 British

Sanderson

226

230

362

26 Patroclus, str.

1,386

Brown

63

65

"+

363

26 Benvenue, str.

1,497

Potter

167

175

"

364

29 Benlarig, str.

1,482

Clark

106

110

1

365

29 Glencoe, str.

1,901

Duke

280

"

"

10

20

300

366

367

27

368

369

29 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

29 Centaur,

29 City of Rio de Janeiro, s. 30 Rochampton, str.

468 German

2,275 American 1,391 British

Offersen Cobb

1,012

Stratton

29

Bangkok Honolulu

34

31

51

3

3

57

San Francisco

669

669

Sanderson

Straits Settlements

200

8

220

TOTAL TONS..

520,295

TOTAL PASSENGERS

70,931 1,979 I

559 298 73,767

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

SUMMARY,

From Adelaide, South Australia,

Australian Ports by the steamers of the China Navigation Company, Limited,

22

""

Bangkok,

"

Brisbane, Queensland,

""

Cooktown,

Do.,

37

Dunedin, New Zealand,.

22

27

""

#

Greymouth, New Zealand,

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, Mauritius, Melbourne,

Port Darwin, South Australia, Rockhampton, Queensland,.

San Francisco, U.S.A.,.. Straits Settlements, Sydney,

Thursday Island, Queensland. Townsville, Queensland,

""

""

!!

Wellington, New Zealand,

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

VALUE

OF TREASURE BROUGHT.

$

47

:

47

616

616

3,874 138

85

29

4,126

374

374

18,010

214

215

45,332

118

118

13

13

1,154

15

18

6

1,193

369

5

10

1

385

199

199

2361

236

6,000

70

70

9,202 201 39 53,541 1,618

19

407 243

9,461 55,809

9,739,169

700

1

14

701 14

560,454

189

189

589

1

::

1

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

70,931 1,979

559

298

73,767 $10,369,554

:

224

XXI-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the Year 1884.

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF.

NATURE OF CHARGE.

No. of CASES.

No, OF DE-

FEND-

Impri- Impri-

soned

soned

ANTS.

with

in

Fined.

Hard

default

Forfei- ture of Pay.

Repri- manded.

Duty.

Labour. of Fine.

Sent back to charged

from Ship.

To be dis-

Dis-

Com- mitted

missed.

for

Trial.

AMOUNT OF

Absent from Ship without Leave,..

3

Assault,

20

24

Desertion,

Discharging Firearm in Harbour,

Disorderly Conduct,

Drunkenness,

14

False Particulars, Giving (Junk),

Harbouring Deserter,......

Harbour Regulations, Breach of,

Leaving without Clearance (Junk), Refusal of Duty,

Throwing Ballast, &c. into Harbour, Wilfully remaining behind,

~! Bei

$56.00

80.00

12

10.50

26.00

8.00

81

59

:00:

5.00

5.00

3

TOTAL,....

78

169

72

13

32

11

1

9

28

...

$190.50

FINES.

227

No. 20,

1

SIR,

Correspondence respecting the Rifle Practice of the Civil Police,

and the supply of Ammunition.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

Major-General Cameron, C.B. to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

HEAD QUARTERS, HONGKONG, 13th April, 1885.

I have the honour to inform you that, with your permission, I saw the Civil Police at Rifle Practice at Kowloon, on Saturday, the 4th instant, and I candidly confess that, without the slightest desire to flatter, I was exceedingly pleased at their performance, and more especially considering the small amount of ammunition allowed them.

I understand that the arming of the Civil Police with the MARTINI-HENRY Carbine as also their Musketry training are entirely due to your Excellency; and I must say that both for the suppression of civil revolt, or for the protection of the Colony in case of attack by an enemy, such an armed and well trained Police Force is of the highest importance.

To render, however, this force thoroughly efficient in Musketry, it is very important (as has been found in regard to the Military), to practise such rapid firing at close quarters as would be necessary in the field, and in clearing the streets in cases of disturbance.

For such practice the present allowance of ammunition, at the rate of 50 rounds per man, is quite insufficient; and I strongly recommend, considering the value of this Police Force, as an important factor in the defences of the Colony, that the annual allowance be increased to 150 rounds per man, and that the ammunition C.S.O. No. 1685 of Nov. 25th, 1885, sent out through error and ordered to be returned, vide correspondence (marginally 28th, 1885. noted) between the Military and Colonial Authorities, be retained for the aforesaid purpose, instead of the useless expense being incurred of returning it all to England as directed.

"

434

A.M.S. C.S.O. 1706

" A.M.S.

442

"

"J

"

27th, 1885.

His Excellency

Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

I have, &c.,

&c.,

&c., HONGKONG.

&c.

W. G. CAMERON, Major-General,

Commanding in China and Straits Settlements.

P.S.-Since the above was written, I have received the Inspection report of the Shanghai Volunteers, who appear to have been unable to complete their musketry course owing to want of ammunition; will your Excellency therefore permit the Municipal Council at Shanghai to purchase from this Colony the ammunition required to the extent of 50,000 rounds, out of the supply overdrawn for the Police ?

W. G. CAMERON.

228

SIR,

(2.)

Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G. to Major-General Cameron, C.B.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 21st April, 1885.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 13th instant, and to state that your Excellency's testimony to the efficiency of the Civil Police in their Rifle Practice is very satisfactory to myself and to the Govern- ment of this Colony.

2. With the advice of the Executive Council, I have authorised the increased allowance of 150 rounds per man to the Police, as you recommend; and I have decided to retain the whole of the MARTINI-HENRY Carbine Ammunition, recently sent out from home, looking to possible contingencies in the present critical state of public affairs, and with the view to be in a position to meet the above, and other demands, such as those of the Hongkong Volunteers; and also of the Shanghai Volunteers (referred to in your letter).

3. You state: "I understand that the arming of the Civil Police with the MARTINI-HENRY Carbine, as also their Musketry training, are entirely due to your Excellency; and I must say that both for the suppression of Civil Revolt, or for the protection of the Colony in case of attack by an enemy, such an armed and well-trained Police Force is of the highest importance."

4. I will explain, for your information, what has taken place in this matter. Soon after my arrival in this Colony, I found that the Civil Office of Deputy Superintendent of Police, the pay and allowances of which amounted to £800 a year, was then vacant, and was deemed to be unnecessary ;—when, after consulta- tion with the Captain-Superintendent, and with the advice of the Executive Council, I determined to appoint a Military Officer as Adjutant, with pay and allowances at the rate of only £300 a year; whose duties should be, to assist the Captain-Superintendent generally in the discharge of his duties, and especially in the drill and discipline of the three hundred (300) armed English and Sikh Constables. It was felt that greater efficiency would thus be secured, together with a saving of £500 a year to the Colonial revenue.

5. I found, moreover, that the carbines formerly supplied to the Police were of an obsolete pattern, worn out, and practically useless; so I procured from Her Majesty's Government for both the Police and the Volunteers, MARTINI-HENRY Rifles of the best type (the same as those used by the Royal Artillery,) with an ample supply of ammunition.

6. As I have already said above, your testimony to the present efficiency of the Police in their rifle practice is very satisfactory to myself and to the Colonial Government. A force of three hundred (300) effective men, equal to one-fourth of the whole, has practically been added, in the event of war, or of internal disturbance, to our Garrison of some twelve hundred men (1,200) of all arms; and that not only without increase to the expenditure, but with a positive saving of £500 a year to the Revenue of the Colony.

7. In conclusion, I would observe that I know that you agree with me in the opinion that the drill of the Police, and their rifle practice must not be allowed to interfere with the full and diligent discharge of their civil duties in time of peace. On this point, I will quote a passage from my despatch of June 29th, 1883, in which I reported to Her Majesty's Government the arrangements which I had made for the improved efficiency of the Police :-

"I desire it to be understood that nothing can be further from my wish or intention than to invest a Civil Police Corps with too Military a character. But seeing that the English and Sikh portion of the Police Force at Hongkong is regularly armed with rifles and sword-bayonets; that it is analogous in many respects to the Royal Irish Constabulary; and that it is expected to give efficient support to our weak garrison in the event of foreign attack, or of serious internal disturbance,it is obvious that it should have the advantage of being drilled by a Military Officer as Adjutant. All experience shows that nothing is more useless, and that nothing may become more dangerous than an armed force under imperfect discipline."

His Excellency

Major-General CAMERON, C.B.,

&c.,

I have, &c.,

G. F. BOWEN.

&c.,

&c.

"

4,000,000

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

BLUE LINE represents Junk Tonnage only.

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

1874.

I.-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1884 inclusive.

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire trade in Foreign Ships and Junks.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878:

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

1884.

-5,400,000

TONS.

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

*2,900,000

2,800,000

kong, 21st January, 1885.

H. G. THOMSETT, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

R1

X

TONS.

5:400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,coo

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4, ICO,OCO

4,000,000

3,900,000

1867.

1868.

1869.

BLUE LINE represents Junk Tonnage only.

XXII-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1884 incli

1870.

1871.

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire trade in Foreign Ships and Junks.

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,CCO

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

2,000,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

Harbour Department, Hongkong, 21st January, 1885.

Man",

:

:

:

229

G. F. BOWEN.

·Minute by His Excellency the Governor.

..

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of three thousand dollars for an additional

supply of about 200,000 rounds of MARTINI-HENRY Carbine Ammunition, required for the

Police and Volunteers, under the circumstances stated in the annexed correspondence.

Government House, 22nd April, 1885.

:

231

No. 21.

Correspondence respecting Fees charged for issuing Bills of Health.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G. to the Secretary of State.

No. 36.

MY LORD,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 23rd January, 1885.

I have the honour to lay before your Lordship the following circumstances connected with the issue of Bills of Health at this Port.

2. It appears that at many ports the production of Bills of Health is insisted

See enclosed Letter from Chamber of on in the case of all vessels coming from Hongkong. These Bills of Health have

Commerce, January 19th, 1885.

for many years been granted by the Colonial Surgeon and the Health Officer on payment of a private fee varying from five ($5) to ten ($10) dollars for each Bill of Health issued. No return, however, was made of these fees, and this Government was not aware of the practice of receiving them until quite recently. During the enforcement of Quarantine Regulations in this Colony last year, the attention of the owners and agents of ships was called to the subject, and representations were made by them to the Chamber of Commerce, which addressed my Government as follows:-

(C

(6

66

"It has come to the knowledge of the Committee that the practice has prevailed in this Colony for some time past of charging for Bills of Health

* *

on a varying scale from five ($5) to ten ($10) dollars, the variance pre- sumably being made on account of the difference in tonnage of Steamers, "or length of voyage, or for some other reason.

According to the "Schedule published by the Government, the Committee is unable to see "where the charge for Bills of Health is recognized by the Government. No "doubt these fees are collected by the Government Officials or their subordi- "nates in virtue of their public office held under the Government, and the "Committee would be glad to know whether the Government recognizes "these charges, and the varying scale on which some of them are based, as "the Committee has been unable satisfactorily to ascertain this from any "record or returns made of fees so collected, and their application by the "Government."

3. I caused a copy of this communication from the Chamber of Commerce to be forwarded to the Colonial Surgeon (Dr. AYRES), who was requested to furnish explanations. In reply a report was received from him, in which he stated that the right of the Health Officer and himself to receive fees for the issue of Bills of Health belongs to them in their capacity as private medical practitioners.

232

4. As it appeared, however, that the Bills of Health issued bore the Royal Arms, were stamped with an official seal, and were signed by the two Officers in their official capacity, I called for a return of the fees received during the year 1883. This return showed that the fees collected by the Colonial Surgeon during that period amounted to only two hundred and forty dollars ($240), (about £48), whereas those received by the Health Officer amounted to the large sum of two thousand nine hundred and eighty dollars ($2,980), (about £596), or more than his Official salary, viz., two thousand dollars per annum ($2,000), (about £400).

5. Since this return was furnished, the use of the Royal Arms and other Official attestations has been discontinued, and the Colonial Surgeon and Health Officer claim that, as any duly qualified medical practitioner can grant Bills of Health, they are in a position exactly similar to that of any other practitioner in the Colony. However, there can be little doubt that the Official status of these two Officers has enabled them to have the monopoly of these fees, for it is alleged that the authorities at the different ports at which vessels call on their homeward voyage from this Colony would not so readily accept Bills of Health not signed by medical practitioners of recognized Official standing.

·

6. This question was brought before the Executive Council, when the follow- ing resolution was agreed to unanimously:

CC

The Council advise that a letter should be addressed to the Chairman "of the Chamber of Commerce, stating that the important question of the "fees charged for issuing Bills of Health has been fully considered by the "Governor in Council, who is of opinion that these Bills should be issued "free with the exception of a small charge to cover the Government expenses "of printing, &c. But as vested interests appear to have grown up, it is “advised that the whole question should be referred to the Secretary of State "for his decision."

7. I am unwilling without your Lordship's instructions to interfere with what

may

be now considered the vested interests of the Colonial Surgeon and the Health Officer, the fees for Bills of Health having been collected in the same manner as now during the tenure of office of their predecessors. But as the cost of Bills of Health constitutes a serious tax on shipping, I would strongly recommend that, as soon as a proper arrangement can be made to that effect, the Health Officer of this Port should issue Bills of Health at a nominal charge, and should into the Colonial Treasury.

pay the fees

8. In the case of the Colonial Surgeon, who, as has been shown, collects only a small amount each year in the way of fees for granting Bills of Health, it would not be difficult to deal with the matter at once; but, in the case of the Health Officer, owing to the large amount of fees annually received by him, an arrangement could not be so easily made. Adequate compensation to the Health Officer would be too heavy a tax on the present revenue of the Colony.

9. Under these circumstances, I have felt it to be my duty to bring the facts of the case to your notice, and to solicit instructions as to the manner in which your Lordship desires that this matter should be dealt with in future.

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF DERBY, K.G.,

&c.,

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

G. F. BOWEN.

&c.,

&c.

1

J

A

Enclosure.

233

SIR,

The Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce to the Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 19th January, 1885.

In reply to your letter of the 14th instant, requesting us to state what are the Ports which insist on a Bill of Health being produced from Hongkong, I have the honour to state, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, that Bills of Health from Hongkong are required by the following Ports, viz.:—

1. Manila, which at all times insists on the production of a Bill of Health

from Hongkong.

2. All Spanish Ports, speaking generally, require a Bill of Health from

this Port.

3. San Francisco and all United States' Ports likewise insist at all times

on Bills of Health from Hongkong.

4. All Australian Ports.

5. Mauritius. Capetown also would insist on a Bill of Health from Hongkong in the case of a steamer arriving direct from Hongkong without having called at and obtained a Bill of Health from Mauri- tius, but in the case of a steamer having called at Mauritius en route for Capetown, the latter Port is then satisfied with a Bill of Health from Mauritius alone.

6. All vessels proceeding to Europe via the Suez Canal must also be provided with Bills of Health from this Port, in order to avoid

Quarantine," which would otherwise be enforced by Egypt,

I would also state, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, that during the period of enforcement of the Quarantine Regulations here, the produc- tion of a Bill of Health from every Port within ten days' sail of this Colony was insisted upon by the Health Officer of Hongkong.

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

No. 67.

SIR,

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

W. KESWICK,

Chairman.

(2.)

The Secretary of State to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

DOWNING STREET,

20th March, 1885.

I have received your despatch, No. 36, of the 23rd of January, relative to the

fees charged for issuing Bills of Health to vessels leaving Hongkong.

934

2. I approve the action which you have taken in this matter, and the course which you propose to adopt in future. I have given my careful consideration to the question as to how the special cases of Dr. ADAMS and Dr. AYRES should be dealt with, on which you request my instructions.

3. I do not feel, however, that this is a question upon which, with the informa- tion before me, I am in a position to form any definite opinion; but I shall be prepared to sanction the grant of such a personal allowance to Dr. ADAMS as the Legislative Council may recommend, bearing in mind that, since it cannot be doubted that the number of fees which he received would have been much less had he not improperly given an official character to the Bills of Health issued by him, his compensation allowance should be calculated rather upon what his fees. might have amounted to had the Bills of Health which he issued been of a purely un-official character.-With regard to Dr. AYRES, I presume that this circumstance would not have affected his fees to the same proportionate extent.

3. I need not add that any such allowances should be personal to Dr. ADAMS and Dr. AYRES, and should not be continued to their successors.

Governor

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

DERBY.

SIR G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

& Cas

&c.,

&.c..

:

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

STATEMENT SHOWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His

REVENUE.

Amount Estimated.

Amount received in the Colony.

Amount received by the Crown Agents in England.

Total Receipts.

More than Less than Estimated. Estimated.

EXPENDITURE.

$

c.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

c.

LAND REVENUE:-

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS:-

Leased Lands,

140,000

156,136.75

156,136.75

Lands not Leased, including Stone

18,000

21,549.05

Quarries,

Fees on Grant of Leases,

300

115.00

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS:~

Markets,

61,000

62,444.54

Buildings,..

4,700-

4,647.33

::

::

21,549.05

16,136.75 3,549.05

115.00

62,444.54

185.00

The Governor,.............

Colonial Secretary,..................................

1,444.54

Auditor,

4,647.33

52,67

LICENCES:-

Treasurer,...

Spirit Retailers.

25,000

28,812.50

28,812.50

3,812.50

+

Pawnbrokers,

11,550

12,950.00

12,950.00

1,400.00

Clerk of Councils,

Auctioneers....

3,000

Tenements for Emigrants,

125

Emigration Brokers,

1,600

2,750.00 178.30 1,400.00

2,750.00

250.00

...

178.30 1,400.00

53.30

Surveyor General,

200.00

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys,

700

750.00

...

Opium,

240,000

113,826.13

...

750.00 113,826.13

50.00

Postmaster General,..

...

126,173.87

Boarding Houses,

175

220.83

220.83

45.83

Registrar General,

Marriage,..

300

319.00

319.00

19.00

Chinese Undertakers,

90

100.00

100.00

10.00

***

Harbour Master.........................

Money Changers,

Marine Store Dealers,

Spirit Distillers,

TAXES:-

750

720.00

...

1,000

1,095.00

410

300.00

720.00 1,095.00 300.00

30.00

...

95.00

Lighthouses,

110.00

Observatory,

Stamps,

150,000

136,393.14

Municipal Rates,

249,600

263.988.56

POSTAGE,

105,000

117,352.01

136,393.14 263,988.56

14,388.56

117,352.01 12,352.01

...

13,606.86

FINES, FORFEITURES & FEES OF COURT:

Collector of Stamp Revenu

Government Gardens & Pla

Fines,

6,500

13,774.97

13,774.97

7,274.97

Forfeitures,

600

Fees,

8,000

1,370.83 10,392.14

1,370.83

10,392.14

770.83 2,392.14

FEES OF OFFICE:-

Judicial Departments,....

Ecclesiastical Department,

***

On Cemetery Burials,

500

755.75

755.75

255.75

Licences for Junks, &c.,

20,000

19,397.25

19,397.25

...

602.75 Educational

do.,

Registry of Boats,

3,000

3,011.41

Do.

of Cargo Boats and Crew,

3,200

3,467.48

3,011.41 3,467.48

11.41

267.48

Medical

do.,

:

:

Do.

of Hawkers,.....

3,500

3,710.00

Cargo Boat Certificates,

600

625.00

Registration of Householders,

2,100

Do.

of Servants, &c.,

85

1,354.75

65.50

...

3,710.00 625.00 1,354.75 65.50

210.00

25.00

Police Magistrates' do.,

..

745.25

***

...

19.50 Police

do.,

:

Official Signatures,..

80

178.00

178.00

98.00

Registration of Deeds,

4,000

4,134,50

4,134.50

134.50

Gaol

do.,

:

Shipping Seamen,..

9,000

9,253,00

9,253.00

253.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,500

1,620.00

1,620.00

120.00

***

Survey of Steam Ships, &c.,.

9,000

.9,590.00

9,590.00

590.00

Colonial Registers,.

5

Registry Fees, &c., (Mer. Shipping Act),

300

620.00

620.00

320.00

Do.,

of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

4,500

Registration of Companies,

600

4,013.72 427.44

4,013.72

...

Fire Brigade

5.00 Pensions, Retired Allowances &

486.28 Charitable Allowances,

do.,

427.44

172.56

...

Medical Fees on Examination of

Emigrants,

15,000

14,574.75

Registration of Births, &c.,.

40

Light Dues,

25,000

63.30 24,356.17

14,574.75

63.30 24,356.17

425.25

Transport,

...

23.30

Works and Buildings,

643.83

Licences for Steam Launches,..

150

242.50

242.50

92.50

Surveyor's Cert. for Steam Launches,...

400

530.00

530.00

130.00

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c., Į

1,400

Commission,

2,710.58

2,710.58

1,310.58

Registration of Trade Marks,

50

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

500

725.00 445.00

172.39

Medical Registration Fees,

90.00

897.39 445.00 90.00

847.39

55.00

90.00

SALE OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY:—

Condemned Stores, &c.,......

500

2,470.85

2,470.85 1,970.85

REIMBURSEMENTS:-

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,.

600

837.24

Subsistence Money of Seamen, and

150

370.84

others, in Victoria Gaol,.

Medical treatment of sick Seamen,

and others, in Civil Hospital,

7,000

6,130.53

Convict labour and other items,

2,000

2,086.31

Sale of Printed Forms,

1,000

1.330.25

Recovered from Diplomatic, Naval

and Military Departments, on account of Gaol Expenses, Contribution from Imperial Post Office.

1,200

677.73

3.888

3.888.00

:

:

:

:

837.24

370.81

237.24

220.84

Do. Extraordinary (Tai-tam, Sanitary

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

Miscellaneous Services,

Land and Houses Purchased,..

Military Expenditure,...............................

Colonial Defence, (Fortificati

6,130.53

869.47

2,086.31

86.31

1,330.25 330.25

677.73

522.27

3,$88.00

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

OWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS IN THE YEAR 1884.

gislative

Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 22.

t

by Total n Receipts.

More than Less than Estimated. Estimated.

EXPENDITURE.

Amount Estimated.

Amount paid in the Colony.

Amount paid by Crown Agents in England.

Total

More than Less than Payments.Estimated. Estimated.

c.

$

C.

C.

C.

$ c.

$

C.

C. $ C.

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS:-

156,136.75 16,136.75

21,549.05 3,549.05

The Governor,..........

33,958

33,320.37

33,320.37

637.63

115.00

185.00

Colonial Secretary.............

25,616

25,031,17

271.19

25,302.36

313.61

62,444.54 1,444.54

Auditor,

4,647,33

52.67

Treasurer,...

28,812.50

12,950.00

2,750.00

178.30

1,400.00 750.00

113,826.13

220.83

3,812.50 1,400.00

...

53.30

...

50.00

...

..

444

Clerk of Councils,

250.00

Surveyor General,

200.00

Postmaster General,..

126,173.87

45.83

Registrar General,

319.00

19.00

100.00

10.00

...

Harbour Master,.....

720.00

30.00

***

1,095.00

95.00

Lighthouses,

300.00

110.00

Observatory,

136,393.14

13,606.86

263,988.56 14,388.56

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

117,352.01 12,352.01

Government Gardens & Plantations,

13,774.97

7,274.97

1,370.83

770.83

Judicial Departments,...

10,392.14

2,392.14

Ecclesiastical Department,

5,958 5,918.72

20,622 18,772,82

1,060 1,087.41

53,553 53,568.99 1,048.85

153,128 120,549.71| 12,271.28

22,097 21,308,50 495.77

53,198 48,562,33 2,410.14

7,508 4,351.47 895.73

5,796 5,430,29 254.40

4,702 4,542.11 334.92

22,690 21,207.51 528.93

63,105 58,578.04 4,615.48

5,498 6,214.75

5,918.72

39.28

63.93

18,836.75

1,785.25

1,087,41

54,617.84 1,064.84

132,820.99

27.41

21,804.27

50,972,47

5,247.20

:

:

20,307,01

292.73

2,225.53

2,260.80

5,684.69

111.31

4,877.03 175.03

21,736,44

63,193.52

953.56

88.52

6,214.75

716,75

755.75 19,397.25 3,011.41

255.75

...

602.75 Educational

do.,

44,619

40,893.74 704.02

41,597,76

3,021.24

11.41

3,467.48

267.48

Medical

do.,

34,234

29,358.18 2,275.18

31,633.36

2,600.64

3,710,00

210.00

625.00

25,00

Police Magistrates' do.,

1,354.75

745.25

65.50

19.50 Police

do.,

178.00

98.00

4,134.50

134,50

Gaol

do.,

9,253.00

253.00

1,620.00 120.00 9,590.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

590,00

5.00 Pensions, Retired Allowances & Gratuities

620.00

320.00

4,013.72

486.28 Charitable Allowances,

4,000

20,149 16,304.36 2,628.96

191,848 173,692.86 42,869.69

48,504 46,241.58 1,348.49

15,406 12,367.42 2,500.73

26,000 13,820.34 20.112.12

2,855.18

18,933.32

1,215.68

216,562,55 24,714,55

47,590.07

14,868.15

913.93

537.85

33,932.46 7,932.46

2,855.18

1,144.82

427.44

172.56

14,574.75

63.30

24,356.17 242.50

530.00

...

425,25

Transport,

23.30

Works and Buildings,

643.83

92.50 130.00

Do. Extraordinary (Tai-tam, Sanitary Works, &c.,)

272,000

4,500 2,651.11 2,547.38

117,500 119,493.61 17,980.14

245,753.06 91,545.92

5,198.49 698.49

137,473.75 19,973.75

337,298.98 65,298.98

2,710.58

1,310.58

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

41,500

50,520.54 3,780.33

54,300.87 | 12,800.87

9

897.39 445.00 90.00

847.39

Miscellaneous Services,

53,997

74,468.38 9,952.58

84,420.96 | 30,423.96

55,00

90,00

Land and Houses Purchased,......

2,598.90

2,598,90 2,598.90

2,470.85 1,970.85

Military Expenditure,..........

112,745

111,034.14

111,034.14

1,710.86

837.24

237.24

370.84

220.84

6,130.53

869.47

2,086.31

1,330.25

$6.31 330,25

677.73

522.27

::

Colonial Defence, (Fortification),.........................

3,464.64

3,464.64 3,464.61

3,888.00

:

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS:—

Markets,

Buildings,.

LICENCES:-

Spirit Retailers,

Pawnbrokers,

Auctioneers,..

Tenements for Emigrants,

Emigration Brokers,

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys,

Opium,

Boarding Houses,

Marriage,

61,000

4,700-

62,444.54

4,647.33

62,444,54 1,414.54

4,647,33

Auditor,

52.67

Treasurer,....

25,000 28,812.50

11,550

12,950.00

28,812,50 3,812.50 12,950.00

1,400.00

Clerk of Councils,

3,000

2,750.00

2,750.00

250.00

125

1,600

178.30 1,400.00

178.30

53.30

Surveyor General,

1,400.00

200.00

700

750.00

750.00

50.00

Postmaster General,.

240,000

113,826.13

113,826.13

126,173.87

175

220.83

220.83

45.83

Registrar General,

300

319.00

319.00

19.00

Chinese Undertakers,

Money Changers,

Marine Store Dealers,

Spirit Distillers,

TAXES:-

90

100.00

100.00

10.00

Harbour Master,.

750

720.00

720.00

30.00

1,000

1,095.00

1,095.00

95.00

Lighthouses,

410

300.00

300.00

110.00

Observatory,

Stamps,..

Municipal Rates,

POSTAGE,

FINES, FORFEITURES & FEES OF COURT:

105,000

150,000 136,393.14 249,600 263.988.56 117,352.01

136,393.14

13,606.86

263,988.56 14,388.56

A

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

117,352.01| 12,352.01

***

Government Gardens & Plantatio

Fines,

Forfeitures,

6,500 600

13,774.97

13,774.97

1,370.83

1,370.83

Fees,

8,000

10,392.14

10,392.14

7,274.97 770.83 2,392.14

Judicial Departments,............

FEES OF OFFICE:-

Ecclesiastical

Department,

On Cemetery Burials,

500

755.75

755.75

255.75

Licences for Junks, &c.,

20,000

19,397.25

19,397.25

602.75 | Educational

do.,

Registry of Boats,

3,000

2,011.41

3,011.41

11.41

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crew,

3,200

3,467.48

3,467.48

267.48

Medical

do.,

Do. of Hawkers,..

3,500

3,710.00

...

3,710,00

210.00

Cargo Boat Certificates,

600

625.00

625.00

25.00

Police Magistrates' do.,

Registration of Householders,

2,100

1,354.75

1,354.75

745.25

Do. of Servants, &C.,

85

65.50

65.50

19.50 Police

Official Signatures,..

80

178.00

178.00

98.00

Registration of Deeds,

4,000

4,134.50

4,134,50

134.50

Gaol

Shipping Seamen,.

9,000

9,253.00

9,253.00

253.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,500

1,620.00

1,620.00

120.00

Survey of Steam Ships, &c.,

9,000

.9,590.00

9,590.00

590.00

Colonial Registers,,

5

Do., of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

Registry Fees, &c., (Mer. Shipping Act),

Registration of Companies,

300

4,500

620.00 4,013.72

620.00

320.00

4,013.72

Fire Brigade

5.00 Pensions, Retired Allowances & Gratui

486.28 Charitable Allowances,

do.,

do.,

do.,

600

427.44

427.44

172.56

Medical Fees on Examination of)

Emigrants,

15,000

14,574.75

14,574.75

425.25

Transport,

Registration of Births, &c.,.

40

Light Dues,

25,000

63.30 24,356.17

63.30

23.30

Works and Buildings,

24,356.17

643.83

Licences for Steam Launches,.

150

242.50

242.50

92.50

Do. Extraordinary (Tai-tam, Sanitary Works,

+

Surveyor's Cert. for Steam Launches,..

400

530.00

530.00

130.00

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c., Į

Commission,

1,400

2,710.58

2,710.58

1,310.58

Registration of Trade Marks,

50

725.00

172,39

897.39

847.39

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

500

445.00

445.00

55.00

Medical Registration Fees,

90.00

90.00

90.00

SALE OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY:—

Condemned Stores, &C.,...................

500

2,470.85

2,470.85

1,970.85

REIMBURSEMENTS:-

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,..

600

837.24

837.21

237.24

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

Miscellaneous Services,

Land and Houses Purchased,.......................

Military Expenditure,.........

Colonial Defence, (Fortification),...........

Subsistence Money of Seamen, and

150

370.84

370.84

220.84

others, in Victoria Gaol,

Medical treatment of sick Seamen,

and others, in Civil Hospital,

7,000

6,130.53

6,130.53

869.47

Convict labour and other items,

2,000

2,086.31

2,086.31

86.31

Sale of Printed Forms,

1,000

1.330.25

1,330.25 330.25

Recovered from Diplomatic, Naval

and Military Departments, on account of Gaol Expenses,

1,200

677.73

677.73

522.27

Contribution from Imperial Post Office,

3,888

3,888.00

Sale of Chinese Gazette,

105.00

3,$88.00 105.00

105.00

Interest for use of Furniture at l

250

Government House,

250.00

...

Fees from Scholars at Central School,

4,100

4,981.00

4,981.00 881.00

INTEREST,

40,000

22,211.95 14,750.48

36,962.43

3,037.57

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

Storage of Gunpowder,.

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

TOTAL Colonial Revenue,......$

RECEIPTS.

15,000

12,539.77 5,000 42,971.96

1,213,598 1,158,148.61

12,539.77

2,460.23

42,971.96 37,971.96

14,922.87 1,173,071.48 110,376.84 | 150,903.36

TOTAL Colonial Expenditure,..

PAYMENTS.

Deposits Available, Premia on Land Sales,.

Other Deposits,

$ 19,695.00 687,500.00

Deposits not available,

707,195.00

8,031.99

707,195.00

2,704.23

10,736.22

Advance Account,

31,469.78

72,441.55

103,911,33

Family Remittances,

33,222.79

33,222.79

Subsidiary Coins,

220,000.00

220,000.00

Money Order Account,

30,840.08

30,840.08

Exchange Account,

3,920.23

Crown Agents,

Investment by Crown Agents,

Balance, 1st January, 1884,

32,883.38

516,865.82

55,773.83

***

TOTAL,..........

3,920.23 32,883.38 516,865.82 55,773.83

2,248,602.31639,817.85| 2,888,420.16

Deposits Available,

Deposits not Available,..

Advance Account, Family Remittances, Subsidiary Coins, Money Order Account, Kaulung Sea Wall, Crown Agents,

Balance, 31st December, 188

TOTAL,.

A. F. ALVES,

Examined.

W. II. MARS

Accountant.

Auditor

Treasury, Hongkong, 17th April, 1885.

62,444.54 1,444.54

4,647,33

28,812.50 3,812.50

Auditor,

5,958 5,918.72

5,918.72

39.28

52.67

Treasurer,..

12.950.00

1,400.00

Clerk of Councils,

20,622 18,772.82

1,060 1,087.41

63.93

18,836.75

1.785.25

1,087.41

27.41

2,750.00

250.00

178.30

1,400.00 750.00

53.30

Surveyor General,

53,553 53,568.99 1,048.85 51,617.81 1,064.84

200.00

...

50.00

Postmaster General,.

153,128 120,549.71 12,271,28

132,820.99

20,307.01

113,826.13

126,173.87

220.83

45.83

Registrar General,

22,097 21,308,50 495.77 21,804.27

202.73

319.00

19.00

100.00

10.00

Harbour Master,...

720.00

...

30.00

1,095.00 300.00

95.00

Lighthouses,

53,199

7,508

48,562.33 2,410.14

50,972.47

2,225.53

4,351.47 895.73

5,247.20

2,260.80

110.00

...

Observatory,

5,796

5,430.29 254.40 5,684.69

111.31

136,393.14

13,606.86

263,988.56 14,388.56

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

4,702 4,542.11 334.92 4,877.03 175.03

117,352.01 12,352.01

Government Gardens & Plantations,

22,690 21,207,51 528.93 21,736.44

953.56

13,774.97

7,274.97

1,370.83

770.83

Judicial Departments,.....

63,105

58,578.04 4,615,48

63,193.52

88.52

10,392.14

755.75

19,397.25

2,392.14

Ecclesiastical Department,

5,498

6,214.75

6,214.75

716.75

255,75

...

602.75 Educational

do.,

44,619

40,893.74 704.02

41,597,76

3,021.21

3,011.41

11.41

3,467.48

267.48

Medical

do.,

34,234

29,358,18 2,275.18

31,633.36

2,600.64

3,710.00

210.00

625.00

1,354.75

65,50

25,00

Police Magistrates' do.,

20,149

4.

745.25

19.50 Police

do.,

191,848

178.00

98.00

4,134,50 134.50

Gaol

...

do.,

48,504

16,304,36 2,628.96

173,692.86 42,869.69

46,241.58 1,348.49

18,933.32

1,215.63

216,562.55 | 24,714.55

47,590.07

913.93

9,253,00

1,620,00

253.00 120.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

15,406

12,367.42 2,500.73

14,868.15

537.85

9,590,00 590.00

5.00 Pensions, Retired Allowances & Gratuities)

26,000

13,820.34 20,112,12

620,00

320.00

4,013.72

427.44

14,574,75

63.30

24,356.17 242.50

...

486.28 Charitable Allowances,

4,000

2,855.18

33,932.46 7,932,46

2,855.18

1,144,82

172.56

425.25

Transport,

4,500

23.30

Works and Buildings,

117,500

2,651.11 2,547.38

119,493.61 17,980.14

5,198.49 698.49

137,473.75 | 19,973.75

643.83

92.50

Do. Extraordinary (Tai-tam, Sanitary Worka, &c.,)

272,000

245,753.06 | 91,545.92

337,298.98 65,298.98

530,00

130.00

2,710.58

1,310.58

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

41,500

50,520.54 3,780.33

54,300.87 12,800.87

897.39

847.39

Miscellaneous Services,

53,997

74,468.38 9,952.58

84,420.96 | 30,423.96

445.00

55.00

90.00

90.00

Land and Houses Purchased,...

2,598.90

2,598.90 2,598.90

2,470.85 1,970.85

837.24

237.24

Military Expenditure,...................

Colonial Defence, (Fortification),..................

112,745 111,034.14

111,034.14

1,710.86

:

3,464.64

3,464.64 3,461.64

370.81 220.84

6,130.53

869.47

2,086,31

1,330.25

86.31 330.25

677.73

522.27

3,888.00

105.00

105.00

250.00

4,981.00 881,00

36,962.43

3,037.57

12,539,77

2,460.23

42,971.96 37,971.96

1,173,071.48 110,376.84 150,903.36

TOTAL Colonial Expenditure,...$ 1,465,491 1,373,962.23 | 221,436.16| 1,595,398.39 | 169,979.15 40,071.76

PAYMENTS.

707,195.00

10,736.22 103,911.33

33,222,79 220,000.00 30,840.08

3,920.23 32,883.38 516,865.82

55,773.83

2,888,120.16

Deposits Available,

Deposits not Available,.

Advance Account,

Family Remittances, Subsidiary Coins,

Money Order Account,

Kaulung Sea Wall,

Crown Agents,

Balance, 31st December, 1884, .

TOTAL,......

320,000.00

320,000.00

16,711,79

16,711.79

92,755.05

1,012.63

93,767.68

38,779.22

38,779.22

20,890.67 | 230,343.07

251,233.74

22,896.61

22,896.61

2,007.85

2,007.85

241,342.69 | 125,350.16 180,932.03

366,692.85

180,932.03

.$ 2,248,602.31 | 639,817.85 | 2,888,420,16

ALVES, Accountant.

Examined.

W. II. MARSH,

Auditor General,

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

REVENUE.

LAND REVENUE :-

Leased Lands,

not leased,.

Stone Quarries,

1883.

$ 143,817.46

C.

2,594.91

23,600.00

450.00

59,024.35

7,253.00

28,660.00

11,725.00

Auctioneers,

.....

3,000.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

140.00

Emigration Brokers,

1,600.00

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys,

710.00

Opium,

216,449.95

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COI

Lands occupied by Chinese Villagers, Squatters, &e., Į

Fees on Grant of Leases,

RENTS EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS

Markets,

Buildings,

LICENCES:-

Spirit Retailers,

Pawnbrokers,

1881.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

2,605.67

...

250.00

...

EXPENDITU

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS :-

The Governor,... Colonial Secretary, Auditor,... Treasurer, Clerk of Councils,

Surveyor General,.

Postmaster General,

Registrar General, Harbour Master,..

Lighthouses,......

Observatory,.............................................................. Collector of Stamp Revenue,.. Government Gardens and Plan

do.,

$ 156,136.75

C.

$ C. $ C. 12.319.29

1,949.05

...

19,600.00

115.00

6±5.86

4,000.00 335.00

62,444.54

3,420.19

4,647.33

28,812.50

12,950.00

152.50 1,225.00

2,750.00

178.30

58.30

1.400.00

200.00

750.00

40.00

Judicial

Department,

113,826.13

132,623.82

Ecclesiastical

Boarding Houses,

150.00

220.83

70.83

Educational

Marriage,..

369.00

319.00

50.00

Medical

Chinese Undertakers,.

100.00

100.00

...

Money Changers,......

Marine Store Dealers,..

Spirit Distillers,

TAXES:-

Stamps,

Municipal Rates,

POSTAGE,

FINES, FORFEITURES AND FEES OF COURTS :-

Fines,..

258,613.84 263,988.56 5,374.72 107,275.91 117,352.01 10,076.10

750,00

720.00

30.00

Police

960.00

1,095.00

210.00

300.00

135.00 90.00

Gaol

153,329.88

136,393.14

16,936.74

Police Magistrates' do.,

Fire Brigade

Pensions, Retired Allowances and Charitable Allowances,

Transport...

Works and Buildings,

Do.,

Extraordinary,

Roads, Streets and Bridges, Miscellaneous Services,

............

3,455.03 | Land and Houses Purchased,...

Military Expenditure, Colonial Defence (Fortification),

do.,

...

do.,

******

do.,

do.,

do.,

10,247.35

13,774.97

Forfeitures,.

1,109.54

1,370.83

3,527,62 261.29

Fees,

13,817,17

10,392.11

FEES OF OFFICE:-

On Cemetery Burials,

613.75

755.75

Licences for Junks, &c.,.........

18,768.25

19,397.25

142.00 629.00

...

Registry of Boats,.

3,050.27

3,011.41

38.86

Do.

Do.

of Cargo Boats and Crew,.... of Hawkers,

3,409.99

3,467.48

57.49

3,715.50

3,710.00

5.50

Cargo Boat Certificates,...

612.00

625.00

13.00

Registration of Householders,

1,925.25

1,354.75

...

Do. of Servants, &C.,

75.50

65.50

570.50 10.00

Official Signatures,.

175.50

178.00

Registration of Deeds,

4,093.75

4,131.50

2.50 40.75

Shipping Seamen,..

9,223.00

9,253.00

30.00

..

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,280.00

1,620.00

310.00

...

Survey of Steam-ships, &c.,..

9,316.50

9,590.00

273,50

Colonial Registers,

1.00

Registry Fees, &c., (Merchant Shipping Act),.

640.00

Registry of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

4,909.02

,620.00 4,013.72

...

1.00 20.00 895.30

Registration of Companies,.

1,481.25

427.44

1,053.81

Medical Fees on Examination of Emigrants,

15,691.00

14,574.75

1,116.25

Registration of Births, &c.,.

49.20

63.30

14.10

Light Dues,

24,714.32

24,356.17

358.15

...

Licences, &c., for Steam-launches,

720.00

772.50

52.50

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c., Commission,

3,016.32

2,710.58

305.74

Registration of Trade Marks,..

137.15

.897.39

760.24

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

525,00

445.00

80.00

Medical Registration Fees,.

90.00

90.00

Sale of Government Property,

888.26

2,470.85

1,582.59

...

Reimbursements

Interest,

Miscellaneous Receipts,

24,443.23

20,406.90

4,036.33

52,194.89 36,962.43

15,232.46

27,791.03 55,511.73

27,720.70

1,289,448.29 1,173,071,48

68,479.21

184,856.02

Deduct Increase,

..$

68,479.21

Nett Decrease,

116,376.81

Treasury, Hongkong, 17th April, 1885.

A. F. ALVES,

Accountant.

Examin

'HE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1883 & 1884.

1881.

$ C. 6,136.75

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITURE,

1883.

1881.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

$ C. 12.319.29

$ c.

$

c.

$ c.

C.

C.

1,949.05

.9,600.00

615.86

4,000.00

115.00

335.00

2,414.54 4,647.33

3,420.19

2,605,67

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS :-

The Governor,.......

Colonial Secretary, Auditor,....... Treasurer, Clerk of Councils, Surveyor General,. Postmaster General,

Registrar General,..

33,828.32

33,320.37

507.95

23,045.81

25,302.36

2,256,52

29,565.73

5,918.72

23,647.01

16,550.76

18,836.75

2,285.99

1,062.03

1,087.41

25.38

44,261.96

54,617.84

10,355.8S

78,649.72

132,820.99

54,171.27

22,921,55

21,801.27

1,117.28

£8,812.50

152.50

Harbour Master,...

45,085.36 50,972.47

5,887.11

.2,950.00

1,225.00

Lighthouses,.........

5,293.21

5,217.20

46.01

2,750.00

250.00

Observatory,..

2,739.50

5,681.69

2,945.19

178.30

1.400.00 750.00

38.30

Collector of Stamp Revenue,..

4,478.76

4,877.03

398.27

200.00

...

Government Gardens and Plantations,

22,091.70

21,736.41

355.26

40.00

Judicial Department,

57,553.52

63,193.52

5,640.00

.3,826.13

132,623.82

Ecclesiastical

do.,

5,496.50

6,214.75

718.25

220.83

70.83

Educational

do.,

47,316.72

41,597.76

5,748.96

319.00

50.00

Medical

do.,

39,883.37

31,633.36

8,250.01

100.00

Police Magistrates' do.,

18,190.25

18,933.32

743.07

720.00

30.00

Police

do.,

185,951.47

216,562.55

30,611.08

1,095.00

135.00

Gaol

do.,

46,067.48

47,590.07

1,522.59

300.00

90.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

21,068.05

14,868.15

6,199.90

Pensions, Retired Allowances and Gratuities,

28,968.16

33,932.46

4,964.30

6,393.14

16,936.74

Charitable Allowances,

3,229.99

2,855,18

374.81

3,988.56

5,374.72

Transport......

3,503.79

5,198.49

1,694.70

...

.7,352,01 10,076.10

Works and Buildings,

101,263.33

137,473.75

36,210.42

...

Do.,

Extraordinary, (Taitam, Sanitary Works, &c.,)

180,052.10

337,298.98 157,246.88

3,774.97

3,527.62

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

69,695.22

54,300.87

15,391.35

1,370.83

261.29

Miscellaneous Services,

54,492.76

84,420.96 29,928.20

0,392.11

3,455.03

Land and Houses Purchased,.

38,000.00

2,598.90

35,401.10

755.75

142.00

Military Expenditure,

Colonial Defence (Fortification),

111,962.09

111,034.14

927.95

3,464.64 3,461.61

.9,397.25

629.00

3,011.41

38.86

3,467.48

57.49

3,710.00

5.50

625.00

13.00

1,354.75

570.50

63.50

10.00

178.00

2.50

4,134.50

40.75

9,253.00

30.00

1,620.00

340.00

9,590.00

273.50

1.00

620.00

20.00

4,013.72

895.30

427.44

1,053.81

4,574.75

1,116.25

63.30

14.10

24,356.17

358.15

772.50

52.50

2,710.58

305.74

.897.39

760.24

445.00

80,00

90.00

2,470.85

90.00 1,582.59

and

20,406.90

36,962.43

4,036.33 15,232.46

55,511.73

27,720.70

73,071,48

68,479.21

184,856.02

68,479.21

116,376.81

A. F. ALVES,

Accountant.

Nett Increase,

Examined,

. W. H. MARSH,

Auditor General.

Deduct Decrease,

1,342,299.24 1,595,398.39 351,069.74 97,970.59

97,970.59

253,099.15

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

1.

;

No. 23.

Report on the Accounts of Receipts and Expenditure for the Year 1884,

BY THE

Colonial Secretary and Auditor General.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

237

RECEIPTS.

1. In a report made by me on 10th November last, I estimated that the Revenue for the year 1884, which had been originally calculated at $1,213,598, would not exceed $1,151,000.

The accounts for that year have now been closed and the Revenue actually received proves to have been $1,173,071 or $22,071 in excess of my revised Estimate. Besides this amount the sum of $19,695 has been collected for premia on sales of land.

2. The items which exhibit the most considerable falling off, as compared with the original Esti- mates, are the following:-

1. Licences,

2. Stamps,

3. Interest,

.....

4. Storage of Gunpowder,

$126,174 less than estimated.

13,607

3,037 2,460

"1

""

""

On the other hand, excesses over the original Estimates will be seen in a number of items, the most important of which, are:-

5. Miscellaneous receipts,

6. Rents of Land,

7. Municipal Rates,

8. Postage,

9. Fines,

10. Spirit Licences,

11. Fees,

·

$ 37,972 more than estimated.

16,137 14,389

""

23.

22

12,352

22

7,275

39.

"}

3,812 2,392

}}

21.

""

25

}

3. The principal falling off in the Revenue of 1884 has been under the head of Opium Licences (No. 1), owing mainly to the San Francisco market for this drug having been largely overstocked during the year 1883, in anticipation of a considerable increase in the Import duty which the Govern- ment of California had announced its intention of imposing. The restrictions imposed on the immigra- tion of Chinese by the Governments of the United States and of the Australian Provinces have also, to some extent, affected the demand for Opium. Macao has also competed with Hongkong in the supply of prepared Opium for exportation.

4. The next item of importance on the list of Receipts which have fallen short of Estimates is Stamps (No. 2). The serious interruption of business caused by the prolonged hostilities between France and China accounts for the reductions shewn under this head. Light Dues and Junk Licences also shew a falling off, though they have not been affected to the same extent.

The withdrawal of part

of the accumulated balances which are being employed on important Public Works, now in progress, explains the smaller amount received for interest (No. 3); and the falling off on receipts for Storage of Gunpowder (No. 4) is owing to the imports of that article having been allowed to remain for a com- paratively short time in the Stores.

238

5. A considerable portion of the excess shewn under the head of Miscellaneous Receipts (No. 5) has been derived from profit on subsidiary coins, for which a constant demand exists, owing to the large quantity that is taken away from the Colony into the neighbouring Chinese provinces. The remaining portion of the excess results from the new contract for removal of excretal matter which had not been entered into when the Estimates were framed.

6. The increases shewn for Rents of Lands and Municipal Rates, (No. 6) and (No. 7), are due to sales of land and the construction of more houses. The large increase of Postage (No. 8) is derived almost entirely from Chinese letters to California which were formerly sent irregularly by the hands of passengers instead of through the Post Office. The Authorities at San Francisco having seized some thousands of these letters, it is believed that the irregularity has now been effectually put a stop Fines and Fees of Courts, (No. 9) and (No. 11), are items which never can be estimated beforehand with any accuracy.

EXPENDITURE.

7. The Expenditure of the year 1884 was originally estimated :-

the ordinary expenditure at,

and the extraordinary expenditure at,

$1,193,491

272,000

$1,465,491

A revised estimate, made in November last, shewed that, as far as could then be ascertained, it

would probably be:--

Ordinary Expenditure,

Extra ordinary, Taitam,

Sanitary Works, Fortifications,

.$1,183,600

$150,000

177,180

50,000

377,180

$1,560,780

The actual expenditure as shewn by the accounts now made up has been :-

Ordinary,

. $1,254,634

Extra ordinary, Taitam,

Sanitary, Fortifications,

$173,424 163,874

3,465

340,763

$1,595,397

The items in which the original Estimates have been most considerably exceeded are the follow-

ing:-

a. Extraordinary Public Works,

excess $65,298

b. Miscellaneous Services,

c. Police,

d. Works and Buildings,

30,424

""

""

24,714

19,973

>>

e. Roads, Streets, and Bridges,

12,800

"}

f. Pensions,

7,932

g. Lands and Houses purchased,

2,599

8. The original Estimates of Extraordinary Works comprised Taitam Water Works $100,000,

and Sanitary Works $172,000.

;

239

The sums expended on these items have been: Taitam Water Works $173,424, and Sanitary Works $163,874, total $337,298. The large excess over the estimates for Taitam Water Works is due mainly to the greater depth to which the foundations of the dam have been carried down, entailing the use of more cement than was originally calculated, and to the purchase of additional boring machinery for the tunnel.

The total expenditure on these works, to the 31st December last, has been $297,693. The total expenditure on extraordinary Sanitary Works, to the same date, has been $214,143.

9. Under the head Miscellaneous (b.) the excess is composed, 1st of the payment of $20,700 to the Contractor for scavenging the Town for which no provision had been made in the Estimates. As this sum is nearly counterbalanced by receipts from the Contractor for the removal of excretal matters, which were also not provided in the Estimates of Revenue, this excess is more a matter of account than a substantial increase of expenditure. The remainder of the excess is made up of the grants to the City Hall, and to the Po Leung Kuk, extra printing, and other work.

ابع

10. The large excess under the head of Police (c.) has been caused by the supply of new Carbines and Ammunition to the Force; extra outlay in clothing and accoutrements; and the expenses entailed by the destruction by Fire of the floating Water Police Station.

11. Supplementary votes taken for the Observatory, the new Water Police Station; the Sea Wall at Lápsápwán; Pumps, &c., &c., account for the increase under Public Works (d.); and similar votes for works at Causeway Bay; for improvements at Shaukiwán; for Roads near the Mahomedan Ceme- tery to open out new building sites which will be offered for sale; have caused the excess on Roads, Streets, and Bridges (e.).

12. Under the head of Pensions (f.) the excess over Estimates is owing to arrears for 1883 having been paid at home in 1884. Lands and Houses purchased (g.) were not estimated as the necessity for their resumption could not be foreseen.

13. The annexed statement shows that the balance of Assets on 31st December last, originally estimated at $659,250, was actually

There is no reason, I think, to anticipate any, falling off in the revised estimates of Revenue which were sent home in January last, and which amounted to

Further may be added for balances which have remained for a long time unclaimed and which will be transferred to the credit of the Colony under authority of Ordinance 7 of 1885, about

.$ 729,562

1,137,558

Total,.......

Deducting from this amount the estimated expenditure of 1885, viz. :--

Ordinary Expenditure,

Extraordinary Expenditure,

Total,.....

20,000

.$1,887,120

.$1,092,981

594,700

$1,687,681

There will remain on the 31st December next, as far as it now possible to foresee, a balance of Assets of ...

..$ 199,439

The accounts now submitted do not correspond with those published in the Blue Book for 1884 which were incomplete as they included the Crown Agents accounts up to 30th September only. Their accounts for the last quarter of the year could not then be included as they had not been classified.

W. H. MARSH, Colonial Secretary and Auditor General.

Audit Office, Hongkong, 28th April, 1885.

241

No. 24.

HONGKONG.

Educational Reports for 1884.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

Report by the Inspector of Schools.

EDUCATION Department, HONGKONG, 25th February, 1885.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith the Annual Report on Education, and the Blue Book Returns for the

year 1884.

2. The total number of Schools, subject to supervision by the Government, amounted in the year 1884 to 90, as compared with 50 in 1879, and 39 in the year 1874. The total number of scholars enrolled, during the year 1884, in Schools subject to supervision and annual examination by the Government, amounted to 5,885, as compared with 3,460 enrolled in 1879, and 2,563 enrolled in the year 1874. There are now 51 more Schools and 3,322 more scholars under Government supervision than there were ten years ago. It appears therefore that both the number of Schools under Govern- ment supervision in the Colony and the number of scholars attending such Schools have been doubled within the last ten years.

3. The number of children attending Schools in the Colony is steadily increasing from year to year in the Grant-in-Aid Schools. There is at present no increase of attendance observable in the Government Schools, but an annual decrease, because, in the case of the Anglo-Chinese Schools kept by the Government, all available space is already overcrowded, and, in the case of those Government Schools which give purely Chinese teaching, the teaching given in the Government Schools is less appreciated by the people than that given in the Grant-in-Aid Schools, where the bonus allowed to the teacher acts as a powerful stimulant upon the efficiency of the teaching. But when once the long- expected new Victoria College buildings are completed, and the Government Central School moved into them, the matter of attendance will resume its normal development so far as Anglo-Chinese Schools are concerned.

4. Of the above mentioned 5,885 children in Schools under Government supervision, as many as 3,907 children were placed by their parents in denominational Grant-in-Aid Schools where they receive a Christian education, whilst 1,978 attended the secular Government Schools. Of the latter, 558 attended the Government Central School, 975 attended other Government Schools in town and in the villages, and 445 attended the Aided Schools in the villages.

5. Comparing the number of scholars in town and in the villages with the population, it appears that out of a population of 106,398 people in town 4,616 children or 4.34 per cent. attended Schools under Government supervision, whilst in the villages, out of a population of 45,595 souls 1,269 children or 2.78 per cent. attended Schools under Government supervision. I estimate the number of children attending about 100 private Schools in town and villages, not under Government supervision, at 2,000, and therefore the total of children attending Schools of any description at 7,885. This is, perhaps, about one third of the children of school-going age living in the Colony, and about 5 per cent. of the whole population. It will be seen from Table XVI., that I estimate the number of uneducated children in the Colony at 12,115, but the estimate is not a reliable one, as there are not sufficient data to go upon. But we may safely assume that most of the children withheld from school are Chinese girls.

6. As regards the expenses incurred by the Government in 1884 in supporting Government Schools and Grant-in-Aid Schools, the following details may suffice. The Government Central School, which gives an Anglo-Chinese education and was attended last year by 558 boys (mostly Chinese), cost the Government last year $13,378.62. or $23.97 per head. Five other Government Schools, also giving an Anglo-Chinese education, and numbering 331 boys, cost the Government, in 1884, $1,900.07 or $5.74 per head. On twenty-nine other Government Schools, giving a purely Chinese education, and attended by 1,089 children, the Government spent, in 1884, $3,709.15 or $3.40 per head. The Government spent, thus, on 1875 children in 35 Government Schools, $18,987.84 or on an

242

average $10.12 per head. In addition to this expenditure incurred for Government Schools, the Govern- ment paid for the year 1884 the sum of $14,662.30 by way of Grants-in-Aid for 3,907 children educated in denominational Grant-in-Aid Schools, or $3.70 per head. Altogether, therefore, the Government spent, for the year 1884, in direct payments for the education of 5,882 children the sum of $33,650.14 or $5.71 per head. The original cost of school-buildings, the cost of repairs, and the expenses of the Inspectorate of Schools, are not included in the figures here given.

7. As to the nature of the education given in the various Schools supported or aided by the Government, there were, in 1884, as many as 2,933 children receiving a purely Chinese education in Grant-in-Aid Schools, and 1,089 children receiving the same education in Government Schools. There were 55 children receiving a Chinese education in the Chinese language, but with English in addition, and 97 children receiving a European education by the use of the Chinese language. There were, further, 822 children receiving a European education in some European language (either English or Portuguese) in Grant-in-Aid Schools and 889 children receiving an Anglo-Chinese education in Government Schools. The languages and dialects, taught in Schools under Government supervision and brought under examination, are English and Portuguese, and the Chinese language in the Punti, Hakka, and Hoklo dialects. The subjects of examination are in Chinese Schools reading, writing, repeating, composition, prosody and geography. No arithmetic is taught in purely Chinese Schools. In Schools which give a European education in the Chinese language, the foregoing subjects are taught with the exception of prosody, for which arithmetic and history are substituted, and the use of romanized writing is combined with reading and writing Chinese characters. The subjects taught in Schools which give a European or Anglo-Chinese education are (in addition to the above mentioned Chinese subjects in the case of Anglo-Chinese Schools), English (or Portuguese) reading, writing, grammar, composition, history, arithmetic, geography, physical geography, map-drawing, algebra, mensuration and Euclid. Latin and book-keeping have been added, in 1884, to the extra- subjects of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, but none of the Grant-in-Aid Schools has as yet taken advantage of these new subjects. In Girls-schools, needle-work also is taught as one of the subjects of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme.

8. The proportion of boys to girls enrolled in the Schools under Government supervision is steadily, though slowly, improving year by year. There is, indeed, but a very slight improvement visible in 1884 as compared with the preceding year, for in 1883 there were on the rolls of these Schools 4,120 boys and 1,477 girls, whilst in 1884 there were 4,294 boys and 1,488 girls in the same Schools, shewing an increase of only 174 boys and 11 girls. But the increase becomes apparent if we compare the state of things in this respect as it was 5 and 10 years ago, when the 4,294 boys and 1,488 girls attending Schools under Government supervision in 1884 compare very favourably with 2,850 boys and 610 girls enrolled in such Schools in 1879, and with 2,282 boys and 281 girls enrolled in 1874. It appears, therefore, that the proportion of girls to boys was 1 to 8 in 1874, 1 to 4 in 1879 and 1 to 3 in 1884. But as there are hardly more than 200 girls attending Schools in the Colony apart from the above mentioned Schools under the supervision of the Government, so that the above given figures virtually cover the whole area of female education in the Colony, and as the proportion of male and female children appears from the census to be about equal, it is evident that there is much room for improvement left.

9. The results of the teaching given in Schools under Government supervision, as ascertained by the annual examinations, are, as far as the Central School is concerned, embodied in the Report of the Headmaster which will be found below; and, as far as other Government Schools and the Grant- in-Aid Schools are concerned, the results of the examinations are given in detail in the Tables appended to this Report. The following additional details and observations may, however, be of interest.

10. The Government Central School was examined by myself, as usual, in concert with the Headmaster who used the results of my examination for the purpose of determining the award of the annual prizes and scholarships. Of 379 boys of the Central School examined in 1884, as many as 362 passed, which gives 95.58 per cent. of passes, as compared with 96.98 per cent. obtained in 1883. There was, therefore, a very slight falling off in the total results, as compared with the previous year. The English subjects in which this diminution of results is specially apparent are the following, viz., arithmetic (especially in Classes VI, VII and VIII), dictation and algebra (in Class I, where the subjects given out were, perhaps, slightly more difficult than in former years), translation (especially in Class XI), and grammar (in Class VIII). Dictation was in 1884, as in the previous year, the weak side of Class I, where 14 failed out of 25, but the composition was rather good in Classes I, II and III. Classes II and VII specially distinguished themselves by obtaining the highest average of passes. The examination of the Chinese Classes, though not displaying such high results as the English teaching given in this School, shewed, on the whole, satisfactory results. But the Chinese teaching given in the Anglo-Chinese Classes continues, year by year, to yield unsatisfactory results. Even apart from the meagre results obtained at the examination, the teaching itself that appears to have been given in these Classes seems to have been defective. The whole year's tuition amounted in the first division of the Anglo-Chinese Classes to reading 13 pages in the Analects of Confucius, 22 pages in the Shing-ü-háu, and 4 pages in the Sit-yuk (vocabulary). In the second division the year's teaching consisted in reading 39 pages of Mencius, learning a single meaning of each of 250 Chinese characters, and 35 brief English sentences with curious Chinese renderings in a style mixing together

"

243

book-style with the lowest colloquial. In the third division the Sám-tsze-king was read (without explanation of the meaning of the words) and 150 Chinese radicals were taught. Much of the defect of the teaching given in these Anglo-Chinese Classes is caused by the absence of properly trained teachers having a sufficient knowledge of both the English and the Chinese languages, and by the want of interest in Chinese studies generally displayed by non-Chinese boys (Indians excepted).

11. The subjoined Tables exhibit in detail the results obtained by the examination of the several divisions of the Central School, both in English and Chinese subjects

NUMBER of Bors PASSED in EACH SUBJECT.

Class.

25

23

21

II.,

20

20

19

III.,

30

28

25

IV...........

42

40

41

V.,

32

30

32

VI.,

27

VII.,..... 37

VIII., 40

IX.,

X.,

....

59

51

XI.,

59

it & co co no

25

37

37

58

o as as N

25

35

37

£ 2 2 265

2 2 2

17

11

20

16

. 15

24

23

26

34

29

10

24

21

37

21

38

51

47

58

& CO NO NO to it to 5 20

23

23

15

26

40

26

200

22

35

28

22

25

NO NO CO NO NO NO

23

20

23

20

19

18

23

27

25

38

40

33

2 2 2 398

27

24

25

27

19.

22

27

35

22

37

33

32.

38

14

33

36

***

53

58

46

49

44

37 34

41

39

16

15

16

13

15

14

:

:

:

Class.

PERCENTAGE of PASSES in EACH SUBJECT.

Euclid.

Mensuration.

21 17.

:

:

:

:

:

:

22

22

13

20

18

16

19

30

25

21

25

...

...

...

:..

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:.

I.,

II.,

III.,.

IV.,

V.,

VI.,

VII., ......

VIII.,

IX.,

X.,

XI.,

....

25

20

30.

42

A co no com A co to N

32

27

92.00 84.00 | 68.00 | 44.00 92.00 92.00| 92.00 80.00 92.00| 88.00 88.00 52.00 | 84.00 68.00

100.00 95.00 100.00 80.00 75.00 75.00 100.00 95.00 90.00 100.00 90.00 80.00 | 95.00

93.33 83.33 80.00 76.66 86.66 73.33 76.66 90.00 83.33 100.00 | 83.33| 70.00 83.33

95.23 97.61 61.90 80.95 95.23 83.33 90.47 95.23 78.59 92.85

93.75 100.00 78.12 90:62 81.25 87.50| 84.37 75.00 78.12

92.59 92.59 37.37| 88.88 81.47 92.59 100.00 73.73 81.47

37 100.00 94.59 56.75 T00.00 72.97 94.59 59.45 100.00 89.18

40 92.50 92.50 | 52.50 95.00 | 80,00 95.00 35.00 82.50 90.00

59

51

98.30 86.44 79.66 98.30 89.83 98.30 77.96

96.0786.27 72.54 66.66 80.39 76:47

16 93.75 100.00 81.25 93.75 43.75 87.50

Total Percent-

:

:

:

:

..

:

:

:

:.

.:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

age in each subject,

95

91

66 84 82 87 77 86

85

95

87

66 87

:

244

II.,

III.,

IV.,

PERCENTAGE of PASSES in EACH SUBJECT.

Anglo-Chinese Examination.

Total

Divisions.

Percentage

Copy Writing.

Reading.

Translation.

Chinese Characters.

of Passes.

93.00

93.00

50.00

100.00.

71.43

57.14

57.14

57.14

71.43

100.00

100.00

57.14

42.85

100.00

40.00

90.00

10.00

30.00

Chinese Examination.

Classes.

Total Percentage

Essay Writing.

Letter Writing.

Prosody.

of Passes.

I...

II.,

III.,

IV.,

V.,

VI.,

89

100

87

47

47

58

58

65

40

59

74

46

61

73

80

70

63

31

51

59

34

48

63

:

12. There are five other Government Schools, outside the Central School, which give the same kind of education as that represented by the lower half of the Central School. These Schools made good progress in 1884. They act as feeders to the Central School, and I am glad to be able to report that the Headmaster of the Central School had occasion lately to express his satisfaction with the solidity of the elementary training given in those outside Schools, which evidenced itself by the rapid and steady progress made in the highest classes of the Central School by boys originally trained in those outside Government Schools. The remainder of the Government Schools, giving a purely Chinese education, call for no special remark.

*

13. The Grant-in-Aid Schools came, with the beginning of the year 1884, under the operation of the changes which were made in the Scheme in the year 1883, the required notice having been given some months before. These changes affected principally those Schools which the Scheme designates 'Schools in Class I.,' and which give a purely Chinese education, the other Schools being only so far affected as two new extra-subjects (Latin and book-keeping) were allowed. But in these purely Chinese Schools (Class I.) important changes were introduced. The value of a pass in Standard I. was reduced from $5 to $2, in Standard II. from $6. to $4, in Standard III. from $7 to $6. In Standard IV. the value of a pass was left unchanged, but in Standard V. the value of a pass was increased from $9 to $10, and in Standard VI. from $10 to $12. In addition to these changes the pensum of each Standard was extended, so that more work had to be done, in writing and repetition, and especially in the subject of geography, which was made to include the general outlines of the map of the world, and in Girls-schools a new subject (letter-writing) was made obligatory in the highest Standard. The object in view in making these changes was, in the first instance, to reduce the earning power of these inexpensive Chinese Schools, which hitherto earned abnormally high grants as compared with the grants earned by English Schools, covering generally 90 per cent. of their actual expenses. A second object, which the Government had in view in making these changes, was to give these Chinese Schools greater encouragement to bring more children under the teaching of the higher Standards (IV., V. and VI.), because a tendency had been observed, for many years past, of training children chiefly in the lower Standards of the Scheme in which passes could be obtained at the examination with comparative ease, but to bring forward as few scholars as possible into the higher Standards in which the risk of failure was much greater. Now this first year's trial of the working of the Scheme in its revised form is not sufficient to form a conclusive opinion as to the practical and permanent value of the changes made, and I defer therefore expressing any opinion as to whether the objects aimed at have been permanently achieved or not.

But this much I may say

:

245

at once, that the Managers, who previously acknowledged the need of a change in the direction above mentioned, but were afraid that the changes might result in such a serious diminution of the grants that they would be unable to continue their Schools, are all willing to continue working their Schools under the revised Scheme. I may also add that in most of the Schools and especially in the Boys-schools, affected by these changes, the percentage of passes obtained in 1884, as compared with the percentage obtained in 1883, has been considerably reduced, the diminution ranging from 2 to 37 per cent. owing to this diminution in the earning power of the purely Chinese Schools that the sum voted for Grants-in-Aid ($17,000) has not only proved amply sufficient but left an unexpended balance of over $2,000 in hand. The following details may also be given as illustrative of the effects which the above mentioned changes in the Grant-in-Aid Scheme have so far brought to the surface. The number of children brought under examination in the years 1883 and 1884 respectively under each separate Standard of Schools in Class I. (giving a purely Chinese education), and the sums earned by them (apart from Capitation Grant and Needlework) under each Standard, are exhibited by the subjoined Table.

SCHOOLS IN CLASS I.

Standards.

Number of Scholars examined, in 1883.

Amount earned by passes in 1883.

Number of Scholars examined, in 1884.

Amount earned by passes in 1884.

$

I.

428

1,585

76

146

II.

607

3,504

557

3,124

III.

305

2,065

470

2,208

IV.

76

520

120

840

√.

17

126

26

230

VI.

5

50

2

24

Total,

1,438

$7,850

1,251

$6,572

14. It will be seen from the above figures that the number of children brought under ex- amination in Schools of Class I. was in 1884 smaller by 187 than in 1883. This reduction in the number of children was caused by accidental circumstances unconnected with the changes made in the Scheme. It will further be seen that, whilst in 1883 out of 1,438 children as many as 428 were examined in Standard I., only 76 were examined in that same Standard, which in- dicates, what I otherwise observed as a fact, that the teachers, considering the value of Standard I. too low, put into Standard II., the higher one, children who would otherwise have been placed in the lower Standard. This is a result of the above changes, by no means to be deplored, for it is one which rather tends to raise the general standard of education. It will further be seen from the above figures that the teachers crowded as many children as they could into Standards III. and IV., so that, whilst in 1883 only 381 children were examined in these two Standards, as many as 590 were examined in the same Standards in 1884. This appears to be likewise a rather favourable result of the revision of the Scheme. It will finally be seen from the above Table that there was an increase in the number of children examined in Standard V. in 1884, as compared with the previous year, but a decrease in Standard VI. The amount of money earned in 1884 and 1883 by these Schools is, of course, in proportion to the number of children who were ex- amined, passed and failed, but it is obvious that the number of failures was greater in 1884 than in any previous year, which was exactly what was intended, and hence a decrease of $1,278 in the total amount of grants earned by this Class of Schools as compared with the amount earned in 1884. I need hardly add that the teachers, in crowding children into certain Standards, were not allowed to deviate from the strict rule of the Scheme that no scholar can be examined in a lower Standard than that under which he has been previously presented, nor in the same Standard unless he has failed to pass in two or more subjects. Although these details seem to indicate that the changes made in the Scheme have, as far as the year 1884 is concerned, on the whole worked beneficially, it will be advisable to watch the results of these changes for one or two years longer before making a decision as to any further modification of the Scheme. The actual working of the Scheme depends to a great extent on the tactics adopted by the teachers in endeavouring to obtain as high a grant as possible, and these tactics are adopted by them without regard to the bearing such tactics may have on the general interests of education in the Colony.

15. As to the remainder of the Grant-in-Aid Schools, there was a signal failure in composition in the upper classes of St. Joseph's College and, to a minor extent, also in the Berlin and Basel Mission Girls-schools. On the other hand, the lower classes of St. Joseph's College, the Diocesan School and

j

246

the Italian Convent School specially distinguished themselves in various subjects, the Diocesan School especially also by continuing its laudable efforts in bringing forward, year after year, a good proportion of its pupils in extra-subjects (Euclid, etc.). None of these Schools, however, calls this year for special remarks, with the exception of St. Joseph's College.

16. St. Joseph's College is not only well housed now, but the discipline and method of this School appear also to be very good. There has also been an improvement in the regularity of attend- ance, and the staff of Masters has also been increased during the last few years. But year after year I have to complain of the low results obtained in the highest Standards, in Standards V. and VI., in the subject of English composition. When it is considered that the subjects of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, and the amount of proficiency required of a scholar under this Scheme in order to entitle him to a pass, do not represent the maximum but the minimum of an elementary English education, and when it is found difficult to obtain in composition more than three correctly formed sentences in Standards V. and VI., and when a School, otherwise well organized and well taught, year by year exhibits poor results in composition, there must be something radically wrong. The defect lies, I believe, in the fact, that nearly all the scholars of this College are Portuguese to whom the English language is entirely foreign, but who, strange to say, do not first learn to express thought and feeling correctly in their own mother-tongue, and, in fact, learn neither to read nor write Portuguese, knowing their own language only colloquially. They make very good progress in the lower Standards, because they devote all their school-time to English studies, whilst in other Schools half the time is devoted to teaching the scholars to master their respective native language, but when these Portuguese youths reach the higher Standards, though excelling in arithmetic, grammar and history, they appear to think and feel not in English but in Portuguese, and having no practical idea of the differences in structure and idiom which distinguish the two languages, they find themselves signally at a loss when called upon to express their thoughts and feelings independently in correct and idiomatic English on any given subject. I am therefore clearly of opinion that the remedy lies in applying the policy of education which, in accordance with previous suggestions of my Annual Reports, a portion of the Portuguese Community adopted in starting several elementary Portuguese Schools in the Colony, to a re-organisation of St. Joseph's College. The Head Master endeavoured to do this, but met with opposition on the part of many parents. I believe it highly desirable that all Portuguese youths, to whom the English language is not their mother-tongue nor the language of their home-life, should first of all be set to master the Portuguese language before they are put to more advanced English studies.

17. The needle work of the Girls-schools was this year examined by two separate sets of Ladies' Committees, to the members of which the thanks of the Government are due for the painstaking examination of the needlework submitted to them. It was found impracticable to arrange for a public exhibition of the needlework submitted for examination, but endeavours will be made on a future occasion to improve the whole system of examining the needlework of all the Girls-schools under the Grant-in-Aid Scheme.

6

18. Government Scholarships for the study of Law, Medicine or Civil Engineering in Great Britain' have been established during the year and a pupil of the Government Central School was the first successful competitor. Apart from these Scholarships there are now four Scholarships connected with the Central School, viz., a Morrison Scholarship, a Stewart Scholarship, and two Belilios Scholar- ships. St. Joseph's College enjoys the benefit of two Belilios Scholarships.

19. I enclose the usual Tables, I. to XVI., containing the Educational Statistics for the

I have the honour to be,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant,

year

1884.

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

E. J. EITEL, PH. DR., Inspector of Schools.

(

I

No. 1.

(2.)

Report by the Head Master of the Government Central School.

247

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL,

HONGKONG, 3rd January, 1885.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward for the Blue Book the Annual Returns and Report belonging to this Department.

1. The past year has been an eventful one, for the school.

2. On 16th February a large number of former scholars of the Central School, presented an Address to the late headmaster, the Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D. and at the same time announced the foundation in his honour of a scholarship, to be called the "STEWART Scholarship." Their committee have decided to award this Scholarship annually to the boy, who gets the highest marks in all English Subjects, together with Translation from and into Chinese. The Scholarship is intended to be of the value of $100 a year for three years; but for the present, the first will be the only instalment.

On 26th April, His Excellency the Governor laid the foundation stone of the new Victoria College; which event was hailed with joy by all friends of the Central School, as well as by masters and scholars, who are anxious to reap the advantages, to health and progress in education, which will be afforded by the fine building now about to be erected. The conversion of the ground selected, into a site for the building and play-ground, a large and solid undertaking, is nearly completed and the foundations of the walls of the building have appeared above ground.

3. The first examination for the Government Scholarship, of £200 a year for prosecution of studies in England, granted by the Colonial Government, at the suggestion of His Excellency the Governor, was held in December. There were only two candidates both from the Central School; the successful one being Mr. W. BOSMAN with 788 out of 1,100 possible marks, while Mr. C. F. G. GRIMBLE obtained 638 marks. This result must be considered very satisfactory, when it is remembered that the boys are at the lower limit of age (only just turned 17) and that they had barely 8 months in which to read for the Scholarship. The special classes, required by the extra subjects for the scholar- ship, entailed extra hours of instruction outside the usual school hours. The Literature subjects and Latin were taken by myself; the Mathematical subjects by Mr. ARTHUR (Acting Second Master); and English History by Mr. FALCONER (Acting Superintendent of Victoria Gaol) who since September kindly gave his services on this occasion, and for the Chinese Translation in the First Class.

4. On the 1st of June Mr. CALDWELL resigned his appointment; having obtained employment outside the Government Service. During 4 years Mr. CALDWELL proved an efficient and successful master in the Preparatory and Lower Schools, his classes obtaining a high percentage of marks.

5. I regret to have to report that the school was deprived, by death, of the valuable services of Mr. MCKINNEY. Mr. MCKINNEY joined the Colonial Service in 1870, and having served successively in the Police Force and Survey Department was appointed to the Central School in December, 1878. To a large extent self-educated, it speaks very highly for the determination and perseverance of his character, that he succeeded in becoming, not only an excellent master in English and Mathematical Subjects, but also a fair Chinese scholar above the average of students.

6. The permanent loss of these two masters, together with the previous temporary transfer of Mr. FALCONER to the Gaol, and Mr. HUTCHISON to the Post Office, has naturally told on the progress of the school this year.

7. Mr. DEALY, successor to Mr. CALDWELL, arrived on the 1st of December. He was trained at S. Mary's Hammersmith, and has been in charge of a school in Derby. Just before he left England, Mr. DEALY passed the Intermediate Examination for the degree of B. A. at the London University, being placed in the First Division.

8. Since the 1st of June Mr. CHAPE, who acted successfully in this capacity for twelve months on a previous occasion, was Acting Assistant Master, in lieu of Mr. CALDWELL until Mr. DEALY'S arrival, and is now continuing his services, until the arrival of Mr. JONES, Mr. MCKINNEY'S successor.

9. The following changes are to be noted among the Chinese Assistants, Mr. ALARAKIA was transferred to the Observatory, Mr. LI KING PAU to the Public Works Department and Mr. WAT PAK'TAI to the Registrar General's Office.

10. As many difficulties were found to attend the custom of allowing boys the use of books, which on promotion or on finally leaving the school they returned into store; a new plan has been with His EXCELLENCY's permission adopted this year, by which the boys pay two dollars a piece extra per annum ($12 instead of $10), and in return for this become possessors of all the books they require, much to the gratification of the boys and with some gain to the Treasury.

248

11. With regard to alterations in the course of studies; the Reading Books have been advanced one Standard throughout the school; the mathematical studies of the Upper School are of a higher standard than formerly; English History is now extended to the 3rd Class and English Composition to the 4th Class; an attempt has, moreover, been made to make the Anglo-Chinese Classes more practically useful, by introducing the translation of short English sentences into Chinese, and substi- tuting a Table of 300 of the most common Chinese characters for the 214 Radicals, several of which are of little use outside the native dictionary, which these boys will never use.

12. As the Annual Examination will, as usual, not take place till the end of January, I must defer comments on the work done since last February, until the next Annual Report.

13. In the past year 6 boys have entered the Colonial Service, 21 the Chinese Service; 17 boys have obtained employment in professional and mercantile firms and 2 in the Dock Company,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.

Colonial Secretary.

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A.

Head Master.

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the CENTRAL SCHOOL during 1884.

Expenditure, Deduct School Fees,

.$18,359.62 4,981.00

Total Expense of the School,......................

Average Expense of each Scholar per number on Roll, Average Expense of each Scholar per Average Daily Attendance,

Central School, 3rd January, 1885.

ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE.

1884.

CENTRAL SCHOOL.

.$13,378.62

.$23.97 .$32.48

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A. Head Master.

NUMBER

NUMBER

MONTH.

OF

OF

SCHOLARS.

ATTENDANCES.

NUMBER

OF SCHOOL DAys.

AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE.

REMARKS.

January, February,

362

5,324

15

354.93

457

3,153

7

450.43

March...

462

11,380

26

437.69

April,

449

6,080

14

434.28

May,

451

10,827

25

433.08

?

June,

447

9,907

23

430.74

July,

432

10,583

26

407.04

August,

409

2,009

5

401.8

September,

436

8,321

20

416.05

October,

433

10,585

26

407.11

November,

410

9,781

25

391.24

December,......

405

9,235

24

384.79

97,185

236

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1884, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1884, Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1884,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1884,

97,185

236 411.8 558

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A.

Head Master.

Central School, 3rd January, 1885.

No.

TABLE I-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1884.

249

Aberdeen,

Akungngám,

Name of School.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys);

92

""

"J

"

East Street (Boys),

Station Terrace (Boys),

1

Wellington Street (Boys),

Presbyterian Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Baxter Vernacular, Bonham Road (Girls),

وو

"

D'Aguilar Street (Girls), High Street (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls);

Queen's Road (Girls),

Stanley (Girls);

Berlin Mission (Girls),

8

9

10

11

12

13

>

14

15

16

17

18

"}

19

"3

20

""

21

"

""

23

21

24

22

Central School,

C. M. S., D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),.

??

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

(Girls),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

"

I. Division (Boys),

II.

Third Street (Girls),

"

(Boys),

25 Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

26

Háwán,

27

Hoktsui,

28

Hokün,

29

30

31

32

"

33

"

34.

"

Hunghòm (Boys)....

35

"

36

}}

37

""

38

"

39

"

40

""

41

42

II.

""

43

11

44

""

45

(Girls),

27

46

"}

47

Hollywood Road, Independent School (Boys), Little Hongkong,

L. M. S., Aberdeeni Street (Girls),.

Aplichau (Boys),

Hollywood Road (Boys),.

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Saiyingp'ún, I. Division (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Staunton Street, I. Division (Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

"

Uihing Street (Girls),

Wántsai (Boys),

Anglo-Chinese (Girls),

II.

""

(Boys),

(Girls),

(Girls),

48

""

""

(Girls),

49

Yaumati (Boys),

17

50

22

"

(Girls),

51

52

53

54

55

..

56

57

Mat'auch'ung,

Mat'auts'ün,

Mongkok,

New Village (Little Hongkong),

Pokfulam,

R. C. M., Bridges Street, Poor School (Mixed),.

Cathedral School (Boys),

Italian Convent (Girls),

St. Francis' Chapel, Portuguese (Mixed),

English (Girls),

St. Joseph's College, European Division (Boys),

23

Chinese Division (Boys),

Victoria, Portuguese (Mixed),

Saiyingp'ún, (English),

58

""

59

""

60

15

61

"

62

"1

63

64

65

(Chinese),

66

Shaiwán,..

67

Shamshuip'ò,

68

Shaukiwán,

69

Sheko,

70

Shéungwán (Boys),

71

(Girls......

72

Stanley,

73

Táikoktsui,

74

Táit'amtuk,..

75

Táiwongkung,

76. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

77

(Punti),

78

T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

79

(Western Village),.

80

Ts'attszemúi,

81

Victoria School (Boys),

82

(Girls),

83

Wántsai (English),

84

(Chinese),

85

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street (Boys),

86

>>

"

(Girls),

87

Wongkoktsui,..

88

Wongmákok,

89

Wongnaich'ung,

90

Yaumáti,..

Central School.

Native Native Grant-in- School School Aid (Govt.) (Aided.) School.

Total.

26

26

13

13

8888

93

93

28

28

41

41

104

101

64

64

68

68

31

31

39

39

50

50

60

60

59

59

43

43

29

29

558

...

558

99

99

75

75

55

55

93

93

65

65

172

172

92

92

45

45

68

68

65

...

65

10

10

18

18

36

36

35

35

69

69

49

49

133

133

31

31

58

58

95

95

78

78

59

59

84

81

31

31

61

61

55

55

55

55

36

36

79

79

71

71

105

105

55

55

98

98

40

40

34

34

••

24

24

...

29

29

15

15

11

11

89

89

6

51

51

123

123

75

75

219

219

75

75

...

78

78

90

90

***

50

50

88888

22

22

38

38

56

56

29

29

57

57

113

113

...

56

56

45

59

45

9

47

588888

58

66

66

47

...

2535

29

29

17

17

37

37

61

ཙ་ཚ

61

34

106 103

106

...

103

...

206

995

206

45

45

24

**

24

9

9

48 31

48

31

558

975

445

3,907

5,885

250

TABLE II. PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1884.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA.

Population as per Census of 1881,.................................

.106,398

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GovernmeNT INSPECTION, IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat Population, as per Census of 1881,...45,595.

CHILDREN IN SCHOOL UNDER GOVERNMENT INSPECTION,

IN VILLAGES.

No. of Scholars.

No. of Scholars.

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

93

1. Aberdeen,

26

2.

3.

""

"

""

East Street (Boys), Staunton Street (Boys),

28

2. Akungngám,

13

41

3. Baxter Vernacular, Stanley (Girls),

43

4.

5.

99

Presbyterian Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys), 104 Wellington Street (Boys),. 64

4. Hoktsúi,

10

5. Hokün,

18

6. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),.

68

6. Little Hongkong,

35

7. Baxter Vernacular, Bonham Road (Girls),

31

7. L. M. S. Aplichau (Boys),

49

8.

9.

10.

>>

"}

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

39

8.

"

Hunghom (Boys),

31

High Street (Girls),

50

9.

11.

**

Hollywood Road (Girls), Queen's Road (Girls),.

60

10.

11

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys), (Girls),

84

31

59

11.

Tanglungchau (Boys),

12. Berlin Mission (Girls),

29

12.

(Girls),

36 79

13. Central School,

558

13.

15.

">

16.

""

17.

""

18.

"

19.

"

20.

II.

11

""

21.

Third Street (Girls),

11

"

وو

26.

33

27.

""

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

28.

""

14. C. M. S., D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),..

I. Division (Boys),

22. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

23. Hảwán,

24. Hollywood Road, Independent School (Boys),. 25. L. M. S. Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),

99

14.

Yaumati (Boys), (Girls),

98

40

75

15. Mat'auch'ung,

34

19

(Girls),

55

16. Mat auts'ün,

24

93

17. Mongkok,

29

65

18. New Village,

15

172

19. Pokfulam,...

11

(Boys),

92

20. Shaiwán,

22

45

21. Shamshuip'o,

38

68

22. Shaukiwán,

56

65

23. Sheko,

29

36

J

24. Stanley,...

56

69

25. Táikoktsui,

+

45

133

26 Táit'amtuk,

58

27. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

66

95

28.

(Punti),

47

29.

II.

"

""

""

(Boys),

78

29. T'òkwawán, (Eastern Village),

29

30.

""

"

(Girls),..

59

30.

""

(Western Village),

17

31.

""

Staunton Street. I. Division (Girls),

61

31. Tsattszemúi,

37

32.

II.

11

11

وو

Anglo-Chinese (Girls), 55

32. Wongkoktsúi,

24

33.

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

55

33. Wongmakok,

31.

35.

36.

38.

39.

"}

40.

41.

">

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

Wantsai (Boys),

(Girls),

37. R. C. M. Bridges Street, Poor School (Mixed),..

Cathedral School (Boys),

Italian Convent (Girls),

St. Francis' Chapel, Portuguese (Mixed),

19

English (Girls),

71

34. Wongnaich'ung,

48

105

35. Yaumati,

31

55

89

1,269

51

123

75

42.

">

St. Joseph's College, European Division (Boys),

219

43.

19

Chinese Division (Boys),

75

44.

46.

48.

(Chinese),

(Girls),

51.

"

"

53.

"

(Girls),

(Chinese),.

Victoria, Portuguese (Mixed),

45. Saiyingp'ún (English),

47. Sheungwán (Boys),

31

49. Taiwongkung.

50. Victoria School (Boys),

52. Wantsái (English),....

54. Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street (Boys),

78

90

50

57

113

58

61

34

106

103

206

55.

>>

>>

(Girls),

TOTAL,........

45

.4,616

TABLE III-NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the Government Schools during 1884, and Expenses of each School.

No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total. Expense. No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls.

Total.

Expense.

1

Aberdeen,

2

Akungngám,..

26 13

26

13

3

Central School,

558

558

$ 41.66

60.00 19 13,378.62 20

+9

Brought forward,. Shéungwán (Boys),.

(Girls),

1,123

1,123

$15,297.58

57

57

307.70

113

113

640.50

4 Háwán,

65

65

352.20 21

...

Stanley,

56

56

332.42

5 Hoktsui,

10

10

60.00 22

Taikoktsui,

45

45

60.00

6

Hokün,

18

18

60.00 23

Táit'amtuk,

9

9

72.00

7

Little Hongkong,.

35

35

60.00 24

Taiwongkung,

58

58

303.39

8

Mat'auch'ung,

34

34

60.00 25

Tanglungchau (Hakka),.

66

66

120.00

9

Mat'auts'ün,

24

24

60.00 26

(Punti),

47

47

244.00

10

Mongkok,

29

29

60.00 27

T'òkwawan (Eastern Village),

29

29

60.00

11

New Village (Sants'üi),

15

15

60.00 28

""

(Western Village),

17

17

55.00

12

Pokfulam,

11

11

72.00 29

Ts'attszemúi,

37

37

60.00

13

Saiyingp'ún (English),

14

»

(Chinese),

15

Shaiwán,

16

Shamshuip'o,

17

Shaukiwán,

18

Shekò,

882882

90

90

456.40 30

Wantsai (English),

106

106

496.09

50

50

120.70. 31

22

60.00 32

38

38

60.00 33

56

56

...

(Chinese),

Wongkoktsui,

Wongmakok,

156.00 34 Wongnaich'ung,

"

103

103

180.00

24

24

72.00

9

9

72.00

48

48

252.10

29

29

120.00 35

Yaumati,

31

31

363.06

Carried forward,..

1,123

1,123 $15,297.58

TOTAL,..

1'865

113

1,978

$18,987.84

251

TABLE IV.-AVERAGE EXPENSES of each SCHOLAR or STUDENT at the Government Schools during the Year 1884.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL.

Expenditure,

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND AIDED SCHOOLS.

Expenditure, ...

Add Inspector's Salary,

22

Chinese Writer's Salary,..

""

وو

Teacher's Salary,

Travelling Expenses,

Total Expenditure for the year :-

Government Central School,

Government Schools and Aided Schools,

.$13,378.62

.$ 5,609.22

..$2,400

300

120

288

3,108.00

$22,095.84

.$13,378.62 5,609.22

A.

Average Expenses calculated by the Enrolment.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Central School,

2.

""

3.

25

33

وو

99

at other Government Schools,

J

at Government Aided Schools,

B.

Average Expenses calculated by the average Daily Attendance.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Central School,

Hoi co

2.

3.

95

"

39

at other Government Schools,

12

j

وو

at Government Aided Schools,

$23.97

4.55

2.61

$32.48

8.13

4.37

TABLE V.-AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1884.

No.

1234

6

Aberdeen,. Akungngám,

Central School,

Háwán, Hoktsui,

Hokün,

Little Hongkong,

Mat'auch'ung,

Name of School.

:

:

:

...

...

:.

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

***

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

16.15 9.42

16.12

8.40

429.41

411.80

40.08

35.06

9.00

8.33

14.58

12.72

27.50

23.15

24.08

18.48

16.33

13.58

23.00

20.18

12.17

11.64

10.08

8.80

64.50

61.70

25.75

21.78

14.83

10.77

30.08

24.16

33.58

26.63

...

18.27

14.74

...

...

36.25

33.26

:

65.42

55.42

:

47.33

45.52

18.17

15.18

:..

:

8.08

5.51

32.58

29.78

37.58

32.32

16.25

9.16

.:.

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

17.17

12.88

15.91

13.65

21.58

17.05

69.75

63.27

69.25

61.41

**

21.00

18.60

8.00

7.26

39.00

35.91

21.75

20.08

1,363.88

1,224.30

...

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:.

:

10

Mat'auts'ün,

Mongkok,

11

12

13

New Village (Sants'un), Pokfulam,

Sayingp'ún (English),

...

14

"

(Chinese),

15

Shaiwán,

16

17

18

Shekò,

19

20

Shamshuip'ò

Shaukiwán,

Shéungwán (Boys), (Girls),

21

Stanley,

22

Táikoktsui,...

23

Táit'amtuk,

24

Táiwongkung,

25

Tanlungchau (Hakka),

26

""

(Punti),

27 T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

22

(Western Village),

...

28

29

30

31

""

32

Wongkoktsui,

33

Ts'attszemúi,

Wántsai (English),

(Chinese),

Wongmakok,

34

Wongnaich'ung,

...

35

Yaumati,

...

...

:

:

...

:

252

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1884.

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Daily Minimum Daily

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum

Monthly Enrolment.

Attendance.

Attendance.

(monthly average). (monthly average).

1

Aberdeen,

18

8

17.63

8.00

Akungngám,

10

8

10.00

6.12

Central School,

462

362

450.43

354.93

Háwán,.

44

33

41.35

24.59

Hoktsui,

10

7

9.88

6.56

6

Hokün,

17

15.00

5.94

Little Hongkong, ..............

29

22

25.87

18.86

8

Mat'auch'ung,

27

17

22.60

11.67

9

Mát auts'ün,

19

15

16.89

10.15

10

Mongkok,

28

15

25.92

15.00

11

New Village (Sant'sün,)

13

8

13.00

7.86

12

Pokfulam,

11

7

11.00

6.67

13

Saiyingp'ún (English)

73

50

70.61

46.06

14

(Chinese),.

31

21

26.96

10.47

15

Sháiwán,

18

9

16.77

6.00

16

Shamshuip'o,

35

12

33.58

6.82

17

Shaukiwán,

38

29

31.57

21.73

18

Shekò,

24

15

22.38

10.25

19

Shéungwán (Boys),

41

32

36.56

29.00

20

(Girls),

79

47

69.25

40.29

21

Stanley,

51

42

48.83

40.82

22

Táikoktsui,

28

10

22.29

8.16

23

Táit'amtuk,..

9

8

5.94

5.25

24

Táiwongkung,

36

28

33.88

22.00

25

Tanlungchau (Hakka),

43

31

37.12

27.29

26

(Punti),

21

13

15.59

6.35

27

Tokwáwán (Eastern Village),

20

12

17.13

6.72

28

(Western Village),.

17

8

15.58

8.00

29

Ts'attszemui,

24

16

19.18

13.72

30

Wántsai (English),

81

56

74.27

53.55

31

(Chinese),

79

57

73.28

46.78

32

Wongkoktsui,

24

11

19.87

9.56

33

34 35

Wongmákok,

Wongnaich'ung, Yaumati,

9

7

7.75

6.85

42

27

40.37

25.94

23

15

22.08

13.06

1,534

1,066

1,420.41

941.02

No.

TABLE VII.—NUMBER of DAYS on which the Government Schools were taught during 1884.

Name of School.

School Days.

No.

Name of School.

School Days.

12345670

Aberdeen,

Akungngám,

Central School,

150

19

Shéungwán (Boys),

240

247

20

""

(Girls),

244

236

21

Stanley,

241

8

Háwán,

Hoktsui, Hokün,.......

Mat'auch'ung,

235

22

Táikoktsui,

247

248

23

Táit'amtuk,

242

247

24

Táiwongkung,

241

Little Hongkong,

243

25

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

241

248

26

(Punti),

238

9

Mat'auts'ün,

245

27

T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

242

10

Mongkok,

253

28

(Western Village),

229

11

New Village (Sants'ün),

245

29

Ts'attszemui,

241

12

Pokfulam,

251

30

Wántsai (English),..

237

13

Saiyingp'ún (English),

237

31

(Chinese),

238

14

"

(Chinese),

236

32

Wongkoktsui,

247

15

Sháiwán,

249

33

Wongmakok

247

16

Shamshuip'o,

247

34

Wongnaich'ung,

236

17

Shaukiwán,

247

35

Yaumati,

242

18

Shekò,

219

C

:

253

Total Enrolment

for the Year.

TABLE VIII.—SUMMARY of ENROLment and Attendance at the Government SCHOOLS for the last twenty-two Years.

Years.

Minimum Daily Attendance.

Maximum Daily Attendance.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

(Monthly Average).

1863,

535

469

414

301

1864,

502

417

634

324

1865,

597

535

418

330

1866,

623

572

435

337

1867.

700

610

533

408

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

741

571

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,931

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

990 941

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the CENTRAL SCHOOL during 1884.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

January,

February,

March,

362

5,324

15

354.93

457

3,153

7

450.43

462

11,380

26

437.69

April, May, June, July,

449

6,080

14

434.28

451

10,827*

25

433.08

447

9,907

23

430.74

432

10,583

26

407.04

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,...

409

2,009

5

401.08

436

8,321

433

10,585

410

9,781

405

9,235

2222

20

416.05

26

407.11

25

391.24

24

384.79

5,153

97,185

236

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1884,

97,185

236

411.80

558

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1884,

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1884,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1884,

Average Monthly Attendance during 1884,.....................

429.41

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (CENTRAL SCHOOL excepted) arranged in the order of their efficiency.

Rank II,-Continued.

Shaukiwán, Punti School.

Rank I.

Saiyingp'ún, Anglo-Chinese School.

Háwán, Punti School.

Shekò, Punti School.

Tanglungchau, Hakka School.

Shéungwán, Punti School.

Rank II.

Wántsai, Anglo-Chinese School.

Wongnaich'ung, Anglo-Chinese School.

Stanley, Anglo-Chinese School.

Wántsai, Puuti School.

Shéungwán, Chinese Girls School.

Tanglunchau, Punti School.

Yumati, Anglo-Chinese School.

Saiyingp'ún, Hakka School.

Rank III.

Táiwongkung, Punti School.

Little Hongkong (Old Village) Punti

School.

Ts'attszemui, Hakka School. Mát'auch'ung, Hakka School.

Táikoktsui, Hakka School.

Shamshuipfò, Hakka and Punti School. Wongkoktsui, Hakka School.

Rank III,-Continued.

Mongkok, Hakka School.

T'òkwáwán East, Hakka School.

T'òkwáwán West, Hakka School.

Hokün, Hakka School.

Mat'auts'ün, Punti School. Aberdeen, Punti School.

Little Hongkong (New Village) Punti

School.

Sháiwán, Hakka School. Hoktsui, Hakka School. Pokfulam, Hakka School. Akungngám, Hakka School. Wongmákok, Hakka School. Táit'ámtuk, Hakka School.

254

TABLE XI.—Number of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1883), Expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each in 1884.

>

Class

of

School

Name of School,

Boys. Girls. Total.

Expenses incurred

in 1884.

Amount of Grant gained for 1884.

$ c.

$

..

""

29

༑ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ མ མ མ

I,

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

93

93

292.62

231.50

وو

""

"

"

"

""

25

""

""

"

""

""

25

>>

"

""

"

"

"7

"9

22

II,

دو

""

""

و

""

"J

Aplichau, (Boys),

""

""

""

Hunghom (Boys),

""

95

""

Presbyterian Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),.......

Baxter Vernacular, Bonham Road (Girls),

22

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road (Girls), Stanley (Girls),

C. M. S., D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

""

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),.

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

15

19

I, Division (Boys),

Third Street (Girls),

Hollywood Road Independent School (Boys),

L. M. S., Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Boys),.

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Saiyingp'úng I, Division (Boys),

East Street (Boys),

"

Station Terrace (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

28

28

209.00

167.23

41

41

192.00

105.62

104

104

451.60

407.79

64

64

257.00

215.22

31

31

991.50

115.98

39

39

255.40

165.74

50

50

210.35

151.97

99

75

(Girls),

35

(Boys),

133

95

99

""

35

""

""

""

II, (Girls),.

(Boys),

78

: : : : :

;:;& ; ; ུ་ླ

60

60

219.76

198.53

59

59

231.35

205.81

43

43

161.90

122.08

...

99

363.73

250.06

75

319.03

186.83

55

55

232.33

182.17

93

298.30

205.60

65

65

264.78

207.79

172

465.33

379.59

92

322.11

307.51

45

45

162.76

145.03

36

272.00

114.96

69

69

408.93

328.09

49

276.35

131.08

133

533.24

474.07

31

404.74

126.65

58

58

275.82

95

752.83

344.21

78

206.52

59

59

428.80

185.12

""

وو

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

84

84

427.14

301.74

""

""

(Girls),

31

31

150.68

""

""

Staunton Street I, Division (Girls),

55

55

278.88

163.28

"9

وو

"

(Girls),..

39

39

وو

29

25

"

وو

(Girls),

(Girls),

99

II,

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

Uihing Street (Girls),

Wántsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

R. C. M., Chathedral School (Boys),

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street (Boys),

L. M. S., Staunton Street II, Division Anglo-Chinese (Girls),

55

55

349.08

229,72

36

36

105.97

79

79

389.40

201.16

71

71

413.65

205.50

105

105

498.04

241.10

...

.55

55

384.19

202.56

98

98

317.14

255.80

40

40

197.99

144.69

51

51

244.00

98.74

206

206

595.64

603.14

""

(Girls),

45

45

254.54

136.82

61

61

309.13

87.33

III,

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

68 68

857.41

511.72

IV,

Berlin Mission, (Girls),

29

1,153,00

298.80

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (mixed),

59

9

68

6,112.85

376.20

>>

R. C. M., Bridges Street Poor School (mixed),.

45

44

89

924.00

354.83

""

Italian Convent (Girls),

:

123

123

2,127.43

910.41

""

""

St. Francis' Chapel Portuguese Division (mixed),

>"

12

""

English Division (Girls),

63

75

924.00

386.53

29

وو

15

"

""

""

"

22

"

"

St. Joseph's College European Division (Boys),

*

Victoria, Portuguese (mixed),.

Victoria School (Boys),

(Girls),

Chinese Division (Boys),

985:

219

219

5,356.73

1,491.16

75

75

445.07

39

39

78

788.30

269.65

61

61

6,854.34

ƒ 180.82

34

34

169.31

2,373 1,534 3,907 38,734.62 14,662.30

:

255.

TABLE XII-ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1884.

No.

Name of School.

Maxi-

Mini-

Average Average Maxi- Mini-

mum

Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol-

mum

mum

mum

ment.

ment.

Daily Attend

ance.

Daily Attend-

Average Average Daily Monthly Attend-

Enrol- ance

Number

of

School

ment.

for the

Days.

ance.

Year.

123 +

10

American Board Mission, Bridges St. (Boys), .....

93

57 82.84 43.95

77.09

65.50

252

>>

وو

ގ

55

East Street (Boys), Station Terrace (Boys),

28

41

22

22 27.08

17.00

26.90

25.23

241

22

39.00

18.87

38.36

35.62

248

Presbyterian Mission, Queen's Road

104

81

West (Boys), f

98.73 71,27

99.27

89.79

260

5

وو

99

Wellington St.

59

44

54.84

(Boys),

37.08

48.81

43.22

256

ƒ

6

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

65

48

61.76

47.33

57.91

55.72

260

7

Baxter Vernacular, Bonham Road (Girls),

25

13

23.83

12.81

22.09

20.48

253

8

95

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

36

24

33.23

19.21

29.58

26.24

268

9

High Street (Girls),

45

23

37.96

22.22

36.16

30.97.

273

10

77

Hollywood Road (Girls),

47

31

35.68

22.60

36.17

30,53

269

11

**

Queen's Road (Girls),

47

22

36.96

21.09

37.50

30.31

280

12

Stanley (Girls),

32

20

29.34

17.59 29.50

26.08

283

13

14

15

وو

16

"

17

35

18

""

19

وو

20

""

21

Berlin Mission, (Girls),

C. M. S., D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

St. Stephen's-Baxter Memorial (Girls),

I, Division (Boys),

Third Street (Girls),

22 Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

29

29

29.00

28.63 29.00 28.80

261

66

45

56.92

43.42 55.83

50.06

264

58

38

51.88

36.46 48.75 44.66

266

(Girls),

38

28

30.96

23.78

31.17

27.17

276

67

41

55.57

35.74

51.75

44.60

270

49

31

44.39

26.07

41.25

36.79

266

120

79

102.38

73.57

104.08

89.59

263

II,

"2

(Boys),

73

27

66.84

22.12

62.33

53.51

262

39

18

31.38

16.60

29.25

24.53

271

50

40

47.24

38.14

47.41 45.20

245

24

25

21

23 Hollywood Road Independent School (Boys), ..

L. M. S., Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Aplichau (Boys),

36

25

33.38

22.72

32.09

28.96

252

47

40,

41.03

32.29 44.66

38.09

270

35

19

34.07

18.23 30.66

29.08

260

26

29

Hollywood Road (Boys),

113

58

99.46

57.33

95.25

88.07

266

27

Hunghom (Boys),

31

18

30.85

17.35

28.63 27.65

271

28

15

Kau-ü-fong (Boys),

49

39

42.73

28.00

46.72

38.82

275

29

""

Saiyingpun I, Division (Boys),

91

36

82.71

34.30

78.83 70,21

272

30

$5

25

31

32

وو

والو

25

II, (Girls),.

""

(Boys),

76

57

70.65

42.19

64.27

56.52

274

40

29

34.15

22.00

34.91 29.62

282

33

""

"

34

23

35

36

وق

وو

"

37

""

38

وو

39

"9

40

55

41

42

43

44

Q* * *

15

45

""

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Staunton Street I, Division (Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

""

Uihing Street (Girls),

Wántsaí Chapel (Boys),.

Yaumati (Boys),...

(Girls),

R. C. M., Bridges Street Poor School (Mixed),

Cathedral School (Boys),

64

32

60.53

29.30

58.41

53,74

269

(Girls),

31

24

28.00

15.17

28.09

25.68

273

45

30

34.30

23.32

33.75 28.58

264

II.

29

(Girls),.

31

13

31.00

10.84

17.60

12.28

221

37

28

34.46 19.00

33.75

30.72

268

35

20

33.80

13.16

28.09 23.54

264

(Girls),

52

36

49.65

28.61

43.16 37.16

282

50

37

47.14

28.26 43.00 32.00

285

74

49 58.80

42.07 60,66 51.10

285

(Girls),

37

28

34.83

24.07

33.75

28.06

266

59

41

54.48

38.42

54.08 51,80

289

29

17

27.33

14.09

25.75 24.19

286

72

·60

64.29

48.46

66.41 56.83

257

37

20

46

""

Italian Convent (Girls),

103

93

33.72 20.00 32.75 28.74 97.65 $0.90 99.36 92.91

269

231

47

St. Francis Chapel Portuguese Di-)

vision (Mixed),

48

St. Francis' Chapel English Division

62

49

51.80

18.30

58.83 45.03

271

(Girls),

49

17

St. Joseph's College European Di-

vision (Boys),..

219

187

207.04

169.13

201.54 189.16

232

50

57

St. Joseph's College Chinese Divi-

sion (Boys),

75

57

72.90

53.60 68.90 66.49

230

51

"

Victoria Portuguese (Mixed),

65

55

55.42

52

Victoria School, (Boys),......

45

26

40.19

53

(Girls),....

30

23

27.75

54 Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street (Boys),....

155

100

148.96

55

وو

(Girls),

34

21

32.92

45.91 59.75 49.65 25.20 36.00 32.82 17.34 25.58 22.81 90.85 136.10 127.14 18.31 29.66 27.82

247

251

248

258

257

1

256

1

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Exam-

TABLE XIII-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1884, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

Number of Scholars who Passed. No. of Scholars who Failed.

Sums to which the School is entitled.

ined.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

33-

22.

"

Aplichau (Boys),

23.-

24.-

"

Hollywood Road (Boys),

Hunghom (Mixed),.

25.--

35

Kau-u-fong (Girls),

26.

"

Salyingp'un I. Division (Boys),

"

""

>>

""

II.

(Girls),

""

(Boys),

29

19

30.

""

31-

"}

32

"

"1

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges' Street (Boys),.

I

2.-

"

"

>>

"1

"

>>

99

3.-

4.-

5.-

"

Presbyterian Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),.. Wellington Street (Boys),

6. Baxter Vernacular, Bonham Road (Girls),...

East Street (Boys), Station Terrace (Boys),

I

I

I

I

....

I

7.-

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

I

8.-

"

High Street (Girls),

I

9.-

"

Hollywood Road (Girls),..

I

10

11.-

19

12.-C. M. S. D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

13.-

14.-

15.-

16.—

17.-

"

"

"

"

>>

18.-

19

39.

*

"7

II. Third Street (Girls),

"

(Boys),

Queen's Road (Girls), Stanley (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys), (Girls),

I

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),.

19.-

15

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

I. Division (Boys),

20.-Hollywood Road, Independent School (Boys), ..........................

21.—L. M. S. Aberdeen Street (Girls),

34.

35

"

36

37-

"}

(Girls),..

38

"

Yaumati (Boys),

39

"

(Girls),

40

42 -

"

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

""

(Girls),

Staunton Street, I. Division (Girls),.

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

Uihing Street (Girls),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

(Girls),

45.-Berlin Mission (Girls),...

R. C. Mission, Cathedral School (Boys),

41..-Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street (Boys),

43.-L. M. S., Staunton Street II. Division Anglo-Chinese (Girls),

44.- Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

46.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

(Girls),

III

IV

47.-R. C. Mission, Bridges' Strect, Poor School (Mixed),..

IV

48.-

Italian Convent (Girls),

IV

11

40.-

St. Francis Chapel Portuguese Division (Mixed),.

IV

50.-

"

English

(Girls),.. IV

61

"}

St. Joseph's College, European Division (Boys),.

62.-

}}

11

55.

"

Chinese

53.---- Victoria Portuguese (Mixed), 51. - Victoria School (Boys), . . (Girls),

י.

IV

(Boys),..

---- = EE 2 PERR22:

104 101

1

24

II

IV

IV

IV

* * * * * * 2232268d52284SAADANDAABAR~ *baae* * ** * ***

****** 2 2 2 ***ENDOJ8*285PNAPB¤°**~A8Õ ̄*BRAGA ~ 92 8 *R*******

34

::::

16

3

13

8

36

29

23

8

4

16

::::

CO LO

1

5

2

5

I

11

4

3

5

5

8

8

44

30

3

20

75

72

27

57

21

19

29

50

24

51

21

20

23

46

10

29

***::*:om-a ::: : : : :* :*::::***::*:*

495 *

3848

10

2

6

13

5

1 3 2 co on

3

I

8

4

29

10

15

::

11

19

15

47

8

29

16

15

2

14

5

15

13

12

9

36

25

9

15

5

15

12

i

46

11

25

7

5

3

13

41

14

4

14

8

8

13

15

8

:::

10

8

12

8

2

3

7

2

10

2

27

9

3

8

34

10

11

8

3

52

38

4

3

4

7

10

10

7

5

8

11

6

9

ลง

2

8

1

1

1

8

8

5

18

20

13

7 12

3

IV 142 141- 20

27

24

20

21

54

18

18

15

32

13

11

18

2.

6

2

11

2

1

6

21: 2: went

3

12

4

2

1

2

~

4 1

S :::*:::**

:::: : : : : 000

:

2

30.53

16

40

30.31

8

52

26.08

12

32

2

50.06

116

12

44.66

60

2

27.17

10

44

6

44.60

76

30

36.79

60

89.59

188

53.51

116

24.53

60

28.96

56

37

38.09

60

29.08

48

88.07

20

27.65

144

60

32

2 38.82

2

60

60

12 70.21

184

1

:::::

33

20

56.52

100

1

23

29.62

10

12

55

53.74

164

21

25.68

8

56

21

12.28

32

30.72

60

23.54

40

37.16

48

32,00

6

28

51.10

4

108

28.06

6

32

3

6 51.80

136

18

3

24.19

44

2

17

28.74

16

12

4

2

95

6 127.14

208

4

13

10

27.82

4

16

Half Grant.

2

28.58

10 22.75

55.72

60

70

:::::::::::

28.80

80

49

I

45.20 18

88

56.83 96

92.91

64

48 144

2

45.08

189.16

42

120 216

56

66.49

49.65

82.82

22.81

108

144

78

32

12

24

16

:15

4 124

2

::

::

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23

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5

2 2 3

7

65.50

136

25.23

64

16

8

35.62

52

9

89.79

..

144

7

43.22

92

2

20.48

2 26.24

30.97

..

4 20

44

10 20

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Total Passed.

Total Failed.

Average Daily

Attend-

ance during School

Year.

Standard I.

Standard II.

+ 8 = 8 8 8 8 8 8 * * * HÖCHSEXJAAA**£76878ÕFJ8586~***8** ¦ ¦ ¦ : * Standard III.

72

36

240

294

54

{

108

4+

3+

60

156

54

**:: £ £ 2: «***:

32

8

28: :* :* : 12 :* :

:*::*:20* :*::*:*::* * * * * *⠀⠀⠀⠀

:: 2 ::::& : : :A 18 :8 :2 : :2 : : 18 : : : : : :2 :::

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10

10.50

}

64

102

110 25.50

88 7.50

:

:

14

13.50

10

72

20

24

10

66

3.00

24

:::*::*::::* : : :2 :~ :*

24

$

**:*:: 2

:

32

..

8 30

24

::

:

號:

: 39

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Good.

Very

Good.

Fair.

Needle Work.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in

1884.

Amount paid to

Teacher.

Amount paid to

Manager.

$

12

6 15.50

10

30

7,50

65.50 231.50 57.87 25.23 107.23 41.80 125.43 35.62 105.62 26.40 79.22 407.79

89.79 101.94 305.85

215.22

43.22 53.80 161.42 20.48 115.98 28.99 86.99 26.24 165,74 41.43 124.31

173.63

..

16

4

18.00

5

80.97

48

40

9.00

3

30.53

151.97 37.99 113.98

198.53

49.68 148.90

24

20

20 19.50

2

30.31

26

2

26.08

24

56

8

48 3.00

182.17

154.36 205.81 51.45 122.08 80.52 91.56 50.06 250.06 62.51 187.55 44.66 186.831 46.70 140.13 27.17

45.54

136.63

24 20

44.60

206.60

51.65

154.95

24

28

21.00

2

$6.79

207.79

51.94

155.85

48

40

89.59

53.51 307.51-

379,59

94.89

284.70

76.87

230.64

10

18

16.50

2

24.53

145.03 36.25

108.78

28.96

114.96

28.74

86.22

24

60

44

24.00

38.09

828.09

82.02

246.07

29.08

131.08

32.77

98.31

88.07

474.07

118,51

355.56

3

27.65

126.65 31.66

94.99

38.82

70.21

56.52

29.62

26 15.00

2

68.95 275.82 206.87

86.05

344.21 258.16 206.52 51.63 154.89 46.28 185.12 53.74 301.74 75.43 25.68 150.68 37.67

138.84

226.31

113.01

26

28

15.00

21.00

12.28 163.28

40.82 122.46

30.72 229.72

57.43

172.29

16

40 6.00

6

80

10.50

25

24

48

42

4.50

10

12 13.50

5

24.19

255.80 63.95 144.69

23.54 105.97

201.16

37.16 32.00 205.50 51.37 154.13 241.10 60.27 180.83

51.10 28.06 202.56 50.64 151.92 51.80

26.49

79.48

50.29

150.87

191.85

36.17

108.52

24

28.74

98.74

24,68

74.06

40

127.14

603.14

150.78

452.36

14

24.00

1

27.82

136.82

34.20

102.62

26

..

28.58 87.33 21.83

65.50

86

68

18.00

12

6.00

48

16

6

55.72 511.72

28.80

45.20 376.20

127.93

883.79

298.80

74.70

224.10

94.05

282.15

34

12.00

2

240

354.83 88.70

56.83 92.91 910.41 227.60

45.03 386.53

189.16 1,491.16 66.49 445.07 49.65 269.65

96.63 280.90

372.79 1,118.37

111 26

67.41

266.13

682.81

333.81

202.24

32.82 180.82 45:20

135.62

22.81 169.31 42.32

126.99

* See C.S.O, No. 1761 of 1884.

+ Extra subject.

* Reduction of 5 per cent. in accordance with Rule No. 3 of Grant-in-Aid Scheme. See C.S.O. Nos. 727 and 2603.

TOTAL,

..$14,662.30 3,665.89 10,996.9%

?

No.

TABLE XIV.—PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

Name of School.

1884.

1883.

Increase.

Decrease.

1234 LO CON

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

84.78

"

""

""

وو

East Street (Boys), Station Terrace (Boys),

100.00

66.67

100.00

33.33

""

Presbyterian Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

87.84

100.00

12.16

وو

23

Wellington Street (Boys),

83.34

97.30

13.96

6

7

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),...

Baxter Vernacular, Bonham Road (Girls),..

100.00

100.00

85.71

100.00

14.29

8

">

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

90.90

100.00

9.10

9

52

""

High Street (Girls),

80.00

81.48

1.48

10.

>>

"3

Hollywood Road (Girls),

92.85

100.00

7.15

11

"

>"

Queen's Road (Girls),

100.00

100.00

12

""

"

Stanley (Girls),

85.71

13

14

15

16

""

59

17

""

18

""

19

""

20

"

99

II,

21

"

22

23

Hollywood Road Independent School (Boys),.....

24

Berlin Mission, (Girls),..

C. M. S., D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

I, Division, (Boys),.

Third Street (Girls),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

L. M. S., Aberdeen Street (Girls),

93.10

100.00

6.90

95.45

100.00

4.55

70.00

92.31

22.31

(Girls),

92.59

90.91

1.68

84.00

94.64

10.64

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

""

(Boys),..

100.00

85.71

14.29

83.33

88.89

5.56

97.00

84.00

13.00

95.00

97.30

2.30

97.37

95.12

2.25

25

39

Aplichau (Boys),

84.00

78.12

5.88

26

Hollywood Road (Boys),

96.00

100.00

4.00

27.

دو

Hunghom (Boys),

77.00

88.89

11.89

28

Kau-ü-fong (Boys),

94.12

29

"

Saiyingp'ún I, Division (Boys),

83.34

90.32

35.03

30

""

II,

(Boys),

62.27

31

32

(Girls),

86.00

64.71

21.29

32

""

Shektongtsui (Boys),

96.49

100.00

3.51

33

>>

(Girls),

90.00

34

""

35

""

""

36

""

37

"

38

وو

39

59

40

""

41

""

42.

"J

43

""

""

44

45

""

46

""

Italian Convent (Girls),

47

"

48

"

22

23

49

50

25

51

52

Staunton Street I, Division (Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Tánglungchau (Boys), (Girls),

Ui-hing Street (Girls), Wántsai Chapel (Boys),

19

Yaumati (Boys),

(Girls),

R. C. M., Bridges Street, Poor School (mixed),

Cathedral School (Boys),..

St. Francis Chapel Portuguese Division (mixed)

St. Joseph's College European Division (Boys),

Victoria Portuguese (mixed),

Victoria School (Boys),

100.00

93.56

6.44

II,

19

(Girls),

84.61

96.15

11.54

......

84.37

92.86

8.49

94.74

76.00

92.50

16.50

82.14

95.55

13.41

82.00

95.92

13.92

(Girls),

100.00

100.00

88.23

73.81

14.42

86.00

91.30

5.30

100.00

95.00

5.00

85.00

91.70

6.70

100.00

95.35

4.65

94.12

96.30

2.18

English Division (Girls), ....

100.00

20.00

80.00

88.03

91.27

3.24

Chinese

94.45

90.00

4.45

87.50

83.33

100.00

16.67

53.

19

(Girls),...

100.00

100.00

54

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street (Boys),

94.06

88.54

5.52

55

(Girls),

56.52

94.44

37.92

257

258

TABLE XV. PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1884.

Class of

School.

Name of School.

Reading. or Com-

Writing, Arith-

metic.

mar.

position.

Gram- Geo-

graphy.

History.

Repeti- Expla-Compo- . tion. nation. sition.

I.

"

>>

"

32

22

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),...

93.31

54.35

99

Õ་

East Street (Boys), Station Terrace (Boys),...

100.00

96.43

100.00

100.00

96.00

60.00

73.00 100.00 100.00 60.00

"

33

Presbyterian Miss., Queen's Rd. W., (Boys),

Wellington St., (Boys),

Baxter Vernacular, Bonham Road (Girls),

96.00

67.56

100.00 97.00

4

98.00

76.19

100.00

100.00 100.00

80.00

100.00

90.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

...

**

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls),

100.00

95.24

100.00

100.00

82.00

19

High Street (Girls),

100.00

75.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

Hollywood Road (Girls),

96.43 93.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

"

""

"

Queen's Road (Girls),.

100.00

96.29

100.00

100.00

100.00

>>

Stanley (Girls),

85.71

71.43

96.95

100.00

??

??

"

"

""

"

,,

"

">

C. M. S. D'Aguilar Street (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

I. Division (Boys),

100.00

90.90

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

92.50

90.90

100.00

85.00

81.82

(Girls),

100.00

96.29

96.29

100.00

100.00

97.29

92.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

66.67

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),.

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00,

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

II.

*

"

"

(Boys),

100.00

86.54

100.00

100.00 100.00

19

""

Third Street (Girls),

L. M. S. Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00

96.00

25.00

100.00

86.00

Hollywood Road, Independent School (Boys),

100.00

75.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

90.00

100.00

100,00

Aplichau (Boys),

96.00

72.00

96.00

99

Hollywood Road (Boys),

,100.00

97.35

100.00

100.00

100.00

78.57

""

Hunghòm (Boys),

100.00

54.00

"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

97.06 100.00

80.00

100.00

100,00

??

Saiyingp'ün, I. Division (Boys),

91.66

79.18

100,00

95.83

90.48

50.00.

>>

17

II. (Girls),

"

(Boys),

88.68

37.13

100.00

90.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

85.71

100.00

100.00

95.00

""

Shekt ongtsui (Boys),

96.49 82.45

100.00

100,00

,,

(Girls),

90.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

""

19

""

"}

Staunton Street, I. Division (Girls),

Táip'ingshán Chapel (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

Ui-hing Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

87.50 84.37

100.00

100.00

100.00

...

94.74

94.74

100.00

100.00

...

(Girls),

83.00

50.00

100.00

96.55

91.67

100.00 100.00

68.75

100.00

94.44

""

>>

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

94.00

86.00

83.34

100.00

95.00

83.33

29

-97

19

(Girls),

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

15

19

11

(Girls),..

"""

29

R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys),..

Yaumati (Boys),..

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street (Boys),

L. M. S. Staunton St., II. Division, Anglo-Ch., (Girls),

96.08

88.23

100.00

98.04

86.67 50.00

90.90

80.95

50.00

95.24

100.00

96.04 81.18

100.00

99.00

98.00

100.00

(Girls),

100.00

43.48

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

90.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 75.00

92.30

92.30

100.00

III.

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls).

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

80.00

Berlin Mission (Girls),

100.00 96.51 100.00

83.33

16.66

IV.

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

100.00

""

R. C. M., Bridges Street Poor School (Mixed),

Italian Convent (Girls),

100.00

100.00

87.88 97.00 90.62

100.00

97.14

100.00

17

""

St. Francis Chapel Port. Division (Mixed),

100.00

97.06

90.00

97.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100,00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

...

->

**

"

Eng.

*

(Girls),

100.00

100.00

100.00

""

St. Joseph's College Eu.

Chi. Victoria Portuguese (Mixed),. Victoria School (Boys),.

""

(Boys),

100.00

92.00

""

(Boys),

98.15.

83.33

100,00

98.63 100.00 100.00 87.50 100.00

92.25

100.00

100.00

79.55

""

"""

(Girls),

100.00 100.00 77.77 94.44 100.00 60,00 Failed 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1884.

?

Number of children (6 to 16 years of age) in the Colony, say,

.....20,000

Deduct,-

As attending 90 Schools under Government supervision in 1884,

.........5,885

As attending about 100 Private Schools, not under Government supervision, in 1884, say, 2,000

7,885

Number of uneducated children in the Colony, in 1884, say,

.12,115

Hongkong, 25th January, 1885.

E. J. EITEL, Ph. Dr., Inspector of Schools.

+

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE SUBJECT OF DESTITUTES.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

HONGKONG, 1st May, 1885.

259

No. 25.

SIR,

The Committee appointed by His Excellency the Governor to enquire into the subject of Destitutes in this Colony have taken the various points referred to them into consideration, and beg to report as follows:

2. The Committee consider that Legislative measures are necessary to check the influx of destitutes, but that such measures can never be expected to get rid of the destitute class altogether. A proper organisation for dealing with such destitutes as must always present themselves in greater or less numbers will tend, the Committee think, to decrease rather than to increase destitution, as it will bring the men under observation, and will enable persistent measures to be taken to keep the Colony clear of them. The main evil to be overcome would seem to be the mistaken charity which finds its outcome in indiscriminate distribution of money to men who have no intention of working so long as they can prey on good-natured people.

3. The Committee consider that a Government Casual Ward should be instituted, and that it should be called simply the Shelter. There would appear to be no alternative but to attach it to the Gaol, where in fact such an institution has existed in embryo for many years. To complete the scheme of the Committee, a building will undoubtedly be necessary, but they recommend that the experiment be tried with existing means, until experience shows what amount of success is attainable and what accommodation would be required.

4. The Committee recommend that admission to this Shelter should be by printed ticket, space being left on each ticket for the name and a short description of the man relieved, which particulars the giver of the ticket would be requested to insert. In view, however, of the improbability that these details would be always or even often supplied, the Committee are not prepared to suggest that they should be made compulsory. Each ticket should cover board and lodging for 24 hours, and should not be transferable. Such tickets should be sold at the Treasury, in books of 20, the price of each book being $3.

5. The Committee further recommend that, if it can be arranged at a moderate expense, permanent advertisements should be inserted in the Newspapers explain- ing this system, and dissuading benevolent persons from relieving destitutes with

money.

6. Books of Tickets for free distribution should be furnished to the Harbour Master, the Captain Superintendent of Police, the Police Magistrates, and to other Heads of Departments, if they find it necessary to have them.

260

7. The Committee consider it essential that, after the first two days' residence by any destitute in the Shelter, it shall be within the discretion of the Superintendent of the Gaol to require him to perform a reasonable amount of moderate labour, as the condition of his obtaining further relief, time and opportunity being afforded him each day to look for employment. It would be understood also that habitual frequenters of the Shelter who shew no desire to get their living, or to leave the Colony, who will not work, or who are disorderly, should be charged before the Magistrates as rogues and vagabonds.

8. Lists of the men inhabiting the Shelter should be forwarded to the Shipping Office weekly.

9. It may be found necessary to keep a Register of the inmates of the Shelter, with dates of admission and discharge, &c. These details, however, will be best arranged as the scheme gradually grows into shape. The Visiting Justices of the Gaol would of course inspect the arrangements, and doubtless all necessary informa- tion as to the character and conduct of the men relieved would be given to persons with any reasonable ground for asking it.

.

10. The Committee consider that the arrangements suggested above will put it in the power of any charitable person at once to provide any destitute, at a merely nominal expense, with the necessaries of life. The class of professional idlers will doubtless very much prefer the old system of indiscriminate pecuniary relief. Charitable persons must therefore expect to be told frightful stories of the hardships endured in the Government Shelter. That it is in the Gaol, that the men are locked in, that they have to do the work that convicts do--all this will be urged in the hope of extorting the accustomed dollar to be spent in drink. If well-meaning but mistaken persons listen to these stories, and persist in throwing money away on men whose only desire is to be idle, the plan will be a failure; if not, it may be a success.

11. Until, however, the enquires which the Committee understand are being made at other ports are complete, and Legislative measures based on their results can be adopted, the suggestions of this Report can be regarded as tentative only.

The Committee have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servants,

The Honourable W. H. MARSH, C.M.G.,

}

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Supt. of Police. R. MURRAY RUMSEY,

Ret. Com., R.N.,

Acting Harbour Master.

A. FALCONER,

Acting Supt., Victoria Gaol.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

N. J. EDE.

D. R. CRAWFORD.

Colonial Secretary.

+

Report by the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol.

VICTORIA GAOL,

HONGKONG, 13th May, 1885.

I have perused and considered the Report of the Committee appointed by His Excellency the Governor to enquire into the subject of Destitutes in this Colony.

2. I am as yet so unfamiliar with the general conditions of the Colony that observations of mine on the general scheme proposed would be useless, and I assume are not required.

any

3. As far as the suggestions made affect the Gaol administration, there seems to me to be no difficulty in carrying out the arrangements suggested.

4. It must be borne in mind however that the Gaol is already somewhat over- crowded, and may be more so, when it would become highly inconvenient to afford sleeping accommodation to such casuals. I think therefore it would be a much more satisfactory arrangement if sleeping accommodation for such destitutes could be provided elsewhere-perhaps a room for this purpose might be made available in the Police barracks-while their meals would be supplied to them in the Prison.

5. The suggestion in para. 7 that after two days' shelter destitutes should be made liable to work seems to me not sufficiently stringent, and I think it would be better to adopt the practice of English Casual Wards, that every able bodied person who obtains food and shelter should perform a moderate amount of work, say three hours work in the day. The plan proposed of giving two days food and lodging without exacting labour would perhaps tend rather to encourage the idle. Such persons would very likely accept food and shelter only for the two days during which no work was assigned them, and would then leave, to return again for another two days after a short interval.

A. GORDON, Supt. Victoria Gaol.

261

.

263

No. 26.

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the Prorogation of the

Session of the Legislative Council of Hongkong,

June 1st, 1885.

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

1. The satisfactory conclusion to which you have carried no small amount of public business enables me now to close this Session.

2. Several measures of importance will be prepared by my Government during the recess for your consideration at your next Meeting. As I have stated on a previous occasion, I understand it to be generally agreed that the public convenience will be best consulted by opening the Annual Session of the Council in the month of November of each year. But it will be necessary to have a Special Meeting in next September to consider the Estimates for 1886. It has been found to be practically impossible to calculate accurately at an earlier period the probable revenue and expenditure of the ensuing year.

3. I will now proceed, according to the practice established in all Colonies, to lay before the Legislature a brief summary of the present condition of Hongkong, with regard to Finance, Legislation, Public Works, Education, the Public Institutions, and the Police.

4. With regard to Finance; I thank you, in the name of the QUEEN, for the supplies which you have voted for Her Majesty's service in this Colony, and as a contribution to the cost of the Defence Works. The Report of the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General shows that the probable assets of the Colony on the 31st of next December will amount to nearly two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000). It will not, therefore, be necessary to raise during the present year any portion of the Loan proposed for the com- pletion of the Extraordinary Works connected with Sanitation, Water Supply, and Defence.

-fifteen Bills have become law during the Session; the more important being the Ordinances regulating Weights and Measures, Bills of Exchange, the Disposition of Property by Married Women, and Amending the Post Office Ordinance.

5. With regard to Legislation;

6. With regard to Public Works;- -the depression of the Public Revenue, con- sequent on the unsettled state of political affairs in this quarter of the globe, has rendered necessary some temporary reduction and postponement in several of the principal undertakings contemplated last year. Steady progress has, however, been made with the Tytam Water Works; with the Victoria College; and with the general plan of Sanitation approved, in 1883, by Her Majesty's Government, on the recommendation of Mr. CHADWICK. In connec- tion with the last-mentioned subject, the details of the proposed new Building Ordinance will be carefully considered during the recess by the Public Works Committee.

7. With regard to Education; -the Annual Report of the Government Inspector shows very satisfactory progress, for 'both the number of Schools under Government supervi- sion in the Colony, and also the number of Scholars attending those Schools have been. doubled within the last ten years.' Moreover, from paragraph 13 of the same Report, it will be seen that the changes recently introduced into the Education Code have proved completely successful, and have already resulted in decreased expense coupled with increased efficiency.

264

Again, it is remarked by the Head Master in his Report that the past was an eventful year for the Central School, for the erection of the Victoria College was then commenced. It is believed that this new College will become the principal place of education not only for this Island, but also for many of the future leading men of the vast neighbouring Empire of China; and that this will prove a powerful, legitimate, and honourable method of extending British influence throughout this quarter of the globe. Already indeed, several men holding high positions in the service of the Chinese Government owe their education to the schools established in Hongkong under British auspices.

8. With regard to the Public Institutions and the Police; I have satisfied myself by several personal inspections that they are in a generally satisfactory condition. Further, from papers recently laid before the Council, it will have been seen that Major-General CAMERON, Commanding the Troops on this Station, has borne his testimony to the efficiency of the English and Sikh portion of the Police Corps in their rifle practice. A force of 300 men, equal to one fourth of the whole, has thus practically been added, in the event of war, or of serious internal disturbance, to the garrison. At the same time, the Police fully understand that their military drill must not be allowed to interfere with their civil duties in time of peace.

9. Having thus glanced at the internal affairs of this Colony, I will remind you, Honourable Gentlemen, of what I stated in my Prorogation Speech last year, viz.: that the foremost statesmen of England attach greater importance to this Colony than to other Colonies of far larger territorial extent; for Hongkong is the centre of British power and commerce in this part of the world. As you are already aware, one of my first acts after my assumption of this Government, was to call the attention of the Imperial Authorities to the comparatively unprotected state of this first-class Naval and Military Station, and great Mart of Trade, and thus to procure the 'commencement of the Defence Works which are now in progress. I know that you all entirely agree with me in the opinion that the present favourable prospect of peace should not be allowed to cause any relaxation in the efforts in this direction. It is a wise maxim that preparation for War is the surest guarantee for Peace. And, as you know already, the highest Naval and Military Authorities in the Empire believe that the completion of the Defences which are now being vigorously pushed forward by General CAMERON, will place this Colony in safety against foreign attack.

10. In conclusion, I desire to thank you, Honourable Gentlemen, once more, for your valuable advice and assistance during the past Session, and for the constant and loyal support which you afford on all occasions to the Representative of the Queen. I trust that the return of peace will soon remove the temporary depression in our trade and revenue; and that, through the blessing of Almighty God on the energy and industry of all classes in this community, the general progress and prosperity of Hongkong will be increased and consolidated.

11. I now prorogue this Council to the 15th day of next September.

PAPERS

LAID BEFORE THE

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

OF

HONGKONG.

DEC., 1884 To JUNE, 1885.

SOM QUI MAL·)

DIE

ET

MON

CDROIT.

HONGKONG:

PRINTED BY NORONHA & Co., GOVERNMENT PRINTERS.

1885.

¿

".

Juliany

AWN 30 JAN 1982*

:

CONTENTS.

PAGE.

PROCEEDINGS

.....

-of the Legislative Council,

1-76

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the opening of the Session of

the

2

Do.

Address of the

in reply to the Speech of His Excellency the Governor,.

==

77

81

3 DEFENCES

KONG.

4

5

HONG- Despatch respecting the

EASTERN MAIL SERV- Despatch respecting contribution towards the

ICE.

FINANCES OF THE COL- Report on the by the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General,

ONY.

83

85

87

6

ROMAN

CATHOLIC Despatch respecting the payment of a for the Gaol and Civil Hospital,......

91

CHAPLAIN.

7

FINANCES OF THE COL- Report on theby the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General,

93

38333

ONY.

8

POST OFFICE.

Report of the Postmaster General for 1884,

97

9

COLONIAL AND INDIAN

Papers respecting the

103

EXHIBITION OF 1886.

10

11

EASTERN MAIL SERV- Correspondence respecting the

ICE.

HONGKONG OBSERVA- Report of the Government Astronomer for 1884,

TORY.

BOTANICAL AND

115

123

12

FORESTATION

PARTMENT.

Ar- Report of the Superintendent of the for 1884, DE-

131

13

CONVEYANCING

ORDI

NANCE.

ARMAMENTS OF

THE

Telegrams and Correspondence respecting the

Petition by the Solicitors and certain Landowners for the Introduction

of a

139

147

FORTS AT HONG-

KONG.

14B

Do.

15

QUARANTINE.

16

!

17

Further Correspondence as to the

Despatch respecting the question of -,

18

19

MENT.

20

RIFLE PRACTICE OF

Correspondence respecting the

J

THE CIVIL POLICE,

AND THE SUPPLY OF AMMUNITION.

21

BILLS OF HEALTH....

Correspondence respecting Fees charged for issuing

22

RECEIPTS AND PAY-

Statement showing the total

MENTS, 1884.

KAU NG CHECK (foot Petition by certain Chinese Merchants for Permission to use the

measure).

INCORPORATION OF THE

VICAR APOSTOLIC OF THE ROMAN CA- THOLIC CHURCH IN HONGKONG.

MEDICAL DEPART-

MENT.

Report of the Colonial Surgeon for 1884,

HARBOUR DEPART- Report of the Harbour Master for 1884,

Despatches respecting the proposed —,

153

155

157

159

173

203

227

231

235

23 RECEIPTS AND EX- Report on the for the year, 1884, by the Colonial Secretary and Auditor

PENDITURE.

General,

24 EDUCATIONAL DE- Report of the Inspector of Schools for 1884,

237

241

PARTMENT.

25

DESTITUTES.

Report on the Subject of

259

26 LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the. Prorogation of the Session

of the

263

2

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 1.

WEDNESDAY, 3RD DECEMBER, 1884.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

>>

"3

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

""

""

THOMAS JACKSON.

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

19

WONG SHING.

""

2

Pursuant to Proclamation, the Council met.

At 3 o'clock P.M., the Acting Clerk of Councils read the Proclamation convening the Council, as follows:-

No. 16.

[L.S.] G. F. BOWEN.

PROCLAMATION.

By His Excellency Sir GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hong- kong and its Dependencies, and Vice-Admiral of the same.

Whereas the Legislative Council of Hongkong stands prorogued to Wednesday, the 19th day of November instant, now I, Sir GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, in exercise of the powers in me vested as Governor aforesaid, do hereby proclaim that the said Legislative Council be further prorogued to Wednesday, the 3rd December, 1884, on which day it shall meet for the despatch of business at the hour of 3 o'clock in the afternoon in the Council Chamber, in the City of Victoria in the said Colony; and the Members of the Legislative Council are hereby required to give their attendance at the said time and place accordingly.

Given under my Hand and the public Seal of the Colony, this 12th day of November, 1884.

By Command,

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

FREDERICK STEWART,

for the Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the Governor came into the Council Chamber, and having desired the Honourable Members to be seated, was pleased to speak as follows:--

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I have much pleasure in opening this Session, and in inviting your co-operation in its labours and duties.

2. Full information with regard to the Financial position of the Colony at the present time will be laid before you in the Report of the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General. The political and other complications which have now for a considerable period affected generally this quarter of the globe and especially the neighbouring Empire of China, have exercised an injurious influence on trade and commerce, and consequently on the resources of this community. It is, however, believed that this depression will prove to be only temporary, and that the restoration of peace will restore the elasticity of the public revenue. Meanwhile, it will be necessary to practise a prudent economy. list of the Public Works proposed and commenced will be submitted for your consideration; and I request, that you will report which of those works should, in your opinion, be pushed on and which postponed. Your local knowledge and experience will prove of practical advantage in enabling my Government to arrive at a sound decision on this point. It may become expedient, moreover, to revise the Estimates for 1885.

A

3. In opening the last Session, I informed you that the necessity of strengthening the Military Defences of this important Naval and Military Station and great mart of commerce had been urgently represented to the Imperial Government. Without referring to the value of the other and manifold interests, both Imperial and Colonial, which are at stake here, I reminded you that Official Statistics show that the tonnage of the shipping entered at the Port of Hongkong in the year 1883, exceeded five millions of tons; that is, it exceeded the tonnage of the shipping entered at the Port of London in 1843, the year in which Hongkong was annexed to the British Crown. At the present day, the shipping of Hongkong exceeds that of all Ports in the United Kingdom with the exception of London and Liverpool. The value of the property of every kind in this community is estimated at not less than twenty millions sterling; and this is without taking into account the Naval and Military Arsenals, Stores, and Barracks. The Imperial Government has determined to proceed with the completion of the four principal Forts which are deemed by the Military Authorities to be necessary for the protection from hostile attack of this City, with its harbour and shipping. Towards the cost of these works, this Colony is expected to contribute the sum of £56,000. The payment of this contribution will be spread over two years; and you will probably agree that it should be ultimately charged against the moderate loan, not exceeding one year's revenue, which you have already sanctioned in principle for the construction of urgently required public works. I recommend this question to your early and favourable consideration.

4. You are already aware, from papers presented during the last Session, that I have strongly pressed the expediency, on sanitary and other grounds, of the junction of the Eastern and Western divisions of this City by means of a continuous Marine Embankment along the sea-frontage of the Military cantonments and of the Royal Naval Yard. The Colonial Office in England supports my recommendation; but I regret to announce that its negotiations with the War Office and Admiralty have not as yet been brought to a successful issue.

5. During the course of the Session, reports and other papers will be laid before you showing the condition of the several Departments of the Public Service; which is generally satisfactory.

6. With regard to Legislation, there will be submitted to you, among other measures, Bills to make certain amendments in the Bankruptcy Law; to regulate Weights and Measures; to codify the law of Bills of Exchange; to amend certain Provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act; to appropriate certain unclaimed balances of Bankrupt and Intestate Estates; and to amend the Building Ordinance. 7. It is hoped, moreover, that the progress in its important work of the Commission appointed to consolidate the laws now in force in this Colony will enable several revised Ordinances to be proposed during the present Session.

8. You will further be requested to consider the propriety of enacting in a permanent form certain provisions of the temporary Peace Preservation Ordinance. On a recent occasion, the precautionary measures promptly adopted by the Civil Government with the support of the Military, speedily repressed the tendency to disorder which for a short period seemed to be threatening among the lower section of the Chinese population. Perfect tranquillity was at once restored. It must always be remembered that the position of the Chinese in Hongkong is essentially different from that of the natives in India, and in other possessions of the Crown acquired by conquest, where British rule has been imposed on peoples with long established institutions of their own. Hongkong, on the other hand, when ceded to the British Crown in 1843, was little more than a barren rock, inhabited only by a few fishermen and pirates. Since the first establishment of our rule here, a Chinese immigration, now amounting to above 150,000, has settled in this British territory of its own free will, and for the sake of its own convenience and profit. It is obvious that this new population, while entitled to the full protection of the English laws, is bound to obey those laws. Moreover, the Government of Hongkong, while expecting the loyal support of all the nationalities dwelling here together under the British flag, has ample strength of itself to enforce obedience, and to brook no interference from the Chinese Secret Societies, or from other illegal or unauthorized associations. It is satisfactory to know that the principal Chinese Merchants, and all other Chinese residents of worth and substance, appreciate the advantages which they enjoy in this community, and are favourable to the adoption of measures required for the maintenance of law and order, and for the protection of industry and property.

9. In conclusion, Honourable Gentlemen, I would express my confident hope that a steady and prudent development of the resources of this Colony, coupled with constant firmness and justice,- not dry but sympathetic justice, on the part of the Government and Legislature will, by the favour of Divine Providence, secure the general welfare and contentment of all races and classes of our population. His Excellency the Governor having left the Council Chamber, the chair was taken by the Chief Justice, as Senior Member.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the following gentlemen be appointed a Committee to prepare the address in reply to His Excellency's Speech

The Honourable THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

The Honourable THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

The Honourable THE. COLONIAL TREASURER.

The Honourable P. RYRIE,

and The Honourable W. KESWICK.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following papers: -

(1.) Despath respecting the Defences of Hongkong.

(2.) Despatch respecting contribution towards the Eastern Mail Service. (3.) Report on the Finances of the Colony.

On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, the Council adjourned till 4 P.M. to enable the Address of the Legislative Council in reply to the Speech of His Excellency the Governor to be prepared.

The Council re-assembled at 4 P.M.

The Chief Justice took the Chair.

The Acting Clerk of Councils read at the table the following Address to be presented to His Excellency the Governor, in reply to the Speech he had been pleased to deliver to the Council :-

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

1. We the members, of the Legislative Council of Hongkong, in Council assembled, desire to thank Your Excellency for your speech, and to assure you of our cordial co-operation in the labours and duties of the Session which has now been opened.

2. We regret that the trade and commerce of the Colony have been injuriously affected by the political complications which prevail in this region; but we trust with Your Excellency that the present depression will prove to be only temporary, and that the return of peace at no distant date will restore the elasticity of the public revenue. Meanwhile we acknowledge the necessity for a prudent economy; and in that view we shall carefully consider the list of proposed public works to be submitted to us, so as to report as to which of them should be pushed on and which may be conveniently postponed.

3. We are glad to hear that the Imperial Government has determined to proceed with the measures required for the protection of this City with its harbour and shipping. We doubt not that the Colony will be prepared to contribute its share towards the cost of the Defence works to be undertaken, and we shall carefully consider such propositions for that purpose as may be laid before us. We trust, however, that as soon as the plans of the defences are completed, the valuable lands now reserved, which may not be required for military purposes, will be restored to the Colonial Government, free of all restriction.

4. While thanking Your Excellency for the steps that you have taken to impress upon the Imperial Government the expediency of providing for the junction of the Eastern and Western divisions of this City by means of a continuous marine embankment, we regret that the necessary negociations with the War Office and the Admiralty have not yet been brought to a successful issue.

5. We are glad to understand that the condition of the several departments of the public service is satisfactory.

6. We shall carefully consider the Legislative measures which are to be introduced in the course of the Session.

7. We look with hope to the results to be obtained by the Commission appointed to revise and consolidate the laws now in force in this Colony.

8. We shall be glad to consider the propriety of enacting in a permanent form some of the provisions of the temporary Peace Preservation Ordinance. It is a cause for thankfulness and satisfac- tion that on the occasion of the recent disturbances the precautionary measures promptly adopted by the Government, supported by the military, sufficed for the speedy repression of all tendency to disorder and the perfect restoration of tranquillity. While we recognize with pleasure that the Government has ample strength to enforce obedience to law, and will not brook the interference of Chinese Secret Societies, or of other unauthorized associations, we believe with Your Excellency that it will always receive the loyal support of all nationalities dwelling in this Colony under the protection of the British flag..

9. In conclusion, we join with Your Excellency in the sincere hope that, under the favour of Divine Providence, the prudence, firmness and justice of the Government and Legislature will conduce to the general welfare and contentment of all classes and races in the population.

The Honourable P. RYRIE moved that the Address as read be adopted.

The Honourable F. D. SASSOON seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Colonial Secretary moved, That the Address in reply be presented to His Excellency by the Honourable P. RYRIE and the Honourable F. D. SASSOON on Friday, the 5th instant.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned at 5 P.M. until Wednesday, the 10th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of December, 1884.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 2.

WEDNESDAY, 10TH DECEMBER, 1884.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE Ferguson Bowen, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

"}

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

>>

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

29

""

""

""

""

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following Vote passed by the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

2320 of 1884.

Repairs to damages caused by the typhoon of the 10th September,

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

..$19,180

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :----

The Council are recommended to vote the sum of £55,625 required for the erection of the additional Colonial defences as explained in the despatch from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies which has already been laid on the table.

In anticipation of a Vote of Council, the Governor has already authorised an expenditure of $1,255.73 on this account during the month of November. A further sum of about $2,200 will probably be required during the present month, and, as far as can be foreseen, about $200,000 will be expended during the course of next year. The remainder of the sum will not be required till 1886.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums :-

C.S.O.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Colonial Secretary.

1561 of 1884. Travelling expenses of Cadet (Mr. SERCOMBE SMITH) to Peking,...

Opium Revenue Service,-

Treasurer.

17121824. Fitting the premises No. 223, Praya West, as an Opium boiling establishment,

C.S.O. 2644 of 1884.

Rent, &c.,

Storm damages and other expenses,

$

159.70

$ 508.10

500.00

$ 1,008.10

Postmaster General.

C.S.O.

1983 of 1884. Contingencies at the Ports, excess,

Registrar General.

4

2164 of 1884. Salary of 2 Scavengers for Yaumati Market, at $5 per month each, from 1st

September to 30th November, 1884,.

300.00

.$

30.00

6

Medical.

2581 of 1884. Apothecary and Analyst, annual increase of $96 per annum, from 12th

September to 30th November, 1884,

C$184. Care-taker of the Mortuary, salary at $10 per month, 6 months,

2034 of

$.

21.06

60 00

81.06

Police.

C.S.O.

of

2855f1884. Allowance to Adjutant for 4 Chair Coolies, at $24 per month, 1 month,.

$

24.00

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Postmaster General.

CS04. Gratuities to Ship Masters for carrying Mails, excess,

1983 of 1884.

150 of 1884.

Ecclesiastical.

..$ 1,000.00

c. O. Desp. Grant for the Services of a Roman Catholic Chaplain in the Gaol and the

Civil Hospital,.

C.S.O.

-2144 of 1884. Repairs to Police Launch, No. 3,

1706 of

Police.

Works and Buildings.

CS.1884. Lazaretto, on Stone Cutters' Island, re-vote,

Observatory and Time Ball,....................

CS: Observatory, Turfing the Platform,..............

C1884.

1518 of 1884.

1414 of 1884.

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

New Roads near the old Mahomedan Cemetery, (1st instalment),

C. O. Desp. Grant to the City Hall,..

188 of 1884.

cs.

1860 of 1884.

Miscellaneous Services.

Furniture for Government House,

720.00

$ 550.00

$ 1,805.00 3,000.00 240.00

$ 5,045.00

$ 5,000.00

.....$ 1,200.00 293.60

$ 1,493.60

EXTRAORDINARY WORKS.

C.S.O.

2997 of 1884. Tytam Water Works, supplementary,

C.S.O.

1835 of 1854. Sanitary Works, supplementary,

COLONIAL DEFENCES.

Amount paid in 1884,

700.00 7,000.00

$ 7,700.00

$ 3,464.64

The Colonial Secretary moved that these papers be referred to the Finance Committee. Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES.-The Colonial Secretary moved the appointment of the following Committees to be empowered to sit during any prorogation or adjournment of Council :—

1. Finance, to consist of the whole of the Members of the Legislative Council, with the Colonial

Secretary as Chairman.

2. Law, to consist of the Honourable the Attorney General, (Chairman), the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, the Honourable P. RYRIE, the Honourable F. D. SASSOON, and the Honourable WONG SHING.

3. Public Works, to consist of the Honourable the Surveyor General (Chairman), the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, the Honourable the Registrar General, the Honourable W. KESWICK, and the Honourable T. JACKSON.

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary the following Bills were read a first time :-

(1.) A Bill to amend The Stamp Ordinance, 1884.

2.) A Bill entitled The Bankers' Books Evidence Ordinance, 1884.

(3.) A Bill entitled The Weights and Measures Ordinance, 1884.

(4.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 7 of 1873.

5.) A Bill entitled The Merchant Shipping Ordinance, Amendment Ordinance, 1884.

(6.) A 'Bill entitled The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1884.

NOTICE OF 2ND READING.-The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of some of the above Bills.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 17th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of December, 1884.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

7:

&

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 3.

WEDNESDAY, 17TH DECEMBER, 1884.

9

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

59

**

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

29

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

"}

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

"}

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

"}

WONG SHING.

27

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Honourable the Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following Paper :

Despatches respecting the payment of a Roman Catholic Chaplain for the Gaol and Civil Hospital.

MINUTES OF THE Governor referRRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

(1.)

G. F. BOWEN.

In the speech at the opening of the Session of the Legislative Council on the 3rd instant, the Governor informed the Council that it might become expedient to revise the Estimates for 1885.

Such revision has now been made, and a revised copy of the Estimates is now ready for consideration by the Council.

It has been deemed prudent to reduce the Estimates of Revenue from the amount originally stated,

to

that is to say, $77,188 lower than what was estimated in June last.

$1,212,188 1,135,000

As regards the expenditure, it is necessary in the first place to increase the amount by certain items, some of which have been already voted by this Council, whilst the necessity of others has become apparent since the Estimates were framed.

These items added to the original Estimates will bring the total amount up from $1,150,801 to $1,173,521.

On the other hand the Council will be invited to consider certain reductions in expendi- ture, amounting in all to $82,900, the details of which will be laid before them.

The total amount of expenditure will then be reduced from $1,173,521 to $1,085,600 leaving a margin of Revenue to meet unforeseen expenses of about $45,000.

17th December, 1884.

(2.) On laying the Estimates before the Council in June last, it was stated that the Estimate of Extraordinary Public Works to be defrayed from accumulated balances would be postponed till the present Session of Council.

This Estimate is now laid on the table, and the Council is requested to vote the different items amounting altogether to $594,700 as shewn in the annexed Schedule.

10

It is estimated that the amount of accumulated balances on 1st January, 1885 will be $657,500. The balances will therefore be nearly exhausted by the end of next year. But, before that time, it is proposed that a loan of $1,000,000 should be sanctioned to continue the Public Works of an extraordinary nature during the following years.

SCHEDULE.

a. Tytam Water-works.-The sooner this work is completed the better; a large

sum is therefore set down,....

b. Military Defences,

c. Central School transferred from Estimates of ordinary expenditure,. d. Drains and Sea-wall at Lápsápwán, which Government is bound to make, in fulfilment of the agreement with the purchasers of land in that District,

e. Completion of Steam Dredger and cost of dredging operations, f. Unspent balance of vote for repairs of Typhoon damages of 1884, re-vote,... g. Sanitary Works, the detail of which will be laid before the Public Works

Committee before their exécution is sanctioned,

$200,000

200,000

50,000

75,000 10,000

.9,700

50,000

$594,700

17th December, 1884.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following Votes passed by the Finance Committee:-

ESTABLISHMENTS. Colonial Secretary.

C.S.O.

1561 of 1884. Travelling expenses of Cadet (Mr. SERCOMBE SMITH) to Peking,.....

C.S.O.

Opium Revenue Service,-

Treasurer.

1712 of 1824. Fitting the premises No. 223, Praya West, as an Opium boiling establishment,

C.S.O. 2644 of 1884.

Rent, &c., ....

Storm damages and other expenses,

Postmaster General.

159.70

....

508.10

500.00

$ 1,008.10

C.S.0.

1983 of 1884. Contingencies at the Ports, excess,

C.S.O.

Registrar General.

2164 of 1884. Salary of 2 Scavengers for Yaumáti Market, at $5 per month each, from 1st

September to 30th November, 1884,

Medical.

2581 of 1884. Apothecary and Analyst, annual increase of $96 per annum, from 12th

September to 30th November, 1884,

300.00

30.00

$

21.06

2931 of 1884. Care-taker of the Mortuary, salary at $10 per month, 6 months,

60.00

$

81.06

Police.

C.S.O:

2853 of 1884.

Allowance to Adjutant for 4 Chair Coolies, at $24 per month, 1 month,..............$

24.00

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Postmaster General.

1983 of 1884.

1.5.04. Gratuities to Ship Masters for carrying Mails, excess,

..$ 1.000.00.

}

#

Ecclesiastical.

11

150 of 1884.

c. o. Desp. Grant for the Services of a Roman Catholic Chaplain in the Gaol and the

Civil Hospital,.

C.S.O.

Police.

2144 of 1881. Repairs to Police Launch, No. 3, ....

1706 of 1881. Lazaretto, on Stone Cutters' Island, re-vote,

$

720.00

550.00

Works and Buildings.

Observatory and Time Ball,......

$ 1,805.00 3,000.00

1518 of

C1884. Observatory, Turfing the Platform,

240.00

$ 5,045.00

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

1414 of 1884.

CS New Roads near the old Mahomedan Cemetery, (1st instalment),

.$ 5,000.00

Miscellaneous Services.

C. O. Desp. Grant to the City Hall,.

188 of 1884.

C.S.O.

1860 of 1884.

Furniture for Government House,

.$ 1,200.00 293.60

$ 1,493.60

EXTRAORDINARY WORKS.

C.S.O.

2997 of 1884. Tytam Water Works, supplementary,.

C.S.O.

1835 of 1884. Sanitary Works, supplementary,

.$

700.00 7,000.00

$ 7,700.00

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

BILLS READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary the following Bills were read a second time :-

(1.) A Bill to amend The Stamp Ordinance, 1884.

(2.) A Bill entitled The Bankers' Books Evidence Ordinance, 1884.

(3.) A Bill entitled The Weights and Measures Ordinance, 1884.

4.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 7 of 1873.

(5.) A Bill entitled The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1884.

BILLS REFERRED TO LAW COMMITTEE.-The Attorney General moved that Bills (1), (2), (3), and (5) be referred to the Law Committee.

Seconded by the Colonial Secretary.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 24th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 24th day of December, 1884.

J. H. STEWART Lockhart,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

4

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 4.

WEDNESDAY, 24TH DECEMBER, 1884.

13

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

3

""

35

33

""

29

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACkson.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

WONG SHING.

""

ABSENT:

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable. PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Honourable the Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following Paper:

Report on the Finances of the Colony by the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General.-

MINUTE OF THE Governor referred to the FinanCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. F. BOWEN.

Referring to the previous minute of the 17th instant, the Governor now lays on the table a detail of the alterations proposed in the Estimates of Expenditure for 1885, in order to meet the anticipated reductions in the Revenue for that year.

The Estimates of Expenditure laid before Council in June last should be in the first place increased by the following items, some of which have been already sanctioned by the Council, whilst the rest appear to be necessary :-

a.) Increases to Police Salaries already voted,

.$ 5,500

(b.) Other increases shown in Schedule annexed,.

780

(c.) Civil Hospital Extension, re-vote,

3,300

C.S.O. 2995. (d.) Further vote recommended for additional story and extension of separate build- ing, on account of necessity for increased accommodation in the Hospital,... (e.) Repairs to public buildings, increase strongly recommended,

8,000

2,000

(f.) Police Station Hunghom, new,

3,200

Total increase,

.$ 22,780

Original Estimate,

1,150,801

$1,173,581

13

The Governor proposes that the following alterations be made in the Estimates of Expenditure for 1885 in order to bring this sum down to about $1,090,000:-

(a.) Opium Revenue Department to be abolished from 28th February next,

10 months salaries to be struck out,

6,900

(b.) Tree planting, to be reduced by

4,000

(c.) New Central School (to be paid for out of balances), to be struck out

50,000

(d.) Draining of Wongneichong, to be reduced by

20,000

(e.) Widening Kennedy Road, to be struck out

2,000

$ 82,900

The result of making these alterations will be the reduction of the Estimates

of Expenditure to

$1,090,681

which will leave a margin to meet unforeseen Expenditure of

44,319

Estimated Revenue,

.$1,135,000

Government House, 24th December, 1884.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE ORDER OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved that the Order of the Day be postponed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 31st instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 31st day of December, 1884.

ARATHOON SETII,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 5.

WEDNESDAY, 31ST DECEMBER, 1884.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

""

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

""

THOMAS JACKSON.

""

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

ABSENT:

14

The Honourable WONG SHING (by leave.)

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary moved the adoption of the following vote arranged by the Finance Committee:-

That the Council now vote the sum of Fifty-five thousand six hundred and twenty-five- pounds Sterling required as the contribution of this Colony to the effective defence of Hong- kong; it being understood that the armament to be provided by the Imperial Government will be of the best and latest pattern of breech-loading Ordnance, and capable of resisting attacks by the heaviest modern Iron-clads.

The Treasurer seconded the motion.

Mr. KESWICK addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

The Governor then addressed the Council, as follows:--

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,-I thank you in the name of the QUEEN for this unanimous vote of the contribution required by Her Majesty's Government from this Colony towards the effective defence of Hongkong. This is, as we all know,- an object of great Imperial as well as Colonial importance. I entirely agree with you that in the terms of your vote "the armament to be provided by the Imperial Government should "be of the latest and best pattern of breech-loading Ordnance, and capable of resisting attacks by the heaviest modern Iron-clads." I shall press this point in the strongest manner possible on the Home Authorities; and General SARGENT has authorized me to say that he will do the same. I have no doubt that we shall be successful; for by the later Parlia- mentary Papers issued on this subject, I find that the original vote for the armament of the Forts at Hongkong has been already doubled. There is also the subjoined paragraph in an Official letter from the War Office to the Treasury, dated November 1st, 1884;

(6

66

"At the time the earlier Parliamentary Estimate was framed, it was intended to provide wrought iron guns as possessing sufficient power for the work they would be likely to be "called upon to perform. The armaments of the Forts, however, are required to resist the present power of foreign ships which may attack them, and consequently must be of a more "formidable nature than was at first contemplated; therefore, some of the guns have been "chosen from the latest pattern of breech-loading Ordnance; which has greatly increased "the cost."

Once more, Honourable Gentlemen, in the name of the QUEEN, I thank you for this vote,

€ 15

REVISED ESTIMATES, 1885.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the revised Estimates for 1885, and made the following statement in connexion therewith :-

The Estimates of Revenue for 1885, which were originally have been carefully revised and additions shewn in the annexed Schedule have been made to the amount of.....

..$1,212,188

9,050

$1,221,238

whilst on the other hand the reductions also shewn in the Schedule have been effected to the amount of

83,680

The total of the revised Estimates of Revenue for 1885 are therefore .......$1,137,558

The Estimates of Expenditure for 1885 were originally. additions have had to be made to the sum of

as shewn in the Schedule A.

Whilst reductions on the other hand have been effected as shewn in the Schedule B to the extent of..........

The revised Estimate of Expenditure for 1885 amounts to

The excess of estimated Revenue over Expenditure during the year is therefore,

$1,150,801

26,880

$1,177,681

84,700

$1,092,981

45,577

SCHEDULE showing various items of increases and decreases from the Original Estimates of Expenditure for the year 1885.

(A.)

Increases.

Registrar General's Establishments,

(B.)

Decreases.

.$1,680.00

Ecclesiastical.-Grant for a Roman Catholic

Chaplain in the Gaol and Civil Hospital, .

720.00

Medical.-Care-taker of the Mortuary,

120.00

Colonial Secretary.-Passed Cadet,..... Treasury. Opium Revenue Department to bel . abolished, 10 months salaries,... f

Government Gardens and Plantations.-Tree

Planting, to be reduced by

..$1,800.00.

6,900.00

} 4,000.00

Police. Increase of Salaries,

5,500.00

PUBLIC WORKS:—

Gaol.-Increase to Salary of Hospital Warden,...

60.00

Grant to the City Hall,...

1,200.00

PUBLIC WORKS :—

New Central School (to be paid out of balances), 50,000.00 Draining of Wongneichong, to be reduced by 20,000.00 Widening Kennedy Road, to be struck out, ...

2,000.00

Civil Hospital Extension, re-vote,

3,300.00

$84,700.00

Do.

further vote for additional story and extension of separate buildings,

8,000.00

Deduct, 26,880.00

Repairs to Public Buildings, increase,

.... 2,000.00

Nett decrease,

.$57,820.00

Police Station Hunghòm, extension of,

Police Boat Basin, re-vote,

3,300.00

1,000.00

$26,880.00

The Colonial Secretary then gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of a Bill to amend the supply Ordinance (No. 21 of 1884).

J

7

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS.-The Colonial. Secretary then reported the following Votes for Extraordinary Public Works, and asked for sanction.

Tytam Water Works,

Military Defences,........

New Central School,

$200,000.00

200,000.00

50,000.00

75,000.00

Completion of Steam Dredger, and cost of

dredging operations,

} 10,000.00

Drains and Sea-wall at Lápsápwán,

Typhoon repairs, unspent balance, re-vote,... 9,700.00

Drainage and Sewerage,

50,000.00

$594,700.00

Question-put and carried.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the day.

Question-put and carried.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 7th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of January, 1885.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

16

.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 6.

WEDNESDAY, 7TH JANUARY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

""

""

""

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

WONG SHING.

""

18

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following Paper

The Postmaster General's Report for 1884.

BILL READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Colonial Secretary seconded by the Colonial Treasurer, a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Nine hundred and Forty-nine thousand, and Sixty-one Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1885 was read a first time.

BILL COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Treasurer,

a Bill entitled A Bill to amend The Stamp Ordinance, 1884 was committed.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of the Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 14th instant, at 4 P.M.

:

A

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of January, 1885.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

*

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 7.

WEDNESDAY, 14TH JANUARY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.) ·

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

35

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON,

>>

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

21

B

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

MINUTE BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :---

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Legislative Council to take into consideration the ques- tion of the Mail subsidy, to which the Secretary of State for the Colonies has drawn attention in the despatch No. 174 of the 25th July ultimo, this day laid before this Council herewith, and to which the Postmaster General (Mr. LISTER) has referred in his Annual Report for 1884, already presented to the Council.

Government House, 14th January, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this question be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.--The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following Papers :-

9. The Colonial and Indian Exhibition of 1886, (Papers respecting.)

10. Correspondence respecting the Eastern Mail Service.

11. Report for 1884 from the Government Astronomer.

12. Report for 1884 of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department.

AMENDED APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE, committed, read a third time, and passed.-On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, seconded by the Colonial Treasurer, a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Nine hundred and Forty-nine thousand, and Sixty-one Dllars to the Public Service of the Year 1885 was committed and read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

STAMP ORDINANCE, read a third time, and passed. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Treasurer, a Bill entitled The Stamp Ordinance, 1884 was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

22

BANKERS' BOOKS EVIDENCE ORDINANCE. Committed. Notice of third reading. ~On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a bill entitled The Bankers' Books Evidence Ordinance, 1884 was committed.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of the Bill.

NOTICE OF INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.-The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move the introduction of a Bill to amend Ordinance 14 of 1870.

BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 8 OF 1882.-Read a first time.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 8 of 1882 was read a first time.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 21st instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 21st day of January, 1885.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

2

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 8.

WEDNESDAY, 21ST JANUARY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.) the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

">

>>

27

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

>>

""

""

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON,

WONG SHING.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.--The Honourable T. JACKSON gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask if it is true that the funds of this Colony are at present being spent upon the construction of a fort at the Liümún Pass, covering the proposed minefield, upon which it is intended to mount old 40-pounder guns, which have been obsolete for nearly twenty-years, and which would prove utterly useless against modern ordnance.

PETITION. The Honourable W. KESWICK brought up a Petition from the Solicitors of the Colony, praying for legislation to improve the land laws at present in force in Hongkong, and moved, that it be received.

Question-put and passed.

The Honourable W. KESWICK moved that the Petition and draft Bill accompanying it be printed and circulated.

The Honourable T. JACKSON seconded,

Question-put and passed.

BANKERS' BOOKS EVIDENCE ORDINANCE.-READ A THIRD TIME. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Bankers' Books Evidence Ordinance, 1885 was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

A BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 14 OF 1870.-READ A FIRST TIME. NOTICE OF SECOND READING. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill to amend Ordinance 14 of 1870 was read a first time.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move that the Bill be read a second time.

A BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 8 OF 1882.-READ A SECOND TIME. NOTICE OF GOING INTO COMMITTEE. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 8 of 1882 was read a second time.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 28th instant, at 4 P.M.

23

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of January, 1885.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

+

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

:

,

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 9.

WEDNESDAY, 28TH JANUARY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

3)

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

""

""

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM Keswick.

THOMAS JACKSON.

25

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

""

WONG SHING.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums :-

.C.S O. 1504 of 1884.

(1)

Supplementary Vote for 1884.

Increase to the Salary of the Matron of the Lock Hospital, from $30

to $40 per month, from 1st July to 30th November, 1884,

Supplementary Vote for 1885.

50.00

C.S.O.

1504 of 1884.

Increase to the Salary of the Matron of the Lock Hospital, as above, for

12 months,

.$

120.00

(2)

$815.53 being the balance to the Debit of the Lock Hospital's Account for

the year ended 1884, as per account annexed,

815.53

C.S.O.

3121 of 1884.

Re-vote of $820.30 being amount due to those members of the Police Force, who have accepted the increase of pay under the new Regulations,

820.30

.$ 500.00

C.S.0.

Arrears of pay for 1884 to be paid in 1885.

(3)

3252 of 1884. Building a Dwelling House for the First Assistant at the Kaulung

Observatory,

The Government is at present paying $30 per month for his quarters at Kaulung. It will therefore be more economical to build a dwelling for him.

Government House, 28th January, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

3

26

ASSENT TO ORDINANCES.-The Acting Clerk of Councils announced His Excellency the Governor's assent to the following Ordinances :-

Ordinance No. 1 of 1885.—An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Nine hundred and Forty-nine thousand, and Sixty one Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1885.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1885.-An Ordinance to amend The Stamp Ordinance, 1884.

QUESTION.-The Honourable T. JACKSON, pursuant to notice, asked if it is true that the funds of this Colony are at present being spent upon the construction of a fort in the Liümun Pass, covering the proposed minefield, upon which it is intended to mount old 40-pounder guns, which have been obsolete for nearly twenty years, and which would prove utterly useless against modern ordnance.

His Excellency the Governor replied as follows:-

6

6

"With reference to the question of the Honourable Gentleman, I desire, in the first place, to take this opportunity of informing the Council that, on the 2nd instant, I forwarded by telegraph to the Secretary of State for the Colonies, the vote passed unanimously, on the 31st ultimo, viz.:-

This Council now vote unanimously the sum of fifty-five thousand six hundred and twenty-five pounds sterling (£55,625), required as the contribution of this Colony to the effective defence 'of Hongkong; it being understood that the armament to be provided 'by the Imperial Government will be of the best and latest pattern 'of breech-loading ordnance, capable of resisting attacks by the 'heaviest modern ironclads.' To this I have received the follow- ing reply:

6

Referring to your telegram of the 2nd January, new guns are 'being provided at the cost of more than eighty thousand pounds sterling (£80,000).' It will be remembered that this is more than double the cost (viz. £37,500) of the guns originally proposed for the new Forts at Hongkong.

"With regard to the terms of the Honourable Gentleman's

ques- tion, I am unable to say, if 'the Funds of the Colony are at present 'being spent upon the construction of a Fort in the Liümun Pass.' I have ascertained that the military works here are being carried out under the immediate direction of the War Office in England, and that it is not known as yet whether the cost of the battery at the Liümun Pass, which will not exceed one thousand pounds sterling, (£1,000), will be set down to Imperial Funds, or to the Colonial con- tribution. Of course, if it is so desired, I will forward the question of my Honourable Friend to the Secretary of State.

"With respect to the other points of the Honourable Gentleman's question, I am informed that heavy ordnance will probably be mount- ed at the Liümun Pass so soon as it can be procured; but that the primary object of the new work there is to protect the Submarine minefield against the attack of armed boats and steam-launches; and that for this purpose lighter and rapidly firing guns are indispensable; such as breech-loading 40-pounder guns, which the Military author- ities declare are not obsolete, or ineffective."

A BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 14 OF 1870.-READ A SECOND TIME. COMMITTED. NOTICE OF THIRD READING.--On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill to amend Ordinance 14 of 1870 was read a second time and committed.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of this Bill.

A BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 8 OF 1882.-COMMITTED. NOTICE OF THIRD READING.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill to amend Ordinance 8 of 1882 was committed.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of this Bill.

NOTICE OF

A BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 7 OF 1873.-COMMITTED. THIRD READING.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 7 of 1873 was committed.

a Bill

·

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of this Bill.

:

i

:

27

THE UNCLAIMED BALANCES ORDINANCE, 1885.-WITHDRAWN. AMENDED BILL READ A FIRST TIME. The Attorney General asked leave to withdraw this Bill, and to introduce an amended Bill in its stead.

Question-put and passed.

On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Amended Bill was read a first time.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 4th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of February, 1885.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 10.

WEDNESDAY, 4TH FEBRUARY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley.)

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

>>

"}

""

THOMAS JACKSON.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

""

>>

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sum:-

Increase to the Salary of the Steward and Storekeeper at the Civil Hospital,-

For 1884..

For 1885,

.$ 30.00

.$150.00

$180.00

Government House, 4th February, 1885.

THE WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ORDINANCE, 1885.-COMMITTED.

NOTICE OF THIRD READING.

On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Weights and Measures Ordinance, 1885 was committed.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move that the Bill be read a third time.

THE UNCLAIMED Balances ORDINANCE, 1885.-READ A SECOND TIME. NOTICE OF GOING INTO COMMITTEE.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1885 was read a second time.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move that the Council go into Committee on the Bill,

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 8 OF 1882.-RE-COMMITTED. READ A THIRD TIME. PASSED. On the motion of the Attorney General seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 8 of 1882 was re-committed, read a third time, and passed.

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 7 OF 1873.-READ A THIRD TIME. PASSED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 7 of 1873 was read a third time, and passed.

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 14 OF 1870.-READ A THIRD TIME. PASSED. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 14 of 1870 was read a third time, and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 11th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of February, 1885.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

29

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No 11.

WEDNESDAY, 11TH FEBRUARY, 1885.

31

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR ·

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

""

""

>>

12

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

"}

THOMAS JACKSON.

>>

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Correspondence relative to the renewal of the Postal Contract and the question of Mail subsidy.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:-

For surface scavenging the City of Victoria, and the Villages, for 12 months,

commencing from 1st January, 1885,..

..$18,570.00

Although this sum will be amply covered by the receipts for the privilege of removing excretal matters, see annexed Memorandum, the Treasury instructions require all Expenditure to be voted.

Statement regarding the removal of Excretal Matters, and General Surface Scavenging.

REVENUE.

For the privilege of removing Night-soil from the City of Victoria, for 12 months,

from 1st January, 1885, the Contractor Ko I, will pay,

EXPENDITURE.

.$18,600.00

For scavenging the City of Victoria, for 12 months, from 1st January, 1885,

the Government to pay to LIN SHAN,

..$17,760.00

For scavenging the Villages of Yaumáti, Hunghòm, Shaukiwán, Stanley, Aberdeen, and Aplichau, with privilege of removing all Night-soil, the Government to pay to Ko I,.....

810.00

Total,..........

$18,570.00

Government House, 11th February, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

32

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following Votes passed by the Finance Committee:---

(Finance Committee, 10th February, 1885.)

C.9.0.

1904 of 1883.

C.S.O.

1904 of 1883.

ESTABLISHMENTS. Civil Hospital.

Increase to the Salary of the Steward and Storekeeper ($10 per month after first year, and $20 per month after second year), from 1st September to 30th November, 1884, at $10 per month,

Increase to the salary of the Steward and Storekeeper ($10 per month after first year, and $20 per month after second year), from 1st December, 1884, to 31st August, 1885, at $10 per month,

And from 1st September to 30th November, 1885, at $20 per month,

30.00

:

90.00

60.00

$

180.00

DEPOSITS NOT AVAILABLE.

1304 of

C1884. Increase to the Salary of the Matron of the Lock Hospital, from $30 to $40 per

month, from 1st July to 30th November, 1884,

50.00

C.S.0.

1504 of 1884.

Increase to the Salary of the Matron of the Lock Hospital, from $30 to $40 per

month, from 1st December, 1884 to 30th November, 1885,

120.00

Police.

C.8.0. 5121 of 1884.

Amount due to those Members of the Police Force, who have accepted the increase of pay under the new regulations as to term of service for pension and remittances to England, arrears of pay for 1884 to be paid in 1885, re-vote,

..$

820.30

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Medical.

C.S.O.

204 of 1885.

Balance to the debit of the Lock Hospital's Account, for the year ended 1884, ......$

Works and Buildings.

2254 of 1884, Building Quarters at Kaulung, for the First Assistant at the Observatory,.............$

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer. Question-put and passed.

815.53

500.00

THE UNCLAIMED BALANCES ORDINANCE, 1885.-COMMITTED. NOTICE OF THIRD READING.--On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1885, was committed.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of the Bill.

BILLS OF EXCHANGE ORDINANCE.-READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885, was read a first time.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move the second reading of this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 18th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 18th day of February, 1885.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

&

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 12.

WEDNESDAY, 18TH FEBRUARY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

"}

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

>>

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

WILLIAM KESWICK.

""

THOMAS JACKSON.

>>

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed. ·

THE UNCLAIMED BALANCES ORDINANCE, 1885.-READ A THIRD TIME.

PASSED. On the motion

of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1885, was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

THE WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ORDINANCE, 1885.-

MEASURES ORDINANCE, 1885.-RE-COMMITTED.

READ A READ A THIRD TIME.

PASSED. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Weights and Measures Ordinance, 1885, was re-committed and read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

NOTICE OF GOING INTO

THE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ORDINANCE, 1885.-READ A SECOND TIME. COMMITTEE. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885, was read a second time.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council, he would move that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Council adjourned until Tuesday, the 24th instant, at 4 P.M.

G. F. BOWEN,

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of March, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

33

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 13.

TUESDAY, 24TH FEBRUARY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

>>

""

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

"

>>

"

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

The draft Jury List for the year 1885, was considered with closed doors.

The List was finally adopted, after having been revised and amended, and the Special Jurors having been designated.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 4th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of March, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

35

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 14.

WEDNESDAY, 4TH MARCH, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.) The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

??

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

37

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), by leave.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.-The Honourable WONG SHING gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would ask whether an apology or explanation has been received from the French Authori- ties for the reported outrage committed on board a Coal barge in this Harbour on the 19th February last, while the barge was being employed to supply Coal to the French Man-of-war Duguaý Trouin.

His Excellency the Governor spoke as follows:-With reference to the question of which the Honourable Gentleman has given notice, I may mention now that the important matter to which he refers has not escaped my attention. A report on the subject was addressed to the Government by the Police, when I caused an official letter to be addressed to the French Consul. That gentleman has replied that he will make enquiry forthwith, and state the result. Accordingly, when the Honourable Gentleman asks the question of which he has given notice at the next meeting of this Council, I shall probably be in a position to afford him further information.

MARRIED WOMEN'S DISPOSITION OF PROPERTY ORDINANCE.--READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Treasurer, a Bill entitled The Married Women's Disposition of Property Ordinance, 1885, was read a first time.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move the second reading of this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved that the other Order of the Day be postponed.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 11th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of March, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 15.

WEDNESDAY, 11TH MARCH, 1885.

PRESENT :

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SİR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

·

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

·

>:

""

>>

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

";

WONG SHING.

**

39

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:-

(1.)

Supplementary Vote for 1885.

202 of 1885.

C. Cost of a suitable house on piles for the proper working of the Automatic

Tide-gauge recently received from England,

C.S.O.

305 of 1885.

C.S.O. 344 of 1885.

C.S.O.

404 of 1885.

(2.)

Increase to the Allowance to the Inspector of Weights and Measures, from

$8 to $20 per month, from 1st April to 30th November, 1885,

The new Ordinance (No. 8 of 1885) does away with the system of paying a share of the fines to the Inspector, and the whole of the fines will in future he paid into the Treasury.

(3.)

Increase to the salary of the Clerk of the Government Civil Hospital, from $20 to $30 per month, rising to $40 a month by an annual increment of $2 a month, 9 months-

This increase has been strongly recommended by both the Coloniał Surgeon and the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital, as the pay is at present too low to induce any competent person to accept the post.

(4.)

For restoring to their original condition the two shops on the Praya West,

recently used in connexion with the Opium boiling factory,

Government House, 11th March, 1885.

$ 200.00

96.00

$ 90.00

..$ 200.00

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded,

Question-put and passed.

40

QUESTION. The Honourable WONG SHING, pursuant to notice, asked whether any apology or explanation has been received from the French Authorities for the reported outrage committed on board a Coal barge in this Harbour on the 19th February last, while the barge was being employed to supply Coal to the French Man-of-war Duguay Trouin.

His Excellency the Governor replied as follows:--I am glad to be enabled to reply to the Honourable gentleman who so worthily represents in this Council his Chinese countrymen in a manner which I believe he cannot fail to consider satisfactory. When at the last meeting of Council my Honourable friend gave notice of his question, I observed as follows:-

"With reference to the question of which the Honourable gentleman has given notice, I may mention now that the important matter to which he refers has not escaped my attention. A report on the subject was addressed to the Government by the Police, when I caused an official letter to be addressed to the French Consul. That gentleman has replied that he will make enquiry forthwith, and state the result. Accordingly, when the Honourable gentleman asks the question of which he has given notice at the next meeting of this Council, I shall probably be in a position to afford him further information."

I have since received a letter from the French Consul containing a full explanation and expression of regret for the occurrence in question. He states that a misunderstanding arose between the French officers and the European contractor respecting the quality of the coal supplied to the French cruiser Duguay Trouin, for as a very limited quantity of coal is, in accordance with the instructions of Her Majesty's Government, permitted to be supplied to the men-of-war of the belligerent powers it is necessary to test the quality of the article furnished. Further, the Consul states that he regrets that any incident should have happened in consequence of this misunderstanding to give ground of complaint, and that he has written to the French naval authorities, so as to prevent a recurrence of any incident of a similar nature. He adds that the officer commanding the Duguay Trouin and the officers of the French navy generally fully recognise the necessity of avoiding all cause of dispute between the French seamen and the Chinese resident in this Colony, and of observing more faithfully than ever, under existing circumstances, the respect due to British sovereignty in the waters of Hongkong.

A BILL ENTITLED THE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ORDINANCE, 1885.-COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885, was committed.

The Council went into Committee.

Progress reported at clause 48.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved that the other Order of the Day be postponed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded:

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 18th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 18th day of March, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

+

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 16.

WEDNESDAY, 18TH MARCH, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.) the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

>>

""

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

>>

WONG SHING.

""

ABSENT:

41

His Honour the Chief Justice, (Sir George PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

CONVEYANCE OF MAILS.-The Colonial Secretary moved the adoption of the following resolution of the Finance Committee of the 10th ultimo :-

"That as the sections of the Community which are most interested in the question of "the conveyance of mails are represented by the Chamber of Commerce, the recommendations of that Chamber, which have been made with only one dissentient vote, should, in the opinion of the Committee, be recommended for adoption."

(6

The Colonial Secretary also read the following rider to the above resolution :—

(C

"The Committee trust that, in any new arrangements, the distribution of the amount of contribution towards the paying of the subsidy will be favourably considered as far as "this Colony is concerned, and recommend that the papers on this subject which have not "already been printed should be printed forthwith.

The Honourable W. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and passed.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Governor moved that the other Orders of the Day be postponed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 25th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of March, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 17.

WEDNESDAY, 25TH MARCH, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

>>

>>

པ་

""

215

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

>>

WONG SHING.

43

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE,-Read the following Minute by His Excelleney the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sum:-

C.S.O.

541 of 1885.

Arrears of

pay for 1884, due to Inspector LINDSAY, who has just returned from leave and accepted the increase of pay under the new regulations as to term of service for pension and remittances to England,

Government House, 25th March, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

..$ 81.28

ASSENT TO ORDINANCES.-The Clerk of Councils announced His Excellency the Governor's assent to the following Ordinances :-

No. 3 of 1885.--The Bankers' Books Evidence Ordinance, 1885.

No. 4 of 1885.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 8 of 1882. No. 5 of 1885.—An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 7 of 1873. No. 6 of 1885.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 14 of 1870. No. 7 of 1885.-The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1885. No. 8 of 1885.-The Weights and Measures Ordinance, 1885.

ORDINANCES CONFIRMED BY THE QUEEN.-The Clerk of Councils announced Her Majesty's confirmation of the following Ordinances :-

No. 1 of 1884, entitled.-The Opium Ordinance, 1884.

No. 2 of 1884, entitled.-An Ordinance for the naturalisation of WILLIAM DOBERCK.

No. 3 of 1884, entitled.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 3 of 1862.

No. 5 of 1884, entitled —An Ordinance for the naturalisation of TSÉUNG SZ-kái.

No. 6 of 1884, entitled.—The Medical Registration Ordinance, 1884.

No. 7 of 1884, entitled.-The Dangerous Goods Ordinance, Amendment Ordinance,

1884.

124

44

No. 8 of 1884, entitled.-The Criminal Procedure Amendment Ordinance, 1884.

No. 9 of 1884, entitled.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 3 of 1881.

No. 11 of 1884, entitled.—The French Mail Steamers Ordinance continuation Ordinance,

1884.

No. 13 of 1884, entitled.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 3 of 1871.

No. 14 of 1884, entitled.-The Merchant Shipping Ordinance, 1879, Amendment Ordi-

nance, 1884.

No. 15 of 1884, entitled.-The Stamp Ordinance, 1884..

No. 16 of 1884, entitled.--The Preservation of Birds Ordinance 1870, Amendment Ordi-

nance 1884.

No. 17 of 1884, entitled.-An

Ordinance to make provision for certain duties formerly

attaching to the Office of Sheriff.

No. 18 of 1884, entitled.-An. Ordinance to authorise FRANCIS BULKELEY JOHNSON to construct piers and wharves in the harbour of Vic- toria, and to confer upon the said FRANCIS BULKELEY JOHNSON certain other powers and privileges.

No. 19 of 1884, entitled.-An Ordinance to authorise CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, to con- struct piers and wharves in the harbour of Victoria, and to confer upon the said CATCHICK PAUL CHATER certain other powers and privileges.

No. 20 of 1884, entitled.-An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Two hundred and Thirty-five thousand Three hundred and Forty-five Dollars and Twenty-six Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1883.

No. 21 of 1884, entitled.-An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One million and Six thousand, Eight hundred and Eighty-one Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1885.

No. 22 of 1884, entitled.-The Peace Preservation Ordinance, 1884.

THE LATE SIR HARRY PARKES.-The Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council with reference to the death of the late Sir HARRY S. PARKES, Her Britannic Majesty's Minister at Peking, and moved that this Council pass a resolution of condolence with the family of the deceased.

The Honourable T. JACKSON seconded the motion.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council, expressing his entire concurrence with the motion, and read the following despatch which he had addressed to the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the subject:-

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, March 24th, 1885.

My LORD, I have the honour to report that the telegraphic intelligence of the death of Sir HARRY PARKES on the 22nd instant, of remittent typhoid fever, after three days' illness, has caused much sorrow in Hongkong, where he had formerly resided for several years. This feeling will be general throughout the English communities in China and Japan, with which he has been connected as Consul and Minister for above a quarter of a century. Even those who differed from some parts of Sir HARRY PARKES' policy always admired his many high qualities,—his courage, his energy, his unselfish devotion to the public service. To myself he is a great loss. Our relations, both official and personal, have always been most cordial; he deplored that I had been obliged to seek, on medical certificate, the leave of absence which was so kindly granted by your Lordship; and he rejoiced and applauded when I decided, at whatever risk of health and sacrifice of personal convenience, to remain at my post during the present crisis in the affairs of this quarter of the globe. The feeling of Sir HARRY PARKES on this point was identical with my own. He had been for some time in failing health, and he felt severely the weight of work and responsibility pressing upon him, as upon me, at the present juncture. But he declined to listen to the advice given him to seek at least temporary rest and relaxation. Recently he wrote to a friend as follows:- "Where I may fail is in physical health, which warns me that the present strain will have its limits, and that some relief,-even if it be for a short period, will become indispensable. I shall do my best, however, to hold on till the end of this year." His friends knew, and Sir HARRY PARKES himself knew, that his impaired strength would yield altogether to any severe attack of illness, if he should determine to remain at Peking. He did so determine, and thus this able and gallant servant of his Queen and country has died by the most envi- able of all deaths, at the post of honour and duty.

Question-put and passed.

I have, &c.,

G. F. BOWEN.

:

རྩྭ

45

BILL READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Married Women's Disposition of Property Ordinance, 1885, was read a second time.

PRIVATE BILL. FIRST READING.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, A Bill for the Incorporation of the Roman Catholic Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong, was read a first time.

A BILL ENTITLED THE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ORDINANCE, 1885, IN COMMITTEE.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Council resumed consideration, in Committee, of the Bill entitled The Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885.

Progress reported at clause 82.

On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, the Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 1st proximo,

at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 1st day of April, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

1

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor

!

!

!

:

í

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 18.

WEDNESDAY, 1ST APRIL, 1885.

47

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley.)

22

""

79.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

WILLIAM KESWICK.

>>

THOMAS JACKSON.

>>

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

WONG SHING.

""

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table Telegrams and Correspondence respecting the Armament of the Forts of Hongkong.

DIRECT TELEGRAPH LINE TO SINGAPORE.

TORPEDO LAUNCHES.-The Honourable THOMAS

JACKSON, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution :-

"That in the Opinion of this Council, there ought to be direct Telegraphic Communica- tion between Hongkong and Singapore, the nearest British Settlement; and that immediate .steps be taken to supplement the defences of Hongkong, by obtaining with the least possible

delay a flotilla of Torpedo Launches fully equipped."

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded, and addressed the Council.

The Honourable W. KESWICK addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council, and spoke as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,-I am very glad indeed that my Honourable friend who so worthily represents in this Council the Chamber of Commerce, has brought forward this most important resolution; and I thank him and I thank the two Honourable members who supported him for the way in which they have spoken of myself and of the Executive of this Colony. I hope that this resolution will be carried unanimously. As the Honourable member said, it is owing to my exertions that the Un-official element in this Council was increased from two to five, and that the Chamber of Commerce was invited to nominate its own representative. I am sure from the able speeches my Honourable friend has made on this and other occasions, and from his high character and position, that the Chamber of Commerce could not have made a better choice. In fact I look upon my Honourable friend as a living, and I am happy to add, flourishing, proof of the success of my policy. I said just now that I hoped that this resolution would be passed unani- mously, and I said so because it would give great strength to recommendations I have already made on the same subject to Her Majesty's Government. The fact is, gentlemen, that a truly paternal Governor on this as on other occasions has anticipated the wishes of his children. A great English statesman some years ago-I refer to Sir ROBERT PEEL-said it was the first duty of a statesman to be a little, but not too much, in advance of the people over whom he rules. Now it can be proved by documentary evidence that. I have been in this question of defence twelve months at least in advance, not of the Royal Engineer Officers. and others to whom my Honourable friend on my left (Honourable W. KESWICK) referred just now as having given special attention to the subject, but of general opinion in this community. I can only say that when I came here there was no general agitation on the subject of defences, and it was I who then first raised the question with the Imperial Government. I have prepared a minute showing exactly what has been done, and quoting from various documents, and with the permission of the Council I will now read that minute:-

48

·

"I arrived at Hongkong on March 30th, 1883; and six weeks afterwards, after careful study of the subject, I opened the question of the Defences of this Colony by an elaborate despatch to the Secretary of State (Lord DERBY), dated May 12th, 1883. In that Despatch, after entering fully into details, I concluded as follows:"-

I submit that your Lordship should move the War Office to prepare a full and final plan for the defences of Hongkong, and that such plan should be transmitted by Her Majesty's Government to both the Governor and the General Commanding the troops, with instructions to use all the authority and influence of their respective offices in assisting in carrying it into execution. The Major-General Commanding has read this despatch, and authorises me to state that he cordially agrees with my views in every respect. He fully concurs as to the urgent necessity of the War Office finally deciding on a complete plan of defence, and of that plan being carried into execution without unavoidable delay.

I may here observe that in the phrase "full and final plan," I referred to those various and conflicting schemes to which my honourable friend alluded just now. I knew, of course, that various Engineer Officers had proposed various plans, but none had been adopted, and the great point was that a full and final plan should be decided upon.

"After several detailed statements and arguments, I proceeded as follows:-

that shipping

It has been frequently shown that Hongkong commands our Trade Routes in the Far East; to the amount of above five millions of tons (a larger tonnage than that which entered the port of London 40 years ago) yearly enters this port; and that it is of paramount importance not to suffer any nation, or any possible confederacy of nations, to destroy or lessen the prestige and influence of Great Britain with China and Japan, those rich and vast countries which have in all human probability a great future before them in the history of the world.

of

"Such, Honourable gentlemen, was the language in which I opened the question of our defences just six weeks after my first arrival here. And I have followed up this opening by a long series of official despatches and (what has proved still more effective), of private letters to my personal friends among English statesmen and among the chief Military Authorities at the War Office. I cannot, of course, publish correspondence much of which is of a confidential character; but I am ready to show it to any member of this Council. I know that you, Honourable gentlemen, like myself, deprecate any irresponsible chatter' (as one you has truly called it), which could have no other result but to point out any weak point in the armour of our country to our possible enemies-to all who fear or who envy the greatness of England. A perusal of my correspondence on this subject will show that what has been done, and is doing. for the defences of this Colony, is due mainly to my constant and persistent representations, aided, of course, by General Sargent, and by the other naval and military authorities. I am in cordial co-operation with Admiral Sir W. Dowell, and with General CAMERON, who possess the entire confidence of the Admiralty and of the War Office; and this community can place full reliance on their prudence and energy.

Sir W. DOWELL is now temporarily absent in the execution of measures which, if they could be divulg- ed, would be regarded by all of you as the best calculated alike for the protection of our trade and of English interests generally in this quarter of the globe, and also for the protection of Hongkong. The Admiral has authorised me to state, moreover, that there will remain

perma- nently in this harbour the formidable ironclad Wivern-now fully manned and equipped-and five other men-of-war, together with four torpedo boats, and a large, provision of submarine mines. I may add that I have recently received a letter from the highest official military authority in England, in which he writes that with the 'defensive power' of various kinds already provided, or which will shortly be provided for this harbour, 'you should laugh to scorn the possible attacks of the ships of all other nations now in the China seas.'

"I am sorry to be obliged to detain you so long; but I must now tell you precisely what has already been done with regard to the two subjects referred to in the Resolution proposed by my Honourable friend.

"(1.) The Government entirely agree that 'there ought to be direct Telegraphic Commu- nication between Hongkong and Singapore.' I have already communicated with the Imperial Government on this subject, both by telegraph and by despatch. I also brought it before the Executive Council, which, after full consideration, passed the following Minute:-

The Council advise that, in the present depressed state of the Colonial Revenue, it is impossible that this Colony should give any substantial contribution towards a direct telegraphic cable to Singapore, which is desirable for Imperial rather than for Colonial, for naval and military rather than for commercial interests.

"I have communicated on this point also with the Acting Governor of the Straits Settlements, who informs me that his Government, like that of Hongkong, is unable to give any substantial aid to the proposed scheme.

I was informed by the Manager of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company that a direct Telegraph cable to Singapore would cost about £400,000, that is, about twice the total annual revenue of this Colony; but I have been informed since that that is probably an extravagant estimate. It appears that the Company would require a guarantee of £20,000 yearly for twenty years. It is possible that the Imperial Government might be inclined to give a guarantee, or to aid in some other way.

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"(2.) With regard to the second point of the Resolution now before the Council, viz., the provision of a 'flotilla of torpedo boats,' I have already stated that Admiral Sir W. DOWELL has informed me that four torpedo boats, fully equipped, are attached to this harbour. After consultation with him, I have asked the Imperial Government, both by telegraph and despatch, to provide four more torpedo-boats, making eight in all, which the naval authorities consider amply sufficient. I may here add that the naval authorities believe that the Auxiliary Flotilla, formed of six of the steam-launches belonging to the Colonial Government, will afford very valuable aid.

valuable aid. At my request, the Imperial Government has provided the Colony with a full equipment for this Flotilla of 7-pounder guns and Nordenfeldt machine-guns, and of rifles and revolvers for the crews, together with a large supply of ammunition. I am informed that two of the Government steam-launches can be fitted for torpedos.

"There are several other points connected with the subject of our Defences to which I should like to refer, if this Minute were not already longer than I intended. I should not omit, however, to mention that, more than a year ago, I strongly recommended the increase of the Garrison by a considerable force of Artillery and another regiment of the line. As you are aware, a second battery of the Royal Artillery was sent out at once. It is impossible that, at the present crisis, a second battalion of English infantry should be spared; but I have been assured that arrangements have been made for sending here as soon as possible at least one regiment of Indian troops and two more batteries of Artillery, making four batteries in all.

"In conclusion, I would observe that nothing can be further from my intention, in. writing this Minute, than to claim any special credit for the constant, zealous, and successful efforts which I have made during the last two years for the improvement of our Defences. I feel that. I have only discharged what is one of the first duties of the Governor of this Colony at the existing crisis."

If no other Honourable gentleman wishes to address the Council I will now put the resolution to the vote, and I repeat that I hope it will be carried unanimously, for it is calculated to add force to the recommendations I have already made to the Imperial Government on the subjects of which it treats.

Question-put and passed.

THE BILL ENTITLED THE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ORDINANCE, 1885, IN COMMITTEE.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council resumed consideration, in Committee, of the Bill entitled The Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885.

Progress reported at the Schedule.

PRIVATE BILL-SECOND READING. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Bill for the Incorporation of the Roman Catholic Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong, was read a second time.

A BILL TO AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE. NOTICE OF FIRST READING.-The Attorney General gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would move the first reading of this Bill.

ADJOURNMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.—The Attorney General moved the postponement of the other Order of the day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 8th instant, at 4 P.M.

40

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of April, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 19.

WEDNESDAY, 8TH APRIL, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

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$

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK,

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table Despatches respecting the question of Quarantine.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sum :-

688 of 1885.

C.S.O. For the construction of new Roads near the Mahomedan Cemetery,

(second instalment),

Government House, 8th April, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this paper be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

.$2,500.00

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following Votes passed by the Finance Committee:-

(Finance Committee, 7th April, 1885.)

344 of 1885.

305 of 1985.

ESTABLISHMENTS. Medical.

Increase to the salary of the Clerk of the Civil Hospital, from $20 to $30 per month,

rising to $40 a month by an annual increment of $2 a month, 9 months @ $10-$

Police Magistrates.

C. Increase to the Allowance to the Inspector of Weights and Measures, from $8 to $20 per month, from 1st April to 30th November, 1885, in lieu of receiving a portion of the fines,

90.00

96.00

51

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Treasury.

404 of 1885.

C. For restoring to their original condition the two shops in Praya West, recently used

in connection with the Opium boiling Factory,

202 of 1885.

C.S.O.

650 of 1885.

Observatory.

5. For the erection of a suitable house on piles for the proper working of the Automatic

Tide-gauge, recently received from England,

Miscellaneous Services.

$

200.00

200.00.

For surface scavenging the City of Victoria and the Villages, for 12 months,.........$18,570.00

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PETITION.-The Honourable WONG SHING brought up a Petition from certain Chinese Merchants, praying for leave to use the Kau-ng Chek or the Custom House Standard Chek in Hongkong instead of the Chek (foot) as described in Ordinance 8 of 1885, and moved that it be received.

Question-put and passed.

QUESTIONS. The Honourable T. JACKSON, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions

1st. Has the Blockade of Pakhoi been legally notified?

2nd. Is it an effective blockade?

3rd. Can your Excellency suggest any remedies for the existing evils under which the trade of this Colony with Pakhoi, and the surrounding district is at present suffering, in consequence of the reported blockade?

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,-My Honourable friend who represents the Chamber of Commerce has, in the exercise of his undoubted privilege as a Member of this Council, put questions to the Government on a subject of the gravest import- ance to the interests of this community. I am very glad indeed that my Honourable friend has taken this course, because it enables me to lay before the Council a Minute giving the fullest information which I have been able to collect on all the subjects connected with the matter to which he refers. Before reading that minute I will, with the permission of the Council, inform you of a telegram which I have during the last half hour received from Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires at Peking :-

H.B.M. CHARGÉ D'AFFAIRES AT PEKING TO THE Governor of Hongkong.

(Received 8th April at 3.30 p.m.)

Protocol restoring peace between France and China has been signed in Paris, and would probably be submitted to the French Legislative Chambers on the 7th April.

Armistice with prohibition of contraband of war continues till definitive signature of Treaty. Please communicate to Admiral in command.

This, of course, I at once did. Favourable as is the prospect of peace, still as the present state of affairs seems likely to continue for a short time, I think it better that I should read to the Council the Minute to which I have referred :-

When the French Consul announced to me the blockade of Pakhoi and of the neigh- bouring Coast, I immediately (on the 6th March ultimo), telegraphed this intelligence to Her Majesty's Government, and on the following day (March 7th), I addressed to Lord DERBY the subjoined despatch:

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 7th March, 1885.

"MY LORD, I have the honour to report that I yesterday telegraphed to your Lordship in the following terms :-

The French Consul informs me that a blockade will be established from March the 7th on Pakhoi and the neighbouring coast of China, from the frontier of Tonquin to the 107th meridian of longitude.'

2. This blockade was announced to the French Consul at Hongkong by a telegram from Captain DE BEAUMONT, commanding the French Naval Forces in Tonquin, dated at Haiphong on the 5th instant. It was added that no notice of the blockade could be given to the Foreign Consuls at Pakhoi, as no communications were possible between the French Naval Forces and that port. Consequently, I telegraphed to the above effect to the British Consul at Pakhoi (Mr. ALLEN).

3. It appears that the longitude referred to is reckoned by the French from Paris; and therefore, the blockade would seem to extend from the Frontier of Tonquin to a short dis- tance to the East of the Treaty Port of Pahkoi; which contains about 25,000 inhabitants and is the outlet of a large district.-Public Notice (By Proclamation in the Hongkong Government Gazette of March 7th 1885) of the blockade has been given at Hongkong, which carries on a considerable trade with Pakhoi; and Admiral Sir W. DOWELL has despatched thither the British Gun-boat Espoir.

4. It will be understood that the French are now blockading parts of the coast of China both to the North and to the South of Hongkong."

As is mentioned in this despatch, I lost no time in causing public notice of the blockade to be given in the Hongkong Government Gazette of March 7th, and there was a further notice in the Gazette of March 28th, when the British Consul at Pakhoi had sent me, under flying seal, a letter addressed to Her Majesty's Minister at Peking, to the effect that the blockade was then in active operation, being carried on by two French Men-of-war. This is all that I know concerning the blockade of Pakhoi.

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The Council is, of course, aware (as the Honourable Gentlemen stated,) that all questions of the nature of that now under consideration should properly be addressed to the British Minister at Peking, who is ex-Officio Superintendent of Trade in China, and not to the Governor of Hongkong, whose jurisdiction is limited by law to the waters of this Colony. And it will be recollected that the Chamber of Commerce has hitherto acted on this prin- ciple, and has addressed its correspondence on matters affecting the trade of this community direct to the Minister, without even transmitting the letters through the Governor. The Honourable Member has, I think, given reasons which will be deemed sufficient by the British Legation in China, for treating the present case as an exception to the general rule of the Chamber. Moreover, I have always considered myself justified in addressing both Her Majesty's Government and my late lamented friend, Sir HARRY PARKES, on all matters affecting the commercial and general interests of this Colony. Thus I have reported, both by telegraph and by despatch, all the French blockades and other proceedings which can affect, directly or indirectly, the trade of this community; such as the stopping and search of the Glenroy, and of other British Merchant vessels, and of one of the P. & O. steamers; and the declaration of the French that they will treat rice as contraband of war. My instructions from the Imperial Authorities on this subject are to the effect that they recognise the exercise by the French of the customary rights of Belligerent nations, and that the legality of any seizure of a British ship by French cruizers "must depend, in the first instance, on the decision of the Prize Court, subject to ulterior diplomatic action."

These instructions confirm in principle the opinion given two months ago by my responsible Legal Adviser (the Attorney General), when one of the leading Mercantile Firms here asked a question of the Government as to whether coal would be regarded by the French as contraband of war; and suggested that the Home Government should be consulted on this point. I was then advised that "Neither the Imperial Government, nor the Colonial Government can give an authoritative opinion on questions of this nature, nor should any such application as that suggested be made to the Home Government.

Whatever cargo private firms carry in their ships on the China Seas under present circumstances, they carry entirely at their own risk."

I was further advised in connexion with this question that "it is of the utmost import- ance that the Colonial Government should not give any legal opinion upon matters of this kind; for otherwise it may find itself involved in dangerous responsibilities,

(1.) To the Belligerents; for acts which, though harmless from an international point of view so long as they are distinctly the acts of private persons only, and done without the sanction or connivance of the Government, might, if they were done under the positive sanction or advice of the Government, form a proper subject of complaint by the Belligerents.

(2.) To the Mercantile Firms, or other persons obtaining the opinion; who, if any harm should happen to them, would say that they were acting in accordance with the authoritative opinion of the Government, and were entitled to be either supported by the Government or compensated by it for loss incurred while acting within its advice."

Having thus stated as briefly as possible what has already taken place respecting this import- ant subject, and the broad principles applicable to cases of this nature, I will now reply to the special questions put by my Honourable friend.

With regard to the 1st question, viz.: "Has the blockade of Pakhoi been legally notified?", I am advised that the notifications made to the Government and published in the Gazette of the 7th and 28th March (as stated above,) would be regarded as sufficient "to affect all merchants in this Colony with notice of the existence of an actual blockade, and with an obligation to observe it."

With regard to the 2nd question, viz.: "Whether the blockade is effective?" I am advised that this is a question, the reply to which must depend on facts of which the Colonial Government has no precise knowledge.

With regard to the 3rd question, I must, of course, in the first instance, communicate respecting it with Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires at Peking, who has already expressed his desire to co-operate with me as heartily as did Sir HARRY PARKES. Meanwhile, I will remark that, while there is no doubt but that the place where the legality of any seizures of ships must be tested is the Prize Court of the captors, still, at the same time, if under pretence of seizing vessels for breach of blockade, or for other similar offences, any Belligerent Power were to pursue any system clearly in violation of the rights of neutrals, as recognised by international law, the Government of the neutral Power would interfere on behalf of its subjects. I shall not fail, whenever circumstances seem to require it, to invoke energetically that " ulterior diplomatic action" which has been referred to above:

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In conclusion, I would observe that, after the persevering efforts which I have made during the two years of my administration here, to procure the strengthening of the Defences, and to promote the general interests of this Colony, I need hardly assure this Council that Í sympathize deeply with the grave inconveniences to which our Mercantile community have been subjected for some time past in consequence of the protracted Franco-Chinese complica- tions. The general depression of trade has, moreover, led to a serious depression in the public revenue. But I have entire confidence in the elasticity of our resources, and in the energy and enterprise of this community; and I hope that the return of peace will soon restore the former prosperity and progress of Hongkong.

THE BILL ENTITLED THE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ORDINANCE, 1885, IN COMMITTEE.—REPORTED. NOTICE OF THIRD READING.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council resumed consider- ation, in Committee, of the Bill entitled The Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885.

The Bill was reported with amendments.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would move that the Bill be read a third time.

THE BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC VICAR APOSTOLIC OF HONGKONG.-COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled an Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Roman Catholic Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong, was Committed.

A BILL ENTITLED THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1884, AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1885.-FIRST READING. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Post Office Ordinance, 1884, Amendment Ordinance, 1885, was read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Order of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 15th instant, at 4 P.M.

*

G. F. BOWEN,

:

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of April, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 20.

WEDNESDAY, 15TH APRIL, 1885.

55

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

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the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

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THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

(1.) The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1884.

(2.) Despatches respecting the proposed Incorporation of the Vicar Apostolic of the Roman

Catholic Church in Hongkong.

QUESTION.-The Honourable P. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, asked, with reference to the resolution passed at the Meeting of Council on 1st April, what replies, if any, have been received from the Home · Government?

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, AS I have already intimated to my Honourable Friend, I have not as yet received the reply of the Imperial Authorities with reference to the subjects of the Resolution passed by this Council on the 1st April. The Council may rest assured that I will always communicate to them forthwith every decision of the Imperial Government affecting the interests of this Colony. I am glad, however, that the Honourable Gentleman has asked this question, for it gives me an opportunity of laying before you a further official statement on the matters to which it refers. As you, Honourable Gentlemen, are already aware, a paternal Governor had anticipated your wishes in the matters referred to in the Resolution of the 1st April, as also with regard to the fortification of Hong- kong generally; and what has been done already, and is now doing for our Defences, is mainly due (as there is abundant documentary evidence to prove), to my constant and urgent representations during the two years of my administration here, both in official despatches, and in private letters to my personal friends among English Statesmen and among the chief Military Authorities in England. It was very satisfactory to me to observe that all the speakers at the recent discussion in this Council fully recognised my foresight, energy, and

perseverance in promoting the true interests of this Colony in these and in all other matters; and to hear the Honourable Gentleman who represents the Chamber of Commerce declare that "a time "of emergency has now arisen, and it is in times, of emergency that we should all act together "and rally round the Governor for the common good."

It will be recollected that I expressed a hope that the Resolution of the 1st April would be passed unanimously, because it would add force to the representations which I had already made to the Imperial Authorities on the subjects of which it treated. Accordingly, on the 2nd April, I telegraphed to the Secretary of State that the Legislative Council, as well as the Admiral and General Commanding Her Majesty's Forces on this Station, concurred with me on the points in question. As I said just now, I have not as yet received any reply

56

to my telegram of the 2nd instant. I must here remark that if Honourable Gentlemen knew, as well as I do, through my experience as Governor for above a quarter of a century, the length of time required for official correspondence between the different departments of the Imperial Administration, they would not be so sanguine in the expectation of speedy answers in matters of this nature. From the official papers which I laid before you a fortnight ago (No. 14), you will have perceived that it required nineteen days to receive a reply on the much simpler matter of the calibre of the Ordnance to be mounted on the new Forts. Now the questions treated of in the Resolution of the 1st April, viz.: (1) the provision of direct telegraphic communication between Hongkong and Singapore, and (2) the provision of "a Flotilla of Torpedo-boats, fully equipped,"-would require an exchange of official correspond- ence between the Colonial Office, the War Office, the Admiralty, the Directors of the Tele- graph Company, and, above all, the Imperial Treasury, the approval of which is necessary for the expenditure of public money in each and all of the public Departments. However, I yes- terday telegraphed once more, urging an early reply showing the decision of Her Majesty's Government concerning direct telegraphic communication, and a further supply of Torpedo- boats; and also asking when the heavy Ordnance for the new Forts may be expected to arrive. I will now make some further observations on each of the two matters treated of in the Resolution:-

(1.) With regard to the proposed Telegraph to Singapore, I have been in correspondence respecting it with the Manager, and find that the Eastern Extension Company would require a guarantee of £20,000 a year, for twenty years, before undertaking to lay a direct cable. You already know that the Executive Council of Hongkong, while agreeing with me and with this Council as to the importance of a direct cable, has advised that, especially in the present condition of our revenue, this Colony is wholly unable to offer any substantial aid to this project. I have already stated, moreover, that the Acting Governor of the Straits Settlements has informed me that the view of his Government is similar, and that it would not be prepared to give material assistance. It remains to be seen what will be the decision of the Imperial Government on my strong representations, afterwards supported by this Council.

I

(2.) I now come to the second proposal, which I, and most others who have given thought and attention to the matter, consider to be more likely to prove feasible, viz., the provision of a Flotilla of eight Torpedo-boats, which the Naval Authorities consider to be amply sufficient. As I have already informed you, Admiral Sir W. DOWELL has left the four Torpedo-boats now on this station to strengthen the Naval defence of our harbour. have, as you know, asked that four more Torpedo-boats may be sent out; but, though I have not as yet received the decision of the Imperial Government, I learn from other sources that it is very improbable that any more Torpedo-boats can be spared for this Colony, while many of the chief ports of the United Kingdom, and of the other Colonies, remain wholly unprotected; and that, at all events, no more boats of this kind could reach us for many months to come. I am strongly of opinion that we should prefer to look to our own resources on the spot, which (as I am assured), could be made available in a few weeks, and at a very small cost. I have ascertained that two of the Steam-launches belonging to the Civil Government, and two of the Steam-launches belonging to the Military Departments, could be easily and speedily fitted for Spar and Whitehead Torpedoes. I have been in corres- pondence on this head with Commodore MORANT, who has written to me as follows:-"I "have the honour to inform your Excellency that these fittings could be made and fitted to "the launches in question at a cost of about fifty-five pounds (£55) each; and that there are in store torpedoes which, with the Commander-in-Chief ( Admiral DOWELL'S) sanction, "could be supplied, should your Excellency determine to have these boats so fitted."

CC

I have already informed Commander RUMSEY, R.N., the Commandant of our Auxiliary Flotilla, that two of our steam-Jaunches will be used for Torpedoes, so soon as the crews are sufficiently drilled; and I have assured the Military Authorities that the Colonial Govern- ment will be ready to pay also for the fittings of their two launches. It will thus be seen that a valuable addition to the Torpedo Flotilla can be secured at a cost to this Colony of about £250.

In conclusion, I would repeat that, on the completion of the works now in hand, and with the great "defensive. power" in Ships, Torpedoes, and Submarine Mines, permanently. attached to the harbour, one of the highest Official Military Authorities in England has recently assured me that "you (at Hongkong) should laugh to scorn the possible attacks of all the ships now in the China Seas." One word more, and I have done. I am confident that I interpret rightly the mind of every member of this Council when I say that nothing can be further from your wish and intention than to countenance any feeling of panic at the present moment. I believe that, like myself, you simply desire to see this first-class Naval and Military Station and great Mart of Commerce, placed, once for all, in a condition of practical and permanent security;-and that on the principle of the old Roman Maxim, Si vis pacem, para bellum.

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THE BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC VICAR APOSTOLIC OF HONGKONG.-On the motion of the Attorney General the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

CLAUSE 1.

The Attorney General moved, and the Colonial Secretary seconded, that after the words Vicar Apostolic the words "of Hongkong" be struck out, and the words "of the Roman Catholic Church in Hongkong" be inserted in lieu thereof.

The Honourable W. KESWICK, seconded by the Honourable P. RYRIE, moved as an amendment, that the first six lines be struck out and that there be substituted in place thereof the words "The Sacred Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith shall be a body Corporate in Hongkong."

For.

The Honourable WONG SHING,

F. D. SASSOON,

>>

W. KESWICK,

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P. RYRIE.

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THE COUNCIL DIVIDED.

Against.

THE REGISTRar General, THE SURVEYOR GENERAL, THE COLONIAL TREASURER, THE ATTORNEY General, THE COLONIAL SECRETARY, THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

The Honourable T. JACKSON did not vote.

For, 4; Against, 6; Majority, 2.-Motion lost.

The original motion was then put to the vote.

THE COUNCIL DIVIDED,

For.

Against.

THE REGISTRAR GENERAL,

THE SURVEYOR GENERAL, THE COLONIAL TREASURER,

THE ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE COLONIAL SECRETARY, THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

The Honourable F. D. SASSOON,

W. KESWICK,

27

P. RYRIE.

""

The Honourable T. JACKSON and the Honourable WONG SHING did not vote.

For, 6; Against, 3; Majority, 3.-Motion carried.

A few verbal amendments were also made.

The Bill having been reported as amended, the Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting he would move that the Bill be read a third time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 16 OF 1873, (Trade MARKS).—FIRST READING.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER Orders of the DaY.-The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Orders of the day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 22nd instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of April, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 21.

59

WEDNESDAY, 22ND APRIL, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPo, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

""

","

3

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

";

THOMAS JACKSON.

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

22

WONG SHING.

""

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

(1.) The Harbour Master's Report for 1884. (No. 19).

(2.) Correspondence respecting Rifle Practice by the Police. (No. 20).

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums :--

C.S.O.

864 of 1885. (1.)

Supplementary vote for Afforestation, being amount required to carry out certain contracts to which the Government is already pledged for this year,

.$3,000.00

888 1885. (2.) For the supply of 300,510 rounds of MARTINI-HENRY Ammunition required for the use of the Police and Volunteers, under the circumstances stated in the annexed correspondence (printed paper No. 20),.................

C.S.O.

941.of 1885.

L

The proceeds of the 50,000 rounds to be supplied to the Shanghai Volunteers will be credited to this account in due course.

(3.) The equivalent of £220, @ 3/8 per dollar, which Commodore Morant has stated will be the approximate cost of fitting for torpedoes four Steam-launches,...

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd April, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

$6,998.11

$1,200.00

Question-put and passed.

C

60

QUESTION.-The Honourable P. RYRIE pursuant to notice asked the following question:-

In regard to a Bill styled A Bill to incorporate the Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong, (that being the name originally given to the Bill), is the Attorney General acting as a Public Servant, or as a legal practitioner in the Colony?"

The Attorney General replied that he was acting as a Public Servant, and not as a legal practi- tioner.

THE BILLS OF EXCHANGE ORDINANCE, 1885.-THIRD READING.-PASSED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL TO AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE.--SECOND READING.-NOTICE OF GOING INTO COMMITTEE. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a second time.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would move that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 16 of 1873, (Trade MARKS).-SECOND READING.-NOTICE OF Going INTO COMMITTEE.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a second time.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would move that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

BILL FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE VICAR APOSTOLIC OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH IN HONGKONG.-RE-COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, this Bill was re-committed.

IN COMMITTEE.

Clause 1. The Attorney General moved, and the Colonial Secretary seconded, the following amendments:-

In the second line, after the word and, and before the word Vicar, insert the words holding the Ecclesiastical appointment of.

In the third line, strike out the words successors in Office, and insert in lieu thereof, the words holding the said appointment.

In the seventh line, insert between the words and and have, the words shall for the purposes of this Ordinance.

Question-put and passed, the Honourable P. RYRIE dissenting.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of the Bill.

BILL FOR THE PREVENTION OF ABUSES CONNECTED WITH CHILD ADOPTION AND DOMESTIC SERVICE. -FIRST READING.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Friday, the 1st May, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 1st day of May, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 22.

61

FRIDAY, 1ST MAY, 1885.

HIS

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

""

""

""

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

>>

THOMAS JACKSON.

>>

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

WONG SHING.

31

!

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

DEFENCES OF THE COLONY.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,-Before proceeding to the order of the day, I desire to inform you that I have now received from the Secretary of State a reply to my telegrams respecting the subject of the resolution adopted by this Council on the 1st April in favour of a direct telegraphic cable between Hongkong and Singapore and the provision of a flotilla of torpedo-boats for this harbour. No reference is made to the question of a direct telegraph, which, it is to be presumed, is still under the consideration of Her Majesty's Government. With regard to the torpedoes, Lord DERBY's telegram is to the.. following effect:-

The Admiralty cannot promise more torpedo-boats; but, after consulting with the Naval Commander-in- Chief, they are satisfied that the Colony under your Government is quite safe in the event of apprehended war. And they are thoroughly aware of what is necessary for the defence of the Colony.

I stated to the Council, on the 15th April, that I had learned from other sources that it was very improbable that any torpedo-boats, beyond the four already here, could be spared for this Colony at the present crisis. I added that, in my opinion, we should prefer to look to our own resources on the spot, which can be made available in a very short time and at a very small cost. Directions have already been given that four of the steam-launches belonging to the Imperial and Colonial Governments shall be fitted forthwith for tor- pedoes, thus making a flotilla of eight torpedo-boats, which, as you are already aware, the Naval Authorities consider amply sufficient. I had also telegraphed asking when the heavy guns for the new forts may be expected to arrive. On this point the telegram is to this effect:

The new heavy guns will be sent as soon as practicable, though there will be some delay, owing to an alteration in the design of the gun-carriages. The rest of the heavy guns will be sent out sooner.

I am informed by a high military authority here that the words in the telegram "an alter- ation in the design of the gun-carriages," probably refer to the substitution of what are called 'disappearing carriages," which are considered necessary for the protection of the artillery- men while reloading.

CC

6.2

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

(1.) Correspondence respecting the Armaments of the Forts at Hongkong, (in continuation

of No. 14), (No. 14B.).

(2.) Correspondence respecting Fees charged for issuing Bills of Health. (No. 21). (3.) Statement showing the total Receipts and Payments in the Year 1884, together with a Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for the Years 1883 and 1884. (No. 22).

(4.) Report on the Accounts of Receipts and Expenditure for the Year 1884, by the Colonial

Secretary and Auditor General. (No. 23).

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:--

C.S.O.

849 of 1885. (1.) Cost of apparatus for testing Coal-Gas,

C.S.O.

927 of 1885. (2.) Honorarium, sanctioned by the Secretary of State, to Mr. W. C. HILLIER, Acting Chinese Secretary at the British Legation, for superintending Chinese studies of two Cadets in Peking,

C.S.O.

930 of 1885.

$ 500.00

.£100 @ 3/8,=$ 545.45

(3.) Arrears of pay for 1884, due to four Police Constables who have accepted the increase of pay under the new regulations as to term of Service for pension and remittance to England, at $60 each,.....

978 of 185. (4.) Increase to the salary of the Student Apothecary in Civil Hospital,

from $16 to $30 per month, from the 1st January, 1885,

$ 240.00

$ 168.00

Government House, Hongkong, 1st May, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

QUESTION.-The Honourable T. JACKSON, by permission, asked whether there is any objection to state the grounds on which the prisoner LEE LUM KWAI has been released from custody.

The Colonial Secretary replied as follows:-

In reply to the question of my Honourable friend, I am directed by the Governor to state that the facts of the case to which he refers are very simple. LEE LUM KWAI was released from custody on the recommendation of the Acting Superintendent of the Gaol, of the Colonial Surgeon, and of the English and Roman Catholic Chaplains, on the ground of his good conduct during his imprisonment, and of his bad health, said by the Colonial Surgeon to endanger, his life. Dr. AYRES also certified that an amelioration of his sentence had been promised by the late Governor.

Dr. AYRES further stated that "the petitioner has been of the greatest service to the Medical Department of the Gaol as interpreter and attendant; and his conduct has been very good."

Both the Chaplains strongly supported the prayer of the petition, as did the Acting Superintendent, who added as follows:-

"From enquiries made I find that five (5) prisoners who had received death sentences, afterwards commuted to penal servitude for life, were released after three (3) years' imprison- ment; and that three (3) prisoners, who had been sentenced to penal servitude for life, were released after terms of imprisonment not exceeding six (6) years."

LEE LUM KWAI was sentenced to penal servitude for life in 1874, and has been in Gaol for eleven (11) years. Now it is the practice in many other Colonies to consider that fifteen (15) years' imprisonment is equivalent to a life sentence, especially in cases where the health of the prisoner has been seriously affected; and that good conduct in Gaol should procure a remission of one-third of that period. On this system, LEE LUM KWAI would, under ordinary circumstances, have been released a year ago.

However, looking to the peculiar circumstances of this case, it has been determined to banish LEE LUM KWAI from the Colony, on a report from the Captain Superintendent of Police to the effect that he is a person dangerous to the peace and good order of the Colony.

2

PETITION RESPECTING THE CHINESE FOOT-MEASURE KNOWN AS THE KAU-NG CHEK.-The Honour- able WONG SHING, pursuant to notice, moved that the Petition of Ko LUNG-TAI, WO LUN and others be read, in order to obtain the opinion of the Council in the matter of the Custom House Standard Chek.

The Honourable W. KESWICK seconded.

The Colonial Treasurer, seconded by the Registrar General, moved, as an Amendment, that the Petition do lie on the table, and addressed the Council at length on the subject.

The Amendment was put to the vote.

63

For.

The Honourable F. D. SASSOON,

""

T. JACKSON,

W. KESWICK,

THE REGISTRAR GENERAL, THE SURVEYOR GENERAL, THE COLONIAL TREASURER, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

THE COUNCIL DIVIDED.

Against.

The Honourable WONG SHING,

P. RYRIE, THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

For, 8; Against, 3; Majority, 5.-Motion carried.

The original motion was lost.

BILL FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE VICAR APOSTOLIC OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH IN HONGKONG.-THIRD READING.-PASSED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

The Honourable P. RYRIE expressed his dissent.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE MARRIED WOMEN'S DISPOSITION OF PROPERTY ORDINANCE, 1885.—COMMITTED. NOTICE OF THIRD READING. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

The Bill was reported with a few verbal amendments.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of this Bill.

BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 16 OF 1873, (TRADE MARKS).-COMMITTED.-NOTICE OF THIRD READING.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the Bill.

The Bill was reported with some verbal amendments.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS of the Day.—The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Friday, the 8th May, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of May, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 23.

65

FRIDAY, 8TH MAY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MAlley.)

"}

27

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

K

3

ܪܪ

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.), (on leave).

The Honourable WILLIAM KESWICK, (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:-

C.S.O.

+

3119 of 1884.

C.S.O.

of 1885.'

Increase to the salary of the Chinese Clerk and Shroff of the Supreme Court, from $40 to $50 per month, from 1st April to 30th November, 1885,

101.05. Allowance to a Seaman Gunnery Instructor for the Hongkong Auxiliary Flotilla, @ £50 per annum ($272.72), from 1st April to 30th Novem- ber, 1885,

Government House, Hongkong, 6th May, 1885.

80.00

.$ 181.80

The Colonial Secretary said that as these Minutes had already, by His Excellency's permission, been referred to the Finance Committee, there was no necessity for any further action being taken in

the matter.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following votes passed by the Finance Committee:-

(Finance Committee, 7th May, 1885.)

ESTABLISHMENTS.

}

Cadets.

927 of 1885.

05.05. Honorarium, sanctioned by the Secretary of State, to Mr. HILLIER, Acting Chinese Secretary at the British Legation, for Superintending Chinese Studies of two Cadets in Peking,

....£100 @ 3/8=$

545.45

66

Judicial.

C.S.O.

of 1884.

3119 Increase to the Salary of Chinese Clerk and Shroff of Supreme Court, from $40 to

$50 per month, from 1st April to 30th November, 1885, ......

C.S.O.

541 of 1885.

C.S.O.

Police.

Arrears of pay for 1884 due to Inspector LINDSAY who has just returned from leave,

and accepted the increase of pay under the new regulations,...

930 of 1885. Arrears of pay for 1884 due to four Police Constables who have accepted the increase

of pay under the new regulations,

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Government Gardens and Plantations.

.$

80.00

864 of 1885. Supplementary vote for Afforestation being amount required to carry out certain

contracts to which the Government is already pledged for this

C.S.O.

888 of 1885.

Police.

year, ......

For the supply of 300,510 rounds of MARTINI-HENRY Ammunition required for

the use of the Police and Volunteers,

CS1885, New Roads near the old Mahomedan Cemetery, 2nd instalment,

688 of

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

Miscellaneous Services.

C.S.05. Cost of apparatus for testing of Coal-Gas,

849 of 1885.

Colonial Defences.

$

81.28

240.00

$

321.28

$ 3,000.00

.$ 6,998.11

$ 2,500.00

500 00

C.S.O.

941 of 1885. Approximate cost of fitting for torpedoes, four Steam-launches, 1014 of 1885. Allowance to a Seaman Gunnery Instructor for the Hongkong Auxiliary Flotilla,

@ £50 per annum ($272.72), from 1st April to 30th November,

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer. Question-put and passed.

.£220 @ 3/8=$ 1,200.00

$

181.80

$ 1,381.80

DIRECT TELEGRAPH LINE TO SINGAPORE.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,-Before proceeding to the order of the day I desire to inform you that I have now received a reply to my telegrams respecting that part of your resolution of the 1st April ultimo which advocated a direct telegraphic cable between Hongkong and Singapore. Lord DERBY'S telegram states as

follows:

"Her Majesty's Government consider that there would be no advantage gained by a direct submarine cable, in the present emergency, commensurate with the heavy expenditure of the annual payment required."

However, I have submitted for favourable consideration a suggestion on this subject by a high military authority, which, if feasible, and if approved, would secure the desired object at a comparatively small cost.

BILL TO AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

The Bill was reported without amendment.

'On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Bill was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

67

BILL ENTITLED THE MARRIED WOMEN'S DISPOSITION OF PROPERTY ORDINANCE, 1885.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE 16 OF 1873, (TRADE MARKS)-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

0

BILL FOR THE PREVENTION OF ABUSES CONNECTED WITH CHILD ADOPTION AND DOMESTIC SERVICE. -On the motion of the Attorney General, the order for the second reading of this Bill was discharged. BILL ENTITLED THE FRENCH MAIL STEAMERS ORDINANCE CONTINUATION ORDINANCE, 1885. The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

The Council adjourned until Friday, the 15th instant, at 4 P.M.

:

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of May, 1885.

ARATHOON SETHI,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

i

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 24.

FRIDAY, 15TH MAY, 1885.

69

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

>>

27

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

* * * *

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.), (on leave).

The Honourable WILLIAM KESWICK, (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C. O. Desp.

67 of 1885.

G. F. BOWEN.

Referring to the despatch from the Secretary of State, No. 67, of 1885, the Governor requests the Legislative Council to consider the amount of the personal allowance to be paid to Dr. AYRES and to Dr. ADAMS, respectively, in lieu of the fees received by them for issuing Bills of Health.

It is proposed that henceforward Bills of Health shall be issued by the Health Officer ex-officio for a fee of $3 (three dollars), to be paid into the Colonial Treasury. It will be necessary to recoup the amount of the personal allowances to Dr. AYRES and Dr. ADẨMS ; but when this object has been attained, it is proposed to reduce the fees to a still lower amount, covering only the necessary expense to the Government.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th May, 1885,

G. F. BOWEN,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:-

C.S.O.

1089 of 1885.

C.S.O. 1099 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1113 of 1885.

Re-construction of Hospital Matsheds at Stone Cutters' Island for Quaran-

tine purposes,

Supplementary vote for renewing the decayed portions of Murray Pier, and for extending it out into deep water, so that it may be approached by Steam-launches when the tide is ebbing,

This is the Pier at which nearly all strangers of distinction and Officers of the Army and Navy land.

For fitting a Nordenfeldt Gun on board the Police Steam-launch Charles

May,

Government House, Hongkong, 15th May, 1885..

$ 500.00

.$3,500.00

£58.5.10 @ 3/63=$ 329.18

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

70

BILL ENTITLED THE FRENCH MAIL STEAMERS ORDINANCE CONTINUATION Ordinance, 1885.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

The Honourable P. RYRIE observed that a very great privilege was conferred by this Ordinance on the French Mail Steamers, and that some assurance should be received from the French Govern- ment that they will not interfere with vessels carrying Her Majesty's Mails coming to this port.

His Excellency the Governor said that, in sending home the Bill, he would ask the Home. Government to take this question into consideration.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would move that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

BILL ENTITLED THE PRESERVATION OF WILD BIRDS AND GAME ORDINANCE.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would move the second reading of this Bill.

The Council adjourned until Friday, the 22nd instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of May, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

$

Q

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 25.

FRIDAY, 22ND MAY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley.)

""

""

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

WONG SHING.

})

ABSENT:

71

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.), (on leave).

The Honourable WILLIAM KESWICK, (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

3

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

(1.) Educational Reports for 1884. (No. 24).

(2.) Report on the subject of Destitutes. (No. 25).

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:-

1125 of 1885.

C.S.O. Refund to the Police Fine Fund of the amount disbursed last year from that Fund for legal expenses incurred in the defence of Sergeant BUTLIN,

C.S.O.

1166 of 1885. Personal Allowances, in lieu of Fees for issuing Bills of Health, to the

Colonial Surgeon, per annum, Health Officer, per annum,

Government House, Hongkong, 18th May, 1885.

$ 414.25

200.00 1,200.00

$ 1,400.00

The Colonial Secretary stated that these votes had already been approved by the Finance Committee.

PEDDER'S WHARF.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. F. BOWEN.

1221 of 1885.

C.S.O. The Governor informs the Council that a sum for the renewal and extension of Pedder's Wharf will be placed on the Estimates for 1886; and in the meantime he recommends that the Public Works Committee shall consider and report whether the new Wharf should be of wood, or iron, or stone.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th May, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Public Works Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

A

12

72

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following votes passed by the Finance Committee :-

(Finance Committee, 18th May, 1885.)

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Medical.

67 of 1885.

S. of S. Desp. Personal allowance to Colonial Surgeon in lieu of fees for issuing Bills of Health, at

the rate of $200 per annum, from 1st June to 30th November, 1885, 6 months,...$ 100.00 Personal allowance to Health Officer in lieu of fees for issuing Bills of Health, at the

rate of $1,200 per annum, from 1st June to 30th November, 1885, 6 months, 600.00

Do.

...

$ 700.00

1089

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Works and Buildings.

39 of 1885. Reconstruction and repairs of Hospital Matsheds at Stone Cutters' Island for

Quarantine purposes,

C.S.O.

1099 of 1885. Renewing and extending Murray Pier,......

1125 of

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

Miscellaneous Services.

C.8.185. Refund to the Police Fine Fund of the amount disbursed last year from that Fund for

legal expenses incurred in the defence of Sergeant BUTLIN,

C.S.O.

Colonial Defences.

1113 of 1885. Expenses for fitting a Nordenfeldt Gun on board the Police Steam-launch Charles May,

£58.5.10 @3/61,

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

.$ 500.00

$3,500.00

$ 414.25

$329.18

Question-put and passed.

The Honourable P. RYRIE remarked with reference to the vote for Murray Pier, that Pedder's Wharf also needed repairs and extensions, and that the public were dissatisfied that the repairs and extensions of Murray Pier should take precedence of those to Pedder's Wharf.

The Honourable T. JACKSON addressed the Council in support of Mr. RYRIE's remarks.

The Colonial Secretary replied that the question of Pedder's Wharf was under consideration as would appear by His Excellency the Governor's Minute just read; and that Murray Pier was in a dilapidated state, and needed immediate repairs.

BILL ENTITLED THE FRENCH MAIL STEAMERS ORDINANCE CONTINUATION ORDINANCE, 1885.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

The Bill was reported without amendment.

On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Bill was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Order of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Friday, the 29th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 29th day of May, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

;

!

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 26.

FRIDAY, 29TH MAY, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

""

>

>>

"}

""

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

""

ABSENT:

73

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.), (on leave). The Honourable WILLIAM KESWICK, (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

PEDDER'S WHARF.-The Surveyor General, as Chairman of the Public Works Committee, re- ported to the Council that the Committee had considered His Excellency the Governor's Minute of the 20th instant, respecting the renewal and extension of Pedder's Wharf, and recommended that a new Wooden Pier be erected at the foot of Pedder's Street without delay, at a cost of not exceeding $10,000, $5,000 of which to be voted this year, and the balance to be placed on the Estimates for 1886.

VOTES OF MONEY.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor:-

G. F. BOWEN.

C.S.O.

1221 of 1885.

In pursuance of the recommendation of the Public Works Committee, the Governor recommends the Council to vote $5,000 to be expended during the current year on the erection of a new and enlarged Wooden Pier at Pedder's Wharf, the cost of which is estimated at $10,000. The balance of this sum will be provided in next year's Estimates.

Government House, May 29th, 1885.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sum :--

C.S.0. 1168 of 1885.

For the construction of 3 trucks to hold the Nordenfeldt Guns belonging

to the Auxiliary Flotilla when not required for use,

Government House, May 29th, 1885.

قرآن

.$ 120.00

The Colonial Secretary stated, with reference to the first Minute, that as the matter had been con- sidered by the Public Works Committee, the Members of which are also members of the Finance Committee, there was no necessity to refer it to the latter Committee. He therefore moved that the vote be passed.

With reference to the second Minute, he also moved that, considering that the item is small, and that this is the last Meeting of the present Session of the Council, the amount be voted without reference to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

574

BILL ENTITLED THE PRESERVATION OF WILD BIRDS AND GAME ORDINANCE.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary secónded.

Question-put and passed.

On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council went into Committee on the Bill.

The Bill was reported with one amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Standing Orders be suspended, and the Bill read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

The Council adjourned until Monday, the 1st proximo, at 5.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 1st day of June, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

you

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 27.

MONDAY, 1ST JUNE, 1885.

75

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

";

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFREd Lister.)

"}

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

>"

>>

""

the Registrar General (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Kut.), (on leave).

The Honourable WILLIAM KESWICK, (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Minutes read and confirmed.

CLOSING OF THE SESSION.-His Excellency the Governor closed the Session with the following Speech:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

1. The satisfactory conclusion to which you have carried no small amount of public business enables me now to close this Session.

2. Several measures of importance will be prepared by my Government during the recess for your consideration at your next Meeting. As I have stated on a previous occasion, I understand it to be generally agreed that the public convenience will be best consulted by opening the Annual Session of the Council in the month of November of each year. But it will be necessary to have a Special Meeting in next September to consider the Estimates for 1886. It has been found to be practically impossible to calculate accurately at an earlier period the probable revenue and expenditure of the ensuing year.

3. I will now proceed, according to the practice established in all Colonies, to lay before the Legislature a brief summary of the present condition of Hongkong, with regard to Finance, Legislation, Public Works, Education, the Public Institutions, and the Police.

4. With regard to Finance;I thank you, in the name of the QUEEN, for the supplies which you have voted for Her Majesty's service in this Colony, and as a contribution to the cost of the Defence Works. The Report of the Colonial Secretary and Auditor General shows that the probable assets of the Colony on the 31st of next December will amount to nearly two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000). It will not, therefore, be necessary to raise during the present year any portion of the Loan proposed for the com- pletion of the Extraordinary Works connected with Sanitation, Water Supply, and Defence.

5. With regard to Legislation;- -fifteen Bills have become law during the Session; the more important being the Ordinances regulating Weights and Measures, Bills of Exchange, the Disposition of Property by Married Women, and Amending the Post Office Ordinance.

6. With regard to Public Works;- -the depression of the Public Revenue, con- sequent on the unsettled state of political affairs in this quarter of the globe, has rendered necessary some temporary reduction and postponement in several of the principal undertakings contemplated last year. Steady progress has, however, been made with the Tytam Water Works; with the Victoria College; and with the general plan of Sanitation approved, in 1883, by Her Majesty's Government, on the recommendation of Mr. CHADWICK. In connec- tion with the last-mentioned subject, the details of the proposed new Building Ordinance will be carefully considered during the recess by the Public Works Committee.

76

7. With regard to Education; the Annual Report of the Government Inspector shows very satisfactory progress, for 'both the number of Schools under Government supervi- sion in the Colony, and also the number of Scholars attending those Schools have been doubled within the last ten years.' Moreover, from paragraph 13 of the same Report, it will be seen that the changes recently introduced into the Education Code have proved completely successful, and have already resulted in decreased expense coupled with increased efficiency. Again, it is remarked by the Head Master in his Report that the past was an eventful year for the Central School, for the erection of the Victoria College was then commenced. It is believed that this new College will become the principal place of education not only for this Island, but also for many of the future leading men of the vast neighbouring Empire of China; and that this will prove a powerful, legitimate, and honourable method of extending British influence throughout this quarter of the globe. Already indeed, several men holding high positions in the service of the Chinese Government owe their education to the schools established in Hongkong under British auspices.

8. With regard to the Public Institutions and the Police; -I have satisfied myself by several personal inspections that they are in a generally satisfactory condition. Further, from papers recently laid before the Council, it will have been seen that Major-General CAMERON, Commanding the Troops on this Station, has borne his testimony to the efficiency of the English and Sikh portion of the Police Corps in their rifle practice. A force of 300 men, equal to one fourth of the whole, has thus practically been added, in the event of war, or of serious internal disturbance, to the garrison. At the same time, the Police fully understand that their military drill must not be allowed to interfere with their civil duties in time of peace.

9. Having thus glanced at the internal affairs of this Colony, I will remind you, Honourable Gentlemen, of what I stated in my Prorogation Speech last year, viz.: that the foremost statesmen of England attach greater importance to this Colony than to other Colonies of far larger territorial extent; for Hongkong is the centre of British power and commerce in this part of the world. As you are already aware, one of my first acts after my assumption of this Government, was to call the attention of the Imperial Authorities to the comparatively unprotected state of this first-class Naval and Military Station, and great Mart of Trade, and thus to procure the commencement of the Defence Works which are now in progress. I know that you all entirely agree with me in the opinion that the present favourable prospect of peace should not be allowed to cause any relaxation in the efforts in this direction. It is a wise maxim that preparation for War is the surest guarantee for Peace. And, as you know already, the highest Naval and Military Authorities in the Empire believe that the completion of the Defences which are now being vigorously pushed forward by General CAMERON, will place this Colony in safety against foreign attack.

10. In conclusion, I desire to thank you, Honourable Gentlemen, once more, for your valuable advice and assistance during the past Session, and for the constant and loyal support which you afford on all occasions to the Representative of the Queen. I trust that the return of peace will soon remove the temporary depression in our trade and revenue; and that, through the blessing of Almighty God on the energy and industry of all classes in this community, the general progress and prosperity of Hongkong will be increased and consolidated.

11. I now prorogue this Council to the 15th day of next September,

C